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Sample records for 125-mm lbimduga likeketaste

  1. Parametric Study On The CW Nd: YAG Laser Cutting Quality Of 1.25 mm Ultra Low Carbon Steel Sheets Using O2 Assist Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Hanadi G.; Abbas, Wafaa A.; Mansour, Mohy S.; Badr, Yehia A.

    2007-02-14

    There are many non-linear interaction factors responsible for the performance of the laser cutting process. Identification of the dominant factors that significantly affect the cut quality is important. In the current research, the gas pressure, laser power and scanning speed were selected as the cutting parameters. Effect of the cutting parameters on the cut quality was investigated, by monitoring the variation in hardness, oxide layer width and microstructural changes within the heat affected zone (HAZ). Results revealed that good quality cuts can be produced in ultra low carbon steel thin sheets, using CW Nd:YAG laser at a window of scanning speed ranging from 1100-1500 mm/min at a minimum heat input of 337watts under an assisting O2 gas pressure of 5 bar. Higher laser power resulted in either strengthening or softening in the HAZ surrounding the cut kerf. The oxide layer width is not affected by the energy density input but rather affected by the O2 gas pressure due to exothermal reaction.

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REAL-TIME AND TIME-INTEGRATED COARSE (2.5-10MM), INTERMEDIATE (1-2.5MM), AND FINE (<2.5MM) PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has received considerable attention due to the association between ambient particulate concentrations and mortality. Current toxicological and epidemiological studies and controlled human and animal exposures suggest that a...

  3. Parameter comparison of white matter diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Mo, Yin; Chao, Fang; Song, Ming; Liu, Ci-Rong; Liu, Hui-Lang; Qian, Xi-Ying; Zhao, Xu-Dong

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we analyzed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) results of brain white matter in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with four different parameter settings and found that the sequence A (b=1 000 s/mm(2), spatial resolution=1.25 mm×1.25 mm× 1.25 mm, numbers of direction=33, NSA=3) and B (b=800 s/mm(2), spatial resolution=1.25 mm×1.25 mm×1.25 mm, numbers of direction=33, NSA=3) could accurately track coarse fibers. The fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from sequence C (b=1 000s/mm(2), spatial resolution=0.55 mm×0.55 mm×2.5 mm, direction number=33, NSA=3) was too fuzzy to be used in tracking white matter fibers. By comparison, the high resolution and the FA with high contrast of gray matter and white matter derived from sequence D (b=800 s/mm(2), spatial resolution=1.0 mm×1.0 mm ×1.0 mm, numbers of direction=33, NSA=3) qualified in its application in tracking both thick and thin fibers, making it an optimal DTI setting for rhesus macaques. PMID:24866488

  4. Detection of optical properties in small region by diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Shengcai; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Zongping; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The optical properties of small and highly absorbing tissues can be determined by measurement of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance at short source-detector separations. Spatial resolution and number of measuring point influence the inverting precision of optical property directly from the experimental diffuse reflectance. To increase spatial resolution and number of measuring point, a high-resolution and multiple points detection system is designed. A special optical fiber array probe is employed. Its spatial resolution is 0.125mm. The system is proved to be reliable by comparing the experimental result of diffuse reflectance from small region 0.125mm-1.25mm with that of numerical simulation. The inverting method based on Monte Carlo simulation is designed, by which optical properties can be achieved by building optical parameter date base and training artificial neural network (ANN).

  5. High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, H.

    2011-03-01

    Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink high efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.

  6. The Levitational Zone Refining (LZR) of photovoltaic silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukin, D. A.

    1990-07-01

    The horizontal zone refining of silicon by induction heating within a water cooled segmented copper boat has produced material with average solar efficiences of 11.3% (max. 14%). The LZR process is totally non-contaminating and produces ingots 125 mm square up to 2 m long, with low carbon and undetectable oxygen content.

  7. ADSORPTION OF ENTEROVIRUSES TO SOIL CORES AND THEIR SUBSEQUENT ELUTION BY ARTIFICIAL RAINWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adsorption and elution of a variety of human enteroviruses in a highly permeable, sandy soil was studied by using cores (43 by 125 mm) collected from an operating recharge basin on Long Island. Viruses studied included field and reference strains of polioviruses types 1 and 3...

  8. The Impact of Short Fiber Content on the Quality of Cotton Ring Spun Yarn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was carried to obtain a quantitative assessment of how the presence of short fiber (< 12.5 mm long) in raw cotton affect the quality of ring yarn spun from the mix. Properties of the raw cotton were measured on HVI and AFIS instruments and by the manual Suter-Webb Array method. Twenty-nine...

  9. Intraoperative protection of cranial nerves and arteries by split silicone tube.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Kobayashi, S; Hongo, K; Oikawa, S

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the usefulness of split silicone tubing to protect the cranial nerves and arteries during microneurosurgery. The inner diameter of the tube varied from 1.0 to 3.3 mm with a thickness of 0.125 mm. Application of the tube protects the nerves and arteries from mechanical trauma, electrical injury, and dryness. PMID:8413888

  10. Five degree-of-freedom control of an ultra-precision magnetically-suspended linear bearing. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumper, David L.; Slocum, A. H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors constructed a high precision linear bearing. A 10.7 kg platen measuring 125 mm by 125 mm by 350 mm is suspended and controlled in five degrees of freedom by seven electromagnets. The position of the platen is measured by five capacitive probes which have nanometer resolution. The suspension acts as a linear bearing, allowing linear travel of 50 mm in the sixth degree of freedom. In the laboratory, this bearing system has demonstrated position stability of 5 nm peak-to-peak. This is believed to be the highest position stability yet demonstrated in a magnetic suspension system. Performance at this level confirms that magnetic suspensions can address motion control requirements at the nanometer level. The experimental effort associated with this linear bearing system is described. Major topics are the development of models for the suspension, implementation of control algorithms, and measurement of the actual bearing performance. Suggestions for the future improvement of the bearing system are given.

  11. Effect of copper addition at a rate of 4% weight on the machininability of ZA-21A1 cast alloy by CNC milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqawabah, S. M. A.; Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Little work is published on the effect of copper addition to zinc-aluminium ZA-21Al alloy on its surface quality machined by milling. In this paper, the effect of copper addition at a rate 4 % weight to the ZA-21Al alloy on its hardness and surface quality is investigated. It was found that the addition of 4% Cu resulted in 18.3% enhancement in microhardness whereas the mechanical characteristics were reduced (softening) about 14.5% at 0.2% strain. It was found that the best surface finish for this alloy before copper addition ZA21 was achieved at a feed rate of 100 mm/min and 1.25 mm depth of cut whereas the best surface finish for ZA21-4% Cu was achieved at feed rate 250 mm/min, 1600 rpm cutting velocity and 1.25 mm depth of cut.

  12. High temperature lubricant screening and systems studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Four candidate lubricants for next generation aircraft gas turbine application were tested under open atmosphere conditions in a rig simulating an advanced engine 125 mm bore mainshaft thrust bearing position. Testing was conducted at speeds to 24,000 rpm (3,000,000 bearing DN), bearing ring temperature of 500 F, and with 1200 F air and 100 psi differential pressure across the seals installed in a dual tandem arrangement. Test bearing was a 125 mm bore split inner ring, outer race riding angular contact ball bearing under a 3280 lb. thrust load. One lubricant, a type 2 ester, performed extremely well. The mainshaft seal limited the performance. Numerous design improvements for this seal were indicated.

  13. Space resolution obtained with a highly segmented SCIFI e.m. calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertino, M.; Bini, C.; De Pedis, D.; De Zorzi, G.; Diambrini Palazzi, G.; Di Cosimo, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Zanello, D.

    1992-05-01

    During the setting up of the LEP-5 experiment, we tested a longitudinal SCIFI e.m. calorimeter, having a module cross area 25 × 25 mm 2 and 12.5 × 12.5 mm 2 for large and small modules respectively. The results were obtained with 10 and 50 GeV electrons, and concern the impact point resolution and the transverse distribution of the e.m. shower energy inside the calorimeter.

  14. Development of a 3D CT scanner using cone beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masahiro; Kamagata, Nozomu; Sato, Kazumasa; Hattori, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Shigeo; Mizuno, Shinichi; Jimbo, Masao; Kusakabe, Masahiro

    1995-05-01

    In order to acquire 3D data of high contrast objects such as bone, lung and vessels enhanced by contrast media for use in 3D image processing, we have developed a 3D CT-scanner using cone beam x ray. The 3D CT-scanner consists of a gantry and a patient couch. The gantry consists of an x-ray tube designed for cone beam CT and a large area two-dimensional detector mounted on a single frame and rotated around an object in 12 seconds. The large area detector consists of a fluorescent plate and a charge coupled device video camera. The size of detection area was 600 mm X 450 mm capable of covering the total chest. While an x-ray tube was rotated around an object, pulsed x ray was exposed 30 times a second and 360 projected images were collected in a 12 second scan. A 256 X 256 X 256 matrix image (1.25 mm X 1.25 mm X 1.25 mm voxel) was reconstructed by a high-speed reconstruction engine. Reconstruction time was approximately 6 minutes. Cylindrical water phantoms, anesthetized rabbits with or without contrast media, and a Japanese macaque were scanned with the 3D CT-scanner. The results seem promising because they show high spatial resolution in three directions, though there existed several point to be improved. Possible improvements are discussed.

  15. Four- and Eight-Channel Aortoiliac CT Angiography: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay Foley, Dennis

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To compare performance parameters, contrast material load and radiation dose in a patient cohort having aortoiliac CT angiography using 4- and 8-channel multidetector CT (MDCT) systems. Methods. Eighteen patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent initial 4-channel and follow-up 8-channel MDCT angiography. Both the 4- and 8-channel MDCT systems utilized a matrix detector of 16 x 1.25 mm rows. Scan coverage included the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries to the level of the proximal femoral arteries. For 4-channel MDCT, nominal slice thickness and beam pitch were 1.25 mm and 1.5, respectively, and for 8-channel MDCT they were 1.25 mm and 1.35 or 1.65 respectively. Scan duration, iodinated contrast material load and mean aortoiliac attenuation were compared retrospectively. Comparative radiation dose measurements for 4- and 8-channel MDCT were obtained using a multiple scan average dose technique on an abdominal phantom. Results. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, 8-channel MDCT aortoiliac angiography was performed with equivalent collimation, decreased contrast load (mean 45% decrease: 144 ml versus 83 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml contrast material) and decreased acquisition time (mean 51% shorter: 34.4 sec versus 16.9 sec) without a significant change in mean aortic enhancement (299 HU versus 300 HU, p > 0.05). Radiation dose was 2 rad for the 4-channel system and 2/1.5 rad for the 8-channel system at 1.35/1.65 pitch respectively. Conclusion. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, aortoiliac CT angiography with 8-channel MDCT produces equivalent z-axis resolution with decreased contrast load and acquisition time without increased radiation exposure.

  16. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PMID:27167266

  17. Astrometry of STF 2448 on the Mount Wilson 1.5 m Telescope with a Novel Video Eyepiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Reed; Ramos, Rafael; Wasson, Rick; Carro, Joseph; Kenney, John; Estrada, Chris; Hollman, Cassie; Wallen, Vera; Tassell, Noah; Genet, Russell

    2015-07-01

    The Mt. Wilson Double Star Workshop was organized to provide a hands-on educational and research opportunity for students and amateur astronomers to learn and carry out astrometric eyepiece measurements of double stars. Due to the unique operating characteristics of the Mt Wilson 1.5 meter telescope and the limited time available for observations, a Bell & Howell DNV16HDZ high definition video camera was adapted to a Celestron 12.5mm astronomic eyepiece to record the position and separation of double star STF2448. This paper records the results of the team's observations and their techniques used to record and analyze the data.

  18. Impact of Nanotopography and/or Functional Groups on Periodontal Ligament Cell Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şaşmazel, Hilal Türkoğlu; Manolache, S.; Gümüşderelİoğlu, M.

    The main purpose of this contribution was to obtain COOH functionalities and/or nanotopographic changes on the surface of 3D, non-woven polyester fabric (NWPF) discs (12.5 mm in diameter) by using low pressure water/O2 plasma assisted treatments. The prepared discs were characterized by various methods after the plasma treatment. Periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts were used in cell culture studies. The cell culture results showed that plasma treated 3D NWPF discs are favorable for PDL cell spreading, growth and viability due to the presence of functional groups and/or the nanotopography of their surfaces.

  19. Numerical simulation and experimental results of ultrasonic waves scattering on a model of the artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, J.; Powalowski, T.; Trawinski, Z.

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the results of the mathematical modeling and experimental results of the ultrasonic waves scattering in the inhomogeneous dissipative medium. The research was carried out for an artery model (a pipe made of a latex), with internal diameter of 5 mm and wall thickness of 1.25 mm. The numerical solver was created for calculation of the fields of ultrasonic beams and scattered fields under different boundary conditions, different angles and transversal displacement of ultrasonic beams with respect to the position of the arterial wall. The investigations employed the VED ultrasonic apparatus. The good agreement between the numerical calculation and experimental results was obtained.

  20. Effect of pre-strain on ratcheting behavior of A668 Class D steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, S.; Mondal, A. K.; Dutta, K.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the effect pre-strain (0%, 2%, 4% and 8%) on ratcheting behavior of ASTM A668 Class D steel in different heat treatment conditions (normalized and hardened-tempered). Ratcheting tests were carried out at room temperature on cylindrical specimens having 12.5 mm gauge length and 6 mm gauge diameter. The results include reduced strain accumulation with increasing prestrain level due to work hardening of the pre-strained samples. Further, cyclic hardening takes place during ratcheting deformation.

  1. Rail accelerators for space transportation: An experimental investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.; Sturman, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted at the Lewis Research Center with the objective of investigating the technical feasibility of rail accelerators for propulsion applications. Single-stage, plasma driven rail accelerators of small (4 by 6 mm) and medium (12.5 by 12.5 mm) bores were tested at peak accelerating currents of 50 to 450 kA. Streak-camera photography was used to provide a qualitative description of plasma armature acceleration. The effects of plasma blowby and varying bore pressure on the behavior of plasma armatures were studied.

  2. Efficient second harmonic generation of a diode-laser-pumped CW Nd:YAG laser using monolithic MgO:LiNbO3 external resonant cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, William J.; Nabors, C. D.; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    56-percent efficient external-cavity-resonant second-harmonic generation of a diode-laser pumped, CW single-axial-mode Nd:YAG laser is reported. A theory of external doubling with a resonant fundamental is presented and compared to experimental results for three monolithic cavities of nonlinear MgO:LiNbO3. The best conversion efficiency was obtained with a 12.5-mm-long monolithic ring cavity doubler, which produced 29.7 mW of CW, single-axial model 532-nm radiation from an input of 52.5 mW.

  3. Design of rigid GRIN-endoscope with sapphire window and improved image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluder, Grzegorz; Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bakholdin, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    The possibilities of using gradient index (GRIN) lenses as the objective and relay lens in rigid endoscopic systems working in visible spectrum are investigated. The final aim of the project is to obtain a system providing diffraction limited image quality, which could be used for examining the gastrointestinal tract. This paper describes steps of the design of the system with working distance equal to 125 mm and angular field of view 25°. The diameter of the GRIN lenses is equal to 2,2 mm. Influence of the gradient of refractive index on the image quality is shown. Current results are analysed and future steps are described.

  4. Semiconductor diodes as neutron detectors for position-sensitive measurements and for application in personal neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzhaeuser, Michael; Dehoff, A.; Engels, R.; Hoengesberg, F.; Lauter, J.; Luth, Hans; Reetz, M.; Reinartz, Richard; Richter, H.; Schelten, Jim; Schmitz, Th.; Steffen, A.; Vockenberg, Th.

    1997-02-01

    A new design for a position-sensitive detector system for thermal neutrons is introduced. The detection principle with a thin 6LiF converter on the surface of a semiconductor diode is described. In experiments with thermal neutrons, a spatial resolution of 1.25 mm was obtained. The detector is insensitive to (gamma) -rays with energies up to 1.5 MeV. The design of a detector with an improvement of the detection efficiency for thermal neutrons from 2.5 percent up to 35 percent is also proposed and the present state of the process development for its fabrication is described.

  5. Effects of specimen width and rolling direction on the mechanical properties of beryllium copper alloy C17200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Liu, Z. R.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the research was to study the effects of specimen width and rolling direction of beryllium copper alloy, C17200, on the mechanical properties of yield strength and Young's modulus. The experimental results showed that the reduction of the specimen width from 12.5 mm to 2.5 mm did not affect the yield strength but reduced the Young's modulus by 4%. Also, the change of rolling direction affected both the yield strength and the Young's modulus. When the tension direction is parallel to the rolling direction, the maximum yield strength was obtained. The results can help predict the behavior of small-scale beryllium copper products more accurately.

  6. Measuring lifting forces in rock climbing: effect of hold size and fingertip structure.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Roger; Halaki, Mark; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Clarke, Jillian

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that shallow edge lifting force in high-level rock climbers is more strongly related to fingertip soft tissue anatomy than to absolute strength or strength to body mass ratio. Fifteen experienced climbers performed repeated maximal single hand lifting exercises on rectangular sandstone edges of depth 2.8, 4.3, 5.8, 7.3, and 12.5 mm while standing on a force measurement platform. Fingertip soft tissue dimensions were assessed by ultrasound imaging. Shallow edge (2.8 and 4.3 mm) lifting force, in newtons or body mass normalized, was uncorrelated with deep edge (12.5 mm) lifting force (r < .1). There was a positive correlation (r = .65, p < .05) between lifting force in newtons at 2.8 mm edge depth and tip of bone to tip of finger pulp measurement (r < .37 at other edge depths). The results confirm the common perception that maximum lifting force on a deep edge ("strength") does not predict maximum force production on very shallow edges. It is suggested that increased fingertip pulp dimension or plasticity may enable increased deformation of the fingertip, increasing the skin to rock contact area on very shallow edges, and thus increase the limit of force production. The study also confirmed previous assumptions of left/right force symmetry in climbers. PMID:21451181

  7. Separation and recovery of fine particles from waste circuit boards using an inflatable tapered diameter separation bed.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chenlong; Sheng, Cheng; Wu, Lingling; Zhao, Yuemin; He, Jinfeng; Zhou, Enhui

    2014-01-01

    Recovering particle materials from discarded printed circuit boards can enhance resource recycling and reduce environmental pollution. Efficiently physically separating and recovering fine metal particles (-0.5 mm) from the circuit boards are a key recycling challenge. To do this, a new type of separator, an inflatable tapered diameter separation bed, was developed to study particle motion and separation mechanisms in the bed's fluid flow field. For 0.5-0.25 mm circuit board particles, metal recovery rates ranged from 87.56 to 94.17%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 87.71 to 94.20%. For 0.25-0.125 mm particles, metal recovery rates ranged from 84.76 to 91.97%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 84.74 to 91.86%. For superfine products (-0.125 mm), metal recovery rates ranged from 73.11 to 83.04%, and separation efficiencies ranged from 73.00 to 83.14%. This research showed that the inflatable tapered diameter separation bed achieved efficient particle separation and can be used to recover fine particles under a wide range of operational conditions. The bed offers a new mechanical technology to recycle valuable materials from discarded printed circuit boards, reducing environmental pollution. PMID:25379546

  8. Variation of quantitative emphysema measurements from CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Barr, R. Graham; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2008-03-01

    Emphysema is a lung disease characterized by destruction of the alveolar air sacs and is associated with long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema, and several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease. In this paper we compare these measures for repeatability over time. The measures of interest in this study are emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentile, and the fractal dimension. To allow for direct comparisons, the measures were normalized to a 0-100 scale. These measures have been computed for a set of 2,027 scan pairs in which the mean interval between scans was 1.15 years (σ: 93 days). These independent pairs were considered with respect to three different scanning conditions (a) 223 pairs where both were scanned with a 5 mm slice thickness protocol, (b) 695 with the first scanned with the 5 mm protocol and the second with a 1.25 mm protocol, and (c) 1109 pairs scanned both times using a 1.25 mm protocol. We found that average normalized emphysema index and histogram percentiles scores increased by 5.9 and 11 points respectively, while the fractal dimension showed stability with a mean difference of 1.2. We also found, a 7 point bias introduced for emphysema index under condition (b), and that the fractal dimension measure is least affected by scanner parameter changes.

  9. Thresholds of Central Systolic Blood Pressure in a Normotensive Chinese Middle-Aged Population.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guang; Wang, Zengwu; Zhang, Linfeng; Chen, Zuo; Wang, Xin; Guo, Min; Tian, Ye; Shao, Lan; Zhu, Manlu

    2016-02-01

    An increasing body of evidence has emerged showing that the central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) is more relevant to the risk of cardiovascular (CV) diseases than brachial blood pressure. However, there are no agreed CSBP threshold values above which the risk of CV disease is increased. The aim of our study was to define the threshold values of the CSBP in a normotensive Chinese population; 10 012 adults 35 to 65 years of age were eligible for analysis. We excluded 3765 participants with hypertension, and the final normotensive reference sample consisted of 6247 participants. We defined abnormally high CSBP as exceeding the 90th percentile age- and sex-specific values in the normotensive population. The 90th percentile cutoff value for CSBP in the reference sample was 125 mm Hg in men and 126 mm Hg in women. The CSBP was significantly higher in participants with diabetes, history of CV disease, and hyperlipidemia (P < .001). The CSBP values increased with age (P < .001). We established that the 90th percentile of the CSBP threshold value in normotensive Chinese middle-aged population is 125 mm Hg for men and 126 mm Hg for women. PMID:25934007

  10. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes. PMID:9720100

  11. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  12. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain. PMID:25421627

  13. Development of sheet molding compound solar collectors with molded-in silvered glass reflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, R. L.; Allred, R. E.

    1980-12-01

    The reflecting concentrator of a parabolic trough solar collector system comprises approximately 40% of initial system cost. The parabolic concentrator structure is also the most influential component in determining overall system efficiency. Parabolic test moldings have been fabricated from a general purpose sheet molding compound with flat chemically strengthened glass, flat annealed glass, and thermally formed glass. The test panel configuration was a 1.22 m x 0.61 m, 45/sup 0/ rim angle (0.762 m focal length) parabola. Attempts to mold with annealed sheet glass (1 mm thick) and thermally formed glass (1.25 mm thick) were unsuccessful; only the chemically strengthened glass (1.25 mm thick) was strong enough to survive molding pressures. Because of the mismatch in thermal expansion between glass and sheet molding compound, the as-molded panels contained a sizeable residual stress. The results are given of dimensional changes taking place in the panels under accelerated thermal cycling and outdoor aging conditions; these results are compared to an analytical model of the laminate. In addition, the sheet molding compound has been examined for thermomechanical properties and flow behavior in the rib sections. Results indicated that lowering the thermal expansion coefficient of the sheet molding compound through material modifications would produce a more stable structure.

  14. Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

    2011-06-01

    In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (< 50 micrometres) single crystal silicon wafers on foreign substrates. We reverse the conventional approach of depositing or forming silicon on foreign substrates by depositing or forming thick (200 to 400 micrometres) ceramic materials on high quality single crystal silicon films ~ 50 micrometres thick. Our key innovation is the fabrication of thin, refractory, and self-adhering 'handling layers or substrates' on thin epitaxial silicon films in-situ, from powder precursors obtained from low cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

  15. Incidence of and Factors Associated with Sinus Membrane Perforation During Maxillary Sinus Augmentation Using the Reamer Drilling Approach: A Double-Center Case Series.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; Monje-Gil, Florencio; Burgueño, Miguel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Raúl; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary sinus membrane perforation has been reported as the most common intraoperative complication during sinus augmentation, potentially leading to postoperative infection and consequent loss of graft or even implant failure. Numerous anatomical factors have been demonstrated to affect membrane tearing. However, careful use of proper instrumentation, such as a reamer, seems to play an important role in minimizing the incidence of these complications. Hence, the aim of the present study was to (1) investigate the reliability of reamer drilling for lateral window preparation; (2) examine the incidence of membrane perforation; and (3) study the factors that might influence membrane perforation. Results from this study showed the safety and effectiveness of using a reamer to perform lateral window approach sinus augmentation. The sinus membrane perforation rate was found to be 12.5%. A slightly higher perforation rate was noted in thinner maxillary lateral walls (< 1.25 mm). The authors concluded that reamer drilling is a safe and effective alternate technique for opening the lateral window wall when the lateral wall thickness is ≥ 1.25mm. PMID:27333013

  16. Influence of leaching conditions for ecotoxicological classification of ash.

    PubMed

    Stiernström, S; Enell, A; Wik, O; Hemström, K; Breitholtz, M

    2014-02-01

    The Waste Framework Directive (WFD; 2008/98/EC) states that classification of hazardous ecotoxicological properties of wastes (i.e. criteria H-14), should be based on the Community legislation on chemicals (i.e. CLP Regulation 1272/2008). However, harmonizing the waste and chemical classification may involve drastic changes related to choice of leaching tests as compared to e.g. the current European standard for ecotoxic characterization of waste (CEN 14735). The primary aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the influence of leaching conditions, i.e. pH (inherent pH (∼10), and 7), liquid to solid (L/S) ratio (10 and 1000 L/kg) and particle size (<4 mm, <1 mm, and <0.125 mm), for subsequent chemical analysis and ecotoxicity testing in relation to classification of municipal waste incineration bottom ash. The hazard potential, based on either comparisons between element levels in leachate and literature toxicity data or ecotoxicity testing of the leachates, was overall significantly higher at low particle size (<0.125 mm) as compared to particle fractions <1mm and <4mm, at pH 10 as compared to pH 7, and at L/S 10 as compared to L/S 1000. These results show that the choice of leaching conditions is crucial for H-14 classification of ash and must be carefully considered in deciding on future guidance procedures in Europe. PMID:24280620

  17. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  18. Rapid estimation of lives of deficient superpave mixes and laboratory-based accelerated mix testing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Chandra Bahadur

    The engineers from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) often have to decide whether or not to accept non-conforming Superpave mixtures during construction. The first part of this study focused on estimating lives of deficient Superpave pavements incorporating nonconforming Superpave mixtures. These criteria were based on the Hamburg Wheel-Tracking Device (HWTD) test results and analysis. The second part of this study focused on developing accelerated mix testing models to considerably reduce test duration. To accomplish the first objective, nine fine-graded Superpave mixes of 12.5-mm nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS) with asphalt grade PG 64-22 from six administrative districts of KDOT were selected. Specimens were prepared at three different target air void levels Ndesign gyrations and four target simulated in-place density levels with the Superpave gyratory compactor. Average number of wheel passes to 20-mm rut depth, creep slope, stripping slope, and stripping inflection point in HWTD tests were recorded and then used in the statistical analysis. Results showed that, in general, higher simulated in-place density up to a certain limit of 91% to 93%, results in a higher number of wheel passes until 20-mm rut depth in HWTD tests. A Superpave mixture with very low air voids Ndesign (2%) level performed very poorly in the HWTD test. HWTD tests were also performed on six 12.5-mm NMAS mixtures with air voids Ndesign of 4% for six projects, simulated in-place density of 93%, two temperature levels and five load levels with binder grades of PG 64-22, PG 64-28, and PG 70-22. Field cores of 150-mm in diameter from three projects in three KDOT districts with 12.5-mm NMAS and asphalt grade of PG 64-22 were also obtained and tested in HWTD for model evaluation. HWTD test results indicated as expected. Statistical analysis was performed and accelerated mix testing models were developed to determine the effect of increased temperature and load on the duration of the HWTD test. Good consistency between predicted and observed test results was obtained when higher temperature and standard load level were used. Test duration of the HWTD can thus be reduced to two hours or less using accelerated mix testing (statistical) models.

  19. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  20. Uncoupling of the baroreflex by N(N)-cholinergic blockade in dissecting the components of cardiovascular regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Black, B. K.; Costa, F.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Systemic administration of adrenergic agonists and nitric oxide donors is used extensively to determine cardiovascular receptor sensitivity. Conclusions regarding receptor sensitivity in the presence of the baroreflex may be misleading. In 8 normal volunteers, we determined the heart rate and blood pressure changes after incremental bolus doses of isoproterenol, phenylephrine, and sodium nitroprusside before and during neuronal nicotinic cholinergic (N(N)-cholinergic) blockade with trimethaphan. Results are given as median (25th/75th percentile). With trimethaphan, the baroreflex slope (as determined by bolus doses of nitroprusside and phenylephrine) decreased from 24 (22/26) to 0.00 (0.00/0.09) ms/mm Hg (P<0.01). The dose of isoproterenol that decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) 12.5 mm Hg changed from 0.61 (0.51/5.3) to 0.17 (0.12/0.21) microg (P<0.01); the dose required to increase heart rate 12.5 bpm changed from 0.22 (0.17/0.41) to 0.74 (0.33/2.3) microg (P<0.01). The dose of nitroprusside required to decrease SBP 12.5 mm Hg changed from 2.3 (1.3/3.4) to 0.18 (0.14/0.24) microg/kg (P<0.01). The dose of phenylephrine required to increase SBP 12.5 mm Hg changed from 135 (110/200) to 16 (10/30) microg (P<0.01). We conclude that the efferent arc of the baroreflex can be completely interrupted with N(N)-cholinergic blockade. Estimation of adrenoreceptor sensitivity and sensitivity to nitric oxide donors by systemic administration of agonists is severely confounded by baroreflexes. Uncoupling of the baroreflex by N(N)-cholinergic blockade may be a useful method to obtain an integrated measure of adrenergic receptor sensitivity and sensitivity to nitric oxide donors in humans. This approach would permit the comparison of normal and abnormal physiological states without the "noise" of baroreflex buffering.

  1. Performance of a lead radiator, gas tube calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, L.; Arenton, M.; Chen, T.Y.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Delchamps, S.W.; Etemadi, B.; Fortney, L.; Guffey, K.; Haire, M.

    1989-03-13

    Design and performance of a 4.2 radiation length lead-sandwich, gas tube hodoscope are discussed. The device, measuring 1 /times/ 2 m/sup 2/ in area and 12 cm in depth, was employed in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment 705. Multiple samplings of anode wires situated within three-walled aluminum tubes were used to generate an X coordinate; similarly, capacitively coupled copper-clad strips were ganged together to yield a Y coordinate. The results reviewed are based on an analysis of electron calibration data taken during a recent six-month running period. In particular, position resolution (in millimeters) is seen to be 0.8 + 3.3/..sqrt..E + 31/E for the 9.92 mm spaced wires and 0.6 + 3.2/..sqrt..E + 32/E for the 12.5 mm strips, where E represents the electron beam energy in GeV. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Effects of aspect ratio and specimen size on uniaxial failure stress of iron green bodies at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Nishida, Masahiro; Ogura, Takashi; Häggblad, H.-Å.; Jonsén, P.; Gustafsson, G.

    2015-09-01

    Powder metallurgy is used for the production of a number of mechanical parts and is an essential production method. These are great advantages such as product cost effectiveness and product uniqueness. In general, however parts created by powder metallurgy have low strength because of low density. In order to increase strength as well as density, new techniques such as high-velocity-compaction (HVC) was developed and further investigation has been conducted on improvement of techniques and optimum condition using computer simulation. In this study, the effects of aspect ratio and specimen size of iron green bodies on failure strength of uniaxial compression and failure behavior were examined using a split Hopkinson pressure Bar. The diameters of specimens were 12.5 mm and 25 mm the aspect ratios (thickness/diameter) were 0.8 and 1.2.

  3. Cladding technique for development of Ag In Cd decoupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshigawara, M.; Harada, M.; Saito, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Kogawa, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Kawai, M.; Kurishita, H.; Konashi, K.

    2005-08-01

    To develop a Ag (silver)-In (indium)-Cd (cadmium) alloy decoupler, a method is needed to bond the decoupler between two plates of the Al alloy (A6061-T6). We found that a better HIP condition was temperature, pressure and holding time at 803 K, 100 MPa and 1 h, respectively, for small test pieces ( ϕ 22 mm in diam. × 5 mm in height). Especially, a sandwich case (a Ag-In plate with thickness of 0.5 mm between two Ag-Cd plates with thickness of 1.25 mm) gave easier (or better) bonding results. Though a hardened layer is found in the bonding layer, the rupture strength of the bonding layer is more than 30 MPa, which is higher than the design stress in our application.

  4. Application of laser TLD 2-dimensional dose mapping in medical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Braunlich, P.F.; Jones, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    IST, Inc. has developed a laser-based system for rapid evaluation of two-dimensional monolithic thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) films. For most applications, the authors use arrays of 1.5- mm diameter, 38-{mu}m-thick TLDs, deposited on 0.125-mm-thick polymer in a 3x3-mm grid of up to 30x30-cm size. Continuous films are available for applications requiring higher spatial resolution (300 {mu}m.) The films are re-usable and water-immersible. Results from radiation therapy (photon and charged particle beam) dose measurements, quality assurance in mammography (dose distribution and kVp), interventional radiotherapy and personnel dosimetry (detection of intentional fraudulent exposures) are given.

  5. Measurements of mixed-mode crack surface displacements and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Altiero, N. J.; Mirmohamadsadegh, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of a finite-width tension specimen containing a crack oriented at various angles to the load axis is attacked from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Displacements of an electro-machined slot, 12.5 mm long and oriented at angles of 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 deg, are measured using a laser-based in-plane measuring technique. Various width specimens, ranging from a crack-length/width ratio of 0.167 to 0.794, are tested. A boundary-integral equation method is extended to deal with the presence of a sharp crack. Agreement between the two approaches is generally good except near the tips of the cracks.

  6. Highly Reliable Operation of High-Power InGaAsP/InGaP/AlGaAs 0.8 µ m Separate Confinement Heterostructure Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, Toshiaki; Wada, Mitsugu; Asano, Hideki; Hayakawa, Toshiro

    1995-09-01

    We report the high-power and reliable operation of InGaAsP/InGaP/AlGaAs 0.8 µ m separate confinement heterostructure single-quantum-well laser diodes. High output power of 1.8 W is achieved from an anti-reflection- and high-reflection-coated device with stripe width of 50 µ m and cavity length of 1.25 mm. This device has high characteristic temperature of 164 K and low threshold current density of 300 A/cm2. No catastrophic failure in the laser with 0.75 mm cavity length is observed during 1000 h aging test at 50° C under an automatic power control of 500 mW. The effect of cavity length on laser characteristics is also discussed.

  7. A high-charge and short-pulse RF photocathode gun for wake-field acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, W.; Li, X.; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.

    1998-02-01

    In this paper we present a design report on 1-1/2 cell, L-Band RF photocathode gun which is capable of generating and accelerating electron beams with peak currents >10 kA. We address several critical issues of high-current RF photoinjectors such as longitudinal space charge effect, and transverse emittance growth. Unlike conventional short electron pulse generation, this design does not require magnetic pulse compression. Based on numerical simulations using SUPERFISH and PARMELA, this design will produce 100 nC beam at 18 MeV with r.m.s. bunch length 1.25 mm and normalized transverse emittance 108 mm mrad. Applications of this source beam for wake-field acceleration are also discussed.

  8. High-Speed Laser Scanner Maps a Surface in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph; Schuet, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    A scanning optoelectronic instrument generates the digital equivalent of a threedimensional (X,Y,Z) map of a surface that spans an area with resolution on the order of 0.005 in. ( 0.125mm). Originally intended for characterizing surface flaws (e.g., pits) on space-shuttle thermal-insulation tiles, the instrument could just as well be used for similar purposes in other settings in which there are requirements to inspect the surfaces of many objects. While many commercial instruments can perform this surface-inspection function, the present instrument offers a unique combination of capabilities not available in commercial instruments. This instrument utilizes a laser triangulation method that has been described previously in NASA Tech Briefs in connection with simpler related instruments used for different purposes. The instrument includes a sensor head comprising a monochrome electronic camera and two lasers. The camera is a high-resolution

  9. Pressurized subsampling system for pressured gas-hydrate-bearing sediment: Microscale imaging using X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yusuke Konno, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Jiro

    2014-09-01

    A pressurized subsampling system was developed for pressured gas hydrate (GH)-bearing sediments, which have been stored under pressure. The system subsamples small amounts of GH sediments from cores (approximately 50 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height) without pressure release to atmospheric conditions. The maximum size of the subsamples is 12.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. Moreover, our system transfers the subsample into a pressure vessel, and seals the pressure vessel by screwing in a plug under hydraulic pressure conditions. In this study, we demonstrated pressurized subsampling from artificial xenon-hydrate sediments and nondestructive microscale imaging of the subsample, using a microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. In addition, we estimated porosity and hydrate saturation from two-dimensional X-ray CT images of the subsamples.

  10. Circulating bovine pregnancy associated glycoproteins are associated with late embryonic/fetal survival but not ovulatory follicle size in suckled beef cows.

    PubMed

    Pohler, K G; Geary, T W; Johnson, C L; Atkins, J A; Jinks, E M; Busch, D C; Green, J A; MacNeil, M D; Smith, M F

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to examine the relationship between ovulatory follicle size and embryo and fetal survival by using circulating concentrations of bovine pregnancy associated glycoproteins (bPAG) to detect the presence of an embryo or fetus and monitor placental function. Before examining the relationship between bPAG, ovulatory follicle size, and embryo and fetal survival, the half-life of bPAG was determined in Exp. 1. The half-life of bPAG after PGF2α-induced abortion on d 32 to 36 postinsemination was 35.8 ± 21.9 h (mean ± SD; range 7.1 to 78.5 h). In Exp. 2, suckled beef cows (n = 91) were treated with the CO-Synch protocol (GnRH on d -9, PGF2α on d -2, and GnRH and AI 48 h later [d 0]) and classified into 1 of 2 ovulatory follicle size groups: 1) small follicle (<12.5 mm; n = 25) or 2) large follicle (≥ 12.5 mm; n = 66). The first increase (P < 0.0001) in serum bPAG occurred in pregnant cows on d 24 after insemination and circulating bPAG decreased before a decrease in progesterone in 3 of 4 cows that lost an embryo or fetus. Pattern of secretion of bPAG in serum from d 24 to 60 after insemination (d 0) was affected by day (P < 0.0001), but not ovulatory follicle size. In Exp. 3, suckled beef cows (n = 1164) were administered the CO-Synch protocol either with (donor cows; n = 810) or without (recipient cows; n = 354) AI on d 0. Single embryos (n = 394) or oocytes (n = 45) were recovered from the donor cows [d 7; embryo transfer (ET)] and all live embryos were transferred into recipients the same day. Cows were classified on d 0 as having a small (<12.5 mm) or large (≥ 12.5 mm) ovulatory follicle, and randomly chosen as donors or recipients to remove confounding effects of ovulatory follicle size on fertility. Serum concentration of bPAG at d 28 was not affected by ovulatory follicle size (P = 0.85), embryo stage at ET (P = 0.75), embryo quality at ET (P = 0.64), estradiol at GnRH2 (P = 0.62) or serum progesterone at ET (d7; P = 0.14). Compared with cows that maintained pregnancy (n = 176), cows that exhibited late embryonic or fetal mortality (n = 19) after d 28 had decreased (P < 0.05) concentrations of bPAG on d 28. In summary, there was no relationship between serum bPAG and ovulatory follicle size or embryo stage or quality at ET; however, cows that lost an embryo after d 28 had reduced concentrations of bPAG on d 28 compared with cows that maintained pregnancy. PMID:23825331

  11. Experimental Acquisitions with ^125I on a Small Animal SPECT Device*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Kevin; Welsh, Robert E.; Bradley, Eric L.; Saha, Margaret S.; Kross, Brian; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph

    2001-04-01

    We have performed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies on a small animal scanning system for which the detector employed position sensitive phototubes (125 mm dia. Hamamatsu R3292 and 18 x 18 mm Hamamatsu M-64) coupled to pixelated scintillators CsI(Tl) and CsI(Na) Phantom acquisitions were used to investigate the effects of angular sampling and scan time on reconstructed image quality and noise. Results from these studies will be described and extended to in vivo studies with small animals. *Supported in part by the Thomas F. and Kate Miller Jeffress Trust, the Department of Energy, The American Diabetes Association, The National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Foundation and the Virginia Commonwealth Health Research Board.

  12. Hemolytic anemia with aortic stenosis resolved by urgent aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Isamu; Matsuo, Tatsuro; Sasayama, Koji; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Hideo

    2008-08-01

    A 78-year-old man with aortic stenosis complained of dark colored urine followed by recurrent chest pain and syncopal episodes. Echocardiography showed severely calcified aortic stenosis with the maximal pressure gradient of 125 mm Hg. Hemoglobin was 7.9 g/dL, lactate dehydrogenase was 2,295 IU/L, haptoglobin was less than 10 mg/dL, reticulocyte count was elevated, and Coombs' test was negative. We performed an urgent aortic valve replacement. After the surgery, the patient's urine became clear and his chest pain and syncope abated. All laboratory data returned to normal physiological values. In conclusion, the observed hemolysis was related to the aortic shear stress of a calcified aortic valve. PMID:18640351

  13. Hot melt joints for carbon fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netze, C.; Michaeli, W.

    The electric conductivity of carbon fibers and EVA thermoplastic adhesives in composite materials are exploited in a method for melting and/or hardening joint bonds. The joining method is based on the simultaneous use of electrical energy and mechanical pressure in joining sections of CFRP materials by means of hot melts. The EVA hot melt is used as a model adhesive to join 1:1 bidirectional CFRP sheets with a 12.5 mm overlap. Heating power is shown to affect the temperature development in the joining areas, and no relationship is noted between heating behavior and joining pressure. The strength of the bonds is comparable to the values yielded by other methods, although the carbon black in the EVA films leads to some microscopic cracks. The joining technique outlined is shown to provide effective structural bonds that could be of use in the fabrication of aircraft and other structures.

  14. Actuator usage and fault tolerance of the James Webb Space Telescope optical element mirror actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barto, A.; Acton, D. S.; Finley, P.; Gallagher, B.; Hardy, B.; Knight, J. S.; Lightsey, P.

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) telescope's secondary mirror and eighteen primary mirror segments are each actively controlled in rigid body position via six hexapod actuators. The mirrors are stowed to the mirror support structure to survive the launch environment and then must be deployed 12.5 mm to reach the nominally deployed position before the Wavefront Sensing & Control (WFS&C) alignment and phasing process begins. The actuation system is electrically, but not mechanically redundant. Therefore, with the large number of hexapod actuators, the fault tolerance of the OTE architecture and WFS&C alignment process has been carefully considered. The details of the fault tolerance will be discussed, including motor life budgeting, failure signatures, and motor life.

  15. High-precision multicomponent borehole deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin, Michael T.

    1984-12-01

    An instrument capable of deep borehole measurement of vector plane strain to 0.3 nstrain and tilt to 1.0 nrad has been developed for deployment in crustal deformation and earthquake prediction studies. The instrument has been deployed in California where shear strains dominate the deformation. The 125-mm-diam package is grouted in 175-mm boreholes at depths of approximately 200 m. The wall thickness and the grout thickness are chosen to match instrument strength to expected rock parameters. The instrument is capable of flat response from dc to 10 Hz on any single channel. The electronics package is stable to three parts in 108 over the temperature range 10 to 45° C. Reliable shear strain data is available immediately on installation when simple volume strain meters show only bond curing effects or thermal recovery signals.

  16. Preliminary investigation of a low power pulsed arcjet thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Russell D.; Burton, Rodney L.; Wetzel, Kyle K.

    1992-01-01

    A type of pulsed arcjet is examined which operates with gaseous helium propellant at powers from 100 to 1500 W and pulse rats from 360 to 6000 pulses per second. During the pulse, peak power is 50 to 250 kW generating chamber pressures of 10 to 50 atmospheres. The high operating pressure substantially reduces ionization in the 2.5 mm diameter x 12.5 mm long capillary and lowers frozen flow losses in the nozzle. The thruster thermal efficiency, measured calorimetrically, is 43 percent at 440 W and 8 mg/sec helium mass flow rate. Thruster performance trends are predicted by a time-dependent lumped-parameter model which includes heat exchange between the propellant and the wall. The model substantially underpredicts the experimental thermal efficiency values. Alternative thruster configurations yielding significant improvements in thrust efficiency and specific impulse are discussed.

  17. Dose enhancement close to platinum implants for the 4, 6, and 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Ng, Ben K.P.; Yu, K.N.

    2004-10-01

    Three photon interaction processes, namely, the photoelectric effect, Compton effect, and pair production, can occur when materials with high atomic numbers are irradiated by the high- and low-energy bremsstrahlung photons from a linear accelerator. A dose enhancement, due to the photoelectric effect and pair production, near targets with platinum implants (with a high atomic number) in radiosurgery cannot be predicted by the XKnife{sup reg} radiosurgery treatment planning system. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using PRESTA EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements from 4, 6, and 10 MV energies commonly used in the stereotactic radiosurgery system. Dose enhancements from 32% to 68% were observed close to the platinum implant for the above energies when using a 12.5 mm collimator. Comparatively higher dose enhancements were observed when using smaller collimators. It was found that this dose enhancement increased with beam energy but decreased as beam size increased.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  19. An evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of lead aprons used in clinics for protection against ionising radiation from novel radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Deb, Pradip; Jamison, Robert; Mong, Lisa; U, Paul

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of personal radiation shields currently worn in hospital and other diagnostic environments. This study was performed with four different radioisotopes; (18)F, (99m)Tc, (124)I and (131)I. (18)F results showed a decrease in dose with 0.5-mm Pb shielding but the reduction provided does not warrant its use clinically. (124)I testing demonstrated that dose enhancement can occur in greater shield thicknesses. PET isotope (124)I can be adequately shielded using 0.25-mm Pb equivalent aprons but any higher thickness increase the wearer's dose. As a result more shielding does not always equal more protection. The (131)I test showed that no dose reduction occurred, even when tested with up to 1.25-mm Pb equivalent shielding. Novel radioisotopes being used in the laboratory and clinic should be individually tested as each requires specific shielding testing. PMID:25848112

  20. Fourier transform-limited optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometry over several tens of laser coherence lengths.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weilin; Zhou, Qian; Bretenaker, Fabien; Xia, Zongyang; Shi, Hongxiao; Qin, Jie; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-07-01

    We report on a versatile optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometry technique that exploits wideband phase locking for generating highly coherent linear laser frequency chirps. This technique is based on an ultra-short delay-unbalanced interferometer, which leads to a large bandwidth, short lock time, and robust operation even in the absence of any isolation from environmental perturbations. In combination with a digital delay-matched phase error compensation, this permits the achievement of a range window about 60 times larger than the intrinsic laser coherence length with a 1.25 mm Fourier transform-limited spatial resolution. The demonstrated configuration can be easily applied to virtually any semiconductor laser. PMID:27367076

  1. Diet of double-crested cormorants wintering in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campo, J.J.; Thompson, B.C.; Barron, J.C.; Telfair II, R. C.; Durocher, P.; Gutreuter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The diets of 420 Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) were studied during November 1986-March 1987 on eight public reservoirs in Texas. Prey included 29 fish species and the mean live weight of fish per bird was 122 g. Fishes a??415 mm long were ingested, but those a??125 mm accounted for 90% of cormorant food contents by number. Shad (Dorosoma spp.) and sunfishes (Lepomis spp.) accounted for 90% of the total food items by number. Consumption of fishes (percent by weight) was different for male vs. female and adult vs. juvenile cormorants. Total consumption of fish by weight was consistent throughout the period; however, fewer but much larger fish were consumed after 15 February. Cormorants ate fishes that were most abundant in reservoirs. Sport fishes made up a substantial portion of cormorant food by weight, but not by number on some reservoirs. Cormorants ate very few large sport fish, however.

  2. Pressurized subsampling system for pressured gas-hydrate-bearing sediment: microscale imaging using X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yusuke; Konno, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Jiro

    2014-09-01

    A pressurized subsampling system was developed for pressured gas hydrate (GH)-bearing sediments, which have been stored under pressure. The system subsamples small amounts of GH sediments from cores (approximately 50 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height) without pressure release to atmospheric conditions. The maximum size of the subsamples is 12.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. Moreover, our system transfers the subsample into a pressure vessel, and seals the pressure vessel by screwing in a plug under hydraulic pressure conditions. In this study, we demonstrated pressurized subsampling from artificial xenon-hydrate sediments and nondestructive microscale imaging of the subsample, using a microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. In addition, we estimated porosity and hydrate saturation from two-dimensional X-ray CT images of the subsamples. PMID:25273747

  3. Experimental Investigation and 3D Finite Element Prediction of Temperature Distribution during Travelling Heat Sourced from Oxyacetylene Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar Alkali, Adam; Lenggo Ginta, Turnad; Majdi Abdul-Rani, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D transient finite element modelling of the workpiece temperature field produced during the travelling heat sourced from oxyacetylene flame. The proposed model was given in terms of preheat-only test applicable during thermally enhanced machining using the oxyacetylene flame as a heat source. The FEA model as well as the experimental test investigated the surface temperature distribution on 316L stainless steel at scanning speed of 100mm/min, 125mm/min 160mm/min, 200mm/min and 250mm/min. The parametric properties of the heat source maintained constant are; lead distance Ld =10mm, focus height Fh=7.5mm, oxygen gas pressure Poxy=15psi and acetylene gas pressure Pacty=25psi. An experimental validation of the temperature field induced on type 316L stainless steel reveal that temperature distribution increases when the travelling speed decreases.

  4. Impact verification of space suit design for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    The ballistic limits of single sheet and double sheet structures made of 6061 T6 Aluminum of 1.8 mm and larger nominal thickness were investigated for projectiles of 1.5 mm diameter fired in the Vertical Gun Range Test Facility and NASA Ames Research Center. The hole diameters and sheet deformation behavior were studied for various ratios of sheet spacing to projectile diameter. The results indicate that for projectiles of less than 1.5 mm diameter the ballistic limit exceeds the nominal 10 km/sec orbital debris encounter velocity, if a single-sheet suit of 1.8 mm thickness is behind a single bumper sheet of 1 mm thickness spaced 12.5 mm apart.

  5. Wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, R L; Aubrun, Jean-Noel; Bell, Ray; Benson, Robert; Benson, Larry; Brace, David; Breakwell, John; Burriesci, Larry; Byler, Eric; Camp, John; Cross, Gene; Cuneo, Peter; Dean, Peter; Digumerthi, Ramji; Duncan, Alan; Farley, John; Green, Andy; Hamilton, Howard H; Herman, Bruce; Lauraitis, Kris; de Leon, Erich; Lorell, Kenneth; Martin, Rob; Matosian, Ken; Muench, Tom; Ni, Mel; Palmer, Alice; Roseman, Dennis; Russell, Sheldon; Schweiger, Paul; Sigler, Rob; Smith, John; Stone, Richard; Stubbs, David; Swietek, Gregg; Thatcher, John; Tischhauser, C; Wong, Harvey; Zarifis, Vassilis; Gleichman, Kurt; Paxman, Rick

    2006-06-20

    A nine-aperture, wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope has been built at the Lockheed-Martin Advanced Technology Center. The telescope consists of nine, 125 mm diameter collector telescopes coherently phased and combined to form a diffraction-limited image with a resolution that is consistent with the 610 mm diameter of the telescope. The phased field of view of the array is 1 murad. The measured rms wavefront error is 0.08 waves rms at 635 nm. The telescope is actively controlled to correct for tilt and phasing errors. The control sensing technique is the method known as phase diversity, which extracts wavefront information from a pair of focused and defocused images. The optical design of the telescope and typical performance results are described. PMID:16778931

  6. Rail accelerator technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Rail accelerators offer a viable means of launching ton-size payloads from the Earth's surface to space. The results of two mission studies which indicate that an Earth-to-Space Rail Launcher (ESRL) system is not only technically feasible but also economically beneficial, particularly when large amounts of bulk cago are to be delivered to space are given. An in-house experimental program at the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was conducted in parallel with the mission studies with the objective of examining technical feasibility issues. A 1 m long - 12.5 by 12.5 mm bore rail accelerator as designed with clear polycarbonate sidewalls to visually observe the plasma armature acceleration. The general character of plasma/projectile dynamics is described for a typical test firing.

  7. Recovery Act: Novel Kerf-Free PV Wafering that provides a low-cost approach to generate wafers from 150um to 50um in thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Theodore E.

    2013-05-06

    The technical paper summarizes the project work conducted in the development of Kerf-Free silicon wafering equipment for silicon solar wafering. This new PolyMax technology uses a two step process of implantation and cleaving to exfoliate 50um to 120um wafers with thicknesses ranging from 50um to 120um from a 125mm or 156mm pseudo-squared silicon ingot. No kerf is generated using this method of wafering. This method of wafering contrasts with the current method of making silicon solar wafers using the industry standard wire saw equipment. The report summarizes the activity conducted by Silicon Genesis Corporation in working to develop this technology further and to define the roadmap specifications for the first commercial proto-type equipment for high volume solar wafer manufacturing using the PolyMax technology.

  8. Percutaneous Management of a Coronary Bifurcation Aneurysm with Mesh-Covered Stents and the Simultaneous Kissing Stent Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Davide; Bellotti, Sandro; Iannone, Alessandro; Rubartelli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted with a clinical diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (non-ST-segment elevation), characterized by regional hypokinesia of the left ventricular posterior and lateral walls and by positive cardiac biomarkers. The coronary angiogram showed a 12.5-mm-diameter aneurysm with a mural thrombus and possible distal embolism to the bifurcation of the left circumflex coronary artery and the 2nd marginal branch. The aneurysm was managed percutaneously by implanting 2 mesh-covered stents in accordance with the “simultaneous kissing stent” technique. Follow-up angiography and optical coherence tomography at 5 postprocedural months documented complete sealing of the aneurysm and diffuse in-stent restenosis. No sign of ischemia occurred during the subsequent follow-up. PMID:26413028

  9. Fabrication and experimental demonstration of the first 160 Gb/s hybrid silicon-on-insulator integrated all-optical wavelength converter.

    PubMed

    Stamatiadis, C; Stampoulidis, L; Kalavrouziotis, D; Lazarou, I; Vyrsokinos, K; Zimmermann, L; Voigt, K; Preve, G B; Moerl, L; Kreissl, J; Avramopoulos, H

    2012-02-13

    We present a hybrid integrated photonic circuit on a silicon-on-insulator substrate that performs ultra high-speed all-optical wavelength conversion. The chip incorporates a 1.25 mm non-linear SOA mounted on the SOI board using gold-tin bumps as small as 14 μm. Τhe device performs chirp filtering and signal polarity inversion with two multi-mode interference (MMI) - based cascaded delay interferometers (DIs) monolithically integrated on the same SOI substrate. Full free spectral range (FSR) tuning of the DIs is accomplished by two independently tuneable on-chip thermal heaters. We demonstrate 160Gb/s all-optical wavelength conversion with power penalties of less than 4.6dB. PMID:22418139

  10. Two new species of Choerophryne (Anura, Microhylidae) from the northern versant of Papua New Guinea's central cordillera.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Amy; Oliver, Paul; Richards, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We describe two new species of small microhylid frogs in the genus Choerophryne from the northern slopes of Papua New Guinea's central cordillera. Choerophryne epirrhina sp. nov. can be distinguished from congeners by the combination of moderately small size (SUL 14.9-15.0 mm), distinctly elongated snout (OHG/SUL 0.09-0.10), first finger without expanded disk, and advertisement call consisting of 3-4 distinctly pulsed notes repeated in long sequences. Choerophryne grylloides sp. nov. can be distinguished from congeners by the combination of very small size (SUL 12.5 mm), moderately long snout (OHG/SUL 0.08), long legs (TL/SUL 0.42), first finger without expanded disk and advertisement call consisting of 4-5 distinctly pulsed notes, the last of which has many more pulses than preceding notes (9-10 vs. 3-4). PMID:26701530

  11. Estudios interferométricos del campo magnético en regiones de formación estelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández López, M.; Stephens, I.; Segura-Cox, D.; Crutcher, R.; Looney, L. W.; Kwon, W.

    2015-08-01

    Currently, the possible role of magnetic fields in star formation processes is not clear. Despite the efforts made through single-dish observations, a stronger observational effort is required in order to broaden the sample of detections and acquire more insight into the morphology of the magnetic field at high-angular resolution scales. Here we present some results obtained from CARMA 1.25 mm continuum and spectral line polarization observations. The target of these observations were two accretion disks around a Class 0 (L1527) and a T Tauri (HL Tau) protostar and the massive star-forming region W3OH. We resolved the morphology of the magnetic field in both disks and, in W3OH, we achieved the first Zeeman detection ever made with an interferometer.

  12. Distributed Non-evaporable Getter pumps for the storage ring of the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.; Benaroya, R.

    1993-07-01

    A pair of distributed Non-evaporable Getter (NeG) strip assemblies is installed in each of 236 aluminum vacuum chambers of the 1104-m storage ring of the Advanced Photon Source. Distributed pumping is provided to remove most of the gas resulting from photon-stimulated desorption occurring along the outer walls of the chambers. This is an efficient way of pumping because conductance is limited along the beam axis. The St-707 NeG strips are conditioned at 450{degree}C for 45 min. with 42 A. Base pressures obtained are also as low as 4 {times} 10{sup 11} Torr. The NeG strip assemblies are supported by a series of electrically isolated, 125-mm-long, interlocking stainless steel carriers. These unique interlocking carrier elements provide flexibility along the vacuum chamber curvature (r=38.96 m) and permit removal and installation of assemblies with as little as 150 mm external clearance between adjacent chambers.

  13. [Diol column as stationary phase for high performance liquid chromatographic analysis of carbohydrates in drinks with evaporative light scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Guo, L; Ding, M Y

    2001-11-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method with a diol column and evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was established for the direct analysis of fructose, glucose, sucrose, maltose and raffinose in mixture. A separation column (Lichrospher 100 Diol, 250 mm x 4.0 mm i.d., 5 microns, Hewlett-Packard, USA) and a guard column (Zorbax Rx-SIL, 12.5 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 5 microns) were used. The mobile phase was a mixture of dichloromethane-methanol (3.2:1, volume ratio). Regression equations revealed linear relationship (correlation coefficients: 0.995-0.999) between the mass of carbohydrates injected and the peak area of carbohydrates detected by ELSD. The detection limits of ELSD (S/N = 3) were about 0.20 microgram for all carbohydrates. This system could be used for the routine analysis of simple carbohydrates in some common drinks on market. PMID:12545463

  14. Millimeter Resolved Observations of the HD 181327 Debris Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The presence of debris disks around young main sequence stars hints at the structure of hidden planetary systems, with any deviations from axisymmetry pointing toward interactions among planetesimals. HD 181327 is a ~24 Myr old F5.5 member of the Beta Pic Moving Group that hosts an extremely bright debris disk (L_IR/L_\\star = 0.25%) of dust continuously generated through the collisional erosion of a circumstellar ring of planetesimals at 90 AU. An HST STIS observation of the HD 181327 disk provided tentative evidence for the recent collisional destruction of a Pluto mass object. Spatially resolved millimeter wavelength observations are crucial to investigate this scenario, characterize the structure of the dust disk, and characterize the gravitationally interacting grains. We present ALMA observations at ~1 arcsec resolution and investigate the azimuthal variations in the HD 181327 debris disk at 1.25 mm.

  15. [Characteristics of granular sludge during start-up of the internal circulation].

    PubMed

    Ding, L; Ren, H; Hua, Z; Chen, J

    2001-05-01

    The quick start-up of the laboratory scale IC reactor and the characteristics of granular sludge during start-up were studied in this paper. The results showed that the first start-up of IC reactor could be finished in 20 days, while secondary start-up only needed 15 days with COD loading rate of 12-15 kg.(m3.d)-1 and COD removal larger than 85%. During start-up, the characteristics of granular sludge changed greatly: average granular diameter was increased from 0.88 mm to 1.25 mm; average settling velocity was enhanced from 35.4 m.h-1 to 105.17 m.h-1; methanogenic activities of the granular increased up to 4 times as large as the seeded sludge; the main methanobacteria was changed from Methanothrix to Methanococcus and Methanobacterium. PMID:11507902

  16. Pregnancy in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with Severe Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeouk; Kim, Minsu; Lee, Junsoo; Kim, Sihun; Kim, Myeonggun; Hwang, Hyunjung; Moon, Jeonggeun; Shin, Mi-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) patients with severe left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (those with a gradient of > 100 mm Hg) are at the highest risk of hemodynamic deterioration during pregnancy. Complications of HOCM include sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Physiological changes during pregnancy may induce these complications, affecting maternal and fetal health conditions. Therefore, close monitoring with appropriate management is essential for the well-being of both mother and fetus. We report on the case of a 27-year-old female patient with severe LVOT obstruction HOCM, pressure gradient (PG) of 125 mm Hg at resting, and 152 mm Hg induced by the Valsalva maneuver at 34 weeks gestation. This case showed how close monitoring using echocardiography and proper management during the course of pregnancy resulted in successful delivery in the patient with extremely high PG HOCM. PMID:27358709

  17. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Springeling, Geert; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; van Soest, Gijs

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerotic plaque. We specifically imaged lipid content, a key factor in vulnerable plaques that may lead to myocardial infarction. An integrated intravascular photoacoustics (IVPA) and ultrasound (IVUS) catheter with an outer diameter of 1.25 mm was developed. The catheter comprises an angle-polished optical fiber adjacent to a 30 MHz single-element transducer. The ultrasonic transducer was optically isolated to eliminate artifacts in the PA image. We performed measurements on a cylindrical vessel phantom and isolated point targets to demonstrate its imaging performance. Axial and lateral point spread function widths were 110 μm and 550 μm, respectively, for PA and 89 μm and 420 μm for US. We imaged two fresh human coronary arteries, showing different stages of disease, ex vivo. Specific photoacoustic imaging of lipid content, is achieved by spectroscopic imaging at different wavelengths between 1180 and 1230 nm.

  18. Using Mid-Upper Arm Circumference to End Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition Leads to Higher Weight Gains in the Most Malnourished Children

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nancy M.; Myatt, Mark; Prudhon, Claudine; Briend, André

    2013-01-01

    Objective The World Health Organization recommends discharging children admitted to nutrition programs treating severe acute malnutrition, with a low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC <115 mm) when weight gain is >15%. When this recommendation is followed, the most severely malnourished children receive a shorter treatment compared to children that are less severely malnourished. This study assesses whether using MUAC >125 mm as discharge criteria eliminates this effect. Methods and Findings Data from 753 children cured from a Médecins Sans Frontières outpatient nutrition program in Gedaref, North Sudan were analyzed. MUAC >125 mm was used as discharge criteria. Length of stay and percent weight gain of children were compared in relation to nutritional status on admission. Children with low MUAC on admission had a longer duration of treatment (p = 0.000) and also a higher percent weight gain (p = 0.000) than children with higher MUAC. Similar results with weight-for-height z-scores categories were shown with both duration of treatment (p = 0.000) and percent weight gain (p = 0.000). Conclusion This study shows that using MUAC as the discharge criteria eliminates the effect of shorter treatment in most severely malnourished children compared to least severely malnourished, as is observed with percent weight gain. The findings directly address the main concern that has been identified with the current WHO recommendation of using percent weight gain. MUAC could be used as discharge criteria, instead of percent weight gain, as having a longer duration of treatment and a higher percent weight gain for the most malnourished is highly desirable. PMID:23418442

  19. Metal contamination at a wood preservation site: characterisation and experimental studies on remediation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Prosun; Mukherjee, Arun B; Jacks, Gunnar; Nordqvist, Sune

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the occurrence of As, Cu, Cr and Zn in the soil at an abandoned wood preservation unit and to examine some possible extractants for the contaminants in the soil. The mean As content of the contaminated surface soils (0-10 cm) was 186 mg kg(-1), where as the mean concentrations of Cu, Cr and Zn in soils from the contaminated area were 26, 29 and 91 mg kg(-1), respectively. The elevated As content in the mineral soils is related to adsorption of inorganic As phases in the fine grained fractions, which are characterised by large surface area and high positive surface charge under the current acidic conditions. Cu and Cr were found to be rather mobile, which is reflected in their lower abundance in soils and significant accumulation in sediments in the drainage leaving the area. The fine fraction of the soil (<0.125 mm) has an average metal content increased by nearly 34% as compared to the <2-mm fraction conventionally used for the analysis and assessment of soil contamination. The <2-mm fraction constitutes approximately 65% of the total weight while the fine fraction (<0.125 mm) constitutes approximately 10%. These facts, taken together, are essential for the choice of remediation measures. Oxalate solutions have been tested as extractants for soil remediation. Dark acid oxalate extraction dissolves the amorphous Al- and Fe-oxides and hydroxides and mobilises the adsorbed inorganic As species. Oxalate also acts as a ligand for the cationic heavy metals, releasing them from exchangeable sites. With a three-step sequential leaching, up to 98-99% of the metals could be removed. At lower concentrations and higher pH, the leaching decreased to approximately 70%. PMID:12083708

  20. Unenhanced MDCT in Suspected Urolithiasis: Improved Stone Detection and Density Measurements Using Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Michael T.; Hsu, Margaret; McGahan, John P.; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) reformations improve urinary tract stone detection and density measurements compared with routine axial and coronal images. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five consecutive patients who underwent MDCT for suspected urolithiasis were included. Two radiologists independently determined the number of stones on 5-, 3-, and 1.25-mm axial, 5- and 3-mm coronal, and 5-mm coronal MIP images. The reference standard was obtained by consensus review using all six datasets. Stone density was determined for all calculi 4 mm or larger on all datasets. RESULTS There were a total of 115 stones. Reader 1 identified 111 (96.5%), 112 (97.4%), 97 (84.3%), 102 (88.7%), 99 (86.1%), and 85 (73.9%) stones and reader 2 identified 105 (91.3%), 102 (88.7%), 85 (73.9%), 89 (77.4%), 89 (77.4%), and 76 (66.1%) stones on the MIP, 1.25-mm axial, 3-mm axial, 3-mm coronal, 5-mm coronal, and 5-mm axial images, respectively. Both readers identified more stones on the MIP images than on the 3- or 5-mm axial or coronal images (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in stone attenuation compared with the thin axial images was significantly less for the MIP images (44.6 HU) compared with 3-mm axial (235 HU), 3-mm coronal (309 HU), and 5-mm coronal (329.6 HU) or axial images (347.8 HU) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION Coronal MIP reformations allow more accurate identification and density measurements of urinary tract stones compared with routine axial and coronal reformations. PMID:24147474

  1. Effects of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Mesenchymal Stem Cells Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation in a Fibrin Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Yu, Aixi; Qi, Baiwen; Li, Zonghuan; Hu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been proven to be an effective therapeutic method for the treatment of recalcitrant wounds. However, its role in bone healing remains to be unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of NPWT on rat periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells (P-MSCs) proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation in a 3D fibrin matrix. P-MSCs underwent primary culture for three passages before being used to construct cell clots. The fibrin clots were incubated with NPWT under continuous suction at −125 mmHg in a subatmospheric perfusion bioreactor. Clots exposed to atmospheric pressure served as the static control. Compared to the control group, cell proliferation significantly increased in NPWT group after incubation for 3 days. There was no statistical difference in apoptosis rate between two groups. The ALP activity and mineralization of P-MSCs all increased under continuous suction. The expressions of collagen type 1 and transcription factor Cbfa-1 were higher at the 1-, 3-, and 7-day timepoints and the expressions of osteocalcin and integrin β5 were higher at the 3-, and 7-day timepoints in the NPWT group. These results indicate that a short time treatment with NPWT, applied with continuous suction at −125 mmHg, can enhance cellular proliferation of P-MSCs and induce the differentiation toward an osteogenic phenotype. The mechanotransduction molecule integrin β5 was found to be highly expressed after NPWT treatment, which indicates that NPWT may play a positive role in fracture healing through enhance bone formation and decrease bone resorption. PMID:25216182

  2. [Novel strategy for thoracoabdomianl aortic aneurysm repair; intraoperative selective perfusion of the Adamkiewicz artery].

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, S; Furukawa, K; Rikitake, K; Okazaki, Y; Sato, M; Natsuaki, M; Matsumoto, K; Kato, A; Kudo, S; Itoh, T

    2004-04-01

    We report our method for delineating the Adamkiewicz artery using multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with selective perfusion using a distal perfusion cannula that is clinically available for off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). The tip of a distal perfusion catheter (Medtronic Quickflow, Minneapolis) designed for OPCAB was applicable for selective perfusion of the segmental arteries. The femoro-femoral venoarterial bypass was branched off into selective perfusion of the segmental arteries, using an independent roller pump and heat exchanger. Our method of visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery was MDCT scanning with injection of contrast medium directly into the proximal descending aorta: namely, "CT during aortography". Lower descending aorta to abdominal aorta (the range involving the aneurysm) was scanned in a cephalad-to-caudal direction using a detector collimation of 4 x 1.25 mm with a table speed of 9.4 mm/sec, pitch of 6, and image thickness of 1.25 mm. All images were reviewed on a workstation to investigate the continuity between the Adamkiewicz artery and its proximal segmental artery with paging, mulitplanar reformation and curved planar reformation. Distal perfusion cannulae of 2.0 mm in diameter were inserted into the respective intercostal arteries. 4-0 polyethylene sutures were placed to tourniquet the catheters. Segmental arteries were perfused with total flow of approximately 80 ml/min at a circuit pressure of 120 mmHg. Reattachment of the ninth intercostal arteries related to the Adamkiewicz artery was carried out. A total of 6 consecutive 6 patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) have undergone graft replacement by the methods described, since April 2002. All patients survived surgery without any neurological complications. This method is expected to minimize the ischemic time of the spinal cord and attenuate the reperfusion injury. PMID:15071861

  3. Landfill mining: Case study of a successful metals recovery project.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Travis P; Raymond, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, the generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) is increasing and landfills continue to be the dominant method for managing solid waste. Because of inadequate diversion of reusable and recoverable materials, MSW landfills continue to receive significant quantities of recyclable materials, especially metals. The economic value of landfilled metals is significant, fostering interest worldwide in recovering the landfilled metals through mining. However, economically viable landfill mining for metals has been elusive due to multiple barriers including technological challenges and high costs of processing waste. The objective of this article is to present a case study of an economically successful landfill mining operation specifically to recover metals. The mining operation was at an ashfill, which serves a MSW waste-to-energy facility. Landfill mining operations began in November 2011. Between December 2011 and March 2015, 34,352 Mt of ferrous and non-ferrous metals were recovered and shipped for recycling, which consisted of metals >125 mm (5.2%), 50-125 mm (85.9%), <50mm (3.4%), zorba (4.6%), and mixed products (0.8%). The conservative estimated value of the recovered metal was $7.42 million. Mining also increased the landfill's airspace by 10,194 m(3) extending the life of the ashfill with an estimated economic value of $267,000. The estimated per-Mt cost for the extraction of metal was $158. This case study demonstrates that ashfills can be profitably mined for metals without financial support from government. Although there are comparatively few ashfills, the results and experience obtained from this case study can help foster further research into the potential recovery of metals from raw, landfilled MSW. PMID:26152366

  4. Performance comparison of NE213 detectors for their application in moisture measurement

    PubMed

    Naqvi; Nagadi; Rehman; Kidwai

    2000-10-01

    The pulse shape discrimination (PSD) characteristic and neutron detection efficiency of NE213 detectors have been measured for their application in moisture measurements using 252Cf and 241Am-Be sources. In PSD studies, neutron peak to valley (Pn/V) ratio and figure of merit M were measured at four different bias values for cylindrical 50, 125 and 250 mm diameter NE213 detectors. The result of this study has shown that better PSD performance with the NE213 detector can be achieved with a smaller volume detector in conjunction with a neutron source with smaller gamma-ray/neutron ratio. The neutron detection efficiency of the 125 mm diameter NE213 detector for 241Am-Be and 252Cf source spectra was determined at 0.85, 1.25 and 1.75 MeV bias energies using the experimental neutron detection efficiency data of the same detector over 0.1-10 MeV energy range. Due to different energy spectra of the 241Am-Be and 252Cf sources, integrated efficiency of the 125 mm diameter NE213 detector for the two sources shows bias dependence. At smaller bias, 252Cf source has larger efficiency but as the bias is increased, the detector has larger efficiency for 241Am-Be source. This study has revealed that NE213 detector has better performance (such as PSD and neutron detection efficiency) in simultaneous detection of neutron and gamma-rays in moisture measurements, if it is used in conjunction with 241Am-Be source at higher detector bias. PMID:11003515

  5. TU-A-12A-07: CT-Based Biomarkers to Characterize Lung Lesion: Effects of CT Dose, Slice Thickness and Reconstruction Algorithm Based Upon a Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, B; Tan, Y; Tsai, W; Lu, L; Schwartz, L; So, J; Goldman, J; Lu, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiogenomics promises the ability to study cancer tumor genotype from the phenotype obtained through radiographic imaging. However, little attention has been paid to the sensitivity of image features, the image-based biomarkers, to imaging acquisition techniques. This study explores the impact of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm on measuring image features using a thorax phantom. Methods: Twentyfour phantom lesions of known volume (1 and 2mm), shape (spherical, elliptical, lobular and spicular) and density (-630, -10 and +100 HU) were scanned on a GE VCT at four doses (25, 50, 100, and 200 mAs). For each scan, six image series were reconstructed at three slice thicknesses of 5, 2.5 and 1.25mm with continuous intervals, using the lung and standard reconstruction algorithms. The lesions were segmented with an in-house 3D algorithm. Fifty (50) image features representing lesion size, shape, edge, and density distribution/texture were computed. Regression method was employed to analyze the effect of CT dose, slice of thickness and reconstruction algorithm on these features adjusting 3 confounding factors (size, density and shape of phantom lesions). Results: The coefficients of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm are presented in Table 1 in the supplementary material. No significant difference was found between the image features calculated on low dose CT scans (25mAs and 50mAs). About 50% texture features were found statistically different between low doses and high doses (100 and 200mAs). Significant differences were found for almost all features when calculated on 1.25mm, 2.5mm, and 5mm slice thickness images. Reconstruction algorithms significantly affected all density-based image features, but not morphological features. Conclusions: There is a great need to standardize the CT imaging protocols for radiogenomics study because CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm impact quantitative image features to various degrees as our study has shown.

  6. Comparison of two methods of erosive rains determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Středová, Hana; Krása, Josef; Štěpánek, Petr; Novotný, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Number of erosive rains, kinetic energy of erosive rains and factor of erosive efficiency of rains according to the USLE methodology were assessed by two methods of erosive rains determination. The first method (VAR1) defined erosive rains by intensity ≥ 0.4 mm· min-1; total ≥ 12.5 mm and the second method (VAR2) by intensity ≥ 6 mm· 15 min-1; total ≥ 12.5 mm. Database contained one minute precipitation data from four automatic stations in the Czech Republic for the period of 2000-2005. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a statistically highly significant difference between the annual number of erosive rains determined by the two methods. The rains simultaneously complying with two following criteria (30 min intensity lower than 15 mm·h-1 and sum of 40 mm) were not generally classified as erosive rains according to VAR2. The number of erosive rains determined by VAR2 most often reached 40 to 50% of VAR1 results. Two-way ANOVA proved highly significant differences between the kinetic energy values for the erosive rains determined by VAR1 a VAR2. According to VAR2 the rains with kinetic energy lower than 3 MJ·ha -1 are generally not considered as erosive rains. The results of kinetic energy of the erosive rains determined by VAR2 most often reached 60 to 70% of VAR1 results. Two-way ANOVA has not proved a statistical difference between annual values of R factor of erosive rains determined by the two methods. According to VAR2 the rains with R factor lower than 5 are in general not included into annual R factor value. The results of annual R factor values of erosive rains determined by VAR2 are about 25% lower than the results of VAR1. Correlation between number of erosive rains, kinetic energy of erosive rains and annual R factor value assessed by both methods showed a statistically significant relationship. The conversion formulas between results of the two methods (VAR1 and VAR2) were derived by linear regression. As conclusion we can state that when using present automatic stations in R factor analyses, we have to be aware of overestimating the erosivities compared to historical data based on ombrograms, where only low temporal resolution data were available.

  7. Validation of a HPLC method for the measurement of erythrocyte encapsulated thymidine phosphorylase (EE-TP) activity.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Lynette D; Levene, Michelle; Bax, Bridget E

    2013-03-25

    A sensitive and simple reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay has been validated for the determination of thymine as a measure of thymidine phosphorylase activity encapsulated in erythrocytes (EE-TP), a formulation which is under clinical development as an enzyme replacement therapy for the treatment of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). Diluted erythrocyte lysates were incubated in 100mM sodium phosphate buffer and 10mM thymidine at 37°C for 10min and the reaction stopped with 40% trichloroacetic acid. Following centrifugation, the supernatant was washed with water saturated diethyl ether, and injected onto a Spherisorb C(18) column (125mm×4.6mm, 5μm), with a mobile phase (40mM ammonium acetate, 5mM tetrabutyl ammonium hydrogen sulphate, pH 2.70) delivered at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min and run time of 8min. Ultraviolet detection (UV) was employed at 254nm. The method was linear in the range of 5-500nmol/ml (r(2)=0.992), specific with intra- and inter-day precisions of <9.6 and accuracies within ±20%. Limits of detection and quantification were 1.2nmol/ml and 10nmol/ml, respectively. The method was applied to quantify thymidine phosphorylase activity in samples of in-process controls and batches of EE-TP manufactured for clinical use. PMID:23291437

  8. Structural and mechanical study of the sintering effect in hydroxyapatite doped with iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filho, F. P.; Nogueira, R. E. F. Q.; Graça, M. P. F.; Valente, M. A.; Sombra, A. S. B.; Silva, C. C.

    2008-10-01

    Calcium phosphates are very important for applications in medicine due to their properties such as biocompatibility and bioactivity. In order to improve their properties, substitution of calcium with other ions has been proposed. Partial substitution of calcium by different ions has been made as a way to improve the properties of the calcium phosphates and also to allow new applications of apatites in medicine. In this work, hydroxyapatite [Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2-HAP], prepared by high-energy dry milling (20 h), was mixed with different amounts of iron oxide (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 wt%). The mixtures were calcinated at 900 °C for 5 h with a heating rate of 3 °C/min in an attempt to introduce the iron oxide in the HAP structure. Small discs (12.5 mm ∅) were uniaxially pressed under a load of 2 t for 2 min. The pellets were sintered at 1000, 1200 and 1300 °C for 5 h in air. The main purpose of this work is to study why the iron oxide concentration and the heat treatment of the samples change the microhardness of the obtained ceramics. The sintered samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers Microhardness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  9. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm3, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr2Se4 (V = 12.5 mm3), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  10. Optimal egg size in a suboptimal environment: reproductive ecology of female Sonora mud turtles (Kinosternon sonoriense) in central Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Madrak, Sheila V.; Drost, Charles A.; Monatesti, Anthony J.; Casper, Dennis; Znari, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    We studied the reproductive ecology of female Sonora mud turtles (Kinosternon sonoriense) at Montezuma Well, a chemically-challenging natural wetland in central Arizona, USA. Females matured between 115.5 and 125 mm carapace length (CL) and 36-54% produced eggs each year. Eggs were detected in X-radiographs from 23 April-28 September (2007-2008) and the highest proportion (56%) of adult females with eggs occurred in June and July. Clutch frequency was rarely more than once per year. Clutch size was weakly correlated with body size, ranged from 1-8 (mean = 4.96) and did not differ significantly between years. X-ray egg width ranged from 17.8-21.7 mm (mean 19.4 mm) and varied more among clutches than within. Mean X-ray egg width of a clutch did not vary significantly with CL of females, although X-ray pelvic aperture width increased with CL. We observed no evidence of a morphological constraint on egg width. In addition, greater variation in clutch size, relative to egg width, suggests that egg size is optimized in this hydrologically stable but chemically-challenging habitat. We suggest that the diversity of architectures exhibited by the turtle pelvis, and their associated lack of correspondence to taxonomic or behavioral groupings, explains some of the variation observed in egg size of turtles.

  11. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Owen Evans

    2011-10-13

    Under this program, Aspen Aerogels has developed an industrial insulation called Pyrogel HT, which is 4-5 times more thermally efficient than current non-aerogel technology. Derived from nanoporous silica aerogels, Pyrogel HT was specifically developed to address a high temperature capability gap not currently met with Aspen Aerogels{trademark} flagship product, Pyrogel XT. Pyrogel XT, which was originally developed on a separate DOE contract (DE-FG36-06GO16056), was primarily optimized for use in industrial steam processing systems, where application temperatures typically do not exceed 400 C. At the time, further improvements in thermal performance above 400 C could not be reasonably achieved for Pyrogel XT without significantly affecting other key material properties using the current technology. Cumulative sales of Pyrogel HT into domestic power plants should reach $125MM through 2030, eventually reaching about 10% of the total insulation market share in that space. Global energy savings would be expected to scale similarly. Over the same period, these sales would reduce domestic energy consumption by more than 65 TBtu. Upon branching out into all industrial processes in the 400 C-650 C regime, Pyrogel HT would reach annual sales levels of $150MM, with two-thirds of that being exported.

  12. Aerodynamic performance of a vibrating piezoelectric fan under varied operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, J.; Jeffers, N.

    2014-07-01

    This paper experimentally examines the bulk aerodynamic performance of a vibrating fan operating in the first mode of vibration. The influence of operating condition on the local velocity field has also been investigated to understand the flow distribution at the exit region and determine the stalling condition for vibrating fans. Fan motion has been generated and controlled using a piezoelectric ceramic attached to a stainless steel cantilever. The frequency and amplitude at resonance were 109.4 Hz and 12.5 mm, respectively. A test facility has been developed to measure the pressure-flow characteristics of the vibrating fan and simultaneously conduct local velocity field measurements using particle image velocimetry. The results demonstrate the impact of system characteristics on the local velocity field. High momentum regions generated due to the oscillating motion exist with a component direction that is tangent to the blade at maximum displacement. These high velocity zones are significantly affected by increasing impedance while flow reversal is a dominant feature at maximum pressure rise. The findings outlined provide useful information for design of thermal management solutions that may incorporate this air cooling approach.

  13. Steam/fuel system optimization report: 6000-tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Vakil, T.D.

    1983-07-01

    The design and configuration of the steam and fuel system for the 6000-ton-per-day (tpd) SRC-I Demonstration plant have been optimized, based on requirements for each area of the plant that were detailed in Area Baseline Designs of December 1982. The system was optimized primarily for the two most likely modes of plant operation, that is, when the expanded-bed hydrocracker (EBH) is operating at either high or low conversion, with all other units operating. However, the design, as such, is also operable under four other anticipated operating modes. The plant is self-sufficient in fuel except when the coker/calciner unit is not operating; then the required fuel oil import ranges from 80 to 125 MM Btu/h, lower heating value (LHV). The system affords stable operation under varying fuel gas availability and is reliable, flexible, and efficient. The optimization was based on maximizing overall efficiency of the steam system. The system was optimized to operate at five different steam-pressure levels, which are justifiable based on the plant's team requirements for process, heat duty, and power. All identified critical equipment drives will be run by steam turbines. Also part of the optimization was elimination of the steam evaporator in the wastewater treatment area. This minimized the impact on the steam system of operating in either the discharge of zero-discharge mode; the steam system remains essentially the same for either mode. Any further optimization efforts should be based on overall cost-effectiveness.

  14. Studying gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Azzopardi, Barry

    2013-11-01

    High-speed LIF-technique is applied to study gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with 161 mm width. Instantaneous distributions of film thickness resolved in both longitudinal and transverse coordinates were obtained with a frequency of 10 kHz and spatial resolution from 0.125 mm to 0.04 mm. Processes of generation of fast and slow ripples by disturbance waves are the same as described in literature for downwards annular pipe flow. Disturbance waves are often localized by transverse coordinate and may have curved or slanted fronts. Fast ripples, covering disturbance waves, are typically horseshoe-shaped and placed in staggered order. Their characteristic transverse size is of order 1 cm and it decreases with gas velocity. Entrainment of liquid from film surface can also be visualized. Mechanisms of ripple disruption, known as ``bag break-up'' and ``ligament break-up,'' were observed. Both mechanisms may occur on the same disturbance waves. Various scenarios of droplet deposition on the liquid film are observed, including the impact, slow sinking and bouncing, characterized by different outcome of secondary droplets or entrapped bubbles. Number and size of bubbles increase greatly inside the disturbance waves. Both quantities increase with gas and liquid flow rates. EPSRC Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1), and Roll-Royce UTC (Nottingham, for access to flow facility).

  15. Effect of Different Coarse Aggregate Sizes on the Strength Characteristics of Laterized Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Busari, A. O.

    2015-11-01

    The high cost of conventional concrete materials is a major factor affecting housing delivery in developing countries such as Nigeria. Since Nigeria is blessed with abundant locally available materials like laterite, researchers have conducted comprehensive studies on the use of laterite to replace river sand partially or fully in the concrete. However, the works did not consider the optimum use of coarse aggregate to possibly improve the strength of the laterized concrete, since it is normally lower than that of normal concrete. The results of the tests showed that workability, density and compressive strength at constant water-cement ratio increase with the increase in the coarse aggregate particle size and also with curing age. As the percentage of laterite increases, there was a reduction in all these characteristics even with the particle size of coarse aggregate reduction due to loss from the aggregate-paste interface zone. Also, when sand was replaced by 25% of laterite, the 19.5mm and 12.5mm coarse aggregate particle sizes gave satisfactory results in terms of workability and compressive strength respectively at 28 days of curing age, compared to normal concrete. However, in case of 50% up to 100% laterite contents, the workability and compressive strength values were very low.

  16. Influence of intrafraction motion on margins for prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberg, Dale W. . E-mail: litzen@umich.edu; Balter, James M.; Hadley, Scott W.; Sandler, Howard M.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Levine, Lisa

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of intrafraction intervention on margins for prostate radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven supine prostate patients with three implanted transponders were studied. The relative transponder positions were monitored for 8 min and combined with previously measured data on prostate position relative to skin marks. Margins were determined for situations of (1) skin-based positioning, and (2) pretreatment transponder positioning. Intratreatment intervention was simulated assuming conditions of (1) continuous tracking, and (2) a 3-mm threshold for position correction. Results: For skin-based setup without and with inclusion of intrafraction motion, prostate treatments would have required average margins of 8.0, 7.3, and 10.0 mm and 8.2, 10.2, and 12.5 mm, about the left-right, anterior-posterior, and cranial-caudal directions, respectively. Positioning by prostate markers at the start of the treatment fraction reduced these values to 1.8, 5.8, and 7.1 mm, respectively. Interbeam adjustment further reduced margins to an average of 1.4, 2.3, and 1.8 mm. Intrabeam adjustment yielded margins of 1.3, 1.5, and 1.5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Significant reductions in margins might be achieved by repositioning the patient before each beam, either radiographically or electromagnetically. However, 2 of the 11 patients would have benefited from continuous target tracking and threshold-based intervention.

  17. Comparison of objects detection capabilities in LWIR and THz ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marcin; Kastek, Mariusz; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-10-01

    Multispectral systems for detection of concealed dangerous objects are becoming more popular because of their higher effectiveness compared to mono-spectral systems. So far, the problem of detecting objects hidden under clothing was considered only in the case of airports but it is becoming more important for public places like metro stations, and government buildings. Exploration of new spectral bands as well as development of technology result in introduction of new solutions - both mono and multispectral. It has been proved that objects hidden under clothing can be detected and visualized using terahertz (THz) cameras. However, passive THz cameras still offer too low image resolution for objects recognition. Limited range is another issue of passive imagers. On the other hand new infrared cameras offer sufficient parameters to detect objects covered with fabrics in some conditions, as well as high image quality and big pixel resolutions. The purpose of the studies is to investigate and compare the possibilities of using passive cameras operating in long wavelength infrared (LWIR) and THz spectral ranges for detection of concealed objects. For the purpose of investigations, commercial imagers operating in 6.5-11.7 μm and 250GHz (1.25mm) were used. In the article, we present the measurement setup and the results of measurements in various operating conditions. Theoretical studies of both spectral bands focused on detection of objects with passive imagers are also presented.

  18. The Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 Cysteine-2/Histidine-2 Repressor-Like Transcription Factor Regulates Development and Tolerance to Salinity in Tomato and Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hichri, Imène; Muhovski, Yordan; Žižková, Eva; Dobrev, Petre I.; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Solano, Roberto; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Motyka, Vaclav; Lutts, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    The zinc finger superfamily includes transcription factors that regulate multiple aspects of plant development and were recently shown to regulate abiotic stress tolerance. Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 [SIZF2]) is a cysteine-2/histidine-2-type zinc finger transcription factor bearing an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression domain and binding to the ACGTCAGTG sequence containing two AGT core motifs. SlZF2 is ubiquitously expressed during plant development, and is rapidly induced by sodium chloride, drought, and potassium chloride treatments. Its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato impaired development and influenced leaf and flower shape, while causing a general stress visible by anthocyanin and malonyldialdehyde accumulation. SlZF2 enhanced salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis, whereas SlZF2 delayed senescence and improved tomato salt tolerance, particularly by maintaining photosynthesis and increasing polyamine biosynthesis, in salt-treated hydroponic cultures (125 mm sodium chloride, 20 d). SlZF2 may be involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis/signaling, because SlZF2 is rapidly induced by ABA treatment and 35S::SlZF2 tomatoes accumulate more ABA than wild-type plants. Transcriptome analysis of 35S::SlZF2 revealed that SlZF2 both increased and reduced expression of a comparable number of genes involved in various physiological processes such as photosynthesis, polyamine biosynthesis, and hormone (notably ABA) biosynthesis/signaling. Involvement of these different metabolic pathways in salt stress tolerance is discussed. PMID:24567191

  19. Clinical applications of CO2 lasers: clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinibaldi, Kenneth R.

    1994-09-01

    The most common surgery performed in our clinic with the CO2 laser is the cutting and vaporization of neoplasms associated with the head and neck, in particular, the squamous cell carcinoma in the cat. A majority of the tumors are malignant and 50% are metastatic at the time of presentation for surgery. Experience has taught us that early detection and removal with the CO2 laser affords the best prognosis. To date, roughly 100 cases have been treated with the CO2 laser. The success rate in the dog is not as rewarding as in the cat. Most cases were done with 5 - 10 watts of power continuous or pulsed wave, using a 125 mm or 50 mm handpiece. The laser beam was focused or defocused to adjust for cutting, vaporization, and coagulation. No post-op care of the wounds was recommended. Other small neoplasms in and around the ears, head, and neck can also be removed easily with the CO2 laser.

  20. Efficient and sensitive detection of residues of nine coccidiostats in egg and muscle by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dubois, M; Pierret, G; Delahaut, Ph

    2004-12-25

    We present a method based on electrospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for determining in muscle and eggs the following nine coccidiostats: halofuginone, diclazuril, dinitrocarbanilide (the main metabolite of nicarbazin), robenidine, monensin, lasalocid, narasin, salinomycin, and maduramicin. Dinitrocarbanilide-d8, nigericin, and diclazuril-bis were used as internal standards. The method uses extraction in acetonitrile followed by a clean-up on an SiOH solid-phase extraction column. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation was performed on a Purospher C(18) column (125 mm x 3 mm i.d.) protected by a guard column, the mobile phase being a water-acetonitrile gradient (each gradient component containing 0.1% formic acid) at a flow rate of 1 ml min(-1). For unequivocal identification of each analyte, two ions were detected and chosen for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Validation was carried out on spiked muscle and egg samples. The method described meets all the criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC and is easy to use in routine analysis. Validation results are presented with the measured CCalpha and CCbeta values. This whole method allows extraction and analysis of up to 24 samples per day. PMID:15556532

  1. Active imaging lens with real-time variable resolution and constant field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Jocelyn; Thibault, Simon

    2010-08-01

    We present a lens with a constant total field of view and real-time variable resolution in certain zones of interest. This smart imaging lens uses an active optical element to modify as desired the local distortion. This way, while keeping the total field of view constant, the resolution can be increased in a zone of interest, at the expense of decreasing it somewhere in the remaining part of the field of view. We first present the concept of this lens, using a deformable mirror as the active surface. Computer simulations are done with Zemax in which a magnifying power of 2 in a zone of interest representing 10% of the full field of view is achieved, using a f=12.5 mm lens and a F/# of 18. Different combinations of theses parameters would allow different performances and results. We then present experimental results of this lens with a prototype built using a ferrofluidic deformable mirror as the active element. Experimental results of a zone of increased resolution with a magnification of 1.32 and a zone of decreased resolution with a magnification of 0.80 are obtained.

  2. Gyrotron experiments employing a field emission array cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Garven, M.; Cooke, S.J.; Cross, A.W.; Phelps, A.D.R.; Spark, S.N.

    1995-12-31

    The design and operation of a field emission array (FEA) cathode for a millimeter wave gyrotron are presented. The FEA chip employed achieved 10mA reproducibly while operating in the environment of a gyrotron, namely in a vacuum of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mbar at voltages of up to 40kV. New methods are presented of mounting such FEA chips involving the shielding of the micron devices from voltages of up to 40kV, as experienced in a microwave device. The design parameters of the FEA gun were similar to those of a magnetron injection gun with cathode radius 12.5mm and slope angle 4{degree}. An electron beam current of up to 100mA was achievable from the FEA gyrotron cathode. An electrically isolated, fiber-optic, 10-channel control unit was developed to allow individual control of each chip. Electron beam powers of {approximately} 1kW were measured from the FEA cathode. To obtain oscillation, cavity inserts were employed in the electron beam-microwave interaction region to increase the cavity quality factor. Results are presented which verify the gyrotron interaction from the novel FEA cathode.

  3. Debris cloud characterization at impact velocities of 5 to 11 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Boslough, M.B.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    A series of experiments has been performed on the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher to impact a 1.25-mm thick aluminum bumper by an aluminum flier plate 17-mm diameter by 0.92-mm thick over the velocity range of 5 km/s to 11 km/s. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact. The shape of the debris cloud is found to depend on the flier plate tilt. Generally -- the data indicate a central core of higher density surrounded by a diffused layer. These experiments allow measurements of debris cloud expansion velocities as the material undergoes a phase change from solid fragments at impact velocities of 5 km/s to a mixture of liquid and vapor phase at higher impact velocities. The expansion velocity of the debris cloud increases with increasing impact velocity, with the high-density leading edge traveling faster than the impact velocity. There is a difference between the X-ray and photographic measurements of expansion velocities at higher impact velocities. This is believed to be due to the presence of very low-density vapor in the photographic records that are not detecting using X-ray techniques.

  4. Multidisciplinary management of the airway in a trauma-induced brain injury patient.

    PubMed

    Conaway, Jacques R; Scherr, Steven C

    2004-09-01

    Laryngomalacia occurs in some brain injury patients secondary to global muscle hypotonia. Surgical therapies for epiglottis prolapse have centered around removal or reshaping of the epiglottis. This approach has brought mixed success and frequent complications. We present a case that demonstrates successful nonsurgical treatment of a 33-year-old male brain injury patient with moderate obstructive sleep apnea that is believed to be a consequence of post-brain injury nocturnal epiglottis prolapse. The presence of a tracheostomy performed at the time of emergency surgery had become an emotional and physical barrier to our patient's recovery. The tracheostomy could only be reversed if the obstructive sleep apnea disorder could be managed in an alternative fashion. A titratable mandibular repositioning appliance was prescribed and its effectiveness was demonstrated with nasolaryngoscopy and polysomnography. After initially fitting the oral appliance, a period of accommodation and gradual protrusive adjustments was allowed. Subsequent confirmation polysomnography demonstrated improvement, but not suitable resolution, of disordered breathing events. However, an additional 1.25-mm protrusive titration of the oral appliance during the course of the confirmation polysomnogram led to therapeutic success. The patient's tracheostomy was subsequently reversed with significant quality of life benefits. PMID:15389392

  5. A Hemispherical Sparse Phased Array Design For Low Frequency Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Applications Without Skull-Specific Phase Aberration Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiangtao; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    A sparse large-element hemispherical phased array scheme was investigated for low frequency transcranial focused ultrasound applications without skull-specific phase aberration correction. The simulated transcranial focused beams in brain from the randomly distributed sparse array elements (0.25 MHz, 125 mm radius of curvature, 250 mm diameter, 50% sparsity of 953 square elements of 10 mm spacing) could be steered without skull specific aberration correction at 0.25 MHz. The 28 foci were on average 1.7±1.2 mm shifted from their intended locations. The average -3 dB beam width and length were 3.3±1.2 mm and 6.3±2.2 mm, respectively. The sidelobe levels ranged from 28% to 62% of the peak pressure values. The focal beam was steerable 35 mm laterally away from the transducer center axis and 30 mm axially in the transducer center axis when the sidelobe pressure values were 50% of or less than the peak pressure values. This allows the array to be mechanically aimed to one quarter of the brain and then electronically steered. The sparse array design offers a tradeoff between the best beam steering range and the manageable number of elements for a practical clinical system.

  6. Role of the buffer at the interface of intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H on amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanying; Shen, Leilei; Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Jinning; Liu, Yucheng; Liu, Zhengxin

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the influence of the different buffer at the interface between the intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H layers on amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells performance. It is demonstrated that the ultrathin buffer at interface of intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H, obtained by H-rich plasma treatment on the initial intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layer, can significantly enhance the minority carrier lifetime and decrease the emitter saturation current density. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses indicate that the initial intrinsic a-Si:H films become dense and less defected as a result of the relaxation and reconstruction when they are treated during the H-rich plasma environment. Based on this finding combined with the optimization of surface texturization of the silicon wafer, this work allows us to reach very high Voc values over 730 mV without losses on fill factor, the 100 μm, 125 × 125 mm2 SHJ solar cells were fabricated with industry-compatible process, yielding the efficiency up to 22.5%.

  7. Transcostal high-intensity-focused ultrasound: ex vivo adaptive focusing feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Marquet, Fabrice; Tanter, Mickaël; Fink, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    Ex vivo experiments have been conducted through excised pork rib with bone, cartilage, muscle and skin. The aberrating effect of the ribcage has been experimentally evaluated. Adaptive ultrasonic focusing through ribs has been studied at low power. Without any correction, the pressure fields in the focal plane were both affected by inhomogeneous attenuation and phase distortion and three main effects were observed: a mean 2 mm shift of the main lobe, a mean 1.25 mm spreading of the half width of the main lobe and up to 20 dB increase of the secondary lobe level. Thanks to time reversal focusing, a 5-dB decrease in the secondary lobes was obtained and the ratio between the energy deposited at the target location and the total amount of energy emitted by the therapeutic array was 6 times higher than without correction. Time reversal minimizes the heating of the ribs by automatically sonicating between the ribs, as demonstrated by temperature measurements using thermocouples placed at different location on the ribcage. It is also discussed how this aberration correction process could be achieved non invasively for clinical application. PMID:18475006

  8. Measurement of enhanced heat transfer coefficient with perforated twisted tape inserts during condensation of R-245fa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, A. K.; Kumar, P.; Singh, H. N.; Kumar, R.

    2016-04-01

    The experimental conductive heat transfer results for flow through inserted perforated twisted tapes in a horizontal tube during condensation of pure R-245fa vapor. The test section consisting of two separate coaxial double pipes assembled in series, acted like a counter flow heat exchanger, where the refrigerant condensed inside the inner tube by rejecting heat to the cooling water flowing inside the outer tube in reversed direction. Data for three perforated twisted tapes having constant twist ratio of 7.1 mm and pitch of perforation as 12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 mm, inserted one by one in full length of test condenser by varying refrigerant mass flux from 100 to 200 kg/m2 s in steps of 50 kg/m2 s for the range of vapor quality from 0.1 to 0.9, were collected together with flow and without insert (plain tube). It has been found that the perforated twisted tape insert having pitch of perforation equal to in order of 12.5 mm gives the highest value of average heat transfer coefficient and is of the order of 37.5 % more than that of the plain one and the correlation predicts the experimental data within an error band of ±15 %.

  9. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  10. Investigation of MMOD Impact on STS-115 Shuttle Payload Bay Door Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.; Lear, D.; Kerr, J.; Lyons, F.; Yasensky, J.

    2007-01-01

    The Orbiter radiator system consists of eight individual 4.6 m x 3.2 m panels located with four on each payload bay door. Forward panels #1 and #2 are 2.3 cm thick while the aft panels #3 and #4 have a smaller overall thickness of 1.3 cm. The honeycomb radiator panels consist of 0.028 cm thick Aluminum 2024-T81 facesheets and Al5056-H39 cores. The face-sheets are topped with 0.005 in. (0.127 mm) silver-Teflon tape. The radiators are located on the inside of the shuttle payload bay doors, which are closed during ascent and reentry, limiting damage to the on-orbit portion of the mission. Post-flight inspections at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) following the STS-115 mission revealed a large micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) impact near the hinge line on the #4 starboard payload bay door radiator panel. The features of this impact make it the largest ever recorded on an orbiter payload bay door radiator. The general location of the damage site and the adjacent radiator panels can be seen in Figure 2. Initial measurements of the defect indicated that the hole in the facesheet was 0.108 in. (2.74 mm) in diameter. Figure 3 shows an image of the front side damage. Subsequent observations revealed exit damage on the rear facesheet. Impact damage features on the rear facesheet included a 0.03 in. diameter hole (0.76 mm), a approx.0.05 in. tall bulge (approx.1.3 mm), and a larger approx.0.2 in. tall bulge (approx.5.1 mm) that exhibited a crack over 0.27 in. (6.8 mm) long. A large approx.1 in. (25 mm) diameter region of the honeycomb core was also damaged. Refer to Figure 4 for an image of the backside damage to the panel. No damage was found on thermal blankets or payload bay door structure under the radiator panel. Figure 5 shows the front facesheet with the thermal tape removed. Ultrasound examination indicated a maximum facesheet debond extent of approximately 1 in. (25 mm) from the entry hole. X-ray examinations revealed damage to an estimated 31 honeycomb cells with an extent of 0.85 in. x 1.1 in. (21.6 x 27.9 mm). Pieces of the radiator at and surrounding the impact site were recovered during the repair procedures at KSC. They included the thermal tape, front facesheet, honeycomb core, and rear facesheet. These articles were examined at JSC using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS). Figure 6 shows SEM images of the entry hole in the facesheet. The asymmetric height of the lip may be attributed to projectile shape and impact angle. Numerous instances of a glass-fiber organic matrix composite were observed in the facesheet tape sample. The fibers were approximately 10 micrometers in diameter and variable lengths. EDS analysis indicated a composition of Mg, Ca, Al, Si, and O. Figures 7 and 8 present images of the fiber bundles, which were believed to be circuit board material based on similarity in fiber diameter, orientation, consistency, and composition. A test program was initiated in an attempt to simulate the observed damage to the radiator facesheet and honeycomb. Twelve test shots were performed using projectiles cut from a 1.6 mm thick fiberglass circuit board substrate panel. Results from test HITF07017, shown in figures 9 and 10, correlates with the observed impact features reasonably well. The test was performed at 4.14 km/sec with an impact angle of 45 degrees using a cylindrical projectile with a diameter and length of 1.25 mm. The fiberglass circuit board material had a density of 1.65 g/cu cm, giving a projectile mass of 2.53 mg. An analysis was performed using the Bumper code to estimate the probability of impact to the shuttle from a 1.25 mm diameter particle. Table 1 shows a 1.6% chance (impact odds = 1 in 62) of a 1.25 mm or larger MMOD impact on the radiators of the vehicle during a typical ISS mission. There is a 0.4% chance (impact odds = 1 in 260) that a 1.25 mm or larger MMOD particle would impact the RCC wing leading edge and nose cap during a typical miion. Figure 11 illustrates the vulnerable areas of the wing leading edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC), an area of the vehicle that is very sensitive to impact damage. The highlighted red, orange, yellow, and light green areas would be expected to experience critical damage if impacted by an OD particle such as the one that hit the RH4 radiator panel on STS-115.

  11. Pushing spatial and temporal resolution for functional and diffusion MRI in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil; Xu, Junqian; Auerbach, Edward J.; Moeller, Steen; Vu, An; Duarte-Carvajalino, Julio M.; Lenglet, Christophe; Wu, Xiaoping; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre Francois; Strupp, John; Sapiro, Guillermo; De Martino, Federico; Wang, Dingxin; Harel, Noam; Garwood, Michael; Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David A.; Smith, Stephen M.; Miller, Karla L.; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Jbabdi, Saad; Andersson, Jesper L; Behrens, Timothy EJ; Glasser, Matthew F.; Van Essen, David; Yacoub, Essa

    2013-01-01

    The human connectome project (HCP) relies primarily on three complementary magnetic resonance (MR) methods. These are: 1) resting state functional MR imaging (rfMRI) which uses correlations in the temporal fluctuations in an fMRI time series to deduce ‘functional connectivity’; 2) diffusion imaging (dMRI), which provides the input for tractography algorithms used for the reconstruction of the complex axonal fiber architecture; and 3) task based fMRI (tfMRI), which is employed to identify functional parcellation in the human brain in order to assist analyses of data obtained with the first two methods. We describe technical improvements and optimization of these methods as well as instrumental choices that impact speed of acquisition of fMRI and dMRI images at 3 Tesla, leading to whole brain coverage with 2 mm isotropic resolution in 0.7 second for fMRI, and 1.25 mm isotropic resolution dMRI data for tractography analysis with three-fold reduction in total data acquisition time. Ongoing technical developments and optimization for acquisition of similar data at 7 Tesla magnetic field are also presented, targeting higher resolution, specificity of functional imaging signals, mitigation of the inhomogeneous radio frequency (RF) fields and power deposition. Results demonstrate that overall, these approaches represent a significant advance in MR imaging of the human brain to investigate brain function and structure. PMID:23702417

  12. Cryogenic Testing of Different Seam Concepts for Multilayer Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent testing in a cylindrical, comparative cryostat at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory has focused on various seam concepts for multilayer insulation systems. Three main types of seams were investigated: straight overlap, fold-over, and roll wrapped. Each blanket was comprised of 40 layer pairs of reflector and spacer materials. The total thickness was approximately 12.5-mm, giving an average layer density of 32 layers per centimeter. The blankets were tested at high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum using liquid nitrogen to maintain the cold boundary temperature at 77 K. Test results show that all three seam concepts are all close in thermal performance; however the fold-over method provides the lowest heat flux. For the first series of tests, seams were located 120 degrees around the circumference of the cryostat from the previous seam. This technique appears to have lessened the degradation of the blanket due to the seams. In a follow-on test, a 20 layer blanket was tested in a roll wrapped configuration and then cut down the side of the cylinder, taped together, and re-tested. This test result shows the thermal performance impact of having the seams all in one location versus having the seams clocked around the vessel. This experimental investigation indicates that the method of joining the seams in multilayer insulation systems is not as critical as the quality of the installation process.

  13. ANTIBACTERIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF ZALEYA PENTANDRA.

    PubMed

    Samina, Afzal; Bashir Ahmad, Chaudhry; Javaria, Saeed; Khurram, Afzal; Bilal, Ahmed; Muhammad Imran, Qadiri

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial and antioxidant activity of methanolic extract of Zaleya pentandra. It inhibited the growth of S. typhi, with zone of inhibition 13 mm at concentration 3 mg/100 µL and 11 mm at concentration 1.5 mg/100 µL. It also showed zone of inhibition against S. aureus with 17.5 mm and 12.5 mm at concentration 3 mg/100 µL in comparison to erythromycin with 15.6 mm. It showed 73% radical scavenging at concentration 161 µL/mL. The extract was fractioned by column chromatography using eluents (chloroform:methanol:H₂O). The isolation and purification afforded amorphous solid which was subjected to physical, chemical and spectral techniques UV, IR, ¹H-NMR, ¹³C-NMR and HREI-MS for the structure elucidation of the isolated compound. The compound was named pentandraol. From the present study, it was concluded that the methanolic extract of Zaleya pentandra has antibacterial and antioxidant activity and contains a novel compound named as pentandraol. PMID:27008809

  14. Enhanced biomethane potential from wheat straw by low temperature alkaline calcium hydroxide pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Matthew; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan

    2015-08-01

    A factorially designed experiment to examine the effectiveness of Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment, enzyme addition and particle size, on the mesophilic (35 °C) anaerobic digestion of wheat straw was conducted. Experiments used a 48 h pre-treatment with Ca(OH)2 7.4% (w/w), addition of Accellerase®-1500, with four particle sizes of wheat straw (1.25, 2, 3 and 10mm) and three digestion time periods (5, 15 and 30 days). By combining particle size reduction and Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment, the average methane potential was increased by 315% (from 48 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1) to 202 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1)) after 5 days of anaerobic digestion compared to the control. Enzyme addition or Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment with 3, 2 and 1.25 mm particle sizes had 30-day batch yields of between 301 and 335 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1). Alkali pre-treatment of 3mm straw was shown to have the most potential as a cost effective pre-treatment and achieved 290 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1), after only 15 days of digestion. PMID:25898087

  15. Development of a Compact Rectenna for Wireless Powering of a Head-Mountable Deep Brain Stimulation Device.

    PubMed

    Hosain, M D Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Abulseoud, Osama A; Amiet, Andrew; Galehdar, Amir; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Design of a rectangular spiral planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) at 915 MHz for wireless power transmission applications is proposed. The antenna and rectifying circuitry form a rectenna, which can produce dc power from a distant radio frequency energy transmitter. The generated dc power is used to operate a low-power deep brain stimulation pulse generator. The proposed antenna has the dimensions of 10 mm [Formula: see text]12.5 mm [Formula: see text]1.5 mm and resonance frequency of 915 MHz with a measured bandwidth of 15 MHz at return loss of [Formula: see text]. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] with thickness of 1.5 mm is used for both antenna and rectifier circuit simulation and fabrication because of its availability and low cost. An L-section impedance matching circuit is used between the PIFA and voltage doubler rectifier. The impedance matching circuit also works as a low-pass filter for elimination of higher order harmonics. Maximum dc voltage at the rectenna output is 7.5 V in free space and this rectenna can drive a deep brain stimulation pulse generator at a distance of 30 cm from a radio frequency energy transmitter, which transmits power of 26.77 dBm. PMID:27170863

  16. Optimizing probe design for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Michael J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop an implantable optical perfusion and oxygenation sensor, based on multiwavelength reflectance pulse oximetry, we investigate the effect of source detector separation and other source-detector characteristics to optimize the sensor s signal to background ratio using Monte Carlo (MC) based simulations and in vitro phantom studies. Separations in the range 0.45 to 1.25 mm were found to be optimal in the case of a point source. The numerical aperture (NA) of the source had no effect on the collected signal while the widening of the source spatial profile caused a shift in the optimal source-detector separation. Specifically, for a 4.5 mm flat beam and a 2.4 mm 2.5 mm photodetector, the optimal performance was found to be when the source and detector are adjacent to each other. These modeling results were confirmed by data collected from in vitro experiments on a liver phantom perfused with dye solutions mimicking the absorption properties of hemoglobin for different oxygenation states.

  17. An Intrinsic Fiber-Optic Single Loop Micro-Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rios, Alejandro; Monzon-Hernandez, David; Torres-Gomez, Ismael; Salceda-Delgado, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    A micro-displacement sensor consisting of a fiber-loop made with a tapered fiber is reported. The sensor operation is based on the interaction between the fundamental cladding mode propagating through the taper waist and higher order cladding modes excited when the taper is deformed to form a loop. As a result, a transmission spectrum with several notches is observed, where the notch wavelength resonances shift as a function of the loop diameter. The loop diameter is varied by the spatial displacement of one end of the fiber-loop attached to a linear translation stage. In a displacement range of 3.125 mm the maximum wavelength shift is 360.93 nm, with 0.116 nm/μm sensitivity. By using a 1,280 nm broadband low-power LED source and a single Ge-photodetector in a power transmission sensor setup, a sensitivity in the order of 2.7 nW/μm is obtained in ∼1 mm range. The proposed sensor is easy to implement and has a plenty of room to improve its performance. PMID:22368477

  18. Low cost corrosion damage mitigation and improved fatigue performance of low plasticity burnished 7075-T6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevéy, Paul S.; Cammett, John

    2001-10-01

    Low plasticity burnishing (LPB) has been investigated as a surface enhancement process and corrosion mitigation method for aging aircraft structural applications. Compressive residual stresses reaching the alloy yield strength and extending to a depth of 1.25 mm (0.050 in.) deeper than typical corrosion damage is achievable. Excellent surface finish can be achieved with no detectable metallurgical damage to surface and subsurface material. Salt fog exposures of 100 and 500 h reduced the fatigue strength at 2×106 cycles by 50%. The LPB of the corroded surface, without removal of the corrosion product or pitted material, restored the 2×106 fatigue strength to greater than that of the original machined surface. The fatigue strength of the corroded material in the finite life regime (104 to 106 cycles) after LPB was 140 MPa (20 ksi) higher than the original uncorroded alloy and increased the life by an order of magnitude. Ease of adaptation to computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools allows LPB processing at costs and speeds comparable to machining operations. Low plasticity burnishing offers a promising new technology for mitigation of corrosion damage and improved fatigue life of aircraft structural components with significant cost and time savings over current practices.

  19. Suture Forces in Undersized Mitral Annuloplasty: Novel Device and Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Andrew; Pierce, Eric; Lee, Madonna; Jensen, Morten; Aoki, Chikashi; Takebayashi, Satoshi; Gorman, Robert; Gorman, Joseph; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Demonstrate the first use of a novel technology for quantifying suture forces on annuloplasty rings to better understand the mechanisms of ring dehiscence. Description: Force transducers were developed, attached to a size 24 Physio™ ring, and implanted in the mitral annulus of an ovine animal. Ring suture forces were measured after implantation and for cardiac cycles reaching peak left ventricular pressures (LVP) of 100, 125, and 150 mmHg. Evaluation: After implanting the undersized ring to the flaccid annulus, the mean suture force was 2.0±0.6 N. During cyclic contraction, anterior ring suture forces were greater than posterior ring suture forces at peak LVPs of 100 mmHg (4.9±2.0 N vs. 2.1±1.1 N), 125 mmHg (5.4±2.3 N vs. 2.3±1.2 N), and 150 mmHg (5.7±2.4 N vs. 2.4±1.1 N). The largest force was 7.4 N at 150 mmHg. Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrate trends in annuloplasty suture forces and their variation with location and LVP. Future studies will significantly contribute to clinical knowledge by elucidating the mechanisms of ring dehiscence while improving annuloplasty ring design and surgical repair techniques. PMID:24996707

  20. The design of Cu-doped ZnO thermoelectric module (simulation study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Syamsul; Suratwan, Agus; Kurniawan, Agus; Budiana, Eko Prasetya; Suyitno

    2016-03-01

    The p-type semiconductor of Cu-doped ZnO-based thermoelectric material has already been synthesized and studied as an energy harvester. The next challenge is manufacturing the thermoelectric module in the development of thermoelectric as an eco-friendly material in the future. This research aims to investigate the effect of thermoelectric geometric design on the electrical output power and voltage and to recommend the most appropriate thermoelectric geometric design. The design of thermoelectric generator (TEG) includes the determinations of dimension (width, length, and height), number of modules, and semiconductor materials. The simulation used the coupled-field analysis of ANSYS APDL 14.5 in the steady state condition. The p- and n- type thermoelectric material used Cu-doped ZnO and Al-doped ZnO, respectively. The width of element and the number of thermoelectric module were varied to obtain a thermoelectric design, which produces the largest current, power, and voltage. The result of research shows that the t hermoelectric generator with the element widths of 0.94 mm, 1.125 mm, 1.05 mm, and 1.2 mm generates the largest power output and voltage, namely: 0.32 W and 0.89 V, 0.38 W and 0.98 V, 0.45 W and 1.06 V, and 0.52 W and 1.13 V, respectively.

  1. Widespread potential for microbial MTBE degradation in surface-water sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2001-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to stream and lake bed sediments, collected from 11 sites throughout the United States, demonstrated significant mineralization of the fuel oxygenate, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Mineralization of [U-14C]MTBE to 14CO2 ranged from 15 to 66% over 50 days and did not differ significantly between sediments collected from MTBE contaminated sites and from sites with no history of MTBE exposure. This result suggests that even the microbial communities indigenous to newly contaminated surface water systems will exhibit some innate ability to attenuate MTBE under aerobic conditions. The magnitude of MTBE mineralization was related to the sediment grain size distribution. A pronounced, inverse correlation (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.73) was observed between the final recovery of 14CO2 and the percentage content of silt and clay sized grains (grain diameter < 0.125 mm). The results of this study indicate that the microorganisms that inhabit the bed sediments of streams and lakes can degrade MTBE efficiently and that this capability is widespread in the environment. Thus aerobic bed sediment microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE in surface water systems throughout the United States and may contribute to the reported transience of MTBE in some surface waters.

  2. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth {le}9 {Angstrom} in the soft x-ray region below 21 {Angstrom}. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 {Angstrom}), two 114 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 {Angstrom}) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from FethinspXVII{endash}XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. The effect of chemical agents on the turnover of the bound phosphate associated with the sodium-and-potassium ion-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase in ox brain microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Rodnight, R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effect of chemical agents on the turnover of the Na+-dependent bound phosphate and the simultaneous Na+-dependent hydrolysis of ATP by a membrane preparation from ox brain was studied at an ATP/protein ratio of 12.5pmol/μg. 2. The agents were added immediately after phosphorylation of the preparation in a medium containing 50mm-sodium chloride and 2.5μm-[γ-32P]ATP. 3. Concentrations of sodium chloride above 150mm, calcium chloride to 20mm and suramin to 1.4mm inhibited both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation and concomitantly slowed ATP hydrolysis. At 125mm-sodium chloride dephosphorylation and hydrolysis were slightly slowed without affecting phosphorylation. 4. Ethanol to 1.6m concentration inhibited dephosphorylation without affecting phosphorylation; the bound phosphate was increased and ATP hydrolysis slowed. 5. Ouabain to 4mm concentration partially inhibited ATP hydrolysis and caused a transient (1–2s) rise in bound phosphate followed by a rapid fall to a lower plateau value, which eventually declined to zero by the time ATP hydrolysis was complete. 6. Of the detergents examined Lubrol W, Triton X-100 and sodium deoxycholate had no significant effect on turnover. Sodium dodecyl sulphate and sodium decyl sulphate to 3.5mm and 20mm respectively completely inhibited turnover and ATP hydrolysis and stabilized the bound phosphate. PMID:4250238

  4. [Plausible solution to prevent major amputation in diabetic foot patients].

    PubMed

    Laginja, Stanislava; Seremet, Jasmina; Spehar, Branka; Marinović, Marin

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading public health problems in the world. Complications of diabetes mellitus include cardiovascular diseases, retinopathy, neuropathy and diabetic foot, which can in turn lead to lower extremity amputations. This is the main cause of mortality and the biggest expenditure for health system. Treatment is long and frustrating for the patient and also for medical staff. Amputations are becoming more frequent, while the quality of life after amputation is greatly reduced. Healing of postoperative infection is long lasting and demands a lot of hard work from the surgeon and the rest of medical staff, while causing severe suffering for the patient. Progression of infection increases mortality. Negative pressure therapy after minor foot amputations greatly reduces healing time. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was applied after surgical treatment. All necrotic tissue and fibrin deposits were removed. Initial therapy was administered continuously with 125 mm Hg of vacuum. The NPWT was continued intermittently. Additionally, all patients underwent additional hyperbaric treatment and local hemoglobin administration. In conclusion, in all cases presented, combined NPWT, hyperbaric and topical hemoglobin therapy proved to be a highly effective therapeutic option in preventing pending major amputation following minor diabetic foot amputation. PMID:25326996

  5. Antireflection properties and solar cell application of silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huihui, Yue; Rui, Jia; Chen, Chen; Wuchang, Ding; Deqi, Wu; Xinyu, Liu

    2011-08-01

    Silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs) are fabricated on polished pyramids of textured Si using an aqueous chemical etching method. The silicon nanowires themselves or hybrid structures of nanowires and pyramids both show strong anti-reflectance abilities in the wavelength region of 300-1000 nm, and reflectances of 2.52% and less than 8% are achieved, respectively. A 12.45% SiNWAs-textured solar cell (SC) with a short circuit current of 34.82 mA/cm2 and open circuit voltage (Voc) of 594 mV was fabricated on 125 × 125 mm2 Si using a conventional process including metal grid printing. It is revealed that passivation is essential for hybrid structure textured SCs, and Voc can be enlarged by 28.6% from 420 V to 560 mV after the passivation layer is deposited. The loss mechanism of SiNWA SC was investigated in detail by systematic comparison of the basic parameters and external quantum efficiency (EQE)of samples with different fabrication processes. It is proved that surface passivation and fabrication of a metal grid are critical for high efficiency SiNWA SC, and the performance of SiNWA SC could be improved when fabricated on a substrate with an initial PN junction.

  6. Computational micromechanical analysis of the representative volume element of bituminous composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Hasan; Ghauch, Ziad G.; Dhasmana, Heena; Al-Qadi, Imad L.

    2016-03-01

    Micromechanical computational modeling is used in this study to determine the smallest domain, or Representative Volume Element (RVE), that can be used to characterize the effective properties of composite materials such as Asphalt Concrete (AC). Computational Finite Element (FE) micromechanical modeling was coupled with digital image analysis of surface scans of AC specimens. Three mixtures with varying Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size (NMAS) of 4.75 mm, 12.5 mm, and 25 mm, were prepared for digital image analysis and computational micromechanical modeling. The effects of window size and phase modulus mismatch on the apparent viscoelastic response of the composite were numerically examined. A good agreement was observed in the RVE size predictions based on micromechanical computational modeling and image analysis. Micromechanical results indicated that a degradation in the matrix stiffness increases the corresponding RVE size. Statistical homogeneity was observed for window sizes equal to two to three times the NMAS. A model was presented for relating the degree of statistical homogeneity associated with each window size for materials with varying inclusion dimensions.

  7. Size characteristics of stones ingested by common loons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hansen, S.P.; Pokras, M.A.; Miconi, R.

    2001-01-01

    Common Loon (Gavia immer) carcasses recovered in New England had more stones of greater combined mass in their stomachs than loons from the southeastern United States. Stones retained in sieves with mesh sizes between 4.75 and 8.00 mm accounted for the greatest percentage (by mass) of grit in loon stomachs. The median longest dimension of the largest single stone in each stomach was 12.5 mm in loons from New England and 10.7 mm in loons from the southeast (maximum = 23.1 mm and 16.8 mm, respectively). A recent national proposal to restrict the use of certain fishing weights in the United States called for a ban on lead fishing sinkers of 25.4 mm or less in any dimension. Our findings suggest it is unlikely that Common Loons would ingest lead fishing weights greater than 25.4 mm in any dimension, if such ingestion was solely the result of their search for replacement stones for their stomachs. However, this does not preclude the possibility that loons may ingest larger fishing weights under other circumstances, such as the consumption of fish with attached sinkers.

  8. Quantifying the transport of energetic materials in unsaturated sediments from cracked unexploded ordnance.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Martel, Richard; Trépanier, Luc; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved explosive species have been found in the groundwater under military training areas. These explosives are thought to originate from munitions although the mechanism of transport to the groundwater is poorly understood. This study was conducted to determine whether ruptured unexploded ordnance may be a viable source term for these explosives. The rupturing effect of one 81 mm-mortar exploding in close proximity to another 81-mm mortar was observed and the resulting contaminants were collected. These contaminants were then subjected to leaching experiments on repacked, jack drill compacted unsaturated sediment columns in a climate controlled laboratory. The mortars which were exposed to nearby explosions were shown to be susceptible to rupturing rather than sympathetically detonating under certain conditions. The ruptured mortars released up to 166+/-2 g of pulverized explosive residues (largely Composition B) and the results from the subsequent leaching tests showed that this explosive residue is highly mobile in unsaturated sandy soil. Up to 4.45+/-1.00 g of dissolved explosive contamination was transported through the unsaturated soil columns during the first year of infiltration. The results indicate the mass of transported explosive residue dissolved in the leachate was primarily caused by the preferential dissolution of explosive contaminants having a grain size under 0.125 mm. Surface or near-surface unexploded ordnance (UXO) on live fire ranges may therefore be significant sources of explosive environmental contamination after they have been exposed to other rounds which explode nearby. PMID:19875778

  9. Fischer-Tropsch reaction studies with supported ruthenium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.C.; Mulder, H. )

    1993-09-01

    An investigation was undertaken to examine the production of low molecular weight alkenes (C[sub 2][sup =] to C[sup =][sub 4]) and high molecular weight hydrocarbons (C[sub 5]+) from synthesis gas in a fixed bed reactor with supported ruthenium catalyst. The catalyst used consisted of 0.5% ruthenium on gamma-alumina with a 43% metal dispersion. An experimental reactor consisting of a single 12.5-mm-diameter stainless-steel tube with catalyst packings up to 1 m long, surrounded by an aluminium block with heating elements and an outer insulating ceramic block was used. The effect of temperature, synthesis gas composition (CO/H[sub 2]), weight hourly space velocity (WHSV), and bed length on carbon monoxide conversion and selectivity was examined and results are reported. The presence of secondary reactions consisting of hydrogenation and chain growth involving alkenes along the reactor bed was observed. These reactions favour the formation of alkanes and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. The alkene to alkane ratio in the product can be increased by restricting the hydrogenation reaction with the use of a synthesis gas mixture with a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio.

  10. Hydrophone arrays for instantaneous measurement of high-pressure acoustic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2010-03-01

    Electrohydraulic lithotripter acoustic fields are measured with single-element hydrophones even though the acoustic fields are not highly repeatable. The ability to obtain an instantaneous "snapshot" of the sound field would have broad implications for advancing the understanding of how lithotripters fragment stones and damage kidney tissue. To better characterize the acoustic field of lithotripters, linear hydrophone arrays were fabricated by bonding a 9 μm piezopolymer film to a copper-clad polyimide which had an array pattern etched on the copper layer. After bonding, the devices were backed with an epoxy plug in order to provide structural support. The array elements were each 0.5 by 0.5 mm, spaced 1.25 mm center to center, and there were 20 elements. The relative sensitivity of each hydrophone element was measured at 5.25 MHz for an acoustic pressure of 4.5 kPa and the elements were found to vary by ≈ 6%. The arrays were then placed in the focus of a piezoelectric lithotripter and were found to maintain their sensitivity for roughly 500 shock waves before gradually losing sensitivity.

  11. Alternative method to treat oroantral communication and fistula with autogenous bone graft and platelet rich firbin

    PubMed Central

    Niedzielska, Iwona; Borgiel-Marek, Halina; Różanowski, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Background Removing a tooth from the jaw results in the occurrence of oroantral communication in beneficial anatomic conditions or in the case of a iatrogenic effect. Popularized treatments of the oroantral communication have numerous faults. Large bone defect eliminates the chance to introduce an implant. Purpose of this work was assessment of the usefulness of autogenous bone graft and PRF in normal bone regeneration in the site of oroantral communication. Material and Methods Bone regeneration in the site of oroantral communication was assessed in 20 patients. Bone defects were supplemented autogenous bone graft from mental protuberance in 14 cases and from oblique line in 6 cases. The graft was covered with a PRF membrane. Results In the study group in all cases closure of the oroantral communication was observed. The average width of the alveolar was 13 mm and the average height was 12.5 mm. In 3 patients an average increase of alveolar height of 1.5 mm was observed. Conclusions This method may be the best option to prepare alveolar for new implant and prosthetic solutions. Key words:Oroantral communication, oroantral fistula, autogenous bone graft, bone regeneration, platelet rich fibrin. PMID:27475687

  12. Behavior of turbulent gas jets in an axisymmetric confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The understanding of the mixing of confined turbulent jets of different densities with air is of great importance to many industrial applications, such as gas turbine and Ramjet combustors. Although there have been numerous studies on the characteristics of free gas jets, little is known of the behavior of gas jets in a confinement. The jet, with a diameter of 8.73 mm, is aligned concentrically in a tube of 125 mm diameter, thus giving a confinement ratio of approximately 205. The arrangement forms part of the test section of an open-jet wind tunnel. Experiments are carried out with carbon dioxide, air and helium/air jets at different jet velocities. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one-color, one-component laser Doppler velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. Measurements show that the jets are highly dissipative. Consequently, equilibrium jet characteristics similar to those found in free air jets are observed in the first two diameters downstream of the jet. These results are independent of the fluid densities and velocities. Decay of the jet, on the other hand, is a function of both the jet fluid density and momentum. In all the cases studied, the jet is found to be completely dissipated in approximately 30 jet diameters, thus giving rise to a uniform flow with a very high but constant turbulence field across the confinement.

  13. Interferometer for optical waviness and figure testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freischlad, Klaus R.

    1997-09-01

    A novel instrument is described for the optical, non-contact measurement of the waviness and figure component of the surface texture of flat surface. Here the spatial frequency range for waviness is typically chosen from 1.25/mm to 0.05/mm, whereas the global figure error contains the lower spatial frequencies. The special requirements on the dynamic range, the spatial resolution, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement are discussed. The presented instrument consists of a white-light, extended-source, phase-shifting Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The special design employing low temporal and spatial coherence avoids coherent speckle noise on the measured surface maps while providing good spatial resolution. Thus in the waviness frequency band the modulation transfer function exceeds 0.75, an the RMS- precision is 0.1nm over the measurement area of 100mm in diameter. Measurement examples of typical applications, e.g. substrates for hard disks and flat panel displays, are shown.

  14. Surface oxidation of porous ZrB2-SiC ceramic composites by continuous-wave ytterbium fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, Dayang Salyani Abang; Glandut, Nicolas; Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean-Claude

    2015-12-01

    Surface treatment of ceramic substrates by a laser beam can allow to incorporate interesting properties to these ceramics. In the present work, surface oxidation of ca. 30% porous ZrB2-SiC ceramic composites by using an ytterbium fibre laser was conducted. Oxidation of ceramic substrates through this process under ambient conditions has certain advantages compared to the classical oxidation method. A particular spiral laser pattern was created in order to produce an oxidized structure on ZrB2-SiC porous substrates. The laser parameters were as follows i.e., laser power of 50, 60 and 70 W, a beam diameter of 1.25 mm, velocity of 2 mm/s, acceleration and deceleration of 1 mm/s2. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser-treated region was examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. At laser power of 70 W, the sample exhibits uniform oxidation. It revealed that the very porous bulk beneath remained unaffected and unoxidized because this laser-formed oxide scale protects the substrate from oxidation. The presence of oxidized and unaffected regions indicated a high degree of heat localization. The dense glassy SiO2-rich layer prevents the inward oxygen diffusion into the inner bulk hence enhances the oxidation resistance.

  15. [Investigation of Region of Interest (ROI) for measurement of slice thickness in Computed Tomography (CT)].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinobu; Kawata, Hidemichi; Nanbu, Ryosuke; Ohkura, Sunao; Hayashida, Kazuya; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2010-03-20

    We evaluated an appropriate region of interest (ROI) size for the measurement of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the bead method (0.1 mm and 0.5 mm diameter; lead) and the microdisk method (0.05 mm thickness and 1.0 mm diameter; tungsten) using multislice computed tomography (CT). The FWHM of preset slice thicknesses 0.625 mm, 1.25 mm, 5.0 mm and 7.5 mm were measured by varying helical pitch, location of measurement [center and off-center of scan field of view (SFOV)] and ROI size, and they were compared with the tolerance stated in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). It was conlcuded that the appropriate ROI size was influenced by preset slice thickness in this study. At the center of SFOV, measurements of FWHM were enabled within the tolerance of the JIS with small variations in all preset slice thicknesses if the ROI sizes were set between 0.4 times and equal to the size of the bead or microdisk indicating the maximum CT value in the series of CT images. At the off-center of SFOV, the tendency of increasing FWHM was confirmed, but it was shown that variations of the off-center in thicker slice thickness were larger regardless of helical pitch when the orbital synchronized helical scan technique was not used. PMID:20379062

  16. Metal-bonded Co-ferrite composites for magnetorestrictive torque sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Snyder, J.E.; Schwichtenberg, C.R.; Dennis, K.W.; McCallum, R.W.; Jiles, D.C.

    1999-09-01

    A new class of magnetomechanical sensor materials, co-ferrite (CoO {center{underscore}dot} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and metal-bonded (Ag, Ni, Co) Co-ferrite composites, has been investigated. These materials exhibited magnetostriction in excess of 200 ppm and high d{sub 33} ({partial{underscore}derivative}{lambda}/{partial{underscore}derivative}H){sub {sigma}} coefficient, 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}9} A{sup {minus}1}m, at low applied field (<100 kA/m). Selected compositions were formed into test samples in the form of rings brazed to stainless steel through-shafts. Changes of surface axial magnetic field in response to applied torque as high as 64 AN{sup {minus}1}m{sup {minus}2} were observed for a demonstration sample of dimensions 25 mm OD, 12.5 mm ID, and 8 mm high. A hysteresis of {+-}0.5 N{center{underscore}dot}m was observed. These materials appear to be promising candidates for torque sensors, and other magnetostrictive sensor and actuator applications.

  17. GEM-type detectors using LIGA and etchable glass technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, S.K.; Kim, J.G.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Chang, S.; Jackson, K.H.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.A.; Cho, G.

    2001-11-02

    Gas electron multipliers (GEMS) have been made by a deep X-ray lithography technique (LIGA process) using synchrotron radiation on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and by UV processes using a UV etchable glass. Gain, stability and rate capability for these detectors are described.The LIGA detectors described consist of PMMA sheets of various thicknesses, 125mm to 350mm, and have 150mm x 150mm square holes spaced with a pitch of 300mm. Thin copper electrodes are plated on the top and bottom surfaces using a Damascene method, followed by electroless plating of the copper onto a palladium-tin base layer. For various thicknesses of PMMA measurements have been made of absolute gain vs. voltage, time stability of gain, and rate capability. The operating gas mixture was usually Ar/CO2 (70/30) gas, but some tests were also done using P10 gas. We also made GEM-like detectors using the UV etchable glass called Foturan, patterned by exposure to UV light and subsequent etching. A few measurements using these detectors will be reported, including avalanche gain and time stability.

  18. Electro-Mechanical Simulation of a Large Aperture MOEMS Fabry-Perot Tunable Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan L.; Barclay, Richard B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Mott, D. Brent; Satyapal, Shobita; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We are developing a micro-machined electrostatically actuated Fabry-Perot tunable filter with a large clear aperture for application in high through-put wide-field imaging spectroscopy and lidar systems. In the first phase of this effort, we are developing key components based on coupled electro-mechanical simulations. In particular, the movable etalon plate design leverages high coating stresses to yield a flat surface in drum-head tension over a large diameter (12.5 mm). In this approach, the cylindrical silicon movable plate is back etched, resulting in an optically coated membrane that is suspended from a thick silicon support ring. Understanding the interaction between the support ring, suspended membrane, and coating is critical to developing surfaces that are flat to within stringent etalon requirements. In this work, we present the simulations used to develop the movable plate, spring suspension system, and electrostatic actuation mechanism. We also present results from tests of fabricated proof of concept components.

  19. Stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sakai, T; Sugano, N; Nishii, T; Haraguchi, K; Ochi, T; Ohzono, K

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed 60 custom-made femoral components of two different lengths : 125 mm (group A) and 100 mm (group B), in order to investigate the relationship between stem length and canal filling in uncemented custom-made total hip arthroplasty. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in age, gender, height, body weight, canal flare index, or bowing angle of the femur. Postoperatively there was no statistical difference between the two groups in the proximal canal filling, but significant difference in the distal canal filling (75.5% vs 85.8% on the anteroposterior view and 76.0% vs 82.5% in the lateral view, P<0.001). The distal canal filling inversely correlated with the ratio of the proximal portion and the distal portion of the stem curvature on the lateral view (lateral curve ratio of the stem, P=0.002). We conclude that superior filling at both the proximal and the distal levels can be obtained by using 100-mm custom made components with a small lateral curve ratio. PMID:10591939

  20. Computational micromechanical analysis of the representative volume element of bituminous composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Hasan; Ghauch, Ziad G.; Dhasmana, Heena; Al-Qadi, Imad L.

    2016-08-01

    Micromechanical computational modeling is used in this study to determine the smallest domain, or Representative Volume Element (RVE), that can be used to characterize the effective properties of composite materials such as Asphalt Concrete (AC). Computational Finite Element (FE) micromechanical modeling was coupled with digital image analysis of surface scans of AC specimens. Three mixtures with varying Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size (NMAS) of 4.75 mm, 12.5 mm, and 25 mm, were prepared for digital image analysis and computational micromechanical modeling. The effects of window size and phase modulus mismatch on the apparent viscoelastic response of the composite were numerically examined. A good agreement was observed in the RVE size predictions based on micromechanical computational modeling and image analysis. Micromechanical results indicated that a degradation in the matrix stiffness increases the corresponding RVE size. Statistical homogeneity was observed for window sizes equal to two to three times the NMAS. A model was presented for relating the degree of statistical homogeneity associated with each window size for materials with varying inclusion dimensions.

  1. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data of superalloys including directionally solidified eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained on 61 specimens, representing 15 discrete alloy compositions or fabricating techniques and three coating systems. Conventionally fabricated alloys included V57, MM 200, Rene 77, Rene 125, MM 246, MM 509, IN-738, IN-792 + Hf, and MM 200 + Hf. The directionally solidified alloys were MM 200, MM 200 single crystal, MM 200 bicrystal, cellular gamma/gamma' - delta) and lamellar gamma/gamma' - delta. The coatings systems included NiCrAlY on IN-738, In-792 + Hf, MM 200 DS, MM 200 DS single crystal, and cellular gamma/gamma' - delta and NiCrAlY/Pt on lamellar gamma/gamma' - delta. Crack initiation survival rates were recorded for all alloys, with and without coatings. All uncoated alloys, except MM 509, exhibited significant oxidation weight loss in 75,000 to 15,000 cycles. MM 509 specimens had weight losses only slightly higher than coated specimens through 7,500 cycles. All coated specimens had low weight loss.

  2. Methanol Droplet Extinction in Carbon-Dioxide-Enriched Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Nayagam, Vedha; Williams, Forman A.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusive extinction of methanol droplets with initial diameters between 1.25 mm and 1.72 mm, burning in a quiescent microgravity environment at one atmosphere pressure, was obtained experimentally for varying levels of ambient carbon-dioxide concentrations with a fixed oxygen concentration of 21% and a balance of nitrogen. These experiments serve as precursors to those which are beginning to be performed on the International Space Station and are motivated by the need to understand the effectiveness of carbon-dioxide as a fire suppressant in low-gravity environments. In these experiments, the flame standoff distance, droplet diameter, and flame radiation are measured as functions of time. The results show that the droplet extinction diameter depends on both the initial droplet diameter and the ambient concentration of carbon dioxide. Increasing the initial droplet diameter leads to an increased extinction diameter, while increasing the carbon-dioxide concentration leads to a slight decrease in the extinction diameter. These results are interpreted using a critical Damk hler number for extinction as predicted by an earlier theory, which is extended here to be applicable in the presence of effects of heat conduction along the droplet support fibers and of the volume occupied by the support beads

  3. A Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Skeletal Muscle During Hindlimb Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causey, Laura; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    During hindlimb unloading (HU) dramatic fluid shifts occur within minutes of the suspension, leading to a less precise matching of blood flow to O2 demands of skeletal muscle. Vascular resistance directs blood away from certain muscles, such as the soleus (SOL). The muscle volume gradually reduces in these muscles so that eventually the relative blood flow returns to normal. It is generally believed that muscle volume change is not due to O2 depletion, but a consequence of disuse. However, the volume of the unloaded rat muscle declines over the course of weeks, whereas the redistribution of blood flow occurs immediately. Using a Krogh Cylinder Model, the distribution of O2 was predicted in two skeletal muscles: SOL and gastrocnemius (GAS). Effects of the muscle blood flow, volume, capillary density, and O2 uptake, are included to calculate the pO2 at rest and after 10 min and 15 days of unloading. The model predicts that 32 percent of the SOL muscle tissue has a pO2 1.25 mm Hg within 10 min, whereas the GAS maintains normal O2 levels, and that equilibrium is reached only as the SOL muscle cells degenerate. The results provide evidence that there is an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria in the SOL muscle after 10 min HU.

  4. The possibility of E-glass woven roving as reinforcement of GFRP composite sheet roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyanto, Djoko

    2016-03-01

    The 1.25 mm thickness of opaque glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite sheet roof that is produced by an Indonesia company at Tangerang, consists of two layers of 300 g/m2 E-glass chopped strand mat as reinforcement and unsaturated polyester resin as matrix. A layer of 300 g/m2 E-glass chopped strand mat is replaced by a layer of 400 g/m2 E-glass woven roving as reinforcement to study the possibility use as sheet roof material. The properties of the two samples of GFRP composite materials were compared. Barcol hardness and flexure strength of the two samples relatively not significance change. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of the new sample which contains a layer of woven roving reinforcement is greater than the other one. On the other hand the waviness of the new sample is greater, but cheaper. In general, a layer of E-glass woven roving and a layer of E-glass chopped strand mat can be considered as an alternative reinforcement of two layers reinforcement of GFRP composite material of sheet roof.

  5. A laboratory evaluation of tagging-related mortality and tag loss in juvenile humpback chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Persons, William R.; Young, Kirk; Stone, Dennis M.; Van Haverbeke, Randy; Knight, William R.

    2015-01-01

    We quantified tag retention, survival, and growth in juvenile, captive-reared Humpback Chub Gila cypha marked with three different tag types: (1) Biomark 12.5-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected into the body cavity with a 12-gauge needle; (2) Biomark 8.4-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected with a 16-gauge needle; and (3) Northwest Marine Technology visible implant elastomer (VIE) tags injected under the skin with a 29-gauge needle. Estimates of tag loss, tagging-induced mortality, and growth were evaluated for 60 d with each tag type for four different size-groups of fish: 40–49 mm, 50–59 mm, 60–69 mm, and 70–79 mm TL. Total length was a significant predictor of the probability of PIT tag retention and mortality for both 8-mm and 12-mm PIT tags, and the smallest fish had the highest rates of tag loss (12.5–30.0%) and mortality (7.5–20.0%). Humpback Chub of sizes 40–49 mm TL and tagged with VIE tags had no mortality but did have a 17.5% tag loss. Growth rates of all tagged fish were similar to controls. Our data indicate Humpback Chub can be effectively tagged using either 8-mm or 12-mm PIT tags with little tag loss or mortality at sizes as low as 65 mm TL.

  6. Development of second mode instability in a Mach 6 flat-plate boundarylayer with two-dimensional roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanhong; Lee, Cunbiao

    2014-11-01

    The PCB pressure sensors and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are used to study the development of the second mode instability in a Mach 6 flow over a flat plate with two-dimensional roughness. A two-dimensional transverse wall blowing is used to enhance the second mode instability in the boundary layer and seeding tracer particles for PIV measurement. Three roughness elements with different heights are mounted at 125mm downstream the leading edge of the flat plate. It is proved that two-dimensional roughness could enhance the second mode fluctuation upstream the roughness. The second mode instability waves in flat-plate boundary layer are clearly shown by PIV and the boundary layer separation zone upstream the roughness is carefully measured. The boundary layer then reattaches the wall and the second mode instability waves are found damping downstream the roughness. It is also proved that the amplification and damping effect of the second mode instability waves depend on the height of the roughness.

  7. Study of deoxyribonucleic acid-ligand interactions by partial filling affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Martin; Čížková, Martina; Jirásek, Michael; Teplý, Filip; Koval, Dušan; Kašička, Václav

    2014-07-01

    In this work, a new partial filling affinity capillary electrophoresis (PF-ACE) method has been developed and applied to investigation of non-covalent molecular interactions between double stranded DNA oligonucleotide (Dickerson dodecamer) and classical DNA intercalator ligand-ethidiumbromide (EtBr) or oligophenylene derivatives-based potential new type of DNA ligands. Binding constants of DNA-ligand complexes were determined from the dependence of migration time changes of DNA oligomer (applied as analyte) on the length of ligand zones introduced beforehand as plugs of various lengths (0-75mm with 12.5mm step) in hydroxypropylcellulose coated fused silica capillary of 50/375μm I.D./O.D. and 400/300mm total/effective length. PF-ACE experiments were performed in two background electrolytes, Tris-borate, pH 8.0, ionic strength 14.3mM (BGE1), and sodium phosphate, pH 7.5, ionic strength 133mM (BGE2). Binding constants of DNA-EtBr complex (ca 15300L/mol in the BGE1 and 4200L/mol in the BGE2) were found to be significantly higher than those of DNA complexes with oligophenylene derivatives (ca 2200-3600L/mol in the BGE1 and 1600-2300L/mol in the BGE2). PMID:24861783

  8. Some observations on cyclic deformation structures in the high-strength commercial aluminum alloy AA 7150

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, D.N.; Rainforth, W.M.

    1998-11-01

    Load-controlled fatigue testing of the aluminum alloy AA 7150 has been conducted using four-point bending with an R ratio of + 0.1 over a range of maximum stress levels from 60 to 120% of the 0.2% proof stress. The alloy, in the form of 12.5-mm rolled plate, was investigated in underaged (UA), peak-aged (PA), and overaged (OA) conditions, corresponding to a change in average precipitate sizes from 5 nm in the UA condition to 21 nm in the OA condition. Three orientations of the plate were investigated. Orientation and aging condition influenced the degree of surface topographical development but not fatigue life. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the fatigued surface indicated that deformation in all aging conditions occurred by planar slip. Slip was generally restricted to a single slip system within each grain, and subgrain boundaries offered little resistance to dislocation movement facilitating long slip line lengths (measured up to 310 {micro}m) between adjacent high-angle grain boundaries. Planar slip observed in the OA condition is attributed to shearing of large strengthening precipitates, which is promoted by long slip line lengths. No evidence of surface specific changes in slip character was observed.

  9. An Efficient Method for Calculating the Characteristics of the Integrated Lens Antennas on the Basis of the Geometrical and Physical Optics Approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharovskiy, A. V.; Artemenko, A. A.; Mal'tsev, A. A.; Maslennikov, R. O.; Sevast'yanov, A. G.; Ssorin, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    We develop a combined method for calculating the characteristics of the integrated lens antennas for millimeter-wave wireless local radio-communication systems on the basis of the geometrical and physical optics approximations. The method is based on the concepts of geometrical optics for calculating the electromagnetic-field distribution on the lens surface (with allowance for multiple internal re-reflections) and physical optics for determining the antenna-radiated fields in the Fraunhofer zone. Using the developed combined method, we study various integrated lens antennas on the basis of the data on the used-lens shape and material and the primary-feed radiation model, which is specified analytically or by computer simulation. Optimal values of the cylindrical-extension length, which ensure the maximum antenna directivity equal to 19.1 and 23.8 dBi for the greater and smaller lenses, respectively, are obtained for the hemispherical quartz-glass lenses having the cylindrical extensions with radii of 7.5 and 12.5 mm. In this case, the scanning-angle range of the considered antennas is greater than ±20° for an admissible 2-dB decrease in the directivity of the deflected beam. The calculation results obtained using the developed method are confirmed by the experimental studies performed for the prototypes of the integrated quartz-glass lens antennas within the framework of this research.

  10. Studies into Using Manure in a Biorefinery Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shulin; Wen, Zhiyou; Liao, Wei; Liu, Chuanbin; Kincaid, R. L.; Harrison, J. H.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Brown, Michael D.; Stevens, Don J.

    2005-03-01

    Animal manure is an underutilized biomass resource containing a large amount of organic carbon that is often wasted in the existing manure disposal practices. A research project funded by the US Department of Energy explored the feasibility of using manure via the sugar platform in a biorefinery. The results showed that fiber, the major component of dry manure, constituted approximately 50%, 40%, and 36% of the dry dairy, swine, and poultry manure materials, respectively. The highest fiber contents were in dairy manure of which more than 75% of the dry matter was in the particles greater than 0.125 mm. Manure can be used for substrate to produce cellulase on site. The hemicellulose component in the manure fiber could be readily converted to sugar through acid hydrolysis. Concentrated acid treatment was most effective in manure cellulose decrystallization. The effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis was limited without concentrated acid pretreatment. The high protein content in manure had negative affects on acid hydrolysis. Purification and separation is necessary for further chemical conversion of the sugar to value-added chemicals through hydrogenation.

  11. Effect of Layer Thickness and Printing Orientation on Mechanical Properties and Dimensional Accuracy of 3D Printed Porous Samples for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farzadi, Arghavan; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Powder-based inkjet 3D printing method is one of the most attractive solid free form techniques. It involves a sequential layering process through which 3D porous scaffolds can be directly produced from computer-generated models. 3D printed products' quality are controlled by the optimal build parameters. In this study, Calcium Sulfate based powders were used for porous scaffolds fabrication. The printed scaffolds of 0.8 mm pore size, with different layer thickness and printing orientation, were subjected to the depowdering step. The effects of four layer thicknesses and printing orientations, (parallel to X, Y and Z), on the physical and mechanical properties of printed scaffolds were investigated. It was observed that the compressive strength, toughness and Young's modulus of samples with 0.1125 and 0.125 mm layer thickness were more than others. Furthermore, the results of SEM and μCT analyses showed that samples with 0.1125 mm layer thickness printed in X direction have more dimensional accuracy and significantly close to CAD software based designs with predefined pore size, porosity and pore interconnectivity. PMID:25233468

  12. Distributions of phosphorus fractions in the sediments of a river-lake system: a case study in Huai River catchment area, China.

    PubMed

    Jingqiu, Piao; Changyuan, Tang; Xianfang, Song

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) forms, with respect to sediment characteristics, and an in-stream sluice were studied in the river-lake system, Huai River catchment area, China. The mean of total P in sediments in the mainstream of the Huai River was higher than that in the Hongze Lake. It was found that P fractions varied in the sediments throughout the river and lake. Detrital-P was the dominant P fraction in the mainstream and organic P and detrital-P were the dominant P fractions in the lake, which could indicate: biologically available and non-biologically available forms. Useful information for the interpretation of P fractions could also be obtained from major sediment characteristics. Whether the relations between P fractions and grain size characteristics were significant or weak, 0.125 mm was a threshold grain size for P fraction distribution in sediment. In addition, the Bengbu Sluice, one of the most important in-stream facilities in the Huai River catchment area, regulated not only the transport of P in sediments upstream and downstream of the sluice, but also the distribution of P fractions in the river-lake system. Therefore, it was confirmed that nutrient loadings could be prevented from reaching the watershed, as well as improved ecological diversity by integrating sluice operation. PMID:26287843

  13. Simplified stereo-optical ultrasound plane calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoßbach, Martin; Noll, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Image guided therapy is a natural concept and commonly used in medicine. In anesthesia, a common task is the injection of an anesthetic close to a nerve under freehand ultrasound guidance. Several guidance systems exist using electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound probe as well as the needle, providing the physician with a precise projection of the needle into the ultrasound image. This, however, requires additional expensive devices. We suggest using optical tracking with miniature cameras attached to a 2D ultrasound probe to achieve a higher acceptance among physicians. The purpose of this paper is to present an intuitive method to calibrate freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems employing a rigid stereo camera system. State of the art methods are based on a complex series of error prone coordinate system transformations which makes them susceptible to error accumulation. By reducing the amount of calibration steps to a single calibration procedure we provide a calibration method that is equivalent, yet not prone to error accumulation. It requires a linear calibration object and is validated on three datasets utilizing di erent calibration objects: a 6mm metal bar and a 1:25mm biopsy needle were used for experiments. Compared to existing calibration methods for freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems, we are able to achieve higher accuracy results while additionally reducing the overall calibration complexity. Ke

  14. Analysis of the fetal placental vascular tree by X-ray micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Langheinrich, A C; Wienhard, J; Vormann, S; Hau, B; Bohle, R M; Zygmunt, M

    2004-01-01

    The current understanding of the placental vascular tree largely derives from time-consuming morphometric analyses performed by conventional histology, electron microscopy of corrosion casts and three-dimensional reconstructions based on physical tissue sections. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) emerges as a new, non-destructive and fast tool for imaging and quantifying fetoplacental vasculature. Term placentae (n=5) were perfused with contrast agent consisting of barium-sulfate, gelatine and thymol shortly after Caesarean-section-delivery. Samples (1 cm(3)) from eight different regions of the placenta were subsequently scanned in a micro-CT. Using tomographic reconstruction algorithms, three dimensional images were obtained by micro-CT allowing total stereoscopic visualization and continuous quantitative analysis of the vascular structure of the investigated samples. These samples were compared regarding vascular surface (VS) and vascular density (vascular volume fraction, TCVF). Quantitative assessment showed an average vascular density of 16 per cent (SD+/-0.4) and a vascular surface of 475 mm(2)(SD+/-8) per total tissue volume (including intervillous space) of 125 mm(3). Micro-CT image-analysis showed no significant differences in the fetal vascularization among term placentae. Micro-CT imaging is feasible for imaging and analysis of the villous vascular tree, allows further morphologic studies and immunohistochemistry of the placental specimens and may emerge as an additional tool in the investigation of the physiology and pathophysiology of the placental vasculature. PMID:15013644

  15. A contact-lens-shaped IC chip technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ching-Yu; Yang, Frank; Teng, Chih-Chiao; Fan, Long-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    We report on novel contact-lens-shaped silicon integrated circuit chip technology for applications such as forming a conforming retinal prosthesis. This is achieved by means of patterning thin films of high residual stress on top of a shaped thin silicon substrate. Several strategies are employed to achieve curvatures of various amounts. Firstly, high residual stress on a thin film makes a thin chip deform into a designed three-dimensional shape. Also, a series of patterned stress films and ‘petal-shaped’ chips were fabricated and analyzed. Large curvatures can also be formed and maintained by the packaging process of bonding the chips to constraining elements such as thin-film polymer ring structures. As a demonstration, a complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS) image-sensing retina chip is made into a contact-lens shape conforming to a human eyeball 12.5 mm in radius. This non-planar and flexible chip technology provides a desirable device surface interface to soft tissues or non-planar bio surfaces and opens up many other possibilities for biomedical applications.

  16. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  17. Study of hafnium oxide thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering under glancing angle deposition at varying target to substrate distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Misal, J. S.; Tokas, R. B.; Shinde, D. D.; Ramana, J. V.; Rai, Sanjay; Sahoo, N. K.

    2015-10-01

    Glancing angle deposition of HfO2 thin films by RF magnetron sputtering technique has been explored with respect to two vital deposition parameters visualizing angle of deposition (at 82° and 86° glancing angles) and target to substrate distance, DTS in the range 70-125 mm. AFM and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements show that at optimum DTS of 110 mm and glancing angle 82°, the films exhibit nanostructures with an estimated lowest refractive index ∼1.63 at 550 nm. For both the deposition angles, with decrease in DTS the round shaped grains of the film surface as obtained from AFM images are found to coalesce and produce films with elliptical shaped grains at shorter target to substrate distance. With increase in DTS the deposition rate first decreases up to DTS = 110 mm and subsequently increases. The phenomenon has been ascribed to the competition between reduced deposition flux density and increased sticking coefficient due to decrease in adatom kinetic energy with the increase in DTS. GIXRD measurement reveals that all the films exhibit monoclinic crystal structure. At lower DTS, the crystallinity has improved with increase in deposition angle whereas at higher DTS (>90 mm) the crystallinity becomes poorer with increase in deposition angle. The fact has been explained in light of variation of shadowing effect and deposition rate.

  18. Current challenges in antihypertensive treatment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Imprialos, Konstantinos P; Boutari, Chrysoula; Stavropoulos, Konstantinos; Doumas, Michael; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios I

    2016-08-25

    Arterial hypertension affects more than 25% of the global population, and its prevalence is increasing with age. Arterial stiffening occurs with aging and results in a pattern of increased systolic and decreased diastolic blood pressure (BP). In the elderly population, elevated BP has been related with increased cardiovascular risk. Trials on this population have shown great benefits for morbidity and mortality from reducing systolic BP (SBP) levels to less than 150 mmHg. Most guidelines for the management of elderly hypertensive patients agree on BP reduction to less than 150/90 mmHg. However, there is still uncertainty whether further BP reduction could provide beneficial results. The recently published SPRINT trial demonstrated that reducing SBP to between 120 and 125 mmHg in patients over the age of 75 years is related with increased survival and is expected to affect future recommendations. On the contrary, the limited data that are available for octogenarians and frail nursing home patients create concerns for more aggressive BP strategies in these subgroups, and thus they should be treated more conservatively. Among the various antihypertensive classes of drugs, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers were proved beneficial in the elderly and are favored as first choices for the management of elderly hypertensive individuals. Given the common coexistence of other comorbidities and polypharmacy, physicians should be careful when initiating or uptitrating treatments to avoid potential adverse events or interaction with other drugs or diseases. PMID:27578222

  19. Long-term Results from Cyclocryotherapy Applied to the 3O'clock and 9O'clock Positions in Blind Refractory Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung Seon; Kim, Young Jun; Seo, Seong Wook; Yoo, Ji Myong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the long-term follow-up results after cyclocryotherapy, applied to the 3-o'clock and 9-o'clock positions in blind refractory glaucoma patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 19 blind patients, and a total of 20 eyes with refractory glaucoma who were treated with cyclocryotherapy. Cyclocryotherapy treatments were performed using a retinal cryoprobe. The temperature of each cyclocryotherapy spot was -80℃ and each spot was maintained in place for 60 seconds. Six cyclocryotherapy spots were placed in each quadrant, including the 3-o'clock and 9-o'clock positions. Results The mean baseline pretreatment intraocular pressure (IOP) in all eyes was 50.9 ± 12.5 mmHg, which significantly decreased to a mean IOP at last follow-up of 14.1 ± 7.1 mmHg (p < 0.001). The mean number of antiglaucoma medications that patients were still taking at last follow-up was 0.3 ± 0.6. Devastating post-procedure phthisis occurred in only one eye. Conclusions Cyclocryotherapy, performed at each quadrant and at the 3-o'clock and 9-o'clock position, is an effective way to lower IOP and, thus, is a reasonable treatment option for refractory glaucoma patients who experience with ocular pain and headaches. PMID:25646060

  20. Rigidity and retention of ceramic root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Love, R M; Chandler, N P

    2000-01-01

    Ceramic root-canal posts offer potential advantages over other types with respect to aesthetics and biocompatibility. Any post must be sufficiently rigid and retentive to withstand functional forces. Ceraposts (1.2 mm coronal diameter, ceramic, tapering, smooth posts) and Paraposts (1.25 mm, stainless-steel, parallel, serrated posts) were tested for rigidity by means of a three-point bending test. To test retention in roots, ceramic posts were cemented using one of three protocols: (1) glass-ionomer cement, (2) silane coupling agent and resin cement, or (3) sandblasted post surface, silane coupling agent, and resin cement. Stainless-steel posts were cemented with resin. The tensile force required to dislodge the posts, following four weeks of storage in water, was recorded. Data were compared using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U analysis. Ceraposts were significantly more rigid than Paraposts (p < 0.001). Paraposts cemented with resin were significantly more strongly retained than Ceraposts following any cementation protocol (p < 0.001). Retention of the ceramic posts was significantly greater with a silane coupling agent and resin cement than with glass-ionomer cement (p < 0.001). Sandblasting the ceramic posts produced variable results and needs further investigation before it could be recommended. PMID:11203820

  1. The effect of serrations on carbon fibre posts-retention within the root canal, core retention, and post rigidity.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Purton, D G

    1996-01-01

    The retention in root canals of serrated carbon fibre Composiposts and stainless steel Paraposts was tested under tensile load. Twenty unrestored human roots were endodontically prepared and root filled. Two groups of 10 roots received 1.4-mm Composiposts or 1.25-mm Paraposts luted with a resin cement. The specimens were then embedded in acrylic resin and mounted in an Instron machine. The tensile force (kg) required to dislodge the posts was recorded and analysed with Student's test. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in the retention of either post (P > .05). The rigidty of 10 1.4-mm serrated Composiposts was tested in a three-point bend test in an Instron machine, and the retention of composite cores to 10 of these posts under tensile force was also tested. The results from these tests were compared to previous data from the authors' laboratory and revealed that the serrations significantly reduced the rigidity of the post (P < .001) and increased the retention of a core material (P < .001). PMID:9108751

  2. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth ⩽9 Å in the soft x-ray region below 21 Å. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm × 13 mm × 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 Å), two 114 mm × 13 mm × 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 Å) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from Fe XVII-XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously.

  3. Quality control for blood pressure measurement in population studies: Shibata Children's Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Yoshiike, N; Nakayama, T; Yokoyama, T; Tanaka, H; Labarthe, D R

    1997-10-01

    To investigate the relation between observer performance for blood pressure measurement in a training process and in field conditions, measurement values were studied under training and field conditions among 21 blood pressure observers of 1434 subjects aged 6-15 years in Japan. The observers received training by a videotape, which included six audiovisual presentations of a falling mercury column in a standard sphygmomanometer with Korotkoff sounds. Observer bias was measured for each trainee as the mean difference between the observed and the standard values for each blood pressure reading, including systolic (SBP), fourth-phase diastolic (K4), and fifth-phase diastolic (K5) values. In multiple linear regression analyses, each 1 mmHg increment in observer bias was equivalent to 1.27, 0.88, and 1.25 mmHg difference in actual readings of SBP, K4, and K5, respectively, in the field. This finding indicates that observer performance in videotape training is predictive of measurement behavior in the field. PMID:9368525

  4. Exposure to sulfosulfuron in agricultural drainage ditches: field monitoring and scenario-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Brown, Colin D; Dubus, Igor G; Fogg, Paul; Spirlet, Marie; Gustin, Christophe

    2004-08-01

    Field monitoring and scenario-based modelling were used to assess exposure of small ditches in the UK to the herbicide sulfosulfuron following transport via field drains. A site in central England on a high pH, clay soil was treated with sulfosulfuron, and concentrations were monitored in the single drain outfall and in the receiving ditch 1 km downstream. Drainflow in the nine months following application totalled 283 mm. Pesticide lost in the first 12.5 mm of flow was 99% of the total loading to drains (0.5% of applied). Significant dilution was observed in the receiving ditch and quantifiable residues were only detected in one sample (0.06 microg litre(-1)). The MACRO model was evaluated against the field data with minimal calibration. The parameterisation over-estimated the importance of macropore flow at the site. As a consequence, the maximum concentration in drainflow (2.3 microg litre(-1)) and the total loading to drains (0.76 g) were over-estimated by factors of 2.4 and 5, respectively. MACRO was then used to simulate long-term fate of the herbicide for each of 20 environmental scenarios. Resulting estimates for concentrations of sulfosulfuron in a receiving ditch were weighted according to the prevalence of each scenario to produce a probability distribution of daily exposure. PMID:15307668

  5. Application of nondestructive testing methods to study the damage zone underneath impact craters of MEMIN laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Dorothee; Poelchau, Michael H.; Stark, Florian; Grosse, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact Research Network (MEMIN) research group, the damage zones underneath two experimentally produced impact craters in sandstone targets were investigated using several nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. The 20 × 20 × 20 cm sandstones were impacted by steel projectiles with a radius of 1.25 mm at approximately 5 km s-1, resulting in craters with approximately 6 cm diameter and approximately 1 cm depth. Ultrasound (US) tomography and vibrational analysis were applied before and after the impact experiments to characterize the damage zone, and micro-computer tomography (μ-CT) measurements were performed to visualize subsurface fractures. The newly obtained experimental data can help to quantify the extent of the damage zone, which extends to about 8 cm depth in the target. The impacted sandstone shows a local p-wave reduction of 18% below the crater floor, and a general reduction in elastic moduli by between approximately 9 and approximately 18%, depending on the type of elastic modulus. The results contribute to a better empirical and theoretical understanding of hypervelocity events and simulations of cratering processes.

  6. Table-top transient collisional excitation x-ray laser research at LLNL: Status June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J., LLNL

    1997-07-01

    This is a status report of transient collisional excitation x-ray laser experiments at LLNL during June 1997 that have the advantage of being conducted on a table-top. Two laser drivers with modest energy {approximately}6 J are used in the scheme: a long {approximately}1 ns pulse to preform and ionize the plasma followed by a short {approximately}1 ps pulse to produce the excitation and population inversion. The beams are co-propagated and focused using a combination of a cylindrical lens and paraboloid to a line of {approximately}70 {micro}m x 12.5 mm dimensions. High repetition rates approaching 1 shot/3 min. allow typically in excess of 50 target shots in a day. Various slab targets have been irradiated and we report preliminary results for x-ray laser gain in 3p-3s J=0-1 Ne-like Ti and Fe transitions where gains as high as 24 cm{sup -1} and gL products of {approximately}15 have been observed.

  7. Effectiveness and mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by camphor-derived biochar.

    PubMed

    Shang, Guofeng; Shen, Guoqing; Wang, Tingting; Chen, Qin

    2012-08-01

    The characteristics and mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) adsorption on a biochar through pyrolysis at various temperatures (100 to 500 degrees C) were investigated. The biochar used in the current study was derived from the camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora). The samples were ground and sieved to produceparticle sizes of 0.4 mm to 1.25 mm, 0.3 mm to 0.4 mm, and <0.3 mm. The H2S breakthrough capacity was measured using a laboratory-designed test. The surface properties of the biochar were characterized using pH and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The results obtained demonstrate that all camphor-derived biochars were effective in H2S sorption. Certain threshold ranges ofthepyrolysis temperature and surfacepH were observed, which, when exceeded, have dramatic effects on the H2S adsorption capacity. The sorption capacity ranged from 1.2 mg/g to 121.4 mg/g. The biochar with 0.3 mm to 0.4 mm particle size possesses a maximum sorption capacity at 400 degrees C. The pH and FTIR analysis results showed that carboxylic and hydroxide radical groups were responsible for H2S sorption. These observations will be helpful in designing biochar as engineered sorbents for the removal of H2S. PMID:22916434

  8. The distance between the posterior communicating arteries and their relation to the endoscopic third ventriculostomy in adults: An anatomic study

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alicia Del Carmen Becerra; da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires

    2011-01-01

    Background: The diencephalic leaf of the Liliequist's membrane is a continuous structure that should be perforated in the endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Its lateral borders are penetrated by the third cranial nerve and the posterior communicating arteries. The most important complication of endoscopic third ventriculostomy is the vascular injury, such as the posterior communicating artery. The purpose of this study is to measure the distance between posterior communicating arteries located below the third ventricle floor and anterior of the mammillary bodies. Methods: In this observational prospective study 20 fresh brains from cadavers were utilized to measure the distance between the posterior communicating arteries in April 2008 at the Death Check Unit of our Institution. A digital photograph of the posterior communicating arteries was taken and the distance between the arteries was measured. The measurement was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: In the descriptive analysis of the 20 specimens, the posterior communicating arteries distance was 9 to 18.9 mm, a mean of 12.5 mm, median of 12.2 mm, standard deviation of 2.3 mm. Conclusion: The detailed knowledge of vascular structures involved in the endoscopic third ventriculostomy as to the posterior communicating arteries distance provides a safe lateral vascular border when performing such procedure. PMID:21748043

  9. Pressure measurements during injection of corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Egbert, J E; Walsh, A W; Hoey, M F

    1998-11-01

    Corticosteroid injection into the orbit, eyelid and larynx is a common treatment for inflammation and neoplasm. Complications include embolisation into the ocular circulation resulting in permanent loss of vision. The overall aim of the reported research is to develop an injection cannula and monitoring system which can prevent inadvertent embolisation into the ocular circulation during injection of corticosteroids. To that end, a special cannula was designed that allows simultaneous estimation of pressure at the tip of the cannula and flow rate during injection. The cannula was tested with backpressures corresponding to physiological ranges of 0 to 125 mmHg and injection flow rates of 3 to 11 cm3 min-1. The estimated pressure at the tip of the cannula during injection of corticosteroids was compared with direct pressure measurements. The results show that the mean estimated pressure is linearly related to the mean measured pressure with a slope of 0.99 and correlation coefficient of 0.99. Statistical analyses show that with standard error of estimate (SEE) of 2.14 mmHg, the estimated pressure is well within the 95% prediction interval limits of the measured values. The estimation of pressure from the cannula and monitoring system was accurate and warrants further testing in animal models. PMID:10367464

  10. Debris cloud characterization in the liquid-vapor phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Boslough, M.B.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    A series of experiments has been performed on the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher to impact a 1.25-mm thick aluminum bumper by an aluminum flier plate 17-mm diameter by 0.92-mm thick over the velocity range of 5 km/s to 11 km/s. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact. The shape of the debris cloud is found to depend on the flier plate tilt. Generally the data indicate a central core of higher density surrounded by a diffused layer. These experiments allow measurements of debris cloud expansion velocities as the material undergoes a phase change from solid fragments at impact velocities of 5 km/s to a mixture of liquid and vapor phase at higher impact velocities. The expansion velocity of the debris cloud increases with increasing impact velocity, with the high-density leading edge traveling faster than the impact velocity. There is a difference between the X-ray and photographic measurements of expansion velocities at higher impact velocities. This is believed to be due to the presence of very low- density vapor in the photographic records that are not detected using X-ray techniques.

  11. Quantification of airway morphometry: the effect of CT acquisition and reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; McMurray, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Maitz, Glenn S.; Gur, David

    2007-03-01

    This study measured the accuracy of our airway quantification scheme using phantoms airway under different CT protocols. Airway remodeling is associated with several thoracic diseases (e.g., chronic bronchitis, asthma, and bronchiectasis), and, therefore, quantification of airway remodeling may have wide clinical application. Our scheme assigns pixels partial membership in the airway wall and lumen based on the pixel's HU value, which is intended to account for partial volume averaging inherent in CT image reconstruction. Twenty-four phantom airways with an outer diameter from 2.6 to 14.0 mm and wall thicknesses from 0.5 to 2.0 mm were analyzed. The absolute differences between measurements supplied by the manufacture and computed from CT images acquired at 40 mAs and reconstructed at 1.25 mm thickness using GE's "soft" and "lung" reconstruction kernels for lumen area ranged from 1.4% to 49.3% and 0.4% to 33.0%, respectively, and for wall area ranged from 0.3% to 118.0% and 2.1 to 92.9%, respectively. Accuracy typically improved as the kernel's spatial frequency increased. Airways whose wall thickness was close to the pixels dimensions were challenging to quantify. The partial membership assignment of our airway quantification accurately computed airway morphometry across a range of phantom airway sizes.

  12. Post-irradiation Examination of the AGR-1 Experiment: Plans and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz

    2001-10-01

    Abstract – The AGR-1 irradiation experiment contains seventy-two individual cylindrical fuel compacts (25 mm long x 12.5 mm diameter) each containing approximately 4100 TRISO-coated uranium oxycarbide fuel particles. The experiment accumulated 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory with peak burnups exceeding 19% FIMA. An extensive post-irradiation examination campaign will be performed on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature accident testing. PIE experiments will include dimensional measurements of fuel and irradiated graphite, burnup measurements, assessment of fission metals release during irradiation, evaluation of coating integrity using the leach-burn-leach technique, microscopic examination of kernel and coating microstructures, and accident testing of the fuel in helium at temperatures up to 1800°C. Activities completed to date include opening of the irradiated capsules, measurement of fuel dimensions, and gamma spectrometry of selected fuel compacts.

  13. Value of digital volume tomography in patients with conductive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dalchow, C V; Weber, A L; Bien, S; Yanagihara, N; Werner, J A

    2006-02-01

    Digital volume tomography (DVT) is an extension of panoramic tomography. With this diagnostic technique, characterized by high resolution, a narrow section width (0.125 mm) and three-dimensional display, small pathological processes can be well visualized. Twenty-five patients with the history of a progressive hearing loss were examined with DVT (Accu-I-tomo, Morita, Japan). The results were compared with pre- and intraoperative findings to evaluate the diagnostic value of DVT in cases of erosion of the ossicular chain. With high resolution and artifact-free demonstration of the middle ear and the ossicular chain, it was possible to define its continuity preoperatively by DVT in all 25 cases. An intact ossicular chain was found by DVT in 13 cases and was later confirmed by surgery. The predicted erosion of the ossicles was verified in 12 patients, and a tympanoplasty type III was performed. Digital volume tomography is an excellent technique to examine the middle ear cleft and inner ear, and expands the application of diagnostic possibilities in the lateral skull base. Therefore, improvement in preoperative diagnosis is achieved along with more accurate planning of the surgical procedure. Digital volume tomography delivers a small radiation dose with a high resolution and a low purchase price for the equipment. PMID:16163510

  14. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs' of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of μa and μs' were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that μa ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm-1 and μs' was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm-1 (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  15. Four dimensional deformable image registration using trajectory modeling

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Edward; Castillo, Richard; Martinez, Josue; Shenoy, Maithili; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A four-dimensional deformable image registration (4D DIR) algorithm, referred to as 4D local trajectory modeling (4DLTM), is presented and applied to thoracic 4D computed tomography (4DCT) image sets. The theoretical framework on which this algorithm is built exploits the incremental continuity present in 4DCT component images to calculate a dense set of parameterized voxel trajectories through space as functions of time. The spatial accuracy of the 4DLTM algorithm is compared with an alternative registration approach in which component phase to phase (CPP) DIR is utilized to determine the full displacement between maximum inhale and exhale images. A publically available DIR reference database (http://www.dir-lab.com) is utilized for the spatial accuracy assessment. The database consists of ten 4DCT image sets and corresponding manually identified landmark points between the maximum phases. A subset of points are propagated through the expiratory 4DCT component images. Cubic polynomials were found to provide sufficient flexibility and spatial accuracy for describing the point trajectories through the expiratory phases. The resulting average spatial error between the maximum phases was 1.25 mm for the 4DLTM and 1.44 mm for the CPP. The 4DLTM method captures the long-range motion between 4DCT extremes with high spatial accuracy. PMID:20009196

  16. Optimization of typical diffuse herbicide pollution control by soil amendment configurations under four levels of rainfall intensities.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wei; Huang, Weijia; Wei, Peng; Hao, Fanghua; Yu, Yongyong

    2016-06-15

    Herbicides are a main source of agricultural diffuse pollution due to their wide application in tillage practices. The aim of this study is to optimize the control efficiency of the herbicide atrazine with the aid of modified soil amendments. The soil amendments were composed of a combination of biochar and gravel. The biochar was created from corn straw with a catalytic pyrolysis of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. The leaching experiments under four rainfall conditions were measured for the following designs: raw soil, soil amended with gravel, biochar individually and together with gravel. The control efficiency of each design was also identified. With the designed equipment, the atrazine content in the contaminant load layer, gravel substrate layer, biochar amendment layer and soil layer was measured under four types of rainfall intensities (1.25 mm/h, 2.50 mm/h, 5.00 mm/h and 10.00 mm/h). Furthermore, the vertical distribution of atrazine in the soil sections was also monitored. The results showed that the herbicide leaching load increased under the highest rainfall intensity in all designs. The soil with the combination of gravel and biochar provided the highest control efficiency of 87.85% on atrazine when the additional proportion of biochar was 3.0%. The performance assessment under the four kinds of rainfall intensity conditions provided the guideline for the soil amendment configuration. The combination of gravel and biochar is recommended as an efficient method for controlling diffuse herbicide pollution. PMID:27017267

  17. Lightweight photovoltaic module development for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, M.J.; Maglitta, J.C.; Lamp, T.R.

    1998-07-01

    Lightweight photovoltaic modules are being developed for powering high altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Terrestrial crystalline silicon solar cell and module technologies are being applied to minimize module cost, with modifications to improve module specific power (W/kg) and power density (W/m{sup 2}). New module processes are being developed for assembling standard thickness (320 mm) and thin (125 mm) solar cells, thin (50 to 100 mm) encapsulant films, and thin (25 mm) cover films. In comparison, typical terrestrial modules use 300 to 400 mm thick solar cells, 460 mm thick encapsulants, and 3.2 mm thick glass covers. The use of thin, lightweight materials allows the fabrication of modules with specific powers ranging from 120 to 200 W/kg, depending on cell thickness and efficiency, compared to 15 W/kg or less for conventional terrestrial modules. High efficiency designs based on ultra-thin (5 mm) GaAs cells have also been developed, with the potential for achieving substantially higher specific powers. Initial design, development, and module assembly work is completed. Prototype modules were fabricated in sizes up to 45 cm x 99 cm. Module materials and processes are being evaluated through accelerated environmental testing, including thermal cycling, humidity-freeze cycling, mechanical cycling, and exposure to UV and visible light.

  18. Confocal Endomicroscopy: Instrumentation and Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Bixler, Joel N.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in fiber optic technology and miniaturized optics and mechanics have propelled confocal endomicroscopy into the clinical realm. This high resolution, non-invasive imaging technology provides the ability to microscopically evaluate cellular and sub-cellular features in tissue in vivo by optical sectioning. Because many cancers originate in epithelial tissues accessible by endoscopes, confocal endomicroscopy has been explored to detect regions of possible neoplasia at an earlier stage by imaging morphological features in vivo that are significant in histopathologic evaluation. This technique allows real-time assessment of tissue which may improve diagnostic yield by guiding biopsy. Research and development continues to reduce the overall size of the imaging probe, increase the image acquisition speed, and improve resolution and field of view of confocal endomicroscopes. Technical advances will continue to enable application to less accessible organs and more complex systems in the body. Lateral and axial resolutions down to 0.5 μm and 3 μm, respectively, field of view as large as 800×450 μm, and objective lens and total probe outer diameters down to 350 μm and 1.25 mm, respectively, have been achieved. We provide a review of the historical developments of confocal imaging in vivo, the evolution of endomicroscope instrumentation, and the medical applications of confocal endomicroscopy. PMID:21994069

  19. Real-Time Measurement of Vehicle Exhaust Gas Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Hylton, J.O.; Joy, R.D.; McKnight, T.E.

    1999-06-28

    A flow measurement system was developed to measure, in real-time, the exhaust gas flow from vehicies. This new system was based on the vortex shedding principle using ultrasonic detectors for sensing the shed vortices. The flow meter was designed to measure flow over a range of 1 to 366 Ips with an inaccuracy of ~1o/0 of reading. Additionally, the meter was engineered to cause minimal pressure drop (less than 125mm of water), to function in a high temperature environment (up to 650oC) with thermal transients of 15 oC/s, and to have a response time of 0.1 seconds for a 10% to 90!40 step change. The flow meter was also configured to measure hi-directional flow. Several flow meter prototypes were fabricated, tested, and calibrated in air, simulated exhaust gas, and actual exhaust gas. Testing included gas temperatures to 600oC, step response experiments, and flow rates from O to 360 lps in air and exhaust gas. Two prototypes have been tested extensively at NIST and two additional meters have been installed in exhaust gas flow lines for over one year. This new flow meter design has shown to be accurate, durabIe, fast responding, and to have a wide rangeabi~ity.

  20. Femtosecond laser induced nanostructuring for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoudi, H.; Das, S. K.; Lange, J.; Heinrich, F.; Schrader, S.; Frohme, M.; Grunwald, R.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of periodical nanostructures with femtosecond laser pulses was used to create highly efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We report about the structuring of silver and copper substrates and their application to the SERS of DNA (herring sperm) and protein molecules (egg albumen). The maximum enhancement factors were found on Ag substrates processed with the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a 1-kHz Ti:sapphire laser and structure periods near the SHG wavelength. In the case of copper, however, the highest enhancement was obtained with long-period ripples induced with at fundamental wavelength. This is explained by an additional significant influence of nanoparticles on the surface. Nanostructured areas in the range of 1.25 mm2 were obtained in 10 s. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fast Fourier Transform and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the role of the chemical modification of the metal structures is addressed. Thin oxide layers resulting from working in atmosphere which improve the biocompatibility were indicated by vibration spectra. It is expected that the detailed study of the mechanisms of laser-induced nanostructure formation will stimulate further applications of functionalized surfaces like photocatalysis, selective chemistry and nano-biology.

  1. Effect of negative pressure on growth, secretion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongtong; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Liu, Jianheng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Tang, Peifu

    2015-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has gained popularity in the management of contaminated wounds as an effective physical therapy, although its influence on the bacteria in the wounds remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of negative pressure conditions on Staphylococcus aureus, the most frequently isolated pathogen during wound infection. S. aureus was cultured in Luria-Bertani medium at subatmospheric pressure of -125 mmHg for 24 h, with the bacteria grown at ambient pressure as the control. The application of negative pressure was found to slow down the growth rate and inhibit biofilm development of S. aureus, which was confirmed by static biofilm assays. Furthermore, decreases in the total amount of virulence factors and biofilm components were observed, including α-hemolysin, extracellular adherence protein, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin and extracellular DNA. With quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we also revealed a significant inhibition in the transcription of virulence and regulatory genes related to wound infections and bacterial biofilms. Together, these findings indicated that negative pressure could inhibit the growth, virulence and biofilm formation of S. aureus. A topical subatmospheric pressure condition, such as NPWT, may be a potential antivirulence and antibiofilm strategy in the field of wound care. PMID:26272011

  2. Discriminating between unresolved point sources and `negative' Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters in cosmic microwave background maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2003-10-01

    Clusters of galaxies produce negative features at wavelengths λ > 1.25 mm in cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps by means of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, while point radio sources produce positive peaks. This fact implies that a distribution of unresolved SZ clusters could be detected using the negative asymmetry introduced in the odd moments of the brightness map (skewness and higher), or in the probability distribution function for the fluctuations, once the map has been filtered in order to remove the contribution from primordial CMB fluctuations from large scales. This property provides a consistency check on the recent detections from CBI and BIMA experiments of an excess of power at small angular scales, in order to confirm that they are produced by a distribution of unresolved SZ clusters. However, it will require at least 1.5-2 times more observing time than detection of the corresponding power signal. This approach could also be used with the data of the planned SZ experiments (e.g. ACT, AMI, AMIBA, APEX, 8-m South Pole Telescope).

  3. Accuracy of needle position measurements using fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Henken, Kirsten; Van Gerwen, Dennis; Dankelman, Jenny; Van Den Dobbelsteen, John

    2012-11-01

    Accurate placement of the needle tip is essential in percutaneous therapies such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors. Use of a robotic system for navigating the needle could improve the targeting accuracy. Real-time information on the needle tip position is needed, since a needle deflects during insertion in tissue. Needle shape can be reconstructed based on strain measurements within the needle. In the current experiment we determined the accuracy with which the needle tip position can be derived from strain measurements using Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs). Three glass fibers equipped with two FBGs each were incorporated in a needle. The needle was clamped at one end and deformed by applying static radial displacements at one or two locations. The FBG output was used for offline estimation of the needle shape and tip position. During deflections of the needle tip up to 12.5 mm, the tip position was estimated with a mean accuracy of 0.89 mm (std 0.42 mm). Adding a second deflection resulted in an error of 1.32 mm (std 0.48 mm). This accuracy is appropriate for applications such as RFA of liver tumors. The results further show that the accuracy can be improved by optimizing the placement of FBGs. PMID:22455615

  4. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  5. Intensity of Rainfall and Severity of Melioidosis, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Jacups, Susan P.

    2003-01-01

    In a 12-year prospective study of 318 culture-confirmed cases of melioidosis from the Top End of the Northern Territory of Australia, rainfall data for individual patient locations were correlated with patient risk factors, clinical parameters, and outcomes. Median rainfall in the 14 days before admission was highest for those dying with melioidosis (211 mm), in comparison to 110 mm for those surviving (p = 0.0002). Median 14-day rainfall was also significantly higher for those admitted with pneumonia. On univariate analysis, a prior 14-day rainfall of ≥125 mm was significantly correlated with pneumonia (odds ratio [OR] 1.70 [confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 2.65]), bacteremia (OR 1.93 [CI 1.24 to 3.02]), septic shock (OR 1.94 [CI 1.14 to 3.29]), and death (OR 2.50 [CI 1.36 to 4.57]). On multivariate analysis, rainfall in the 14 days before admission was an independent risk factor for pneumonia (p = 0.023), bacteremic pneumonia (p = 0.001), septic shock (p = 0.005), and death (p < 0.0001). Heavy monsoonal rains and winds may cause a shift towards inhalation of Burkholderia pseudomallei. PMID:14720392

  6. Early application of negative pressure wound therapy to acute wounds contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus: An effective approach to preventing biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    LI, TONGTONG; ZHANG, LIHAI; HAN, LI; WANG, GUOQI; YIN, PENG; LI, ZHIRUI; ZHANG, LICHENG; GUO, QI; LIU, DAOHONG; TANG, PEIFU

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been demonstrated to be effective at preventing biofilm-associated infections; however, its role in biofilm prevention is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of NPWT on biofilm prevention when rapidly initiated following wound contamination. Full-thickness dermal wounds (8 mm) were created in rabbit ears and inoculated with green fluorescent protein-labeled Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). At 6 h following inoculation, continuous NPWT at −125 mmHg was initiated, with the wounds on the contralateral ear left untreated in order to serve as self-controls. S. aureus rapidly formed mature biofilms in the wound beds post-inoculation, with a persistent bacterial burden of ~105−107 colony-forming units (CFUs)/wound and impaired wound healing. Compared with the untreated group, NPWT resulted in a significant reduction in biofilm matrix, which was verified by scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence. A reduction in bacterial counts followed (P<0.05) with ~103 CFUs/wound on postoperative day 13 and improvement in all healing parameters (P<0.05) relative to control wounds. The results of the present investigation suggest that NPWT is an effective strategy to impeding the formation of S. aureus wound biofilms when initiated rapidly following bacterial contamination. The early application of NPWT, aimed at biofilm prevention, may improve wound care. PMID:26997991

  7. Lesions of nucleus tractus solitarii globally impair cerebrovascular autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, T.; Iadecola, C.; Underwood, M.D.; Reis, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of acute bilateral electrolytic lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and its autoregulation in rats anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. rCBF or regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCGU) was measured 30 min after NTS lesions, by the UC-iodoantipyrine technique or 2-deoxyglucose method, respectively. Cerebrovascular autoregulation was assessed in groups of 4-5 rats at three levels of arterial pressure (AP):90, 125, and 140 mmHg. AP was lowered by hemorrhage or elevated by intravenous infusion of phenylephrine. NTS lesions did not alter rCBF at 125 mmHg but resulted in loss of autoregulation. In contrast, lesions of the cuneate nucleus or transection of the baroreceptor afferents did not alter autoregulation. NTS lesions did not affect the reactivity of the cerebrovascular bed to hypercarbia or hypocarbia nor the rCGU in any brain regions. They conclude that lesions of the NTS impair cerebrovascular autoregulation. The effect is not due to changes in metabolism, nonspecific effects of the lesions, vasoparalysis, or interruption of the baroreceptor reflex arch. Neural pathways originating in or passing through the NTS can regulate the cerebrovascular autoregulation of the entire brain.

  8. [An optimum donor site for venous grafting for microsurgery].

    PubMed

    Grimaud, O; Delpit, X; Hardy, P

    2011-06-01

    We report the results of an anatomic study based on 10 cadavers. The aim of this work is to find an optimum donor site for venous grafts which is safe, reproducible, and suitable for microsurgery stitches especially in finger reimplantation, when a long and small calibre graft is needed. This study describes the deep venous network of the radial artery, an original donor site for microsurgical venous grafts. The second aim is to describe our technique of harvesting. Dissections always show two satellite veins, that can be harvested with optimal average diameter of 1.8mm constant over the whole length. The maximum length available is about 126.5mm for the radial satellite vein, and 125 mm for the ulnar one, with a few number of collateral ligatures needed. No tying is required in 60% cases for radial satellite vein, and one ligature for the other 40%, whereas in the ulnar satellite vein, no tying is needed in 80% and just one in the other 20%. This original site is advantageous in microsurgery of the upper limb, offering an easy, quick, safe and reproducible option in an emergency situation. PMID:21621446

  9. The use of simulated rainfall to study the discharge process and the influence factors of urban surface runoff pollution loads.

    PubMed

    Qinqin, Li; Qiao, Chen; Jiancai, Deng; Weiping, Hu

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the characteristics of pollutants on impervious surfaces is essential to estimate pollution loads and to design methods to minimize the impacts of pollutants on the environment. In this study, simulated rainfall equipment was constructed to investigate the pollutant discharge process and the influence factors of urban surface runoff (USR). The results indicated that concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) appeared to be higher in the early period and then decreased gradually with rainfall duration until finally stabilized. The capacity and particle size of surface dust, rainfall intensity and urban surface slopes affected runoff pollution loads to a variable extent. The loads of TP, TN and COD showed a positive relationship with the surface dust capacity, whereas the maximum TSS load appeared when the surface dust was 0.0317 g·cm⁻². Smaller particle sizes (<0.125 mm) of surface dust generated high TN, TP and COD loads. Increases in rainfall intensity and surface slope enhanced the pollution carrying capacity of runoff, leading to higher pollution loads. Knowledge of the influence factors could assist in the management of USR pollution loads. PMID:26204082

  10. Performance evaluation of D-SPECT: a novel SPECT system for nuclear cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Kacperski, Krzysztof; van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F.

    2009-05-01

    D-SPECT (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is a novel SPECT system for cardiac perfusion studies. Based on CZT detectors, region-centric scanning, high-sensitivity collimators and resolution recovery, it offers potential advantages over conventional systems. A series of measurements were made on a β-version D-SPECT system in order to evaluate its performance in terms of energy resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, count rate capability and resolution. Corresponding measurements were also done on a conventional SPECT system (CS) for comparison. The energy resolution of the D-SPECT system at 140 keV was 5.5% (CS: 9.25%), the scatter fraction 30% (CS: 34%), the planar sensitivity 398 s-1 MBq-1 per head (99mTc, 10 cm) (CS: 72 s-1 MBq-1), and the tomographic sensitivity in the heart region was in the range 647-1107 s-1 MBq-1 (CS: 141 s-1 MBq-1). The count rate increased linearly with increasing activity up to 1.44 M s-1. The intrinsic resolution was equal to the pixel size, 2.46 mm (CS: 3.8 mm). The average reconstructed resolution using the standard clinical filter was 12.5 mm (CS: 13.7 mm). The D-SPECT has superior sensitivity to that of a conventional system with similar spatial resolution. It also has excellent energy resolution and count rate characteristics, which should prove useful in dynamic and dual radionuclide studies.

  11. A mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen uptake data for thin Zircaloy-2 specimens in steam at 300-400°C have been analysed to show that there is a decrease in the rate of uptake with respect to the rate of oxidation when the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen in the metal is exceeded. In order for TSS to be reached during pre-transition oxidation a very thin 0.125 mm Zircaloy sheet was used. The specimens had been pickled initially removing all Zr 2(Fe/Ni) particles from the initial surfaces, yet the initial hydrogen uptake rates were still much higher than for Zircaloy-4 or a binary Zr/Fe alloy that did not contain phases that dissolve readily during pickling. Cathodic polarisation at room temperature in CuSO 4 solution showed that small cracks or pores formed the cathodic sites in pre-transition oxide films. Some were at pits resulting from the initial dissolution of the Zr 2(Fe/Ni) phase; others were not; none were at the remaining intermetallics in the original surface. These small cracks are thought to provide the ingress routes for hydrogen. A microscopic steam starvation process at the bottoms of these small cracks or pores, leading to the accumulation of hydrogen adjacent to the oxide/metal interface, and causing breakdown of the passive oxide forming at the bottom of the flaw, is thought to provide the mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process during both pre-transition and post-transition oxidation.

  12. Human motion energy harvesting: numerical analysis of electromagnetic swing-excited structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Energy harvesting from human motion has constantly attracted scientific interest over recent years. A location where a harvesting device can easily and unobtrusively be integrated is the shoe sole, which also protects the device from exterior influences. In this work a numerical system model is developed, which can be used to simulate different inductive harvester geometries and predict their power output. Real world acceleration data is used as a model input. The model is implemented in Matlab/Simulink and subdivided into a mechanical and an electromagnetic model. The key features including the motion model and the calculation of the electromagnetic coupling coefficient are explained in detail and the model is briefly evaluated experimentally. A total of six inductive architectures, i.e. different cylindrical and rectangular magnet-coil arrangements, are then investigated in detail. The geometrical parameters are optimized for each architecture to find the best geometry within the size of 71 mm × 37.5 mm × 12.5 mm, which can be integrated into the sole. With the best overall design an average power output of 42.7 mW is simulated across an ohmic load of 41 Ohms. In addition to the respective best designs, the (dis-)advantages of each architecture are explained.

  13. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

    1995-04-01

    Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

  14. Geometric optimization of a neutron detector based on a lithium glass-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Trivelpiece, C.; Jovanovic, I.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the simulation and optimization of a neutron detector based on a glass-polymer composite that achieves high gamma rejection. Lithium glass is embedded in polyvinyltoluene in three geometric forms: disks, rods, and spheres. Optimal shape, geometric configuration, and size of the lithium glass fragments are determined using Geant4 simulations. All geometrical configurations maintain an approximate 7% glass to polymer mass ratio. Results indicate a 125-mm diameter as the optimal detector size for initial prototype design achieving a 10% efficiency for the thermalization of incident fission neutrons from 252Cf. The geometrical features of a composite detector are shown to have little effect on the intrinsic neutron efficiency, but a significant effect on the gamma rejection is observed. The sphere geometry showed the best overall performance with an intrinsic neutron efficiency of approximately 6% with a gamma rejection better than 10-7 for 280-μm diameter spheres. These promising results provide a motivation for prototype composite detector development based on the simulated designs.

  15. Using medical silicone to ensure an airtight negative pressure wound therapy dressing seal in challenging wounds: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nora; Hendricks, Joerg; Hoffmann, Karen; Hemprich, Alexander; Halama, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been used for a broad range of indications and wound types. However, it can be difficult to maintain an airtight dressing seal when the wound is located in an anatomically challenging area or environment. To address this problem, medical silicone, used to create intraoral vacuum dressings, was used in five patients (one woman, four men, age range 57 to 66 years) to seal leaking NPWT dressings (four polyurethane dressings and one polyurethane silver foam dressing). The wounds were located in the head and neck, abdominal, lower extremity, and anogenital areas. Initial wound sizes ranged from 2.5 cm² to 700 cm², and periwound areas were characterized by irregular surfaces (scars, skin folds, or curved surfaces), humid milieu, or mobile structures. In all five patients, negative pressure was set at -125 mm Hg constant suction, and the silicone was able to seal the leaking dressings. Wound size reductions from 2.5 cm² to 13.5 cm² were observed during 9 to 64 days (range) of NPWT treatment. In these patients, medical silicone was found to be a suitable material to facilitate airtight sealing of the dressings used with NPWT. PMID:25105477

  16. Silicone-coated non-woven polyester dressing enhances reepithelialisation in a sheep model of dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Losi, Paola; Briganti, Enrica; Costa, Manolo; Sanguinetti, Elena; Soldani, Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) also known as V.A.C. (Vacuum-assisted closure), is widely used to manage various type of wounds and accelerate healing. NPWT has so far been delivered mainly via open-cell polyurethane (PU) foam or medical gauze. In this study an experimental setup of sheep wound model was used to evaluate, under NPWT conditions, the performance of a silicone-coated non-woven polyester (N-WPE) compared with PU foam and cotton hydrophilic gauze, used as reference materials. Animals were anesthetized with spontaneous breathing to create three 3 × 3 cm skin defects bilaterally; each animal received three different samples on each side (n = 6 in each experimental group) and was subjected to negative and continuous 125 mmHg pressure up to 16 days. Wound conditions after 1, 8 and 16 days of treatment with the wound dressings were evaluated based on gross and histological appearances. Skin defects treated with the silicone-coated N-WPE showed a significant decrease in wound size, an increase of re-epithelialization, collagen deposition and wound neovascularisation, and a minimal stickiness to the wound tissue, in comparison with gauze and PU foam. Taken all together these findings indicate that the silicone-coated N-WPE dressing enhances wound healing since stimulates higher granulation tissue formation and causes minor tissue trauma during dressing changes. PMID:22692367

  17. Suture-free laser-assisted vessel repair using CO2 laser and liquid albumin solder.

    PubMed

    Wolf-de Jonge, Ingrid C D Y M; Heger, Michal; van Marle, Jan; Balm, Ron; Beek, Johan F

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the use of proteinic solders during laser-assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA) and repair (LAVR) can significantly increase welding strength, but these studies combined solder-mediated LAVA/R with the use of stay sutures, thereby defeating its purpose. In an in vitro study, we examined the leaking point pressures (LPPs) and histological damage profile of porcine carotid arteries following albumin solder-mediated CO(2) LAVR without the use of sutures. Longitudinal arteriotomies (9.1+/-0.8 mm in length) were sheathed with 25% liquid bovine serum albumin solder, and LAVR was performed using a micromanipulator-controlled CO(2) laser operating at 170-mW power and 1.25-mm spot size in continuous wave mode. The welding regime consisted of a transversal zigzag pass followed by one or two longitudinal zigzag passes, producing an irradiance of 13.9 W/cm(2) and energies of 10.5 J and 11.3 J per mm weld, respectively. LPPs were measured by the fluid infusion technique, and histological analysis was performed with light, fluorescence, and polarization microscopy. The LPP of the two-pass welds was 351+/-158 mmHg versus 538+/-155 mmHg for the three-pass welds. Thermal damage was confined primarily to the adventitial layers, with limited heat diffusion into the media below the solder around the coaptation interface. PMID:19021359

  18. Quarry blasts assessment and their environmental impacts on the nearby oil pipelines, southeast of Helwan City, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Adel M. E.; Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.

    2013-06-01

    Ground vibrations induced by blasting in the cement quarries are one of the fundamental problems in the quarrying industry and may cause severe damage to the nearby utilities and pipelines. Therefore, a vibration control study plays an important role in the minimization of environmental effects of blasting in quarries. The current paper presents the influence of the quarry blasts at the National Cement Company (NCC) on the two oil pipelines of SUMED Company southeast of Helwan City, by measuring the ground vibrations in terms of Peak Particle Velocity (PPV). The seismic refraction for compressional waves deduced from the shallow seismic survey and the shear wave velocity obtained from the Multi channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) technique are used to evaluate the closest site of the two pipelines to the quarry blasts. The results demonstrate that, the closest site of the two pipelines is of class B, according to the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) classification and the safe distance to avoid any environmental effects is 650 m, following the deduced Peak Particle Velocity (PPV) and scaled distance (SD) relationship (PPV = 700.08 × SD-1.225) in mm/s and the Air over Pressure (air blast) formula (air blast = 170.23 × SD-0.071) in dB. In the light of prediction analysis, the maximum allowable charge weight per delay was found to be 591 kg with damage criterion of 12.5 mm/s at the closest site of the SUMED pipelines.

  19. Growth patterns in the orbital region: a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Farkas, L G; Posnick, J C; Hreczko, T M; Pron, G E

    1992-07-01

    Data for analysis of age-related changes in growth in the intercanthal (en-en) and biocular (ex-ex) widths were obtained from 1,594 healthy North American Caucasians in age groups from 1 to 18 years, divided equally between males and females. At 1 year, the degree of development of the intercanthal width reached 84.1%, and that of the biocular width 85.9% of adults in both sexes. The levels of growth achieved by 5 years of age rose to 93.3% in the intercanthal width and 88.1% in the biocular width, in both sexes. The average total growth increments achieved between ages 1 and 18 years were 5.2 mm in the intercanthal width and 12.5 mm in the biocular. The intercanthal width showed very little growth after 1 year of age; in contrast, the biocular width showed significantly greater growth increments both before and after 5 years of age. Rapid growth was observed between 3 and 4 years in the intercanthal width of both sexes. The age-related growth observed in the biocular width was small but continuous up to maturation time. The intercanthal width reached full maturation at 8 years in females and 11 years in males, and the biocular width at 13 years in females and 15 years in males. PMID:1643059

  20. A sub-10 nA DC-balanced adaptive stimulator IC with multi-modal sensor for compact electro-acupuncture stimulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Kiseok; Lee, Hyungwoo; Hong, Sunjoo; Cho, Hyunwoo; Ha, Unsoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2012-12-01

    A compact electro-acupuncture (EA) system is proposed for a multi-modal feedback EA treatment. It is composed of a needle, a compact EA patch, and an interconnecting conductive thread. The 3 cm diameter compact EA patch is implemented with an adaptive stimulator IC and a small coin battery on the planar-fashionable circuit board (P-FCB) technology. The adaptive stimulator IC can form a closed current loop for even a single needle, and measure the electromyography (EMG) and the skin temperature to analyze the stimulation status as well as supply programmable stimulation current (40 μA-1 mA) with 5 different modes. The large time constant (LTC) sample and hold (S/H) current matching technique achieves the high-precision charge balancing ( <;10 nA) for the patient's safety. The measured data can be wirelessly transmitted to the external EA analyzer through the body channel communication (BCC) transceiver for the low power consumption. The external EA analyzer can show the patient's status, such as the muscle fatigue and the change of the skin temperature. Based on these analyses, the practitioner can adaptively change the stimulation parameters for the optimal treatment value. A 12.5 mm(2) 0.13 μm RF CMOS stimulator chip consumes 6.8 mW at 1.2 V supporting 32 different current levels. The proposed compact EA system is fully implemented and tested on the human body. PMID:23853254

  1. Effects of maximum aggregate size on UPV of brick aggregate concrete.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tarek Uddin; Mahmood, Aziz Hasan

    2016-07-01

    Investigation was carried out to study the effects of maximum aggregate size (MAS) (12.5mm, 19.0mm, 25.0mm, 37.5mm, and 50.0mm) on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of concrete. For investigation, first class bricks were collected and broken to make coarse aggregate. The aggregates were tested for specific gravity, absorption capacity, unit weight, and abrasion resistance. Cylindrical concrete specimens were made with different sand to aggregate volume ratio (s/a) (0.40 and 0.45), W/C ratio (0.45, 0.50, and 0.55), and cement content (375kg/m(3) and 400kg/m(3)). The specimens were tested for compressive strength and Young's modulus. UPV through wet specimen was measured using Portable Ultrasonic Non-destructive Digital Indicating Tester (PUNDIT). Results indicate that the pulse velocity through concrete increases with an increase in MAS. Relationships between UPV and compressive strength; and UPV and Young's modulus of concrete are proposed for different maximum sizes of brick aggregate. PMID:27085110

  2. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  3. Experimental evidence for saltatory propagation of the Mauthner axon impulse in the tench spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Greeff, N G; Yaşargil, G M

    1980-07-01

    External longitudinal current recording was applied in situ to the exposed spinal cord of the tench (Tinca tinca) for the study of impulse propagation in the Mauthner axon, a giant nerve fibre whose myelin sheath is not interrupted by nodes of Ranvier. Impulses in the antidromically excited Mauthner axon were recorded from the dorsal surface of the spinal cord; the time-lag between the main peaks of the bipolarly recorded current signal and unipolarly recorded reference signal was measured at regular intervals along the cord. Using a slot width of the bipolar electrodes, d = 0.65 mm and electrode displacement s = 0.5 mm, the latency plotted as a function of distance showed small fluctuations, but no clear-cut steps over a 12.5 mm stretch of spinal cord. However, with improved spatial resolution (d = 0.24 mm, s = 0.1 mm) and electrical insulation of the spinal cord from the underlying tissues, it was possible to demonstrate steps in the latency plot occurring at 0.5--0.3 mm intervals and indicating a saltatory propagation of the Mauthner axon impulse. The distances between the latency steps and their distribution was comparable to the known distribution of the Mauthner axon collaterals suggesting that the myelin-free regions of the collaterals may be quivalents of Ranvier nodes. PMID:7378828

  4. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments

    PubMed Central

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4–8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic). PMID:21243106

  5. Hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector for astrophysics based on pixelated CdTe semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-01-01

    Stellar explosions are astrophysical phenomena of great importance and interest. Instruments with high sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. In order to achieve the needed performance, a hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. We present a detector module which consists of a single CdTe crystal of 12.5 × 12.5mm 2 and 2mm thick with a planar cathode and with the anode segmented in an 11x11 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 1 mm attached to the readout chip. Two possible detector module configurations are considered: the so-called Planar Transverse Field (PTF) and the Parallel Planar Field (PPF). The combination of several modules in PTF or PPF configuration will achieve the desired performance of the imaging detector. The sum energy resolution of all pixels of the CdTe module measured at 122 keV and 356 keV is 3.8% and 2% respectively, in the following operating conditions: PPF irradiation, bias voltage -500 V and temperature -10̂ C.

  6. The spectrum and variability of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abada-Simon, Meil; Lecacheux, Alain; Bastian, Tim S.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Dulk, George A.

    1993-01-01

    The first detections of the magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii at millimeter wavelengths are reported. AE Aqr was detected at wavelengths of 3.4 and 1.25 mm. These data are used to show that the time-averaged spectrum is generally well fitted by a power law S(nu) varies as nu exp alpha, where alpha is approximately equal to 0.35-0.60, and that the power law extends to millimeter wavelengths, i.e., the spectral turnover is at a frequency higher than 240 GHz. It is suggested that the spectrum is consistent with that expected from a superposition of flarelike events where the frequency distribution of the initial flux density is a power law f (S0) varies as S0 exp -epsilon, with index epsilon approximately equal to 1.8. Within the context of this model, the high turnover frequency of the radio spectrum implies magnetic field strengths in excess of 250 G in the source.

  7. Cryogenic magnetic bearing scanning mechanism design for the SPICA/SAFARI Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Dool, Teun C.; Hamelinck, Roger F. M. M.; Kruizinga, Bob; Gielesen, Wim L. M.; Braam, Ben C.; Nijenhuis, Jan R.; Loix, Nicolas; Luyckx, Stanislas; van Loon, Dennis; Kooijman, Peter Paul; Swinyard, Bruce M.

    2010-07-01

    TNO, together with its partners Micromega and SRON, have designed a cryogenic scanning mechanism for use in the SAFARI Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) on board of the SPICA mission. The optics of the FTS scanning mechanism (FTSM) consists of two back-to-back cat's-eyes. The optics are mounted on a central "back-bone" tube which houses all the important mechatronic parts: the magnetic bearing linear guiding system, a magnetic linear motor serving as the OPD actuator, internal metrology with nanometer resolution, and a launch lock. A magnetic bearing is employed to enable a large scanning stroke in a small volume. It supports the optics in a free-floating way with no friction, or other non-linearities, enabling sub-nanometer accuracy within a single stage with a stroke of -4 mm to +31.5 mm. Because the FTSM will be used at cryogenic temperatures of 4 Kelvin, the main structure and optics are all constructed from 6061 Aluminum. The overall outside dimensions of the FTSM are: 393 x 130 x 125 mm, and the mass is 2.2 kg.

  8. Anthropomorphic phantoms for assessment of strain imaging methods involving saline-infused sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Maritza A; Madsen, Ernest L; Frank, Gary R; Jiang, Jingfeng; Shi, Hairong; Hall, Timothy J; Varghese, Tomy

    2008-10-01

    Two anthropomorphic uterine phantoms were developed that allow assessment and comparison of strain imaging systems adapted for use with saline-infused sonohysterography (SIS). Tissue-mimicking (TM) materials consist of dispersions of safflower oil in gelatin. TM fibroids are stiffer than the TM myometrium/cervix, and TM polyps are softer. The first uterine phantom has 3-mm-diameter TM fibroids distributed randomly in TM myometrium. The second uterine phantom has a 5-mm and 8-mm spherical TM fibroid, in addition to a 5-mm spherical and a 12.5-mm-long (medicine capsule-shaped) TM endometrial polyp protruding into the endometrial cavity; also, a 10-mm spherical TM fibroid projects from the serosal surface. Strain images using the first phantom show the stiffer 3-mm TM fibroids in the myometrium. Results from the second uterine phantom show that, as expected, parts of inclusions projecting into the uterine cavity will appear very stiff, whether they are stiff or soft. Results from both phantoms show that although there is a five-fold difference in the Young's moduli values, there is not a significant difference in the strain in the transition from the TM myometrium to the TM fat. These phantoms allow for realistic comparison and evolution of SIS strain imaging techniques and can aid clinical personnel to develop skills for SIS strain imaging. PMID:18514999

  9. TH-E-17A-04: Geometric Validation of K-Space Self-Gated 4D-MRI Vs. 4D-CT Using A Respiratory Motion Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Y; Fan, Z; Yang, W; Pang, J; McKenzie, E; Deng, Z; Tuli, R; Sandler, H; Li, D; Fraass, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CT is often limited by motion artifacts, low temporal resolution, and poor phase-based target definition. We recently developed a novel k-space self-gated 4D-MRI technique with high spatial and temporal resolution. The goal here is to geometrically validate 4D-MRI using a MRI-CT compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: 4D-MRI was acquired using 3T spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection sequences. Respiratory phases were resolved using self-gated k-space lines as the motion surrogate. Images were reconstructed into 10 temporal bins with 1.56×1.56×1.56mm3. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed with a 23mm diameter ball target filled with highconcentration gadolinium(Gd) gel embedded in a 35×40×63mm3 plastic box stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The whole phantom was driven by an air pump. Human respiratory motion was mimicked using the controller from a commercial dynamic phantom (RSD). Four breathing settings (rates/depths: 10s/20mm, 6s/15mm, 4s/10mm, 3s/7mm) were scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT (slice thickness 1.25mm). Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Reconstructed images were imported into Eclipse(Varian) for target contouring. Volumes and target positions were compared with ground-truth. Initial human study was investigated on a liver patient. Results: 4D-MRI and 4D-CT scans for the different breathing cycles were reconstructed with 10 phases. Target volume in each phase was measured for both 4D-CT and 4D-MRI. Volume percentage difference for the 6.37ml target ranged from 6.67±5.33 to 11.63±5.57 for 4D-CT and from 1.47±0.52 to 2.12±1.60 for 4D-MRI. The Mann-Whitney U-test shows the 4D-MRI is significantly superior to 4D-CT (p=0.021) for phase-based target definition. Centroid motion error ranges were 1.35–1.25mm (4D-CT), and 0.31–0.12mm (4D-MRI). Conclusion: The k-space self-gated 4D-MRI we recently developed can accurately determine phase-based target volume while avoiding typical motion artifacts found in 4D-CT, and is being further studied for use in GI targeting and motion management. This work supported in part by grant 1R03CA173273-01.

  10. Weight Estimation Tool for Children Aged 6 to 59 Months in Limited-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    .33%); proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 97.36% (95% CI 97.40%, 97.46%); and Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.05 kg and (-2.15 kg; 2.24 kg). The height model fitted for MUAC classes was accurate and precise. For MUAC < 115 mm, the proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 97.15% (95% CI 96.90%, 97.42%) and the Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.08 kg and (-1.21 kg; 1.37 kg). For MUAC between 115 and 125 mm, the proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 98.93% (95% CI 98.82%, 99.03%) and Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.05 kg and (-1.15 kg; 1.24 kg). For MUAC > 125 mm, the proportion of estimates accurate to within ± 25% of true weight was 98.33% (95% CI 98.29%, 98.37%) and Bland-Altman bias and 95% limits of agreement were 0.05 kg and (-2.08 kg; 2.19 kg). Conclusions and Relevance Models estimating weight from height alone and height with MUAC class in children aged 6–59 months in a database from low-to-middle income countries were more accurate and precise than previous weight estimation tools. A height-based weight estimation tape stratified according to MUAC classes is proposed for children aged 6–59 months in limited-resource settings. PMID:27529816

  11. Impact ejecta in upper Eocene deposits at Massignano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Billy P.; Liu, Shaobin; Montanari, Alessandro

    2004-04-01

    Previous workers have shown that an impact ejecta layer at Massignano, Italy contains a positive Ir anomaly, flattened spheroids (pancake spherules), Ni-rich spinel crystals, and shocked quartz with multiple sets of planar deformation features. Because of sample sizes and work by different investigators, it was not clear if the shocked quartz is associated with the Ir anomaly and pancake spherules or if it belongs to a separate impact event. To address this problem, we carried out a high-resolution stratigraphic study of this ejecta layer. The ejecta layer was sampled continuously at 1 cm intervals in two adjacent columns. The carbonate was removed with dilute HCl, and the noncarbonate fraction was gently sieved. Pancake spherules were recovered from the 250-500 mm size fraction and counted. At the peak abundance, the number of pancake spherules in the 250-500 mm size fraction is about 6-7/g of sample. The pancake spherules removed from the 250-500 mm size fraction are mostly translucent to opaque pale green, but some have a grey color or dark opaque patches due to a coating of Ni- and Cr-rich spinel crystals. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction data indicate that the green spherules are composed of iron-rich smectite, probably nontronite. Black opaque spinel stringers (dark spinel-rich pancake spherules), usually <200 mm across, can be seen in a polished section of a block that includes the ejecta layer. None of the dark spinel-rich pancake spherules were recovered from the sieved non-carbonate fraction due to their fragile nature, but we believe that they are from the same impact event as the green pancake spherules. The <250 mm size fractions from both columns were disaggregated using ultrasonics and re-sieved. The 63-125 mm size fractions were then searched for shocked quartz using a petrographic microscope. At the peak-abundance level, the number of shocked quartz grains in the 63-125 mm size fraction is about 7/g of sample. Some of the

  12. Hydrogel based sensor arrays (2 × 2) with perforated piezoresistive diaphragms for metabolic monitoring (in vitro)

    PubMed Central

    Orthner, M.P.; Lin, G.; Avula, M.; Buetefisch, S.; Magda, J.; Rieth, L.W.; Solzbacher, F.

    2010-01-01

    This report details the first experimental results from novel hydrogel sensor array (2 × 2) which incorporates analyte diffusion pores into a piezoresistive diaphragm for the detection of hydrogel swelling pressures and hence chemical concentrations. The sensor assembly was comprised of three components, the active four sensors, HPMA/DMA/TEGDMA (hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA), N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMA) and crosslinker tetra-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA)) hydrogel, and backing plate. Each of the individual sensors of the array can be used with various hydrogels used to measure the presence of a number of stimuli including pH, ionic strength, and glucose concentrations. Ideally, in the future, these sensors will be used for continuous metabolic monitoring applications and implanted subcutaneously. In this paper and to properly characterize the sensor assembly, hydrogels sensitive to changes ionic strength were synthesized using hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA), N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMA) and crosslinker tetra-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and inserted into the sensor assembly. This hydrogel quickly and reversibly swells when placed environments of physiological buffer solutions (PBS) with ionic strengths ranging from 0.025 to 0.15 M, making it ideal for proof-of-concept testing and initial characterization. The assembly was wire bonded to a printed circuit board and coated with 3 ± 0.5 μm of Parylene-C using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to protect the sensor and electrical connections during ionic strength wet testing. Two versions of sensors were fabricated for comparison, the first incorporated diffusion pores into the diaphragm, and the second used a solid diaphragm with perforated backing plate. This new design (perforated diaphragm) was shown to have slightly higher sensitivity than solid diaphragm sensors with separate diffuse backing plates when coupled with the hydrogel. The sensitivities for the 1 mm × 1 mm, 1.25 mm × 1.25 mm, 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm perforated diaphragm sensors were 53.3 ± 6.5, 171.7 ± 8.8, and 271.47 ± 27.53 mV/V-M, respectively. These results show that perforations in the diaphragm can be used not only to allow the diffusion of analyte into the cavity but to increase mechanical stress in the piezoresistive diaphragm, thereby increasing sensor output signal. The time constants for swelling (τswelling) and contracting (τcontracting) were calculated by fitting the sensor output half cycles to an exponential growth function. We found that the sensors' response was initially retarded during the preliminary hydrogel conditioning period then improved after 3–5 cycles with values of approximately 9 and 7 min for τswelling and τcontracting. For all sensors tested τswelling > τcontracting. This may be due to the increased loading on the hydrogel from the diaphragm during the swelling process. During contraction the diaphragm aids the hydrogel by reversibly applying mechanical pressure and therefore reducing τcontracting. Long term stability testing showed the sensors remained functional for upwards of 2 weeks in the test phosphate buffer solution (PBS). PMID:23750073

  13. Prospective Trial of High-Dose Reirradiation Using Daily Image Guidance With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Recurrent and Second Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Cheng, Suzan; Donald, Paul J.; Purdy, James A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image-guided radiotherapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one consecutive patients were prospectively treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy from February 2006 to March 2009 to a median dose of 66 Gy (range, 60-70 Gy). None of these patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Daily helical megavoltage CT scans were obtained before each fraction as part of an image-guided radiotherapy registration protocol for patient alignment. Results: The 1- and 2-year estimates of in-field control were 72% and 65%, respectively. A total of 651 daily megavoltage CT scans were obtained. The mean systematic shift to account for interfraction motion was 1.38 {+-} 1.25 mm, 1.79 {+-} 1.45 mm, and 1.98 {+-} 1.75 mm for the medial-lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Pretreatment shifts of >3 mm occurred in 19% of setups in the medial-lateral, 27% in the superior-inferior, and 33% in the anterior-posterior directions, respectively. There were no treatment-related fatalities or hospitalizations. Complications included skin desquamation, odynophagia, otitis externa, keratitis, naso-lacrimal duct stenosis, and brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image guidance results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck.

  14. A Point-of-Care Immunosensor for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Clinical Urine Samples Using a Cuneated Polysilicon Nanogap Lab-on-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, S. R.; Hashim, U.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Poopalan, P.; Ramayya, H. R.; Iqbal Omar, M.; Haarindraprasad, R.; Veeradasan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a glycoprotein hormone secreted from the placenta, is a key molecule that indicates pregnancy. Here, we have designed a cost-effective, label-free, in situ point-of-care (POC) immunosensor to estimate hCG using a cuneated 25 nm polysilicon nanogap electrode. A tiny chip with the dimensions of 20.5 × 12.5 mm was fabricated using conventional lithography and size expansion techniques. Furthermore, the sensing surface was functionalized by (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and quantitatively measured the variations in hCG levels from clinically obtained human urine samples. The dielectric properties of the present sensor are shown with a capacitance above 40 nF for samples from pregnant women; it was lower with samples from non-pregnant women. Furthermore, it has been proven that our sensor has a wide linear range of detection, as a sensitivity of 835.88 μA mIU-1 ml-2 cm-2 was attained, and the detection limit was 0.28 mIU/ml (27.78 pg/ml). The dissociation constant Kd of the specific antigen binding to the anti-hCG was calculated as 2.23 ± 0.66 mIU, and the maximum number of binding sites per antigen was Bmax = 22.54 ± 1.46 mIU. The sensing system shown here, with a narrow nanogap, is suitable for high-throughput POC diagnosis, and a single injection can obtain triplicate data or parallel analyses of different targets. PMID:26368287

  15. Use of an Acellular Regenerative Tissue Matrix Over Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, D. Heath

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Bioengineered skin grafts, including acellular dermal matrices, may be effective in treating lower extremity and trunk wounds that are not responsive to traditional wound management. Acellular dermal wound matrix is derived from human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) tissue and provides a scaffold that supports cellular repopulation and revascularization. The major structural components of the dermis are retained during processing, and a single application has been shown to help achieve wound closure. Methods: This patient case series examined the use of HADWM on lower extremity and trunk wounds in 11 patients (6 male and 5 female) with a mean age of 55 years (range: 31–83 years). Wounds were debrided 1 to 2 times, followed by placement of HADWM (range: 4–330 cm2) on wounds that varied from the dorsal surface of the foot, lower abdomen, and lower extremity to the Achilles flap. A nonadherent layer in conjunction with bacitracin was placed over HADWM. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was placed over the HADWM and initiated continuously at −125 mm Hg for 1 to 2 weeks. After the application of NPWT, HADWM was covered with various gauze dressings using mineral oil. Results: All patients completed their treatment successfully, and follow-up ranged from 1 week to 6 months. One patient experienced an infection, which resulted in partial graft loss that required replacement with HADWM and NPWT. No additional complications occurred in the other patients. Conclusions: This patient case series demonstrated successful use of HADWM and NPWT, which further supports published studies documenting HADWM success in chronic wounds. PMID:24324850

  16. Riparian vegetation and water yield: A synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemi, Luiz Felippe; Groppo, Juliano Daniel; Trevisan, Rodrigo; Marcos de Moraes, Jorge; de Paula Lima, Walter; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio

    2012-08-01

    SummaryForested riparian zones perform numerous ecosystem functions, including the following: storing and fixing carbon; serving as wildlife habitats and ecological corridors; stabilizing streambanks; providing shade, organic matter, and food for streams and their biota; retaining sediments and filtering chemicals applied on cultivated/agricultural sites on upslope regions of the catchments. In this paper, we report a synthesis of a different feature of this type of vegetation, which is its effect on water yield. By synthesizing results from studies that used (i) the nested catchment and (ii) the paired catchment approaches, we show that riparian forests decrease water yield on a daily to annual basis. In terms of the treated area increases on average were 1.32 ± 0.85 mm day-1 and 483 ± 309 mm yr-1, respectively; n = 9. Similarly, riparian forest plantation or regeneration promoted reduced water yield (on average 1.25 ± 0.34 mm day-1 and 456 ± 125 mm yr-1 on daily and annual basis, respectively, when prorated to the catchment area subjected to treatment; n = 5). Although there are substantially fewer paired catchment studies assessing the effect of this vegetation type compared to classical paired catchment studies that manipulate the entire vegetation of small catchments, our results indicate the same trend. Despite the occurrence of many current restoration programs, measurements of the effect on water yield under natural forest restoration conditions are still lacking. We hope that presenting these gaps will encourage the scientific community to enhance the number of observations in these situations as well as produce more data from tropical regions.

  17. A three-dimensional culture system using alginate hydrogel prolongs hatched cattle embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuan; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Gao, Hui; Wu, Yi; Fang, Yuan; Wu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Ming-Jie; Bai, Jia-Hua; Liu, Yan; Evans, Alexander; Zeng, Shen-Ming

    2015-07-15

    No successful method exists to maintain the three-dimensional architecture of hatched embryos in vitro. Alginate, a linear polysaccharide derived from brown algae, has characteristics that make it an ideal material as a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix for in vitro cell, tissue, or embryo culture. In this study, alginate hydrogel was used for IVC of posthatched bovine embryos to observe their development under the 3D system. In vitro-fertilized and parthenogenetically activated posthatched bovine blastocysts were cultured in an alginate encapsulation culture system (AECS), an alginate overlay culture system (AOCS), or control culture system. After 18 days of culture, the survival rate of embryos cultured in AECS was higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05), and the embryos were expanded and elongated in AECS with the maximal length of 1.125 mm. When the AECS shrinking embryos were taken out of the alginate beads on Day 18 and cultured in the normal culture system, 9.09% of them attached to the bottoms of the plastic wells and grew rapidly, with the largest area of an attached embryo being 66.00 mm(2) on Day 32. The embryos cultured in AOCS developed monovesicular or multivesicular morphologies. Total cell number of the embryos cultured in AECS on Day 19 was significantly higher than that of embryos on Day 8. Additionally, AECS and AOCS supported differentiation of the embryonic cells. Binuclear cells were visible in Day-26 adherent embryos, and the messenger RNA expression patterns of Cdx2 and Oct4 in AOCS-cultured embryos were similar to those in vivo embryos, whereas IFNT and ISG15 messenger RNA were still expressed in Day-26 and Day-32 prolong-cultured embryos. In conclusion, AECS and AOCS did support cell proliferation, elongation, and differentiation of hatched bovine embryos during prolonged IVC. The culture system will be useful to further investigate the molecular mechanisms controlling ruminant embryo elongation and implantation. PMID

  18. Novel Approach for Selective Emitter Formation and Front Side Metallization of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Baomin

    2010-07-26

    In this project we will explore the possibility of forming the front side metallization and selective emitter layer for the crystalline silicon solar cells through using selective laser ablation to create contact openings on the front surface and a screen printer to make connections with conductive paste. Using this novel approach we expect to reduce the specific contact resistance of the silver gridlines by about one order of magnitude compared to the state-of-art industrial crystalline silicon solar cells to below 1 mΩ∙cm2, and use lightly doped n+ emitter layer with sheet resistance of not smaller than 100 Ω. This represents an enabling improvement on crystalline silicon solar cell performance and can increase the absolute efficiency of the solar cell by about 1%. In this scientific report we first present our result on the selective laser ablation of the nitride layer to make contact openings. Then we report our work on the solar cell fabrication by using the laser ablated contact openings with self-doping paste. Through various electrical property characterization and SIMS analysis, the factors limiting the cell performance have been discussed. While through this proof-of-concept project we could not reach the target on cell efficiency improvement, the process to fabricate 125mm full-sized silicon solar cells using laser ablation and self-doping paste has been developed, and a much better understanding of technical challenges has been achieved. Future direction to realize the potential of the new technology has been clearly defined.

  19. The cardiovascular and renal functional responses to the 5-HT1A receptor agonist flesinoxan in two rat models of hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Chamienia, A. L.; Johns, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. This study investigated the importance of renal sympathetic nerves in regulating sodium and water excretion from the kidneys of stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive and 2K1C Goldblatt hypertensive rats anaesthetized with chloralose/urethane (17.5/300 mg initially and supplemented at regular intervals), and prepared for measurement of renal function. 2. In stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rats, flesinoxan, 30-1000 micrograms kg-1, i.v., caused graded reductions in blood pressure and heart rate of 74 +/- 5 mmHg and 63 +/- 9 beats min-1, respectively at the highest dose (P < 0.001). Renal blood flow did not change at any dose of drug while glomerular filtration rate fell by some 20% (P < 0.001) at the highest dose of drug, absolute and fractional sodium excretions, approximately doubled at 100 micrograms kg-1, and thereafter fell to below the baseline level at 1000 micrograms kg-1. 3. This pattern of excretory response was abolished following acute renal denervation when flesinoxan caused dose-related reductions in urine flow and sodium excretion, similar to that obtained by a mechanical reduction of renal perfusion pressure. 4. Flesinoxan administration (30-1000 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) into 2K1C Goldblatt hypertensive rats caused a maximum decrease in blood pressure and heart rate (both P < 0.001) of 34 +/- 3 mmHg and 20 +/- 6 beats min-1 and while renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were autoregulated, from 160 to 125 mmHg, there were dose-related decreases in urine volume and sodium excretion from the clipped and non-clipped kidneys of approximately 50-60% at the highest dose. 5. These findings suggest that in the stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rat the renal nerves importantly control sodium and water reabsorption at the level of the tubules, whereas in 2K1C Goldblatt hypertensive rats, they play a minor role. PMID:8864520

  20. Negative pressure induces p120-catenin-dependent adherens junction disassembly in keratinocytes during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Chow, Shu-Er; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Lu, Mu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    A negative-pressure of 125mmHg (NP) has been widely used to treat chronic wounds in modern medicine. Keratinocytes under NP treatment have shown accelerated cell movement and decreased E-cadherin expression. However, the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin regulation under NP remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we investigated the E-cadherin regulation in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) under NP. HaCaT cells were treated at ambient pressure (AP) and NP for 12h. Cell movement was measured by traditional and electric wound healing assays at the 2 different pressures. Mutants with overexpression of p120-catenin (p120(ctn)) were used to observe the effect of NP on p120(ctn) and E-cadherin expression during wound healing. Cell fractionation and immunoblotting data showed that NP increased Y228-phosphorylated p120(ctn) level and resulted in the translocation of p120(ctn) from the plasma membrane to cytoplasm. Immunofluorescence images revealed that NP decreased the co-localization of p120(ctn) and E-cadherin on the plasma membrane. Knockdown of p120(ctn) reduced E-cadherin expression and accelerated cell movement under AP. Overexpression of the Y228-phosphorylation-mimic p120(ctn) decreased E-cadherin membrane expression under both AP and NP. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants conferred restored adherens junctions (AJs) under NP. The Src inhibitor blocked the phosphorylation of p120(ctn) and impeded cell migration under NP. In conclusion, Src-dependent phosphorylation of p120(ctn) can respond rapidly to NP and contribute to E-cadherin downregulation. The NP-induced disassembly of the AJ further accelerates wound healing. PMID:27220534

  1. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. High strain rate tests show similar results. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that lower elongation and reduced strain hardening behavior lead to a transition from shear to adiabatic shear failure, while high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  2. Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S.; Connolly, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m{sup 3} at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s to 6.6 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed.

  3. Hyoid bone development: An assessment of optimal CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Meghan M.; Whyms, Brian J.; Kelly, Michael P.; Doherty, Benjamin M.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Bersu, Edward T.; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2015-01-01

    The hyoid bone anchors and supports the vocal tract. Its complex shape is best studied in three dimensions, but it is difficult to capture on computed tomography (CT) images and three-dimensional volume renderings. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning and rendering parameters to accurately measure the growth and developmental anatomy of the hyoid and to determine whether it is feasible and necessary to use these parameters in the measurement of hyoids from in vivo CT scans. Direct linear and volumetric measurements of skeletonized hyoid bone specimens were compared to corresponding CT images to determine the most accurate scanning parameters and three-dimensional rendering techniques. A pilot study was undertaken using in vivo scans from a retrospective CT database to determine feasibility of quantifying hyoid growth. Scanning parameters and rendering technique affected accuracy of measurements. Most linear CT measurements were within 10% of direct measurements; however, volume was overestimated when CT scans were acquired with a slice thickness greater than 1.25 mm. Slice-by-slice thresholding of hyoid images decreased volume overestimation. The pilot study revealed that the linear measurements tested correlate with age. A fine-tuned rendering approach applied to small slice thickness CT scans produces the most accurate measurements of hyoid bones. However, linear measurements can be accurately assessed from in vivo CT scans at a larger slice thickness. Such findings imply that investigation into the growth and development of the hyoid bone, and the vocal tract as a whole, can now be performed using these techniques. PMID:25810349

  4. Surface dose measurement using TLD powder extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapley, P. . E-mail: rapleyp@tbh.net

    2006-10-01

    Surface/near-surface dose measurements in therapeutic x-ray beams are important in determining the dose to the dermal and epidermal skin layers during radiation treatment. Accurate determination of the surface dose is a difficult but important task for proper treatment of patients. A new method of measuring surface dose in phantom through extrapolation of readings from various thicknesses of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) powder has been developed and investigated. A device was designed, built, and tested that provides TLD powder thickness variation to a minimum thickness of 0.125 mm. Variations of the technique have been evaluated to optimize precision with consideration of procedural ease. Results of this study indicate that dose measurements (relative to D{sub max}) in regions of steep dose gradient in the beam axis direction are possible with a precision (2 standard deviations [SDs]) as good as {+-} 1.2% using the technique. The dosimeter was developed and evaluated using variation to the experimental method. A clinically practical procedure was determined, resulting in measured surface dose of 20.4 {+-} 2% of the D{sub max} dose for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 80-cm source-to-surface distance (SSD), Theratron 780 Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}C) beam. Results obtained with TLD powder extrapolation compare favorably to other methods presented in the literature. The TLD powder extrapolation tool has been used clinically at the Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC) to measure surface dose effects under a number of conditions. Results from these measurements are reported. The method appears to be a simple and economical tool for surface dose measurement, particularly for facilities with TLD powder measurement capabilities.

  5. Late Quaternary slip history of the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault in San Gorgonio Pass, southern California: The role of a subsidiary left-lateral fault in strand switching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendrick, Katherine J.; Matti, Jonathan; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The fault history of the Mill Creek strand of the San Andreas fault (SAF) in the San Gorgonio Pass region, along with the reconstructed geomorphology surrounding this fault strand, reveals the important role of the left-lateral Pinto Mountain fault in the regional fault strand switching. The Mill Creek strand has 7.1–8.7 km total slip. Following this displacement, the Pinto Mountain fault offset the Mill Creek strand 1–1.25 km, as SAF slip transferred to the San Bernardino, Banning, and Garnet Hill strands. An alluvial complex within the Mission Creek watershed can be linked to palinspastic reconstruction of drainage segments to constrain slip history of the Mill Creek strand. We investigated surface remnants through detailed geologic mapping, morphometric and stratigraphic analysis, geochronology, and pedogenic analysis. The degree of soil development constrains the duration of surface stability when correlated to other regional, independently dated pedons. This correlation indicates that the oldest surfaces are significantly older than 500 ka. Luminescence dates of 106 ka and 95 ka from (respectively) 5 and 4 m beneath a younger fan surface are consistent with age estimates based on soil-profile development. Offset of the Mill Creek strand by the Pinto Mountain fault suggests a short-term slip rate of ∼10–12.5 mm/yr for the Pinto Mountain fault, and a lower long-term slip rate. Uplift of the Yucaipa Ridge block during the period of Mill Creek strand activity is consistent with thermochronologic modeled uplift estimates.

  6. Position-resolved Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Butterling, M.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2013-06-01

    A new method which allows for position-resolved positron lifetime spectroscopy studies in extended volume samples is presented. In addition to the existing technique of in-situ production of positrons inside large (cm3) bulk samples using high-energy photons up to 16 MeV from bremsstrahlung production, granular position-sensitive photon detectors have been employed. A beam of intense bremsstrahlung is provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear Accelerator with high Brilliance and low Emittance) which delivers electron bunches of less than 10 ps temporal width and an adjustable bunch separation of multiples of 38 ns, average beam currents of 1 mA, and energies up to 40 MeV. Since the generation of bremsstrahlung and the transport to the sample preserves the sharp timing of the electron beam, positrons generated inside the entire sample volume by pair production feature a sharp start time stamp for positron annihilation lifetime studies with high timing resolutions and high signal to background ratios due to the coincident detection of two annihilation photons. Two commercially available detectors from a high-resolution medial positron-emission tomography system are being employed with 169 individual Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillation crystals, each. In first experiments, a positron-lifetime gated image of a planar Si/SiO2 (pieces of 12.5 mm × 25 mm size) sample and a 3-D structured metal in Teflon target could be obtained proving the feasibility of a three dimensional lifetime-gated tomographic system.

  7. Optical spectroscopy with a near-single-mode fiber-feed and adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Angel, J. Roger P.; Shelton, J. Christopher

    1998-07-01

    We report on first astronomical results with a cross-dispersed optical echelle spectrograph fed by a near single-mode fiber. We also present on a novel design of a new adaptive optics (AO) optimized fiber-fed cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph. The spectrograph is designed to match with AO corrected images in the optical bands provided by such as the Mt. Wilson 100 inch, Starfire Optical Range 3.5 m AO telescopes. Ultimately, it will be installed at the 6.5 m MMT, when this has high resolution AO correcting the optical spectrum. The spectrograph, fed by a 10 micron fused silica fiber, is unique in that the entire spectrum from 0.4 micron to 1.0 micron will be almost completely covered at resolution 200,000 in one exposure. The detector is a 2k X 4k AR coated back illuminated CCD with 15 micron pixel size. The close order spacing allowed by the sharp AO image makes the full cover possible. A 250 X 125 mm(superscript 2) Milton Roy R2 echelle grating with 23.2 grooves mm(superscript -1) and a blaze angle of 63.5 deg provides main dispersion. A double pass BK7 prism with 21 deg wedge angle provides cross dispersion, covering the spectrum from order 193 to 77. The spectrograph is used in the quasi- Littrow configuration with an off-axis Maksutov collimator/camera. The fiber feeds the AO corrected beams from the telescope Cassegrain focus to the spectrograph, which is set up on an optical bench. The spectrograph will be used mainly to study line profiles of solar type stars, to explore problems of indirect detection of planets and also study interstellar medium, circumstellar medium and metal abundance and isotopic ratios of extremely metal-poor stars.

  8. Net irrigation requirements for maize (Zea mays L.) in Bocono-Masparro interfluvium area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias Ramirez, Asdrubal Jesus; Moreno Pizani, Maria Alejandra

    2013-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture is one of the largest consumers of fresh water. In situations where water resources are limited, the irrigation for crops has led to water use conflicts because of human, hydroelectric and industrial demands. Thus, achieving precise information about water availability and water needs of crops becomes safety factors to guarantee sustainable development of irrigated crops in the future. In Bocono-Masparro interfluvium area located within Barinas and Portuguesa states in Venezuela, there has been a significant increase in intensive farming with maize (Zea mays L.) which made essential to determine the availability of irrigation water to meet the crop requirement and improve the management based on planning designs. Due to the lack of irrigation requirements data for the study area, a methodology was developed to estimate the net irrigation requirements (NIR). Therefore, the available information of this region related to climate, soil and irrigation was used to estimate NIR for maize through CROPWAT 8.0 model. There were established different crop-climate-soil combinations that allowed estimating NIR. It was found that NIR did not exceed the value of 125 mm/month in all of the combinations. Based on these results, a NIR spatial distribution map was obtained through the use of ArcView 3.2 ®. The results showed that the highest NIR were located in the northeast sector of the study area which was associated to the influence of the Weather Station named San Hipolito. Additionally, the estimated availability of groundwater was found to be higher than the surface water, and both combined exceeded the demands of the study area. The model CROPWAT 8.0 provided necessary information for irrigation planning in large scale. A NIR map developed through the proposed methodology represents a useful tool to integrate water balance factors.

  9. Initial Experience Using Closed Incision Negative Pressure Therapy after Immediate Postmastectomy Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sigalove, Steven R.; Maxwell, G. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Although immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction is favored over delayed reconstruction, it remains associated with high complication rates. Potential complications include seroma formation, dehiscence, infection, and tissue necrosis along incision edges. Closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT; Prevena Incision Management System, KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, Tex.) has been reported to help hold incision edges together, protect incisions from external contamination, and remove fluid and infectious material. We investigated outcomes of applying ciNPT with a customizable dressing over closed incisions in 13 patients (25 breasts) who received immediate postmastectomy reconstruction as part of 2-stage expander/implant breast reconstruction. Nipple-sparing mastectomy was performed on 14 breasts, reduction-pattern mastectomy on 6 breasts, and skin-sparing mastectomy on 5 breasts. All breasts had ciNPT with a customizable dressing applied over the entire clean closed incision immediately after surgery at −125 mmHg for an average of 4.3 days. At 3-month follow-up, 24 of the 25 (96%) breasts had achieved healing. Delayed hematoma occurred on postoperative day 13 in 1 breast in the nipple-sparing mastectomy group and resolved. In the reduction-pattern mastectomy group, superficial dehiscence occurred on 3 breasts and resolved with local wound care. One breast in that group developed flap necrosis requiring surgical revision. Less drainage was observed in attached closed-suction drains, so time to drain removal was reduced from an estimated average of 12–14 days to 8.2 days. Based on the initial experience in this study, larger studies are warranted to evaluate the use of ciNPT with customizable or peel-and-place dressings after immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction. PMID:27536498

  10. Expanded secondary craters in the Arcadia Planitia region, Mars: Evidence for tens of Myr-old shallow subsurface ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Donna; McEwen, Alfred S.; Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane

    2015-03-01

    A range of observations indicates widespread subsurface ice throughout the mid and high latitudes of Mars in the form of both pore-filling and excess ice. It is generally thought that this ice was recently emplaced and is not older than a hundred thousand to a few millions of years old based on ice stability and orbital-induced climate change. We analyze the distribution of subsurface ice in Arcadia Planitia, located in the northern mid latitudes, by mapping thermokarstically expanded secondary craters, providing additional evidence for extensive excess ice down to fairly low latitudes (less than 40°N). We further infer the minimum age of this subsurface ice based on the ages of the four primary craters that are thought to be the source of a large portion of these secondaries, which yields estimates on the order of tens of millions of years old - much more ancient than anticipated. This estimated ancient age suggests that ice can be preserved in the shallow subsurface for long periods of time, at least in some parts of Arcadia Planitia where expanded secondary craters are especially abundant. We estimate the amount of ice lost to sublimation during crater expansion based on measurements of expanded secondary craters in HiRISE Digital Terrain Models. The loss is equivalent to a volume of ice between ∼140 and 360 km3, which would correspond to a global layer of 1-2.5 mm thick. We further argue that much more ice (at least 6000 km3) is likely preserved beneath the un-cratered regions of Arcadia Planitia since significant loss of this excess ice would have caused extensive terrain dissection and the removal of the expanded secondary craters. Both the loss of ice due to secondary crater expansion and the presence of this ice today have implications for the martian climate.

  11. Immediate loading short implants inserted on low bone quantity for the rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla using an All-on-4 design.

    PubMed

    Maló, P; de Araújo Nobre, M A; Lopes, A V; Rodrigues, R

    2015-08-01

    More studies evaluating the outcome of short-length dental implants in immediate loading are needed. To evaluate the use of short-length tapered implants in immediate loading for complete edentulous maxillae rehabilitations using an All-on-4 design. This retrospective clinical study included a cohort of 43 patients with 172 implants (74 short-length implants) inserted in low bone quantity. The patients were followed between 4 months and 6 years (average = 3 years). Outcome measures were implant survival, marginal bone remodelling, biological and mechanical complications. Two patients with four short-length implants were lost to follow-up during the first year. Three short and three long implants failed in four patients, rendering an overall cumulative survival rate implant and patient level, respectively, of 95.7% and 95.1% for short implants, 100% for regular implants and 96.6% and 95.2% for long implants. The average marginal bone remodelling at 1 and 3 years was 0.97 and 1.25 mm for the short implants, 0.82 and 0.87 mm for regular implants and 0.87 and 0.98 mm for long implants. Three patients presented 4 short-length implants with peri-implant pockets (3 implants in 2 patients were pseudo-pockets). Mechanical complications were registered in 13 patients (7 provisional prostheses fractures and 6 abutment screw loosening). All complications were treated successfully. Within the limitations of this clinical study, the short-term outcome of fixed prosthetic complete edentulous maxillae rehabilitations supported by short-length implants inserted in low bone quantity areas is viable. Long-term clinical studies are necessary for evaluating the outcome of these implants. PMID:25757870

  12. Automated quantification of pulmonary emphysema from computed tomography scans: comparison of variation and correlation of common measures in a large cohort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to retrospectively investigate the variation of standard indices of pulmonary emphysema from helical computed tomographic (CT) scans as related to inspiration differences over a 1 year interval and determine the strength of the relationship between these measures in a large cohort. 626 patients that had 2 scans taken at an interval of 9 months to 15 months (μ: 381 days, σ: 31 days) were selected for this work. All scans were acquired at a 1.25mm slice thickness using a low dose protocol. For each scan, the emphysema index (EI), fractal dimension (FD), mean lung density (MLD), and 15th percentile of the histogram (HIST) were computed. The absolute and relative changes for each measure were computed and the empirical 95% confidence interval was reported both in non-normalized and normalized scales. Spearman correlation coefficients are computed between the relative change in each measure and relative change in inspiration between each scan-pair, as well as between each pair-wise combination of the four measures. EI varied on a range of -10.5 to 10.5 on a non-normalized scale and -15 to 15 on a normalized scale, with FD and MLD showing slightly larger but comparable spreads, and HIST having a much larger variation. MLD was found to show the strongest correlation to inspiration change (r=0.85, p<0.001), and EI, FD, and HIST to have moderately strong correlation (r = 0.61-0.74, p<0.001). Finally, HIST showed very strong correlation to EI (r = 0.92, p<0.001), while FD showed the least strong relationship to EI (r = 0.82, p<0.001). This work shows that emphysema index and fractal dimension have the least variability overall of the commonly used measures of emphysema and that they offer the most unique quantification of emphysema relative to each other.

  13. Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Jason P.; Vörösmarty, Charles J.; Dingman, S. Lawrence; Ward, Larry G.; Meybeck, Michel

    2006-02-01

    An assessment is made of contemporary effective sea-level rise (ESLR) for a sample of 40 deltas distributed worldwide. For any delta, ESLR is a net rate, defined by the combination of eustatic sea-level rise, the natural gross rate of fluvial sediment deposition and subsidence, and accelerated subsidence due to groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction. ESLR is estimated under present conditions using a digital data set of delta boundaries and a simple model of delta dynamics. The deltas in this study represent all major climate zones, levels of population density, and degrees of economic development. Collectively, the sampled deltas serve as the endpoint for river basins draining 30% of the Earth's landmass, and 42% of global terrestrial runoff. Nearly 300 million people inhabit these deltas. For the contemporary baseline, ESLR estimates range from 0.5 to 12.5 mm yr - 1 . Decreased accretion of fluvial sediment resulting from upstream siltation of artificial impoundments and consumptive losses of runoff from irrigation are the primary determinants of ESLR in nearly 70% of the deltas. Approximately 20% of the deltas show accelerated subsidence, while only 12% show eustatic sea-level rise as the predominant effect. Extrapolating contemporary rates of ESLR through 2050 reveals that 8.7 million people and 28,000 km 2 of deltaic area in the sample set of deltas could suffer from enhanced inundation and increased coastal erosion. The population and area inundated rise significantly when considering increased flood risk due to storm surge. This study finds that direct anthropogenic effects determine ESLR in the majority of deltas studied, with a relatively less important role for eustatic sea-level rise. Serious challenges to human occupancy of deltaic regions worldwide are thus conveyed by factors which to date have been studied less comprehensively than the climate change-sea-level rise question.

  14. Anterior Segment Dysgenesis and Early-Onset Glaucoma in nee Mice with Mutation of Sh3pxd2b

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Koehn, Demelza; John, Simon W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Mutations in SH3PXD2B cause Frank-Ter Haar syndrome, a rare condition characterized by congenital glaucoma, as well as craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiac anomalies. The nee strain of mice carries a spontaneously arising mutation in Sh3pxd2b. The purpose of this study was to test whether nee mice develop glaucoma. Methods. Eyes of nee mutants and strain-matched controls were comparatively analyzed at multiple ages by slit lamp examination, intraocular pressure recording, and histologic analysis. Cross sections of the optic nerve were analyzed to confirm glaucomatous progression. Results. Slit lamp examination showed that, from an early age, nee mice uniformly exhibited severe iridocorneal adhesions around the entire circumference of the eye. Presumably as a consequence of aqueous humor outflow blockage, they rapidly developed multiple indices of glaucoma. By 3 to 4 months of age, they exhibited high intraocular pressure (30.8 ± 12.5 mm Hg; mean ± SD), corneal opacity, and enlarged anterior chambers. Although histologic analyses at P17 did not reveal any indices of damage, similar analysis at 3 to 4 months of age revealed a course of progressive retinal ganglion cell loss, optic nerve head excavation, and axon loss. Conclusions. Eyes of nee mice exhibit anterior segment dysgenesis and early-onset glaucoma. Because SH3PXD2B is predicted to be a podosome adaptor protein, these findings implicate podosomes in normal development of the iridocorneal angle and the genes influencing podosomes as candidates in glaucoma. Because of the early-onset, high-penetrance glaucoma, nee mice offer many potential advantages as a new mouse model of the disease. PMID:21282566

  15. A digital volumetric tomography (DVT) study in the mandibular molar region for miniscrew placement during mixed dentition

    PubMed Central

    Bhattad, Mayur S.; Baliga, Sudhindra; Vibhute, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess bone thickness for miniscrew placement in the mandible during mixed dentition by using digital volumetric tomograph (DVT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 15 healthy patients aged 8-10 years old, with early exfoliated mandibular second deciduous molar, were included. DVT images of one quadrant of the mandible were obtained using Kodak extraoral imaging systems and analyzed by Kodak dental imaging software. The error of the method (EM) was calculated using Dahlberg's formula. Mean and standard deviation were calculated at 6 and 8 mm from the cementoenamel junction (CEJ).Paired t-test was used to analyze the measurements. RESULTS: Buccal cortical bone thickness, mesiodistal width and buccolingual bone depth at 6 mm were found to be 1.73 + 0.41, 2.15 + 0.49 and 13.18 + 1.22 mm, respectively; while at 8 mm measurements were 2.42 + 0.34, 2.48 + 0.33 and 13.65 + 1.25 mm, respectively. EM for buccal cortical bone thickness, mesiodistal width and buccolingual bone depth was 0.58, 0.40 and 0.48, respectively. The difference in measurement at 6 and 8 mm for buccal cortical plate thickness (P < 0.05) and buccolingual bone thickness (P < 0.05) was found to be significant, whereas for mesiodistal width it was insignificant (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Bone thickness measurement has shown promising evidence for safe placement of miniscrews in the mandible during mixed dentition. The use of miniscrew is the best alternative, even in younger patients. PMID:25992988

  16. A wind-driving disc model for the mm-wavelength polarization structure of HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, Titos; Tzeferacos, Petros; Königl, Arieh

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of spatially resolved mm- and cm-wavelength polarimetry in protostellar accretion discs could help clarify the role of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport in these systems. The best case to date is that of HL Tau, where the inability to produce a good fit to the 1.25-mm data with a combination of vertical and azimuthal magnetic field components was interpreted as implying that centrifugally driven winds (CDWs) are probably not a significant transport mechanism on the ˜102 au scale probed by the observations. Using synthetic polarization maps of heuristic single-field-component discs and of a post-processed simulation of a wind-driving disc, we demonstrate that a much better fit to the data can be obtained if the radial field component, a hallmark of the CDW mechanism, dominates in the polarized emission region. A similar inference was previously made in modelling the far-infrared polarization map of the pc-scale dust ring in the Galactic centre. To reconcile this interpretation with theoretical models of protostellar discs, which indicate that the wind is launched from a comparatively high elevation above the mid-plane, we propose that most of the polarized emission originates - with a high (≳ 10%) intrinsic degree of polarization - in small (≲ 0.1 mm) grains that remain suspended above the mid-plane, and that the bulk of the mm-wavelength emission is produced - with low intrinsic polarization - by larger grains that have settled to the mid-plane.

  17. Pool boiling enhancement through bubble induced convective liquid flow in feeder microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    Bubbles departing from the nucleation sites induce a liquid flow from the bulk to the heated surface during pool boiling. Alternating the nucleating regions with non-nucleating regions facilitates separate liquid-vapor pathways for departing vapor bubbles and returning liquid. We explored an additional enhancement through liquid feeder channels on the heater surface directing the returning liquid towards the nucleating region. The nucleating bubbles were confined to the nucleating region as the returning liquid flow induced strong convective currents over the non-nucleating regions. In the best performing configuration, the nucleating regions were 0.5 mm wide, separated by non-nucleating regions of width 2.125 mm, which corresponded to the bubble departure diameter. The non-nucleating regions contained 0.5 mm wide feeder channels directing liquid towards the nucleating region. High speed images indicated distinct vapor columns over the nucleating regions with liquid channeled through the feeder channels. At higher heat fluxes, the strong liquid currents established over the feeder channels suppressed any undesirable nucleation in them keeping the separated vapor-liquid pathways functional. This enhancement technique resulted in a critical heat flux of 394 W/cm2 at a wall superheat of 5.5 °C which translated to a heat transfer coefficient of 713 kW/m2 °C. The additional surface area and high heat transfer coefficient due to microchannel flow in feeder channels, and the unobstructed surface available for the bubbles to expand over the prime heat transfer surface area before departing were seen to be responsible for their superior performance.

  18. Uncemented total hip arthroplasty in patients younger than 50 years: a 6- to 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tian J; You, Mu Z; Xing, Pei F; Bin, Shen; Ke, Zhou Zhong; Jing, Yang

    2010-04-01

    Young patients are expected to place increased demands on total hip arthroplasty (THA) because they are more active and have a longer life expectancy. The long-term outcome of the Charnley low-friction arthroplasty in young, active patients has been shown to be associated with a high degree of polyethylene wear and osteolysis. However, cementless acetabular components have been shown to be successful in young patients.We evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of 77 cementless THAs in 81 young, active patients at a mean follow-up of 7.5 years. Mean preoperative Harris Hip Score improved from 46.24 to 96.5 points at 6 years. One acetabular component showed aseptic loosening 10 years postoperatively. Three patients (3 hips) underwent bone grafts and liner renewal for severe osteolysis around the acetabular component. The rate of survival at 6 years for loosening was 98.8%, and for revision of the liner was 95.5% (95% confidence interval, 93%-98%). Mean liner wear rate was 0.125 mm/year (range, 0.0-0.39 mm/year). Acetabular osteolysis was found in 14% (9 hips) of the 67 hips and was related to polyethylene wear (P=.0024). Although there was only 1 cup loosening in this study, there was a high rate of linear wear of the polyethylene liner and acetabular osteolysis in young, active patients. Further follow-up is therefore needed, and osteolysis and polyethylene wear should continue to be observed in young, active patients. PMID:20415300

  19. Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, William J

    2009-01-01

    Space flight (SF) and dust inhalation in habitats cause hypertension whereas in SF (alone) there is no consistent hypertension but reduced diurnal blood pressure (BP) variation instead. Current pharmaceutical subcutaneous delivery systems are inadequate and there is impairment in the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and deterioration of some pharmaceuticals. Data obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Freedom of Information Act shows that Irwin returned from his 12-day Apollo 15 mission in 1971 and was administered a bicycle stress test. With just three minutes of exercise, his BP was >275/125 mm Hg (heart rate of only 130 beats per minute). There was no acute renal insult. Irwin’s apparent spontaneous remission is suggested to be related to the increase of a protective vasodilator, and his atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reduced with SF because of reduced plasma volume. With invariable malabsorption and loss of bone/muscle storage sites, there are significant (P < 0.0001) reductions of magnesium (Mg) required for ANP synthesis and release. Reductions of Mg and ANP can trigger pronounced angiotensin (200%), endothelin, and catecholamine elevations (clearly shown in recent years) and vicious cycles between the latter and Mg deficits. There is proteinuria, elevated creatinine, and reduced renal concentrating ability with the potential for progressive inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced renal disease and hypertension with vicious cycles. After SF, animals show myocardial endothelial injuries and increased vascular resistance of extremities in humans. Even without dust, hypertension might eventually develop from renovascular hypertension during very long missions. Without sufficient endothelial protection from pharmaceuticals, a comprehensive gene research program should begin now. PMID:21694921

  20. Different systolic blood pressure targets for people with history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack: PAST-BP (Prevention After Stroke—Blood Pressure) randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Richard J; Roalfe, Andrea; Fletcher, Kate; Taylor, Clare J; Martin, Una; Virdee, Satnam; Greenfield, Sheila; Hobbs, F D Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether using intensive blood pressure targets leads to lower blood pressure in a community population of people with prevalent cerebrovascular disease. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting 99 general practices in England, with participants recruited in 2009-11. Participants People with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack whose systolic blood pressure was 125 mm Hg or above. Interventions Intensive systolic blood pressure target (<130 mm Hg or 10 mm Hg reduction from baseline if this was <140 mm Hg) or standard target (<140 mm Hg). Apart from the different target, patients in both arms were actively managed in the same way with regular reviews by the primary care team. Main outcome measure Change in systolic blood pressure between baseline and 12 months. Results 529 patients (mean age 72) were enrolled, 266 to the intensive target arm and 263 to the standard target arm, of whom 379 were included in the primary analysis (182 (68%) intensive arm; 197 (75%) standard arm). 84 patients withdrew from the study during the follow-up period (52 intensive arm; 32 standard arm). Mean systolic blood pressure dropped by 16.1 mm Hg to 127.4 mm Hg in the intensive target arm and by 12.8 mm Hg to 129.4 mm Hg in the standard arm (difference between groups 2.9 (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 5.7) mm Hg; P=0.03). Conclusions Aiming for target below 130 mm Hg rather than 140 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure in people with cerebrovascular disease in primary care led to a small additional reduction in blood pressure. Active management of systolic blood pressure in this population using a <140 mm Hg target led to a clinically important reduction in blood pressure. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29062286. PMID:26919870

  1. Pre-construction of giant steerable science mirror for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Zhao, Hongchao; Guo, Peng; An, Qichang; Jiang, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    The Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics (CIOMP) team is developing the Giant Steerable Science Mirror (GSSM) for Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) which will get into the preliminary design phase in 2016. To develop the passive support structure system for the largest elliptic-plan flat mirror and smoothest tracking mechanism for the gravity-invariant condition, CIOMP is designing and building a 1/4 scale, functionally accurate version of the GSSM prototype. The prototype will incorporate the same optical-mechanical system and electric control system as the GSSM. The size of the prototype mirror is 898.5mm×634mm×12.5mm with elliptic-plan figure and will be supported by 18 points whiffletree on axial and 12 points whiffletree on lateral. The mirror surface figure will be evaluated by SlopeRMS which is the final evaluation method used in the actual GSSM. The prototype allows the mirror point to and be tested in five specified gravity orientations and meet the requirements of SlopeRMS. The prototype testing platform will have the interfaces with direct drive systems. The jitter testing will be implemented on the prototype system to verify the bearing, the encoder, the servo control algorithm in the low speed up to 5 arcsecond per second. The total prototype system configured mirror surface figure will be better than 1 micro radian SlopeRMS in each tested orientation. The positioner jitter will be less than 0.1 arcsecond RMS for tilt and rotator axis respectively and will be analyzed with frequency domain to meet the requirements of the TMT adaptive optics system. The pre-construction will be completed at the beginning of 2016 and provide the technical support to the preliminary design of GSSM.

  2. Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2005-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

  3. Does length of prostate biopsy cores have an impact on diagnosis of prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Müslüm; İslamoğlu, Ekrem; Yalçınkaya, Soner; Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Savaş, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether core length is a significant biopsy parameter in the detection of prostate cancer. Material and methods We retrospectively analyzed pathology reports of the specimens of 188 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone initial transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy, and compared biopsy core lengths of the patients with, and without prostate cancer. The biopsy specimens of prostate cancer patients were divided into 3 groups according to core length, and the data obtained were compared (Group 1; total core length <10 mm, Group 2; total core length 10 mm–19 mm, and Group 3; total core length >20 mm). Biopsy core lengths of the patients diagnosed as prostate cancer, and benign prostatic hyperplasia were compared, and a certain cut-off value for core length with optimal diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer was calculated. Results Mean age, PSA and total length of cores were 65.08±7.41 years, 9.82±6.34 ng/mL and 11.2±0.2 mm, respectively. Assessment of biopsy core lengths showed that cores with cancer (n=993, median length 12.5 mm) were significantly longer than benign cores (n=1185, median length=11.3 mm) (p<0.001). Core length analysis yielded 12 mm cores have an optimal sensitivity (41.9%) and specificity (62%) for detection of cancer (odds ratio: 1.08). Conclusion Biopsy core length is one of the most important parameter that determines the quality of biopsy and detection of prostate cancer. A median sample length of 12 mm is ideal lower limit for cancer detection, and biopsy procedures which yield shorter biopsy cores should be repeated.

  4. Pulmonary airways tree segmentation from CT examinations using adaptive volume of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Won Pil; Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Pu, Jiantao; Tan, Jun; Gur, David

    2009-02-01

    Airways tree segmentation is an important step in quantitatively assessing the severity of and changes in several lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cystic fibrosis. It can also be used in guiding bronchoscopy. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated scheme for segmenting the airways tree structure depicted on chest CT examinations. After lung volume segmentation, the scheme defines the first cylinder-like volume of interest (VOI) using a series of images depicting the trachea. The scheme then iteratively defines and adds subsequent VOIs using a region growing algorithm combined with adaptively determined thresholds in order to trace possible sections of airways located inside the combined VOI in question. The airway tree segmentation process is automatically terminated after the scheme assesses all defined VOIs in the iteratively assembled VOI list. In this preliminary study, ten CT examinations with 1.25mm section thickness and two different CT image reconstruction kernels ("bone" and "standard") were selected and used to test the proposed airways tree segmentation scheme. The experiment results showed that (1) adopting this approach affectively prevented the scheme from infiltrating into the parenchyma, (2) the proposed method reasonably accurately segmented the airways trees with lower false positive identification rate as compared with other previously reported schemes that are based on 2-D image segmentation and data analyses, and (3) the proposed adaptive, iterative threshold selection method for the region growing step in each identified VOI enables the scheme to segment the airways trees reliably to the 4th generation in this limited dataset with successful segmentation up to the 5th generation in a fraction of the airways tree branches.

  5. Proximal HCO3- reabsorption and the determinants of tubular and capillary PCO2 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maddox, D A; Atherton, L J; Deen, W M; Gennari, F J

    1984-07-01

    Studies were carried out in Munich-Wistar rats to define the CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) profile in the surface tubules and capillaries of the kidney and to relate these measurements to proximal tubular HCO3- reabsorption, renal blood flow, and O2 consumption. In euvolemic rats, PCO2 in Bowman's space (BS) was 12.5 mmHg higher than in arterial blood, indicating CO2 addition to the arterial tree as it traverses the cortex. PCO2 further rose by 3.9 mmHg between the efferent arteriole (EA) and the peritubular capillaries (PC) (P less than 0.01) and by 4.9 mmHg between BS and the early proximal tubule (EP) (P less than 0.01). In studies with paired measurements, PCO2 in EP was 1.8 mmHg higher than in the adjacent PC (P less than 0.05). HCO3- reabsorption in EP (first 0.4-1.25 mm) was 579 pmol X min-1 X mm-1 (34.3 +/- 4.6% of the filtered load). By use of a model of facilitated diffusion of CO2 across the cell, the trans-epithelial PCO2 gradient in EP can be accounted for by the CO2 generated from HCO3- reabsorption, assuming an intracellular pH of 7.3. In the vascular compartment, roughly half the rise in PCO2 between the afferent arteriole (estimated to equal BS PCO2) and PC can be accounted for by metabolic CO2 production and half by titration of blood buffers by reabsorbed HCO3-. PMID:6430105

  6. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  7. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  8. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  9. First experience with a new negative pressure incision management system on surgical incisions after cardiac surgery in high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sternal wound infection remains a serious potential complication after cardiac surgery. A recent development for preventing wound complications after surgery is the adjunctive treatment of closed incisions with negative pressure wound therapy. Suggested mechanisms of preventive action are improving the local blood flow, removing fluids and components in these fluids, helping keep the incision edges together, protecting the wound from external contamination and promoting incision healing. This work reports on our initial evaluation and clinical experience with the Prevena™Incision Management System, a recently introduced new negative pressure wound therapy system specifically developed for treating closed surgical incisions and helping prevent potential complications. We evaluated the new treatment on sternal surgical incisions in patients with multiple co-morbidities and consequently a high risk for wound complications. Methods The Prevena™incision management system was used in 10 patients with a mean Fowler risk score of 15.1 [Range 8-30]. The negative pressure dressing was applied immediately after surgery and left in place for 5 days with a continuous application of -125 mmHg negative pressure. Wounds and surrounding skin were inspected immediately after removal of the Prevena™ incision management system and at day 30 after surgery. Results Wounds and surrounding skin showed complete wound healing with the absence of skin lesions due to the negative pressure after removal of the Prevena™ dressing. No device-related complications were observed. No wound complications occurred in this high risk group of patients until at least 30 days after surgery. Conclusions The Prevena™system appears to be safe, easy to use and may help achieve uncomplicated wound healing in patients at risk of developing wound complications after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:22145641

  10. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG HD 107146

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Fu, B.; Hughes, A. M.; Corder, S.; Isella, A.

    2015-01-10

    We present the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) continuum observations at a wavelength of 1.25 mm of the debris disk surrounding the ∼100 Myr old solar analog HD 107146. The continuum emission extends from about 30 to 150 AU from the central star with a decrease in the surface brightness at intermediate radii. We analyze the ALMA interferometric visibilities using debris disk models with radial profiles for the dust surface density parameterized as (1) a single power law, (2) a single power law with a gap, and (3) a double power law. We find that models with a gap of radial width ∼8 AU at a distance of ∼80 AU from the central star, as well as double power-law models with a dip in the dust surface density at ∼70 AU provide significantly better fits to the ALMA data than single power-law models. We discuss possible scenarios for the origin of the HD 107146 debris disk using models of planetesimal belts in which the formation of Pluto-sized objects trigger disruptive collisions of large bodies, as well as models that consider the interaction of a planetary system with a planetesimal belt and spatial variation of the dust opacity across the disk. If future observations with higher angular resolution and sensitivity confirm the fully depleted gap structure discussed here, a planet with a mass of approximately a few Earth masses in a nearly circular orbit at ∼80 AU from the central star would be a possible explanation for the presence of the gap.

  11. Hyoid Bone Development: An Assessment Of Optimal CT Scanner Parameters and Three-Dimensional Volume Rendering Techniques.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Meghan M; Whyms, Brian J; Kelly, Michael P; Doherty, Benjamin M; Gentry, Lindell R; Bersu, Edward T; Vorperian, Houri K

    2015-08-01

    The hyoid bone anchors and supports the vocal tract. Its complex shape is best studied in three dimensions, but it is difficult to capture on computed tomography (CT) images and three-dimensional volume renderings. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning and rendering parameters to accurately measure the growth and developmental anatomy of the hyoid and to determine whether it is feasible and necessary to use these parameters in the measurement of hyoids from in vivo CT scans. Direct linear and volumetric measurements of skeletonized hyoid bone specimens were compared with corresponding CT images to determine the most accurate scanning parameters and three-dimensional rendering techniques. A pilot study was undertaken using in vivo scans from a retrospective CT database to determine feasibility of quantifying hyoid growth. Scanning parameters and rendering technique affected accuracy of measurements. Most linear CT measurements were within 10% of direct measurements; however, volume was overestimated when CT scans were acquired with a slice thickness greater than 1.25 mm. Slice-by-slice thresholding of hyoid images decreased volume overestimation. The pilot study revealed that the linear measurements tested correlate with age. A fine-tuned rendering approach applied to small slice thickness CT scans produces the most accurate measurements of hyoid bones. However, linear measurements can be accurately assessed from in vivo CT scans at a larger slice thickness. Such findings imply that investigation into the growth and development of the hyoid bone, and the vocal tract as a whole, can now be performed using these techniques. PMID:25810349

  12. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 × 0.6 mm and 16 × 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 10–20% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  13. Strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of two Dual Phase steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, E.; Singh, N. K.; Forni, D.; Singha, M. K.; Gupta, N. K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the strain rate sensitivity of Dual Phase steel 1200 (DP1200) and Dual Phase steel 1400 (DP1400) under uni-axial tensile loads in the strain rate range from 0.001 s-1 to 600 s-1. These materials are advanced high strength steels (AHSS) having high strength, high capacity to dissipate crash energy and high formability. Flat sheet specimens of the materials having gauge length 10 mm, width 4 mm and thickness 2 mm (DP1200) and 1.25 mm (DP1400), are tested at room temperature (20∘C) on electromechanical universal testing machine to obtain their stress-strain relation under quasi-static condition (0.001 s-1), and on Hydro-Pneumatic machine and modified Hopkinson bar to study their mechanical behavior at medium (3 s-1, and 18 s-1) and high strain rates (200 s-1, 400 s-1, and 600 s-1) respectively. Tests under quasi-static condition are performed at high temperature (200∘C) also, and found that tensile flow stress is a increasing function of temperature. The stress-strain data has been analysed to determine the material parameters of the Cowper-Symonds and the Johnson-Cook models. A simple modification of the Johnson-Cook model has been proposed in order to obtain a better fit of tests at high temperatures. Finally, the fractographs of the broken specimens are taken by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to understand the fracture mechanism of these advanced high strength steels at different strain rates.

  14. Controlled pitch-adjustment of impeller blades for an intravascular blood pump.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Sciolino, Michael G; Downs, Emily A; Saxman, Robert S; López-Isaza, Sergio; Moskowitz, William B

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of mechanical blood pumps are currently providing circulatory support, and the incidence of their use continues to increase each year. As the use of blood pumps becomes more pervasive in the treatment of those patients with congestive heart failure, critical advances in design features to address known limitations and the integration of novel technologies become more imperative. To advance the current state-of-the-art in blood pump design, this study investigates the inclusion of pitch-adjusting blade features in intravascular blood pumps as a means to increase energy transfer; an approach not explored to date. A flexible impeller prototype was constructed with a configuration to allow for a variable range of twisted blade geometries of 60-250°. Hydraulic experiments using a blood analog fluid were conducted to characterize the pressure-flow performance for each of these twisted positions. The flexible, twisted impeller was able to produce 1-25 mmHg for 0.5-4 L/min at rotational speeds of 5,000-8,000 RPM. For a given twisted position, the pressure rise was found to decrease as a function of increasing flow rate, as expected. Generally, a steady increase in the pressure rise was observed as a function of higher twisted degrees for a constant rotational speed. Higher rotational speeds for a specific twisted impeller configuration resulted in a more substantial pressure generation. The findings of this study support the continued exploration of this unique design approach in the development of intravascular blood pumps. PMID:22691415

  15. Caffeine improves performance in double poling during acute exposure to 2,000-m altitude.

    PubMed

    Stadheim, H K; Nossum, E M; Olsen, R; Spencer, M; Jensen, J

    2015-12-15

    There is limited research on the physiological effects of caffeine (CAF) ingestion on exercise performance during acute hypoxia. The aim of the present study was therefore to test the effect of placebo (PLA) and CAF (4.5 mg/kg) on double poling (DP) performance during acute hypoxia. Thirteen male subelite cross-country skiers (V̇o2max 72.6 ± 5.68 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were included. Performance was assessed as 1) an 8-km cross-country DP time-trial (C-PT), and 2) time until task failure at a set workload equal to ∼90% of DP V̇o2max. Testing was carried out in a hypobaric chamber, at 800 mbar (Pio2: ∼125 mmHg) corresponding to ∼2,000 m above sea level in a randomized double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. CAF improved time to task failure from 6.10 ± 1.40 to 7.22 ± 1.30 min (P < 0.05) and velocity the first 4 km (P < 0.05) but not overall time usage for the 8-km C-PT. During submaximal exercise subjects reported lower pain in arms and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) following CAF ingestion. Throughout C-PTs similar RPE and pain was shown between treatments. However, higher heart rate was observed during the CAF 8 km (187 ± 7 vs. 185 ± 7; P < 0.05) and 90% C-PT (185 ± 7 vs. 181 ± 9) associated with increased ventilation, blood lactate, glucose, adrenaline, decreased pH, and bicarbonate. The present study demonstrates for the first time that CAF ingestion improves DP time to task failure although not consistently time trial performance during acute exposure to altitude. Mechanisms underpinning improvements seem related to reduced pain RPE and increased heart rate during CAF C-PTs. PMID:26494444

  16. Gender Differences of Airway Dimensions in Anatomically Matched Sites on CT in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Il; Schroeder, Joyce; Lynch, David; Newell, John; Make, Barry; Friedlander, Adam; Estépar, Raúl San José; Hanania, Nicola A.; Washko, George; Murphy, James R.; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John E.; Zach, Jordan; Butterfield, Kiel; Bowler, Russell P.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives There are limited data on, and controversies regarding gender differences in the airway dimensions of smokers. Multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were analyzed to examine whether gender could explain differences in airway dimensions of anatomically matched airways in smokers. Materials and Methods We used VIDA imaging software to analyze MDCT scans from 2047 smokers (M:F, 1021:1026) from the COPDGene® cohort. The airway dimensions were analyzed from segmental to subsubsegmental bronchi. We compared the differences of luminal area, inner diameter, wall thickness, wall area percentage (WA%) for each airway between men and women, and multiple linear regression including covariates (age, gender, body sizes, and other relevant confounding factors) was used to determine the predictors of each airway dimensions. Results Lumen area, internal diameter and wall thickness were smaller for women than men in all measured airway (18.4 vs 22.5 mm2 for segmental bronchial lumen area, 10.4 vs 12.5 mm2 for subsegmental bronchi, 6.5 vs 7.7 mm2 for subsubsegmental bronchi, respectively p < 0.001). However, women had greater WA% in subsegmental and subsubsegmental bronchi. In multivariate regression, gender remained one of the most significant predictors of WA%, lumen area, inner diameter and wall thickness. Conclusion Women smokers have higher WA%, but lower luminal area, internal diameter and airway thickness in anatomically matched airways as measured by CT scan than do male smokers. This difference may explain, in part, gender differences in the prevalence of COPD and airflow limitation. PMID:21756032

  17. Scanning pupil approach to aspheric surface slope error tolerancing in head-up display optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel approach to tolerancing slope errors of aspheric surfaces in relay optics of typical avionics head-up displays (HUD). In these systems, a beamlet entering the pilot eye occupies only a tiny fraction of HUD entrance pupil/eyebox with a typical diameter of 125mm. Consequently the beam footprint on any HUD optical surface is a small fraction of its clear aperture. This presents challenges to HUD tolerancing which is typically based on parallax (angular difference in line of sight between left and right eyes) analysis. Aspheric surfaces manufactured by sub-aperture grinding/polishing techniques add another source of error - surface slope error. This type of error not only degrades image quality of observed HUD symbology but also leads to its "waviness" and "floating" especially noticeable when a pilot moves his head within the HUD eyebox. The suggested approach allows aspheric surface slope error tolerancing that ensures an acceptable level of symbology "waviness". A narrow beamlet is traced from a pilot eye position backwards through the HUD optics until it hits the light source. Due to the small beamlet size, slope error of the aspheric surface acts primarily as an overall tilt/wedge that deviates the beam and causes it to shift. The slope error is acceptable when this shift is not resolved by a pilot eye. The beamlet is scanned over entire eyebox and field of view and the slope error tolerance is established for several zones in the aspheric surface clear aperture. The procedure is then repeated for each aspheric surface.

  18. SHERLOC: Scanning Habitable Environments With Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals, an Investigation for 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; DeFlores, L. P.; Asher, S. A.; Burton, A. S.; Clegg, S. M.; Conrad, P. G.; Edgett, K. S.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Langenhorst, F.; Fries, M.; Nealson, K. H.; Popp, J.; Sobron, P.; Steele, A.; Wiens, R. C.; Williford, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals SHERLOC investigation was recently selected for the Mars 2020 integrated payload. SHERLOC enables non-contact, spatially resolved, and highly sensitivity detection and characterization of organics and minerals in the Martian surface and near subsurface. SHERLOC is an arm-mounted, Deep UV (DUV) resonance Raman and fluorescence spectrometer utilizing a 248.6-nm DUV laser and 50 micron spot size. The laser is integrated to an autofocusing/scanning optical system, and co-boresighted to a context imager with a spatial resolution of 30 μm. SHERLOC operates over a 7 × 7 mm area through use of an internal scanning mirror. The 500 micron depth of view in conjunction with the MAHLI heritage autofocus mechanisms enables arm placements from 48 ±12.5 mm above natural or abraded surfaces without the need for rover arm repositioning/movement. Additionally, borehole interiors to a depth of ~25 mm, at angles from normal incidence to ±20 degrees, can be analyzed. Deep UV induced native fluorescence is very sensitive to condensed carbon and aromatic organics, enabling detection at or below 10-6 w/w (1 ppm) at <100 µm spatial scales. SHERLOC's deep UV resonance Raman enables detection and classification of aromatic and aliphatic organics with sensitivities of 10-2 to below 10-4 w/w at <50 µm spatial scales. In addition to organics, the deep UV Raman enables detection and classification of minerals relevant to aqueous chemistry with grain sizes below 20 µm grains. The instrument goals are to assess past aqueous history, detect the presence and preservation of potential biosignatures, and to support selection of return samples. To do this, SHERLOC will measure CHNOPS-containing mineralogy, measure the distribution and type of organics preserved at the surface, and correlate them to textural features.

  19. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahara, E.; Meilani

    2014-03-01

    Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  20. Feeding activity, salivary amylase activity, and superficial damage to soybean seed by adult Edessa meditabunda (F.) and Euschistus heros (F.) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Silva, F A C; da Silva, J J; Depieri, R A; Panizzi, Antônio Ricardo

    2012-10-01

    Greenhouse and laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate feeding activity and superficial damage to soybean seed by the brown-winged stink bug, Edessa meditabunda (F.), and the Neotropical brown stink bug, Euschistus heros (F.). Soybean plants (cv. BRS 282), at R6 stage of development were used. Thirty pairs of each species were used individually for 48 h. Two daily observations (9:00 AM and 3:00 PM) were taken to record the number of bugs (feeding/resting) on plant parts. Harvested seeds imbibed in tetrazolium solution were photographed for measurement of the damaged surface. Adult E. meditabunda significantly preferred soybean stems (19.7 bugs) to pods (2.7). Feeding/resting was similar at 9:00 AM (mean number of 28.0 bugs) and 3:00 PM (24.3). Euschistus heros equally fed/stayed on stems (7.3 bugs) and pods (6.9), although most bugs (12.3) remained on the cage net; feeding/resting on all plant structures amounted to 13.7 bugs at 9:00 AM and 17.7 bugs at 3:00 PM. Amylase activity was greater for E. heros (41.61 ± 0.89 U/mg) and almost none for E. meditabunda (2.35 ± 0.14 U/mg). The superficial damage to seeds was significantly greater for E. meditabunda (22. 9 mm(2)) compared to E. heros (12.5 mm(2)). However, E. meditabunda caused less shrinkage of the seed tegument, while E. heros damage was deeper and seeds showed reduction in size. PMID:23950088

  1. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  2. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy of Chronically Infected Wounds Using 1% Acetic Acid Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeong Ho; Lee, Hye Kyung; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Moon, Min Seon; Suh, In Suck

    2015-01-01

    Background Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) induces angiogenesis and collagen synthesis to promote tissue healing. Although acetic acid soaks normalize alkali wound conditions to raise tissue oxygen saturation and deconstruct the biofilms of chronic wounds, frequent dressing changes are required. Methods Combined use of NPWT and acetic acid irrigation was assessed in the treatment of chronic wounds, instilling acetic acid solution (1%) beneath polyurethane membranes twice daily for three weeks under continuous pressure (125 mm Hg). Clinical photographs, pH levels, cultures, and debrided fragments of wounds were obtained pre- and posttreatment. Tissue immunostaining (CD31, Ki-67, and CD45) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]; procollagen; hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha [HIF-1-alpha]; matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-1,-3,-9; and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase [TIMP]) were also performed. Results Wound sizes tended to diminish with the combined therapy, accompanied by drops in wound pH (weakly acidic or neutral) and less evidence of infection. CD31 and Ki-67 immunostaining increased (P<0.05) post-treatment, as did the levels of VEGFR, procollagen, and MMP-1 (P<0.05), whereas the VEGF, HIF-1-alpha, and MMP-9/TIMP levels declined (P<0.05). Conclusions By combining acetic acid irrigation with negative-pressure dressings, both the pH and the size of chronic wounds can be reduced and infections be controlled. This approach may enhance angiogenesis and collagen synthesis in wounds, restoring the extracellular matrix. PMID:25606491

  3. Descoberta de um aglomerado estelar massivo associado a fonte IRAS 16177-5018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman Lopes, A.; Abraham, Z.; Lépine, J. R. D.

    2003-08-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos a descoberta de um aglomerado de estrelas jovens e massivas embebido em uma região HII extensa associado com a fonte IRAS 16177-5018, que se apresenta invisível na faixa óptica do espectro eletromagnético, onde a extinção é da ordem de AV = 26 magnitudes. As observações foram feitas com a camera infravermelha (CamIV) do Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica, Brasil, equipada com um detector Hawaii de HgCdTe de 1024´1024 pixel acoplada ao telescópio de 60 cm Boller & Chivens do IAG. A fotometria obtida a partir das imagens nas bandas J, H e K (filtro estreito) mostrou a presença de fontes com excesso de emissão no infravermelho em 2.2 mm, concentradas em uma área de aproximadamente um minuto de arco quadrado em torno da nebulosa na qual esta embebido o objeto identificado como a fonte IRAS. A fonte IRAS apresenta um índice espectral (entre 2.2 21.3 mm) a = d log(l Fl) / d log l = 4.78, característico de um objeto extremamente jovem com luminosidade bolométrica (obtida da integral da densidade de fluxo entre o infravermelho próximo (1.25mm) e o infravermelho distante (100mm)) de 2.8´105L¤, o qual corresponde a uma estrela da sequência principal de idade zero de cerca de 42 M¤. A partir do diagrama cor-magnitude foi possível classificar a maioria dos membros do aglomerado como estrelas massivas mais luminosas que tipo espectral B5.

  4. Assessment of the Anterior Loop of the Mental Nerve Using Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Scan.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-I; Won, John; Al-Ardah, Aladdin; Santana, Ruben; Rice, Dwight; Lozada, Jaime

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to use cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans with oblique-transverse reconstruction modality to measure and compare the anterior loop length (AnLL) of the mental nerve between gender and age groups and to compare the difference between the right and left sides. Sixty-one female and 61 male CBCT scans were randomly selected for each age group: 21-40, 41-60, and 61-80 years. Both right- and left-side AnLLs were measured in each subject using i-CATVision software to measure AnLLs on the oblique transverse plane using multiplanar reconstruction. The anterior loop was identified in 85.2% of cases, with the mean AnLL of the 366 subjects (732 hemimandibles) being 1.46 ± 1.25 mm with no statistically significant difference between right and left sides or between different gender groups. However, the mean AnLL in the 21-40 year group (1.89 ± 1.35 mm) was larger than the AnLL in the 41-60 year group (1.35 ± 1.19 mm) and the 61-80 year group (1.13 ± 1.08 mm). In conclusion, when placing implants in close proximity to mental foramina, caution is recommended to avoid injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. No fixed distance anteriorly from the mental foramen should be considered safe. Using CBCT scans with the oblique-transverse method to accurately identify and measure the AnLL is of utmost importance in avoiding and protecting its integrity. PMID:24552176

  5. The VetMousetrap: a device for computed tomographic imaging of the thorax of awake cats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cintia R; Ranallo, Frank N; Pijanowski, Gerald J; Mitchell, Mark A; O'Brien, Mauria A; McMichael, Maureen; Hartman, Susan K; Matheson, Jodi S; O'Brien, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    The VetMousetrap, a novel device that allows computed tomography (CT) of awake cats and provides a clinically supportive environment, is described. Ten normal cats were used to test the device for ambient internal oxygen, carbon dioxide levels, and temperature. Twenty-two awake normal cats were imaged using a 16-multislice helical CT unit to evaluate dose-equivalent protocols. Two different X-ray tube potentials (kV), 80 and 120, and two different helical pitches, 0.562 and 1.75, were evaluated. The signal intensity of the pulmonary parenchyma (SIlung), signal intensity of background (SIbackgr), contrast, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Three evaluators ranked the images for sharpness of liver margins, motion, helical, and windmill artifacts. CT was successfully completed in 20 of 22 cats. No artifacts directly related to the device were detected. Overall, 75 of 80 (94%) examinations were judged to have absent or minimal motion artifact. A statistically significant difference was found for SNR (P = 0.001) and CNR (P = 0.001) between all protocols. The higher pitch protocols had significantly lower noise and higher SNR and CNR, lower motion artifact but greater helical artifacts. A protocol using 80 kV, 130 mA, 0.5s, and 0.562 pitch with 1.25mm slice thickness, and 0.625 mm slice reconstruction interval is recommended. The VetMousetrap appears to provide the opportunity for diagnostic CT imaging of the thorax of awake cats. PMID:21322386

  6. ALMA Observations of the Debris Disk around the Young Solar Analog HD 107146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Fu, B.; Hughes, A. M.; Corder, S.; Isella, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) continuum observations at a wavelength of 1.25 mm of the debris disk surrounding the ~100 Myr old solar analog HD 107146. The continuum emission extends from about 30 to 150 AU from the central star with a decrease in the surface brightness at intermediate radii. We analyze the ALMA interferometric visibilities using debris disk models with radial profiles for the dust surface density parameterized as (1) a single power law, (2) a single power law with a gap, and (3) a double power law. We find that models with a gap of radial width ~8 AU at a distance of ~80 AU from the central star, as well as double power-law models with a dip in the dust surface density at ~70 AU provide significantly better fits to the ALMA data than single power-law models. We discuss possible scenarios for the origin of the HD 107146 debris disk using models of planetesimal belts in which the formation of Pluto-sized objects trigger disruptive collisions of large bodies, as well as models that consider the interaction of a planetary system with a planetesimal belt and spatial variation of the dust opacity across the disk. If future observations with higher angular resolution and sensitivity confirm the fully depleted gap structure discussed here, a planet with a mass of approximately a few Earth masses in a nearly circular orbit at ~80 AU from the central star would be a possible explanation for the presence of the gap.

  7. Design of external insulation for VLF/LF bands via breakdown investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanabria, Doeg

    This document reports about the role of humidity and frequency upon the breakdown of air in uniform and non-uniform electric fields for the Very Low and Low Frequency (VLF/LF) Bands (10-100 kHz), used for long distance communication. Experiments were conducted using a parallel plane configuration for a gap length range of 5-52.5 mm and a frequency range of 18-52 kHz and 60 Hz. Rod/rod and rod/plane configurations were tested at 60 Hz and 30 kHz, for a gap length range of 8-1000 mm. The results indicate that the breakdown voltage at 30 kHz is affected by humidity with varying impact based on gap configuration and length. The results show that breakdown voltage at VLF/LF decreases with humidity for uniform field gaps, opposite to that observed at 60 Hz. Short (8-45 mm) non-uniform gaps show a reduction in the breakdown voltage with humidity, while no significant variation is observed for long gaps (125-1000 mm). Breakdown voltages are observed to be markedly lower for 30 kHz when compared to the same gap at 60 Hz. The observed breakdown phenomena are explained in terms of increased space charge due to the higher frequencies. Models and humidity correction to estimate breakdown voltages at VLF/LF frequencies for uniform and non-uniform configurations were developed. Electric field simulation, space charge calculation and least squares regression were used. The models are shown to be useful for predicting breakdown voltages at VLF/LF for uniform field gap spacings up to 125 mm and nonuniform field gap spacings up to 4 m.

  8. A Rabbit Model of Fat Graft Recipient Site Preconditioning Using External Negative Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Woo; Han, Yea Sik; Kim, Sin Rak; Kim, Han Kyeol; Kim, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Fat is widely used in soft tissue augmentation. Nevertheless, it has an unpredictably high resorption rate. Clinically, external expansion with negative pressure is used to increase fat graft survival. In this study, fat graft recipient sites were preconditioned by external application of negative pressure in order to test for improvements in vascularity and fat graft survival. Methods Negative pressure was applied randomly to either the left or right dorsal ear of 20 New Zealand male white rabbits at a pressure of -125 mm Hg. The negative pressure was removed one week after the skin perfusion was measured. The skin flap at each ear was elevated, and 1 g of fat was grafted above the dorsal perichondrium. After one week, the fat weight, microvessel density, mature vessel density of the skin and fat, and amount of glycerol released were measured. Three months after the grafting, the same measurements were performed, with the exception of glycerol release. Results The fat survival rate of the experimental group (75.4%±3.9%) was higher than that of the control group (53.1%±4.3%) (P<0.001). Skin perfusion was higher in the experimental group. The glycerol release in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control. The microvessel density of the skin and fat was significantly higher in the experimental group. Three months after the grafting, the skin and fat mature vessel density was significantly higher in the experimental groups. Conclusions Negative pressure prior to fat grafting increased the vascularity of the recipient site, and, accordingly, enhanced fat graft survival. PMID:25798385

  9. Distinct development of the cerebral cortex in platypus and echidna.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    Both lineages of the modern monotremes have distinctive features in the cerebral cortex, but the developmental mechanisms that produce such different adult cortical architecture remain unknown. Similarly, nothing is known about the differences and/or similarities between monotreme and therian cortical development. We have used material from the Hill embryological collection to try to answer key questions concerning cortical development in monotremes. Our findings indicate that gyrencephaly begins to emerge in the echidna brain shortly before birth (crown-rump length 12.5 mm), whereas the cortex of the platypus remains lissencephalic throughout development. The cortices of both monotremes are very immature at the time of hatching, much like that seen in marsupials, and both have a subventricular zone (SubV) within both the striatum and pallium during post-hatching development. It is particularly striking that in the platypus, this region has an extension from the palliostriatal angle beneath the developing trigeminoreceptive part of the somatosensory cortex of the lateral cortex. The putative SubV beneath the trigeminal part of S1 appears to accommodate at least two distinct types of cell and many mitotic figures and (particularly in the platypus) appears to be traversed by large numbers of thalamocortical axons as these grow in. The association with putative thalamocortical fibres suggests that this region may also serve functions similar to the subplate zone of Eutheria. These findings suggest that cortical development in each monotreme follows distinct paths from at least the time of birth, consistent with a long period of independent and divergent cortical evolution. PMID:22143038

  10. Computer-assisted, Le Fort-based, face–jaw–teeth transplantation: a pilot study on system feasiblity and translational assessment

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Ryan J.; Gordon, Chad R.; Basafa, Ehsan; Liacouras, Peter; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Le Fort-based face–jaw–teeth transplantation (FJTT) attempts to marry bone and teeth geometry of size-mismatched face–jaw–teeth segments to restore function and form due to severe mid-facial trauma. Recent development of a computer-assisted planning and execution (CAPE) system for Le Fort-based FJTT in a pre-clinical swine model offers preoperative planning, and intraoperative navigation. This paper addresses the translation of the CAPE system to human anatomy and presents accuracy results. Methods Single-jaw, Le Fort-based FJTTs were performed on plastic models, one swine and one human, and on a human cadaver. Preoperative planning defined the goal placement of the donor’s Le Fort-based FJTT segment on the recipient. Patient-specific navigated cutting guides helped achieve planned osteotomies. Intraoperative cutting guide and donor fragment placement were compared with postoperative computed tomography (CT) data and the preoperative plan. Results Intraoperative measurement error with respect to postoperative CT was less than 1.25 mm for both mock transplants and 3.59 mm for the human cadaver scenario. Donor fragment placement (as compared to the planned position) was less accurate for the human model test case (2.91 mm) compared with the swine test (2.25 mm) and human cadaver (2.26 mm). Conclusion The results indicate the viability of the CAPE system for assisting with Le Fort-based FJTT and demonstrate the potential in human surgery. This system offers a new path forward to achieving improved outcomes in Le Fort-based FJTT and can be modified to assist with a variety of other surgeries involving the head, neck, face, jaws and teeth. PMID:25230895

  11. Morphological evaluation of eccentric sets guide-plates of dcp-l 4.5 mm

    PubMed Central

    Borges, José Humberto de Souza; da Silva Filho, Antonio Lisboa; Pereira Neto, Francisco; Daher, Walter Rodrigo; de Mesquita, Alessandro Queiroz; Freitas, Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Objective To carry out isolated and comparative evaluations of the measurements of the set eccentric guide plates used in 4.5mm surgical implants, and to determine the effect of these measurements on compression strength. Methods Four eccentric guides, four large dynamic compression plates (L-DCP) from four local manufacturers, and a Vonder® 200 mm caliper brand were used. Five standard parameter measurements were created for the set eccentric guide-plate, which were identified as A to E. Four sets were made, using materials of the same factory, and identified as groups I to IV. The analyses were performed by measuring all the parameters from a ventral view of the plate, with the eccentric guide placed in the plate hole. Results Groups I and II showed the same values for all the parameters. All the groups showed the same measurements for E = 8.15 e B = 3.60. Group III: A = 8.10mm, C = 3.25mm, D = 1.25mm. Group IV: A = 7.00mm, C = 3.10mm, D = 0.30mm. Maximum compression force was (F Max.): Group I 80.58 N, Group. II: F Max. 81.63 N, Group. III: F Max. 36.32N, Group. IV: F Max. 37.52N Conclusion The measurements evaluated show a lack of standardization in the manufacture of orthopedic instruments and its effects on the values for compression strength. Level of Evidence: Level III, analytical study. PMID:24453573

  12. Matrix cracking in brittle-matrix composites with tailored interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Chao, L.Y.; Shetty, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    Matrix cracking from controlled through cracks with bridging filaments was studied in a model unidirectional composite of SiC filaments in an epoxy-bonded alumina matrix. An unbonded, frictional interface was produced by moderating the curing shrinkage of the epoxy with the alumina filler and coating the filaments with a releasing agent. Uniaxial tension test specimens (2.5 x 25 x 125 mm) with filament-bridged through cracks were fabricated by a novel two-step casting technique involving casting, precracking and joining of cracked and uncracked sections. Distinct matrix-cracking stresses, corresponding to the extension of the filament-bridged cracks, were measured in uniaxial tension tests using a high-sensitivity extensometer. The crack-length dependence of the matrix-cracking stress was found to be in good agreement with the prediction of a fracture-mechanics analysis that employed a new crack-closure force-crack-opening displacement relation in the calculation of the stress intensity for fiber-bridged cracks. The prediction was based on independent experimental measurements of the matrix fracture toughness (K{sub cm}), the interfacial sliding friction stress ({tau}) and the residual stress in the matrix ({sigma}{sub m}{sup I}). The matrix-cracking stress for crack lengths (2a) greater than 3 mm was independent of the crack length and agreed with the prediction of the steady-state theory of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans. Tests on specimens without the deliberately introduced cracks indicated a matrix-cracking stress significantly higher than the steady-state stress.

  13. Comparison of breathing gated CT images generated using a 5DCT technique and a commercial clinical protocol in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Dylan P.; Thomas, David H.; Dou, Tai H.; Lamb, James M.; Feingold, Franklin; Low, Daniel A.; Fuld, Matthew K.; Sieren, Jered P.; Sloan, Chelsea M.; Shirk, Melissa A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hofmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that a “5DCT” technique which utilizes fast helical acquisition yields the same respiratory-gated images as a commercial technique for regular, mechanically produced breathing cycles. Methods: Respiratory-gated images of an anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pig were generated using a Siemens low-pitch helical protocol and 5DCT for a range of breathing rates and amplitudes and with standard and low dose imaging protocols. 5DCT reconstructions were independently evaluated by measuring the distances between tissue positions predicted by a 5D motion model and those measured using deformable registration, as well by reconstructing the originally acquired scans. Discrepancies between the 5DCT and commercial reconstructions were measured using landmark correspondences. Results: The mean distance between model predicted tissue positions and deformably registered tissue positions over the nine datasets was 0.65 ± 0.28 mm. Reconstructions of the original scans were on average accurate to 0.78 ± 0.57 mm. Mean landmark displacement between the commercial and 5DCT images was 1.76 ± 1.25 mm while the maximum lung tissue motion over the breathing cycle had a mean value of 27.2 ± 4.6 mm. An image composed of the average of 30 deformably registered images acquired with a low dose protocol had 6 HU image noise (single standard deviation) in the heart versus 31 HU for the commercial images. Conclusions: An end to end evaluation of the 5DCT technique was conducted through landmark based comparison to breathing gated images acquired with a commercial protocol under highly regular ventilation. The techniques were found to agree to within 2 mm for most respiratory phases and most points in the lung. PMID:26133604

  14. On the importance of continental lithospheric roots in plume-continent interaction: implication for India motions over the last 130 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A.; Davaille, A.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 130 Ma, the India plate migration varied in velocity and direction. The oceanic magnetic anomalies indicates that the India-Asia convergence rate increase at ~ 90 Ma and at ~ 67 Ma. These episodes of acceleration correspond to the emplacement of Morondava and Deccan large igneous provinces, respectively. They therefore may be generated by the arrival of a mantle plume in the vicinity of India. We carried out laboratory experiments to examine and quantify the possible links between plume head impact and the acceleration of a continental plate. The latter is modelled by a buoyant raft, floating on the surface of a plexiglas tank containing Sugar Syrup, a temperature-dependent viscosity fluid. Plumes are generated by heating from below. The initial distance between the plume impact and the raft, as well as the raft size and density were systematically varied. The latter allows to evaluate the influence of a cratonic keel on the plate migration. Experimental results suggest that: (1) a continent can migrate under the influence of a plume head only if the thickness ratio between the keel and the plume head impact is greater than a critical value; (2) the maximum velocity achieved by the raft depends on the distance between the raft and the plume centre and (3) the direction taken by the raft is directly related to the position of the plume impact compared to the keel's. Given the Deccan Traps plume characteristics, the scaling laws derived from the experiments suggest that India could migrate after the plume impact with a velocity ranging between 61 and 125 mm/yr. This estimated range is fully coherent with the India plate velocity calculated from the oceanic magnetic anomalies, but it put strong constraints on the existence and position of cratonic keels under India. Moreover, India migration during the last 130 Ma can be quantitavely related to the successive impacts of three mantle plumes.

  15. Exploring {sup 57}Co as a new isotope for brachytherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Lundqvist, Hans; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The characteristics of the radionuclide {sup 57}Co make it interesting for use as a brachytherapy source. {sup 57}Co combines a possible high specific activity with the emission of relatively low-energy photons and a half-life (272 days) suitable for regular source exchanges in an afterloader. {sup 57}Co decays by electron capture to the stable {sup 57}Fe with emission of 136 and 122 keV photons. Methods: A hypothetical {sup 57}Co source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy encapsulation with the active core set as a pure cobalt cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) covered with a cylindrical stainless-steel capsule (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) was simulated using Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) code version 9.4. The radial dose function, g(r), and anisotropy function F(r,{theta}), for the line source approximation were calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism. The results were compared to well-known {sup 192}Ir and {sup 125}I radionuclides, representing the higher and the lower energy end of brachytherapy, respectively. Results: The mean energy of photons in water, after passing through the core and the encapsulation material was 123 keV. This hypothetical {sup 57}Co source has an increasing g(r) due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons, which results in a more uniform dose distribution than {sup 192}Ir. Conclusions: {sup 57}Co has many advantages compared to {sup 192}Ir due to its low-energy gamma emissions without any electron contamination. {sup 57}Co has an increasing g(r) that results in a more uniform dose distribution than {sup 192}Ir due to its multiple scattered photons. The anisotropy of the {sup 57}Co source is comparable to that of {sup 192}Ir. Furthermore, {sup 57}Co has lower shielding requirements than {sup 192}Ir.

  16. A Point-of-Care Immunosensor for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Clinical Urine Samples Using a Cuneated Polysilicon Nanogap Lab-on-Chip.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S R; Hashim, U; Gopinath, Subash C B; Poopalan, P; Ramayya, H R; Iqbal Omar, M; Haarindraprasad, R; Veeradasan, P

    2015-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a glycoprotein hormone secreted from the placenta, is a key molecule that indicates pregnancy. Here, we have designed a cost-effective, label-free, in situ point-of-care (POC) immunosensor to estimate hCG using a cuneated 25 nm polysilicon nanogap electrode. A tiny chip with the dimensions of 20.5 × 12.5 mm was fabricated using conventional lithography and size expansion techniques. Furthermore, the sensing surface was functionalized by (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and quantitatively measured the variations in hCG levels from clinically obtained human urine samples. The dielectric properties of the present sensor are shown with a capacitance above 40 nF for samples from pregnant women; it was lower with samples from non-pregnant women. Furthermore, it has been proven that our sensor has a wide linear range of detection, as a sensitivity of 835.88 μA mIU(-1) ml(-2) cm(-2) was attained, and the detection limit was 0.28 mIU/ml (27.78 pg/ml). The dissociation constant Kd of the specific antigen binding to the anti-hCG was calculated as 2.23 ± 0.66 mIU, and the maximum number of binding sites per antigen was Bmax = 22.54 ± 1.46 mIU. The sensing system shown here, with a narrow nanogap, is suitable for high-throughput POC diagnosis, and a single injection can obtain triplicate data or parallel analyses of different targets. PMID:26368287

  17. Thermomechanical responses of concrete members strengthened with cfrp sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqurashi, Abdulaziz

    Strengthening structural members means to be able to carry additional loads. Since, 1990s, a lot of materials and techniques have been established to not only increasing the capacity of member but also facing deterioration. Deterioration has become one of the worst highly maintenance cost. According to The ASCE, 27.1% of all bridges in the United States are not effectual. This is because the high traffic reflects negatively to structural members and cause deterioration of these members. This problem has been cost a lot of money. In addition, FRP has approved that it can increase the capacity of member and overcome some disadvantages such as deterioration. Therefore, CFRP sheet has become widely used. However, high temperatures affect the performance of externally bonded CFRP sheet negatively. Investigation should be carried out on relaxation and flexural performance of members under different temperatures. Therefore, this thesis focus on analyzing and investigating the performance of strengthened members exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 175 °C). The experimental program was divided to two main parts. First, 144 strengthen concrete blocks 100mm X 150mm X 75mm has been exposed to elevated temperatures. These blocks have two main categories, which are different CFRP sheet width, and different CFRP sheet length. Different CFRP width has three types, which are type 0.25B (25mm x 100mm), type 0.5B (50mm x 100mm) and type 0.75B (75mm x 100mm). Also, Different CFRP length has three types, which are type L e (bonded area of 50 mm by 90mm), 1.25 Le (area of 50mm by 125mm) and type 1.5Le (50mm by 137 mm). Second, studying the performance of RC beams exposed to elevated temperatures.

  18. Endovascular Stenting for Unsuccessful Angioplasty of the Aorta in Aortoarteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Sanjay; Kaul, Upkar A.; Arora, Ramesh

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: The efficacy and safety of endovascular stent implantation to correct dissection or a suboptimal result after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was evaluated in patients suffering from aortic stenosis due to aortoarteritis. Methods: Twelve children and young adults [aged (mean {+-} SD) 18.2 {+-} 8.7 years] underwent stent implantation after PTA of the aorta, seven for obstructive dissection, four for ineffective balloon dilatation, and one for recurrent restenosis. Nine patients underwent implantation of self-expandable stents and three received balloon-expandable Palmaz stents. Results: Stent implantation could be successfully performed in all 12 patients. After stent implantation, the peak systolic pressure gradient decreased from 91 {+-} 33.5 mmHg to 12.4 {+-} 12.5 mmHg (p < 0.001). The diameter of the stenosed segment increased from 4.6 {+-} 0.8 mm to 11.1 {+-} 1.9 mm (p < 0.001). The dissection was completely covered in all seven patients with dissection. Except for epigastric pain with vomiting in one patient, there was no complication. On follow-up, over 12-57 months (mean 26.8 {+-} 10.8 months), 11 patients (91.6%) had marked improvement in their blood pressure. Patients with congestive heart failure and claudication also showed improvement. Repeat catheterization in five patients, between 6-30 months (mean 16.8 {+-} 9.1 months) after stent implantation, showed sustained improvement in four and a fusiform, long segment, intrastent restenosis after 30 months in one child. The stenosis was safely redilated. Conclusion: Endovascular aortic stent implantation is safe and provides good immediate relief in patients with unsatisfactory results after balloon angioplasty. Improvement is sustained in most patients on intermediate-term follow-up.

  19. Estimating movement and survival rates of a small saltwater fish using autonomous antenna receiver arrays and passive integrated transponder tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudershausen, Paul J.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Dubreuil, Todd; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Poland, Steven J.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of small (12.5 mm long) passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and custom detection antennas for obtaining fine-scale movement and demographic data of mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus in a salt marsh creek. Apparent survival and detection probability were estimated using a Cormack Jolly Seber (CJS) model fitted to detection data collected by an array of 3 vertical antennas from November 2010 to March 2011 and by a single horizontal antenna from April to August 2011. Movement of mummichogs was monitored during the period when the array of vertical antennas was used. Antenna performance was examined in situ using tags placed in wooden dowels (drones) and in live mummichogs. Of the 44 tagged fish, 42 were resighted over the 9 mo monitoring period. The in situ detection probabilities of the drone and live mummichogs were high (~80-100%) when the ambient water depth was less than ~0.8 m. Upstream and downstream movement of mummichogs was related to hourly water depth and direction of tidal current in a way that maximized time periods over which mummichogs utilized the intertidal vegetated marsh. Apparent survival was lower during periods of colder water temperatures in December 2010 and early January 2011 (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.979) than during other periods of the study (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.992). During late fall and winter, temperature had a positive effect on the CJS detection probability of a tagged mummichog, likely due to greater fish activity over warmer periods. During the spring and summer, this pattern reversed possibly due to mummichogs having reduced activity during the hottest periods. This study demonstrates the utility of PIT tags and continuously operating autonomous detection systems for tracking fish at fine temporal scales, and improving estimates of demographic parameters in salt marsh creeks that are difficult or impractical to sample with active fishing gear.

  20. Microvascular fluid exchange following thermal skin injury in the rat: changes in extravascular colloid osmotic pressure, albumin mass, and water content.

    PubMed

    Lund, T; Reed, R K

    1986-01-01

    Microvascular fluid exchange was studied in rats subjected to 0, 10, and 40% body surface area (BSA) full-thickness cutaneous burns without providing fluid substitution. The total amounts of water and of albumin entering the entire burned skin area following 10% BSA burns were similar to that in 40% BSA burns. Colloid osmotic pressure in interstitial fluid (COPi) was around 10 mmHg and did not change in the control group or in burned skin from the 40% BSA burn group. COPi after 10% burns increased to 15 mmHg in injured skin, while plasma COP fell from 16 to 12.5 mmHg. Preburn, the interstitial albumin mass (Qalb) was 14.9 mg/g dry tissue weight (DW) and increased to 42 and 20 mg/g DW in injured skin after 10 and 40% burns, respectively. Extravasation of radiolabeled albumin (Ealb) estimated as plasma equivalents per 30 min increased from 6.0 to 321 microliters/g DW at 30-60 min postburn (PB) in injured skin following 10% BSA burns. At 90-120 and 150-180 min PB Ealb in this group was reduced to approximately 120 microliters/g DW. These levels of Ealb were roughly 6 times higher than those after 40% BSA burns. Total tissue water (TTW) was 1.78 ml/g DW preburn and increased to 3.0 and 2.0 ml X g-1 DW PB in the 10 and 40% burn groups, respectively. TTW and Qalb did not change beyond 60 min PB. PMID:3779907

  1. A model of respiratory airway motion for real-time tracking of an ultrathin bronchoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Timothy D.; Haynor, David R.; Glenny, Robb W.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2007-03-01

    Deformable registration of chest CT scans taken of a subject at various phases of respiration provide a direct measure of the spatially varying displacements that occur in the lung due to breathing. This respiratory motion was studied as part of the development of a CT-based guidance system for a new electromagnetically tracked ultrathin bronchoscope. Fifteen scans of an anesthesized pig were acquired at five distinct lung pressures between full expiration to full inspiration. Deformation fields were computed by non-rigid registration using symmetric "demons" forces followed by Gaussian regularization in a multi-resolution framework. Variants of the registration scheme were tested including: initial histogram matching of input images, degree of field smoothing during regularization, and applying an adaptive smoothing method that weights elements of the smoothing kernel by the magnitude of the image gradient. Registration quality was quantified and compared using inverse and transitive consistency metrics. After optimizing the algorithm parameters, deformation fields were computed by registering each image in the set to a baseline image. Registration of the baseline image at full inspiration to an image at full expiration produced the maximum deformation. Two hypotheses were made: first, that each deformation could be modeled as a mathematical sub-multiple of the maximum deformation, and second, that the deformation scales linearly with respiratory pressure. The discrepancy between the deformation measured by image registration and that predicted by the linear model was 1.25 mm on average. At maximum deformation, this motion compensation constitutes an 87% reduction in respiration-induced localization error.

  2. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    PubMed Central

    Kurşun, Şebnem; Kılıç, Cenk; Özen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Materials and Methods Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60×60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm3 (FOV60); 2) 80×80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm3 (FOV80); and 3) 100×100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm3 (FOV100). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. Results A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. Conclusion In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements. PMID:25793180

  3. Method for effectively maintaining the thickness of mouthguards fabricated using EVA sheets and a circle tray: influence of grooved sheet and heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru; Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    The shapes of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) sheets are mainly square or round. The aim of this study was to elucidate a fabrication method that effectively maintains the thickness of the round sheet. Mouthguards were fabricated using EVA sheets (diameter 125 mm, thickness 4.0 mm) and a vacuum-forming machine. The sheet was pinched at the top and bottom and stabilized by the circle tray. Two heating conditions were compared: (i) the sheet was molded when it sagged 10 mm below the level of the sheet frame at the top of the post under normal conditions (N); and (ii) the sheet frame was lowered to and heated at 50 mm from the level of ordinary use and molded when it sagged 10 mm from the sheet frame (L). Two EVA sheet shapes were compared: an ordinary sheet (O) and a sheet with a horizontal v-shaped groove 30 mm from the anterior end (G). The height of the working model was 20 mm at the incisor point and 15 mm at the first molar. The sheet temperatures of the heating and non-heated surface were measured by the radiation thermometer. Post-molding thickness was determined for the incisal and molar portion. Differences in the thickness were analyzed using two-way anova. The temperature difference among points was smaller under condition L than under condition N. Thickness after formation was higher in condition L than in condition N, and was higher in condition G than in condition O. At the labial surface and the cusp, L-G was thickest. With the present techniques, uneven softening during heating can be improved by lowering the sheet frame and consequently reducing the reduction in the thickness of the sheet. Additionally, the thickness reduction is reduced by creating a horizontal groove on the sheet, establishing the clinical efficacy of this method. PMID:26446254

  4. Design and implementation of non-linear image processing functions for CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Purnawarman; Sudiro, Sunny A.; Wibowo, Eri P.; Harmanto, Suryadi; Paindavoine, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Today, solid state image sensors are used in many applications like in mobile phones, video surveillance systems, embedded medical imaging and industrial vision systems. These image sensors require the integration in the focal plane (or near the focal plane) of complex image processing algorithms. Such devices must meet the constraints related to the quality of acquired images, speed and performance of embedded processing, as well as low power consumption. To achieve these objectives, low-level analog processing allows extracting the useful information in the scene directly. For example, edge detection step followed by a local maxima extraction will facilitate the high-level processing like objects pattern recognition in a visual scene. Our goal was to design an intelligent image sensor prototype achieving high-speed image acquisition and non-linear image processing (like local minima and maxima calculations). For this purpose, we present in this article the design and test of a 64×64 pixels image sensor built in a standard CMOS Technology 0.35 μm including non-linear image processing. The architecture of our sensor, named nLiRIC (non-Linear Rapid Image Capture), is based on the implementation of an analog Minima/Maxima Unit. This MMU calculates the minimum and maximum values (non-linear functions), in real time, in a 2×2 pixels neighbourhood. Each MMU needs 52 transistors and the pitch of one pixel is 40×40 mu m. The total area of the 64×64 pixels is 12.5mm2. Our tests have shown the validity of the main functions of our new image sensor like fast image acquisition (10K frames per second), minima/maxima calculations in less then one ms.

  5. Multimodal system for in vivo tumor imaging in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Cozzolino, Rosanna; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2006-04-01

    We devised a multimodal planar imaging system for in vivo mouse imaging, employing four modalities: optical imaging, green and red fluorescence reflectance imaging, radionuclide imaging and X-ray radiography. We are testing separately, and then in a combined way, each detection mode, via in vivo mouse imaging, with the final purpose of identifying small implanted tumor masses, of providing early tumor detection and following metastatic dissemination. We describe the multimodal system and summarize its main performance, as assessed in our research work in the various stages of the development, in fluorescence and radionuclide tests on healthy or tumor bearing mice. For gamma-ray detection we used a semiconductor pixel detector (Medipix1 or Medipix2) that works in single photon counting. Laser-induced fluorescence reflectance imaging was performed in vivo using a pulsed light source to excite the fluorescence emission of injected hematoporphyrin (HP) compound, a CCD camera, a low pass filter and a commercial image analysis system. The bimodal system was used for the acquisition of combined images of the tumor area (fluorescence: animal top view; radionuclide: bottom view). It was shown that the tumor area can be imaged in a few minutes, with a few millimeter resolution (1 mm pinhole diameter), radioactively ( 99mTc radiotracer), and with the fluorescence system and that, in one case, only one of the two modalities is able to recognize the tumor. A phantom study for thyroid imaging with 125I source embedded in a simulated tissue indicated a spatial resolution of 1.25 mm FWHM with a 1 mm pinhole.

  6. Comparative micromorphological study of wild and micropropagated Dioscorea bulbifera Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Sonibare, Mubo A.; Adeniran, Adedapo A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the leaf epidermis of wild and micropropagated Dioscorea bulbifera Linn. (D. bulbifera) in order to document useful diagnostic features that may be employed for correct crude drug identification and to clear any taxonomic uncertainties in the micropropagated medicinal plant. Methods Growth responses of micropropagated D. bulbifera were observed on Murashige Skoog medium supplemented with 6-benzylamino purine (1.0 mg/L)+α-naphthaleneacetic acid (0.2 mg/L)+cysteine (20 mg/L) using nodal segments as explants. Leaves of the wild and micropropagated plants were studied microscopically. Results More than 80% shoot regeneration and formation of 10%-30% whitish-brown callus were observed within 3 weeks. The highest root proliferation was obtained from Murashige Skoog medium of 6-benzylamino purine (0.05 mg/L) and α-naphthaleneacetic acid (0.01 mg/L) with mean root length of (27.00±1.25) mm and elongated single shoot of mean length (38.00±11.09) mm. Leaf epidermal features that revealed similarities between the wild and micropropagated plants included amphistomatic condition, presence of mucilage, glandular unicellular trichome with multicellular head, polygonal cells with smooth walls, stomata type and shape. Slight variations included thick cuticular wall with closed stomata in wild plant compared to thin walled opened stomata in the in vitro plant. Opening of stomata accounted for larger average stomata sizes of (7.68±0.38) µm and (6.14±0.46) µm on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces, respectively of the micropropagated plant compared to the wild. Conclusions The diagnostic features obtained in the study could serve as a basis for proper identification for quality control for standardization of the medicinal plant. PMID:25182434

  7. Water Dynamics in Fogera and the Upper Blue Nile - Farmers perspectives and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Yann; Desalegn, Mengistu; Curnow, Jayne; Johnston, Robyn

    2015-04-01

    This research work is about finding the connection between farmers perspectives on changes of water conditions in their socio-agricultural environment and satellite remote sensing analysis. Key informant surveys were conducted to investigate localised views on water scarcity as a counterpoint to the physical measurement of water availability. Does a numerical or mapped image identifying water scarcity always equate to a dearth of water for agriculture? To push the limits of the relationship between human and physical data we sought to ground-truth GIS results with the practical experience and knowledge of people living in the area. We data-mined public domain satellite data with FOSS (GDAL, GRASS GIS) and produced water-related spatio-temporal domains for our study area and the larger Upper Nile Basin. Accumulated remote sensing information was then cross-referenced with informant's accounts of water availability for the same space and time. During the survey fieldwork the team also took photographs electronically stamped with GPS coordinates to compare and contrast the views of informants and the remote sensing information with high resolution images of the landscape. We found that farmers perspective on the Spring maize crop sensibility to variability of rainfall can be quantified in space and time by remote sensing cumulative transpiration. A crop transpiration gap of 1-2.5 mm/day for about 20 days is to be overcome, a full amount of 20 to 50 mm, depending on the type of year deficit. Such gap can be overcome, even by temporary supplemental irrigation practices, however, the economical and cultural set up is already developed in another way, as per sesonal renting of higher soil profile water retention capacity fields.

  8. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  9. The rise flank trails left by migrating offsets of the equatorial East Pacific Rise axis

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, P. )

    1989-01-10

    Sea Beam and magnetic surveys of the young (<1 Ma) rise flank around nontransform rise crest offsets at 5.5{degree}N, 4.9{degree}N, 3.4{degree}, 2.0{degree}N, and 2.8{degree}S mapped distinctive trails of obliquely lineated, highly magnetic crust that spreads from the characteristically curving overlapping rift zones. A Deep Tow survey around the small (1.5 km) 3.9{degree}N offset and the large (27 km) 2.0{degree}N offset provided more detailed infromation on the formation of crust in the offset trails, and of the structure of tectoniclly modified crust at interrift rise crest sites. Patches of interrift crust, which forms deep overlap basins at medium size offsets and basins and plateaus of rotated abyssal hills at large offsets, are periodically shed from the axial zone, together with abandoned portions of overlapped rift zone, to become important elements of the rise flank trails. The oblique aximuths of the paired 'fracture zone' trails that diverge from the rise crest offsets show that most have migrated along the rise crest at average speeds of 25-125 mm/yr. Net movement of the 27-km 2.8{degree}S offset has been slower, with alternating periods of rapid northward and southward migration. Information on the migration history of the surveyed offsets was supplemented by inferring the migration direction of another eight offsets on the equatorial East Pacific Rise (EPR) whose trails were less throughly mapped. Most offsets of the southern Pacific-Cocos boundary have migrated south, and most on the northern Pacific-Nazca boundary have migrated south, and most on the northern Pacific-Nazca boundary have migrated north; the patterns are not readily explained by the inferred distribution of mantle upwellings along the EPR axis.

  10. Pilot trials of the microbial degradation of Christos-Bitas water in oil emulsion (chocolate mousse) and BP llandarcy gas oil using venturi aeration

    SciTech Connect

    Berwick, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    Oil residues arising from the Christos-Bitas spillage were found to contain 28% of oil extractable by carbon tetrachloride; the remainder consisted of water and undefined solids. Christos-Bitas mousse was added to 1.18 m/sup 3/ liquor inoculated with oil-contaminated marine mud, and aerated with a 1.5-hp vortex pump and venturi nozzle (12.5 mm) in a cylindrical tank. After 70 days, oil degradation reached 7 mg oil/L/h. About 98% of the solvent extractable oil added was degraded over 83 days. Analysis of oil residues harvested at the end of this experiment showed that there was a decreasing trend in percent degradation in the following order: aromatics > saturates > heterocyclics > asphalts. No less than 94% of any fraction analyzed was degraded. In the second pilot trial, oil degradation was carried out in a cylindrical jacket tank containing 6.82 m/sup 3/ liquor inoculated with oil-contaminated marine mud from Penarth, South Wales, UK, together with pure cultures derived from the same source, and aerated with a 7.5-hp vortex pump and venturi nozzle (18 mm diameter). Mixing of the oil was inhomogeneous for the first 100-110 days. The overall degree of substrate dispersion and total oil balance was determined by sampling at different depths. Degradation by the mixed culture was achieved at the rate of 164 mg oil/L/h. After 224 days, this was equivalent to 9.6 x 10/sup 3//kg/sup -1//yr; (214 kg/wk) for 6.82 m/sup 3/ of liquor.

  11. Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Van Elswyk, Mary; Alexander, Dominik D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although a large body of literature has been devoted to examining the relationship between eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA+DHA) and blood pressure, past systematic reviews have been hampered by narrow inclusion criteria and a limited scope of analytical subgroups. In addition, no meta-analysis to date has captured the substantial volume of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 2 years. The objective of this meta-analysis was to examine the effect of EPA+DHA, without upper dose limits and including food sources, on blood pressure in RCTs. METHODS Random-effects meta-analyses were used to generate weighted group mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between the EPA+DHA group and the placebo group. Analyses were conducted for subgroups defined by key subject or study characteristics. RESULTS Seventy RCTs were included. Compared with placebo, EPA+DHA provision reduced systolic blood pressure (−1.52mm Hg; 95% confidence interval (CI) = −2.25 to −0.79) and diastolic blood pressure (−0.99mm Hg; 95% CI = −1.54 to −0.44) in the meta-analyses of all studies combined. The strongest effects of EPA+DHA were observed among untreated hypertensive subjects (systolic blood pressure = −4.51mm Hg, 95% CI = −6.12 to −2.83; diastolic blood pressure = −3.05mm Hg, 95% CI = −4.35 to −1.74), although blood pressure also was lowered among normotensive subjects (systolic blood pressure = −1.25mm Hg, 95% CI = −2.05 to −0.46; diastolic blood pressure = −0.62mm Hg, 95% CI = −1.22 to −0.02). CONCLUSIONS Overall, available evidence from RCTs indicates that provision of EPA+DHA reduces systolic blood pressure, while provision of ≥2 grams reduces diastolic blood pressure. PMID:24610882

  12. Application of the Eyring Equation in the Evaluation of Semi-Solid Forming-Induced Si Particle Refinement in the Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Yasuyoshi; Nara, Daisaku; Fushimi, Kazuyo; Kumazawa, Noriyoshi

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of Eyring's theory of absolute reaction rate, an approach to modeling Si particle refinement acceleration in the semi-solid forming of a hypereutectic Al-Si alloy has been developed. The acceleration variable data used in the present analysis were obtained from a semi-solid compression test using Al-25 mass pct Si alloy cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 15 mm and a height of 15 mm; the test conditions comprised a combination of compression displacements ∆ h = 5, 10, and 12 mm; compression rates v = 5, 25, and 125 mm/min; and test temperatures T = 853 K and 863 K (580 °C and 590 °C). The coarse primary Si particle refinement depends on a complex interaction among variables, such as compression displacement, compression rate, and test temperature. The performance of Si particle refinement degraded under higher temperature, slower strain rates, and slower shear rates. The results of the Si particle size are suitably summarized by the Eyring equation as a function of the temperature and the shear rate. The baseline Si particle size and the baseline temperature of Si particle refinement, i.e., the reference temperature, were G N = 0.27 mm and T N = 866.4 K (593.4 °C), respectively. The calculated results using this equation correlated well with the observed results. An acceleration factor of Si particle refinement was successfully derived on the basis of this equation and indicated that operating at a higher shear rate and a temperature just above the melting point of eutectic Al-Si alloy are the optimum conditions for refining Si particles.

  13. Simultaneous online SPE-HPLC-MS/MS analysis of docetaxel, temsirolimus and sirolimus in whole blood and human plasma.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Alicia; Martínez-Alcázar, M Paz; Durán, Ignacio; Calvo, Emiliano; Valenzuela, Belén; Barbas, Coral; García, Antonia

    2013-03-15

    Docetaxel and temsirolimus are some of the most used drugs in a wide range of solid tumors. In preclinical studies, mTOR inhibitors such as temsirolimus have demonstrated synergistic cytotoxic effects with taxanes providing the rationale for combination studies. These anticancer agents exhibit a narrow therapeutic concentration range and due to their high inter- and intra-individual pharmacokinetic variability, therapeutic dose monitoring by highly sensitive methods as LC-MS/MS are important for clinical research. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate a sensitive, fast and convenient method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of docetaxel, temsirolimus and its main metabolite, sirolimus, using paclitaxel, another anticancer drug, as the internal standard. These analytes were quantified by an integrated online solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-HPLC-MS/MS) system. Separation was performed on a Zorbax eclipse XDB-C8 (150mm×4.6mm, 5μm) column. The mass spectrometer tandem quadruple detector was equipped with jet stream electrospray ionization, monitored in multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) and operated in positive mode. A combination of protein precipitation with methanol/zinc sulphate (70:30) (v/v) and online SPE using a Zorbax eclipse plus C8 (12.5mm×4.6mm, 5μm) cartridge was used to extract the compounds. This method allows the use of the same reagents, sample treatment and analytical technique independently of whether the samples are whole blood or plasma. The method has been successfully validated and applied to real samples. It is a suitable method for dose adjustment and for evaluating potential drug interactions during combined treatments. PMID:23422405

  14. Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Rowe, William J

    2009-01-01

    Space flight (SF) and dust inhalation in habitats cause hypertension whereas in SF (alone) there is no consistent hypertension but reduced diurnal blood pressure (BP) variation instead. Current pharmaceutical subcutaneous delivery systems are inadequate and there is impairment in the absorption, metabolism, excretion, and deterioration of some pharmaceuticals. Data obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Freedom of Information Act shows that Irwin returned from his 12-day Apollo 15 mission in 1971 and was administered a bicycle stress test. With just three minutes of exercise, his BP was >275/125 mm Hg (heart rate of only 130 beats per minute). There was no acute renal insult. Irwin's apparent spontaneous remission is suggested to be related to the increase of a protective vasodilator, and his atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reduced with SF because of reduced plasma volume. With invariable malabsorption and loss of bone/muscle storage sites, there are significant (P < 0.0001) reductions of magnesium (Mg) required for ANP synthesis and release. Reductions of Mg and ANP can trigger pronounced angiotensin (200%), endothelin, and catecholamine elevations (clearly shown in recent years) and vicious cycles between the latter and Mg deficits. There is proteinuria, elevated creatinine, and reduced renal concentrating ability with the potential for progressive inflammatory and oxidative stress-induced renal disease and hypertension with vicious cycles. After SF, animals show myocardial endothelial injuries and increased vascular resistance of extremities in humans. Even without dust, hypertension might eventually develop from renovascular hypertension during very long missions. Without sufficient endothelial protection from pharmaceuticals, a comprehensive gene research program should begin now. PMID:21694921

  15. Tumour control probability derived from dose distribution in homogeneous and heterogeneous models: assuming similar pharmacokinetics, 125Sn-177Lu is superior to 90Y-177Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrand, Stephan; Hanin, François-Xavier; Pauwels, Stanislas; Jamar, François

    2012-07-01

    Clinical trials on 177Lu-90Y therapy used empirical activity ratios. Radionuclides (RN) with larger beta maximal range could favourably replace 90Y. Our aim is to provide RN dose-deposition kernels and to compare the tumour control probability (TCP) of RN combinations. Dose kernels were derived by integration of the mono-energetic beta-ray dose distributions (computed using Monte Carlo) weighted by their respective beta spectrum. Nine homogeneous spherical tumours (1-25 mm in diameter) and four spherical tumours including a lattice of cold, but alive, spheres (1, 3, 5, 7 mm in diameter) were modelled. The TCP for 93Y, 90Y and 125Sn in combination with 177Lu in variable proportions (that kept constant the renal cortex biological effective dose) were derived by 3D dose kernel convolution. For a mean tumour-absorbed dose of 180 Gy, 2 mm homogeneous tumours and tumours including 3 mm diameter cold alive spheres were both well controlled (TCP > 0.9) using a 75-25% combination of 177Lu and 90Y activity. However, 125Sn-177Lu achieved a significantly better result by controlling 1 mm-homogeneous tumour simultaneously with tumours including 5 mm diameter cold alive spheres. Clinical trials using RN combinations should use RN proportions tuned to the patient dosimetry. 125Sn production and its coupling to somatostatin analogue appear feasible. Assuming similar pharmacokinetics 125Sn is the best RN for combination with 177Lu in peptide receptor radiotherapy justifying pharmacokinetics studies in rodent of 125Sn-labelled somatostatin analogues.

  16. Effects of estrogen on functional and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury: An experimental study with rats

    PubMed Central

    Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Marcon, Raphael Martus

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of estrogen as a neuroprotective agent after a standard experimentally induced spinal cord lesion. METHODS: In this experimental study, 20 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one group with rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI) at T10 and receiving estrogen therapy with 17-beta estradiol (4mg/kg) immediately following the injury and after the placement of skin sutures and a control group with rats only subjected to SCI. A moderate standard experimentally induced SCI was produced using a computerized device that dropped a weight on the rat's spine from a height of 12.5 mm. Functional recovery was verified with the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale on the 2nd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days after injury and by quantifying the motor-evoked potential on the 42nd day after injury. Histopathological evaluation of the SCI area was performed after euthanasia on the 42nd day. RESULTS: The experimental group showed a significantly greater functional improvement from the 28th to the 42nd day of observation compared to the control group. The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in the motor-evoked potential compared with the control group. The results of pathological histomorphometry evaluations showed a better neurological recovery in the experimental group, with respect to the proportion and diameter of the quantified nerve fibers. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen administration provided benefits in neurological and functional motor recovery in rats with SCI beginning at the 28th day after injury. PMID:26598084

  17. Development of a three-layer phoswich alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    For radiation monitoring at the sites of such nuclear power plant accidents as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors are needed not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. In some applications, imaging detectors are required to detect the distribution of plutonium particles that emit alpha particles and radiocesium in foods that emits beta particles and gamma photons. To solve these requirements, we developed an imaging detector that can measure the distribution of alpha and beta particles as well as gamma photons. The imaging detector consists of three-layer scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: ~5 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. Using pulse shape discrimination, the images of these layers can be separated. The position information is calculated by the Anger principle from 8×8 anode signals from the PSPMT. The images for the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons are individually formed by the pulse shape discriminations for each layer. We detected alpha particle images in the first layer and beta particle images in the second layer. Gamma photon images were detected in the second and third layers. The spatial resolution for the alpha and beta particles was ~1.25 mm FWHM and less than 2 mm FWHM for the gamma photons. We conclude that our developed alpha-beta-gamma imaging detector is promising for imaging applications not only for the environmental monitoring of radionuclides but also for medical and molecular imaging.

  18. Quantifying isocenter measurements to establish clinically meaningful thresholds.

    PubMed

    Denton, Travis R; Shields, Lisa B E; Howe, Jonathan N; Spalding, Aaron C

    2015-01-01

    A dataset range of isocenter congruency verification tests have been examined from a statistical perspective for the purpose of establishing tolerance levels that are meaningful, based on the fundamental limitation of linear accelerator isocentricity and the demands of a high-precision stereotactic radiosurgery program. Using a laser-defined isocenter, a total of 149 individual isocenter congruency tests were examined with recorded values for ideal spatial corrections to the isocenter test tool. These spatial corrections were determined from radiation exposures recorded on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) at various gantry, collimator, and treatment couch combinations. The limitations of establishing an ideal isocenter were quantified from each variable which contributed to uncertainty in isocenter definition. Individual contributors to uncertainty, specifically, daily positioning setup errors, gantry sag, multileaf collimator (MLC) offset, and couch walkout, were isolated from isocenter congruency measurements to determine a clinically meaningful isocenter measurement. Variations in positioning of the test tool constituted, on average, 0.38 mm magnitude of correction. Gantry sag and MLC offset contributed 0.4 and 0.16 mm, respectively. Couch walkout had an average degrading effect to isocenter of 0.72 mm. Considering the magnitude of uncertainty contributed by each uncertainty variable and the nature of their combination, an appropriate schedule action and immediate action level were determined for use in analyzing daily isocenter congruency test results in a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) program. The recommendations of this study for this linear accelerator include a schedule action level of 1.25 mm and an immediate action level of 1.50mm, requiring prompt correction response from clinical medical physicists before SRS or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) is administered. These absolute values were derived from considering relative data from a specific linear accelerator and, therefore, represent a means by which a numerical quantity can be used as a test threshold with relative specificity to a particular linear accelerator. PMID:26103187

  19. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  20. Cement-in-cement femoral revisions using a specially designed polished short revision stem; 24 consecutive stems followed for five to seven years.

    PubMed

    te Stroet, Martijn A J; Moret-Wever, Sander G; de Kam, Daniël C J; Gardeniers, Jean W M; Schreurs, B Willem

    2014-01-01

    Femoral cement-in-cement revisions are attractive if the cement bone mantle is well fixed. However, most available cemented stems are too long to fit in the existing cement mantle. We evaluated the medium-term outcomes of the 125 mm short tapered polished stem (Exeter Short Revision Stem (SRS)) with a 44 mm offset specifically designed to facilitate cement-in-cement revisions of hip arthroplasties. The Exeter SRS was clinically and radiographically evaluated in 24 consecutive femoral cement-in-cement revisions (11 men, 13 women) between July 2005 and February 2008 after a mean follow-up of six years (5-7). The mean age at operation was 67 years (54-83). No hip was lost to follow-up, but two patients (two hips) died. None of the deaths were related to the surgery. Kaplan Meier survival analysis was performed. Four femoral components (17%) were removed for septic loosening after a mean of 2.4 years (0.8-4.9). Three of these hips were revised again in a two-stage revision, and one was converted to a permanent excision arthroplasty. The probability of survival with re-revision for any reason was 82% (95% CI: 58-93) and survivorship with aseptic loosening as the endpoint was 100% at six years. There were no additional radiological failures. The Exeter Short Revision Stem is a valuable option for simplifying cement-in-cement revisions. Despite the short stem length, at mid-term there were no signs of instability or aseptic loosening. PMID:24970322

  1. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. High strain rate tests show similar results. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that lower elongation and reduced strain hardening behavior lead to a transition from shear to adiabatic shear failure, while high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  2. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 for Jet Engine Fan Containment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of heat treating Inconel 718 on the ballistic impact response and failure mechanisms were studied. Two different annealing conditions and an aged condition were considered. Large differences in the static properties were found between the annealed and the aged material, with the annealed condition having lower strength and hardness and greater elongation than the aged. Correspondingly large differences were found in the velocity required to penetrate material in the two conditions in impact tests involving 12.5 mm diameter, 25.4 mm long cylindrical Ti-6-4 projectiles impacting flat plates at velocities in the range of 150 to 300 m/sec. The annealed material was able to absorb over 25 percent more energy than the aged. This is contrary to results observed for ballistic impact response for higher velocity impacts typically encountered in military applications where it has been shown that there exists a correlation between target hardness and ballistic impact strength. Metallographic examination of impacted plates showed strong indication of failure due to adiabatic shear. In both materials localized bands of large shear deformation were apparent, and microhardness measurements indicated an increase in hardness in these bands compared to the surrounding material. These bands were more localized in the aged material than in the annealed material. In addition the annealed material underwent significantly greater overall deformation before failure. The results indicate that high elongation and better strain hardening capabilities reduce the tendency for shear to localize and result in an unstable adiabatic shear failure. This supports empirical containment design methods that relate containment thickness to the static toughness.

  3. A numerical study of transcranial focused ultrasound beam propagation at low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiangtao; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-04-01

    The feasibility of transcranial ultrasound focusing with a non-moving phased array and without skull-specific aberration correction was investigated using computer simulations. Three cadaver skull CT image data sets were incorporated into an acoustic wave transmission model to simulate transskull ultrasound wave propagation. Using a 0.25 MHz hemispherical array (125 mm radius of curvature, 250 mm diameter, 24 255 elements), the simulated beams could be focused and steered with transducer element driving phases and amplitude adjusted for focal beam steering in water (water-path). A total of 82 foci, spanning wide ranges of distance in the three orthogonal dimensions, were simulated to test the focal beam steering capability inside the three skulls. The acoustic pressure distribution in a volume of 20 × 20 × 20 mm3 centred at each focus was calculated with a 0.5 mm spacing in each axis. Clearly defined foci were retained through the skulls (skull-path) in most cases. The skull-path foci were on average 1.6 ± 0.8 mm shifted from their intended locations. The -3 dB skull-path beam width and length were on average 4.3 ± 1.0 mm and 7.7 ± 1.8 mm, respectively. The skull-path sidelobe levels ranged from 25% to 55% of the peak pressure values. The skull-path peak pressure levels were about 10%-40% of their water-path counterparts. Focusing low-frequency beam through skull without skull-specific aberration correction is possible. This method may be useful for applying ultrasound to disrupt the blood-brain barrier for targeted delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents, or to induce microbubbles, or for other uses of ultrasound in brain where the required power levels are low and the sharp focusing is not needed.

  4. Nigerian Population Research on Environment, Gene and Health (NIPREGH) – objectives and protocol

    PubMed Central

    Odili, Augustine N.; Ogedengbe, John O.; Nwegbu, Maxwell; Anumah, Felicia O.; Asala, Samuel; Staessen, Jan A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Sub-Saharan Africa is currently undergoing an epidemiological transition from a disease burden largely attributable to communicable diseases to that resulting from a combination of both communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases. Data on chronic disease incidence, lifestyle, environmental and genetic risk factors are sparse in this region. This report aimed at providing relevant information in respect to risk factors that increase blood pressure and lead to development of intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes. We presented the rationale, objectives and key methodological features of the Nigerian Population Research on Environment, Gene and Health (NIPREGH) study. The challenges encountered in carrying out population study in this part of the world and the approaches at surmounting them were also presented. The preliminary data as at 20 November 2013 showed that out of the 205 individuals invited starting from early April 2013, 160 (72 women) consented and were enrolled; giving a response rate of 78%. Participants' age ranged from 18 to 80 years, with a mean (SD) of 39.8 (12.4) years and they were of 34 different ethnic groups spread over 24 states out of the 36 states that constitute Nigeria. The mean (SD) of office and home blood pressures were 113.0 (15.2) mm Hg systolic, 73.5 (12.5) mm Hg diastolic and 117.3 (15.0) mm Hg systolic, and 76.0 (9.6) mm Hg diastolic, respectively. Forty-three (26.8%) participants were hypertensive and 8 (5.0%) were diabetic. In addition to having the unique potential of recruiting a cohort that is a true representative of the entire Nigerian population, NIPREGH is feasible and the objectives realisable. PMID:25332707

  5. Emission characteristics of co-combustion of sewage sludge with olive cake and lignite coal in a circulating fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Toraman, Oner Yusuf; Topal, Hüseyin; Bayat, Oktay; Atimtay, Aysel T

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) of 125 mm diameter and 1800mm height was used to find the combustion characteristics of sewage sludge (SS) produced in Turkey. Sludge + olive cake, and sludge + lignite coal mixtures were burned separately. Various sludge-to-lignite coal and sludge-to-olive cake ratios (5/95, 10/90, 15/85, 20/80) were tried. On-line concentrations of major components (O2, SO2, CO2, CO, NOx, CmHn) were measured in the flue gas, as well as temperature and pressure distributions along the bed. Combustion efficiencies of sludge + olive cake and sludge + lignite coal mixtures were calculated, and the optimum conditions for operating parameters were discussed. The results have shown that the combustion mainly takes place in the upper regions of the main column where the temperature reaches 900 degrees C. SS + Coal burn in the CFB with an efficiency of 95.14% to 96.18%, which is considered to be quite good. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, appreciable amounts of CO and unburned hydrocarbons are formed and the combustion efficiency drops to 92.93%. CO and CmHn emissions are lower when lignite coal is mixed with various amounts of SS than the emissions when the coal is burned alone. As the %SS is increased in the fuel mixture, the SO2 emission decreases. NOx emissions are slightly higher. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, SO2 and NOx emissions are slightly higher. CO and CmHn emissions decrease sharply when SS is mixed with 5%wt. olive cake. With increasing sludge ratio these emissions increase due to the unburned hydrocarbons. As a result of this study, it is believed that SS can be burned effectively in a CFBC together with other fuels, especially with olive cake (OC). OC will be a good additive fuel for the combustion of lower quality fuels. PMID:15137713

  6. Use of SiBN and SiBON films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from borazine as interconnection dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, W.F.; Cohen, S.A.; Hummel, J.P.; Luther, B.; Beach, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    Thin films of silicon boron nitride (SiBN) of typical composition Si{sub 0.09}B{sub 0.39}N{sub 0.51} and silicon boron oxynitride (SiBON) of typical composition Si{sub 0.16}B{sub 0.29}O{sub 0.41}N{sub 0.14} were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and the properties of these films were evaluated with respect to their suitability as interconnection dielectrics in microelectronic fabrication. Films were deposited on 125 mm silicon substrates in a parallel-plate reactor at a substrate temperature of 400 C and a plasma power of 0.5 W/cm{sup 2}. Boron nitride, for comparison of electrical properties, was deposited from borazine (B{sub 3}N{sub 3}H{sub 6}); silicon boron nitride was deposited from borazine, disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}); silicon boron oxynitride was deposited from borazine, disilane, ammonia, and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Metal-insulator-metal capacitors were fabricated and electrical measurements indicated that all three films had excellent dielectric properties with dielectric constants of 4.1, 4.7, and 3.9 for BN, SiBN, and SiBON, respectively. Tests of conformality indicated that deposition into trenches with an aspect ratio of 4:1 gave conformality greater than 70%. Silicon boron oxynitride was shown to be an excellent barrier to the diffusion of copper. A planar, single level metal-insulator structure was constructed using a SiBN/SiBON insulator with copper metallization.

  7. Reduction of aneurysm pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Marston, W A; Criado, E; Baird, C A; Keagy, B A

    1996-03-01

    A canine model was designed to evaluate the changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair. Eight canines underwent laparotomy and creation of an AAA. The aneurysm was then excluded with a transluminally placed endovascular graft (TPEG) inserted through the right femoral artery and deployed across the AAA to exclude the infrarenal aortic branches from aortic perfusion. Blood pressure and flow data were recorded for 6 hours. The AAA blood pressure decreased from 135 +/- 9.3 mm Hg before exclusion to 45 +/- 17.6 mm Hg at 10 minutes after exclusion (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, AAA blood pressure had declined further to 26 +/- 12.5 mm Hg. Blood flow in the excluded iliac artery decreased from a baseline of 242 +/- 58 ml/min to 41 +/- 29 ml/min 10 minutes after TPEG placement (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, flow was reduced to 12 +/- 3.5 ml/min (p < 0.05 compared with that at 10 minutes). Aortic wall stress was significantly reduced by TPEG placement but was only slightly lower than baseline aortic wall stress before AAA creation. The lumbar arteries were patent with retrograde flow in all cases and were found to be the major contributors to postexclusion aneurysm pressure. Endovascular AAA exclusion results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure and wall stress within the excluded aneurysm, but the aneurysm remains perfused by retrograde flow through the lumbar arteries, which resulted in near-baseline levels of aneurysm wall stress in this canine model. Embolization of patient lumbar vessels at prosthesis placement may further reduce the risk of late rupture. PMID:8733869

  8. Report Number 2: Comparison of the CTOD fracture toughness of simulated and weldment HAZ regions in A516 steel with deep and shallow cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Holcomb, R.M.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental fracture toughness study was performed on A516 grade 70 steel to compare crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) values of laboratory specimens with simulated and actual weld microstructures. This study was undertaken as a joint project with the University of Tennessee. Specimens with simulated microstructures from the coarse, fine or intercritical zones were produced in a Gleeble thermal simulator with thermal cycles that represented a 39.4 Kj/cm and 11.0 Kj/cm heat input. Because the thermally simulated specimens were limited to 12.5 x 12.5 mm (0.5 x 0.5 inch) cross-section, the CTOD tests at the University of Kansas were performed on these same size three-point bend specimens. The effect of crack depth to specimen width, a/W, ratio on CTOD toughness was studied for a/W ratios of 0.2 and 0.5. Experimental testing also included Charpy V-Notch (CVN) impact tests at equivalent CTOD temperatures and tension tests of each of the simulated microstructures with 39.4 Kj/cm (100 Kj/in) heat input. Actual weldments were tested to investigate whether the simulated microstructures give similar toughness results as the actual HAZ regions. Good correlation was found between the CVN and CTOD test results on the upper shelf, both for the simulated HAZ and actual weldment HAZ specimens. Also, the results of this study support the conclusions of previous work which showed that increased elastic-plastic fracture toughness is associated with a reduction in the a/W ratio of CTOD test specimens.

  9. Left Ventricular Mass Index and Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Patients with the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sezavar, Seyed Hashem; Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Hejrati, Maral; Ghaleh Bandi, Mir Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sleep apnea is accompanied by some cardiovascular complications. It has even been hypothesized that sleep apnea, itself, can induce some of these complications. Given such controversies, we assessed the left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and systolic pulmonary artery pressure in patients with sleep apnea. Methods: Through convenience sampling, 56 patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were included in the present descriptive cross-sectional study. Patients with any past history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus were excluded. The apnea severity was assessed via the polysomnography-derived apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). All the patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography. In this cross-sectional study - data regarding age, gender, smoking, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, polysomnographic parameters (AHI, severity of disease, mean heart rate, mean oxygen saturation [SaO2], lowest SaO2, and duration of SaO2 below 90% [d.SaO2 < 90%]), and echocardiographic parameters (systolic pulmonary artery pressure and LVMI) were accumulated and processed. Results: Fifty-two men and 14 women at a mean age of 49.29 ± 11.79 years participated in this study. Systolic and was significantly high in the severe group compared with the mild group (128.21 ± 9.73 mmHg vs. 119.23 ± 12.5 mmHg; p value = 0.007). The LVMI was increased parallel to an increase in the severity of the OSAS, but that increase was not statistically significant (p value = 0.161). The d.SaO2 < 90% was positively correlated with the LVMI, and this relationship remained true after adjustment for the body mass index (r = 0.27; p value = 0.042). Conclusion: Severe OSAS was accompanied by a higher blood pressure. The LVMI did not differ significantly between the patients with the OSAS and those who did not suffer from other risk factors of cardiac diseases. PMID:27403184

  10. Consistent interactive segmentation of pulmonary ground glass nodules identified in CT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Fang, Ming; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2004-05-01

    Ground glass nodules (GGNs) have proved especially problematic in lung cancer diagnosis, as despite frequently being malignant they characteristically have extremely slow rates of growth. This problem is further magnified by the small size of many of these lesions now being routinely detected following the introduction of multislice CT scanners capable of acquiring contiguous high resolution 1 to 1.25 mm sections throughout the thorax in a single breathhold period. Although segmentation of solid nodules can be used clinically to determine volume doubling times quantitatively, reliable methods for segmentation of pure ground glass nodules have yet to be introduced. Our purpose is to evaluate a newly developed computer-based segmentation method for rapid and reproducible measurements of pure ground glass nodules. 23 pure or mixed ground glass nodules were identified in a total of 8 patients by a radiologist and subsequently segmented by our computer-based method using Markov random field and shape analysis. The computer-based segmentation was initialized by a click point. Methodological consistency was assessed using the overlap ratio between 3 segmentations initialized by 3 different click points for each nodule. The 95% confidence interval on the mean of the overlap ratios proved to be [0.984, 0.998]. The computer-based method failed on two nodules that were difficult to segment even manually either due to especially low contrast or markedly irregular margins. While achieving consistent manual segmentation of ground glass nodules has proven problematic most often due to indistinct boundaries and interobserver variability, our proposed method introduces a powerful new tool for obtaining reproducible quantitative measurements of these lesions. It is our intention to further document the value of this approach with a still larger set of ground glass nodules.

  11. [Preparation and release mechanism of gestodene reservoir-type intravaginal rings].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Kun; Ning, Mei-Ying

    2014-03-01

    This study taking gestodene (GEST) as a model, investigated the factors affecting reservoir-type intravaginal ring (IVR)'s drug release. This paper reported a gestodene intravaginal ring of reservoir design, comprising a gestodene silicone elastomer core encased in a non-medicated silicone sheath, separately manufactured by reaction injection moulding at 80 degrees C and heating vulcanization at 130 degrees C is reported. The test investigated the factors affecting drug release through a single variable method, taking the drug release rates of 21 days as standards. When changing the thickness of the controlling sheath outside, the ratio of the first day of drug release and mean daily release (MDR), named the relatively burst effect, is closing to 1 with the thickness of controlling sheath increasing, while the 1.25 mm sheath corresponding to 1.04 controlled the burst release effectively; a positive correlation (r = 0.992 2) existed between the average drug release (Q/t) and drug loading (A) within a certain range. The C6-165 controlling sheath with high solubility of GEST is easier to achieve controlled release of the drug; GEST crystalline power is more effective to implement controlled release of drugs among difficent states of the drug. A 1/4 fractional segment core gives a relatively burst effect of 1.76, while the 1/1 and 1/2 are 1.93 and 1.87 separately, at the same drug loading, concluding that use of a fractional segment core would allow development of a suitable GEST reservoir IVR. In summary, GEST reservoir-type IVR could be adjusted by the thickness of controlling sheath, the loading of drug, the material properties of controlling sheath, the dispersion state of drug, the additive composition and structure of intravaginal ring, to control the drug release behavior and achieve the desired drug release rate. PMID:24961114

  12. Versatile use of vacuum-assisted healing in fifty patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Fadhli, Ahmad; Alexander, George; Kanjoor, James Roy

    2009-01-01

    Context: Wound management can often be a challenging experience, especially in the presence of diabetes mellitus, vascular or immunological compromise. While no single technique can be considered by itself to be ideal, vacuum-assisted healing, which is a recent innovation, is fast becoming a necessary addition as adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To determine the efficacy of vacuum-assisted healing. Settings and Design: Plastic surgery centre. Ministry of Health Hospital, Kuwait. Materials and Methods: Patients from Kuwait in a wide variety of clinical situations were chosen for study: Patients (n=50) were classified by diagnosis: Group 1: pressure sore- sacral (n= 3), trochanteric (n=6), ischial (n= 2); Group 2: ulcers (n= 11); Group 3: traumatic soft tissue wounds (n =15); Group 4: extensive tissue loss from the abdominal wall perineum, thigh and axilla (n =5); Group 5: sternal dehiscence wounds (n =4) and Group 6: wounds from flap necrosis (n =4). All wounds were subjected to vacuum by wall unit or portable unit, using pressure of 100-125 mm - continuous or intermittent. Closure of wounds, significant reduction in size and refusal by patient for continuation of vacuum-assisted closure therapy were end points of vacuum application. Results: Sixteen per cent of patients showed complete healing of the wound. Seventy per cent of patients showed 20-78% reduction in wound size. In 14% of patients treatment had to be discontinued. All patients showed improvement in granulation tissue and reduction in bacterial isolates and tissue oedema. Conclusions: The application of subatmospheric pressure or negative pressure promotes healing in a wide range of clinical settings and is an advanced wound healing therapy that can optimize patient care, promote rapid wound healing and help manage costs. It may be used in most instances in both hospital and community settings. PMID:20368850

  13. Urban sediment contamination in a former Hg mining district, Idrija, Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Bavec, Spela; Biester, Harald; Gosar, Mateja

    2014-06-01

    Road sediments from gully pots of the drainage system and stream sediments from local streams were investigated for the first time in the urban area of Idrija town, the central part of the second largest and strongly contaminated Hg mining district in the world. Hg concentrations in road sediments were lower than in stream sediments. They ranged from 16 to 110 mg/kg (Md = 29 mg/kg) for <0.125 mm particles and from 7 to 125 mg/kg (Md = 35 mg/kg) for <0.04 mm particles, while Hg concentrations in stream sediments ranged from 10 to 610 mg/kg (Md = 95 mg/kg) for <0.125 particles and from 10 to 440 mg/kg (Md = 105 mg/kg) for <0.04 mm particles. High Hg loadings in stream sediments were successfully linked with identified mercury sources (rocks containing mercury ore, areas of former ore roasting sites, ore residue dumps), because they are located in the drainage areas of streams, from which the sediments were collected. Links between Hg loadings in road sediments and identified mercury sources were not recognized. Solid phases of Hg were determined by thermo-desorption technique and are similar for both types of sediments. Results show the occurrence of three different forms: elemental mercury, mercury bound to matrix components and cinnabar. Approximately 50 % of Hg in samples consist of non-cinnabar fractions. This is important, since they are potentially bioavailable. An interesting new discovery according to previous research of environmental media from Idrija area by solid-phase Hg thermo-desorption technique is that elemental mercury was determined in almost all investigated sediments in minor amounts (Md = 3 %). PMID:24114255

  14. Design and Construction of a Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    R.M. Malone, B.C. Cox, B.C. Frogget, M.I. Kaufman, T.W. Tunnell; H.W. Herrmann, S.C. Evans, J.M. Mack, C.S. Young; W. Stoeffl

    2009-06-05

    Gas Cherenkov detectors have been used to convert fusion gammas into photons to achieve gamma reaction history (GRH) measurements. These gas detectors include a converter, pressurized gas volume, relay optics, and a photon detector. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90º Off-Axis Parabolic mirrors efficiently collects signal from fusion gammas with 8-ps time dispersion.1 Fusion gammas are converted to Compton electrons, which generate broadband Cherenkov light (our response is from 250 to 700 nm) in a pressurized gas cell. This light is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. The detector optics collect light from a 125-mm-diameter by 600-mm-long interchangeable gas (CO2 or SF6) volume. Because light is collected from source locations throughout the gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than at an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation locations along the gas cell. This design incorporates a fixed time delay that allows the detector to recover from prompt radiation. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they traverse the gas volume. A Monte Carlo model of the conversion process from gammas to Cherenkov photons is used to generate photon trajectories. The collection efficiencies for different gamma energies are evaluated. At NIF, a cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range, as well as different gamma energy thresholds. This GRH design is compared to a gas Cherenkov detector that utilizes a Cassegrain reflector now used at the OMEGA laser facility. 1. R. M. Malone, H. W. Herrmann, W. Stoeffl, J. M. Mack, C. S. Young, “Gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility using 90º off-axis parabolic mirrors,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E532 (2008).

  15. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J S; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  16. Tamoxifen and Src kinase inhibitors as neuroprotective/neuroregenerative drugs after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Iris K.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, Jose M.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that produces significant changes in the lifestyle of patients. Many molecular and cellular events are triggered after the initial physical impact to the cord. Two major phases have been described in the field of SCI: an acute phase and late phase. Most of the therapeutic strategies are focused on the late phase because this provides an opportunity to target cellular events like apoptosis, demyelination, scar formation and axonal outgrowth. In this mini-review, we will focus on two agents (tamoxifen and a Src kinase family inhibitor known as PP2) that have been shown in our laboratory to produce neuroprotective (increase cell survival) and/or regenerative (axonal outgrowth) actions. The animal model used in our laboratory is adult female rat (~250 g) with a moderate contusion (12.5 mm) to the spinal cord at the T10 level, using the MASCIS impactor device. Tamoxifen or PP2 was administered by implantation of a 15 mg pellet (Innovative Research of America, Sarasota, FL, USA) or by intraperitoneal injections (1.5 mg/kg, every 3 days), respectively, to produce a long-term effect (28 days). Tamoxifen and the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2, are drugs that in rats with a moderate spinal cord injury promote functional locomotor recovery, increase spared white matter tissue, and stimulate axonal outgrowth. Moreover, tamoxifen reduces the formation of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, these drugs are possible therapeutic agents that have a neuroprotective/regenerative activity in vertebrates with SCI. PMID:25878585

  17. Cine and tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in normal rat at 1.5 T: a rest and stress study

    PubMed Central

    Daire, Jean-Luc; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noel; Croisille, Pierre; Montet-Abou, Karin; Richter, Sophie; Botsikas, Diomidis; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Morel, Denis; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to measure regional contractile function in the normal rat using cardiac cine and tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during incremental low doses of dobutamine and at rest. Methods Five rats were investigated for invasive left ventricle pressure measurements and five additional rats were imaged on a clinical 1.5 T MR system using a cine sequence (11–20 phases per cycle, 0.28/0.28/2 mm) and a C-SPAMM tag sequence (18–25 phases per cycle, 0.63/1.79/3 mm, tag spacing 1.25 mm). For each slice, wall thickening (WT) and circumferential strains (CS) were calculated at rest and at stress (2.5, 5 and 10 μg/min/kg of dobutamine). Results Good cine and tagged images were obtained in all the rats even at higher heart rate (300–440 bpm). Ejection fraction and left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume showed significant changes after each dobutamine perfusion dose (p < 0.001). Tagged CMR had the capacity to resolve the CS transmural gradient and showed a significant increase of both WT and CS at stress compared to rest. Intra and interobserver study showed less variability for the tagged technique. In rats in which a LV catheter was placed, dobutamine produced a significant increase of heart rate, LV dP/dtmax and LV pressure significantly already at the lowest infusion dose. Conclusion Robust cardiac cine and tagging CMR measurements can be obtained in the rat under incremental dobutamine stress using a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner. PMID:18980685

  18. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  19. Comparing the Effect of Different Voxel Resolutions for Assessment of Vertical Root Fracture of Permanent Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Ismail; Gunduz, Kaan; Celenk, Peruze; Avsever, Hakan; Orhan, Kaan; Canitezer, Gozde; Ozmen, Bilal; Cicek, Ersan; Egrioglu, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Background: The teeth with undiagnosed vertical root fractures (VRFs) are likely to receive endodontic treatment or retreatment, leading to frustration and inappropriate endodontic therapies. Moreover, many cases of VRFs cannot be diagnosed definitively until the extraction of tooth. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the use of different voxel resolutions of two different cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) units in the detection VRFs in vitro. Materials and Methods: The study material comprised 74 extracted human mandibular single rooted premolar teeth without root fractures that had not undergone any root-canal treatment. Images were obtained by two different CBCT units. Four image sets were obtained as follows: 1) 3D Accuitomo 170, 4 × 4 cm field of view (FOV) (0.080 mm3); 2) 3D Accuitomo 170. 6 × 6 cm FOV (0.125 mm3); 3) NewTom 3G, 6˝ (0.16 mm3) and 4) NewTom 3G, 9˝ FOV (0.25 mm3). Kappa coefficients were calculated to assess both intra- and inter-observer agreements for each image set. Results: No significant differences were found among observers or voxel sizes, with high average Z (Az) results being reported for all groups. Both intra- and inter-observer agreement values were relatively better for 3D Accuitomo 170 images than the images from NewTom 3G. The highest Az and kappa values were obtained with 3D Accuitomo 170, 4 × 4 cm FOV (0.080 mm3) images. Conclusion: No significant differences were found among observers or voxel sizes, with high Az results reported for all groups. PMID:26557279

  20. Petrographic and anatomical characteristics of plant material from two peat deposits of Holocene and Miocene age, Kalimantan, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, T.A.; Hilbert, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Samples from two peat-forming environments of Holocene and Miocene age in Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia, were studied petrographically using nearly identical sample preparation and microscopic methodologies. Both deposits consist of two basic types of organic material: plant organs/tissues and fine-grained matrix. There are seven predominant types of plant organs and tissues: roots possessing only primary growth, stems possessing only primary growth, leaves, stems/roots with secondary growth, secondary xylem fragments, fragments of cork cells, and macerated tissue of undetermined origin. The fine-grained matrix consists of fragments of cell walls and cell fillings, fungal remains, spores and pollen grains, and resin. Some of the matrix material does not have distinct grain boundaries (at ??500) and this material is designated amorphous matrix. The major difference between the Holocene peat and Miocene lignite in reflected light, oil immersion is a loss of red coloration in the cell walls of tissue in the lignite, presumably due to loss of cellulosic compounds. In addition, cortex and phloem tissue (hence primary roots and stems) are difficult to recognize in the lignite, probably because these large, thin-walled tissues are more susceptible to microbial degradation and compaction. Particle size in both peat and lignite samples display a bimodal distribution when measurements are transformed to a - log2 or phi (??), scale. Most plant parts have modes of 2-3?? (0.25 - 0.125 mm), whereas the finer-grained particulate matrix has modes of 7-9?? (0.008-0.002 mm). This similarity suggest certain degradative processes. The 2-3?? range may be a "stable" size for plant parts (regardless of origin) because this is a characteristics of a substrate which is most suitable for plant growth in peat. The finer-grained matrix material (7-9??) probably results from fungal decay which causes plant material to weaken and with slight physical pressure to shatter into its component

  1. Volumetric quantification of lung nodules in CT with iterative reconstruction (ASiR and MBIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu; Barnhart, Huiman; Richard, Samuel; Robins, Marthony; Colsher, James; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Volume quantifications of lung nodules with multidetector computed tomography (CT) images provide useful information for monitoring nodule developments. The accuracy and precision of the volume quantification, however, can be impacted by imaging and reconstruction parameters. This study aimed to investigate the impact of iterative reconstruction algorithms on the accuracy and precision of volume quantification with dose and slice thickness as additional variables.Methods: Repeated CT images were acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom with synthetic nodules (9.5 and 4.8 mm) at six dose levels, and reconstructed with three reconstruction algorithms [filtered backprojection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR)] into three slice thicknesses. The nodule volumes were measured with two clinical software (A: Lung VCAR, B: iNtuition), and analyzed for accuracy and precision.Results: Precision was found to be generally comparable between FBP and iterative reconstruction with no statistically significant difference noted for different dose levels, slice thickness, and segmentation software. Accuracy was found to be more variable. For large nodules, the accuracy was significantly different between ASiR and FBP for all slice thicknesses with both software, and significantly different between MBIR and FBP for 0.625 mm slice thickness with Software A and for all slice thicknesses with Software B. For small nodules, the accuracy was more similar between FBP and iterative reconstruction, with the exception of ASIR vs FBP at 1.25 mm with Software A and MBIR vs FBP at 0.625 mm with Software A.Conclusions: The systematic difference between the accuracy of FBP and iterative reconstructions highlights the importance of extending current segmentation software to accommodate the image characteristics of iterative reconstructions. In addition, a calibration process may help reduce the dependency of accuracy on reconstruction algorithms, such that volumes quantified from scans of different reconstruction algorithms can be compared. The little difference found between the precision of FBP and iterative reconstructions could be a result of both iterative reconstruction's diminished noise reduction at the edge of the nodules as well as the loss of resolution at high noise levels with iterative reconstruction. The findings do not rule out potential advantage of IR that might be evident in a study that uses a larger number of nodules or repeated scans.

  2. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  3. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: a PRESAGE study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. PMID:24910247

  4. Solvent removal during synthetic and Nephila fiber spinning.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Nikola; Kojic, Milos; Gudlavalleti, Sauri; McKinley, Gareth

    2004-01-01

    The process by which spiders make their mechanically superior fiber involves removal of solvent (water) from a concentrated protein solution while the solution flows through a progressively narrowing spinning canal. Our aim was to determine a possible mechanism of spider water removal by using a computational model. To develop appropriate computational techniques for modeling of solvent removal during fiber spinning, a study was first performed using a synthetic solution. In particular, the effect of solvent removal during elongational flow (also exhibited in the spinning canal of the spider) on fiber mechanical properties was examined. The study establishes a model for solvent removal during dry spinning of synthetic fibers, assuming that internal diffusion governs solvent removal and that convective resistance is small. A variable internal solvent diffusion coefficient, dependent on solvent concentration, is also taken into account in the model. An experimental setup for dry (air) spinning was used to make fibers whose diameter was on the order of those made by spiders (approximately 1 microm). Two fibers of different thickness, corresponding to different spinning conditions, were numerically modeled for solvent removal and then mechanically tested. These tests showed that the thinner fiber, which lost more solvent under elongational flow, had 5-fold better mechanical properties (elastic modulus of 100 MPa and toughness of 15 MJ/m3) than the thicker fiber. Even though the mechanical properties were far from those of dragline spider silk (modulus of 10 GPa and toughness of 150 MJ/m3), the experimental methodology and numerical principles developed for the synthetic case proved to be valuable when establishing a model for the Nephila spinning process. In this model, an assumption of rapid convective water removal at the spinning canal wall was made, with internal diffusion of water through the fiber as the governing process. Then the diffusion coefficient of water through the initial spinning solution, obtained ex vivo from the Nephila clavipes major ampullate gland, was determined and incorporated into the numerical procedure, along with the wall boundary conditions and canal geometry. Also, a typical fiber reeling speed during web making, as well as the assumption of a dry exiting fiber, were included in the model. The results show that a cross-section of spinning solution (dope), which is initially 70% water, spends 19 s in the spinning canal in order to emerge dry. While the dope cross-section traverses the canal, its velocity increases from 0.37 mm/s at the entrance to 12.5 mm/s at the canal exit. The obtained results thus indicate that simple diffusion, along with the dry wall boundary condition, is a viable mechanism for water removal during typical Nephila fiber spinning. PMID:15360277

  5. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate block detector readout by avalanche photodiode arrays for high resolution animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, B. J.; Swann, B. K.; Rochelle, J.; Nutt, R. E.; Cherry, S. R.; Siegel, S. B.

    2004-09-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) have proven to be useful as light detectors for high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). Their compactness makes these devices excellent candidates for replacing bulky photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) in PET systems where space limitations are an issue. The readout of densely packed, 10 × 10 lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) block detectors (crystal size 2.0 × 2.0 × 12 mm3) with custom-built monolithic 3 × 3 APD arrays was investigated. The APDs had a 5 × 5 mm2 active surface and were arranged on a 6.25 mm pitch. The dead space on the edges of the array was 1.25 mm. The APDs were operated at a bias voltage of approximately 380 V for a gain of 100 and a dark current of 10 nA per APD. The standard deviation in gain between the APDs in the array ranged from 1.8 to 6.5% as the gain was varied from 50 to 108. A fast, low-noise, multi-channel charge sensitive preamplifier application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was developed for the APD readout. The amplifier had a rise time of 8 ns, a noise floor of 515 e- rms and a 9 e- pF-1 noise slope. An acquired flood image showed that all 100 crystals from the block detector could be resolved. Timing measurements with single-channel LSO-APD detectors, as well as with the array, against a plastic scintillator and PMT assembly showed a time resolution of 1.2 ns and 2.5 ns, respectively. The energy resolution measured with a single 4.0 × 4.0 × 10 mm3 LSO crystal, wrapped in four-layer polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and coupled with optical grease on a single APD of the array, yielded 15% (full width at half maximum, FWHM) at 511 keV. Stability tests over 9 months of operation showed that the APD arrays do not degrade appreciably. These results demonstrate the ability to decode densely packed LSO scintillation blocks with compact APD arrays. The good timing and energy resolution makes these detectors suitable for high resolution PET.

  6. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981–5005 (2013)]. Methods: A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11–0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. Results: For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors’ previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O’Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285–1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position obtained using source-based corrections. Conclusions: Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using the method to guide bubble-mediated ultrasound therapies in the brain. The technique may also have application in ultrasound-based cerebral angiography. PMID:26133635

  7. Fault structure, damage and acoustic emission characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresen, G. H.; Göbel, T.; Stanchits, S.; Kwiatek, G.; Charalampidou, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of faulting-related damage and acoustic emission activity in experiments performed on granite, quartzite and sandstone samples with 40-50 mm diameter and 100-125 mm length. Experiments were performed in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame in triaxial compression at confining pressures ranging from 20-140 MPa. We performed a series of fracture and stick-slip sliding experiments on prefractured samples. Acoustic emissions (AE) and ultrasonic velocities were monitored using up to 14 P-wave sensors glued to the cylindrical surface of the rock. Full waveforms were stored in a 16 channel transient recording system (Daxbox, PRÖKEL, Germany). Full moment tensor analysis and polarity of AE first motions were used to discriminate source types associated with tensile, shear and pore-collapse cracking. To monitor strain, two pairs of orthogonally oriented strain-gages were glued onto the specimen surface. Fracture nucleation and growth occurred from a nucleation patch mostly located at the specimen surface or at the tip of prefabricated notches inside the specimens. Irrespective of the rock type, fracture propagation is associated with formation of a damage zone surrounding the fracture surface as revealed by distribution of cracks and AE hypocenters displaying a logarithmic decay in microcrack damage with distance normal to the fault trace. The width of the damage zone varies along the fault. After fracturing, faults were locked by increasing confining pressure. Subsequent sliding was mostly induced by driving the piston at a constant displacement rate producing large single events or multiple stick-slips. With increasing sliding distance a corrugated and rough fault surface formed displaying displacement-parallel lineations. Microstructural analysis of fault surfaces and cross-sections revealed formation of multiple secondary shears progressively merging into an anastomosing 3D-network controlling damage evolution and AE activity in the fault

  8. Jaw expansive lesions: population incidence and CT dentalscan role

    PubMed Central

    FIASCHETTI, V.; FANUCCI, E.; RASCIONI, M.; OTTRIA, L.; BARLATTANI, A.; SIMONETTI, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence of different expansive lesions and the advantages of the clinical employment of Dentalscan to study bones lesions and to establish a common diagnostic path. Materials and methods Since January 2005 to November 2009, 3200 patients, not selected for sex or age, have undergone a CT “Dentalscan” in the department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tor Vergata University Hospital (PTV), a suspect bone pathology was found in 704 of them through the XR-orthopantomograpy (OPT). CT images were obtained with General Electric CT Light Speed multislice. Images were saved in the Advantage Workstation (GE) supported by the “Dentascan” dedicated software and by the 3D software (3D SSD). The protocol was : Slice thickness 1,25 mm, gap 0, matrix 512 × 512, 140 KV and 70 mA. All the lesions were also studied with the dedicated three-dimensional reconstructor 3D SSD. Biopsy for diagnosis was performed on all the lesions, except one (false positive with digital OPT). The technique sensitivity was assessed for two important classes: benign and malignant lesions. Results Through CT Dentascan a detailed evaluation of the jaws lesions and their extension was obtained. 656 patients (93.1 %) out of 704 examined for a suspicious lesion on the orthopantomography had a benign lesion: (127 follicular cysts (18.2 %), 181 radicular cysts (25.1%), 93 non odontogenic cysts (13.2%), 29 fibroma (4.2%), 198 odontomes (28.2%), 24 ameloblastoma (3.6%), 4 brown tumors (0.7%), 47 (6.9%) had malignant lesions: (12 carcinoma (1.7%), 29 metastasis (4.3%), 6 sarcoma (0.8%), 1 Dentascan CT resulted to be negative (1 false positive of digital OPT). The sensitivity of the technique for both groups was 99% for benign lesions and 98% for malign lesions. Conclusions CT Dentascan characteristics suggest to consider these techniques as the gold standard for the evaluation of jaw expansive lesions and the support of surgical planning. PMID:23285385

  9. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Oscar; Ricart, Aurora M.; Lavery, Paul S.; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Masque, Pere; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Steven, Andy; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3- to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8- and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  10. Analysis of Glenoid Inter-anchor Distance with an All-Suture Anchor System

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Jonathan; Robinson, Sean; Dutton, Pascual; Dickinson, Ephraim; Rodriguez, John Paul; Camisa, William; Leasure, Jeremi M.; Montgomery, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization using suture anchors are commonly used techniques. More recently developed all-suture systems employ smaller diameter anchors, which increase repair contact area and allow greater placement density on narrow surfaces such as the glenoid. Our goal is investigate the strength characteristics of various inter-anchor distances in a human glenoid model. Methods: Twelve fresh-frozen human cadaveric glenoids were potted after the labrum was excised. The glenoids were then implanted with 1.4 mm all-suture anchors (Juggerknot, Biomet, Warsaw, IN) at varying inter-anchor distances. Anchors were implanted adjacent to one another or at 2 mm, 3 mm, or 5 mm distances using a template with pre-drilled holes. The glenoids were then underwent single cycle pullout testing using a test frame (Instron 8521, Instron Inc., Norwood, MA). A 5 N preload was applied to the construct and the actuator was driven away from the shoulder at a rate of 12.5mm/s as seen in Figure 1. Force and displacement were collected from the test frame actuator at a rate of 500 Hz. The primary outcomes were failure strength and stiffness. Stiffness was calculated from the initial linear region of the force displacement curve. Failure strength was defined as the first local maximum inflection point in the force displacement curve. Results: During load to fail testing, all but three of the specimens had both anchors pull out of the glenoid. The other mode of failure included one or both of the sutures failing. Stiffness was 13.52 ± 3.8, 17.97 ± 5.02, 17.59 ± 4.65 and 18.95 ± 4.67 N/mm for the adjacent, 2 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm treatment groups as shown Table 1. The adjacent group had a significantly lower stiffness compared to the other treatment groups. Failure strength was 48.68 ± 20.64, 76.16 ± 23.78, 73.19 ± 35.83 and 87.04 ± 34.67 N for the adjacent, 2 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm treatment groups as shown in Table 1. The adjacent group had a significantly lower failure strength compared to the other treatment groups. Conclusion: These data provide biomechanical evidence that in the glenoid, small diameter all-suture anchors may be implanted as close as 2 mm to one another without significantly decreasing their strength characteristics.

  11. Dosimetric analysis of the carousel setup for the exposure of rats at 1.62 GHz.

    PubMed

    Schönborn, Frank; Poković, Katja; Kuster, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The so-called carousel setup has been widely utilized for testing the hypotheses of adverse health effects on the central nervous system (CNS) due to mobile phone exposures in the frequency bands 800-900 MHz. The objectives of this article were to analyze the suitability of the setup for the upper mobile frequency range, i.e., 1.4-2 GHz, and to conduct a detailed experimental and numerical dosimetry for the setup at the IRIDIUM frequency band of 1.62 GHz. The setup consists of a plastic base on which ten rats, restrained in radially positioned tubes, are exposed to the electromagnetic field emanating from a sleeved dipole antenna at the center. Latest generation miniaturized dosimetric E field and temperature probes were used to measure the specific absorption rate (SAR) inside the brain of three rat cadavers of the Lewis strain and two rat cadavers of the Fisher 344 strain. A numerical analysis was conducted on the basis of three numerical rat phantoms with voxel sizes between 1.5 and 0.125 mm3 that are based on high resolution MRI scans of a 300 g male Wistar rat and a 370 g male Sprague-Dawley rat. The average of the assessed SAR values in the brain was 2.8 mW/g per W antenna input power for adult rats with masses between 220 and 350 g and 5.3 mW/g per W antenna input power for a juvenile rat with a mass of 95 g. The strong increase of the SAR in the brain with decreasing animal size was verified by simulations of the absorption in numerical phantoms scaled to sizes between 100 and 500 g with three different scaling methods. The study also demonstrated that current rat phantom models do not provide sufficient spatial resolution to perform absolute SAR assessment for the brain tissue. The variation of the SAR(brain)(av) due to changes in position was assessed to be in the range from +15% to -30%. A study on the dependence of the performance of the carousel setup on the frequency revealed that efficiency, defined as SAR(brain)(av) per W antenna input power, and

  12. Delivery of sry1, but not sry2, to the kidney increases blood pressure and sns indices in normotensive wky rats

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Daniel; Milsted, Amy; Dunphy, Gail; Boehme, Shannon; Dunmire, Jeff; Hart, Mike; Toot, Jonathon; Martins, Almir; Turner, Monte

    2009-01-01

    Background Our laboratory has shown that a locus on the SHR Y chromosome increases blood pressure (BP) in the SHR rat and in WKY rats with the SHR Y chromosome (SHR/y rat). A candidate for this Y chromosome hypertension locus is Sry, a gene that encodes a transcription factor responsible for testes determination. The SHR Y chromosome has six divergent Sry loci. The following study examined if exogenous Sry1 or Sry2 delivered to the kidney would elevate renal tyrosine hydroxylase, renal catecholamines, plasma catecholamines and telemetered BP over a 28 day period. We delivered 50 μg of either the expression construct Sry1/pcDNA 3.1, Sry2/pcDNA 3.1, or control vector into the medulla of the left kidney of normotensive WKY rats by electroporation. Weekly air stress was performed to determine BP responsiveness. Separate groups of animals were tested for renal function and plasma hormone patterns and pharmacological intervention using alpha adrenergic receptor blockade. Pre-surgery baseline and weekly blood samples were taken from Sry1 electroporated and control vector males for plasma renin, aldosterone, and corticosterone. BP was measured by telemetry and tyrosine hydroxylase and catecholamines by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Results In the animals receiving the Sry1 plasmid there were significant increases after 21 days in resting plasma norepinephrine (NE, 27%) and renal tyrosine hydroxylase content (41%, p < .05) compared to controls. BP was higher in animals electroporated with Sry1 (143 mmHg, p < .05) compared to controls (125 mmHg) between 2–4 weeks. Also the pressor response to air stress was significantly elevated in males electroporated with Sry1 (41 mmHg) compared to controls (28 mmHg, p < .001). Sry2 did not elevate BP or SNS indices and further tests were not done. The hormone profiles for plasma renin, aldosterone, and corticosterone between electroporated Sry1 and control vector males showed no significant differences over the 28 day period

  13. 18S rRNA gene sequencing identifies a novel species of Henneguya parasitizing the gills of the channel catfish (Ictaluridae).

    PubMed

    Rosser, Thomas G; Griffin, Matt J; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Khoo, Lester H; Pote, Linda M

    2014-12-01

    In the southeastern USA, the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus is a host to at least eight different species of myxozoan parasites belonging to the genus Henneguya, four of which have been characterized molecularly using sequencing of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. However, only two of these have confirmed life cycles that involve the oligochaete Dero digitata as the definitive host. During a health screening of farm-raised channel catfish, several fish presented with deformed primary lamellae. Lamellae harbored large, nodular, white pseudocysts 1.25 mm in diameter, and upon rupturing, these pseudocysts released Henneguya myxospores, with a typical lanceolate-shaped spore body, measuring 17.1 ± 1.0 μm (mean ± SD; range = 15.0-19.3 μm) in length and 4.8 ± 0.4 μm (3.7-5.6 μm) in width. Pyriform-shaped polar capsules were 5.8 ± 0.3 μm in length (5.1-6.4 μm) and 1.7 ± 0.1 μm (1.4-1.9 μm) in width. The two caudal processes were 40.0 ± 5.1 μm in length (29.5-50.0 μm) with a spore length of 57.2 ± 4.7 (46.8-66.8 μm). The contiguous SSU rRNA gene sequence obtained from myxospores of five excised cysts did not match any Henneguya sp. in GenBank. The greatest sequence homology (91% over 1,900 bp) was with Henneguya pellis, associated with blister-like lesions on the skin of blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus. Based on the unique combination of pseudocyst and myxospore morphology, tissue location, host, and SSU rRNA gene sequence data, we report this isolate to be a previously unreported species, Henneguya bulbosus sp. nov. PMID:25270236

  14. Factors Influencing Watershed Average Erosion Rates Calculated from Reservoir Sedimentation in Eastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamed, A.; Snyder, N. P.; David, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Database (ResSed), a catalogue of reservoirs and depositional data that has recently become publically available, allows for rapid calculation of sedimentation rates and rates of capacity loss over short (annual to decadal) timescales. This study is a statistical investigation of factors controlling watershed average erosion rates (E) in eastern United States watersheds. We develop an ArcGIS-based model that delineates watersheds upstream of ResSed dams and calculate drainage areas to determine E for 191 eastern US watersheds. Geomorphic, geologic, regional, climatic, and land use variables are quantified within study watersheds using GIS. Erosion rates exhibit a large amount of scatter, ranging from 0.001 to 1.25 mm/yr. A weak inverse power law relationship between drainage area (A) and E (R2 = 0.09) is evident, similar to other studies (e.g. Milliman and Syvitski, 1992; Koppes and Montgomery, 2009). Linear regressions reveal no relationship between mean watershed slope (S) and E, possibly due to the relatively low relief of the region (mean S for all watersheds is 6°). Analysis of Variance shows that watersheds in formerly glaciated regions exhibit a statistically significant lower mean E (0.06 mm/year) than watersheds in unglaciated regions (0.12 mm/year), but that watersheds with different dam purposes show no significant differences in mean E. Linear regressions reveal no relationships between E and land use parameters like percent agricultural land and percent impervious surfaces (I), but classification and regression trees indicate that watersheds in highly developed regions (I > 34%) exhibit mean E (0.36 mm/year) that is four times higher than watersheds in less developed (I < 34%) regions (0.09 mm/year). Further, interactions between land use variables emerge in formerly glaciated regions, where increased agricultural land results in higher rates of annual capacity loss in reservoirs (R2 = 0.56). Plots of E versus timescale of measurement (e.g., Sadler and Jerolmack, 2014) show that nearly the full range of observed E, including the highest values, are seen over short survey intervals (< 20 years), suggesting that whether or not large sedimentation events (such as floods) occur between two surveys may explain the high degree of variability in measured rates.

  15. SU-E-J-172: A Quantitative Assessment of Lung Tumor Motion Using 4DCT Imaging Under Conditions of Controlled Breathing in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mohatt, D; Gomez, J; Singh, A; Malhotra, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using the CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)

  16. Orthographic Projection Capillary Array Fluorescent Sensor for mHealth

    PubMed Central

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the limited sensitivity of phone cameras for mobile health (mHealth) fluorescent detection, we have previously developed a capillary array which enables a ~100× increase in detection sensitivity. However, for an effective detection platform, the optical configuration must allow for uniform measurement sensitivity between channels when using such a capillary array sensor. This is a challenge due to the parallax inherent in imaging long parallel capillary tubes with typical lens configurations. To enable effective detection, we have developed an orthographic projection system in this work which forms parallel light projection images from the capillaries using an object-space telecentric lens configuration. This optical configuration results in a significantly higher degree of uniformity in measurement between channels, as well as a significantly reduced focal distance, which enables a more compact sensor. A plano-convex lens (f = 150 mm) was shown to produce a uniform orthographic projection when properly combined with the phone camera’s built in lens (f = 4 mm), enabling measurements of long capillaries (125 mm) to be made from a distance of 160 mm. The number of parallel measurements which can be made is determined by the size of the secondary lens. Based on these results, a more compact configuration with shorter 32 mm capillaries and a plano-convex lens with a shorter focal length (f = 10 mm) was constructed. This optical system was used to measure serial dilutions of fluorescein with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 nM, similar to the LOD of a commercial plate reader. However, many plate readers based on standard 96 well plate requires sample volumes of 100 ul for measurement, while the capillary array requires a sample volume of less than 10 ul. This optical configuration allows for a device to make use of the ~100× increase in fluorescent detection sensitivity produced by capillary amplification while maintaining a compact size and capability

  17. Adaptive Bone Remodeling of the Femoral Bone After Tumor Resection Arthroplasty With an Uncemented Proximally Hydroxyapatite-Coated Stem.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel R; Petersen, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Loss of bone stock and stress shielding is a significant challenge in limb salvage surgery. This study investigates the adaptive bone remodeling of the femoral bone after implantation of a tumor prosthesis with an uncemented press fit stem. We performed a prospective 1 yr follow-up of 6 patients (mean age: 55 (26-78) yr, female/male=3/3) who underwent bone tumor resection surgery of the proximal femur (n=3) or distal femur (n=3). Reconstruction was done using a Global Modular Replacement System (Stryker® Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ) tumor prosthesis, and all patients received a straight-fluted 125-mm uncemented press-fit titanium alloy stem with hydroxyapatite coating of the proximal part of the stem. Measurements of bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) were done postoperatively and after 3, 6, and 12 mo in the part of the femur bone containing the Global Modular Replacement System stem using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. BMD was measured in 3 regions of interest (ROIs) in the femur bone. Nonparametric analysis of variance (Friedman test) for evaluation of changes in BMD over time. BMD decreased in all 3 ROIs with time. In ROI 1 (p=0.01), BMD decreased by 10% after 3 mo and ended with a total decrease of 14% after 1 yr. In ROI 2 (p=0.006), BMD was decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 9% below the postoperative value. In ROI 3 (p=0.009), BMD decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 8% below the postoperative value. A bone loss of 8%-9% during the first postoperative year was seen along the femoral stem, but in the bone containing the hydroxyapatite-coated part of the stem, the decrease in BMD was 14%, thus indicating that stress shielding of this part of the bone may play a role for the adaptive bone remodeling. PMID:25843447

  18. Velocity and deformation fields in the North Aegean domain, Greece, and implications for fault kinematics, derived from GPS data 1993-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M. D.; Geiger, A.; Kahle, H.-G.; Veis, G.; Billiris, H.; Paradissis, D.; Felekis, S.

    2013-06-01

    GPS rates based on data of an extended continuous and campaign-type GPS network in the North Aegean domain are presented. The data processed for the time period 1993-2009 is used to analyze the complex kinematic and deformation fields in the North Aegean Sea and adjacent regions. The presence of slowly deforming areas is investigated. Southern Bulgaria, eastern Macedonia and Thrace move uniformly southward relative to Eurasia (1.5-3.5 mm/yr). Western Macedonia, Epirus, Thessaly and Central Greece rotate rather coherently clockwise. The region comprising the islands of Limnos, Agios Efstratios and Alonnisos moves like a counterclockwise rotating slowly deforming block. The new GPS rates allow a quantification of the spatial change of strike-slip motion and locking depth along the North Aegean trough. Dextral strike-slip motion diminishes from east toward west amounting to 21.2 mm/yr along the Saros basin and 12.5 mm/yr south of the Chalkidiki peninsula. Less than 5 mm/yr (50 nstrain/yr shear strain rate) is transferred from the Sporades islands/Pelion toward Northern Evia. The locking depth is shallow for the Ganos fault and the western Saros basin (5.6-8.9 km). It is deeper between the Sporades islands and Pelion (~ 17.7 km) corresponding to a more diffuse shear zone. An elementary finite element model is applied to derive slip rates of the three main ENE-WSW to NE-SW trending dextral strike-slip faults in the North Aegean. Large-scale N-S to NNE-SSW extension in the North Aegean domain is analyzed by employing finite element and GPS based strain rate analyses. Pronounced extension (> 100 nstrain) is associated with known tectonic structures (e.g., Mygdonian graben, northern Gulf of Evia). In offshore areas such as the Sporades basin the correspondence between GPS derived extension rates and active fault structures is not entirely evident. However, important constraints are provided for seismotectonic interpretations.

  19. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.

  20. Increased anal basal pressure in chronic anal fissures may be caused by overreaction of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex.

    PubMed

    van Meegdenburg, Maxime M; Trzpis, Monika; Heineman, Erik; Broens, Paul M A

    2016-09-01

    Chronic anal fissure is a painful disorder caused by linear ulcers in the distal anal mucosa. Even though it counts as one of the most common benign anorectal disorders, its precise etiology and pathophysiology remains unclear. Current thinking is that anal fissures are caused by anal trauma and pain, which leads to internal anal sphincter hypertonia. Increased anal basal pressure leads to diminished anodermal blood flow and local ischemia, which delays healing and leads to chronic anal fissure. The current treatment of choice for chronic anal fissure is either lateral internal sphincterotomy or botulinum toxin injections. In contrast to current thinking, we hypothesize that the external, rather than the internal, anal sphincter is responsible for increased anal basal pressure in patients suffering from chronic anal fissure. We think that damage to the anal mucosa leads to hypersensitivity of the contact receptors of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex, resulting in overreaction of the reflex. Overreaction causes spasm of the external anal sphincter. This in turn leads to increased anal basal pressure, diminished anodermal blood flow, and ischemia. Ischemia, finally, prevents the anal fissure from healing. Our hypothesis is supported by two findings. The first concerned a chronic anal fissure patient with increased anal basal pressure (170mmHg) who had undergone lateral sphincterotomy. Directly after the operation, while the submucosal anesthetic was still active, basal anal pressure decreased to 80mmHg. Seven hours after the operation, when the anesthetic had completely worn off, basal anal pressure increased again to 125mmHg, even though the internal anal sphincter could no longer be responsible for the increase. Second, in contrast to previous studies, recent studies demonstrated that botulinum toxin influences external anal sphincter activity and, because it is a striated muscle relaxant, it seems reasonable to presume that it affects the striated

  1. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation: Review of Evidence and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E; Olawoye, Olayinka; Crist, Brett D; Gabriel, Allen; Galiano, Robert D; Gupta, Subhas; Lantis Ii, John C; Lavery, Lawrence; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Teot, Luc

    2015-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) and dwell time is an adjunctive treatment modality for selected complex wounds. Because of the greater amount of research now available, a multidisciplinary expert panel comprising the fields of podiatry, plastic and general surgery, burn treatment, infectious diseases, and orthopedics was convened on July 11, 2015, to produce a summary of the data and recommendations on the use of NPWTi. The panel members each reviewed available published literature on NPWTi in the PubMed, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases from 1 January 2012 up until 20 July 2015 using the string search term negative pressure wound therapy instillation provided by the panel moderator; there were no restrictions on the language or type of publication. Panel members discussed their experiences and worked to reach consensus on several predefined topics. NPWTi was found to be most appropriate for properly selected complex hosts or wounds such as patients with multiple comorbidities, patients with an American Society of Anesthesiology Classification ≥ 2, severe traumatic wounds, diabetic foot infections, and wounds complicated by invasive infection or extensive biofilm. NPWTi should not be used routinely to treat simple wounds or hosts without comorbidities.There is evidence that when NPWTi is added to standard of care in properly selected cases it provides better overall clinical outcomes than standard of care alone, even when including NPWT. Based on published evidence and panel member experience, the Panel recommends a dwell time - fluid briefly instilled into the wound and allowed to diffuse for a user-specified time - of 10-20 minutes followed by 2-4 hours of negative pressure at -125 mmHg, although larger wounds may need times of up to 6 hours. Normal saline (0.9%) is the preferred solution for NPWTi, except in special situations. NPWTi with dwell time is an adjunct to other standard principles of appropriate wound assessment and

  2. Comparative analysis of different measurement techniques for characterizing soil surface roughness in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Agirre, Alex; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Valle, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Álvaro; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface roughness can be defined as the variation in soil surface elevations, and as such, it is a key element in hydrology and soil erosion processes. In agricultural soils, roughness is mainly an anthropic factor determined by the type of tillage and management. Roughness is also a property with a high spatial variability, since the same type of tillage can result in surfaces with different roughness depending on the physical characteristics of the soil and atmospheric conditions. In order to quantify roughness and to parameterize its role in different processes, different measurement techniques have been used and several parameters have been proposed in the literature. The objective of this work is to evaluate different measurement techniques and assess their accuracy and suitability for quantifying surface roughness in agricultural soils. With this aim, a comparative analysis of three roughness measurement techniques has been carried out; (1) laser profilometer, (2) convergent photogrammetry and (3) terrestrial laser scanner. Roughness measurements were done in 3 experimental plots (5x5 meters) with different tillage treatments (representing different roughness conditions) obtained with typical agricultural tools. The laser profilometer registered vertically the distance from a reference bar down to the surface. It had a vertical accuracy of 1.25 mm, a sampling interval of 5 mm and a total length profile of 5 m. Eight profiles were taken per plot, four in parallel to tillage direction and four in perpendicular. Convergent photogrammetry consisted of 20-30 images taken per plot from a height of 5-10 m above ground (using an elevation platform), leading to point clouds of ~25 million points per plot. Terrestrial laser scanner measurements were taken from the four sides of each plot at a measurement height of ~1.75 m above ground. After orientating and corregistering the four scans, point clouds of ~60 million points were obtained per plot. The comparative analysis was threefold: (1) comparison of raw data (point clouds), (2) comparison of interpolated DEMs considering different resolutions (2.5mm, 5mm and 10mm) and (3) comparison of roughness parameters. In all cases the profilometer was used as a reference because of its vertical accuracy and nadiral viewing geometry. Thus point clouds and interpolated DEMs were compared to the height profiles. The results showed that in most cases surface height discrepancies were below 10 mm for raw data and increased slightly when increasing the pixel size of DEMs. Finally, a thorough analysis of different roughness parameters proposed in the literature was carried out to find the most appropriate technique and parameter for the characterization of roughness in each case. Although still preliminary, results offer practical recommendations on the usefulness of each technique.

  3. The 3D distribution of cordierite and biotite in hornfels from the Bugaboo contact aureole (British Columbia, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidies, Fred; Petley-Ragan, Arianne; Pattison, David

    2016-04-01

    The size, abundance, shape and spatial distribution of metamorphic minerals bears important information on the rates and mechanisms of fundamental processes that take place during metamorphic crystallization. X-ray computed tomography (XR-CT) has become the method of choice to study the three-dimensional (3D) disposition of minerals in rocks as it allows investigation of relatively large sample volumes at sufficiently high resolution required for statistically meaningful analyses, and as its non-destructive fashion permits further studies such as mineral chemical, isotopic or crystallographic analyses of select grains identified through XR-CT. We present results obtained through the quantification of the 3D disposition of cordierite and biotite crystals in a hornfels from the contact aureole of the Bugaboo Batholith (British Columbia, Canada) using XR-CT and global as well as scale-dependent pattern statistics (Petley-Ragan et al., 2016). The results demonstrate a random distribution of cordierite and biotite crystal sizes for all scales across the entire rock volume studied indicative of interface-controlled prograde metamorphic reaction kinetics. We show that the common approach to approximate the shape of crystals as spherical underestimates the influence of the Strauss hard-core process on rock texture which may be misinterpreted to reflect ordering of crystal sizes by inhibition of nucleation and growth commonly associated with diffusion-controlled reaction kinetics. According to our findings, Strauss hard-core ordering develops at length scales equal to and less than the average major axis of the crystal population. This is significantly larger than what is obtained if a spherical crystal geometry would be assumed, and increases with deviation from sphericity. For the cordierite and biotite populations investigated in this research, Strauss hard-core ordering developed at length scales of up to ˜2.2 and 1.25 mm, respectively, which is almost 1 mm longer than the scales that would be obtained if a spherical geometry would have been assumed. Our results highlight the importance of a critical assessment of the geometrical model assumptions commonly applied in the 3D analysis of crystal size distributions, and underline the need for a quantitative understanding of interface processes in order to appreciate their role in the kinetics of contact metamorphic reactions and rock texture formation. References: Petley-Ragan A, Gaidies F, Pattison DRM (2016) A statistical analysis of the distribution of cordierite and biotite in hornfels from the Bugaboo contact aureole: implications for the kinetics of porphyroblast crystallization. Journal of Metamorphic Geology 34:85-101

  4. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger distances. To demonstrate the transporting action, a video camera was used to record the movement. The speed of particles was measured from the video images.

  5. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Valencia applicator in elderly patients: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Laliscia, Concetta; Manfredi, Bruno; Ursino, Stefano; Pasqualetti, Francesco; Lombardo, Ezio; Perrone, Franco; Morganti, Riccardo; Paiar, Fabiola; Fabrini, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been increasing over the past 30 years. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the two most common subtypes of NMSC. The aim of this study was to estimate tumour control, toxicity, and aesthetic events in elderly patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) using Valencia applicator. Material and methods From January 2012 to May 2015, 57 lesions in 39 elderly eligible patients were enrolled. All the lesions had a diameter ≤ 25 mm (median: 12.5 mm) and a depth ≤ 4 mm. The appropriate Valencia applicator, 2 or 3 cm in diameter was used. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy in 8 fractions (5 Gy/fraction) in 48 lesions (group A), and 50 Gy in 10 fractions (5 Gy/fraction) in 9 lesions (group B), delivered 2/3 times a week. The biological effective dose (BED) was 60 Gy and 75 Gy, respectively. Results After median follow-up of 12 months, 96.25% lesions showed a complete response and only two cases presented partial remission. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group – European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) G 1-2 acute toxicities were observed in 63.2% of the lesions: 56.3% in group A and 77.7% in group B. Late G1-G2 toxicities was observed in 19.3% of the lesions: 18.8% in group A and 22.2% in group B, respectively. No G3 or higher acute or late toxicities occurred. In 86% of the lesions, an excellent cosmetic result was observed (87.5% in group A and 77.8% in group B). Six lesions had a good cosmetic outcome and only 2.3% presented a fair cosmetic impact. Conclusions The treatment of NMSC with HDR-BT using Valencia surface applicator is effective with excellent and good cosmetics results in elderly patients. The hypofractionated course appears effective and no statistical differences were observed between the two groups analysed. PMID:26816500

  6. Long-term preservation of myocardial energetic in chronic hibernating myocardium.

    PubMed

    Jameel, Mohammad Nurulqadr; Li, Qinglu; Mansoor, Abdul; Xiong, Qiang; Swingen, Cory; Zhang, Jianyi

    2011-03-01

    We previously reported that the myocardial energetic state, as defined by the ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP (PCr/ATP), was preserved at baseline (BL) in a swine model of chronic myocardial ischemia with mild reduction of myocardial blood flow (MBF) 10 wk after the placement of an external constrictor on the left anterior descending coronary artery. It remains to be seen whether this stable energetic state is maintained at a longer-term follow-up. Hibernating myocardium (HB) was created in minipigs (n = 7) by the placement of an external constrictor (1.25 mm internal diameter) on the left anterior descending coronary artery. Function was assessed with MRI at regular intervals until 6 mo. At 6 mo, myocardial energetic in the HB was assessed by (31)P-magnetic resonance spectrometry and myocardial oxygenation was examined from the deoxymyoglobin signal using (1)H-magnetic resonance spectrometry during BL, coronary vasodilation with adenosine, and high cardiac workload with dopamine and dobutamine (DpDb). MBF was measured with radiolabeled microspheres. At BL, systolic thickening fraction was significantly lower in the HB compared with remote region (34.4 ± 9.4 vs. 50.1 ± 10.7, P = 0.006). This was associated with a decreased MBF in the HB compared with the remote region (0.73 ± 0.08 vs. 0.97 ± 0.07 ml · min(-1) · g, P = 0.03). The HB PCr/ATP at BL was normal. DpDb resulted in a significant increase in rate pressure product, which caused a twofold increase in MBF in the HB and a threefold increase in the remote region. The systolic thickening fraction increased with DpDb, which was significantly higher in the remote region than HB (P < 0.05). The high cardiac workload was associated with a significant reduction in the HB PCr/ATP (P < 0.02), but this response was similar to normal myocardium. Thus HB has stable BL myocardial energetic despite the reduction MBF and regional left ventricular function. More importantly, HB has a reduced contractile reserve but has a similar energetic response to high cardiac workload like normal myocardium. PMID:21131472

  7. A NEW (or old) RIFT IN EASTERN CALIFORNIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzia, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) includes a broad network of right-lateral faults in the Mojave Desert and southern Basin-Ranges of California. Seven large earthquakes, including the 1992 M7.4 Landers and 1999 M7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes, have occurred within this zone in the last 60 years. This severe seismic activity is complicated by two puzzling facts: 1) the hypocenter of the Landers and Hector Mine earthquakes occur at shallow crustal depths (10±4 km); and 2) the aftershock patterns associated with these earthquakes cross cut the structural grain of the ECSZ at an acute angle. GPS data indicate that crustal rocks within the Mojave Desert segment of the ECSZ are moving as much as 14 mm/year to the northwest relative to Station FUNE in Death Valley; crustal rocks within the Basin-Ranges segment are moving 12.5 mm/year northwestward. Dokka and Travis (1990) concluded that the ECZS accommodates 20-25 percent of relative plate motion along the North American-Pacific plate margin inboard of the San Andreas Fault Zone. Nur and others (1993) reported that the large earthquakes may occur along a new fault system that cuts across the older faults; they named this young fault the Landers-Mojave earthquake line. Neither model, however, considers Quaternary volcanic centers in eastern CA and NV just east of and locally within the ECSZ. Rocks within these volcanic centers, including (from north to south) Lathrop Wells, Cima, Pisgah, Amboy, and Obsidian Butte, are younger than but chemically and isotopically similar to Neogene volcanic rocks that bound the rift province of the northern Gulf of California. The seismic and GPS data, combined with petrologic data from nearby volcanic centers, suggests that the ECZS is the active margin of an incipient transtensional rift as the Gulf of California propagates northward. Given the volume of volcanic rocks and prehistoric seismic history in California, it is not certain if this rift is growing or dying; only time will tell.

  8. Battery-operated, argon-hydrogen microplasma on hybrid, postage stamp-sized plastic-quartz chips for elemental analysis of liquid microsamples using a portable optical emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Weagant, Scott; Chen, Vivian; Karanassios, Vassili

    2011-11-01

    A battery-operated, atmospheric pressure, self-igniting, planar geometry Ar-H(2) microplasma for elemental analysis of liquid microsamples is described. The inexpensive microplasma device (MPD) fabricated for this work was a hybrid plastic-quartz structure that was formed on chips with an area (roughly) equal to that of a small-sized postage stamp (MPD footprint, 12.5-mm width by 38-mm length). Plastic substrates were chosen due to their low cost, for rapid prototyping purposes, and for a speedy microplasma device evaluation. To enhance portability, the microplasma was operated from an 18-V rechargeable battery. To facilitate portability even further, it was demonstrated that the battery can be recharged by a portable solar panel. The battery-supplied dc voltage was converted to a high-voltage ac. The ~750-μm (diameter) and 12-mm (long) Ar-H(2) (3% H(2)) microplasma was formed by applying the high-voltage ac between two needle electrodes. Spectral interference from the electrode materials or from the plastic substrate was not observed. Operating conditions were found to be key to igniting and sustaining a microplasma that was simply "warm" to the touch (thus alleviating the need for cooling or other thermal management) and that had a stable background emission. A small-sized (900 μL internal volume) electrothermal vaporization system (40-W max power) was used for microsample introduction. Microplasma background emission in the spectral region between 200 and 850 nm obtained using a portable fiber-optic spectrometer is reported and the effect of the operating conditions is described. Analyte emission from microliter volumes of dilute single-element standard solutions of Cd, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, and Zn is documented. The majority of spectral lines observed for the elements tested were from neutral atoms. The relative lack of emission from ion lines simplified the spectra, thus facilitating the use of a portable spectrometer. Despite the relative spectral simplicity, some spectral interference effects were noted when running a multi-element solution. An example of how interference in the spectral domain can be resolved in the time domain using selective thermal vaporization is provided. Analytical utility and performance characteristics are reported; for example, K concentrations in diluted (~30 times) bottled water were determined to be 4.1 ± 1.0 μg/mL (4 μg/mL was the stated concentration), precision was about 25%, and the estimated detection limits were in the picogram range (or in nanograms per milliliter in relative units). PMID:21909664

  9. A prospective pilot study to evaluate wound outcomes and levels of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in the wound fluid of patients with trauma-related chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Yang, Fan; Li, Zhanfei; Yi, Chengla; Bai, Xiangjun

    2014-06-01

    If surgical closure of chronic wounds is an option, choosing an appropriate time to definitely close these wounds remains a challenge. Although the underlying mechanisms of nonhealing are not completely understood, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in wound fluid have been found to be markers of the systemic and local inflammation state of chronic wounds. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive pilot study was to evaluate the effect of debridement, systemic antibiotics, and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on the outcomes of trauma-related chronic wounds and changes in local inflammation responses, measured using CRP and IL-6 levels as indicators of cytokine regulation. Between June 2012 and May 2013, 20 consecutive patients (14 men, six women, mean age 40 [range 17-56] years) with various trauma-related, nonhealing chronic wounds were enrolled in the study after failing to heal for an average of 8.5 (range 6-16) weeks using a protocol of regular debridement and gauze dressings. Before the start of the study, wounds were cultured, and laboratory values for white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophils, and levels of serum CRP and IL-6 in the wound fluid obtained. Wounds were surgically debrided and NPWT (continuous at 125 mm Hg) applied. All patients were prescribed systemic antibiotics, and mean time interval between NPWT dressing changes was 5 (range 3-7) days. During an average mean NPWT treatment time of 13 (range 5-20) days, CRP and IL-6 concentrations decreased from 66.4 mg/L to 10.4 mg/L and 44.1 pg/mL to 8.6 pg/mL, respectively (P <0.001). The presence/absence of bacteria, WBC, and neutrophil counts did not change. No complications were noted, and all wounds were successfully closed using various surgical procedures. In this study, clinical wound improvement and a significant decrease in wound fluid CRP and IL-6 levels were observed. Studies with a larger sample size and a more robust study design may help elucidate the

  10. Metal content in street dust as a reflection of atmospheric dust emissions from coal power plants, metal smelters, and traffic.

    PubMed

    Žibret, Gorazd; Van Tonder, Danel; Žibret, Lea

    2013-07-01

    Resuspended street dust is a source of inhalable particles in urban environments. Despite contaminated street dust being a possible health risk factor for local population, little is known about the contribution of atmospheric dust emissions and other factors to the content of toxic metals in street dust. The impact of smelting, traffic, and power plants on metal contaminates in street dust is the focus of street dust sampling at 46 locations in the Witbank area (Republic of South Africa). This area is characterized by numerous open-pit coal mines in the Karoo coal basin, which provides a cheap source of energy to numerous metallurgical smelters and ironworks and supplies coal to the coal-fired power plants located nearby. Street dust was collected on asphalt or concrete surfaces with hard plastic brushes, avoiding collecting of possible sand, soil, or plant particles. Chemical analysis was done on the <0.125 mm fraction using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry subsequent to total digestion. Exceptionally high concentrations of metals were detected with concentrations of Fe reaching 17.7%, Cr 4.3%, Mn 2%, Ni 366 mg/kg, and V 4,410 mg/kg. Factor analysis indicates three sources for the pollution. Road traffic which contributes to the high concentrations of Cu, Pb, Sb, and Sn, with the highest impacts detected in the town of Witbank. The second source is associated with the metal smelting industry, contributing to Fe, Co, Mn, and V emissions. The highest factor scores were observed around four metallurgical smelter operations, located in the Ferrobank, Highveld, and Clewer industrial areas. Impact of vanadium smelter to street dust composition could still be detected some 20 km away from the sources. Exceptionally high concentrations of Cr were observed in four samples collected next to the Ferrobank industrial area, despite Cr not being loaded in factor 2. The last source of the pollution is most probably fly ash associated with the coal-fired power plants

  11. Ambulatory cardiovascular monitoring of healthy adults in Rochester, Minnesota: chronobiologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, P K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    1990-01-01

    To serve as a tentative reference group for clinical health, 107 adults measured their systolic (S) and diastolic (D) blood pressure (BP) with an ambulatory Del Mar Avionics monitor (Irvine, California). Data were collected over approximately 24 hours at 7.5-minute intervals during waking and at 15-minute intervals during sleep. An echocardiogram served to determine the left ventricular mass (LVM), septal wall thickness (SWT), posterior wall thickness (PWT), ejection fraction (EjFr), and left atrial size (LAS). Each data series was analyzed by single cosinor. A statistically significant circadian rhythm (P less than 0.05) was found in 96 subjects (89.7 percent) for SBP and in 86 subjects (80.4 percent) for DBP. A population-mean cosinor reveals a highly significant circadian rhythm (P less than 0.001) for both variables in men (n = 44) as well as in women (n = 63), with an acrophase around 14:15. The double circadian amplitude, a measure of the total predictable change within a day, averages 10 (women) and 11 (men) mm Hg for DBP and 14 (women) and 17 (men) mm Hg for SBP. The midline-estimating statistic of rhythm (MESOR) of SBP is found to be higher for men (125 mm Hg) than for women (120 mm Hg), P = 0.018, whereas no difference in MESOR is found for DBP (71 mm Hg). A statistically significant correlation with age is found for the MESOR of SBP in both men (r = 0.352; P = 0.018) and women (r = 0.336; P = 0.007). The MESOR of SBP is also found to correlate with LVM in men (r = 0.300; P = 0.046), but not in women (r = 0.181; P = 0.153), whereas the MESOR of DBP correlates with LVM in women (R = 0.316; P = 0.011) but not in men (r = 0.117; P = 0.543). A positive correlation is also found between the MESOR of SBP and SWT as well as with EjFr, which is more prominent in women; between the MESOR of DBP and LAS, which is more prominent in men; and a negative correlation is found for women but not men between the circadian amplitude of both SBP and DBP and EjFr. Blood

  12. CT cardiac imaging: evolution from 2D to 3D backprojection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Pan, Tinsu; Sasaki, Kosuke

    2004-04-01

    The state-of-the-art multiple detector-row CT, which usually employs fan beam reconstruction algorithms by approximating a cone beam geometry into a fan beam geometry, has been well recognized as an important modality for cardiac imaging. At present, the multiple detector-row CT is evolving into volumetric CT, in which cone beam reconstruction algorithms are needed to combat cone beam artifacts caused by large cone angle. An ECG-gated cardiac cone beam reconstruction algorithm based upon the so-called semi-CB geometry is implemented in this study. To get the highest temporal resolution, only the projection data corresponding to 180° plus the cone angle are row-wise rebinned into the semi-CB geometry for three-dimensional reconstruction. Data extrapolation is utilized to extend the z-coverage of the ECG-gated cardiac cone beam reconstruction algorithm approaching the edge of a CT detector. A helical body phantom is used to evaluate the ECG-gated cone beam reconstruction algorithm"s z-coverage and capability of suppressing cone beam artifacts. Furthermore, two sets of cardiac data scanned by a multiple detector-row CT scanner at 16 x 1.25 (mm) and normalized pitch 0.275 and 0.3 respectively are used to evaluate the ECG-gated CB reconstruction algorithm"s imaging performance. As a reference, the images reconstructed by a fan beam reconstruction algorithm for multiple detector-row CT are also presented. The qualitative evaluation shows that, the ECG-gated cone beam reconstruction algorithm outperforms its fan beam counterpart from the perspective of cone beam artifact suppression and z-coverage while the temporal resolution is well maintained. Consequently, the scan speed can be increased to reduce the contrast agent amount and injection time, improve the patient comfort and x-ray dose efficiency. Based up on the comparison, it is believed that, with the transition of multiple detector-row CT into volumetric CT, ECG-gated cone beam reconstruction algorithms will provide better image quality for CT cardiac applications.

  13. Risk assessment of physiological effects of atmospheric composition and pressure in Constellation vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, Richard; Conkin, Johnny; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    Introduction: To limit the risk of fire and reduce denitrogenation time to prevent decompression sickness to support frequent extravehicular activities on the Moon, a hypobaric (PB=414mmHg) and mildly hypoxic ( ppO2=132mmHg, 32% O2-68%N2) living environment is considered for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). With acute change in ppO2 from 145-178mmHg at standard vehicular operating pressure to less than 125mmHg at desired lunar surface vehicular operating pressures, there is the possibility that some crewmembers may develop symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). The signs and symptoms of AMS (headache plus nausea, dizziness, fatigue, or sleeplessness) could impact crew health and performance on lunar surface missions. Methods: We performed a literature review on the topic of the physiological effects of reduced ppO2 and absolute pressure. The results of nine studies were evaluated. Results: There is evidence for an absolute pressure effect per se on AMS, so the higher the altitude for a given hypoxic alveolar oxygen (O2) partial pressure (PAO2), the greater the AMS response is. Between 7% and 25% of adults may experience mild AMS near 2000 m altitude following a rapid ascent from sea level while breathing air (6500 ft, acute PAO2=75mmHg). The operational experience with the Shuttle staged denitrogenation protocol at 528mmHg (3048 m) while breathing 26.5% O2 (acute PAO2=85mmHg) in astronauts adapting to microgravity suggests a similar likely experience in the proposed CEV environment. Conclusions: We believe the risk of mild AMS is greater given a PAO2 of 77mmHg at 4876 m altitude while breathing 32% O2 than at 1828 m altitude while breathing 21% O2. Only susceptible astronauts would develop mild and transient AMS with prolonged exposure to 414 mmHg (4876 m) while breathing 32% O2 (acute PAO2=77mmHg). So the following may be employed for operational risk reduction: (1) develop procedures to increase PB as needed in the

  14. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, O.; Ricart, A. M.; Lavery, P. S.; Mateo, M. A.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Masque, P.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3 to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3 to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stores were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). Also, sediment accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3 to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8 and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypotheses that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g. meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g. recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g. hydrodynamic energy and sediment accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  15. SU-E-T-150: End to End Tests On the First Clinical EDGETM

    SciTech Connect

    Scheib, S; Schmelzer, P; Vieira, S; Greco, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the sub millimeter overall accuracy of EDGETM, the dedicated linac based SRS/SABR treatment platform from Varian, using a novel End-to-End (E2E) test phantom. Methods: The new E2E test phantom developed by Varian consists of a cube with an outer dimension of 15x15x15 cm3. The phantom is equipped with an exchangable inner cube (7×7×7 cm3) to hold radiochromic films or a tungsten ball (diameter = 5 mm) for Winston-Lutz tests. 16 ceramic balls (diameter = 5 mm) are embedded in the outer cube. Three embedded Calypso transponders allow for Calypso based monitoring. The outer surface of the phantom is tracked using the Optical Surface Monitoring System (OSMS). The phantom is positioned using kV, MV and CBCT images. A simCT of the phantom was acquired and SRS/SABR plans were treated using the new phantom on the first clinical installed EDGETM. As a first step a series of EPID based Winston-Lutz tests have been performed. As a second step the calculated dose distribution applied to the phantom was verified with radiochromic films in orthogonal planes. The measured dose distribution is compared with the calculated (Eclipse) one based on the known isocenter on both dose distributions. The geometrical shift needed to match both dose distributions is the overall accuracy and is determined using dose profiles, isodose lines or gamma pass rates (3%, 1 mm). Results: Winston-Lutz tests using the central tungsten BB demonstrated a targeting accuracy of 0.44±0.18mm for jaw (2cm × 2cm) defined 0.39±0.19mm for MLC (2cm × 2cm) defined and 0.37±0.15mm for cone (12.5 mm) defined fields. A treated patient plan (spinal metastases lesion with integrated boost) showed a dosimetric dose localization accuracy of 0.6mm. Conclusion: Geometric and dosimetric E2E tests on EDGETM, show sub-millimeter E2E targeting and dose localisation accuracy.

  16. Aortic wall properties and baroreceptor behaviour at normal arterial pressure and in acute hypertensive resetting in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Poore, E R; Roberts, A M; Schultz, H D

    1984-01-01

    In order to throw light on the mechanism of acute hypertensive baroreceptor resetting, we examined the relationship between aortic baroreceptor firing and aortic wall properties in anaesthetized dogs as pressure was varied in a number of ways. We recorded baroreceptor impulses from the left aortic nerve, and measured aortic pressure with a catheter-tip transducer and external aortic diameter with ultrasonic transit-time transducers. Narrow anticlockwise hysteresis loops were evident in the pressure-diameter relationship of the upper thoracic aorta, both during the rapid pulsatile pressure changes of the cardiac cycle and during the slow excursions of mean pressure imposed for construction of baroreceptor pressure--response curves. In contrast to the 'phase-lag' response of diameter to pressure, the baroreceptor response was 'phaselead' in character, decreasing when stress-induced creep occurred in the aortic wall. When the mean arterial pressure set-point was increased from 100 to 125 mmHg for 20 min, the hysteresis loops relating mean diameter to mean pressure in the range 60-200 mmHg were displaced along the diameter axis in the direction of wall creep. A reduction in the baroreceptor response to pressure (i.e. resetting) always accompanied this displacement. Administration of ouabain (25-35 micrograms/kg) had no consistent effect on baroreceptor resetting. It has been suggested that acute baroreceptor resetting is akin to adaptation. To investigate the possibility that the two processes are accompanied by similar changes in aortic wall properties, we converted the aorta into a closed sac and distended it with a square wave of pressure. Like resetting, adaptation of the baroreceptor response to maintained pressure was associated with a small degree of creep of the aortic wall. Our results are compatible with the hypothesis that acute hypertensive resetting of aortic baroreceptors is similar to adaptation, both phenomena being attributable to relaxation of

  17. Amplitude modulated chirp excitation to reduce grating lobes and maintain ultrasound intensity at the focus of an array.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Chandra P; Oelze, Michael L

    2013-09-01

    During application of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with therapy arrays, the existence of grating lobes can cause heating at unintended tissue regions. Therefore, the reduction of grating lobes in therapeutic arrays is an important goal. One way to reduce the grating lobes in therapy arrays is to excite the arrays with broadband signals (defined here as >10% fractional bandwidth). To achieve a reduction in grating lobe levels in an ultrasonic array, coded waveforms can be utilized that reduce the grating lobe levels while maintaining the spatial peak temporal average intensity. In this study, a 5-MHz, 9-element, 1.25 mm inter-elemental spacing linear array was excited by a sinusoidal waveform, a conventional linear chirp, and a modified linear chirp. Both chirps spanned the -3-dB bandwidth of the transducer. The conventional chirp was a broadband signal with a linear sweep of frequencies between 2.5 and 7.5 MHz, with all frequency components excited with equal amplitude. The modified chirp signal also swept the frequencies between 2.5 and 7.5 MHz, but the amplitude was weighted such that the edges (low and high frequencies of the band) were excited with more energy than the center of the band. In simulations, the field patterns for the sinusoidal, conventional chirp and modified chirp excitations were produced from the array using Field II and compared. For experiments, the beam pattern from a 5-MHz single-element transducer was mapped using a hydrophone for the sinusoidal, conventional chirp and modified chirp excitation. Each field from the transducer was repeated and summed to produce a field from an array of 9 elements. The difference in the time averaged intensity (in dB) in the main lobe and grating lobes were estimated for each excitation and compared. The results demonstrated that the chirp signals resulted in decreases in grating lobe levels compared to the main lobe, i.e. 10 dB down for focusing and 6 dB down for focusing and steering. A further 1 dB decrease in grating lobe levels was observed for the modified chirp excitation compared to the conventional chirp excitation, which corresponds to ~21% reduction in energy deposition at the grating lobe location. PMID:23648212

  18. Pyroelectric midresolution camera TH74KB41A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, J.; Barbier, R.; Fillon, H.; Coutures, Jean-Louis

    1995-09-01

    The TH74KB41A camera is designed for the THOMSON-CSF Semiconducteurs Specifiques (TCS) TH7441A pyroelectric IR sensor, optimized for the wavelength range 8 to 14 micrometers. This monolithic area sensor is made of 128 by 128 pixels (85 micrometers by 85 micrometers) compatible with a one inch diameter optic, and operates at ambient temperature. The camera is optimized to operate with a short integration period -- 10 ms -- allowing 50 frames per second, then compatible with a wide range of applications, including real-time imaging. Three video outputs are available: one 10-bit unprocessed image output every 10 ms, one 8-bit processed image every 20 ms, and one composite analog video signal using a 128 by 128 zone of the display. Eight-bit and analog outputs are obtained by summing the two successive fields -- alternately positive and negative. The 10-bit output delivers successively these positive and negative fields, 10 ms each. It is possible to select an analog gain 3 or 6 and a digital gain of 1, half, quarter or an eighth. Offset may be adjusted to fit the temperature range to be viewed in accordance with the chosen gain. The camera also produces pixel, line, and frame pulses to ease synchronization of an optional frame grabber. Power consumption is as low as 12.5 W, including chopper power supply. The useful scene dynamic range is plus or minus 170 degrees around the ambient temperature. With an f/1 optic -- optics transmission is 0.8 -- the NETD is around 1.5 K and the recognition 0.75 K. The contrast transfer function at Nyquist frequency -- 5.9 line pairs per mm -- is 38%. The small size of this lightweight camera body (200 mm by 125 mm by 60 mm without lenses) together with its low power consumption allow easy use everywhere. This camera benefits from the pyroelectric area sensor and does not use any cooling. This camera, quite cheaper than a camera using a cooled detector, is well suited to a wide range of applications such as laser beam profile analysis

  19. Investigation of a zirconia co-fired ceramic calorimetric microsensor for high-temperature flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekholm, Ville; Persson, Anders; Klintberg, Lena; Thornell, Greger

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a flow sensor for high-temperature, or otherwise aggressive, environments, like, e.g. the propulsion system of a small spacecraft. The sensor was fabricated using 8 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ8) high-temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) tape and screen printed platinum paste. A calorimetric flow sensor design was used, with five 80 µm wide conductors, separated by 160 µm, in a 0.4 mm wide, 0.1 mm deep and 12.5 mm long flow channel. The central conductor was used as a heater for the sensor, and the two adjacent conductors were used to resistively measure the heat transferred from the heater by forced convection. The two outermost conductors were used to study the influence of an auxiliary heat source on the sensor. The resistances of the sensor conductors were measured using four-point connections, as the gas flow rate was slowly increased from 0 to 40 sccm, with different power supplied through the central heater, as well as with an upstream or downstream heater powered. In this study, the thermal and electrical integrability of microcomponents on the YSZ8 substrate was of particular interest and, hence, the influence of thermal and ionic conduction in the substrate was studied in detail. The effect of the ion conductivity of YSZ8 was studied by measuring the resistance of a platinum conductor and the resistance between two adjacent conductors on YSZ8, in a furnace at temperatures from 20 to 930 °C and by measuring the resistance with increasing current through a conductor. With this design, the influence of ion conductivity through the substrate became apparent above 700 °C. The sensitivity of the sensor was up to 1 mΩ sccm-1 in a range of 0-10 sccm. The results show that the signal from the sensor is influenced by the integrated auxiliary heating conductors and that these auxiliary heaters provide a way to balance disturbing heat sources, e.g. thrusters or other electronics, in conjunction with the flow sensor.

  20. [Optical Design of Miniature Infrared Gratings Spectrometer Based on Planar Waveguide].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-yu; Fang, Yong-hua; Li, Da-cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-03-01

    infrared planar waveguide spectrometer is designed using this method. The operation wavelength range is 8 - 12 μm, the numerical aperture is 0.22, and the linear array detector contains 64 elements. By using Zemax software, the design is optimized and analyzed. The results indicate that the size of the optical system is 130 mm x 125 mm x 20 mm and the spectral resolution of spectrometer is 80 nm, which satisfy the requirements of design index. Thus it is this method that can be used for designing a miniature spectrometer without movable parts and sizes in the range of several cubic centimeters. PMID:26117908

  1. Development of a Compact Rectenna for Wireless Powering of a Head-Mountable Deep Brain Stimulation Device

    PubMed Central

    Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Tye, Susannah J.; Abulseoud, Osama A.; Amiet, Andrew; Galehdar, Amir; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Design of a rectangular spiral planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) at 915 MHz for wireless power transmission applications is proposed. The antenna and rectifying circuitry form a rectenna, which can produce dc power from a distant radio frequency energy transmitter. The generated dc power is used to operate a low-power deep brain stimulation pulse generator. The proposed antenna has the dimensions of 10 mm \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\times\\,$ \\end{document}12.5 mm \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\times\\,$ \\end{document}1.5 mm and resonance frequency of 915 MHz with a measured bandwidth of 15 MHz at return loss of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${-}{\\rm 10}~{\\rm dB}$ \\end{document}. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\varepsilon _{r}=4.8$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\delta=0.015$ \\end{document} with thickness of 1.5 mm is used for both antenna and rectifier circuit simulation and fabrication because of its availability and low cost. An L-section impedance matching circuit is used between the PIFA and voltage doubler rectifier. The impedance matching circuit also works as a low-pass filter for elimination of higher order harmonics. Maximum dc voltage at the rectenna output is 7.5 V in free space and this rectenna can drive a deep brain stimulation pulse generator at a distance of 30 cm from a radio frequency energy transmitter, which transmits power of 26.77 dBm. PMID:27170863

  2. HIGH-RESOLUTION L(Y)SO DETECTORS USING PMT-QUADRANT-SHARING FOR HUMAN & ANIMAL PET CAMERAS.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Rocio A; Liu, Shitao; Liu, Jiguo; Zhang, Yuxuan; Kim, Soonseok; Baghaei, Hossain; Li, Hongdi; Wang, Yu; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2008-06-01

    We developed high resolution L(Y)SO detectors for human and animal PET applications using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technology. The crystal sizes were 1.27 × 1.27 × 10 mm(3) for the animal PQS-blocks and 3.25 × 3.25 × 20 mm(3) for human ones. Polymer mirror film patterns (PMR) were placed between crystals as reflector. The blocks were assembled together using optical grease and wrapped by Teflon tape. The blocks were coupled to regular round PMT's of 19/51 mm in PQS configuration. List-mode data of Ga-68 source (511 KeV) were acquired with our high yield pileup-event recovery (HYPER) electronics and data acquisition software. The high voltage bias was 1100V. Crystal decoding maps and individual crystal energy resolutions were extracted from the data. To investigate the potential imaging resolution of the PET cameras with these blocks, we used GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) simulation package. GATE is a GEANT4 based software toolkit for realistic simulation of PET and SPECT systems. The packing fractions of these blocks were found to be 95.6% and 98.2%. From the decoding maps, all 196 and 225 crystals were clearly identified. The average energy resolutions were 14.0% and 15.6%. For small animal PET systems, the detector ring diameter was 16.5 cm with an axial field of view (AFOV) of 11.8 cm. The simulation data suggests that a reconstructed radial (tangential) spatial resolution of 1.24 (1.25) mm near the center is potentially achievable. For the wholebody human PET systems, the detector ring diameter was 86 cm. The simulation data suggests that a reconstructed radial (tangential) spatial resolution of 3.09(3.38) mm near the center is potentially achievable. From this study we can conclude that PQS design could achieve high spatial resolutions and excellent energy resolutions on human and animal PET systems with substantially lower production costs and inexpensive readout devices. PMID:19946463

  3. Exploration of Chromatic Aberration for Multiplanar Imaging: Proof of Concept with Implications for Fast, Efficient Autofocus

    PubMed Central

    Weinigel, Martin; Kellner, Albert L.; Price, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Image-based autofocus determines focus directly from the specimen (as opposed to reflective surface positioning with an offset), but sequential acquisition of a stack of images to measure resolution/sharpness and find best focus is slower than reflective positioning. Simultaneous imaging of multiple focal planes, which is also useful for 3D imaging of live cells, is faster but requires complicated optics. Methods With color CCD cameras and white light sources common, we asked if axial chromatic aberration can be utilized to acquire multiple focal planes simultaneously, and if it can be controlled through a range sufficient for practical use. For proof of concept, we theoretically and experimentally explored the focal differences between three narrow wavelength bands on a 3-chip color CCD camera with and without glass inserts of various thicknesses and dispersions. Results Ray tracing yielded changes in foci of 0.65–0.9 µm upon insertion of 12.5-mm thick glass samples for green (G, 522 nm) vs. blue (B, 462 nm) and green vs. red (G-R, 604 nm). On a microscope: 1) With no glass inserts, the differences in foci were 2.15 µm (G-B) and 0.43 µm (G-R); 2) With glass inserts, the maximum change in foci for G vs. B was 0.44 µm and for G vs. R was 0.26 µm; and 3) An 11.3-mm thick N-BK7 glass insert shifted the foci 0.9 µm (R), 0.6 µm (G), 0.35 µm (B), such that the B and R foci were farther apart (2.1 µm vs. 1.7 µm) and the R and G foci were closer together (0.25 µm vs. 0.45 µm). The slopes of the differences in foci were dependent on thickness, index of refraction and dispersion. Conclusion The measured differences in foci are comparable to the axial steps of 0.1–0.24 µm commonly used for autofocus, and focal plane separation can be altered by inserting optical elements of various dispersions and thicknesses. By enabling acquisition of multiple, axially offset images simultaneously, chromatic aberration, normally an imaging pariah, creates a possible mechanism for efficient multiplanar imaging of multiple spectral bands from white light illumination. PMID:19760744

  4. Pliocene-Quaternary syn-collision volcanism of the Javakheti Ridge, NW Armenia: impact on models of magma generation in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetian, Kh.; Neill, I.; Allen, M. B.; Navarsardyan, G.; Karapetyan, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Armenian Highlands and Southern Caucasus formed during convergence and collision between the Arabian and Eurasian margins from the Late Mesozoic to the present. These events culminate in the growth of the present-day Turkish-Iranian high plateau. Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism followed plateau building, and is a key feature of the entire region. However, petrogenetic models are sparse, particularly for outcrops in the Armenia sector. Mantle-derived magmatism in Turkey has been linked to Tethyan slab break-off and/or lithospheric delamination following the Arabia-Eurasia collision. In this study we consider preliminary petrographic and geochemical results from the Javakheti ridge and surrounding areas, in NW Armenia, and their relationship to the orogenic plateau as a whole. The N-S trending Javakheti ridge is the southerly extension of the Samsari ridge in Georgia, and is one of several Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic uplands in Armenia and the Lesser Caucasus (e.g. Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik). The basement consists of the Sevan-Akera suture between the South Armenian Block, of Gondwanaland origin, and the Eurasian active margin and associated Mesozoic island arc of the Lesser Caucasus. Arc-continent collision and obduction occurred in the Late Cretaceous or Paleocene-Eocene. The first Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism in the area is represented by valley-filling fissure-fed basaltic flows, examples of which have been dated to ~2.7-2.0 Ma in Georgia and Armenia. The ridge itself consists of eroded intermediate to felsic flows forming a central volcanic complex. Recently published Ar-Ar dating of ash layers related to the complex reveal ages of ~1.8-1.9 Ma. The flows are cut by numerous Quaternary cinder cones. Volcanism on the ridge complex appears to young towards the north, and the ridge remains tectonically active, undergoing extension at 1.25 mm/yr, according to GPS data. Preliminary geochemical results indicate the valley-filling flows, the ridge, and cinder cones, are petrogenetically related, and form a continuum from silica under-saturated to over-saturated, indicating crustal assimilation during differentiation of mantle-derived magmas. The more primitive compositions strongly resemble those of the well-known centre Mt. Ararat, suggesting that similar petrogenetic circumstances and degrees of partial melting apply at both localities, despite their differing distance to the Arabia-Eurasia suture zone.

  5. Evaluation of bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems to dentin using different cavity models

    PubMed Central

    ISAAC, Stephano Zerlottini; BERGAMIN, Ana Claudia Pietrobom; TURSSI, Cecília Pedroso; do AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to dentin of two different restorative systems: silorane-based (P90), and methacrylate-based (P60), using two cavity models. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel of 40 human third molars was removed to expose flat dentin surface. Class I cavities with 4 mm mesial-distal width, 3 mm buccal-lingual width and 3 mm depth (C-factor=4.5) were prepared in 20 teeth, which were divided into two groups (n=10) restored with P60 and P90, bulk-filled after dentin treatment according to manufacturer's instructions. Flat buccal dentin surfaces were prepared in the 20 remaining teeth (C-factor=0.2) and restored with resin blocks measuring 4x3x3 mm using the two restorative systems (n=10). The teeth were sectioned into samples with area between 0.85 and 1.25 mm2 that were submitted to µTBS testing, using a universal testing machine (EMIC) at speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope and categorized according to fracture pattern. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey Kramer tests. Results For flat surfaces, P60 obtained higher bond strength values compared with P90. However, for Class I cavities, P60 showed significant reduction in bond strength (p<0.05). No statistical difference between restorative systems was shown for Class I cavity model (p>0.05), or between Class I Cavity and Flat Surface group, considering P90 restorative system (p>0.05). Regarding fracture pattern, there was no statistical difference among groups (p=0.0713) and 56.3% of the fractures were adhesive. Conclusion It was concluded that methacrylate-based composite µTBS was influenced by cavity models, and the use of silorane-based composite led to similar bond strength values compared to the methacrylate-based composite in cavities with high C-factor. PMID:24212992

  6. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery to the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues.

  7. Near-Surface Geophysical Mapping of the Hydrological Response to an Intense Rainfall Event at the Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, G.; Vanderlinden, K.; Giraldez, J. V.; Espejo, A. J.; Muriel, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture plays an important role in a wide variety of biogeochemical fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system and governs the (eco)hydrological response of a catchment to an external forcing such as rainfall. Near-surface electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors that measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) provide a fast and non-invasive means for characterizing this response at the field or catchment scale through high-resolution time-lapse mapping. Here we show how ECa maps, obtained before and after an intense rainfall event of 125 mm h-1, elucidate differences in soil moisture patterns and hydrologic response of an experimental field as a consequence of differed soil management. The dryland field (Vertisol) was located in SW Spain and cropped with a typical wheat-sunflower-legume rotation. Both, near-surface and subsurface ECa (ECas and ECad, respectively), were measured using the EM38-DD EMI sensor in a mobile configuration. Raw ECa measurements and Mean Relative Differences (MRD) provided information on soil moisture patterns while time-lapse maps were used to evaluate the hydrologic response of the field. ECa maps of the field, measured before and after the rainfall event showed similar patterns. The field depressions where most of water and sediments accumulated had the highest ECa and MRD values. The SE-oriented soil, which was deeper and more exposed to sun and wind, showed the lowest ECa and MRD. The largest differences raised in the central part of the field where a high ECa and MRD area appeared after the rainfall event as a consequence of the smaller soil depth and a possible subsurface flux concentration. Time-lapse maps of both ECa and MRD were also similar. The direct drill plots showed higher increments of ECa and MRD as a result of the smaller runoff production. Time-lapse ECa increments showed a bimodal distribution differentiating clearly the direct drill from the conventional and minimum tillage plots. However this kind

  8. Dynamics of deposited fly-ash and fine grained magnetite in sandy material of different porosity (column experiments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapicka, Ales; Kodesova, Radka; Petrovsky, Eduard; Grison, Hana

    2010-05-01

    Several studies confirm that soil magnetometry can serve as proxy of industrial immisions as well as heavy-metal contamination. The important assumption for magnetic mapping of contaminated soils is that atmospherically deposited particulate matter, including the ferrimagnetic phase, accumulates in the top soil horizons and remains there over long period. Only if this is true, large areas can be reliably mapped using soil magnetometry, and, moreover, this method can be used also for long-term monitoring. However, in soil types such as sandy soils with different porosity or soils with substantial variability of water regime, translocation of the deposited anthropogenic particles may result in biased (underestimated) values of the measured topsoil magnetic susceptibility. From the physical point of view, this process may be considered as colloid transport through porous medium. In our column experiments in laboratory we used three technical sands with different particle sizes (0,63 - 1.25mm, 0,315-0,80mm, 0,10-0,63mm). Sands in cylinders were contaminated on the surface by fly-ashes from coal-burning power plant (mean grain size 10μm) and fine grained Fe3O4 (grain size < 20 μm). Soil moisture sensors were used to monitor water regime within the sand columns after controlled rain simulation and temperature distribution in sand column was measured as well. Vertical migration of ferrimagnetic particles-tracers presented in the fly-ash was measured by SM 400 Kappameter. By means of magnetic susceptibility distribution we studied two parameters: gradual shift of peak concentration of contaminants (relative to surface layer) and maximum penetration depth. Results indicated that after rain simulation (pulls infiltration of defined water volume) the positions of peak values moved downwards compared to the initial state and gradual decrease of susceptibility peak values were detected in all studied sand formations. Fly-ash migrated more or less freely in coarse sand material. In medium and fine sand the contaminants moved only to the depths of several cm due to the pore-space blocking and water flow decrease. Fine-grained magnetite shows different behavior. Position of peaks value is more or less stable and maximum depth of penetration is only a few cm in all cases. Higher grain size value is probably reason for higher stability of magnetite. Moreover, magnetic interaction between grains increase "effective" grain size value and restricts transport in material with given porosity. This research is supported by the Grant Agency ASCR under grant IAA300120701

  9. Perindopril: first-line treatment for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zanchetti, A; Desche, P

    1989-01-01

    The antihypertensive efficacy and acceptability of perindopril (P) were compared to those of captopril (C), atenolol (A) and a diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide + amiloride (D), in 3 double-blind parallel multicenter studies involving 165, 173, and 165 patients, respectively. Patients with essential hypertension and a supine DBP between 95 and 125 mmHg (mean 103.9, 106.2, and 105.2 mmHg, respectively) after a 1-month placebo period were randomized to P 4 mg once daily (o.d.) and either C 25 mg twice daily, or A 50 mg o.d. or D (hydrochlorothiazide 50 mg + amiloride 5 mg o.d.) and treated for 3 months, with visits at monthly intervals. If necessary, treatment was adjusted at each visit to control BP (supine DBP less than or equal to 90 mm Hg): firstly by doubling the dose and secondly, one month later, by the addition of a second drug, a diuretic in the studies versus C or A, a beta-blocker in the study versus D. At 3 months, BP control on monotherapy in the three studies was achieved in the following proportion of patients: 49% with P vs 49% with C; 55% with P vs 48% with A; 72% with P vs 72% with D. Most of the patients controlled by P received 4 mg, about 15% were controlled with 8 mg. A further percentage of patients was controlled with combination therapy, the combination with a diuretic being more effective with P than with C (26 vs 8%) or A (23 vs 10%) and the combination with a beta-blocker being less effective with P than with D (5 vs 13%). The total percentage of patients controlled was greater with P than with C (75 vs 57%, p = 0.016) or A (78 vs 58%, p = 0.006) and there was no significant difference between P and D (78 vs 84%). The drop-out rate due to side-effects was up to 6% with P, similar to that observed with C (4%), A (5%) and D (5%). Most of the complaints reported with P were minor and non-specific, their incidence being similar to that observed with the other drugs. Cough was reported with both P (1%) and C (2%) as well as with A (1%) and D (1

  10. Effect of culture conditions and mother's age on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna Straus 1820 (Cladocera) neonates to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Martínez-Jerónimo, Laura; Espinosa-Chávez, Félix

    2006-04-01

    Daphnia magna is a freshwater cladoceran used worldwide as test organism in aquatic toxicity assays. In Mexico there is a test protocol for this species; nevertheless, some aspects of the controlled neonate production, as well as the possible consequences of the reproducers' culture conditions on the response of neonates to the toxic substance, are not completely known. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of temperature and photoperiod on the acute toxicity of CrVI in D. magna neonates, aimed at providing useful information on the Median Lethal Concentration (LC50) to this heavy metal, which is used as reference toxicant in some laboratories. D. magna was cultured at 20 and 25 degrees C, in combination with two photoperiod values: 16:8 and 12:12 (light:dark) during 40 days; the green microalga Ankistrodesmus falcatus (4x10(5) cells ml(-1)) was supplied as food. Once the reproduction began, the neonates were removed and acute toxicity bioassays at 20 and 25 degrees C were performed, by exposing them to hexavalent chromium. We also determined changes in neonates' size at 20 and 25 degrees C. Chromium toxicity increased along with increasing temperatures, and LC50 values were slightly lower for the first and last clutches in the observed period, but these findings are not conclusive because of the large variability recorded. The average LC50's were 0.2076+/-0.0164 mg l(-1) (at 20 degrees C) and 0.1544+/-0.0175 mg l(-1) (at 25 degrees C). The reproducers' culture temperature had no effect on neonates' sensitivity to chromium, in spite of performing the tests at temperatures either lower or higher than those at which the neonates had been obtained. The length of neonates produced during the first two clutches (<1.25 mm) was significantly lower than that measured in neonates of following reproductions (>1.3 mm), and were smaller at 25 degrees C; however, this did not seem to affect their sensitivity to chromium. PMID:16570207

  11. Loofah sponge as an interface dressing material in negative pressure wound therapy: results of an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Umut; Turan, Aydin; Markoc, Fatma; Erkorkmaz, Unal; Elmas, Cigdem; Kostakoglu, Naci

    2014-03-01

    Since the introduction of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), the physiological effects of various interface dressing materials have been studied. The purpose of this experimental study was to compare the use of loofah sponge to standard polyurethane foam or a cotton gauze sponge. Three wounds, each measuring 3 cm x 3 cm, were created by full-thickness skin excision on the dorsal sides of 24 New Zealand adult white rabbits. The rabbits were randomly divided into four groups of six rabbits each. In group 1 (control), conventional saline-moistened gauze dressing was provided and changed at daily intervals. The remaining groups were provided NPWT dressings at -125 mm Hg continuous pressure. This dressing was changed every 3 days for 9 days; group 2 was provided polyurethane foam, group 3 had conventional saline-soaked antimicrobial gauze, and group 4 had loofah sponge. Wound area measurements and histological findings (inflammation, granulation tissue, neovascularization, and reepithelialization) were analyzed on days 3, 6, and 9. Wound area measurements at these intervals were significantly different between the control group and study groups (P<0.05). Granulation and neovascularization scores were also significantly different between the control and treatment groups at day 3 (P=0.002). No differences in any of the healing variables studied were observed between the other three dressing materials. According to scanning electron microscopy analysis of the three interface materials, the mean pore size diameter of foam and gauze interface materials was 415.80±217.58 μm and 912.33±116.88 μm, respectively. The pore architecture of foam was much more regular than that of gauze. The average pore size diameter of loofah sponge was 736.83±23.01 μm; pores were hierarchically located--ie, the smaller ones were usually peripheral and larger ones werecentral. For this study, the central part of loofah sponge was discarded to achieve a more homogenous structure of

  12. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 in Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Miranpuri, Gurwattan S.; Schomberg, Dominic T.; Alrfaei, Bahauddeen; King, Kevin C.; Rynearson, Bryan; Wesley, Vishwas S.; Khan, Nayab; Obiakor, Kristen; Wesley, Umadevi V.; Resnick, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) affects approximately 4 million people in the United States with spinal cord injury (SCI) being a common cause. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in mediating inflammatory responses, cellular signaling, cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation and tissue remodeling and repair. As such, they are major components in the pathogenesis of secondary injury within the central nervous system. Other gene regulatory pathways, specifically MAPK/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and Wnt/β-catenin, are also believed to participate in secondary injury likely intersect. The study aims to examine the MMP-2 signaling pathway associated with ERK and Wnt/β-catenin activity during contusion SCI (cSCI)-induced NP in a rat model. This is an experimental study investigating the implication of MMP-2 in SCI-induced NP and its association with the cellular and molecular changes in the interactions between extracellular signaling kinase and β-catenin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received cSCI injury by NYU impactor by dropping 10 g weight from a height of 12.5 mm. Locomotor functional recovery of injured rats was measured on post cSCI day 1, and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores. Thermal hyperalgesia (TH) testing was performed on days 21, 28, 35 and 42 post cSCI. The expression and/or activity of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK were studied following harvest of spinal cord tissues between 3 and 6 weeks post cSCI. All experiments were funded by the department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health having no conflict of interest. MMP-2 and β-catenin expression were elevated and gradually increased from days 21 to 42 compared to sham-operated rats and injured rats that did not exhibit TH. The expression of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK) increased on day 21 but returned to baseline levels on day 42 whereas total ERK levels remained relatively unchanged and constant. Chronic NP is associated with changes in the expression of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK. Our data suggest that the transient upregulation of phospho-ERK is involved in the initial upregulation of both β-catenin and MMP-2 following cSCI-induced NP states.

  13. The Borexino solar neutrino experiment and its scintillator containment vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadonati, Laura

    2001-05-01

    Thirty years ago, the first solar neutrino detector proved fusion reactions power the Sun. However, the total rate detected in this and all subsequent solar neutrino experiments is consistently two to three times lower than predicted by the Standard Solar Model. Current experiments seek to explain this ``solar neutrino puzzle'' through non-standard particle properties, like neutrino mass and flavor mixing, within the context of the MSW theory. The detection of the monoenergetic 7Be solar neutrino is the missing clue for the solution of the solar neutrino problem; this constitutes the main physics goal of Borexino, a real- time, high-statistics solar neutrino detector located under the Gran Sasso mountain, in Italy. In the first part of this thesis, I present a Monte Carlo study of the expected performance of Borexino, with simulations of the neutrino rate, the external y background and the α/β/γ activity in the scintillator. The Standard Solar Model predicts a solar neutrino rate of about 60 events/day in Borexino in the 0.25-0.8 MeV window, mostly due to 7Be neutrinos. Given the design scintillator radiopurity levels (10-16 g/g 238U and 232Th and 10-14 g/g K), Borexino will detect such a rate with a ~2.4% statistical error, after one year. In the MSW Small (Large) Angle scenario, the predicted rate of ~13 (33) events/day will be detected with 8% (4%) error. The sensitivity of Borexino to 8B and pp neutrinos and to a Galactic supernova event is also discussed. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to the liquid scintillator containment vessel, an 8.5 m diameter sphere built of bonded panels of 0.125 mm polymer film. Through an extensive materials testing program we have identified an amorphous nylon-6 film which meets all the critical requirements for the success of Borexino. I describe tests of tensile strength, measurements of 222Rn diffusion through thin nylon films and of optical clarity. I discuss how the materials' radiopurity and mechanical

  14. Small Specimen Data from a High Temperature HFIR Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Thoms, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The HTV capsule is a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target-rod capsule designed to operate at very high temperatures. The graphite containing section of the capsule (in core) is approximately 18 inches (457.2 mm) long and is separated into eight temperature zones. The specimen diameters within each zone are set to achieve the desired gas gap and hence design temperature (900 C, 1200 C or 1500 C). The capsule has five zones containing 0.400 inch (10.16 mm) diameter specimens, two zones containing 0.350 inch (8.89 mm) diameter specimens and one zone containing 0.300 inch (7.62 mm) diameter specimens. The zones have been distributed within the experiment to optimize the gamma heating from the HFIR core as well as minimize the axial heat flow in the capsule. Consequently, there are two 900 C zones, three 1200 C zones, and three 1500 C zones within the HTV capsule. Each zone contains nine specimens 0.210 0.002 inches (5.334 mm) in length. The capsule will be irradiated to a peak dose of 3.17 displacements per atom. The HTV specimens include samples of the following graphite grades: SGL Carbon s NBG-17 and NBG-18, GrafTech s PCEA, Toyo Tanso s IG-110, Mersen s 2114 and the reference grade H-451 (SGL Carbon). As part of the pre-irradiation program the specimens were characterized using ASTM Standards C559 for bulk density, and ASTM C769 for approximate Young s modulus from the sonic velocity. The probe frequency used for the determination of time of flight of the ultrasonic signal was 2.25 MHz. Marked volume (specimen diameter) effects were noted for both bulk density (increased with increasing specimen volume or diameter) and Dynamic Young s modulus (decreased with increasing specimen volume or diameter). These trends are extended by adding the property vs. diameter data for unirradiated AGC-1 creep specimens (nominally 12.5 mm-diameter x 25.4 mm-length). The relatively large reduction in Dynamic Young s Modulus was surprising given the trend for increasing density with increasing volume. The graphite-filler particle size was noted to be influential in the volume dependency data, with finer grained graphites showing the least specimen volume/diameter effect. Here the volume dependency trends are discussed in terms of the graphite s filler-particle size and texture.

  15. Modern spectral transmissometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgerson, Mark J.; Bartz, Robert; Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    We have evaluated a number of spectral attenuation meter designs based on constraints related to power consumption, spectral bandwidth, sampling time, accuracy and stability . Our fmal instrument design employs a unique optical bridge deve1oped1r Sea Tech with ONR support, a tungsten light source and a holographic grating monochromatorThe instrument design is summarized as follows: White light from a 10-Watt tungsten lamp with a 1mm2 filament is collected by a condensing lens and then spatially filtered by a 1mm diameter pinhole which is placed at the entrance port of a monochromator. The monochromator has a 45°, 1200 lines/mm, holographic grating 37 mm in diameter with a 91 mm focal length. The grating is rotated about its vertical axis with a sine arm driven by a stepping motor, allowing wavelength to be selected from 400 to 800 nm. At the exit port of the monochromator we use a 1mm diameter pinhole which spectrally filters the output light, resulting in a spectral bandwidth of 9. 1 nm. This nearly monochromatic light is then measured by a unique reference detector with a 0.5mm diameter pinhole at its center, allowing light to be transmitted through the center of the detector. The transmitted light has a bandwidth of 4.5 nm. The monochromatic light is then collimated by a 50mm focal length achromatic lens and stopped down to a beam 1 cm in diameter. This light then enters the sample chamber. After passing through the sample the light is received by a 61mm focal length achromatic lens and is focused onto a signal detector with a diameter of 1.25mm. Digitized ratios ofreference detector to signal detector voltages allow transmission to be measured with an accuracy of 0.05% and a resolution of 0.01%. By monitoring temperature we were able to temperature compensate the instrument to within 0.05% transmission from 00 C to 25° C. Based on these results it is now possible to construct a spectral attenuation meter with the required sensitivity and accuracy to measure beam attenuation in water as clean as oligotrophic ocean waters.

  16. MicroPET II: design, development and initial performance of an improved microPET scanner for small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Yang, Yongfeng; Silverman, Robert W.; Meadors, Ken; Siegel, Stefan; Newport, Danny F.; Stickel, Jennifer R.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2003-06-01

    MicroPET II is a second-generation animal PET scanner designed for high-resolution imaging of small laboratory rodents. The system consists of 90 scintillation detector modules arranged in three contiguous axial rings with a ring diameter of 16.0 cm and an axial length of 4.9 cm. Each detector module consists of a 14 × 14 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to a multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MC-PMT) through a coherent optical fibre bundle. Each LSO crystal element measures 0.975 mm × 0.975 mm in cross section by 12.5 mm in length. A barium sulphate reflector material was used between LSO elements leading to a detector pitch of 1.15 mm in both axial and transverse directions. Fused optical fibre bundles were made from 90 µm diameter glass fibres with a numerical aperture of 0.56. Interstitial extramural absorber was added between the fibres to reduce optical cross talk. A charge-division readout circuit was implemented on printed circuit boards to decode the 196 crystals in each array from the outputs of the 64 anode signals of the MC-PMT. Electronics from Concorde Microsystems Inc. (Knoxville, TN) were used for signal amplification, digitization, event qualification, coincidence processing and data capture. Coincidence data were passed to a host PC that recorded events in list mode. Following acquisition, data were sorted into sinograms and reconstructed using Fourier rebinning and filtered backprojection algorithms. Basic evaluation of the system has been completed. The absolute sensitivity of the microPET II scanner was 2.26% at the centre of the field of view (CFOV) for an energy window of 250-750 keV and a timing window of 10 ns. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the detectors in the system averaged 1.21 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) when measured with a 22Na point source 0.5 mm in diameter. Reconstructed image resolution ranged from 0.83 mm FWHM at the CFOV to 1.47 mm FWHM in the radial direction, 1.17 mm FWHM in the tangential direction and 1.42 mm FWHM in the axial direction at 1 cm offset from the CFOV. These values represent highly significant improvements over our earlier microPET scanner (approximately fourfold sensitivity increase and 25-35% improvement in linear spatial resolution under equivalent operating conditions) and are expected to be further improved when the system is fully optimized. This work was originally conducted at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, and was continued and completed at UC Davis, Department of Biomedical Engineering.

  17. MicroPET II: design, development and initial performance of an improved microPET scanner for small-animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Yang, Yongfeng; Silverman, Robert W; Meadors, Ken; Siegel, Stefan; Newport, Danny F; Stickel, Jennifer R; Cherry, Simon R

    2003-06-01

    MicroPET II is a second-generation animal PET scanner designed for high-resolution imaging of small laboratory rodents. The system consists of 90 scintillation detector modules arranged in three contiguous axial rings with a ring diameter of 16.0 cm and an axial length of 4.9 cm. Each detector module consists of a 14 x 14 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to a multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MC-PMT) through a coherent optical fibre bundle. Each LSO crystal element measures 0.975 mm x 0.975 mm in cross section by 12.5 mm in length. A barium sulphate reflector material was used between LSO elements leading to a detector pitch of 1.15 mm in both axial and transverse directions. Fused optical fibre bundles were made from 90 microm diameter glass fibres with a numerical aperture of 0.56. Interstitial extramural absorber was added between the fibres to reduce optical cross talk. A charge-division readout circuit was implemented on printed circuit boards to decode the 196 crystals in each array from the outputs of the 64 anode signals of the MC-PMT. Electronics from Concorde Microsystems Inc. (Knoxville, TN) were used for signal amplification, digitization, event qualification, coincidence processing and data capture. Coincidence data were passed to a host PC that recorded events in list mode. Following acquisition, data were sorted into sinograms and reconstructed using Fourier rebinning and filtered hackprojection algorithms. Basic evaluation of the system has been completed. The absolute sensitivity of the microPET II scanner was 2.26% at the centre of the field of view (CFOV) for an energy window of 250-750 keV and a timing window of 10 ns. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the detectors in the system averaged 1.21 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) when measured with a 22Na point source 0.5 mm in diameter. Reconstructed image resolution ranged from 0.83 mm FWHM at the CFOV to 1.47 mm FWHM in the radial direction, 1.17 mm FWHM in the tangential direction and 1.42 mm FWHM in the axial direction at 1 cm offset from the CFOV. These values represent highly significant improvements over our earlier microPET scanner (approximately fourfold sensitivity increase and 25-35% improvement in linear spatial resolution under equivalent operating conditions) and are expected to be further improved when the system is fully optimized. PMID:12817935

  18. Kinetic studies on the regulation of rabbit liver pyruvate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Irving, M. G.; Williams, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two kinetically distinct forms of pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) were isolated from rabbit liver by using differential ammonium sulphate fractionation. The L or liver form, which is allosterically activated by fructose 1,6-diphosphate, was partially purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography to give a maximum specific activity of 20 units/mg. The L form was allosterically activated by K+ and optimum activity was recorded with 30mm-K+, 4mm-MgADP−, with a MgADP−/ADP2− ratio of 50:1, but inhibition occurred with K+ concentrations in excess of 60mm. No inhibition occurred with either ATP or GTP when excess of Mg2+ was added to counteract chelation by these ligands. Alanine (2.5mm) caused 50% inhibition at low concentrations of phosphoenolpyruvate (0.15mm). The homotropic effector, phosphoenolpyruvate, exhibited a complex allosteric pattern (nH=2.5), and negative co-operative interactions were observed in the presence of low concentrations of this substrate. The degree of this co-operative interaction was pH-dependent, with the Hill coefficient increasing from 1.1 to 3.2 as the pH was raised from 6.5 to 8.0. Fructose 1,6-diphosphate interfered with the activation by univalent ions, markedly decreased the apparent Km for phosphoenolpyruvate from 1.2mm to 0.2mm, and transformed the phosphoenolpyruvate saturation curve into a hyperbola. Concentrations of fructose 1,6-diphosphate in excess of 0.5mm inhibited this stimulated reaction. The M or muscle-type form of the enzyme was not activated by fructose 1,6-diphosphate and gave a maximum specific activity of 0.3 unit/mg. A Michaelis–Menten response was obtained when phosphoenolpyruvate was the variable substrate (Km=0.125mm), and this form was inhibited by ATP, as well as alanine, even in the presence of excess of Mg2+. PMID:4722439

  19. Clinical Evaluation of a Robotic 6-Degree of Freedom Treatment Couch for Frameless Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gevaert, Thierry; Verellen, Dirk; Engels, Benedikt; Depuydt, Tom; Heuninckx, Karina; Tournel, Koen; Duchateau, Michael; Reynders, Truus; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the added value of 6-degree of freedom (DOF) patient positioning with a robotic couch compared with 4DOF positioning for intracranial lesions and to estimate the immobilization characteristics of the BrainLAB frameless mask (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), more specifically, the setup errors and intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 40 patients with 66 brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and a 6DOF robotic couch. Patient positioning was performed with the BrainLAB ExacTrac stereoscopic X-ray system. Positioning results were collected before and after treatment to assess patient setup error and intrafraction motion. Existing treatment planning data were loaded and simulated for 4DOF positioning and compared with the 6DOF positioning. The clinical relevance was analyzed by means of the Paddick conformity index and the ratio of prescribed isodose volume covered with 4DOF to that obtained with the 6DOF positioning. Results: The mean three-dimensional setup error before 6DOF correction was 1.91 mm (SD, 1.25 mm). The rotational errors were larger in the longitudinal (mean, 0.23 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.82 Degree-Sign ) direction compared with the lateral (mean, -0.09 Degree-Sign ; SD, 0.72 Degree-Sign ) and vertical (mean, -0.10 Degree-Sign ; SD, 1.03 Degree-Sign ) directions (p < 0.05). The mean three-dimensional intrafraction shift was 0.58 mm (SD, 0.42 mm). The mean intrafractional rotational errors were comparable for the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions: 0.01 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.35 Degree-Sign ), 0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.31 Degree-Sign ), and -0.03 Degree-Sign (SD, 0.33 Degree-Sign ), respectively. The mean conformity index decreased from 0.68 (SD, 0.08) (6DOF) to 0.59 (SD, 0.12) (4DOF) (p < 0.05). A loss of prescribed isodose coverage of 5% (SD, 0.08) was found with the 4DOF positioning (p < 0.05). Half a degree for longitudinal and lateral rotations can be identified as a threshold for coverage loss. Conclusions: With a mask immobilization, patient setup error and intrafraction motions need to be evaluated and corrected for. The 6DOF patient positioning with a 6DOF robotic couch to correct translational and rotational setup errors improves target positioning with respect to treatment isocenter, which is in direct relation with the clinical outcome, compared with the 4DOF positioning.

  20. RAINBOWS and CERAMBOWS: The Technologies of Pre-Stressed Piezo Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene H.

    1996-01-01

    Amplified mechanical displacement effects, similar to those observed in the recently reported Rainbow actuators, have also been found to exist in prestressed ceramic/metal composite structures coined as CERAMBOW's - an acronym for CERamic And Metal Biased Oxide Wafer. Mimicking the Rainbows in many ways, the intentionally created internal compressive and tensile stresses within the Cerambows are used to amplify their displacement properties via the combined effects of piezoelectric d31 strain and domain reorientation. They are fabricated from ferroelectric, piezoelectric or electrostrictive materials and metal substrates of significantly different thermal expansions which are largely responsible for the creation of the stress. Typical ceramics used in Cerambows are PZT, PLZT, PBZT, PSZT and PMN and some typical metal substrates are Al, Ag, Ni, brass, steel and Be/Cu foil. Shapes can vary from round disks to square plates and rectangular bars. Formed at an elevated temperature of approximately 250 C, the stresses on cooling to room temperature are generally sufficient to produce displacements as large as 0.125mm (5 mils) when activated unipolar and 0.25mm (10 mils) when operated bipolar at 450 volts in a dome mode. Comparing equal structures of a Cerambow with a Rainbow, the Cerambow was found to achieve approximately 70% of the displacement that would normally be obtained with a Rainbow. Although this difference in displacement is sufficient to prefer a Rainbow for many applications, there are some advantages for the Cerambow. Among these are (1) the processing temperatures are lower, (2) high lead-containing ceramics are not required and (3) in some instances the metal substrate is more convenient to interface with other elements of a device. However, the disadvantages include (1) lower displacement in the dome mode of operation, (2) the higher displacement saddle mode has not yet been demonstrated with a Cerambow and (3) the ceramic/metal bond interface is a

  1. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 in Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Miranpuri, Gurwattan S; Schomberg, Dominic T; Alrfaei, Bahauddeen; King, Kevin C; Rynearson, Bryan; Wesley, Vishwas S; Khan, Nayab; Obiakor, Kristen; Wesley, Umadevi V; Resnick, Daniel K

    2016-03-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) affects approximately 4 million people in the United States with spinal cord injury (SCI) being a common cause. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in mediating inflammatory responses, cellular signaling, cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation and tissue remodeling and repair. As such, they are major components in the pathogenesis of secondary injury within the central nervous system. Other gene regulatory pathways, specifically MAPK/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and Wnt/β-catenin, are also believed to participate in secondary injury likely intersect. The study aims to examine the MMP-2 signaling pathway associated with ERK and Wnt/β-catenin activity during contusion SCI (cSCI)-induced NP in a rat model. This is an experimental study investigating the implication of MMP-2 in SCI-induced NP and its association with the cellular and molecular changes in the interactions between extracellular signaling kinase and β-catenin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received cSCI injury by NYU impactor by dropping 10 g weight from a height of 12.5 mm. Locomotor functional recovery of injured rats was measured on post cSCI day 1, and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks using Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores. Thermal hyperalgesia (TH) testing was performed on days 21, 28, 35 and 42 post cSCI. The expression and/or activity of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK were studied following harvest of spinal cord tissues between 3 and 6 weeks post cSCI. All experiments were funded by the department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Wisconsin, School of Medicine and Public Health having no conflict of interest. MMP-2 and β-catenin expression were elevated and gradually increased from days 21 to 42 compared to sham-operated rats and injured rats that did not exhibit TH. The expression of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK) increased on day 21 but returned to baseline levels on day 42 whereas total ERK levels remained relatively unchanged and constant. Chronic NP is associated with changes in the expression of MMP-2, β-catenin and ERK. Our data suggest that the transient upregulation of phospho-ERK is involved in the initial upregulation of both β-catenin and MMP-2 following cSCI-induced NP states. PMID:27536019

  2. Introduction of a new laser-scalpel for partial kidney resection based on 1.94 micrometer fiber laser system: initial in vivo-data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedsen, Sönke; Theisen-Kunde, Dirk; Doehn, Christian; Kausch, Ingo; Jocham, Dieter

    2009-02-01

    The technique of nephron sparing surgery has matured significantly over the past decade and is emerging as an oncologically sound procedure for the management of renal tumors. Methods of tumor excision as well as parenchymal reconstruction in a hemostaticallly controlled field have evolved to make this procedure safer. In an attempt to find an improoved hemostatic cutting instrument we developed a 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel system in a porcine model. We evaluated data for partial porcine kidney resection performed by a 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel and compared the data to those of a standard HF- (High- Frequency) dissection device. In 12 pigs general anesthesia and a median laparotomy was performed to expose both kidneys. In each pig one kidney was partially resected with the Laser-Scalpel and the other side with the HF-dissection device. The first 6 pigs were euthanized immediately after the procedure. The following 6 pigs were allowed to recover and underwent 2-3 weeks later euthanasia. The final evaluation data included total resection time, blood loss, mass of dissected tissue, total ischemic time and histological examination. Mean resected kidney tissue mass was 4.75 g with the laser system and 5.57 g for the HF-dissector, respectively. Mean estimated blood loss was 22 ml for the Laser- Scalpel and 78.2 ml for the HF-dissection device. Resection time was 9.45 min for the Laser-scalpel compared to 10.16 min. No complications, specifically no postoperative bleeding, occured in any of the animals. Histological evaluation with H&E staining showed a carbonized zone of about 0.57 mm directly at the dissected edge followed by a thermal damaged zone of about 1.25 mm in width. Thereafter healthy tissue was found in all histological samples. Partial kidney resection was easily and fast performed by the use of a 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel system. Hemostasis was highly sufficient, so blood loss was minimal compared to conventional HF-dissection device. Therefore the 1.94 micrometer Laser-Scalpel system is a very promising dissection device for urological surgery.

  3. A Climatology and Synoptic-Dynamic Basis for Distinguishing Cool-Season Precipitation Events at St. John's, Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milrad, Shawn M.

    For St. John's, Newfoundland, at the confluence of several North American storm tracks, we identify synoptic-scale characteristics and precursors of various classes of cool-season precipitation events. Such events, based upon a climatology for 1979-2005, are separated into three categories based on precipitation amount. We find that the storm systems responsible for extreme precipitation events originate farther south and east than corresponding features in moderate and light events. A wind climatology shows that extreme precipitation events at St. John's are characterized almost exclusively by easterly surface and 925 hPa geostrophic winds, and that both the surface and 925 hPa geostrophic winds rotate clockwise with decreasing precipitation amount. Focusing on extreme events, we utilize two methods of manual synoptic typing to further partition events. The first method uses backward air parcel trajectories to separate events by air parcel source region. One subset of events ("west") is characterized by strong upper-level dynamics and high precipitable water values in the central United States, which helps to produce a strong cyclone upon reaching the Atlantic Ocean; this is not seen for "west" events outside the extreme category. The second method of synoptic typing utilizes time series of three ascent-forcing quasi-geostrophic (QG) variables. While most events are characterized by a strong upstream sea-level cyclone originating from the Gulf of Mexico ("cyclone"), a subset are dominated by strong low-level frontogenesis, in the absence of a substantial upstream cyclone ("frontal"). Finally, a dynamic and thermodynamic analysis, and forecast model evaluation is completed for consecutive extreme events in December 2008, which produced over 125 mm of precipitation over six days. The first event is a "cyclone", and is marked by strong QG forcing for ascent in the presence of low static stability and high values of subtropical moisture. The second event is a "frontal

  4. Geometric validation of self-gating k-space-sorted 4D-MRI vs 4D-CT using a respiratory motion phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yong Yang, Wensha; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Tuli, Richard; Wallace, Robert; Fraass, Benedick; Fan, Zhaoyang; Pang, Jianing; Deng, Zixin; Li, Debiao

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: MRI is increasingly being used for radiotherapy planning, simulation, and in-treatment-room motion monitoring. To provide more detailed temporal and spatial MR data for these tasks, we have recently developed a novel self-gated (SG) MRI technique with advantage of k-space phase sorting, high isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution. The current work describes the validation of this 4D-MRI technique using a MRI- and CT-compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: The 4D-MRI sequence is based on a spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection reconstruction sequence with self-gating for 4D-MRI at 3 T. Respiratory phase is resolved by using SG k-space lines as the motion surrogate. 4D-MRI images are reconstructed into ten temporal bins with spatial resolution 1.56 × 1.56 × 1.56 mm{sup 3}. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed to validate the performance of the 4D-MRI sequence and 4D-CT imaging. A spherical target (diameter 23 mm, volume 6.37 ml) filled with high-concentration gadolinium (Gd) gel is embedded into a plastic box (35 × 40 × 63 mm{sup 3}) and stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The phantom, driven by an air pump, is able to produce human-type breathing patterns between 4 and 30 respiratory cycles/min. 4D-CT of the phantom has been acquired in cine mode, and reconstructed into ten phases with slice thickness 1.25 mm. The 4D images sets were imported into a treatment planning software for target contouring. The geometrical accuracy of the 4D MRI and CT images has been quantified using target volume, flattening, and eccentricity. The target motion was measured by tracking the centroids of the spheres in each individual phase. Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Results: The dynamic phantom has been operated in four respiratory rate (RR) settings, 6, 10, 15, and 20/min, and was scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT. 4D-CT images have target-stretching, partial-missing, and other motion artifacts in various phases, whereas the 4D-MRI images are visually free of those artifacts. Volume percentage difference for the 6.37 ml target ranged from 5.3% ± 4.3% to 10.3% ± 5.9% for 4D-CT, and 1.47 ± 0.52 to 2.12 ± 1.60 for 4D-MRI. With an increase of respiratory rate, the target volumetric and geometric deviations increase for 4D-CT images while remaining stable for the 4D-MRI images. Target motion amplitude errors at different RRs were measured with a range of 0.66–1.25 mm for 4D-CT and 0.2–0.42 mm for 4D-MRI. The results of Mann–Whitney tests indicated that 4D-MRI significantly outperforms 4D-CT in phase-based target volumetric (p = 0.027) and geometric (p < 0.001) measures. Both modalities achieve equivalent accuracy in measuring motion amplitude (p = 0.828). Conclusions: The k-space self-gated 4D-MRI technique provides a robust method for accurately imaging phase-based target motion and geometry. Compared to 4D-CT, the current 4D-MRI technique demonstrates superior spatiotemporal resolution, and robust resistance to motion artifacts caused by fast target motion and irregular breathing patterns. The technique can be used extensively in abdominal targeting, motion gating, and toward implementing MRI-based adaptive radiotherapy.

  5. Evolution of the Foucault-Secretan reflecting telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, William

    2016-08-01

    his cousin Georges Secretan. Production of silvered-glass reflectors and other scientific instruments languished, and focal ratios slowed. Production appears to have revived after R. Mailhat became Director of the company's workshops and then founded his own firm. In 1903 the Secretan Company offered a simplified 125-mm reflector designed specially for members of the Société Astronomique de France, perhaps promoted by Georges' son Paul. Foucault-style reflecting telescopes were offered by other makers too, including Jules Duboscq, Édouard Lutz and Albert Bardou. Following Georges' death in 1906 the Company was operated by Paul before being sold to Charles Épry in 1906 who associated with Gustave Jacquelin in 1913. Only 125- to 200-mm amateur reflectors were offered in their 1924 and 1942 catalogues. Non-specific advertisements for reflectors continued beyond amalgamation with the Morin Company in 1963, but disappeared after a subsequent merger with the Société de Recherches et de Perfectionnements Industriels c.1967.

  6. Radiostereometric Evaluation of Tendon Elongation after Distal Biceps Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nathan; Keller, Robert A.; Guest, John-Michael; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Operative repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures have shown successful outcomes. However, little is known about the amount of tendon or repair site lengthening or creep. Treatment algorithms in regards to repair fixation, immobilization, initiation of activity and physical therapy are largely made on previous tendon healing principles and anecdotal findings. The purpose of our study was to evaluate distal biceps tendon repair via intratendinous radiostereometric analysis to evaluate tendon lengthening/creep at different time intervals of healing. Methods: Ten patients were recruited who sustained a distal biceps rupture requiring operative repair. Distal biceps repairs were performed using an endobutton only, single incision technique. Intraoperatively, two 2-mm tantalum beads with laser-etched holes were sutured to the distal biceps tendon. One bead was placed at the radius tendon interface and the other placed 1cm proximal to the first bead. Beads were evaluated via both CT scans immediately post-operatively and at 16 weeks and x-rays obtained at time 0 and then at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements were made using the endobutton to bead and bead-to-bead distances in order to assess repair site elongation as well as tendon elongation over time. Following final follow-up, patients underwent a DASH questionnaire and ultrasound to confirm the integrity of the tendon. Results: Ten patients were included in the study. Nine patients had complete ruptures with one having a partial rupture that underwent completion and subsequent repair. All patients showed statistically significant lengthening after surgery. The mean amount of lengthening after surgery was 21.8 mm (range 10.1-29.7 mm, p < 0.05). The repair site lengthened a mean of 12.5 mm (range 8.8-17.0 mm, p <0.05) and the tendon lengthened a mean of 9.4 mm (range: 4.0-18.8 mm, p<0.05) from surgery to final follow-up. The greatest change in lengthening was noted between time 0 and week 4 (mean: 11.8 mm, range: 4.0-18.0 mm, p<0.05), with the least amount of lengthening between week 8 and week 16 (mean: 3.6 mm, range: 2.1-5.5 mm, p<0.05). Average DASH scores after surgery was 4.5 (range: 2.5-16.7). Final ultrasound evaluations found no re-ruptures in any of the patients. Conclusion: This study’s findings suggest that all patients undergoing distal biceps tendon repair have significant elongation of their repair site and tendon after surgery, with the greatest amount of lengthening seen in the early post-operative period. These findings lend insight into decision-making with regards to intraoperative repair fixation and post-operative activity protocols while also adding knowledge to overall tendon repair principles.

  7. Growth of Megaspherulites In a Rhyolitic Vitrophyre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert K.; Tremallo, Robin L.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    Megaspherulites occur in the middle zone of a thick sequence of rhyolitic vitrophyre that occupies a small, late Eocene to early Oligocene volcanic-tectonic basin near Silver Cliff, Custer County, Colorado. Diameters of the megaspherulites range from 0.3 m to over 3.66 m, including a clay envelope. The megaspherulites are compound spherulites. consisting of an extremely large number (3.8 x 10(exp 9) to 9.9 x 10(exp 9)) of individual growth cones averaging 3 mm long by 1.25 mm wide at their termination. They are holocrystalline, very fine- to fine-grained, composed of disordered to ordered sanidine (orthoclase) and quartz, and surrounded by a thin K-feldspar, quartz rich rind, an inner clay layer with mordenite, and an outer clay layer composed wholly of 15 A montmorillonite. Whole rock analyses of the megaspherulites show a restricted composition from their core to their outer edge, with an average analyses of 76.3% SiO2, 0.34% CaO, 2.17% Na2O, 6.92% K2O, 0.83% H2O+ compared to the rhyolitic vitrophyre from which they crystallize with 71.07% SiO2, 0.57% CaO, 4.06% Na2O,4.l0% K2O, and 6.40% H2O+. The remaining oxides of Fe2O3 (total Fe), A12O3, MnO,MgO, TiO2, P2O5, Cr2O3, and trace elements show uniform distribution between the megaspherulites and the rhyolitic vitrophyre. Megaspherulite crystallization began soon after the rhyolitic lava ceased to flow as the result of sparse heterogeneous nucleation, under nonequilibrium conditions, due to a high degree of undercooling, delta T. The crystals grow with a fibrous habit which is favored by a large delta T ranging between 245 C and 295 C, despite lowered viscosity, and enhanced diffusion due to the high H2O content, ranging between 5% and 7%. Therefore, megaspherulite growth proceeded in a diffusion controlled manner, where the diffusion, rate lags behind the crystal growth rate at the crystal-liquid interface, restricting fibril lengths and diameters to the 10 micron to 15 micron and 3 micron and 8 micron ranges respectively. Once diffusion reestablishes itself at the crystallization front, a new nucleation event occurs at the terminated tips of the fibril cones and a new cone begins to develop with a similar orientation (small angle branching) to the earlier cones. During crystallization, these fibril cones impinge upon each other, resulting in fibril cone-free areas. These cone-free areas consist of coarser, fine-grained phases, dominated by quartz, which crystallized from the melt as it accumulated between the crystallizing K-feldspar fibrils of the cones. The anhydrous nature of the disordered to ordered sanidine (orthoclase) and quartz, suggests that water in the vitrophyre moved ahead of the crystallization front, resulting in a water rich fluid being enriched in Si, K, Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Y. The clay layers associated with the megaspherulites are therefore, the result of the deuteric alteration between the fractionated water and the vitrophyre, as indicated by the presence of the minerals mordenite and montmorillonite. This silica rich fluid also resulted in the total silicification of the megaspherulites within the upper 3 m of the vitrophyre.

  8. Evaluations of University of Wisconsin Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors 300 LO and 400 LO B

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; B. M. Chase; T. C. Unruh

    2011-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors 05R4-02-A KG1403 (300 LO) and 05R4-01-A KG1415 (400 LO B) were evaluated at the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine their peak irradiation temperatures. HTTL measurements indicate that the peak irradiation temperature for the 300 LO monitor was 295 {+-} 20 C and the peak irradiation temperature for the 400 LO B monitor was 294 {+-} 25 C. Two silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were evaluated at the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine their peak temperature during irradiation. These monitors were irradiated as part of the University of Wisconsin Pilot Project with a target dose of 3 dpa. Temperature monitors were fabricated from high density (3.203 g/cm3) SiC manufactured by Rohm Haas with a nominal size of 12.5 mm x 1.0 mm x 0.75 mm (see Attachment A). Table 1 provides identification for each monitor with an expected peak irradiation temperature range based on preliminary thermal analysis (see Attachment B). Post irradiation calculations are planned to reduce uncertainties in these calculated temperatures. Since the early 1960s, SiC has been used as a post-irradiation temperature monitor. As noted in Reference 2, several researchers have observed that neutron irradiation induced lattice expansion of SiC annealed out when the post-irradiation annealing temperature exceeds the peak irradiation temperature. As noted in Reference 3, INL uses resistivity measurements to infer peak irradiation temperature from SiC monitors. Figure 1 depicts the equipment at the HTTL used to evaluate the SiC monitors. The SiC monitors are heated in the annealing furnace using isochronal temperature steps that, depending on customer needs, can range from 50 to 800 C. This furnace is located under a ventilation hood within the stainless steel enclosure. The ventilation system is activated during heating so that any released vapors are vented through this system. Annealing temperatures are recorded using a National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable thermocouple inserted into an alumina tube in the furnace. After each isochronal annealing, the specimens are placed in a specialized fixture located in the constant temperature chamber (maintained at 30 C) for a minimum of 30 minutes. After the 30 minute wait time, each specimen's resistance is measured using the specialized fixture and a calibrated DC power analyzer. This report discusses the evaluation of the SiC monitors and presents the results. Testing was conducted in accordance with Reference 3. Sections 2 and 3 present the data collected for each monitor and provide interpretation of the data. Section 4 presents the evaluated temperature results.

  9. When Coke Is Not Hydrating: Cocaine-Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Bahaa Aldeen, Mohammed; Talibmamury, Nibras; Alalusi, Sumer; Nadham, Omar; Omer, Abdel Rahman; Smalligan, Roger D

    2014-01-01

    A 47-year-old African American man was admitted with 4 days of back pain, nausea and vomiting, and low urine output. There was no history of fever, dysuria, frequency, hesitancy, viral symptoms, trauma, rash, or constipation. Despite his past medical history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia he denied taking any medications for 18 months, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, or antacids. He denied smoking and alcohol but admitted to cocaine use. No significant FH. Physical examination results were as follows: BP 235/125 mm Hg, heart rate 90 beats/min, temperature 98°F, O2 saturation normal; lungs and heart normal, abdomen soft but bilateral costovertebral angle tenderness. Neurological examination was normal. Laboratory tests yielded the following results: creatinine (Cr) 10.5 mg/dL (1.2 mg/dL in 2010), blood urea nitrogen 63 mg/dL, glucose 151 mg/dL, Ca 9.4 mg/dL, PO4 6.1 mg/dL, Hgb 15 g/dL, white blood cells (WBC) 9100, platelets 167 000, amylase/lipase normal, aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) normal, bilirubin 1.4 mg/dL, alkaline phosphatase 39 IU/L, creatine phosphokinase 127 µg/L. Hepatic panel, C- and P-ANCA (cytoplasmic- and perinuclear-antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies, respectively), anti-GBM (anti-glomerular basement membrane), antimyeloperoxidase, antinuclear antibody, and Helicobacter pylori were all negative. C3, C4 normal, urinalysis: 2+ blood, no white blood cells or eosinophils, no casts, no albumin, negative for nitrate/leukocyte esterase and bacteria. Imaging: chest radiograph, abdominal radiograph, computed tomography of the abdomen, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography were all normal. Course. The patient's urine output declined from 700 to 400 cm(3)/d and the on third day he required hemodialysis with Cr 14 mg/dL. Renal biopsy showed typical findings of interstitial nephritis. The patient was dialyzed for 10 days and responded to steroids and went

  10. Risk Assessment of Physiological Effects of Atmospheric Composition and Pressure in Constellation Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Conkin, Johnny; Jones, J. A.; Gernhardt, M.

    2007-01-01

    To limit the risk of fire and reduce denitrogenation time to prevent decompression sickness to support frequent extravehicular activities on the Moon, a hypobaric (PB = 414 mmHg) and mildly hypoxic (ppO2 = 132 mmHg, 32% O2 - 68% N2) living environment is considered for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). With acute change in ppO2 from 145-178 mmHg at standard vehicular operating pressure to less than 125 mmHg at desired lunar surface vehicular operating pressures, there is the possibility that some crewmembers may develop symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). The signs and symptoms of AMS (headache plus nausea, dizziness, fatigue, or sleeplessness), could impact crew health and performance on lunar surface missions. An exhaustive literature review on the topic of the physiological effects of reduced ppO2 and absolute pressure as may contribute to the development of altitude symptoms or AMS was performed. The results of the nine most rigorous studies were collated, analyzed and contents on AMS and hypoxia symptoms summarized. There is evidence for an absolute pressure effect per se on AMS, so the higher the altitude for a given hypoxic alveolar O2 partial pressure (PAO2), the greater the AMS response. About 25% of adults are likely to experience mild AMS near 2,000 m altitude following a rapid ascent from sea level while breathing air (6,500 feet, acute PAO2 = 75 mmHg). The operational experience with the Shuttle staged denitrogenation protocol at 528 mmHg (3,048 m) while breathing 26.5% O2 (acute PAO2 = 85 mmHg) in astronauts adapting to microgravity suggests a similar likely experience in the proposed CEV environment. We believe the risk of mild AMS is greater given a PAO2 of 77 mmHg at 4,876 m altitude while breathing 32% O2 than at 1,828 m altitude while breathing 21% O2. Only susceptible astronauts would develop mild and transient AMS with prolonged exposure to 414 mmHg (4,876 m) while breathing 32% O2 (acute PAO2

  11. Risk Assessment of Physiological Effects of Atmospheric Composition and Pressure in Constellation Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Conkin, Johnny; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    To reduce denitrogenation time to prevent decompression sickness to support frequent extravehicular activities on the Moon, and to limit the risk of fire, a hypobaric (P(sub B) = 414 mmHg) and mildly hypoxic (ppO2 = 132 mmHg, 32% O2 - 68% N2) living environment is being considered during lunar missions for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). If the vehicular ppO2 is acutely changed from 145-178 mmHg at standard vehicular operating pressure to less than 125 mmHg at desired lunar surface outpost operating pressures, there is the possibility that some crewmembers may develop symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). The signs and symptoms of AMS (headache plus nausea, dizziness, fatigue, or sleeplessness), could impact crew health and performance on lunar surface missions. Methods: An exhaustive literature review on the topic of the physiological effects of reduced ppO2 and absolute pressure as may contribute to the development of hypoxia and altitude symptoms or AMS. The results of the nine most rigorous studies were collated, analyzed and contents on the physiological concerns associated with hypobaric operations, AMS and hypoxia symptoms summarized. Results: Although space vehicles have operated in hypobaric conditions previously, they have not operated in a mildly hypoxic ppO2. There is evidence for an absolute pressure effect per se on AMS, such that the higher the altitude for a given hypoxic alveolar O2 partial pressure (P(sub A)O2), the greater the likelihood of an AMS response. About 25% of adults are likely to experience mild AMS near 2,000 m (xxx mmHg) altitude following a rapid ascent from sea level while breathing air (6,500 feet, acute (P(sub A)O2) = 75 mmHg). The operational experience with the Shuttle staged denitrogenation protocol at 528 mmHg (3,048 m) while breathing 26.5% O2 (acute (P(sub A)O2) = 85 mmHg) in astronauts adapting to microgravity suggests a similar likely experience in the proposed CEV

  12. Sex-structure, depth distribution, intermoult period and reproductive pattern of the deep-sea red crab Chaceon affinis (Brachyura, Geryonidae) in two populations in the north-eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscoito, Manuel; Freitas, Mafalda; Pajuelo, José G.; Triay-Portella, Raül; Santana, José I.; Costa, Ana L.; Delgado, João; González, José A.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the biology of Chaceon affinis in two isolated populations of the Atlantic Ocean, including depth distribution, sexual structure, reproductive patterns and intermoult period. Males were larger and heavier than females. Mean size decreased with depth for both males and females. The highest abundance was found at 600-799 m of depth for males and at 800-999 m depth stratum for females. The highest abundance of ovigerous females was found at the 800-999 m depth stratum. Of the different ovaries' colour or colour shades recorded, only six categories were histologically characterized. The presence of spermatophores in the spermatheca of females in carapace stages II and III suggests that spermatophores are viable and used during the intermoult period. The size at sexual maturity in females was estimated at 104.4-104.7 mm carapace width (CW) in Madeira, and 109.3-110.5 mm CW in the Canary Islands. Only three categories of testes were identified. Mature testes consisted in a large mass, with highly coiled vasa deferentia visible to the naked eye. The size at sexual maturity in males was estimated at 113.8 mm CW in Madeira and 118.9 mm CW in the Canaries. The relative growth of males showed significant changes along the ontogeny and size at which allometric growth changes, as an indicator of morphometric maturity, occurred between 103.2 and 103.6 mm CW in Madeira and between 111.4 and 113.1 mm CW in the Canaries. In females, size at which allometric growth changes was found for maximum width of fifth abdominal somite (AS5W) at 98.2 mm CW in Madeira and 103.0 mm CW in the Canaries. The size at maturity obtained for C. affinis indicates that the minimum landing size (MLS) should not be set smaller than 125 mm CW in Madeira and 130 mm CW in the Canaries. This conservative MLS, higher than length at functional maturity, would safeguard immature individuals until they reach the size at which they can contribute to the reproductive capacity of the

  13. EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo dosimetry of CSA1 and CSA2 {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy source models

    SciTech Connect

    Selvam, T. Palani; Sahoo, S.; Vishwakarma, R. S.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: AAPM TG-56 recommends the use of a specific dosimetric dataset for each brachytherapy source model. In this study, a full dosimetric dataset for indigenously developed {sup 137}Cs source models, namely, the CSA1 and CSA2, in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism is presented. The study includes calculation of dose-to-kerma ratio D/K in water around these sources including stainless steel encapsulated {sup 137}Cs sources such as RTR, 3M, and selectron/LDR {sup 137}Cs. Methods: The Monte Carlo-based EGSnrcMP code system is employed for modeling the sources in vacuum and in water. Calculations of air-kerma strength, S{sub K} for the investigated sources and collision kerma in water along the transverse axis of the RTR source are based on the FLURZnrc code. Simulations of water-kerma and dose in water for the CSA1, CSA2, RTR, 3M, and selectron/LDR {sup 137}Cs sources are carried out using the DOSRZnrc code. In DOSRZnrc calculations, water-kerma and dose are scored in a cylindrical water phantom having dimensions of 80 cm diameterx80 cm height. Results: The calculated dose-rate constants for the CSA1 and CSA2 sources are 0.945(1) and 1.023(1) cGy/(h U), respectively. The calculated value of S{sub K} per unit source activity, S{sub K}/A for the CSA1 and CSA2 sources is 7.393(7)x10{sup -8} cGy cm{sup 2}/(h Bq). The EGSnrcMP-based collision kerma rates for the RTR source along the transverse axis (0.25-10 cm) agree with the corresponding GEANT4-based published values within 0.5%. Anisotropy profiles of the CSA1 and CSA2 sources are significantly different from those of other sources. For the selectron/LDR single pellet {sup 137}Cs spherical source (modeled as a cylindrical pellet with dimensions similar to the seed selectron), the values of D/K at 1 and 1.25 mm from the capsule are 1.023(1) and 1.029(1), respectively. The value of D/K at 1 mm from the CSA1, CSA2, RTR, and 3M {sup 137}Cs source capsules (all sources have an external radius of 1.5 mm) is 1.017(1) and this ratio is applicable to axial positions z=0 to z={+-}L/2. This is in contrast to a published GEANT4-based Monte Carlo dosimetric study on RTR and 3M {sup 137}Cs sources wherein the authors have assumed that collision kerma is approximately equal to absorbed dose at 1 mm from the source capsules. Collision kerma is approximately equal to absorbed dose for distances {>=}2 mm from source capsules as opposed to {>=}1 mm reported in published studies. A detailed electron transport is necessary up to 2 mm from source capsules. Conclusions: The Monte Carlo-calculated dose-rate data for the CSA1 and CSA2 sources can be used as input data for treatment planning or to verify the calculations by radiotherapy treatment planning system.

  14. Multi-Segment Radius Measurement Using an Absolute Distance Meter Through a Null Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merle, Cormic; Wick, Eric; Hayden, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This system was one of the test methods considered for measuring the radius of curvature of one or more of the 18 segmented mirrors that form the 6.5 m diameter primary mirror (PM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The assembled telescope will be tested at cryogenic temperatures in a 17-m diameter by 27-m high vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center. This system uses a Leica Absolute Distance Meter (ADM), at a wavelength of 780 nm, combined with beam-steering and beam-shaping optics to make a differential distance measurement between a ring mirror on the reflective null assembly and individual PM segments. The ADM is located inside the same Pressure-Tight Enclosure (PTE) that houses the test interferometer. The PTE maintains the ADM and interferometer at ambient temperature and pressure so that they are not directly exposed to the telescope s harsh cryogenic and vacuum environment. This system takes advantage of the existing achromatic objective and reflective null assembly used by the test interferometer to direct four ADM beamlets to four PM segments through an optical path that is coincident with the interferometer beam. A mask, positioned on a linear slide, contains an array of 1.25 mm diameter circular subapertures that map to each of the 18 PM segments as well as six positions around the ring mirror. A down-collimated 4 mm ADM beam simultaneously covers 4 adjacent PM segment beamlets and one ring mirror beamlet. The radius, or spacing, of all 18 segments can be measured with the addition of two orthogonally-oriented scanning pentaprisms used to steer the ADM beam to any one of six different sub-aperture configurations at the plane of the ring mirror. The interferometer beam, at a wavelength of 687 nm, and the ADM beamlets, at a wavelength of 780 nm, pass through the objective and null so that the rays are normally incident on the parabolic PM surface. After reflecting off the PM, both the ADM and interferometer beams return to their respective instruments on nearly the same path. A fifth beamlet, acting as a differential reference, reflects off a ring mirror attached to the objective and null and returns to the ADM. The spacings between the ring mirror, objective, and null are known through manufacturing tolerances as well as through an in situ null wavefront alignment of the interferometer test beam with a reflective hologram located near the caustic of the null. Since total path length between the ring mirror and PM segments is highly deterministic, any ADM-measured departures from the predicted path length can be attributed to either spacing error or radius error in the PM. It is estimated that the path length measurement between the ring mirror and a PM segment is accurate to better than 100 m. The unique features of this invention include the differential distance measuring capability and its integration into an existing cryogenic and vacuum compatible interferometric optical test.

  15. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  16. SU-E-T-450: Dosimetric Impact of Rotational Error On Multiple-Target Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery (IMRS) with Single-Isocenter

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, S; Huq, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluating the dosimetric-impact on multiple-targets placed away from the isocenter-target with varying rotational-error introduced by initial setup uncertainty and/or intrafractional-movement Methods: CyberKnife-Phantom was scanned with the Intracranial SRS-protocol of 1.25mm slice-thickness and the multiple-targets(GTV) of 1mm and 10mm in diameter were contoured on the Eclipse. PTV for distal-target only was drawn with 1mm expansion around the GTV to find out how much margin is needed to compensate for the rotational-error. The separation between the isocenter-target and distal-target was varied from 3cm to 7cm. RapidArc-based IMRS plans of 16Gy single-fraction were generated with five non-coplanar arcs by using Varian TrueBeam-STx equipped with high resolution MLC leaves of 2.5mm at center and with dose-rate of 1400MU/min at 6MV for flatteringfilter- free(FFF). An identical CT image with intentionally introduced 1° rotational-error was registered with the planning CT image, and the isodose distribution and Dose-Volume-Histogram(DVH) were compared with the original plans. Additionally, the dosimetric-impact of rotational error was evaluated with that of 6X photon energy which was generated with the same target-coverage. Results: For the 1mm-target with 6X-FFF, PTV-coverage(D100) of the distal-target with 1° rotational-error decreased from 1.00 to 0.35 as the separation between isocenter-target and distal-target increased from 3cm to 7cm. However, GTV-coverage(D100) was 1.0 except that of 7cm-separation(0.55), which resulted from the 1mm-margin around the distal-target. For 6X photon, GTV-coverage remained at 1.0 regardless of the separation of targets, showing that the dosimetric-impact of rotational error depends on the degree of rotational-error, separation of targets, and dose distribution around targets. For 10mm-target, PTV-coverage of distaltarget located 3cm-away was better than that of 1mm-target(0.93 versus 0.7) and GTV-coverage was 1.0 regardless of 6X-FFF/6X photon beams. Conclusion: RapidArc-based Multiple-target IMRS may Resultin a compromised outcome due to the setup-error for distal-targets. With 1mm-margin, GTV-coverage of distal-target was 1.0 although the separation of targets was up to 5cm.

  17. The LITA Drill and Sample Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, G.; Yoon, S.; Zacny, K.; Wettergreeng, D.; Cabrol, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Life in the Atacama (LITA) project has a goal of demonstrating autonomous roving, sample acquisition, delivery and analysis operations in Atacama, Chile. To enable the sample handling requirement, Honeybee Robotics developed a rover-deployed, rotary-percussive, autonomous drill, called the LITA Drill, capable of penetrating to ~80 cm in various formations, capturing and delivering subsurface samples to a 20 cup carousel. The carousel has a built-in capability to press the samples within each cup, and position target cups underneath instruments for analysis. The drill and sample delivery system had to have mass and power requirements consistent with a flight system. The drill weighs 12 kg and uses less than 100 watt of power to penetrate ~80 cm. The LITA Drill auger has been designed with two distinct stages. The lower part has deep and gently sloping flutes for retaining powdered sample, while the upper section has shallow and steep flutes for preventing borehole collapse and for efficient movement of cuttings and fall back material out of the hole. The drill uses the so called 'bite-sampling' approach that is samples are taken in short, 5-10 cm bites. To take the first bite, the drill is lowered onto the ground and upon drilling of the first bite it is then retracted into an auger tube. The auger with the auger tube are then lifted off the ground and positioned next to the carousel. To deposit the sample, the auger is rotated and retracted above the auger tube. The cuttings retained on the flutes are either gravity fed or are brushed off by a passive side brush into the cup. After the sample from the first bite has been deposited, the drill is lowered back into the same hole to take the next bite. This process is repeated until a target depth is reached. The bite sampling is analogous to peck drilling in the machining process where a bit is periodically retracted to clear chips. If there is some fall back into the hole once the auger has cleared the hole, this fall back material will be augered out during auger re-insertion. The next bite will be taken only once the auger has reached the true bottom. In the bite sampling approach the stratigraphy is somewhat preserved since every time the sample is taken, it more or less represents the depth interval in the hole. There is going to be some level of cross contamination due to smearing of cuttings on the flutes against the borehole as the auger is being pulled out, or when formation is very porous and unstable. The goal of the first drill campaign in Atacama in May of 2012 was to demonstrate successful operation of the bite sampling method and to learn about diversity of soils and rocks in the Atacama. In 2013, the sampling system has been integrated onto the CMU Zoe rover and autonomously deployed in Atacama. The drill penetrated various formations and delivered samples to a carousel. When soil was very porous, poor sample recovery was observed. When the soil was dense and cohesive, sample recovery was 100% with little cross contamination. To enable greater sample recovery in loose and unstable formations, the auger diameter will be increased from the current 12.5 mm to 19 mm. Acknowledgements: The project has been funded by the NASA ASTEP program.

  18. Understanding catchment scale sediment sources using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Shakesby, Richard A.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Coelho, Celeste O. A.

    2013-04-01

    It is well-established that urbanization leads to increased erosion (at least locally) as well as enhanced overland flow and streamflow peaks. Less is known about how the spatial distribution of erosion sources and scale of increases in erosion vary with the nature of urbanization in different climatic and socio-economic settings. This is important in order to prevent or reduce adverse impacts of erosion on downstream sedimentation, channel siltation and shifting, and river pollution. This paper adopts a sediment fingerprinting approach to assess the impact of partial urbanization and associated land-use change on sediment sources within a peri-urban catchment (6 km2), Ribeira dos Covões on the outskirts of the city of Coimbra in central Portugal. Urban land-use has increased from just 6% in 1958 to 30% in 2009. The urban pattern includes some well-defined urban residential centres, but also areas of discontinuous urban sprawl, including educational, health and small industrial facilities, numerous new roads and an enterprise park is under construction on the upper part of the catchment. The catchment has a wet Mediterranean climate and the lithology comprises sandstone in the west and limestone in the east. Soil depth is generally >40cm. The average slope angle is 8° (maximum 47°). Altitude ranges from 30m to 205m. A sediment fingerprinting approach was adopted to help establish the relative importance of sediment inputs from different urban areas. During September 2012 current bed-sediment samples (0-3 cm depth) were collected from 11 channel sites along the main stream and in different tributaries. At sites where bed-sediment was deeper, additional samples were taken at 3cm intervals to a maximum depth of around 42cm. In addition, overbank sediment samples (0-3cm depth) were collected at 11 locations around the catchment. All samples were oven-dried (at 38°C) and different particle size fractions (0.125-2mm, 0.063-0.125mm and <0.063mm) obtained, where the <0

  19. Sediment budget for a polluted Hawaiian reef using hillslope monitoring and process mapping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. D.; Rosener, M.; Schmidt, K. M.; Hanshaw, M. N.; Brooks, B. A.; Tribble, G.; Jacobi, J.

    2010-12-01

    Pollution from coastal watersheds threatens the ecology of the nearshore, including tropical reefs. Suspended sediment concentrations off the reefs of Molokai, Hawaii, chronically exceed a toxic 10 mg/L, threatening reef ecosystems. We hypothesize that historic conversion of hillslope processes from soil creep to overland flow increased both magnitude and frequency of erosion. To create a process sediment budget, we used surficial and ecological mapping, hillslope and stream gages, and novel sensors to locate, quantify and model the generation of fine sediments polluting the reef. Ecological and geomorphic mapping from LiDAR and multi-spectral imagery located overland flow areas with vegetation cover below a threshold preventing erosion. Here, feral goat grazing exposed volcanic soils whose low matrix hydraulic conductivities (1-25 mm/hour) promote Horton overland flow. We instrumented steep, barren hillslopes with soil moisture sensors, overland flow meters, Parshal flumes, ISCO sediment samplers, and a rain gage and conducted repeat Tripod LiDAR and infiltration tests. To characterize soil resistance to overland flow erosion, we used a Cohesive Strength Meter (CSM) to simulate water stress. At the 13.5 km 2 watershed mouth we used a USGS stream gage with an ISCO sediment sampler to estimate total load. Over 3 years, storms triggered overland flow during rainfall intensities above 10-15 mm/hr. Overland flow meters indicate such flows can be up to 3 cm deep, with a tendency to deepen downslope. CSM tests indicate that these depths are insufficient to erode soils where vegetation is dense, but far above threshold values of 2-3 mm for bare soils. Sediment ratings curves for both hillslope and downstream catchment gages show clock-wise hysteresis during the first intense storms in the fall, becoming linear later in the season. During fall storms, sediment concentration is often 10X higher at a given stage. Revised annual lowering rates from experimental hillslopes are 1.5 cm/a (erosion pins), 1.4 cm/a (suspended sediment) and 1.6 cm/a (repeat Tripod LiDAR). These rates are at least 100-fold greater than the long-term river lowering rate of 0.13 mm/a. A sediment budget constructed by extrapolating hillslope lowering rates to the portions of the catchments mapped as unvegetated overland flow predicts a total yearly flux of ~ 6500 t, in agreement with the measured total of ~6200 t. Decadal records illustrate that rainfall intensities sufficient to generate overland flow occur for at least 8-10 hours every year, coincident with 1-3 large storm events. We hypothesize that high lowering rates reflect a combination of long-duration overland flow events, and availability of weathered soils that can be entrained by thin flow. It appears that generation of loose, seasonally weathered silt is a 1st order control on the amount of sediment exported to the reef. If climate change increases storm frequency or duration, or decreases vegetation cover, sediment loading to reefs could increase dramatically.

  20. Impact of motion velocity on four-dimensional target volumes: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Sawada, Akira; Matsugi, Kiyotomo; Nakata, Manabu; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of motion velocity that may cause motion artifacts on target volumes (TVs) using a one-dimensional moving phantom. A 20 mm diameter spherical object embedded in a QUASAR phantom sinusoidally moved with approximately 5.0 or 10.0 mm amplitude (A) along the longitudinal axis of the computed tomography (CT) couch. The motion period was manually set in the range of 2.0-10.0 s at approximately 2.0 s interval. Four-dimensional (4D) CT images were acquired by a four-slice CT scanner (LightSpeed RT; General Electric Medical Systems, Waukesha, WI) with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm in axial cine mode. The minimum gantry rotation of 1.0 s was employed to achieve the maximum in-slice temporal resolution. Projection data over a full gantry rotation (1.0 s) were used for image reconstruction. Reflective marker position was recorded by the real-time positioning management system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). ADVANTAGE 4D software exported ten respiratory phase volumes and the maximum intensity volume generated from all reconstructed data (MIV). The threshold to obtain static object volume (V0, 4.19 ml) was used to automatically segment TVs on CT images, and then the union of TVs on 4D CT images (TV(4D)) was constructed. TVs on MIV (TV(MIV)) were also segmented by the threshold that can determine the area occupied within the central slice of TV(MIV). The maximum motion velocity for each phase bin was calculated using the actual averaged motion period displayed on ADVANTAGE 4D software (T), the range of phases used to construct the target phase bin (phase range), and a mathematical model of sinusoidal function. Each volume size and the motion range of TV in the cranial-caudal (CC) direction were measured. Subsequently, cross-correlation coefficients between TV size and motion velocity as well as phase range were calculated. Both misalignment and motion-blurring artifacts were caused by high motion velocity, Less than 6% phase range was needed to construct the 4D CT data set, except for T of 2.0 s. While the positional differences between the TV and ideal centroid in the CC direction were within the voxel size for T > or = 6.0 s, the differences were up to 2.43 and 4.15 mm for (A,T) = (5.0 mm, 2.0 s) and (10.0 mm, 2.0 s), respectively. The maximum volumetric deviations between TV sizes and V0 were 43.68% and 91.41% for A of 5.0 and 10.0 mm, respectively. TV(MIV) sizes were slightly larger than TV(4D) sizes. Volumetric deviation between TV size and V0 had a stronger correlation with motion velocity rather than phase range. This phantom study demonstrated that motion artifacts were substantially reduced when the phantom moved longitudinally at low motion velocity during 4D CT image acquisition; therefore, geometrical uncertainties due to motion artifacts should be recognized when determining TVs, especially with a fast period. PMID:19544777

  1. Automatic tracking of arbitrarily shaped implanted markers in kilovoltage projection images: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Rimner, Andreas; Mostafavi, Hassan; Mageras, Gig S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Certain types of commonly used fiducial markers take on irregular shapes upon implantation in soft tissue. This poses a challenge for methods that assume a predefined shape of markers when automatically tracking such markers in kilovoltage (kV) radiographs. The authors have developed a method of automatically tracking regularly and irregularly shaped markers using kV projection images and assessed its potential for detecting intrafractional target motion during rotational treatment. Methods: Template-based matching used a normalized cross-correlation with simplex minimization. Templates were created from computed tomography (CT) images for phantom studies and from end-expiration breath-hold planning CT for patient studies. The kV images were processed using a Sobel filter to enhance marker visibility. To correct for changes in intermarker relative positions between simulation and treatment that can introduce errors in automatic matching, marker offsets in three dimensions were manually determined from an approximately orthogonal pair of kV images. Two studies in anthropomorphic phantom were carried out, one using a gold cylindrical marker representing regular shape, another using a Visicoil marker representing irregular shape. Automatic matching of templates to cone beam CT (CBCT) projection images was performed to known marker positions in phantom. In patient data, automatic matching was compared to manual matching as an approximate ground truth. Positional discrepancy between automatic and manual matching of less than 2 mm was assumed as the criterion for successful tracking. Tracking success rates were examined in kV projection images from 22 CBCT scans of four pancreas, six gastroesophageal junction, and one lung cancer patients. Each patient had at least one irregularly shaped radiopaque marker implanted in or near the tumor. In addition, automatic tracking was tested in intrafraction kV images of three lung cancer patients with irregularly shaped markers during 11 volumetric modulated arc treatments. Purpose-built software developed at our institution was used to create marker templates and track the markers embedded in kV images. Results: Phantom studies showed mean ± standard deviation measurement uncertainty of automatic registration to be 0.14 ± 0.07 mm and 0.17 ± 0.08 mm for Visicoil and gold cylindrical markers, respectively. The mean success rate of automatic tracking with CBCT projections (11 frames per second, fps) of pancreas, gastroesophageal junction, and lung cancer patients was 100%, 99.1% (range 98%–100%), and 100%, respectively. With intrafraction images (approx. 0.2 fps) of lung cancer patients, the success rate was 98.2% (range 97%–100%), and 94.3% (range 93%–97%) using templates from 1.25 mm and 2.5 mm slice spacing CT scans, respectively. Correction of intermarker relative position was found to improve the success rate in two out of eight patients analyzed. Conclusions: The proposed method can track arbitrary marker shapes in kV images using templates generated from a breath-hold CT acquired at simulation. The studies indicate its feasibility for tracking tumor motion during rotational treatment. Investigation of the causes of misregistration suggests that its rate of incidence can be reduced with higher frequency of image acquisition, templates made from smaller CT slice spacing, and correction of changes in intermarker relative positions when they occur. PMID:24989384

  2. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W.; Sloan, Andrew

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm ± 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

  3. High time resolution observations of the polar stratosphere and mesosphere using a ground-based 230-250 GHz microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, D. A.; Espy, P. J.; Clilverd, M. A.; Maxfield, D. J.; Hartogh, P.; Holmén, K.; Blindheim, S.; Horne, R. B.

    2012-04-01

    Microwave radiometry is used to measure thermal emission by the Doppler- and pressure-broadened molecular rotational lines of atmospheric gases, from which vertical abundance profiles can be determined. Since solar radiation is not required for the measurement, the technique has the advantage that continuous observations are possible including throughout the polar winter. We describe the development of a passive microwave radiometer [Espy, P. J., P. Hartogh, and K. Holmen (2006), Proc. SPIE, 6362, 63620P, doi:10.1117/12.688953] for ground-based remote sensing of the polar middle atmosphere. The instrument measures nitric oxide (NO), ozone (O3), and carbon monoxide (CO) vertical profiles over the altitude range 35-90 km with time resolution as high as 15 minutes, allowing the diurnal variability of trace chemical species to be investigated. Heterodyne detection of atmospheric emission at 230 GHz and 250 GHz (wavelength ~1.25 mm) with a receiver noise temperature of 300 K is achieved using a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer cooled to 4 K. The down-converted signals at 1.35 GHz and 2.10 GHz are analysed using both a moderate-resolution (28 kHz, 220 MHz bandwidth) and a high-resolution (14 kHz, 40 MHz bandwidth) chirp-transform spectrometer (CTS). The instrument was operated semi-autonomously at Troll station (72° 01'S 02° 32'E, 1270 m above sea level), Antarctica during 2008-10 and at the Arctic LIDAR Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR, 69° 16'N, 16° 00'E, 380 m above sea level), northern Norway during 2011-12. NO volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles have been inverted from calibrated brightness temperature spectra of the NO line centred at 250.796 GHz, observed above Troll station, using the Microwave Observation Line Estimation and Retrieval (MOLIERE) version 5 code. A priori pressure, temperature, ozone, water vapour, and NO profiles above 30 km were calculated using the Sodankylä Ion and Neutral Chemistry (SIC, version 6.8) model under geomagnetically quiet conditions. For altitudes up to 30 km MIPAS/Envisat (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) data were combined with 10-year (1999-2008) averages of ozonesonde data from Neumayer station (70° 39'S, 08° 15'W). Reference data for radiative transfer calculations are from HITRAN 2008. The retrieval is constrained with measured CTS channel response curves. Data inversion was performed from the ground to 120 km with NO and water vapour profiles adjusted in the forward model calculations to provide the best fit to the observed brightness temperatures. The area of the normalized averaging kernels is≥0.5 for atmospheric layers between 35-83 km, indicating good information retrieval over this altitude range, although the measurements contribute to the retrieved NO VMR profiles up to at least 90 km. The vertical resolution is estimated from the width of the averaging kernels to be 8 km.

  4. Optimizing strength and fracture toughness of a cast titanium alloy through heat treatment and microstructure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Amy C.

    The relationship between the microstructure and tensile ductility and fracture toughness for cast Ti-5111 was determined and compared to that of hot-rolled and annealed Ti-5111. Graphite mold cast Ti-5111 plate material was examined in the as-received condition and after six different heat treatments involving elevated temperature anneals followed by an air or furnace cool. Three investment cast Ti-5111 plates were also examined after annealing followed by either a fan cool, air cool, or furnace cool. All castings developed a lamellar colony microstructure consisting of aligned lamellae of alpha and beta phases. Altering the cooling rate from the annealing temperature had the most influence on the microstructure such that plates with a slower cooling rate typically developed coarser grain boundary alpha, larger alpha colonies, thicker alpha laths, and greater volume fractions of alpha phase. The average prior beta grain size for the graphite mold cast specimens ranged from 920 mum to 1360 mum, while that for the investment cast specimens was approximately 1750 mum. The tensile behavior of the castings was characterized by a crack initiation and propagation process where the ductility was often limited by the strain required to initiate a large crack. The cracks formed along planar slip bands that crossed alpha colonies or in some cases, entire prior beta grains. Thus, reducing the alpha colony size and prior beta grain size should improve the casting ductility by limiting the length of slip-induced cracks. Due to the large grain and colony sizes present in the castings, the strength and ductility was observed to be sensitive to specimen size such that a smaller tensile diameter (i.e. 3.2 mm as compared to 12.5 mm) decreased the tensile and yield strengths due to the high fraction of large grains located on the specimen surface that can yield by predominantly single slip. The scatter in ductility values in the smaller specimens was significantly greater as a result of fracture controlled by a crack initiation and propagation process within a single grain that comprises a large fraction of the specimen cross-section. Thus, once a large crack initiated, minimal additional strain was required to propagate the crack. Both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms were apparent in the fracture toughness study of the castings. The fracture initiation toughness was enhanced by secondary cracking and significant blunting at the crack tip as evidenced by the presence of strain-induced void formation within a large process zone. Large alpha colonies located at the transition between the fatigue pre-crack and tensile crack growth regions limited the fracture initiation toughness by promoting easy crack growth along a significant fraction of the crack front. Thus, limiting the alpha colony size should enhance the fracture initiation toughness. The best crack propagation resistance (tearing modulus) was observed from specimens with large alpha colonies and large prior beta grains. Enhancing the size of these features increased the surface roughness, and consequently the tearing modulus, due to greater crack deflection, crack bifurcation, and shear ligament toughening from the larger alpha colonies and prior beta grains. Crack bridging by the ductile beta phase was also observed and should enhance the tearing modulus. When compared to the hot-rolled and annealed plate, the graphite mold castings exhibited better fracture initiation toughness and crack propagation resistance. However, the wrought plate maintained relatively good fracture initiation toughness and crack propagation resistance as a result of the continuous ductile beta matrix present in the microstructure.

  5. Downscaling of sea level and fluxes in the Malacca and Singapore Straits using A2 scenario projections of AR4 GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalich, Pavel; Koshebutsky, Volodymyr; Maderich, Vladimir; Thompson, Bijoy

    2013-04-01

    IPCC-coordinated work has been completed within Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) to project climate and ocean variables for the 21st century using coupled atmospheric-ocean General Circulation Models (GCMs). Resolution of the GCMs is not sufficient to resolve local features of narrow Malacca and Singapore Straits, having complex coastal line and bathymetry; therefore, dynamical downscaling of ocean variables from the global grid to the regional scale is advisable using ocean models, such as Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). ROMS is customized for the domain centered on the Singapore and Malacca Straits, extending from 98°E to 109°E and 6°S to 14°N. Following IPCC methodology, the modelling is done for the past reference period 1961-1990, and then for the 21st century projections; subsequently, established past and projected trends and variability of ocean parameters are inter-compared. Boundary conditions for the past reference period are extracted from Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA), while the projections are made using A2 scenario runs of ECHAM5 and CCSM3 GCMs. Atmospheric forcing for ROMS is downscaled with WRF using ERA-40 dataset for the past period, and outputs of atmospheric variables of respective GCMs for the projections. ROMS-downscaled regional sea level change during 1961-1990, corrected for the global thermosteric effect, land-ice melting and Global Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) effect, corresponds to a mean total trend of 1.52 mm/year, which is higher than the global estimate 1.25 mm/year and observed global sea-level rise (1.44 mm/year) for the same period. Local linear trend in the Singapore Strait (0.9 mm/year) corresponds to the observed trend at Victoria Dock tide gauge (1.1 mm/year) for the past period. Mean discharges through the Karimata, Malacca and Singapore Straits are 0.9, 0.21 and 0.12 Sv, respectively, fall in the range of observations and recent model estimates. A2 scenario projections using ROMS-ECHAM5 and ROMS-CCSM3 for 2011-2099 suggest that linear trends of sea level rise in Singapore Strait are 5.4 and 6.1 mm/year, respectively. These values fall in the range of global estimates of 3.0-8.5 mm/year. Mean sea level rise is expected around 0.43 m (ROMS-ECHAM5) and 0.47 m (ROMS-CCSM3) in 2099 relative to mean sea level in 2011. These values are greater than median estimation of global sea rise 0.32 under scenario A2. Mean discharge through Singapore Strait for scenario A2 during 2011 to 2099 is projected to be 0.062 Sv for ROMS-ECHAM5 and 0.11 Sv for ROMS-CCSM3. These projections are comparable to the discharges during 1961-1990 (0.065 and 0.11 Sv, respectively). The linear trend in discharges for the period 2011-2099 is relatively small with statistical confidence level being less than 95%. An important feature computationally discovered is the transient reversal of flow in the Singapore Strait during southwest monsoon. In general, the reversals of flow in ROMS-ECHAM5 and ROMS-CCSM3 are observed respectively to occur 1/3 and 1/5 of the whole period.

  6. FGDC Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization (PostScript Implementation)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    standard, provided that it is clearly explained on the map and in the database. In addition, modifying the size, color, and (or) lineweight of an existing symbol to suit the needs of a particular map or output device also is permitted, provided that the modified symbol's appearance is not too similar to another symbol on the map. Be aware, however, that reducing lineweights below .125 mm (.005 inch) may cause symbols to plot incorrectly if output at higher resolutions (1800 dpi or higher). For guidelines on symbol usage, as well as on color design and map labeling, please refer to the standard's introductory text. Also found there are informational sections covering concepts of geologic mapping and some definitions of geologic map features, as well as sections on the newly defined concepts and terminology for the scientific confidence and locational accuracy of geologic map features. More information on both the past development and the future maintenance of the FGDC Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization can be found at the FGDC Geologic Data Subcommittee website (http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/fgdc_gds/). Earlier Versions of the Standard

  7. Modeling a Hypothetical {sup 170}Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of {sup 170}Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount (<1%) in water. Platinum encapsulation resulted in bremsstrahlung effects similar to those with the gold encapsulation. The range of the beta particles decreases by 1.1 mm with the stainless-steel encapsulation compared to the bare source but the tissue will still receive dose from the beta particles several millimeters from the source capsule. The gold and platinum capsules not only absorb most of the electrons but also attenuate low energy photons. The mean energy of the photons escaping the core and the stainless-steel capsule is 113 keV while for the gold and platinum the mean energy is 160 keV and 165 keV, respectively. Conclusions: A {sup 170}Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being

  8. Active deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: a detailed geodetic study of the Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C. W.; Blewitt, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs faults are parallel, northwest striking, dextral fault systems separated by ~50 km in the westernmost part of the Northern Walker Lane. These two faults work as a cooperative pair to accommodate 3-5 mm/yr of the total 8 mm/yr of right-lateral deformation geodetically observed across the Northern Walker Lane, however it is unclear with fault is dominant. Geologic studies of the faults result in right-lateral slip rates of 1-2.5 mm/yr on the Honey Lake fault and a minimum of 0.3 mm/yr on the Mohawk Valley fault. In contrast, previous geodetic studies estimate slip rates of ~1 mm/yr on the Honey Lake fault and ~3 mm/yr on the Mohawk Valley fault. To reconcile the discrepancy between the distribution of slip on the faults and the differences between sums of the geologically and geodetically estimated slip rates, we use new GPS data to constrain an elastic block model developed specifically to study the Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs fault systems. We present a dense GPS velocity solution (~10 km average station spacing) that incorporates new data from the semi-continuous Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada Transtension network (MAGNET, http://geodesy.unr.edu/networks) operated by the University of Nevada, Reno with continuous data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory and other networks. Data collected during the summer of 2012 bring many MAGNET GPS time series in the Northern Walker Lane to near 5 years in duration. The density of our velocity field and recent advances in data processing give us unprecedented precision in the measurement of contemporary deformation in the Northern Walker Lane. We use the velocity solution to solve for slip rates on the companion fault systems and explore the effects of block model geometry assumptions and tradeoffs. Our model predicts slip rates of 2.2±0.3 mm/yr for the Mohawk Valley fault and 1.1±0.2 mm/yr for the Honey Lake fault. Block model slip rate estimates are sensitive to slip rate estimates on neighboring faults. We use a grid-search approach with dextral slip rates on the Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake faults set a priori to test the effect of different slip rate combinations on model misfit. Model misfit is most sensitive to variations in the Mohawk Valley slip rate, with right-lateral slip rates of 1.5-3.5 mm/yr being preferred. Model misfit is less affected by variations in the Honey Lake slip rate, with right-lateral slip rates between 0-3.5 mm/yr resulting in the lowest misfit. Both the misfit test and our slip rate results support the conclusion of previous geodetic studies that the Mohawk Valley fault is currently the dominant fault accommodating right-lateral deformation in the Northern Walker Lane.

  9. Nucleation and growth of rolling contact failure of 440C bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, V.; Bastias, P. C.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    A 'two-body' elasto-plastic finite element model of 2-dimensional rolling and rolling-plus-sliding was developed to treat the effect of surface irregularities. The model consists of a smooth cylinder in contact with a semi-infinite half-space that is either smooth or fitted with one of 0.4 microns deep or 7 microns deep groove, or a 0.4 microns high ridge-like asperity. The model incorporates elastic-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (ELKP) and non-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (NLKP) material constitutive relations appropriate for hardened bearing steel and the 440C grade. The calculated contact pressure distribution is Hertzian for smooth body contact, and it displays intense, stationary, pressure spikes superposed on the Hertzian pressure for contact with the grooved and ridged surface. The results obtained for the 0.4 microns deep groove compare well with those reported by Elsharkawy and Hamrock for an EHD lubricated contact. The effect of translating the counterface on the half space as opposed to indenting the half space with the counter face with no translation is studied. The stress and strain values near the surface are found to be similar for the two cases, whereas they are significantly different in the subsurface. It is seen that when tiny shoulders are introduced at the edge of the groove in the finite element model, the incremental plasticity and residual stresses are significantly higher in the vicinity of the right shoulder (rolling direction is from left to right) than at the left shoulder. This may explain the experimental observation that the spall nucleation occurs at the exit end of the artificially planted indents. Pure rolling calculations are compared with rolling + sliding calculations. For a coefficient of friction, mu = 0.1, the effect of friction is found to be small. Efforts were made to identify the material constitutive relations which best describe the deformation characteristics of the bearing steels in the initial few cycles. Elastic-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (ELKP) material constitutive relations produce less net plastic deformation in the initial stages for a given stress, than seen in experiments. A new set of constitutive relations: non-linear-kinematic hardening-plastic (NLKP) was used. This material model produces more plasticity than the ELKP model and shows promise for treating the net distortions in the early stages. Techniques for performing experimental measurements that can be compared with the finite element calculations were devised. The measurements are being performed on 9mm-diameter, 440C steel cylindrical rolling elements in contact with 12.5 mm-diameter, 52100 steel balls in a 3-ball-rod fatigue test machine operating at 3600 RPM. Artificial, 7 microns deep, indents were inserted on the running track of the cylindrical rolling elements and profilometer measurements of these indents made, before and after the rolling. These preliminary measurements show that the indents are substantially deformed plastically in the process of rolling. The deformations of the groove calculated with the finite element model are comparable to those measured experimentally.

  10. The aggregation efficiency of very fine volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can discharge large amounts of very small sized pyroclasts (under 0.090 mm) into the atmosphere that may cause problems to people, infrastructures and environment. The transport and deposition of fine ash are ruled by aggregation that causes premature settling of fine ash and, as consequence, significantly reduces the concentration of airborne material over long distances. Parameterizing the aggregation potential of fine ash is then needed to provide accurate modelling of ash transport and deposition from volcanic plumes. Here we present the first results of laboratory experiments investigating the aggregation efficiency of very fine volcanic particles. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that collision kinetic and relative humidity provide the strongest effect on aggregation behaviour but were only limited to particles with size > 0.125 mm. In our work, we focus on natural volcanic ash at ambient humidity with particles size < 0.090 mm, by taking into account the effect of grain size distribution on aggregation potential. Two types of ash were used in our experiments: fresh ash, collected during fall-out from a recent plume-forming eruption at Sakurajima (Japan -July 2013) and old ash, collected from fall-out tephra deposits at Campi Flegrei (Italy, ca. 10 ka), to account for the different chemical composition and morphoscopic effects of altered ash on aggregation efficiency. Total samples were hand sieved to obtain three classes with unimodal grain size distributions (<0.090 mm, <0.063 mm, <0.032 mm). Bimodal grain size distributions were also obtained by mixing the three classes in different proportions. During each experiments, particles were sieved from the top of a transparent tank where a fan, placed at the bottom, allows turbulent dispersion of particles. Collision and sticking of particles on a vertical glass slide were filmed with a high speed cameras at 6000 fps. Our lenses arrangement provide high image resolution

  11. Quantifying moisture transport in cementitious materials using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Catherine L.

    A portion of the concrete pavements in the US have recently been observed to have premature joint deterioration. This damage is caused in part by the ingress of fluids, like water, salt water, or deicing salts. The ingress of these fluids can damage concrete when they freeze and expand or can react with the cementitious matrix causing damage. To determine the quality of concrete for assessing potential service life it is often necessary to measure the rate of fluid ingress, or sorptivity. Neutron imaging is a powerful method for quantifying fluid penetration since it can describe where water has penetrated, how quickly it has penetrated and the volume of water in the concrete or mortar. Neutrons are sensitive to light atoms such as hydrogen and thus clearly detect water at high spatial and temporal resolution. It can be used to detect small changes in moisture content and is ideal for monitoring wetting and drying in mortar exposed to various fluids. This study aimed at developing a method to accurately estimate moisture content in mortar. The common practice is to image the material dry as a reference before exposing to fluid and normalizing subsequent images to the reference. The volume of water can then be computed using the Beer-Lambert law. This method can be limiting because it requires exact image alignment between the reference image and all subsequent images. A model of neutron attenuation in a multi-phase cementitious composite was developed to be used in cases where a reference image is not available. The attenuation coefficients for water, un-hydrated cement, and sand were directly calculated from the neutron images. The attenuation coefficient for the hydration products was then back-calculated. The model can estimate the degree of saturation in a mortar with known mixture proportions without using a reference image for calculation. Absorption in mortars exposed to various fluids (i.e., deionized water and calcium chloride solutions) were investigated. It has been found through this study that small pores, namely voids created by chemical shrinkage, gel pores, and capillary pores, ranging from 0.5 nm to 50 microm, fill quickly through capillary action. However, large entrapped and entrained air voids ranging from 0.05 to 1.25 mm remain empty during the initial filling process. In mortar exposed to calcium chloride solution, a decrease in sorptivity was observed due to an increase in viscosity and surface tension of the solution as proposed by Spragg et al 2011. This work however also noted a decrease in the rate of absorption due to a reaction between the salt and matrix which results in the filling of the pores in the concrete. The results from neutron imaging can help in the interpretation of standard absorption tests. ASTM C1585 test results can be further analyzed in several ways that could give an accurate indication of the durability of the concrete. Results can be reported in depth of penetration versus the square root of time rather than mm3 of fluid per mm2 of exposed surface area. Since a known fraction of pores are initially filling before reaching the edge of the sample, the actual depth of penetration can be calculated. This work is compared with an 'intrinsic sorptivity' that can be used to interpret mass measurements. Furthermore, the influence of shrinkage reducing admixtures (SRAs) on drying was studied. Neutron radiographs showed that systems saturated in water remain "wetter" than systems saturated in 5% SRA solution. The SRA in the system reduces the moisture diffusion coefficient due an increase in viscosity and decrease in surface tension. Neutron radiography provided spatial information of the drying front that cannot be achieved using other methods.

  12. Understanding sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    different particle size fractions (0.125-2.000mm, 0.063-0.125mm and <0.063mm). Seventeen stream sites were sampled plus a sample of sediment from a road surface immediately it entered the stream network. The elemental composition (40 elements) of each size fraction was assessed using a Niton X-ray fluorescence elemental analyser. Results show that rock type has a profound influence on the geochemical properties of bed-sediments. Catchment outlet sediment collected after the summer and a storm of high rainfall intensity following dry weather displayed geochemical properties closer to those of sediment from sandstone sub-catchments, and in particularly sediment from the enterprise park under construction. After the storm that followed very wet weather, however, limestone areas became of much greater significance as sediment sources, probably because of the high soil saturation. At limestone stream sites receiving runoff from the newly constructed road, fine bed-sediment geochemistry was found to be similar to that of road sediment, indicating a high contribution of this source. These results are supported by spatio-temporal differences in streamflow and suspended sediment concentrations at instrumented monitoring stations. It is concluded that this methodology represents a potentially useful tool to enable river managers to detect and assess sediment sources in urbanized and partly urbanized catchments, and to supporting them in designing and implementing effective land-use mosaics and site-specific measures to mitigate erosion.

  13. When Coke Is Not Hydrating

    PubMed Central

    Talibmamury, Nibras; Alalusi, Sumer; Nadham, Omar; Omer, Abdel Rahman; Smalligan, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    A 47-year-old African American man was admitted with 4 days of back pain, nausea and vomiting, and low urine output. There was no history of fever, dysuria, frequency, hesitancy, viral symptoms, trauma, rash, or constipation. Despite his past medical history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia he denied taking any medications for 18 months, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, or antacids. He denied smoking and alcohol but admitted to cocaine use. No significant FH. Physical examination results were as follows: BP 235/125 mm Hg, heart rate 90 beats/min, temperature 98°F, O2 saturation normal; lungs and heart normal, abdomen soft but bilateral costovertebral angle tenderness. Neurological examination was normal. Laboratory tests yielded the following results: creatinine (Cr) 10.5 mg/dL (1.2 mg/dL in 2010), blood urea nitrogen 63 mg/dL, glucose 151 mg/dL, Ca 9.4 mg/dL, PO4 6.1 mg/dL, Hgb 15 g/dL, white blood cells (WBC) 9100, platelets 167 000, amylase/lipase normal, aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) normal, bilirubin 1.4 mg/dL, alkaline phosphatase 39 IU/L, creatine phosphokinase 127 µg/L. Hepatic panel, C- and P-ANCA (cytoplasmic– and perinuclear–antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies, respectively), anti-GBM (anti–glomerular basement membrane), antimyeloperoxidase, antinuclear antibody, and Helicobacter pylori were all negative. C3, C4 normal, urinalysis: 2+ blood, no white blood cells or eosinophils, no casts, no albumin, negative for nitrate/leukocyte esterase and bacteria. Imaging: chest radiograph, abdominal radiograph, computed tomography of the abdomen, electrocardiography, and transthoracic echocardiography were all normal. Course. The patient’s urine output declined from 700 to 400 cm3/d and the on third day he required hemodialysis with Cr 14 mg/dL. Renal biopsy showed typical findings of interstitial nephritis. The patient was dialyzed for 10 days and responded to steroids

  14. A deformable phantom for 4D radiotherapy verification: Design and image registration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Serban, Monica; Heath, Emily; Stroian, Gabriela; Collins, D. Louis; Seuntjens, Jan

    2008-03-15

    Motion of thoracic tumors with respiration presents a challenge for three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy treatment. Validation of techniques aimed at measuring and minimizing the effects of respiratory motion requires a realistic deformable phantom for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a reproducible, tissue equivalent, deformable lung phantom. The phantom consists of a Lucite cylinder filled with water containing a latex balloon stuffed with dampened natural sponges. The balloon is attached to a piston that mimics the human diaphragm. Nylon wires and Lucite beads, emulating vascular and bronchial bifurcations, were uniformly glued at various locations throughout the sponges. The phantom is capable of simulating programmed irregular breathing patterns with varying periods and amplitudes. A tissue equivalent tumor, suitable for holding radiochromic film for dose measurements was embedded in the sponge. To assess phantom motion, eight 3D computed tomography data sets of the static phantom were acquired for eight equally spaced positions of the piston. The 3D trajectories of 12 manually chosen point landmarks and the tumor center-of-mass were studied. Motion reproducibility tests of the deformed phantom were established on seven repeat scans of three different states of compression. Deformable image registration (DIR) of the extreme breathing phases was performed. The accuracy of the DIR was evaluated by visual inspection of image overlays and quantified by the distance-to-agreement (DTA) of manually chosen point landmarks and triangulated surfaces obtained from 3D contoured structures. In initial tests of the phantom, a 20-mm excursion of the piston resulted in deformations of the balloon of 20 mm superior-inferior, 4 mm anterior-posterior, and 5 mm left-right. The change in the phantom mean lung density ranged from 0.24 (0.12 SD) g/cm{sup 3} at peak exhale to 0.19 (0.12 SD) g/cm{sup 3} at peak inhale. The SI displacement of the landmarks varied between 94% and 3% of the piston excursion for positions closer and farther away from the piston, respectively. The reproducibility of the phantom deformation was within the image resolution (0.7x0.7x1.25 mm{sup 3}). Vector average registration accuracy based on point landmarks was found to be 0.5 (0.4 SD) mm. The tumor and lung mean 3D DTA obtained from triangulated surfaces were 0.4 (0.1 SD) mm and 1.0 (0.8 SD) mm, respectively. This phantom is capable of reproducibly emulating the physically realistic lung features and deformations and has a wide range of potential applications, including four-dimensional (4D) imaging, evaluation of deformable registration accuracy, 4D planning and dose delivery.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data, Acquired from 12 and 16 Bit Streaming Systems during Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative analysis of continuous acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during a triaxial compression test, using a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system, is presented. A cylindrical sample (diameter 50.1 mm and length 125 mm) of Berea sandstone was triaxally deformed at a confining pressure of 15 MPa and a strain rate of 1.6E-06 s-1. The sample was loaded differentially until failure occurred at approximately σ1 = 160 MPa. AE activity was monitored for the duration of the experiment by an array of 8 broadband piezoelectric transducers coupled to the rock sample. Raw signals were amplified by 40 dB using pre-amplifiers equipped with filter modules with a frequency passband of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The amplifiers had a split output enabling the measured signal to be fed into a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system. AE waveforms were continuously recorded at 10 MS/s on 8 data acquisition channels per system. Approximately 4,500 events were harvested and source located from the continuous data for each system. P-wave arrivals were automatically picked and event locations calculated using the downhill Simplex method and a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model based on periodical surveys across the sample. Events detected on the 12-bit and 16-bit systems were compared both in terms of their P-wave picks and their source locations. In the early stages of AE activity, there appeared to be little difference between P-wave picks and hypocenter locations from both data sets. As the experiment progressed into the post-peak stress regime, which was accompanied by an increase in AE rate and amplitude, fewer events could be harvested from the 12-bit data compared to the 16-bit data. This is linked to the observation of a higher signal-to-noise ratio on AE waveforms harvested from the 16-bit stream compared to those from the 12-bit stream, which results in an easier identification of P-wave onsets. Similarly a higher confidence in source location is expected. Analysis

  16. Automatic tracking of arbitrarily shaped implanted markers in kilovoltage projection images: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Mageras, Gig S.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Rimner, Andreas; Mostafavi, Hassan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Certain types of commonly used fiducial markers take on irregular shapes upon implantation in soft tissue. This poses a challenge for methods that assume a predefined shape of markers when automatically tracking such markers in kilovoltage (kV) radiographs. The authors have developed a method of automatically tracking regularly and irregularly shaped markers using kV projection images and assessed its potential for detecting intrafractional target motion during rotational treatment. Methods: Template-based matching used a normalized cross-correlation with simplex minimization. Templates were created from computed tomography (CT) images for phantom studies and from end-expiration breath-hold planning CT for patient studies. The kV images were processed using a Sobel filter to enhance marker visibility. To correct for changes in intermarker relative positions between simulation and treatment that can introduce errors in automatic matching, marker offsets in three dimensions were manually determined from an approximately orthogonal pair of kV images. Two studies in anthropomorphic phantom were carried out, one using a gold cylindrical marker representing regular shape, another using a Visicoil marker representing irregular shape. Automatic matching of templates to cone beam CT (CBCT) projection images was performed to known marker positions in phantom. In patient data, automatic matching was compared to manual matching as an approximate ground truth. Positional discrepancy between automatic and manual matching of less than 2 mm was assumed as the criterion for successful tracking. Tracking success rates were examined in kV projection images from 22 CBCT scans of four pancreas, six gastroesophageal junction, and one lung cancer patients. Each patient had at least one irregularly shaped radiopaque marker implanted in or near the tumor. In addition, automatic tracking was tested in intrafraction kV images of three lung cancer patients with irregularly shaped markers during 11 volumetric modulated arc treatments. Purpose-built software developed at our institution was used to create marker templates and track the markers embedded in kV images. Results: Phantom studies showed mean ± standard deviation measurement uncertainty of automatic registration to be 0.14 ± 0.07 mm and 0.17 ± 0.08 mm for Visicoil and gold cylindrical markers, respectively. The mean success rate of automatic tracking with CBCT projections (11 frames per second, fps) of pancreas, gastroesophageal junction, and lung cancer patients was 100%, 99.1% (range 98%–100%), and 100%, respectively. With intrafraction images (approx. 0.2 fps) of lung cancer patients, the success rate was 98.2% (range 97%–100%), and 94.3% (range 93%–97%) using templates from 1.25 mm and 2.5 mm slice spacing CT scans, respectively. Correction of intermarker relative position was found to improve the success rate in two out of eight patients analyzed. Conclusions: The proposed method can track arbitrary marker shapes in kV images using templates generated from a breath-hold CT acquired at simulation. The studies indicate its feasibility for tracking tumor motion during rotational treatment. Investigation of the causes of misregistration suggests that its rate of incidence can be reduced with higher frequency of image acquisition, templates made from smaller CT slice spacing, and correction of changes in intermarker relative positions when they occur.

  17. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  18. Fractal analysis of the hydraulic conductivity on a sandy porous media reproduced in a laboratory facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bartolo, S.; Fallico, C.; Straface, S.; Troisi, S.; Veltri, M.

    2009-04-01

    The complexity characterization of the porous media structure, in terms of the "pore" phase and the "solid" phase, can be carried out by means of the fractal geometry which is able to put in relationship the soil structural properties and the water content. It is particularly complicated to describe analytically the hydraulic conductivity for the irregularity of the porous media structure. However these can be described by many fractal models considering the soil structure as the distribution of particles dimensions, the distribution of the solid aggregates, the surface of the pore-solid interface and the fractal mass of the "pore" and "solid" phases. In this paper the fractal model of Yu and Cheng (2002) and Yu and Liu (2004), for a saturated bidispersed porous media, was considered. This model, using the Sierpinsky-type gasket scheme, doesn't contain empiric constants and furnishes a well accord with the experimental data. For this study an unconfined aquifer was reproduced by means of a tank with a volume of 10 Ã- 7 Ã- 3 m3, filled with a homogeneous sand (95% of SiO2), with a high percentage (86.4%) of grains between 0.063mm and 0.125mm and a medium-high permeability. From the hydraulic point of view, 17 boreholes, a pumping well and a drainage ring around its edge were placed. The permeability was measured utilizing three different methods, consisting respectively in pumping test, slug test and laboratory analysis of an undisturbed soil cores, each of that involving in the measurement a different support volume. The temporal series of the drawdown obtained by the pumping test were analyzed by the Neuman-type Curve method (1972), because the saturated part above the bottom of the facility represents an unconfined aquifer. The data analysis of the slug test were performed by the Bouwer & Rice (1976) method and the laboratory analysis were performed on undisturbed saturated soil samples utilizing a falling head permeameter. The obtained values either of the

  19. On the output factor measurements of the CyberKnife iris collimator small fields: Experimental determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for microchamber and diode detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Zourari, K.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Sakelliou, L.; Kilby, W.; Antypas, C.; Papagiannis, P.; Karaiskos, P.; Georgiou, E.; Seimenis, I.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To measure the output factors (OFs) of the small fields formed by the variable aperture collimator system (iris) of a CyberKnife (CK) robotic radiosurgery system, and determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for a microchamber and four diode detectors. Methods: OF measurements were performed using a PTW PinPoint 31014 microchamber, four diode detectors (PTW-60017, -60012, -60008, and the SunNuclear EDGE detector), TLD-100 microcubes, alanine dosimeters, EBT films, and polymer gels for the 5 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm iris collimators at 650 mm, 800 mm, and 1000 mm source to detector distance (SDD). The alanine OF measurements were corrected for volume averaging effects using the 3D dose distributions registered in polymer gel dosimeters. k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors for the PinPoint microchamber and the diode dosimeters were calculated through comparison against corresponding polymer gel, EBT, alanine, and TLD results. Results: Experimental OF results are presented for the array of dosimetric systems used. The PinPoint microchamber was found to underestimate small field OFs, and a k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor ranging from 1.127 {+-} 0.022 (for the 5 mm iris collimator) to 1.004 {+-} 0.010 (for the 15 mm iris collimator) was determined at the reference SDD of 800 mm. The PinPoint k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factor was also found to increase with decreasing SDD; k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} values equal to 1.220 {+-} 0.028 and 1.077 {+-} 0.016 were obtained for the 5 mm iris collimator at 650 mm and 1000 mm SDD, respectively. On the contrary, diode detectors were found to overestimate small field OFs and a correction factor equal to 0.973 {+-} 0.006, 0.954 {+-} 0.006, 0.937 {+-} 0.007, and 0.964 {+-} 0.006 was measured for the PTW-60017, -60012, -60008 and the EDGE diode detectors, respectively, for the 5 mm iris collimator at 800 mm SDD. The corresponding correction factors for the 15 mm iris collimator were found equal to 0.997 {+-} 0.010, 0.994 {+-} 0.009, 0.988 {+-} 0.010, and 0.986 {+-} 0.010, respectively. No correlation of the diode k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors with SDD was observed. Conclusions: This work demonstrates an experimental procedure for the determination of the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors required to obtain small field OF results of increased accuracy.

  20. Liquid Metal Droplet and Micro Corrugated Diaphragm RF-MEMS for reconfigurable RF filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Wasim

    Widely Tunable RF Filters that are small, cost-effective and offer ultra low power consumption are extremely desirable. Indeed, such filters would allow drastic simplification of RF front-ends in countless applications from cell phones to satellites in space by replacing switched-array of static acoustic filters and YIG filters respectively. Switched array of acoustic filters are de facto means of channel selection in mobile applications such as cell phones. SAW and BAW filters satisfy most criteria needed by mobile applications such as low cost, size and power consumption. However, the trade-off is a significant loss of 3-4 dB in modern cell phone RF front-end. This leads to need for power-hungry amplifiers and short battery life. It is a necessary trade-off since there are no better alternatives. These devices are in mm scale and consume mW. YIG filters dominate applications where size or power is not a constraint but demand excellent RF performance like low loss and high tuning ratio. These devices are measured in inches and require several watts to operate. Clearly, a tunable RF filter technology that would combine the cost, size and power consumption benefits of acoustic filters with excellent RF performance of YIG filters would be extremely desirable and imminently useful. The objective of this dissertation is to develop such a technology based upon RF-MEMS Evanescent-mode cavity filter. Two highly novel RF-MEMS devices have been developed over the course of this PhD to address the unique MEMS needs of this technology. The first part of the dissertation is dedicated to introducing the fundamental concepts of tunable cavity resonators and filters. This includes the physics behind it, key performance metrics and what they depend on and requirements of the MEMS tuners. Initial gap control and MEMS attachment method are identified as potential hurdles towards achieving very high RF performance. Simple and elegant solutions to both these issues are discussed in detail and have proved pivotal to this work. The second part of the dissertation focuses on the Liquid Metal Droplet RF-MEMS. A novel tunable RF MEMS resonator that is based upon electrostatic control over the morphology of a liquid metal droplet (LMD) is conceived. We demonstrate an LMD evanescent-mode cavity resonator that simultaneously achieves wide analog tuning from 12 to 18 GHz with a measured quality factor of 1400-1840. A droplet of 250-mum diameter is utilized and the applied bias is limited to 100 V. This device operates on a principle called Electro-Wetting On Dielectric (EWOD). The liquid metal employed is a non-toxic eutectic alloy of Gallium, Indium and Tin known as Galinstan. This device also exploits interfacial surface energy and viscous body forces that dominate at nanoliter scale. We then apply our Liquid Metal Droplet (LMD) RF-MEMS architecture to demonstrate a continuously tunable electrostatic Ku-Band Filter. A 2-pole bandpass filter with measured insertion loss of less than 0.4dB and 3dB FBW of 3.4% is achieved using a Galinstan droplet of 250mum diameter and bias limited to 100V. We demonstrate that the LMD is insensitive to gravity by performing inversion and tilt experiments. In addition, we study its thermal tolerance by subjecting the LMD up to 150° C. The third part of the dissertation is dedicated to the Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) RF-MEMS. We present an evanescent-mode cavity bandpass filter with state-of-the-art RF performance metrics like 4:1 tuning ratio from 5 to 20 GHz with less than 2dB insertion loss and 2-6% 3dB bandwidth. Micro-Corrugated Diaphragm (MCD) is a novel electrostatic MEMS design specifically engineered to provide large-scale analog deflections necessary for such continuous and wide tunable filtering with very high quality factor. We demonstrate a 1.25mm radius and 2mum thick Gold MCD which provides 30mum total deflection with nearly 60% analog range. We also present a detailed and systematic MCD design methodology for relevant applications. To further demonstrate MCD versatility, we implement a bandstop MCD filter that cascades nine separate resonators to achieve a 6-24 GHz continuous tuning. The disseration concludes with a Galinstan Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump and summary of my doctoral work. Although presented at the very end of this dissertation, the MHD micropump was indeed the very starting point for all my doctoral research efforts. The invaluable lessons learned here paved the way for development of both LMD and MCD RF-MEMS.