Science.gov

Sample records for 12d1 impact properties

  1. Subtask 12D1: Impact properties of production heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Following previous reports of excellent properties of a laboratory heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, the alloy identified as the primary vanadium-based candidate for application as fusion reactor structural components, a large production-scale (500-kg) heat of the alloy was fabricated successfully. Since impact toughness has been known to be most sensitive to alloy composition and microstructure, impact testing of the production-scale heat was conducted in this work between -200{degrees}C and +200{degrees}C. A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified previously as the primary vanadium-based candidate alloy for application as fusion reactor structural components, has been produced successfully. Impact tests were conducted at -196{degrees}C to 150{degrees}C on 1/3-size Charpy specimens of the scale-up heat in as-rolled condition and after annealing for 1 h at 950, 1000, and 1050{degrees}C in high-quality vacuum. The annealed material remained ductile at all test temperatures; the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was lower than -200{degrees}C. The upper-shelf energy of the production-scale heat was similar to that of the laboratory-scale ({approx}30-kg) heat of V-4Cr-4Ti investigated previously. Effect of annealing temperature was not significant; however, annealing at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h not only produces best impact properties but also ensures a sufficient tolerance to effect of temperature inhomogeneity expected when annealing large components. Effect of notch geometry was also investigated on the production heat. When annealed properly (e.g., at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h), impact properties were not sensitive to notch geometry (45{degrees}-notch, root radius 0.25 mm; and 300-notch, root radius 0.08 mm). 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. 17 CFR 270.12d1-2 - Exemptions for investment companies relying on section 12(d)(1)(G) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... by an investment company); and (3) Securities issued by a money market fund, when the acquisition is in reliance on § 270.12d1-1. (b) Definitions. For purposes of this section, money market fund has...

  3. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund shares... issued by a money market fund; and (2) A money market fund, any principal underwriter thereof, and...

  4. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... securities and other investments in which a money market fund may invest under § 270.2a-7; and (B) Undertakes... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund...

  5. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... securities and other investments in which a money market fund may invest under § 270.2a-7; and (B) Undertakes... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund...

  6. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... securities and other investments in which a money market fund may invest under § 270.2a-7; and (B) Undertakes... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund...

  7. 17 CFR 270.12d1-1 - Exemptions for investments in money market funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... securities and other investments in which a money market fund may invest under § 270.2a-7; and (B) Undertakes... money market funds. 270.12d1-1 Section 270.12d1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Exemptions for investments in money market funds. (a) Exemptions for acquisition of money market fund...

  8. 17 CFR 240.12d1-3 - Requirements as to certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirements as to... § 240.12d1-3 Requirements as to certification. (a) Certification that a security has been approved by an... shall be manually signed by the appropriate exchange authority. (Sec. 12, 48 Stat. 892, as amended; 15...

  9. 17 CFR 240.12d1-3 - Requirements as to certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements as to... § 240.12d1-3 Requirements as to certification. (a) Certification that a security has been approved by an... shall be manually signed by the appropriate exchange authority. (Sec. 12, 48 Stat. 892, as amended; 15...

  10. 17 CFR 240.12d1-3 - Requirements as to certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirements as to... § 240.12d1-3 Requirements as to certification. (a) Certification that a security has been approved by an... shall be manually signed by the appropriate exchange authority. (Sec. 12, 48 Stat. 892, as amended; 15...

  11. 17 CFR 240.12d1-3 - Requirements as to certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirements as to... § 240.12d1-3 Requirements as to certification. (a) Certification that a security has been approved by an... shall be manually signed by the appropriate exchange authority. (Sec. 12, 48 Stat. 892, as amended; 15...

  12. 17 CFR 240.12d1-3 - Requirements as to certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements as to... § 240.12d1-3 Requirements as to certification. (a) Certification that a security has been approved by an... shall be manually signed by the appropriate exchange authority. (Sec. 12, 48 Stat. 892, as amended; 15...

  13. The Mitochondrion-Located Protein OsB12D1 Enhances Flooding Tolerance during Seed Germination and Early Seedling Growth in Rice

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongli; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Pingfang

    2014-01-01

    B12D belongs to a function unknown subgroup of the Balem (Barley aleurone and embryo) proteins. In our previous work on rice seed germination, we identified a B12D-like protein encoded by LOC_Os7g41350 (named OsB12D1). OsB12D1 pertains to an ancient protein family with an amino acid sequence highly conserved from moss to angiosperms. Among the six OsB12Ds, OsB12D1 is one of the major transcripts and is primarily expressed in germinating seed and root. Bioinformatics analyses indicated that OsB12D1 is an anoxic or submergence resistance-related gene. RT-PCR results showed OsB12D1 is induced remarkably in the coleoptiles or roots by flooding during seed germination and early seedling growth. The OsB12D1-overexpressed rice seeds could protrude radicles in 8 cm deep water, further exhibiting significant flooding tolerance compared to the wild type. Moreover, this tolerance was not affected by the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. OsB12D1 was identified in the mitochondrion by subcellular localization analysis and possibly enhances electron transport through mediating Fe and oxygen availability under flooded conditions. This work indicated that OsB12D1 is a promising gene that can help to enhance rice seedling establishment in farming practices, especially for direct seeding. PMID:25089878

  14. Tensile properties of impact ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Kellackey, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A special test apparatus was developed to measure the tensile strength of impact ices perpendicular to the direction of growth. The apparatus consists of a split tube carefully machined to minimize the effect of the joint on impact ice strength. The tube is supported in the wind tunnel by two carefully aligned bearings. During accretion the tube is turned slowly in the icing cloud to form a uniform coating of ice on the split tube specimen. The two halves of the split tube are secured firmly by a longitudinal bolt to prevent relative motion between the two halves during ice accretion and handling. Tensile test strength results for a variety of icing conditions were obtained. Both glaze and rime ice conditions were investigated. In general, the tensile strength of impact ice was significantly less than refrigerator ice. Based on the limited data taken, the median strength of rime ice was less than glaze ice. However, the mean values were similar.

  15. Impact properties of zinc die cast alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Manahan, M.P.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2005-01-01

    Alloys 3, 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were tested at five temperatures between -40 C and room temperature to determine impact properties. Izod impact energy data was obtained in accordance with ASTM D256. Unlike ASTM E23, these samples were tested with a milled notch in order to compare with plastic samples. In addition, flexural data was obtained for design use.

  16. Impact failure and fragmentation properties of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Kipp, M.E.

    1998-03-01

    In the present study we describe the development of an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. Spherical test samples of the metals of interest are subjected to controlled impulsive stress loads by acceleration to high velocities with a light-gas launcher facility and subsequent normal impact on thin plates. Motion, deformation and fragmentation of the test samples are diagnosed with multiple flash radiography methods. The impact plate materials are selected to be transparent to the x-ray method so that only test metal material is imaged. Through a systematic series of such tests both strain-to-failure and fragmentation resistance properties are determined through this experimental method. Fragmentation property data for several steels, copper, aluminum, tantalum and titanium have been obtained to date. Aspects of the dynamic data have been analyzed with computational methods to achieve a better understanding of the processes leading to failure and fragmentation, and to test an existing computational fragmentation model.

  17. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5

  18. Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Kahn, Ralph A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Yu, Hongbin; Rind, David; Feingold, Graham; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Streets, David G.; DeCola, Phillip; Halthore, Rangasayi

    2009-01-01

    This report critically reviews current knowledge about global distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosols, as they relate to aerosol impacts on climate. It assesses possible next steps aimed at substantially reducing uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Current measurement techniques and modeling approaches are summarized, providing context. As a part of the Synthesis and Assessment Product in the Climate Change Science Program, this assessment builds upon recent related assessments, including the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR4, 2007) and other Climate Change Science Program reports. The objectives of this report are (1) to promote a consensus about the knowledge base for climate change decision support, and (2) to provide a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the climate-relevant impacts of anthropogenic aerosols for policy makers, policy analysts, and general public, both within and outside the U.S government and worldwide.

  19. Subtask 12D2: Baseline impact properties of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the baseline impact properties of vanadium-base alloys as a function of compositional variables. Up-to-date results on impact properties of unirradiated V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented and reviewed in this paper, with an emphasis on the most promising class of alloys, i.e., V-(4-5)Cr-(3-5)Ti containing 400-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests on small laboratory as well as production-scale heats. DBTT is influenced most significantly by Cr contents and, to a lesser extent, by Ti contents of the alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, V-Cr-Ti alloys exhibit excellent impact properties, i.e., DBTT<-200{degrees}C and upper shelf energies of {approx}120-140 J/cm{sup 2}. Impact properties of the production-scale heat of the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr- 4Ti were as good as those of the laboratory-scale heats. Optimal impact properties of the reference alloy were obtained after annealing the as-rolled products at 1000{degrees}C-1050{degrees}C for 1-2 h in high-quality vacuum. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil hydraulic properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different physical and chemical properties of biochar, which is made out of a variety of biomass materials, can impact water movement through amended soil. The objective of this research was to develop a decision support tool predicting the impact of biochar additions on soil saturated hydraulic con...

  1. Fatigue and impact properties of metal honeycomb sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Guang ping; Lu, Jie; Liang, Jun; Chang, Zhong liang

    2008-11-01

    Honeycomb sandwich structures are significant to be used as applied to thermal protection system on reusable launch vehicle. In this paper the fatigue and impact properties of a novel metallic thermal protection material have been investigated and predicted at room temperature. A series of strength tests are carried out to obtain parameters firstly for further experiments. A set of tension-tension stress fatigue tests and impact tests based on split-Hopkinson pressure bar are carried out. Different high strain rate impact experiments are accomplished. The curves of dynamical stress, strain and strain rate are obtained. Also the cell units images after impact are presented. The results show the fatigue properties of honeycomb sandwich panels are comparatively better. And it has the advantages of anti-impact resistance and high, energy absorption capability.

  2. A Repeated Impact Method and Instrument to Evaluate the Impact Fatigue Property of Drillpipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Qiang; Sun, Yongxing; Zhu, Hongjun; Zhou, Ying; Xie, Juan; Shi, Taihe

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that drillpipe failures are a pendent problem in drilling engineering. Most of drillpipe failures are low amplitude-repeated impact fatigue failures. The traditional method is using Charpy impact test to describe the fracture property of drillpipe, but it cannot veritably characterize the impact fatigue property of drillpipe under low amplitude-repeated impact. Based on the Charpy impact and other methods, a repeated impact method and instrument have been proposed to simulate the low amplitude-repeated impact of downhole conditions for drillpipe. Then, a series of tests have been performed using this instrument. Test results demonstrate the drillpipe upset transition area nonhomogeneity is more severe than drillpipe body, which is the key factor that leads to washout and fracture frequently of it. As the one time impact energy increases, the repeated impact times decrease exponentially, therefore, the rotational speed has a great effect on the fatigue life of drillpipe, and it is vital to select a suitable rotational speed for drilling jobs. In addition, based on SEM fractographs we found that the fracture surface of repeated impact is similar to the fatigue fracture, and there are many low cycle fatigue characteristic features on fracture surface that reveal very good agreement with the features of drillpipe fatigue failures in the field.

  3. Spring cleaning: rural water impacts, valuation, and property rights institutions.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Michael; Leino, Jessica; Miguel, Edward; Zwane, Alix Peterson

    2011-01-01

    Using a randomized evaluation in Kenya, we measure health impacts of spring protection, an investment that improves source water quality. We also estimate households' valuation of spring protection and simulate the welfare impacts of alternatives to the current system of common property rights in water, which limits incentives for private investment. Spring infrastructure investments reduce fecal contamination by 66%, but household water quality improves less, due to recontamination. Child diarrhea falls by one quarter. Travel-cost based revealed preference estimates of households' valuations are much smaller than both stated preference valuations and health planners' valuations, and are consistent with models in which the demand for health is highly income elastic. We estimate that private property norms would generate little additional investment while imposing large static costs due to above-marginal-cost pricing, private property would function better at higher income levels or under water scarcity, and alternative institutions could yield Pareto improvements. PMID:21853618

  4. Droplet impact patterns on inclined surfaces with variable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockard, Michael; Neitzel, G. Paul; Smith, Marc K.

    2014-11-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is used in the investigation of a crime scene to infer the impact velocity and size of an impacting droplet and, from these, the droplet's point and cause of origin. The final pattern is the result of complex fluid mechanical processes involved in the impact and spreading of a blood drop on a surface coupled with the wetting properties of the surface itself. Experiments have been designed to study these processes and the resulting patterns for the case of a single Newtonian water droplet impacting a planar, inclined surface with variable roughness and wetting properties. Results for Reynolds numbers in the range of (9,000 - 27,000) and Weber numbers in the range of (300 - 2,600) will be presented. Transient video images and final impact patterns will be analyzed and compared with results from traditional bloodstain pattern-analysis techniques used by the forensics community. In addition, preliminary work with a new Newtonian blood simulant designed to match the viscosity and surface tension of blood will be presented. Supported by the National Institute of Justice.

  5. Viton's Impact on NASA Standard Initiator Propellant Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohmann, Carl; Tipton, Bill, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the properties of Viton that are relevant to its use as a pyrotechnic binder in a NASA standard initiator (NSI) propellant. Nearly every aspect of NSI propellant manufacture and use is impacted by the binder system. The effect of Viton's molecular weight on solubility, solution viscosity, glass transition temperature, and strength characteristics as applied to NSI production and performance are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the Viton fractionation that occurs during the precipitation cycle and its impact on bridgewire functions. Special consideration is given to the production of bridgewire slurry mixtures.

  6. Structural properties of impact ices accreted on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scavuzzo, R. J.; Chu, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    The structural properties of ice accretions formed on aircraft surfaces are studied. The overall objectives are to measure basic structural properties of impact ices and to develop finite element analytical procedures for use in the design of all deicing systems. The Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to produce simulated natural ice accretion over a wide range of icing conditions. Two different test apparatus were used to measure each of the three basic mechanical properties: tensile, shear, and peeling. Data was obtained on both adhesive shear strength of impact ices and peeling forces for various icing conditions. The influences of various icing parameters such as tunnel air temperature and velocity, icing cloud drop size, material substrate, surface temperature at ice/material interface, and ice thickness were studied. A finite element analysis of the shear test apparatus was developed in order to gain more insight in the evaluation of the test data. A comparison with other investigators was made. The result shows that the adhesive shear strength of impact ice typically varies between 40 and 50 psi, with peak strength reaching 120 psi and is not dependent on the kind of substrate used, the thickness of accreted ice, and tunnel temperature below 4 C.

  7. Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composite Material Properties for Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Biniendak, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Littell, Justin D.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of impact simulations for aircraft components made with triaxial braided carbon fiber composites is currently limited by inadequate material property data and lack of validated material models for analysis. Improvements to standard quasi-static test methods are needed to account for the large unit cell size and localized damage within the unit cell. The deformation and damage of a triaxial braided composite material was examined using standard quasi-static in-plane tension, compression, and shear tests. Some modifications to standard test specimen geometries are suggested, and methods for measuring the local strain at the onset of failure within the braid unit cell are presented. Deformation and damage at higher strain rates is examined using ballistic impact tests on 61- by 61- by 3.2-mm (24- by 24- by 0.125-in.) composite panels. Digital image correlation techniques were used to examine full-field deformation and damage during both quasi-static and impact tests. An impact analysis method is presented that utilizes both local and global deformation and failure information from the quasi-static tests as input for impact simulations. Improvements that are needed in test and analysis methods for better predictive capability are examined.

  8. Impact properties of shear thickening fluid impregnated foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutrenon, M.; Michaud, V.

    2014-03-01

    Concentrated colloidal suspensions of silica particles in polyethylene glycol exhibit a shear thickening behavior: above a critical shear rate in a confined environment, they show a steep increase of viscosity. This reversible transition from a low to a high viscosity state is associated with a large energy absorption that could be harnessed for impact protection. As these suspensions are liquid at rest, however, shear thickening fluids (STFs) are difficult to use in practical applications. Furthermore, their specific rheological properties exist within a narrow range of concentration, so they tend to disappear when the material is in contact with air and humidity. In this work, a soft foam scaffold was impregnated with STF to provide a three-dimensional shape to the assembly at rest, while a silicone was cast around it to serve as a physical barrier to the external environment. A method to quickly impregnate the foam was proposed. Impact tests were carried out on the STF/foam/silicone composite pads using a free fall impact tower. Compared to rubber or pure silicone, larger energy absorptions, up to 85%, were observed, which could be repeated for multiple impacts. The transmitted shock waves were also reduced, showing the potential of this system for impact protection of structures.

  9. Impact of Foliage Surface Properties on Vegetation Reflection and Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Yan, L.; Zhao, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Optical properties of phytoelements and their distribution in the canopy space (i.e., canopy structure) are among key factors that determine light environment in vegetation canopies, which in turn drives various physiological and physical processes required for the functioning of plants. Canopy radiative response is the source of information about ecosystem properties from remote sensing. Understanding of how radiation interacts with foliage and traverses in the 3D vegetation canopy is essential to both modeling and remote sensing communities. Radiation scattered by a leaf includes information from two dissimilar sources - the leaf surface and leaf interior. The first component of scattered radiation emanates from light reflected at the air-cuticle interface. This portion of reflected radiation does not interact with biochemical constituents inside the leaf and depends on the properties of the leaf surface. The leaf cuticle acts as a "barrier" for photons to enter the mesophyll and be absorbed; thus, tending to increase the leaf scattering. The second component mainly results from radiation interactions within the leaf-interior. The canopy radiation regime is sensitive to canopy structure, leaf surface properties and leaf biochemical constituents. Impact of leaf surface properties on canopy reflection and absorption is poorly understood. Radiation scattered at the surface of leaves is partly polarized. Fresnel reflection is the principal cause of light polarization. Polarization measurements provide a means to assess the impact of leaf surface properties on canopy radiation regime. We measured Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) in the principal plane and its polarized portion of needles and shoots of two coniferous species in the 400 to 1000 nm spectral interval. The needle and shoot BRF spectra were decomposed into polarized (PBRF) and diffuse (DBRF) components: BRF=PBRF+DBRF. Our analyses indicate: 1) PBRF in forward directions can account for up to 70% of

  10. Electromagnetic Properties of Impact-Generated Plasma, Vapor and Debris

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.A.; Schultz, P.H.

    1998-11-02

    Plasma, vapor and debris associated with an impact or explosive event have been demonstrated in the laboratory to produce radiofrequency and optical electromagnetic emissions that can be diagnostic of the event. Such effects could potentially interfere with communications or remote sensing equipment if an impact occurred, for example, on a satellite. More seriously, impact generated plasma could end the life of a satellite by mechanisms that are not well understood and not normally taken into account in satellite design. For example, arc/discharge phenomena resulting from highly conductive plasma acting as a current path across normally shielded circuits may have contributed to the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite on August 11, 1993. The possibility of significant storm activity during the Leonid meteor showers of November 1998, 1999 and 2000 (impact velocity, 72 km/s) has heightened awareness of potential vulnerabilities from hypervelocity electromagnetic effects to orbital assets. The concern is justified. The amount of plasma, electrostatic charge and the magnitude of the resulting currents and electric fields scale nearly as the cube of the impact velocity. Even for microscopic Leonid impacts, the amount of plasma approaches levels that could be dangerous to spacecraft electronics. The degree of charge separation that occurs during hypervelocity impacts scales linearly with impactor mass. The resulting magnetic fields increase linearly with impactor radius and could play a significant role in our understanding of the paleomagnetism of planetary surfaces. The electromagnetic properties of plasma produced by hypervelocity impact have been exploited by researchers as a diagnostic tool, invoked to potentially explain the magnetically jumbled state of the lunar surface and blamed for the loss of the Olympus experimental communications satellite. The production of plasma in and around an impact event can lead to several effects: (1) the

  11. Magnetic properties of tektites and other related impact glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Devouard, B.; Moustard, F.; Bezaeva, N. S.; Cournède, C.; Scaillet, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of the magnetic properties of the four known tektite fields and related fully melted impact glasses (Aouelloul, Belize, Darwin, Libyan desert and Wabar glasses, irghizites, and atacamaites), namely magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis properties as well as properties dependent on magnetic grain-size. Tektites appear to be characterized by pure Fe2+ paramagnetism, with ferromagnetic traces below 1 ppm. The different tektite fields yield mostly non-overlapping narrow susceptibility ranges. Belize and Darwin glasses share similar characteristics. On the other hand the other studied glasses have wider susceptibility ranges, with median close to paramagnetism (Fe2+ and Fe3+) but with a high-susceptibility population bearing variable amounts of magnetite. This signs a fundamental difference between tektites (plus Belize and Darwin glasses) and other studied glasses in terms of oxygen fugacity and heterogeneity during formation, thus bringing new light to the formation processes of these materials. It also appears that selecting the most magnetic glass samples allows to find impactor-rich material, opening new perspectives to identify the type of impactor responsible for the glass generation.

  12. Impact of Methylation on the Physical Properties of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Alberto; Castellazzi, Chiara Lara; Battistini, Federica; Collinet, Kathryn; Flores, Oscar; Deniz, Ozgen; Ruiz, Maria Luz; Torrents, David; Eritja, Ramon; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of an alternative code imprinted in the genome that might contribute to gene expression regulation through an indirect reading mechanism. In mammals, components of this coarse-grained regulatory mechanism include chromatin structure and epigenetic signatures, where d(CpG) nucleotide steps are key players. We report a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of d(CpG) steps that provides a detailed description of their physical characteristics and the impact of cytosine methylation on these properties. We observed that methylation changes the physical properties of d(CpG) steps, having a dramatic effect on enriched CpG segments, such as CpG islands. We demonstrate that methylation reduces the affinity of DNA to assemble into nucleosomes, and can affect nucleosome positioning around transcription start sites. Overall, our results suggest a mechanism by which the basic physical properties of the DNA fiber can explain parts of the cellular epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22824278

  13. EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THIN POURS ON SALTSTONE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Langton, C.; Fox, K.

    2012-10-02

    testing showed increased flow when the number of cold joints was increased. Compressive strength testing showed that the maximum load at the onset of cracking was reduced by approximately 26% for those samples that contained cold joints as compared to the monolithic samples. The number of cold joints in the sample had no significant impact on the maximum load prior to cracking. The porosity of the samples was not influenced by cold joints. This result was expected as the porosity is a material property affected by the properties of the components (premix and salt solution) and the water to premix ratio. Overall, the only obvious impact of cold joints in the samples was to significantly increase hydraulic conductivity in the direction parallel to the cold joints. An increasing number of cold joints (thin layers) in the simulated saltstone samples did not exacerbate this effect, nor did it have a negative impact on the Leachability Indices or porosity for surfaces exposed for approximately four days. The presence of a cold joint reduced the compressive strength of the material, although this impact was seen regardless of the number of cold joints in the sample.

  14. Impact of soil properties for European climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillod, B. P.; Davin, E. L.; Kündig, C.; Smiatek, G.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2012-04-01

    Soil properties have a strong influence on the terrestrial water cycle, in particular by influencing soil water distribution and dynamics. This in turn affects evapotranspiration from the land to the atmosphere and thus climate conditions. While many studies have looked at the climatic influence of vegetation characteristics/land cover change, fewer investigated the importance of soil properties for climate, although soil properties can also be indirectly altered by land use changes. In this study, we investigate the influence of soil properties on the European climate using a regional climate model. First, two simulations using two different soil maps are investigated: the soil map of the world from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and the European Soil Database (ESDB) from the European Commission Joint Research Center (JRC). These simulations highlight the importance of the specified soil texture in summer, with differences of up to 2°C in mean 2-meter temperature and 20% in precipitation due to changes in the partitioning of energy at the land surface into sensible and latent heat flux. In an additional set of experiments, we modify different sets of soil physical parameters to evaluate their relative importance. Hydraulic diffusivity as well as field capacity and plant wilting point are shown to play an important role, unlike hydraulic conductivity. We highlight the importance of the vertical profile of soil moisture for evapotranspiration as it impacts soil moisture dynamics. Our study highlights the importance of soil texture and related parameters for climate simulations. Given the uncertainty associated with the geographical distribution of soil texture, efforts to improve existing databases and their integration in climate and hydrological models are needed. Tackling unresolved issues in land-surface modeling related to the high variability of soil parameters, both spatially and within a soil textural class, would benefit a large community and

  15. The high-temperature impact properties of DOP-26 iridium

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Stevens, M.F. )

    1988-10-01

    A study of the impact properties of DOP-26 iridium (which contains 0.3% tungsten and --40 pm thorium) at temperatures of 600 to 1,440/sup 0/C revealed that the predominant mode of failure for the material is intergranular separation with occasional transgranular cleavage. DOP-26 iridium also appears to have a high notch sensitivity, in contrast to most other face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals; at elevated deformation temperatures, the dislocation substructure is similar to that of other fcc metals. In addition, regular arrays of pure edge character dislocations have been found. In the test specimens used in this study, the presence of Ir Th particles was observed within iridium grains. The existence of these particles indicates that the role of thorium is not well understood, particularly in light of the fact that previous studies, which depended on grain boundary segregation, have shown thorium to improve grain boundary cohesion.

  16. Unique Properties of Lunar Impact Glass: Nanophase Metallic Fe Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Thompson, James R; Schnare, Darren W.; Park, Jae-Sung

    2007-01-01

    Lunar regolith contains important materials that can be used for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) on the Moon, thereby providing for substantial economic savings for development of a manned base. However, virtually all activities on the Moon will be affected by the deleterious effects of the adhering, abrasive, and pervasive nature of lunar dust (<20 {micro}m portion of regolith, which constitutes {approx}20 wt% of the soil). In addition, the major impact-produced glass in the lunar soil, especially agglutinitic glass (60-80 vol% of the dust), contains unique nanometer-sized metallic Fe (np-Fe{sup 0}), which may pose severe pulmonary problems for humans. The presence of the np-Fe0 imparts considerable magnetic susceptibility to the fine portion of the lunar soil, and dust mitigation techniques can be designed using these magnetic properties. The limited availability of Apollo lunar soils for ISRU research has made it necessary to produce materials that simulate this unique np-Fe{sup 0} property, for testing different dust mitigation methods using electromagnetic fields, and for toxicity studies of human respiratory and pulmonary systems, and for microwave treatment of lunar soil to produce paved roads, etc. A method for synthesizing np-Fe{sup 0} in an amorphous silica matrix is presented here. This type of specific simulant can be used as an additive to other existing lunar soil simulants.

  17. Economic impact of fuel properties on turbine powered business aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    The principal objective was to estimate the economic impact on the turbine-powered business aviation fleet of potential changes in the composition and properties of aviation fuel. Secondary objectives include estimation of the sensitivity of costs to specific fuel properties, and an assessment of the directions in which further research should be directed. The study was based on the published characteristics of typical and specific modern aircraft in three classes; heavy jet, light jet, and turboprop. Missions of these aircraft were simulated by computer methods for each aircraft for several range and payload combinations, and assumed atmospheric temperatures ranging from nominal to extremely cold. Five fuels were selected for comparison with the reference fuel, nominal Jet A. An overview of the data, the mathematic models, the data reduction and analysis procedure, and the results of the study are given. The direct operating costs of the study fuels are compared with that of the reference fuel in the 1990 time-frame, and the anticipated fleet costs and fuel break-even costs are estimated.

  18. Brief mechanical ventilation impacts airway cartilage properties in neonatal lambs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minwook; Pugarelli, Joan; Miller, Thomas L.; Wolfson, Marla R.; Dodge, George R.; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging allows in vivo assessment of tracheal kinetics and cartilage structure. To date, the impact of mechanical ventilation (MV) on extracellular matrix (ECM) in airway cartilage is unclear, but an indication of its functional and structural change may support the development of protective therapies. The objective of this study was to characterize changes in mechanical properties of the neonatal airway during MV with alterations in cartilage ECM. Trachea segments were isolated in a neonatal lamb model; ultrasound dimensions and pressure-volume relationships were measured on sham (no MV; n = 6) and MV (n = 7) airways for 4 h. Tracheal cross-sections were harvested at 4 h, tissues were fixed and stained, and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was performed. Over 4 h of MV, bulk modulus (28%) and elastic modulus (282%) increased. The MV tracheae showed higher collagen, proteoglycan content, and collagen integrity (new tissue formation); whereas no changes were seen in the controls. These data are clinically relevant in that airway properties can be correlated with MV and changes in cartilage extracellular matrix. Mechanical ventilation increases the in vivo dimensions of the trachea, and is associated with evidence of airway tissue remodeling. Injury to the neonatal airway from MV may have relevance for the development of tracheomalacia. We demonstrated active airway tissue remodeling during MV using a FT-IRIS technique which identifies changes in ECM. PMID:22170596

  19. Impacts of Aminium Sulfates on Atmospheric Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, C.; Zhang, R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence our environment significantly by interacting with the solar radiation and modifying cloud formation processes. Amines are emitted into the atmosphere from various anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Recent studies have shown that atmospheric amines can enter the particle-phase as salts like aminium sulfates by reacting with aerosol constituents including sulfuric acid and ammonium salts. However, little knowledge is available about the properties of these aminium salts and their impacts on aerosol properties. We have conducted laboratory experiments to measure the hygroscopicity, thermostability, and density of five representative alkylaminium sulfates, using an integrated aerosol analytical system including a tandem differential mobility analyzer and an aerosol particle mass analyzer. When exposed to increasing RH, alkylaminium sulfate aerosols show monotonic growth in size without a well-defined deliquescence point. Aerosols of mixed ammonium-alkylaminium sulfates have deliquescence points lower than that of ammonium sulfate. The measurements of thermostability reveal that dimethylaminium sulfate is the most stable species upon heating. Trimethyl- and triethyl-aminium sulfates volatilize similarly to ammonium sulfate, but exhibit lower volatility than monomethyl- and diethyl-aminium sulfates. The density of alkylaminium sulfates ranges from 1.2 to 1.5 g cm-3, and can be predicted from an empirical model on the basis of the mole ratio of alkyl carbons to total sulfate. Our results suggest that the properties of aerosols may be considerably altered by the incorporation of atmospheric amines through heterogeneous reactions. In particular, these processes may lead to an enhanced water uptake at low RH and considerably change the contribution of aerosols to climate forcing.

  20. Impact of soil properties on selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Kocarek, Martin; Klement, Ales; Fer, Miroslav; Golovko, Oksana; Grabic, Roman; Jaksik, Ondrej

    2014-05-01

    The presence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment has been recognized as a potential threat. Pharmaceuticals may contaminate soils and consequently surface and groundwater. Study was therefore focused on the evaluation of selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils, as one of the parameters, which are necessary to know when assessing contaminant transport in soils. The goals of this study were: (1) to select representative soils of the Czech Republic and to measure soil physical and chemical properties; (2) to measure adsorption isotherms of selected pharmaceuticals; (3) to evaluate impact of soil properties on pharmaceutical adsorptions and to propose pedotransfer rules for estimating adsorption coefficients from the measured soil properties. Batch sorption tests were performed for 6 selected pharmaceuticals (beta blockers Atenolol and Metoprolol, anticonvulsant Carbamazepin, and antibiotics Clarithromycin, Trimetoprim and Sulfamethoxazol) and 13 representative soils (soil samples from surface horizons of 11 different soil types and 2 substrates). The Freundlich equations were used to describe adsorption isotherms. The simple correlations between measured physical and chemical soil properties (soil particle density, soil texture, oxidable organic carbon content, CaCO3 content, pH_H2O, pH_KCl, exchangeable acidity, cation exchange capacity, hydrolytic acidity, basic cation saturation, sorption complex saturation, salinity), and the Freundlich adsorption coefficients were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Then multiple-linear regressions were applied to predict the Freundlich adsorption coefficients from measured soil properties. The largest adsorption was measured for Clarithromycin (average value of 227.1) and decreased as follows: Trimetoprim (22.5), Metoprolol (9.0), Atenolol (6.6), Carbamazepin (2.7), Sulfamethoxazol (1.9). Absorption coefficients for Atenolol and Metoprolol closely correlated (R=0.85), and both were also

  1. Impact of temperature on the biological properties of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the response of soil microorganisms and enzymes to the temperature of soil. The effect of the temperatures: 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C on the biological properties of soil was investigated under laboratory conditions. The study was performed using four different soils differing in their granulometric composition. It was found that 15°C was the optimal temperature for the development of microorganisms in soil. Typically, in the soil, the highest activity of dehydrogenases was observed at 10-15°C, catalase and acid phosphatase - at 15°C, alkaline phosphatase at 20°C, urease and β-glucosidase at 25°C. The highest colony development index for heterotrophic bacteria was recorded in soils incubated at 25°C, while for actinomycetes and fungi at 15°C. The incubation temperature of soil only slightly changed the ecophysiological variety of the investigated groups of microorganisms. Therefore, the observed climate changes might have a limited impact on the soil microbiological activity, because of the high ability of microorganisms to adopt. The response of soil microorganisms and enzymes was more dependent on the soil granulometric composition, organic carbon, and total nitrogen than on its temperature.

  2. Collisional properties of ice spheres at low impact velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Bridges, Frank G.

    1988-01-01

    The results of experimental studies on the impact properties of water ice are discussed. Stable temperatures of 85 K and pressures as low as 10 to the -5th Torr were achieved using a new apparatus consisting of a compound disk pendulum and a stainless steel, temperature-controlled cryostat. The coefficient of restitution as a function of velocity was obtained for ice spheres with four different radii of curvature and with a variety of surface conditions. These data can be well fitted by an exponetial law epsilon of given form for most measurements. Surface conditions can drastically alter the resulting value of epsilon, however. In particular, the presence of frost or a roughened contact surface can lower epsilon at a given velocity by 10-30 percent from that of a smooth sphere. It is shown how the presence of frost can change the velocity behavior of epsilon from an exponential to a power-law form. The applications of the results to the dynamics of Saturn's rings are discussed.

  3. Tensile and impact properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-12-31

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens from a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys [based on Fe-8Al (wt %)] had lower transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al-type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with yttrium showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150 C, compared to approximately 300 C for FA-129. In general, the microstructures were coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  4. IMPACT OF INCREASED ALUMINATE CONCENTRATIONS ON PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE MIXES

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Erich Hansen, E; Vickie Williams, V

    2007-10-12

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. The protocols developed in this variability study are ideally suited as a tool to assess the impact of proposed changes to the processing flow sheet for Liquid Waste Operations (LWO). One such proposal that is currently under consideration is to introduce a leaching step in the treatment of the High Level Waste (HLW) sludge to remove aluminum prior to vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This leachate would significantly increase the soluble aluminate concentrations as well as the free hydroxide ion concentration in the salt feed that will be processed at the Saltstone Processing Facility (SPF). Consequently, an initial study of the impact of increased aluminate concentration on the Saltstone grout properties was performed. The projected compositions and ranges of the aluminate rich salt stream (which includes the blending strategy) are not yet available and consequently, in this initial report, two separate salt stream compositions were investigated. The first stream starts with the previously projected baseline composition of the salt solution that will be fed to SPF from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The second stream is the solution that results from washing of the current Tank 51 sludge and subsequent transfer of the salt solution to Tank 11. The SWPF simulant has higher nitrate and lower free hydroxide than the Tank 11 simulant. In both of these cases, the aluminate was varied up to a maximum of 0.40 to 0.45M aluminate in order to evaluate the impact of increasing aluminate ion concentration on the grout properties. In general, the fresh grout properties of mixes made with SWPF and Tank 11 simulants were relatively insensitive to an increase in aluminate concentration in the salt solutions. However, the overall

  5. Notched bar Izod impact properties of zinc die castings

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2007-03-01

    Notched bar Izod impact testing of zinc die cast Alloy 3, Alloy 5, ZA-8, and AcuZinc 5 was performed at five temperatures between -40\\mDC and room temperature in accordance with ASTM E23 for impact testing of metallic materials. A direct comparison between ASTM D256 for impact testing of plastics and ASTM E23 was performed using continuously cast zinc specimens of Alloy 5 and ZA-8 at -40\\mDC and room temperature. There are differences in sample sizes, impact velocity, and striker geometry between the two tests. Bulk zinc tested according to ASTM E23 resulted in higher impact energies at -40\\mDC and lower impact energies at room temperature then did the same alloys when tested according to ASTM D256.

  6. Mechanical properties of glasses impacted by debris or micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, Donald L.; Wiedlocher, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical strength measurements on five glasses and one glass ceramic exposed on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) have revealed no damage exceeding experimental limits of error after exposure. The measurement technique subjected less than 5 percent of the sample surface area to stresses above 90 percent of the failure strength. Seven micrometeorite or space debris impacts occurred at locations which were not in that portion of the sample subjected to greater than 90 percent of the applied stress. In consequence of this, the impact events on the sample were not detected in mechanical strength measurements. The physical form and structure of the impact sites was carefully examined to determine the influence of those events upon stress concentration associated with the impact and the resulting mechanical strength influence. The size of the impact site insofar as it determines flaw size for fracture purposes was examined. Surface topography of the impacts reveals that six of the seven sites display impact melting. The classical melt crater structure is surrounded by a zone of fractured glass. Residual stresses arising from shock compression and from cooling of the impact fused zone cannot be included in fracture mechanics analyses based on simple flaw size analyses. Strategies for refining estimates of mechanical strength degradation by impact events are presented.

  7. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. Here we numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1-30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for a particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. The kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. These results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection strategy.

  8. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. We numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1–30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for amore » particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. Moreover, the kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. Our results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection

  9. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  10. Quantifying military training impacts using soil chemical and mechanical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Historic Preservation Act requires land-managing agencies to identify and account for their impacts on archaeological resources. Regulatory agencies that oversee compliance with historic preservation legislation frequently assume military training adversely affects archaeological resou...

  11. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2009-12-01

    This report uses statistical analysis to evaluate the impact of wind power projects on property values, and fails to uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts.

  12. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  13. Characterizing recovery of soil hydrological properties impacted by wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Alicia; Borak, Jordan; Yatheendradas, Soni; Crosgrove, Brian; Gochis, David; Dugger, Aubrey; Goodrich, David

    2016-04-01

    Accurate characterization of the post-burn recovery of soil properties over time is important for hydrological modeling applications. Yet, this recovery remains not characterized well enough for effective usage as hydrologic model simulation guidelines, for example, by organizations like the NOAA NWS National Water Center for streamflow modeling or like USDA for flash flood modeling. By calibrating a model's soil properties to soil moisture at different short periods of post-fire rain events for an example test case, we attempt to characterize the soil recovery from wildfires as a function of the burn severity, soil properties, hydrologic states like moisture and antecedent rain history post-burn, and ecosystem vegetation type and plant cover density. This work is in line with similar recent work but focuses more on improving predictability for operational hydrologic applications.

  14. Knitted Strain Sensors: Impact of Design Parameters on Sensing Properties

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Ozgur; Kennon, William Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the sensing properties exhibited by textile-based knitted strain sensors. Knitted sensors were manufactured using flat-bed knitting technology, and electro-mechanical tests were subsequently performed on the specimens using a tensile testing machine to apply strain whilst the sensor was incorporated into a Wheatstone bridge arrangement to allow electrical monitoring. The sensing fabrics were manufactured from silver-plated nylon and elastomeric yarns. The component yarns offered similar diameters, bending characteristics and surface friction, but their production parameters differed in respect of the required yarn input tension, the number of conductive courses in the sensing structure and the elastomeric yarn extension characteristics. Experimental results showed that these manufacturing controls significantly affected the sensing properties of the knitted structures such that the gauge factor values, the working range and the linearity of the sensors varied according to the knitted structure. These results confirm that production parameters play a fundamental role in determining the physical behavior and the sensing properties of knitted sensors. It is thus possible to manipulate the sensing properties of knitted sensors and the sensor response may be engineered by varying the production parameters applied to specific designs. PMID:24608010

  15. Online Data Resources in Chemical Engineering Education: Impact of the Uncertainty Concept for Thermophysical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W.; Diky, Vladimir; Muzny, Chris D.; Kazakov, Andrei F.; Chirico, Robert D.; Frenkel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We review the concept of uncertainty for thermophysical properties and its critical impact for engineering applications in the core courses of chemical engineering education. To facilitate the translation of developments to engineering education, we employ NIST Web Thermo Tables to furnish properties data with their associated expanded…

  16. Impact properties of 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Gazda, J.

    1995-04-01

    Following previous reports of excellent properties of a laboratory heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, the alloy identified as the primary vanadium-based candidate for application as fusion reactor structural components, a large industrial-scale (500-kg) heat of the alloy was fabricated successfully. The objective of this work is to determine the impact properties of the industrial-scale heat.

  17. Excellent Ballistic Impact Properties Demonstrated By New Fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a relatively new industrial fiber known by the trade name Zylon has been under commercial development by Toyobo Co., Ltd., Japan. In ballistic impact tests conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center, it was found that dry fabric braided of Zylon had greater ballistic impact capacity than comparable (braid style and weight) fabric braided of Kevlar. To study the potential use of Zylon fabric in jet engine containment systems, the fabric was tested in Glenn's Structures and Acoustics Division Ballistic Impact Facility under conditions simulating those which occur in a jet engine blade-out event. Circular ring test specimens were fabricated by wrapping five layers of braided Zylon or Kevlar fabric around an inner ring made of a thin sheet of aluminum and a 1-in.-thick layer of aluminum honeycomb. The test specimens had an inner diameter of 40 in., an axial length of 10 in., and a wall thickness of approximately 1.5in. A test specimen is shown in the photograph.

  18. Role of impactor properties on the computational simulation of particle impact damage in transparent ceramic windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Robert; Guven, Ibrahim; Zelinski, Brian J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to deploy advanced sensor and seeker systems in harsh environments is often restricted by the mechanical durability of the external electromagnetic window or dome. Mission environments may range from long flights at high speeds through rain, ice, or sand to exposure at slower speeds to debris on runways or from helicopter downwash. While significant progress has been made to characterize, understand, and model rain damage, less is known about modeling damage in windows and domes caused by impacts from solid particles such as stones, pebbles, and sand. This paper highlights recent progress made to simulate particle impact damage in zinc sulfide (ZnS) using peridynamics (PD). Early versions of the PD model of sand impact damage simulated the sand particle as a rigid disk. Results from these early models indicated that the extent of damage in relation to the size of the impacting particle was significantly larger than the actual damage observed by experimentation. In order to identify possible explanations for this discrepancy, the shape, impact orientation and mechanical properties of the impacting particle were modified to more closely resemble actual sand particle impacts, that is, the particle was made friable (deformable and breakable). The impacting geometries considered include sphere, flat face of a cylinder, cube-face, cube-edge, and cube-corner. Results confirm that modification of the impacting particle's mechanical properties, shape and impact orientation lead to better agreement between experimental observations and simulation results.

  19. Impact attenuation properties of new and used lacrosse helmets.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Thomas G; Breedlove, Katherine M; Breedlove, Evan L; Dodge, Thomas M; Nauman, Eric A

    2015-11-01

    The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) has developed impact attenuation thresholds that protective helmets worn in sport must meet to be commercially available in an attempt to prevent injury. It remains unknown how normal helmet use in athletic activity alters the force attenuation ability of lacrosse helmets. We tested 3 new and 3 randomly selected used helmets from 2 popular lacrosse models (Cascade Pro7, Cascade CPXR). All used helmets had been worn for 3 collegiate seasons prior to testing and had never been refurbished. Helmets were drop-tested using 3 prescribed impact velocities at 6 locations according to the NOCSAE lacrosse helmet standard, and we compared the Gadd Severity Index (GSI) scores between new and used helmets using a repeated measure ANOVA with location as the repeated variable and data separated by impact velocity. All 12 helmets passed the NOCSAE GSI threshold for all testing conditions; however 1 used helmet shell cracked resulting in a failed test. We found a significant main effect for helmet age at the low (F5,50=2.98, P=.02), medium (F5,50=3.71, P=.006), and high (F5,50=2.70, P=.03) velocities. We suspect that helmet use can degrade materials under some conditions, but improve performance in others due to changes in helmet composition from use. The clinical implications of the differences in GSI scores noted remain unclear. Because one helmet shell cracked resulting in a failed test, used helmets should be regularly inspected for cracks or other signs of mechanical fatigue that may weaken helmet integrity. PMID:26429768

  20. Intellectual Property in Vaccine Innovation: Impact of Recent Patent Developments.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elizabeth Siew-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the issues on patentability of microorganisms and human genes under the US laws and analyzes their influence on vaccine innovation. The analysis will focus on three aspects, namely, the naturally existing state, unmodified isolated form (i.e., mere extraction from the natural environment), and human-modified/genetically engineered structure. The outcome of the assessment suggests that the impact of the recent US patent jurisprudence on vaccines may differ significantly depending on whether the preparation of a vaccine in question involves natural or man-made DNA material. PMID:27076340

  1. Measurements of Lunar Dust Charging Properties by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Craven, Paul D.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; LeClair, Andre; Spann, James F.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Dust grains in the lunar environment are believed to be electrostatically charged predominantly by photoelectric emissions resulting from solar UV radiation on the dayside, and on the nightside by interaction with electrons in the solar wind plasma. In the high vacuum environment on the lunar surface with virtually no atmosphere, the positive and negative charge states of micron/submicron dust grains lead to some unusual physical and dynamical dust phenomena. Knowledge of the electrostatic charging properties of dust grains in the lunar environment is required for addressing their hazardous effect on the humans and mechanical systems. It is well recognized that the charging properties of individual small micron size dust grains are substantially different from the measurements on bulk materials. In this paper we present the results of measurements on charging of individual Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust grains by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-100 eV energy range. The charging/discharging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approx. 0.1 to 5 micron radii are discussed in terms of the sticking efficiencies and secondary electron yields. The secondary electron emission process is found to be a complex and effective charging/discharging mechanism for incident electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with a strong dependence on particle size. Implications of the laboratory measurements on the nature of dust grain charging in the lunar environment are discussed.

  2. Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR proteins impact erythrocyte mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Sohini; Egée, Stéphane; Bouyer, Guillaume; Perrot, Sylvie; Safeukui, Innocent; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Buffet, Pierre; Deitsch, Kirk W; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; David, Peter H; Templeton, Thomas J; Lavazec, Catherine

    2012-01-12

    Infection of erythrocytes with the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, results in dramatic changes to the host cell structure and morphology. The predicted functional localization of the STEVOR proteins at the erythrocyte surface suggests that they may be involved in parasite-induced modifications of the erythrocyte membrane during parasite development. To address the biologic function of STEVOR proteins, we subjected a panel of stevor transgenic parasites and wild-type clonal lines exhibiting different expression levels for stevor genes to functional assays exploring parasite-induced modifications of the erythrocyte membrane. Using this approach, we show that stevor expression impacts deformability of the erythrocyte membrane. This process may facilitate parasite sequestration in deep tissue vasculature. PMID:22106347

  3. Impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at < 430 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Recent attention to vanadium-base alloys has focused on the effect of low-temperature (<430 C) neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties, especially the phenomena of loss of work-hardening capability under tensile loading and loss of dynamic toughness manifested by low impact energy and high ductile-brittle-transition temperature (DBTT). This paper summarizes results of an investigation of the low-temperature impact properties of V-5Ti, V-4Cr-4Ti, and V-3Ti-Si that were irradiated in several fission reactor experiments, i.e., FFTF-MOTA, EBR-II X-530, and ATR-A1. Irradiation performance of one production-scale and one laboratory heat of V-4C-4Ti and one laboratory heat of V-3Ti-Si was the focus of the investigation. Even among the same lass of alloy, strong heat-to-heat variation was observed in low-temperature impact properties. A laboratory heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and V-3Ti-1Si exhibited good impact properties whereas a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti exhibited unacceptably high DBTT. The strong heat-to-heat variation in impact properties of V-4Cr-4Ti indicates that fabrication procedures and minor impurities play important roles in the low-temperature irradiation performance of the alloys.

  4. Impact of electron beam irradiation on fish gelatin film properties.

    PubMed

    Benbettaïeb, Nasreddine; Karbowiak, Thomas; Brachais, Claire-Hélène; Debeaufort, Frédéric

    2016-03-15

    The objective of this work was to display the effect of electron beam accelerator doses on properties of plasticized fish gelatin film. Electron spin resonance indicates free radical formation during irradiation, which might induce intermolecular cross-linking. Tensile strength for gelatin film significantly increases after irradiation (improved by 30% for 60 kGy). The vapour permeability is weakly affected by irradiation. Surface tension and its polar component increase significantly and are in accordance with the increase of wettability. So, irradiation may change the orientation of polar groups of gelatin at the film surface and crosslink the hydrophobic amino acids. No modification of the crystallinity of the film is observed. These findings suggest that if structure changes, it only occurs in the amorphous phase of the gelatin matrix. It is also observed that irradiation enhances the thermal stability of the gelatin film, by increasing the glass transition temperature and the degradation temperature. PMID:26575707

  5. Impact of pairing on thermodynamical properties of stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrello, S.; Aymard, F.; Colonna, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Raduta, Ad. R.

    2016-05-01

    Superfluidity in the crust is a key ingredient for the cooling properties of proto-neutron stars. Investigations on crust superfluidity carried out so far typically assumed that the cluster component was given by a single representative nucleus and did not consider the fact that at finite temperature a wide distribution of nuclei is expected to be populated at a given crust pressure condition. We want to assess the importance of this distribution on the calculation of the heat capacity in the inner crust, in the framework of an extended NSE model. We additionally show that it is very important to consider the temperature evolution of the proton fraction, imposed by the β-equilibrium condition, for a quantitatively reliable estimation of the heat capacity.

  6. The impact of surface properties on particle-interface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anna; Kaz, David; McGorty, Ryan; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2013-03-01

    The propensity for particles to bind to oil-water interfaces was first noted by Ramsden and Pickering over a century ago, and has been attributed to the huge reduction in surface energy when a particle breaches an oil-water interface and straddles it at its equilibrium height. Since then materials on a variety of length scales have been fabricated using particles at interfaces, from Pickering emulsions to Janus particles. In these applications, it is simply assumed that the particle sits at its hugely energetically favourable equilibrium position. However, it was recently shown that the relaxation of particles towards their equilibrium position is logarithmic in time and could take months, much longer than typical experiments. Here we investigate how surface charge and particle 'hairiness' impact the interaction between micron-sized particles and oil-water interfaces, and explore a molecular kinetic theory model to help understand these results. We use digital holographic microscopy to track micron-sized particles as they approach an oil-water interface with a resolution of 2 nm in all three dimensions at up to thousands of frames per second.

  7. Experimental studies on the impact properties of water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, F. G.; Lin, D. N. C.; Hatzes, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies on the impact of ice particles at very low velocity were continued. These measurements have applications in the dynamics of Saturn's rings. Initially data were obtained on the coefficient of restitution for ice spheres of one radius of curvature. The type of measurements were expanded to include restitution data for balls with a variety of surfaces as well as sticking forces between ice particles. Significant improvements were made to this experiment, the most important being the construction of a new apparatus. The new apparatus consists of a smaller version of the disk pendulum and a stainless steel, double-walled cryostat. The apparatus has proved to be a significant improvement over the old one. Measurements can now be made at temperatures near 90 K, comparable to the temperature of the environment of Saturn's rings, and with much greater temperature stability. It was found that a roughened contact surface or the presence of frost can cause a much larger change in the restitution measure than the geometrical effect of the radius of curvature.

  8. Biological Invasions Impact Ecosystem Properties and can Affect Climate Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Meler, M.; Matamala, R.; Cook, D. R.; Graham, S.; Fan, Z.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change models vary widely in their predictions of the effects of climate forcing, in part because of difficulties in assigning sources of uncertainties and in simulating changes in the carbon source/sink status and climate-carbon cycle feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems. We studied the impacts of vegetation and weather variations on carbon and energy fluxes at a restored tallgrass prairie in Illinois. The prairie was a strong carbon sink, despite a prolonged drought period and vegetation changes due to the presence of a non-native biennial plant. A model considering the combined effects of air temperature, precipitation, RH, incoming solar radiation, and vegetation was also developed and used to describe net ecosystem exchange for all years. The vegetation factor was represented in the model with summer albedo and/or NDVI. Results showed that the vegetation factor was more important than abiotic factors in describing changes in C and energy fluxes in ecosystems under disturbances. Changes from natives to a non-native forbs species had the strongest effect in reducing net ecosystem production and increasing sensible heat flux and albedo, which may result in positive feedbacks on warming. Here we show that non-native species invasions can alter the ecosystem sensitivity to climatic factors often construed in models.

  9. Extent of pyrolysis impacts on fast pyrolysis biochar properties.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Catherine E; Hu, Yan-Yan; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Loynachan, Thomas E; Laird, David A; Brown, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of fast pyrolysis rather than slow pyrolysis biochars as soil amendments is that they may contain high levels of bioavailable C due to short particle residence times in the reactors, which could reduce the stability of biochar C and cause nutrient immobilization in soils. To investigate this concern, three corn ( L.) stover fast pyrolysis biochars prepared using different reactor conditions were chemically and physically characterized to determine their extent of pyrolysis. These biochars were also incubated in soil to assess their impact on soil CO emissions, nutrient availability, microorganism population growth, and water retention capacity. Elemental analysis and quantitative solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed variation in O functional groups (associated primarily with carbohydrates) and aromatic C, which could be used to define extent of pyrolysis. A 24-wk incubation performed using a sandy soil amended with 0.5 wt% of corn stover biochar showed a small but significant decrease in soil CO emissions and a decrease in the bacteria:fungi ratios with extent of pyrolysis. Relative to the control soil, biochar-amended soils had small increases in CO emissions and extractable nutrients, but similar microorganism populations, extractable NO levels, and water retention capacities. Corn stover amendments, by contrast, significantly increased soil CO emissions and microbial populations, and reduced extractable NO. These results indicate that C in fast pyrolysis biochar is stable in soil environments and will not appreciably contribute to nutrient immobilization. PMID:22751053

  10. Thermal properties of rocks of the borehole Yaxcopoil-1 (Impact Crater Chicxulub, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Yu.; Romushkevich, R.; Korobkov, D.; Mayr, S.; Bayuk, I.; Burkhardt, H.; Wilhelm, H.

    2011-02-01

    The results of thermal property measurements on cores from the scientific well Yaxcopoil-1 (1511 m in depth) drilled in the Chicxulub impact structure (Mexico) are described. The thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, volumetric heat capacity, thermal anisotropy coefficient, thermal heterogeneity factor, and, in addition, porosity and density were measured on 451 dry and water-saturated cores from the depth interval of 404-1511 m. The acoustic velocities were determined on a subgroup of representative samples. Significant vertical short- and long-scale variations of physical properties related to the grade of shock-thermal metamorphism and correlations between thermal and other physical properties are established. Rocks of the post-impact and impact complexes differ significantly in heterogeneity demonstrating that the impact complex has larger micro- heterogeneity on sample scale. The pre-impact rocks differ essentially from the impact and post-impact rocks in the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, density and porosity. The thermal anisotropy of rocks of all structural-lithological complexes is very low (K = 1.02 … 1.08), which is similar to the situation in the Puchezh-Katunk and Ries impact structures. Correlations are established between the thermal conductivity and elastic wave velocities measured in laboratory. For limestone-calcarenites, the thermal conductivity (λ) can be calculated from the compressional wave velocity (Vp) using the formula λ= 0.346 Vp + 0.844, and for dolomite-anhydrites this relation has the form λ= 0.998 Vp + 1.163 [for λ in W (m K)-1 and Vp in km s-1]. These correlations are used for downscaling of the sonic velocities to the decimetre scale. The effective medium theory is applied to invert the matrix thermal conductivity and pore/crack geometry from the thermal conductivity measured on the studied samples. Representative experimental data on the thermal properties for all lithological groups encountered by the

  11. Impact of fuel properties on advanced power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sondreal, E.A.; Jones, M.L.; Hurley, J.P.; Benson, S.A.; Willson, W.G.

    1995-12-01

    Advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power systems currently in development and demonstration have the goal of increasing generating efficiency to a level approaching 50% while reducing the cost of electricity from new plants by 20% and meeting stringent standards on emissions of SO{sub x} NO{sub x} fine particulates, and air toxic metals. Achieving these benefits requires that clean hot gas be delivered to a gas turbine at a temperature approaching 1350{degrees}C, while minimizing energy losses in the gasification, combustion, heat transfer, and/or gas cleaning equipment used to generate the hot gas. Minimizing capital cost also requires that the different stages of the system be integrated as simply and compactly as possible. Second-generation technologies including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), externally fired combined cycle (EFCC), and other advanced combustion systems rely on different high-temperature combinations of heat exchange, gas filtration, and sulfur capture to meet these requirements. This paper describes the various properties of lignite and brown coals.

  12. Impacts of Salinity on Soil Hydraulic Properties and Evaporation Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, V.; Cristi Matte, F.; Suarez, F. I.; Munoz, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Saline soils are common in arid zones, where evaporation from shallow groundwater is generally the main component of the water balance. Thus, to correctly manage water resources in these zones, it is important to quantify the evaporation fluxes. Evaporation from saline soils is a complex process that couples the movement of salts, heat, liquid water and water vapor, and strongly depends on the soil water content. Precipitation/dissolution reactions can change the soil structure and alter flow paths, modifying evaporation fluxes. We utilized the HYDRUS-1D model to investigate the effects of salinity on soil hydraulic properties and evaporation fluxes. HYDRUS-1D simulates the transport of liquid water, water vapor, and heat, and can incorporate precipitation/dissolution reactions of the major ions. To run the model, we determined the water retention curve for a soil with different salinities; and we used meteorological forcing from an experimental site from the Atacama Desert. It was found that higher sodium adsorption ratios in the soil increase the soil water retention capacity. Also, it was found that evaporation fluxes increase salts concentration near the soil surface, changing the soil's water retention capacity in that zone. Finally, movement of salts causes differences in evaporation fluxes. It is thus necessary to incorporate salt precipitation/dissolution reactions and its effects on the water retention curve to correctly simulate evaporation in saline soils

  13. Understanding the impact of microcrystalline cellulose physicochemical properties on tabletability.

    PubMed

    Thoorens, Gregory; Krier, Fabrice; Rozet, Eric; Carlin, Brian; Evrard, Brigitte

    2015-07-25

    The quality by design (QbD) initiative is promoting a better understanding of excipient performance and the identification of critical material attributes (CMAs). Despite microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) being one of the most popular direct compression binders, only a few studies attempted identifying its CMAs. These studies were based either on a limited number of samples or on MCC produced on a small scale and/or in conditions that deviate from those normally encountered in production. The present work utilizes multivariate analyses first to describe a large database of MCCs produced on a commercial scale, including an overview of their physicochemical properties, and secondly to correlate the most significant material attributes with tabletability. Particle size and moisture content are often considered as the most common if not the sole CMAs with regard to MCC performance in direct compression. The evaluation of more than 80 neat MCCs and the performance of selected samples in a model formulation revealed the importance of other potential critical attributes such as tapped density. Drug product developers and excipient suppliers should work together to identify these CMAs, which may not always be captured by the certificate of analysis. PMID:25981619

  14. Terrain representation impact on periurban catchment morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Bocher, E.; Chancibault, K.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryModelling the hydrological behaviour of suburban catchments requires an estimation of environmental features, including land use and hydrographic networks. Suburban areas display a highly heterogeneous composition and encompass many anthropogenic elements that affect water flow paths, such as ditches, sewers, culverts and embankments. The geographical data available, either raster or vector data, may be of various origins and resolutions. Urban databases often offer very detailed data for sewer networks and 3D streets, yet the data covering rural zones may be coarser. This study is intended to highlight the sensitivity of geographical data as well as the data discretisation method used on the essential features of a periurban catchment, i.e. the catchment border and the drainage network. Three methods are implemented for this purpose. The first is the DEM (for digital elevation model) treatment method, which has traditionally been applied in the field of catchment hydrology. The second is based on urban database analysis and focuses on vector data, i.e. polygons and segments. The third method is a TIN (or triangular irregular network), which provides a consistent description of flow directions from an accurate representation of slope. It is assumed herein that the width function is representative of the catchment's hydrological response. The periurban Chézine catchment, located within the Nantes metropolitan area in western France, serves as the case study. The determination of both the main morphological features and the hydrological response of a suburban catchment varies significantly according to the discretization method employed, especially on upstream rural areas. Vector- and TIN-based methods allow representing the higher drainage density of urban areas, and consequently reveal the impact of these areas on the width function, since the DEM method fails. TINs seem to be more appropriate to take streets into account, because it allows a finer

  15. Influence of Martensite Volume Fraction on Impact Properties of Triple Phase (TP) Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Ahmad; Ekrami, A.

    2013-03-01

    Ferrite-bainite-martensite triple phase (TP) microstructures with different volume fractions of martensite were obtained by changing heat treatment time during austempering at 300 °C. Room temperature impact properties of TP steels with different martensite volume fractions ( V M) were determined by means of Charpy impact testing. The effects of test temperature on impact properties were also investigated for two selected microstructures containing 0 (the DP steel) and 8.5 vol.% martensite. Test results showed reduction in toughness with increasing V M in TP steels. Fracture toughness values for the DP and TP steels with 8.5 vol.% martensite were obtained from correlation between fracture toughness and the Charpy impact energy. Fractography of Charpy specimens confirmed decrease in TP steels' toughness with increasing V M by considering and comparing radial marks and crack initiation regions at the fracture surfaces of the studied steels.

  16. Impact of Graphene-Metal Interfaces on the Raman and Transport Properties of Graphene Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Allen; Hofmann, Mario; Fang, Wenjing; Kimg, Ki Kang; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomas

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is an amazing nano-material with many exciting properties and applications. However, due to its low dimensionality, the performance of this material is mainly limited by interfaces and surface properties. One of these interfaces, important for graphene field effect transistors and catalysts supported on graphene membranes, is that between the graphene and a metal layer. In this study, we experimentally examine the impact of various metals on graphene through Raman and Transmission Electron Microscopy. We find that strong graphene-metal interactions have significant impacts on the phonon structure in graphene. Furthermore, we observe changes in our Raman spectra relating to the crystallographic orientation between a metal and graphene.

  17. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of ``noxious facilities`` be identified and measured? To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  18. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of noxious facilities'' be identified and measured To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  19. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people`s perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  20. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people's perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  1. Impact of Community-Based Residential Facilities for Mentally Retarded Adults on Surrounding Property Values Using Realtor Analysis Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Dirk; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of a Comparable Market Analysis procedure used by realtors to determine the impact of group homes for the mentally retarded upon surrounding property values indicated no negative property value effects in six of eight instances. (Author/CL)

  2. Impact of reaction conditions on architecture and rheological properties of starch graft polyacrylamide polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We carried out experiments examining the impact that solvent selection and reaction conditions have on the radical initiated graft polymerization reaction of acrylamide onto starch. We have also evaluated the rheological properties the starch graftpolyacrylamide product when a gel is formed in water...

  3. A Demographic Analysis of the Impact of Property Tax Caps on Indiana School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirth, Marilyn A.; Lagoni, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana legislature passed and the governor signed into law House Enrolled Act No. 1001, now referred to as Public Law 146-2008, which capped Indiana school districts' ability to raise revenues from the local property tax without local voter approval. To phase in the impact of the law, the state provided school districts with…

  4. The effect of heat treatment on the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazni Ismail, Noor; Khatif, Nurul Aida Amir; Aliff Kamil Awang Kecik, Mohamad; Hanafiah Shaharudin, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the effect of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of medium carbon steel. The main objective of this project is to investigate the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel treated at different heat treatment processes. Three types of heat treatment were performed in this project which are annealing, quenching and tempering. During annealing process, the specimens were heated at 900°C and soaked for 1 hour in the furnace. The specimens were then quenched in a medium of water and open air, respectively. The treatment was followed by tempering processes which were done at 300°C, 450°C, and 600°C with a soaking time of 2 hours for each temperature. After the heat treatment process completed, Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test were performed. The results collected from the Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test on the samples after quenching and tempering were compared and analysed. The fractured surfaces of the samples were also been examined by using Scanning Electron Microscope. It was observed that different heat treatment processes gave different hardness value and impact property to the steel. The specimen with the highest hardness was found in samples quenched in water. Besides, the microstructure obtained after tempering provided a good combination of mechanical properties due to the process reduce brittleness by increasing ductility and toughness.

  5. Microwave scattering and emission properties of large impact craters on the surface of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, N. J. S.; Campbell, D. B.; Devries, C.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the impact craters on Venus imaged by the Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) have interior floors with oblique incidence angle backscatter cross sections 2 to 16 times (3 dB to 12 dB) greater than the average scattering properties of the planet's surface. Such high backscatter cross sections are indicative of a high degree of wavelength-scale surface roughness and/or a high intrinsic reflectivity of the material forming the crater floors. Fifty-three of these (radar) bright floored craters are associated with 93 percent of the parabolic-shaped radar-dark features found in the Magellan SAR and emissivity data, features that are thought to be among the youngest on the surface of Venus. It was suggested by Campbell et al. that either the bright floors of the parabolic feature parent craters are indicative of a young impact and the floor properties are modified with time to a lower backscatter cross section or that they result from some property of the surface or subsurface material at the point of impact or from the properties of the impacting object. As a continuation of earlier work we have examined all craters with diameters greater than 30 km (except 6 that were outside the available data) so both the backscatter cross section and emissivity of the crater floors could be estimated from the Magellan data.

  6. Effect of matrix structure on the impact properties of an alloyed ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Toktas, Guelcan . E-mail: gzeytin@balikesir.edu.tr; Tayanc, Mustafa; Toktas, Alaaddin

    2006-12-15

    An investigation was performed to examine the influence of the matrix structure on the impact properties of a 1.03% Cu, 1.25% Ni and 0.18% Mo pearlitic ductile iron. Specimens were first homogenized at 925 deg. C for 7 h and a fully ferritic structure was obtained in all ductile iron samples. Then, various heat treatments were applied to the homogenized specimens in order to obtain pearlitic/ferritic, pearlitic, tempered martensitic, lower and upper ausferritic matrix structures. The unnotched charpy impact specimens were tested at temperatures between - 80 deg. C and + 100 deg. C; the tensile properties (ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% yield strength and elongation) and the hardnesses of the matrix structures were investigated at room temperature. The microstructures and the fracture surfaces of the impact specimens tested at room temperature were also investigated by optical and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the best impact properties were obtained for the ferritic matrix structure that had the lowest hardness, yield and tensile strength. Ductile iron with a lower ausferritic matrix had the best combination of ultimate tensile strength, percent elongation and impact energies of all structures.

  7. Impact property enhancement of poly (lactic acid) with different flexible copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likittanaprasong, N.; Seadan, M.; Suttiruengwong, S.

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to improve the impact property of Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) by blending with different copolymers. Six flexible copolymers, namely, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) powder, Biomax, polybutyrate adipate co-terephthalate (PBAT), polyether block amide (PEBAX), ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and ethylene acrylic elastomer (EAE), with loading less than 20wt% were used and compared. The rheological, mechanical and morphological properties of samples were investigated by melt flow index, tensile testing, impact testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. It was found that PLA added 20wt% EAE showed the highest impact strength (59.5 kJ/m2), which was 22 times higher than neat PLA. The elongation at break was also increased by 12 folds compared to neat PLA. The SEM images showed good interface and distribution for PLA containing 20wt% EAE, 15 phr Biomax and 20 wt% PEBAX.

  8. A Novel Ni-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Ultrahigh Impact, Fatigue, and Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Bing-Hao

    2014-08-01

    The impact toughness of powder metallurgy (PM) steel is typically inferior, and it is further impaired when the microstructure is strengthened. To formulate a versatile PM steel with superior impact, fatigue, and tensile properties, the influences of various microstructures, including ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and Ni-rich areas, were identified. The correlations between impact toughness with other mechanical properties were also studied. The results demonstrated that ferrite provides more resistance to impact loading than Ni-rich martensite, followed by bainite and pearlite. However, Ni-rich martensite presents the highest transverse rupture strength (TRS), fatigue strength, tensile strength, and hardness, followed by bainite, pearlite, and ferrite. With 74 pct Ni-rich martensite and 14 pct bainite, Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel achieves the optimal combination of impact energy (39 J), TRS (2170 MPa), bending fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles (770 MPa), tensile strength (1323 MPa), and apparent hardness (38 HRC). The impact energy of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel is twice as high as those of the ordinary high-strength PM steels. These findings demonstrate that a high-strength PM steel with high-toughness can be produced by optimized alloy design and microstructure.

  9. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: A Preliminary Assessment Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.; Frawley, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    Impact craters on Mars have been used to provide fundamental insights into the properties of the martian crust, the role of volatiles, the relative age of the surface, and on the physics of impact cratering in the Solar System. Before the three-dimensional information provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument which is currently operating in Mars orbit aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), impact features were characterized morphologically using orbital images from Mariner 9 and Viking. Fresh-appearing craters were identified and measurements of their geometric properties were derived from various image-based methods. MOLA measurements can now provide a global sample of topographic cross-sections of martian impact features as small as approx. 2 km in diameter, to basin-scale features. We have previously examined MOLA cross-sections of Northern Hemisphere and North Polar Region impact features, but were unable to consider the global characteristics of these ubiquitous landforms. Here we present our preliminary assessment of the geometric properties of a globally-distributed sample of martian impact craters, most of which were sampled during the initial stages of the MGS mapping mission (i.e., the first 600 orbits). Our aim is to develop a framework for reconsidering theories concerning impact cratering in the martian environment. This first global analysis is focused upon topographically-fresh impact craters, defined here on the basis of MOLA topographic profiles that cross the central cavities of craters that can be observed in Viking-based MDIM global image mosaics. We have considered crater depths, rim heights, ejecta topologies, cross-sectional "shapes", and simple physical models for ejecta emplacement. To date (May, 1999), we have measured the geometric properties of over 1300 impact craters in the 2 to 350 km diameter size interval. A large fraction of these measured craters were sampled with cavity-center cross-sections during the first

  10. 46 CFR 54.05-20 - Impact test properties for service of 0 °F and below.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Impact test properties for service of 0 °F and below. 54.05-20 Section 54.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-20 Impact test properties for service of 0 °F and...

  11. Microstructure and Charpy impact properties of 12 14Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of 12-14 Cr ODS ferritic steels fabricated by mechanical alloying of pure Fe, Cr, W, Ti and Y 2O 3 powders in a Retsch ball mill in argon atmosphere, followed by hot isostatic pressing at 1100 °C under 200 MPa for 4 h and heat treatment at 850 °C for 1 h. Weak Charpy impact properties were obtained in the case of both types of as-hipped materials. In the case of 14Cr materials, the weak Charpy properties appeared related to a bimodal grain size distribution and a heterogeneous dislocation density between the coarse and fine grains. No changes in microstructure were evidenced after heat treatment at 850 °C. Significant improvement in the transition temperature and upper shelf energy of 12Cr materials was obtained by heat treatment at 850 °C for 1 h, which was attributed to the formation of smaller grains, homogenous in size and containing fewer dislocations, with respect to the as-hipped microstructure. This modified microstructure results in a good compromise between strength and Charpy impact properties.

  12. Impact properties of rubber-modified epoxy resin-graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Nir, Z.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the impact resistance of graphite-fiber composites, a commercial and an experimental epoxy resin were modified with liquid reactive rubber and a brominated epoxy resin. The commercial epoxy was a tetrafunctional resin, and the experimental epoxy was a trifunctional resin. The reactive rubber was a carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer. The rubber content was varied from 0 to 25 percent (wt). The brominated epoxy resin was used at Br levels of 4, 19, and 35 percent of the resin. Composites were prepared with woven graphite cloth reinforcement. The composites were evaluated by using flexural strength in the dry state and an elevated temperature after saturation with water. The impact properties were determined by measuring shear strength after falling-ball impact and instrumented impact. The rubber-modified, trifunctional resin exhibited better properties, when tested in hot-wet conditions in a heated oven at 366 K (after boiling the material for 2 h in demineralized water), than the tetrafunctional resin. Improved impact resistance was observed with the addition of the reactive rubber to the epoxy resin. Further improvement was observed with the addition of the brominated epoxy resin.

  13. Physical properties of the drill core from the El'gygytgyn impact structure, NE Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharaj, Dharmindar; Elbra, Tiiu; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    2013-07-01

    The El'gygytgyn impact structure in northeast Russia was drilled in 2008/2009. The 3.5 Ma old structure has a rim-to-rim diameter of 18 km and is the only known impact structure that has been formed on a siliceous volcanic target. The petrophysical, rock- and paleomagnetic properties, including attempted reorientation of samples, along the El'gygytgyn drill core were analyzed. Physical properties, such as bulk density, porosity, seismic velocity, and electrical conductivity, clearly showed the propagation of shock and the associated fracturing. The grain density, however, was probably influenced by the postimpact hydrothermal activity and/or the distribution of impact melt. The highest values of electrical conductivity coincided with higher concentrations of particular metals as indicated by Raschke et al. (2012a). The rock- and paleomagnetic investigations showed iron-titanium oxides with varying oxidation/reduction states as the main magnetic fraction in the core samples and indicated them as carriers for remanent magnetization. With few exceptions, most samples showed normal polarity of characteristic remanent magnetization and confirmed that the impact occurred after the Gauss/Gilbert (approximately 3.596 Ma) reversal. Shallower inclinations than that expected for a 3.5 Ma dipole field were probably due to impact-related block movements and/or compaction.

  14. Heat-treatment effect on impact properties of reduced-activation steels*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Maziasz, P. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1991-03-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the impact behavior of eight experimental heats of reduced-activation ferritic steels was investigated. Steels with 2 {1}/{4}, 5, 9, and 12 wt% Cr and containing tungsten, vanadium, and tantalum were examined. Impact properties of steels with 2 {1}/{4} wt% Cr depended on microstructure, which was affected by cooling rate after austenitization. By heat-treating the 2 {1}/{4} wt% Cr steels to change the microstructure from a bainitic structure containing ferrite to one without ferrite, the ductile-brittle transition temperatures were reduced substantially. The cooling rate had essentially no effect on the high-chromium martensitic steels.

  15. Impact of environmental temperature on optical power properties of intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Walker, Bennett N; James, Robert H; Calogero, Don; Ilev, Ilko K

    2014-01-20

    Optical power properties of lenses and materials in general can be influenced by thermal changes of the material and surrounding medium. In the case of an intraocular lens (IOL) implant, the spherical power (SP), cylinder power, (CP), astigmatism, and spherical aberration are the critical fundamental properties that can significantly impact its efficacy. Directly evaluating how changes in temperature can affect these optical properties may show the importance of considering temperature when evaluating IOL optical characteristics. In this paper, we present a quantitative study on evaluating the impact of environmental temperature changes on IOL fundamental optical properties by testing IOL samples with different materials (e.g., hydrophobic and hydrophilic) and designs (e.g., monofocal and toric) to better encompass types of IOLs in conventional use today. The results from this study demonstrate that significant changes are observed as temperatures are changed from room temperature (20°C) to slightly above body temperature (40°C). Findings indicate that evaluating optical properties at arbitrary temperatures could significantly affect the characterization of IOLs that are already near the tolerance thresholds. PMID:24514132

  16. Impact of point defects on the electronic and transport properties of silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, K.; Houssa, M.; van den Broek, B.; Pourtois, G.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Stesmans, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of various point defects on the structural, electronic and ballistic transport properties of armchair silicene nanoribbons, using the density functional theory and the non equilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of a Stone-Wales defect, an interior/edge vacancy and an edge dangling bond is examined. Our results show that structural imperfections can alter the electronic structure (energy band structure and density of states) of the nanoribbons and can either increase or decrease the ballistic current. The dependence of the transport properties on the position of the defects (sublattice A or B) and on their distance from the contact is also investigated.

  17. Tensile and Impact Properties of Thermoplastic Natural Rubber (TPNR) Filled with Carbon Nanotubes (MWNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarawneh, Mou'ad. A.; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.; Yahya, S. Y.; Rasid, Rozaidi; Hock, Yew Chin; Halim, Hazwani Binti

    2010-07-01

    This paper discusses the effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) on the tensile and impact properties of thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) nanocomposite. The nanocomposite was prepared using melt blending method. MWNT were added to improve the mechanical properties of MWNTs/TPNR composites at different compositions which is 1, 3, 5, and 7 wt.%. The result of tensile test showed that tensile strength and Young's modulus increase in the presence of nanotubes and maximum value are obtained with 3 wt.% of MWNTs. On other hand, higher MWNTs concentration has caused the formation of aggregates. The elongation at break considerably decreased with increasing the percentage of MWNTs. The maximum impact strength is recorded with 5 wt.% of MWNTs. SEM micrograph has confirmed the homogenous dispersion of MWNTs in the TPNR matrix and promoted strong interfacial adhesion between MWNTs and the matrix which is improved mechanical significantly.

  18. Tensile and impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at <430°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. M.; Smith, D. L.

    1998-10-01

    Tensile and impact properties were investigated at <430°C on V-Cr-Ti, V-Ti-Si, and V-Ti alloys after irradiation to ≈2-46 dpa at 205-430°C in lithium or helium in the fast flux test facility (FFTF), high flux isotope reactor (HFIR), experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II), and advanced test reactor (ATR). A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti exhibited high ductile-brittle transition temperature and minimal uniform elongation as a result of irradiation-induced loss of work-hardening capability. Work-hardening capabilities of 30- and 100-kg heats of V-4Cr-4Ti varied significantly with irradiation conditions, although the 30-kg heat exhibited excellent impact properties after irradiation at ≈390-430°C. The origin of the significant variations in the work-hardening capability of V-4Cr-4Ti is not understood, although fabrication variables, annealing history, and contamination from the irradiation environment are believed to play important roles. A 15-kg heat of V-3Ti-1Si exhibited good work-hardening capability and excellent impact properties after irradiation at ≈390-430°C. Helium atoms, either charged dynamically or produced via transmutation of boron in the alloys, promote work-hardening capability in V-4Cr-4Ti and V-3Ti-1Si.

  19. Tensile impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at <430{degree}C.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.

    1998-05-18

    Tensile and impact properties were investigated at <430 C on V-Cr-Ti, V-Ti-Si, and V-Ti alloys after irradiation to {approx}2-46 dpa at 205-430 C in lithium or helium in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), and Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti exhibited high ductile-brittle transition temperature and minimal uniform elongation as a result of irradiation-induced loss of work-hardening capability. Work-hardening capabilities of 30- and 100-kg heats of V-4Cr-4Ti varied significantly with irradiation conditions, although the 30-kg heat exhibited excellent impact properties after irradiation at {approx}390-430 C. The origin of the significant variations in the work-hardening capability of V-4Cr-4Ti is not understood, although fabrication variables, annealing history, and contamination from the irradiation environment are believed to play important roles. A 15-kg heat of V-3Ti-1Si exhibited good work-hardening capability and excellent impact properties after irradiation at {approx}390-430 C. Helium atoms, either charged dynamically or produced via transmutation of boron in the alloys, promote work-hardening capability in V-4Cr-4Ti and V-3Ti-1Si.

  20. Influence of Surface Properties and Impact Conditions on Adhesion of Insect Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Smith, Joseph G.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Doss, Jereme R.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Penner, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Insect residues can cause premature transition to turbulent flow on laminar flow airfoils. Engineered surfaces that mitigate the adhesion of insect residues provide, therefore, a route to more efficient aerodynamics and reduced fuel burn rates. Areal coverage and heights of residues depend not only on surface properties, but also on impact conditions. We report high speed photography of fruit fly impacts at different angles of inclination on a rigid aluminum surface, optical microscopy and profilometry, and contact angle goniometry to support the design of engineered surfaces. For the polyurethane and epoxy coatings studied, some of which exhibited superhydrophobicity, it was determined that impact angle and surface compositions play critical roles in the efficacy of these surfaces to reduce insect residue adhesion.

  1. Impact of annealing on electrical properties of Cu2ZnSnSe4 absorber layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Thomas Paul; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Schwarz, Torsten; Spies, Maria; Cojocura-Mirédin, Oana; Choi, P.-P.; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Reported growth processes for kesterite absorber layers generally rely on a sequential process including a final high temperature annealing step. However, the impact and details for this annealing process vary among literature reports and little is known on its impact on electrical properties of the absorber. We used kesterite absorber layers prepared by a high temperature co-evaporation process to explicitly study the impact of two different annealing processes. From electrical characterization it is found that the annealing process incorporates a detrimental deep defect distribution. On the other hand, the doping density could be reduced leading to a better collection and a higher short circuit current density. The activation energy of the doping acceptor was studied with admittance spectroscopy and showed Meyer-Neldel behaviour. This indicates that the entropy significantly contributes to the activation energy.

  2. Impact of the post fire management in some soil chemical properties. First results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francos, Marcos; Pereira, Paulo; Alcañiz, Meritxell; Úbeda, Xavi

    2016-04-01

    Post-fire management after severe wildfires has impact on soil properties. In Mediterranean environments management of fire affected areas is a common practice. This intervention may change soil chemical properties of the soil such as major cations. The aim of this work is to study the impact of different types of forest management in soil extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium after a severe wildfire. The study area is located in Ódena (Catalonia, Spain). The wildfire occurred at July 27th of 2015 and burned 1235 ha. After the fire an experimental plot was designed 9 plots with 2x2 meters (4 square meters). The different managements were: a) clear-cuted area and wood removed, b) no treatment); and c) clear-cutted. The results of the first sampling showed significant differences among all treatments in extractable calcium, sodium and potassium. The amount of these extractable elements was high in clear-cutted treatment in comparison to the others. No differences were identified in extractable magnesium. Overall, in the immediate period after the fire, burned area management, changed the studied soil properties. We are currently studying the evolution of this soil properties in these plots with the time

  3. Microfluidic Assay To Study the Combinatorial Impact of Substrate Properties on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Menon, Nishanth V; Chuah, Yon Jin; Phey, Samantha; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yingnan; Chan, Vincent; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-08-12

    As an alternative to complex and costly in vivo models, microfluidic in vitro models are being widely used to study various physiological phenomena. It is of particular interest to study cell migration in a controlled microenvironment because of its vital role in a large number of physiological processes, such as wound healing, disease progression, and tissue regeneration. Cell migration has been shown to be affected by variations in the biochemical and physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). To study the combinatorial impact of the ECM physical properties on cell migration, we have developed a microfluidic assay to induce migration of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with varying combinatorial properties (hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness). The results show that although the initial cell adhesion and viability appear similar on all PDMS samples, the cell spreading and migration are enhanced on PDMS samples exhibiting intermediate levels of hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness. This study suggests that there is a particular range of substrate properties for optimal cell spreading and migration. The influence of substrate properties on hBMSC migration can help understand the physical cues that affect cell migration, which may facilitate the development of optimized engineered scaffolds with desired properties for tissue regeneration applications. PMID:26186177

  4. Ballistic Impact Properties of Zr-Based Amorphous Alloy Composites Reinforced with Woven Continuous Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyeong Su; Son, Chang-Young; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Song, Young Buem; Lee, Sunghak

    2012-03-01

    This study aims at investigating ballistic impact properties of Zr-based amorphous alloy (LM1 alloy) matrix composites reinforced with woven stainless steel or glass continuous fibers. The fiber-reinforced composites with excellent fiber/matrix interfaces were fabricated without pores and misinfiltration by liquid pressing process, and contained 35 to 41 vol pct of woven continuous fibers homogeneously distributed in the amorphous matrix. The woven-STS-continuous-fiber-reinforced composite consisted of the LM1 alloy layer of 1.0 mm in thickness in the upper region and the fiber-reinforced composite layer in the lower region. The hard LM1 alloy layer absorbed the ballistic impact energy by forming many cracks, and the fiber-reinforced composite layer interrupted the crack propagation and blocked the impact and traveling of the projectile, thereby resulting in the improvement of ballistic performance by about 20 pct over the LM1 alloy. According to the ballistic impact test data of the woven-glass-continuous-fiber-reinforced composite, glass fibers were preferentially fragmented to form a number of cracks, and the amorphous matrix accelerated the fragmentation of glass fibers and the initiation of cracks. Because of the absorption process of ballistic impact energy by forming very large amounts of cracks, fragments, and debris, the glass-fiber-reinforced composite showed better ballistic performance than the LM1 alloy.

  5. Mechanical properties of impact-assembled nanoparticle composites: Fabrication, measurements and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rajesh

    Nanomaterials have assumed substantial importance due to their exotic chemical, mechanical, optical and electro-magnetic properties. Our research focuses on producing nanoparticulate building blocks for producing and evaluating superhard films and micropatterns. Nanoparticles of Si, Ti, their carbides and nitrides are generated by injecting gas-phase precursors into a thermal plasma jet and expanding the flow through a convergent boron nitride nozzle into a low-pressure chamber. The particles subsequently deposit onto temperature-controlled silicon or molybdenum substrates via hypersonic impaction. High impact velocities of about ˜1650 m/s (calculated for a 20 nm SiC particle) are the primary mechanism by which nanoparticles are consolidated into films. We have developed an aerodynamically focused nanoparticle beam deposition method for micromolding of nanoparticulate MEMS components. Evaluation of basic mechanical properties of such materials is of significant interest as they have been proposed to be extremely hard, wear- and friction-resistant. For engineering purposes, the Young's modulus of a material is one of the most important properties tied to design of components and coatings. We have developed a Nanoindenter-aided load-deflection measurement system for evaluating the Young's modulus of our nanoparticle composites. The Nanoindenter deflects clamped-clamped beams machined from our deposits using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The nanoparticle beams behave elastically for small deformations. Porosity variation in our deposits was linked to variation of measured Young's moduli for the FIB-milled beams. Finally we have used discrete element method models (using PFC3D, Itasca Consulting Group) with support from molecular dynamics simulations to create a multiscale framework to mimic the measured Young's modulus behavior of our nanoparticulate deposits. We have found that higher impact velocity of the particles leads to larger contact radii between impacting

  6. Dynamical properties measurements for asteroid, comet and meteorite material applicable to impact modeling and mitigation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Boslough, M.B.; Gray, G.T. III; Remo, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We describe methods for measuring dynamical properties for two material categories of interest in understanding large-scale extraterrestrial impacts: iron-nickel and underdense materials (e.g. snow). Particular material properties measured by the present methods include Hugoniot release paths and constitutive properties (stress vs. strain). The iron-nickel materials lend themselves well to conventional shock and quasi-static experiments. As examples, a suite of experiments is described including six impact tests (wave profile compression/release) over the stress range 2--20 GPa, metallography, quasi-static and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) mechanical testing, and ultrasonic mapping and sound velocity measurements. Temperature sensitivity of the dynamic behavior was measured at high and low strain rates. Among the iron-nickel materials tested, an octahedrite was found to have behavior close to that of Armco iron under shock and quasi-static conditions, while an ataxite exhibited a significantly larger quasi-static yield strength than did the octahedrite or a hexahedrite. The underdense materials pose three primary experimental difficulties. First, the samples are friable; they can melt or sublimate during storage, preparation and testing. Second, they are brittle and crushable; they cannot withstand such treatment as traditional machining or launch in a gun system. Third, with increasing porosity the calculated Hugoniot density becomes rapidly more sensitive to errors in wave time-of-arrival measurements. Carefully chosen simulants eliminate preservation (friability) difficulties, but the other difficulties remain. A family of 36 impact tests was conducted on snow and snow simulants at Sandia, yielding reliable Hugoniot and reshock states, but limited release property information. Other methods for characterizing these materials are discussed.

  7. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L; Ilies, Marc A

    2014-02-01

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact on the plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes, and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, and the internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that the blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. The transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to the transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of colipids, their nature, and amount present in lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically to obtain efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24377350

  8. Modulation of pyridinium cationic lipid-DNA complex properties by pyridinium gemini surfactants and its impact on lipoplex transfection properties

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Lees, Julia; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Brailoiu, Eugen; Madesh, Muniswamy; Wunder, Stephanie L.; Ilies, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The study presents the effects of blending a cationic gemini surfactant into cationic lipid bilayers and its impact towards plasmid DNA compaction and delivery process. Using nanoDSC, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility measurements, together with transfection (2D- and 3D-) and viability assays, we identified the main physicochemical parameters of the lipid bilayers, liposomes and lipoplexes that are affected by the gemini surfactant addition. We also correlated the cationic bilayer composition with the dynamics of the DNA compaction process, and with transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity and internalization mechanism of the resultant nucleic acid complexes. We found that blending of gemini surfactant into the cationic bilayers fluidized the supramolecular assemblies, reduced the amount of positive charge required to fully compact the plasmid DNA and, in certain cases, changed the internalization mechanism of the lipoplexes. Transfection efficiency of select ternary lipoplexes derived from cationic gemini surfactants and lipids was several times superior to transfection efficiency of corresponding binary lipoplexes, also surpassing standard transfection systems. The overall impact of gemini surfactants into the formation and dynamic of cationic bilayers was found to depend heavily on the presence of co-lipids, their nature and amount present into lipoplexes. The study confirmed the possibility of combining the specific properties of pyridinium gemini surfactants and cationic lipids synergistically for obtaining efficient synthetic transfection systems with negligible cytotoxicity useful for therapeutic gene delivery. PMID:24377350

  9. Impact of soil water property parameterization on atmospheric boundary layer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Ek, Michael; Mahrt, Larry

    1996-03-01

    Both the form of functional relationships applied for soil water properties and the natural field-scale variability of such properties can significantly impact simulation of the soil-plant-atmosphere system on a diurnal timescale. Various input parameters for soil water properties including effective saturation, residual water content, anerobiosis point, field capacity, and permanent wilting point are incorporated into functions describing soil water retention, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity, sorptivity, and the plant sink function. The perception of the meaning of these values and their variation within a natural environment often differs from the perspective of the soil physicist, plant physiologist, and atmospheric scientist. This article investigates the sensitivity of energy balance and boundary layer simulation to different soil water property functions using the Oregon State University coupled atmosphere-plant-soil (CAPS) simulation model under bare soil conditions. The soil parameterizations tested in the CAPS model include those of Clapp and Hornberger [1978], van Genuchten [1980], and Cosby et al. [1984] using initial atmospheric conditions from June 16, 1986 in Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment-Modélisation du Bilan Hydrique (HAPEX-MOBILHY). For the bare soil case these results demonstrate unexpected model sensitivity to soil water property parameterization in partitioning all components of the diurnal energy balance and corresponding boundary layer development.

  10. IMPACT OF ALUMINATE IONS ON THE PROPERTIES OF SALTSTONE GROUT MIXES

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Erich Hansen, E; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-02-21

    It is important to identify and control the operational and compositional variables that impact the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixes. The grout that is produced at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) is referred to as Saltstone and is a waste form that immobilizes low concentrations of radionuclides as well as certain toxic metals. The Saltstone will be disposed of in vaults at Savannah River Site (SRS). An effort referred to as the Saltstone Variability Study has been initiated to achieve this goal. The protocols developed in this variability study are also ideally suited as a tool to assess the impact of proposed changes to the processing flow sheet for Liquid Waste Operations at SRS. One such proposal that is currently under consideration is to introduce a leaching step in the treatment of the High Level Waste (HLW) sludge to remove aluminum prior to vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This leachate would significantly increase the soluble aluminate concentration in the salt feed that will be processed at the SPF. Consequently, an initial study of the impact of increased aluminate concentration on the Saltstone grout properties was performed. Prior work by Lukens (1) showed that aluminate in the salt solutions increases the amount of heat generation.

  11. Instrumented impact properties of zircaloy-oxygen and zircaloy-hydrogen alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garde, A.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1980-04-01

    Instrumented-impact tests were performed on subsize Charpy speciments of Zircaloy-2 and -4 with up to approx. 1.3 wt % oxygen and approx. 2500 wt ppM hydrogen at temperatures between 373 and 823/sup 0/K. Self-consistent criteria for the ductile-to-brittle transition, based upon a total absorbed energy of approx. 1.3 x 10/sup 4/ J/m/sup 2/, a dynamic fracture toughness of approx. 10 MPa.m/sup 1/2/, and a ductility index of approx. 0, were established relative to the temperature and oxygen concentration of the transformed BETA-phase material. The effect of hydrogen concentration and hydride morphology, produced by cooling Zircaloy-2 specimens through the temperature range of the BETA ..-->.. ..cap alpha..' = hydride phase transformation at approx. 0.3 and 3 K/s, on the impact properties was determined at temperatures between 373 and 673 K. On an atom fraction basis, oxygen has a greater effect than hydrogen on the impact properties of Zircaloy at temperatures between approx. 400 and 600 K. 34 figures.

  12. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  13. Impact of drying and thiel embalming on mechanical properties of achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Matthias André; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Lepeleere, Bram; Opsomer, Gert-Jan; Van Hoof, Tom; Victor, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical research and orthopedic training is regularly carried out on human cadavers. Given the post-mortem decay, these cadavers were usually frozen or embalmed. The embalming method according to Dr. Thiel was often praised for the preservation of natural texture. The main aim of this article was to quantitatively analyze the impact of this embalming technique on the biomechanical properties. To that extent, Achilles tendons (calcaneal tendons) of seven cadavers have been tested. For each cadaver, a first tendon was tested following a fresh-frozen conservation, the other following the Thiel embalming process. The results indicated a significant difference in Young's modulus between both groups (P values = 0.046). The secondary aim of this article was to analyze the impact of exposure to room conditions and associated dehydration on the biomechanical properties of cadaver tissue. Therefore, each tendon was tested before and after 2 hr of exposure to room conditions. The resulting dehydration caused a significant increase of the Young's modulus for the thawed fresh-frozen tendons. The properties of the Thiel embalmed tendons were not significantly altered. In conclusion, this research promoted the use of fresh-frozen specimens for biomechanical testing. Effort should, however, be made to minimize dehydration of the tested specimens. PMID:26378610

  14. Impact of diacylglycerol and monoacylglycerol on the physical and chemical properties of stripped soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingcan; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined the effect of diacylglycerol (DAG) and monoacylglycerol (MAG) on the oxidative stability of stripped soybean oil (SSO) and on the antioxidative effectiveness of α-tocopherol in SSO. We also examined the influence of DAG and MAG on the physical properties of SSO. DAG (0-2.5wt%) had little effect on the chemical stability of SSO and on the antioxidative activity of 40μM α-tocopherol in SSO (55°C). MAG (0-2.5wt%) had no remarkable impact on the chemical stability of SSO. The addition of MAG (0.5wt%) suppressed the effectiveness of α-tocopherol (40μM) in SSO. The addition of DAG did not cause an appreciable change in the interfacial tension (IFT) of SSO, indicating that it was not strongly surface active. MAG significantly decreased the interfacial tension of SSO, due to its strong surface active properties. Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) analysis showed that DAG did not alter the structured organisation of SSO, which remained in an amorphous form, whereas MAG led to strong scattering, indicating the formation of crystals. The physical properties of DAG and MAG in the SSO may be related to the chemical stability of SSO and the effectiveness of antioxidants incorporated. These results can be used to better understand the physicochemical mechanisms by which minor components impact oxidation of bulk oils. PMID:24001854

  15. Impact properties of irradiated HT9 from the fuel duct of FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Daniel Lewis, W.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports Charpy impact test data for the ACO-3 duct material (HT9) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and its archive material. Irradiation doses for the specimens were in the range of 3-148 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 378-504 °C. The impact tests were performed for the small V-notched Charpy specimens with dimensions of 3 × 4 × 27 mm at an impact speed of 3.2 m/s in a 25 J capacity machine. Irradiation lowered the upper-shelf energy (USE) and increased the transition temperatures significantly. The shift of ductile-brittle transition temperatures (ΔDBTT) was greater after relatively low temperature irradiation. The USE values were in the range of 5.5-6.7 J before irradiation and decreased to the range of 2-5 J after irradiation. Lower USEs were measured for lower irradiation temperatures and specimens with T-L orientation. The dose dependences of transition temperature and USE were not significant because of the radiation effect on impact behavior nearly saturated at the lowest dose of about 3 dpa. A comparison showed that the lateral expansion of specimens showed a linear correlation with absorbed impact energy, but with large scatter in the results. Size effect was also discussed to clarify the differences in the impact property data from subsize and standard specimens as well as to provide a basis for comparison of data from different specimens. The USE and ΔDBTT data from different studies were compared.

  16. Impact properties of irradiated HT9 from the fuel duct of FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Lewis, W. Daniel; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports Charpy impact test data for the ACO-3 duct material (HT9) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and its archive material. Irradiation doses for the specimens were in the range of 3– 148 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 378–504 *C. The impact tests were performed for the small V-notched Charpy specimens with dimensions of 3 * 4 * 27 mm at an impact speed of 3.2 m/s in a 25 J capacity machine. Irradiation lowered the upper-shelf energy (USE) and increased the transition temperatures significantly. The shift of ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DDBTT) was greater after relatively low temperature irradiation. The USE values were in the range of 5.5–6.7 J before irradiation and decreased to the range of 2–5 J after irradiation. Lower USEs were measured for lower irradiation temperatures and specimens with T-L orientation. The dose dependences of transition temperature and USE were not significant because of the radiation effect on impact behavior nearly saturated at the lowest dose of about 3 dpa. A comparison showed that the lateral expansion of specimens showed a linear correlation with absorbed impact energy, but with large scatter in the results. Size effect was also discussed to clarify the differences in the impact property data from subsize and standard specimens as well as to provide a basis for comparison of data from different specimens. The USE and DDBTT data from different studies were compared.

  17. Effects of post-weld heat treatment conditions on hardness, microstructures and impact properties of vanadium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaka, T.; Muroga, T.; Grossbeck, M. L.; Yamamoto, T.

    2002-12-01

    Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) weld joints were made from V-4Cr-4Ti alloys in which oxygen levels at the weld metal ranged from 73 to 355 wppm. Both the weld metal and the base metal of the joints showed hardening after the welding. In this study, the influence of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on hardness, microstructure and impact properties were investigated. Change in hardness due to annealing at 673 and 973-1273 K was shown to be caused by release of contaminant hydrogen and precipitate evolution, respectively. Results indicated that the precipitation hardening increased with oxygen level. Charpy impact properties did not change significantly due to annealing at 673 K, while fine precipitation at 1073 K degraded the impact property. No improvement of impact property by PWHT is expected at low oxygen level in the weld metal. Precipitation behavior during aging and irradiation may determine the performance of V-4Cr-4Ti weld joints.

  18. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: An Assessment from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, J. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.

    2000-01-01

    Global geometric characteristics of topographically fresh impact craters have been assessed, for the first time, from gridded MOLA topography. Global trends of properties such as depth/diameter differ from previous estimates. Regional differences are observed.

  19. Electrokinetic soil remediation: Impact of aqueous phase properties on soil surface charge and electroosmotic efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, L.M.; Zang, G.M.

    1995-10-01

    The electrokinetic remediation of soils is described. The effect of pore fluid properties on the surface charge of clays was examined. Zeta potential results indicate that the electro-osmotic efficiency (flow/voltage ratio) in bentonite should be relatively insensitive to pH and ionic strength variations. The zeta potential of kaolinite, however, was found to be quite sensitive to pH. The electro-osmotic efficiency for kaolinite was found to be equally sensitive to pH. Zeta potential results further indicate that the electro-osmotic efficiency as well as the direction of electroosmosis in kaolinite will be impacted dramatically by the presence of metal cations. These results suggest that zeta potential measurements could be used to study the impact on electro osmotic efficiency of initial site conditions as well as conditions expected during an electrokinetic remediation process.

  20. Comparison of quasistatic to impact mechanical properties of multiwall carbon nanotube/polycarbonate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Brühwiler, Paul A.; Barbezat, Michel; Necola, Adly; Kohls, Doug J.; Bunk, Oliver; Schaefer, Dale W.; Pötschke, Petra

    2010-10-22

    We report the quasistatic tensile and impact penetration properties (falling dart test) of injection-molded polycarbonate samples, as a function of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) concentration (0.0-2.5%). The MWNT were incorporated by dilution of a commercial MWNT/polycarbonate masterbatch. The stiffness and quasistatic yield strength of the composites increased approximately linearly with MWNT concentration in all measurements. The energy absorbed in fracture was, however, a negative function of the MWNT concentration, and exhibited different dependencies in quasistatic and impact tests. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) showed that the dispersion of the MWNT was similar at all concentrations. The negative effects on energy absorption are attributed to agglomerates remaining in the samples, which were observed in optical microscopy and SAXS. Overall, there was a good correspondence between static and dynamic energy absorption.

  1. [Investigation of the chain structure and thermal property of xylene solubles of impact polypropylene copolymers].

    PubMed

    Luo, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Ying; Wu, Jin-Guang; Wang, Du-Jin

    2012-12-01

    Impact polypropylene copolymers (IPC) are in-situ blends of polypropylene homopolymer and ethylene-alpha-olefin copolymers formed in the reactor, which is a multiphasic complex material with isotactic polypropylene (iPP) as a matrix in which poly(ethylene-alpha-olefin) elastomeric copolymer is finely dispersed, and ethylene-alpha-olefin random copolymer (EPR) acts as an elastomer to improve the impact resistance properties of iPP at room temperature and low temperature. In the present, the content of xylene soluble is used to evaluate the content of EPR rubber phase in IPC. The content, the chain structure, and glass transition temperature (T(g)) of EPR rubber are critical to the toughness of IPC. In the present report, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) were utilized to study the comonomer content, chain structure and thermal property of xylene soluble of two IPC prepared by different catalysts. The results indicated that there are small amount of ethylene-propylene segmented copolymers containing short methylene sequence that is crystallizable in the xylene soluble in addition to the ethylene-propylene random copolymers. And the sequence length of crystallizable methylene group of ethylene-propylene segmented copolymers in these two kinds of xylene soluble is different. The random distribution degree of ethylene and propylene monomer in the ethylene-propylene copolymers in these two kinds of xylene soluble is similar. The xylene soluble with lower content of PPP sequence and higher content of ethylene monomer has lower T(g), which will benefit the improvement of impact resistance property of polypropylene. PMID:23427568

  2. Magnetic Properties of Melt Particles of Suevitic Samples From the Bosumtwi Impact Structure, Ghana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbra, T.; Pesonen, L. J.; Lehtinen, M.

    2006-12-01

    The magnetic anomaly over Bosumtwi impact structure has recently raised a debate about its origin. Plado et al. (2000) presented a magnetic model where a strongly remanently magnetized melt or melt-rich body was proposed as a source of this anomaly. Recent deep drilling through the Bosumtwi structure, however, failed to penetrate into the expected melt body. Also, the recent investigations of petrophysical parameters of samples from deep drill cores (Elbra et al., 2006) did not yield any strongly magnetic body. In order to find out whether the current drill cores simply lack the melt or the expected highly magnetized body escaped the drilling, we separated individual melt particles from deep drill core samples and from exposed suevitic rocks, and measured their magnetic properties. Preliminary results of our investigation show differences in magnetic properties between the melt from inside and outside the crater. The melt from drill core samples shows merely a paramagnetic signal of magnetic susceptibility and only a weak intensity of remanence. The melt from exposed rocks, however, shows slightly higher magnetizations. Currently, the more detailed rock-magnetic studies of separate melt inclusions, combined with X-ray diffraction measurements, are carried out in order to identify the nature of magnetic minerals in the melt and to verify if the melt is enough highly magnetic to be the source of the magnetic anomaly. References: Elbra T., Pesonen L.J. (2006) Petrophysical and rock-magnetic properties of impactites from deep drill core of Bosumtwi impact structure. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 41, Supplement, August, A49. Plado J., Pesonen L.J., Koeberl C., Elo S. (2000) The Bosumtwi meteorite impact structure, Ghana: A magnetic model. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 35, 723-732.

  3. Asteroid surface archaeology: Identification of eroded impact structures by spectral properties on (4) Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, M.; Nathues, A.; Schäfer, M.; Schmedemann, N.; Vincent, J.; Russell, C.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Vesta's surface material is characterized as a deep regolith [1,2], mobilized by countless impacts. The almost catastrophic impact near Vesta's south pole, which has created the Rheasilvia basin, and the partly overlapping older impact of similar size, Veneneia, have not only reshaped the areas of their interior (roughly 50 % of the Vesta surface), but also emplaced each time a huge ejecta blanket of similar size, thus covering the whole remaining surface. In this context, pristine and even younger morphologic features have been erased. However, the spectral signatures of the early differentiation and alteration products by impacts have partially remained in situ. While near the north pole several large old eroded impact features are visible, the equatorial zone close to the basin rims seems to be void of those. Since it is unlikely, that this zone has been entirely avoided by large projectiles, in this area the results of such impacts may have left morphologically not detectable remnants: Individual distribution of particle sizes and altered photometric properties, excavated layers, shock metamorphism, melt generation inside particles and on macroscopic scales, and emplacement of exogenous projectile material. An analysis by color ratio images and spatial profiles of diagnostic spectral parameters reveals such features. Results: Based on local spectroscopic evidence we have detected eroded impact features of three categories: 1) Small craters with diameters of a few kilometers, 2) Large craters or, if even larger, incipient impact basins, 3) Sub-global ejecta blankets. The eastern part of Feralia Planitia, diameter 140 km, has little evidence of a round outline in the shape model, but it features spectral gradients towards its center. A feature of similar size, centered north of Lucaria Tholus becomes only visible by a similar spectra gradient and a circular outline in specific spectral ratio mosaics. These features seem to be related to the

  4. Impact toughness and plastic properties of composite layered samples as compared to monolithic ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, I. L.; Tereshchenko, N. A.; Mirzaev, D. A.; Panov, A. V.; Shaburov, D. V.

    2007-08-01

    Effects of testing conditions on the mechanical properties and fracture of a material in the course of impact loading have been studied. Using steels of various phase compositions (ferritic steel 08Kh18T1 and austenitic steel 10Kh18AG19) tested in a wide temperature range (from 20 to -196°C), the advantage of layered structures has been established as compared to monolithic. It has been shown that the testing of composite samples simulates the loading-affected behavior of the ferritic steel 08Kh18T1 with an inhomogeneous layered microstructure obtained during repeated hot rolling with a reduction of no less than 65%.

  5. Plasma Spray-PVD: Plasma Characteristics and Impact on Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2012-12-01

    Typical plasma characteristics of the plasma spray-physical vapour deposition (PS-PVD) process were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. Electron temperatures were determined by Boltzmann plots while temperatures of the heavy species as well as electron densities were obtained by broadening analysis of spectral lines. The results show how the plasma properties and thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are affected by the admixture of hydrogen and the ambient chamber pressure. Some experimental examples of PS-PVD coatings demonstrate the impact on feedstock treatment and deposited microstructures.

  6. [Impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on powder property of fermented cordyceps powder].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hua; Yue, Guo-Chao; Guan, Yong-Mei; Yang, Ming; Zhu, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate such physical indexes as hygroscopicity, angle of repose, bulk density, fillibility of compression of mixed powder of directly compressed auxiliary materials and fermented cordyceps powder by using micromeritic study methods. The results showed that spray-dried lactose Flowlac100 and microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH102 had better effect in liquidity and compressibility on fermented cordyceps powder than pregelatinized starch. The study on the impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on the powder property of fermented cordyceps powder had guiding significant to the research of fermented cordyceps powder tablets, and could provide basis for the development of fermented cordyceps powder tablets. PMID:24754170

  7. Analysis of Basis Weight Uniformity of Microfiber Nonwovens and Its Impact on Permeability and Filtration Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirnasr, Elham

    It is widely recognized that nonwoven basis weight non-uniformity affects various properties of nonwovens. However, few studies can be found in this topic. The development of uniformity definition and measurement methods and the study of their impact on various web properties such as filtration properties and air permeability would be beneficial both in industrial applications and in academia. They can be utilized as a quality control tool and would provide insights about nonwoven behaviors that cannot be solely explained by average values. Therefore, for quantifying nonwoven web basis weight uniformity we purse to develop an optical analytical tool. The quadrant method and clustering analysis was utilized in an image analysis scheme to help define "uniformity" and its spatial variation. Implementing the quadrant method in an image analysis system allows the establishment of a uniformity index that can be used to quantify the degree of uniformity. Clustering analysis has also been modified and verified using uniform and random simulated images with known parameters. Number of clusters and cluster properties such as cluster size, member and density was determined. We also utilized this new measurement method to evaluate uniformity of nonwovens produced with different processes and investigated impacts of uniformity on filtration and permeability. The results of quadrant method shows that uniformity index computed from quadrant method demonstrate a good range for non-uniformity of nonwoven webs. Clustering analysis is also been applied on reference nonwoven with known visual uniformity. From clustering analysis results, cluster size is promising to be used as uniformity parameter. It is been shown that non-uniform nonwovens has provide lager cluster size than uniform nonwovens. It was been tried to find a relationship between web properties and uniformity index (as a web characteristic). To achieve this, filtration properties, air permeability, solidity and

  8. Tensile and impact properties of General Atomics 832864 heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L.J.; Gazda, J.; Billone, M.C.; Smith, D.L.; Johnson, W.R.; Trester, P.

    1998-09-01

    A 1300-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy was procured by General Atomics (GA) for the DIII-D radiative divertor program. To determine the mechanical properties of this alloy, tensile and Charpy tests were conducted on specimens prepared from pieces of 4.8-mm-thick as-rolled plates, a major product form for the DIII-D application. The tensile tests were conducted at three temperatures, 26, 280 and 380 C, the last two being the anticipated peak temperatures during DIII-D boronization and postvent bake-out, respectively. Results from these tests show that the tensile and impact properties of the 832864 heat are comparable to those of the other smaller V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloy heats previously developed by the US Fusion Materials Program and that scale-up of vanadium alloy production can be successfully achieved as long as reasonable process control is implemented.

  9. Impact of future fuel properties on aircraft engines and fuel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Grobman, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the propulsion-system problems that will most likely be encountered if the specifications of hydrocarbon-based jet fuels must undergo significant changes in the future and, correspondingly, the advances in technology that will be required to minimize the adverse impact of these problems. Several investigations conducted are summarized. Illustrations are used to describe the relative effects of selected fuel properties on the behavior of propulsion-system components and fuel systems. The selected fuel properties are those that are most likely to be relaxed in future fuel specifications. Illustrations are also used to describe technological advances that may be needed in the future. Finally, the technological areas needing the most attention are described, and programs that are under way to address these needs are briefly discussed.

  10. Computational assessment of the impact of gamma-ray detector material properties on spectroscopic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Hensley, Walter K.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2011-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is performing a computational assessment of the impact of several important gamma-ray detector material properties (e.g. energy resolution and intrinsic detection efficiency) on the scenario-specific spectroscopic performance of these materials. The research approach combines 3D radiation transport calculations, detector response modeling, and spectroscopic analysis of simulated energy deposition spectra to map the functional dependence of detection performance on the underlying material properties. This assessment is intended to help guide formulation of performance goals for new detector materials within the context of materials discovery programs, with an emphasis on applications in the threat reduction, nonproliferation, and safeguards/ verification user communities. The research results will also provide guidance to the gamma-ray sensor design community in estimating relative spectroscopic performance merits of candidate materials for novel or notional detectors.

  11. Impact of heat treatment and oxidation of Carbon-carbon composites on microstructure and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Sardar Sarwat

    Carbon-carbon (C/C) composites are notable among engineering materials in aerospace and defense industries possessing excellent specific mechanical, thermal, frictional and wear properties. C/C maintain their properties at temperatures where most of the high end alloys give in, and maintain their dimensional stability at temperatures above 2000 °C. C/C is frequently used in aircraft and automotive industries as brake materials. However, frictional performance is dependent on various parameters: microstructure, fiber type, fiber orientation distribution, fiber/matrix interfacial bond, heat treatment, and oxidation. The present study in dissertation provides an insight into the impact of heat treatment, and oxidation on microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties. The heat treatment (performed at 1800, 2100, 2400 °C in argon) of two-directional (2-D) pitch-fiber with charred resin carbon matrix, and three-directional (3-D) PAN-fiber with CVI carbon matrix influenced microstructure, mechanical and thermal properties. Microstructure characterized by polarized light microscopy (PLM), XRD, and Raman spectroscopy changed with increasing heat treatment temperature. The RL microstructure of 3-D C/C progressively highly organized, whereas ISO microstructure of 2-D C/C's charred resin hardly organized into an ordered structure as evident from Raman spectroscopy and Raman profiling of polished samples. Pitch-fiber organized more than the ISO microstructure of charred resin matrix. On the other, PAN-fiber became more ordered, but was organization was lower than pitch-fiber. Thermal conductivity increased for both (2-D, 3-D C/C) materials in comparison to non-heat treated (NHT) C/Cs. Thermal conductivity of oxidized samples decreased significantly than non-oxidized samples. In-plane thermal conductivity of 3-D C/C was much higher than that of 2-D C/C, and was attributed to the rough laminar (RL) microstructure of carbon matrix and continuous PAN-fiber when compared to

  12. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    SciTech Connect

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  13. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive degassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important for assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius of 4-8 μm at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may also capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  14. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Mather, T. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Carboni, E.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol indirect radiative effects - the alteration of cloud properties by atmospheric aerosol - have a large, but relatively uncertain impact on the Earth's radiative balance. Quantification of volcanic aerosol indirect effects contributes to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. The impact of emissions from passively degassing volcanoes and minor volcanic explosions are particularly poorly constrained. We present systematic satellite measurements of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, 2000-2013 and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer 2002-2008). Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea, Yasur and Piton de la Fournaise are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that average upwind and downwind values can be estimated. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth (<0.1) and decreased cloud droplet effective radius (<8 μm) downwind of the volcanoes. Furthermore, Top of Atmosphere Short Wave flux from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) show downwind perturbations ranging from 10 to 45 Wm-2 within 400 km of degassing volcanoes. Comparison of these observations to cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing volcanoes demonstrates that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  15. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive de-gassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius ranging from 48 microns at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties, and our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the preindustrial marine atmosphere.

  16. IMPACT OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL AGING ON DWPF SIMULATED SLUDGE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R; Michael Stone, M

    2006-10-16

    The research and development programs in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other high-level waste vitrification processes require the use of both nonradioactive waste simulants and actual waste samples. While actual waste samples are the ideal materials to study, acquiring large quantities of actual waste is difficult and expensive. Tests utilizing actual high-level waste require the use of expensive shielded cells facilities to provide sufficient shielding for the researchers. Nonradioactive waste simulants have been used for laboratory testing, pilot-scale testing and full-scale integrated facility testing. These waste simulants were designed to reproduce the chemical and, if possible, the physical properties of the actual high-level waste. This technical report documents a study on the impact of irradiating a Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) simulant and of additional tests on aging a SB3 simulant by additional thermal processing. Prior simulant development studies examined methods of producing sludge and supernate simulants and processes that could be used to alter the physical properties of the simulant to more accurately mimic the properties of actual waste. Development of a precipitated sludge simulant for the River Protection Project (RPP) demonstrated that the application of heat for a period of time could significantly alter the rheology of the sludge simulant. The RPP precipitated simulant used distillation to concentrate the sludge solids and produced a reduction in sludge yield stress of up to 80% compared to the initial sludge properties. Observations at that time suggested that a substantial fraction of the iron hydroxide had converted to the oxide during the distillation. DWPF sludge simulant studies showed a much smaller reduction in yield stress ({approx}10%), demonstrated the impact of shear on particle size, and showed that smaller particle sizes yielded higher yield stress products. The current study documented in this report

  17. Impact of Deforestation on Cloud Properties and Rainfall Over the Costa Rica-Nicaraguan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Nair, U. S.; Welch, R. M.; Lawton, R. O.

    2002-12-01

    The Nicaraguan-Costa Rican region in Central America exhibits the typical pattern of complex deforestation now seen throughout the tropics. The region is a mixture of lowland, mostly converted to agriculture, and mountainous regions, where pristine forests still persist. At present the northern fertile plains of Costa Rica are mostly utilized for agriculture. However in the adjacent regions of southern Nicaragua lowland forests are relatively intact. The extensive agricultural areas of northern Costa Rica is a region of discontinuity in the proposed Mesoamerican Biological Corridor which would connect the montane forests in Costa Rica to the lowland forests in Nicaragua. The present study is part of a larger study which investigates the effects of continuing lowland deforestation and associated regional climate change in Central America on the stability of the entire proposed Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. The present work focuses on the effects of land use on the formation of cloudiness, cloud properties and rainfall in the forested regions of southern Nicaragua and the deforested regions of northern Costa Rica. Land surface and cloud properties are retrieved using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) satellite data and products. The land surface properties retrieved are land surface temperature, albedo, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Available Soil Moisture fraction and surface energy fluxes. The cloud properties retrieved are cloud optical thickness and effective radii. In addition, the frequency of cumulus cloudiness on hourly basis are derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and rainfall is studied using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite products. The correlations between the surface properties, cloud properties, cumulus cloudiness and rainfall as a function of ecosystem and topography is

  18. Physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects of sugar-based surfactants: Impact of structural variations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Biao; Vayssade, Muriel; Miao, Yong; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Drelich, Audrey; Egles, Christophe; Pezron, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Surfactants derived from the biorefinery process can present interesting surface-active properties, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability. They are therefore considered as potential sustainable substitutes to currently used petroleum-based surfactants. To better understand and anticipate their performances, structure-property relationships need to be carefully investigated. For this reason, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to systematically explore the effect of subtle structural variations on both physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or maltose head group by an amide linkage, were synthesized and evaluated together along with two commercially available standard surfactants. Physico-chemical properties including solubility, Krafft point, surface-tension lowering and critical micellar concentration (CMC) in water and biological medium were explored. Cytotoxicity evaluation by measuring proliferation index and metabolic activity against dermal fibroblasts showed that all surfactants studied may induce cell death at low concentrations (below their CMC). Results revealed significant differences in both physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects depending on molecule structural features, such as the position of the linkage on the sugar head-group, or the orientation of the amide linkage. Furthermore, the cytotoxic response increased with the reduction of surfactant CMC. This study underscores the relevance of a methodical and multidisciplinary approach that enables the consideration of surfactant solution properties when applied to biological materials. Overall, our results will contribute to a better understanding of the concomitant impact of surfactant structure at physico-chemical and biological levels. PMID:27137806

  19. Impact of carbonation on the durability of cementitious materials: water transport properties characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auroy, M.; Poyet, S.; Le Bescop, P.; Torrenti, J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Within the context of long-lived intermediate level radioactive waste geological disposal, reinforced concrete would be used. In service life conditions, the concrete structures would be subjected to drying and carbonation. Carbonation relates to the reaction between carbon dioxide (CO2) and the main hydrates of the cement paste (portlandite and C-S-H). Beyond the fall of the pore solution pH, indicative of steel depassivation, carbonation induces mineralogical and microstructural changes (due to portlandite and C-S-H dissolution and calcium carbonate precipitation). This results in the modification of the transport properties, which can impact the structure durability. Because concrete durability depends on water transport, this study focuses on the influence of carbonation on water transport properties. In fact, the transport properties of sound materials are known but they still remain to be assessed for carbonated ones. An experimental program has been designed to investigate the transport properties in carbonated materials. Four hardened cement pastes, differing in mineralogy, are carbonated in an accelerated carbonation device (in controlled environmental conditions) at CO2 partial pressure of about 3%. Once fully carbonated, all the data needed to describe water transport, using a simplified approach, will be evaluated.

  20. Relationship between electrical and rheological properties of sewage sludge - Impact of temperature.

    PubMed

    Ségalen, C; Dieudé-Fauvel, E; Clément, J; Baudez, J C

    2015-04-15

    Rheological properties are key criteria for sewage sludge management but are difficult to determine in situ. Because the literature often links rheological characteristics to surface charges of particles that interact, the underlying electrostatic interactions could be key characteristics explaining the rheological behavior of sludge. This paper analyzed the impact of temperature on both rheological and electrical properties. Both liquid and solid properties appear to be related to electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements because they obey the same relationships with the same activation energies. Infinite viscosity follows an Arrhenius law with temperature, whereas the storage modulus shows VTF (Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher) behavior. Sludge electrical behavior can be modeled by an equivalent 2-branch parallel circuit whose respective impedances follow Arrhenius and VTF relationships. More interestingly, resistors are proportional to (dissipative) viscous characteristics, whereas capacitances are proportional to the (storage) elastic modulus. These similarities and relationships underlie the same interactions that seem to be involved in both rheological and electrical properties. These interdependences are quite logical but open new insights into sludge characterization. PMID:25634652

  1. 77 FR 55466 - Environmental Impact Statement for Short Range-Projects and Update of the Real Property Master...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... Department of the Army Environmental Impact Statement for Short Range-Projects and Update of the Real... proposed short-range improvement projects and the proposed update of the Real Property Master Plan (RPMP) for Fort Belvoir, VA. The EIS will analyze environmental impacts associated with the proposed...

  2. An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

    1991-12-31

    Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

  3. An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

  4. Effects of Various Heat Treatments on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    Uncontained failures of aircraft engine fan blades are serious events that can cause equipment damage and loss of life. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requires that all engines demonstrate the ability to contain a released fan blade with the engine running at full power. However, increased protection generally comes at the expense of weight. Proper choice of materials is therefore imperative to an optimized design. The process of choosing a good casing material is done primarily through trial and error. This costly procedure could be minimized if there was a better understanding of the relationships among static material properties, impact properties, and failure mechanisms. This work is part of a program being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to study these relationships. Ballistic impact tests were conducted on flat, square sheets of Inconel 718 that had been subjected to different heat treatments. Two heat treatments and the as-received condition were studied. In addition, results were compared with those from an earlier study involving a fourth heat treatment. The heat treatments were selected on the basis of their effects on the static tensile properties of the material. The impact specimens used in this study were 17.8-cm square panels that were centered and clamped over a 15.2-cm square hole in a 1.27-cm-thick steel plate. Three nominal plate thickness dimensions were studied, 1.0, 1.8, and 2.0 mm. For each thickness, all the specimens were taken from the same sheet of material. The projectile was a Ti-6Al-4V cylinder with a length of 25.4 mm, a diameter of 12.7 mm, and a mass ranging from 14.05 to 14.20 g. The projectiles were accelerated toward the specimens at normal incidence using a gas gun with a 2-m-long, 12.7-mm inner-diameter barrel. The ballistic limit for each heat treatment condition and thickness was determined by conducting a number of impact tests that bracketed as closely as possible the velocity

  5. Impacts of land use changes on physical and chemical soil properties in the Central Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal Romero, Estela; Hoitinga, Leo; Valdivielso, Sergio; Pérez Cardiel, Estela; Serrano Muela, Pili; Lasanta, Teodoro; Cammeraat, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Soils and vegetation tend to evolve jointly in relation to climate evolution and the impacts of human activity. Afforestation has been one of the main policies for environmental management of forest landscapes in Mediterranean areas. Afforestation has been based mainly on conifers because they are fast-growing species, and also because it was believed that this would lead to rapid restoration of soil properties and hydrological processes, and the formation of protective vegetation cover. This study analyses the effects of afforestation on physical and chemical soil properties. Specifically, we addressed this research question: (i) How do soil properties change after land abandonment? The 11 microsites considered were: Afforestation Pinus sylvestris (escarpment, terrace and close to the stem), Afforestation Pinus nigra (escarpment, terrace and close to the stem), natural shrubland, grasslands, bare lands, and undisturbed forest site (pine cover and close to the stem). An extensive single sampling was carried out in September 2014. We systematically collected 5 top soil samples (0-10 cm) and 3 deep soil samples (10-20 cm) per microsite (88 composite samples in total). These properties were analysed: (i) soil texture, (ii) bulk density, (iii) pH and electrical conductivity, (iv) total SOC, (v) Total Nitrogen, (vi) organic matter, (vii) CaCO3 and (viii) aggregate stability. Statistical tests have been applied to determine relationships between the different soil properties and are used to assess differences between different soil samples, land use areas and soil depths. Implications of reafforestation for soil development and environmental response are discussed. Acknowledgments This research was supported by a Marie Curie Intra-European Fellowship in the project "MED-AFFOREST" (PIEF-GA-2013-624974).

  6. Tensile and Impact Toughness Properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Friction Stir Welded Interstitial Free Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-02-01

    Welded regions of interstitial free (IF) steel grades in the vicinity of weld center exhibits larger grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often causes inferior weld mechanical properties. In the present study, tensile properties, charpy impact toughness, microhardness, microstructure, lowest hardness distribution profile, and fracture surface morphology of the gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) and friction stir welded joints were evaluated, and the results are compared. From this investigation, it is found that friction stir welded joint of IF steel showed superior tensile and impact properties compared with GTAW joint, and this is mainly due to the formation of very fine, equiaxed microstructure in the weld zone.

  7. New insights into the properties of contrail cirrus and their impact on climate from airborne experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Christiane; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Anderson, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Current growth rates in aviation demand a profound scientific data base of contrail cirrus properties in order to accurately assess their climate impact. In particular, the differentiation of contrail cirrus in natural cirrus fields is challenging. Direct observations of contrail cirrus throughout their life cycle are scarce and therefore limit our understanding of the climate effects from contrail cirrus. Here, we give new insights into the growth, life-cycle and climate impact from contrail cirrus based on results from suite of aircraft experiments. NASA's ACCESSII mission focused on the detection of aircraft emissions and initial contrail stages. Nascent contrails were detected at cruise altitudes at 100 m distance to the engine exit. Contrail growth to 10-min contrail age was investigated during DLR's CONCERT campaigns. Finally, the objective of the ML-CIRRUS experiment was to study the life cycle and climate impact of contrail cirrus. The contrail measurements are related to previous observations and discussed in the context of recent developments in contrail modeling. Highlights include the quantification of the effects of aircraft type on contrail microphysics, the analysis of ice particle shapes and the quantitative distinction of contrail cirrus and natural cirrus.

  8. The Impact of Higher Waste Loading on Glass Properties: The Effects of Uranium and Thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D.K.

    2003-12-02

    In this study, glasses are designed or selected to assess the impacts of U3O8 and ThO2 on various glass properties of interest. More specifically, glasses were fabricated in which Th replaced U (on a molar basis) to assess the impact of ThO2 on the durability response (as measured by the Product Consistency Test ) and viscosity. Based on the measured normalized boron release values, the results indicated that the Th-enriched glasses were less durable than their Ubased counterparts. Although molar substitution of Th or U had a negative impact, all of the glasses were more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass - the highest release being 7.39 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L as reported for EA. With respect to model predictions, THERMOTM predicts that a molar substitution of thorium for uranium should increase glass durability. However, these data suggest that the signs and/or magnitudes of the Gi values associated with U3O8 and ThO2 are inconsistent with the theory on which the current model is based for the limited number of glasses tested. It should be noted that these glasses cover a narrow compositional region. With respect to the impact on viscosity, the data suggest that there may be a bias in the model. That is, the model currently does not contain a U3O8 or ThO2 term - but perhaps it should to account for their contributions to the measured (or actual) viscosity results. In addition, a series of glasses were produced to assess the impact of higher waste loadings on select glass properties. The PCT results suggest that durable glasses can be made at relatively high WLs (exceeding 40 wt percent). Comparisons between the measured PCTs and their predictions indicate that the current model is applicable, with all of the quenched glasses falling within the 95 percent confidence bands. The viscosity data for the higher WL glasses suggest that the current model may be extremely accurate for some systems but for different regions the model may be biased high

  9. Impact of phytic acid on nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of dehusked rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, H H; Loh, S P; Bong, C F J; Sarbini, S R; Yiu, P H

    2015-12-01

    Whole grains consumption promotes health benefits, but demonstrates controversial impacts from phytic acid in meeting requirements of good health. Therefore, this study was aimed to determine the nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of rice cultivars named "Adan" or "Bario" and deduce the nutritional impact of phytic acid. Majority of the dehusked rice in the collection showed an acceptable level of in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility, but were poor in antioxidant properties and bioaccessibility of minerals (Ca, Fe and Zn). The drawbacks identified in the rice cultivars were due to relatively high phytic acid content (2420.6 ± 94.6 mg/100 g) and low phenolic content (152.39 ± 18.84 μg GAE/g). The relationship between phytic acid content and mineral bioaccessibility was strongest in calcium (r = 0.60), followed by iron (r = 0.40) and zinc (r = 0.27). Phytic acid content did not significantly correlate with in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility but showed a weak relationship with antioxidant properties. These suggest that phytic acid could significantly impair the mineral bioaccessibility of dehusked rice, and also act as an important antioxidant in non-pigmented rice. Bario rice cultivars offered dehusked rice with wide range of in-vitro digestibility of starch and protein, and also pigmented rice as a good source of antioxidants. However, there is a need to reduce phytic acid content in dehusked rice for improved mineral bioaccessibility among Bario rice cultivars. PMID:26604353

  10. Tensile and impact properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy heats 832665 and 832864

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, T. S.; Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L. J.; Billone, M. C.; Smith, D. L.; Johnson, W. R.; Trester, P. W.

    2000-12-01

    Two large heats of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were produced in the US in the past few years. The first, 832665, was a 500 kg heat procured by the US Department of Energy for basic fusion structural materials research. The second, 832864, was a 1300 kg heat procured by General Atomics for the DIII-D radiative divertor upgrade. Both heats were produced by Oremet-Wah Chang (previously Teledyne Wah Chang of Albany). Tensile properties up to 800°C and Charpy V-notch impact properties down to liquid nitrogen temperature were measured for both heats. The product forms tested for both heats were rolled sheets annealed at 1000°C for 1 h in vacuum. Testing results show the behavior of the two heats to be similar and the reduction of strengths with temperature to be insignificant up to at least 750°C. Ductility of both materials is good in the test temperature range. Impact properties for both heats are excellent - no brittle failures at temperatures above -150°C. Compared to the data for previous smaller laboratory heats of 15-50 kg, the results show that scale-up of vanadium alloy ingot production to sizes useful for reactor blanket design can be successfully achieved as long as reasonable process control is implemented (H. Tsai, et al., Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending 30th June 1998, DOE/ER-0313/24, p. 3; H. Tsai, et al., Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending 31st December 1998, DOE/ER-0313/25, p. 3).

  11. Mechanical Properties and Sliding-impact Wear Resistance of Self-adhesive Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, T; Takamizawa, T; Tsujimoto, A; Miyazaki, M; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A

    2016-01-01

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and impact-sliding wear characteristics of self-adhesive resin cements. Five self-adhesive resin cements were used: G-CEM LinkAce, BeautiCem SA, Maxcem Elite, Clearfil SA Automix, and RelyX Unicem 2. Clearfil Esthetic Cement was employed as a control material. Six specimens for each resin cement were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience according to ISO specification #4049. Ten specimens for each resin cement were used to determine the wear characteristics using an impact-sliding wear testing apparatus. Wear was generated using a stainless-steel ball bearing mounted inside a collet assembly. The maximum facet depth and volume loss were determined using a noncontact profilometer in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by the Tukey honestly significantly different test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin cements ranged from 68.4 to 144.2 MPa; the elastic modulus ranged from 4.4 to 10.6 GPa; and the resilience ranged from 4.5 to 12.0 MJ/m(3). The results for the maximum facet depth ranged from 25.2 to 235.9 μm, and volume loss ranged from 0.0107 to 0.5258 mm(3). The flexural properties and wear resistance were found to vary depending upon the self-adhesive resin cement tested. The self-adhesive cements tended to have lower mechanical properties than the conventional resin cement. All self-adhesive resin cements, apart from G-CEM LinkAce, demonstrated significantly poorer wear resistance than did the conventional resin cement. PMID:26918929

  12. [Impact of reclaimed water irrigation on soil chemical properties and culturable microorganisms ].

    PubMed

    Gong, Xue; Wang, Ji-hua; Guan, Jian-fei; Yang, Xue-chen; Chen, Dai-ci

    2014-09-01

    This research used batch soil column experiment to study the effects of irrigating with reclaimed water and tap water on the soil chemical properties and culturable microorganisms. The results indicated that reclaimed water could markedly increase the soil organic material (OM) and total nitrogen (TN) content, but it had no obvious effect on total phosphorus (TP), available phosphorus (AP) and pH value. Reclaimed water irrigation could significantly enhance the amounts of surface soil bacteria and actinomycetes at a depth of 0-20 cm, but it had little effect on the biomass of 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm soil layers. The dominant bacteria in tap water irrigation area was the genus Bacillus whereas that of reclaimed water irrigation area was the genus Acinetobacter. Tap water irrigation area had four endemic genera and reclaimed water irrigation area had six endemic genera. Reclaimed water had no obvious effect on the microbial community Shannon diversity of 0-20 cm soil layer, while it decreased Pielou evenness index, and improved Margalef richness index. Through SPSS 17. 0 correlation analysis between soil microbes quantity and soil chemical properties, it was shown that the soil microbes quantity was positively correlated with OM, TN, TP and AP, but negatively correlated with soil water content (SWC) and pH value. Based on CANOCO 4.5 detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and redundancy analysis (RDA) between soil microbes species and soil chemical properties, it was shown that AP had the strongest correlation with the microbial community (P = 0.002). TN and TP had larger impact on Streptococcus, Aeromonas and Neisseria. OM and AP had larger impact on Aerococcus, Planococcus and Halobacterium. PMID:25518681

  13. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-10-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The time-averaged indirect aerosol effects within 200 km downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002-2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2-8 μm at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Wm-2 at distances of 150-400 km from the volcano, with much greater local (< 80 km) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to

  14. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S.K.; Sayer, Andrew M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The timeaveraged indirect aerosol effects within 200 kilometers downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002- 2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2 - 8 micrometers at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Watts per square meter at distances of 150 - 400 kilometers from the volcano, with much greater local (less than 80 kilometers) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted

  15. Impact of biomass burning on cloud properties in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Nenes, A.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Andreae, M. O.

    2003-01-01

    We used a one-dimensional (1-D) cloud parcel model to assess the impact of biomass-burning aerosol on cloud properties in the Amazon Basin and to identify the physical and chemical properties of the aerosol that influence droplet growth. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements were performed between 0.15% and 1.5% supersaturation at ground-based sites in the states of Amazonas and Rondônia, Brazil during several field campaigns in 1998 and 1999 as part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) Experiment in Amazonia. CCN concentrations measured during the wet season were low and resembled concentrations more typical of marine conditions than most continental sites. During the dry season, smoke aerosol from biomass burning dramatically increased CCN concentrations. The modification of cloud properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius and maximum supersaturation, is most sensitive at low CCN concentrations. Hence, we could expect larger interannual variation of cloud properties during the wet season that the dry season. We found that differences between CCN spectra from forested and deforested regions during the wet season are modest and result in modifications of cloud properties that are small compared to those between wet and dry seasons. Our study suggests that the differences in surface albedo, rather than cloud albedo, between forested and deforested regions may dominate the impact of deforestation on the hydrological cycle and convective activity during the wet season. During the dry season, on the other hand, cloud droplet concentrations may increase by up to 7 times, which leads to a model-predicted decrease in cloud effective radius by a factor of 2. This could imply a maximum indirect radiative forcing due to aerosol as high as ca. -27 W m-2 for a nonabsorbing cloud. Light-absorbing substances in smoke darken the Amazonian clouds and reduce the net radiative forcing, and a comparison of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR

  16. Dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Li, Ya-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic performance of a static or throwing droplet impact onto a solid substrate with different properties is numerically studied in this work. After being released or horizontally thrown out, a two-dimensional droplet can fall freely under gravity. The substrate, which is below the droplet, is either hydrophilic/hydrophobic or inhomogeneous. To conduct numerical simulations, a hybrid method is adopted, in which the flow field is solved by using the lattice Boltzmann method and the interface is captured by solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation directly. Given a fixed distance between the droplet and the substrate (H∗), the effects of Bond number (Bo), Weber number (We), and surface property on the performance of droplet impingement are investigated in detail. With the increase of Bond number, the surface coverage area of a static droplet also increases. A hydrophilic surface or an inhomogeneous surface with small advancing/receding angle difference can lead to the breakup of droplet rim due to the bubble entrapment. Moreover, dependent on the Weber number and the surface property, the leading edge rim of a throwing droplet developing on an inhomogeneous surface may break up before or after it contacts the substrate. As a result, compared to the case of static droplet, the surface coverage area will be reduced due to the diffusion of small droplet segment.

  17. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To use graphite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. This paper presents the mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK thermoplastic fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fabric interleaved with PEEK thermoplastic film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 79 percent of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape material. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 percent of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 percent of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate. The notched quasi-isotropic compression panel failure strength is 42 to 46 percent of the unnotched quasi-isotropic laminate strength. Damage area after impact with 20 ft-lbs of impact energy is larger for the co-mingled panels than for the interleaved panels. The inerleaved panels have less damage than panels made from tape material. Residual compression strength of quasi-isotropic panels after impact of 20 ft-lbs of energy varies between 33 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the tape material and 38 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the co-mingled fabric material.

  18. Spectral properties of simulated impact glasses produced from martian soil analogue JSC Mars-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, L. V.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Hiroi, T.; Rout, S. S.; Baither, D.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Yakovlev, O. I.; Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Rusakov, V. S.; Khramov, D. A.; Zinovieva, N. G.; Arnold, G.; Pieters, C. M.

    2009-07-01

    To simulate the formation of impact glasses on Mars, an analogue of martian bright soil (altered volcanic soil JSC Mars-1) was melted at relevant oxygen fugacities using a pulsed laser and a resistance furnace. Reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and in some cases formation of nanophase Fe0 in the glasses were documented by Mössbauer spectroscopy and TEM studies. Reflectance spectra for several size fractions of the JSC Mars-1 sample and the glasses were acquired between 0.3 and 25 μm. The glasses produced from the JSC Mars-1 soil show significant spectral variability depending on the method of production and the cooling rate. In general, they are dark and less red in the visible compared to the original JSC Mars-1 soil. Their spectra do not have absorption bands due to bound water and structural OH, have positive spectral slopes in the near-infrared range, and show two broad bands centered near 1.05 and 1.9 μm, typical of glasses rich in ferrous iron. The latter bands and low albedo partly mimic the spectral properties of martian dark regions, and may easily be confused with mafic materials containing olivine and low-Ca pyroxene. Due to their disordered structures and vesicular textures, the glasses show relatively weak absorption features from the visible to the thermal infrared. These weak absorption bands may be masked by the stronger bands of mafic minerals. Positive near-infrared spectral slopes typical of fresh iron-bearing impact or volcanic glasses may be masked either by oxide/dust coatings or by aerosols in the Mars' atmosphere. As a result, impact glasses may be present on the surface of Mars in significant quantities that have been either misidentified as other phases or masked by phases with stronger infrared features. Spectrometers with sufficient spatial resolution and wavelength coverage may detect impact glasses at certain locations, e.g., in the vicinity of fresh impact craters. Such dark materials are usually interpreted as accumulations of mafic

  19. Impact of substrate on structure and electrical properties in lead-based ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valanoor, Nagarajan Venkatasubramanian

    Current trends in semiconductor technology demand that ferroelectric materials be used in thin film form, rather than bulk, for integration and scaling purposes. An inevitable consequence of integration is substrate induced constraint and stress. Sources of this stress are the lattice and thermal mismatch between film and substrate, structural phase transformation which leads to spontaneous strains, and dislocation cores at the film substrate interface. In addition to classical stress relaxation mechanisms all highly tetragonal ferroelectrics relax internal stress via formation of polydomain (90° domains and not 180° domains) structures below the phase transformation, which brings about a change in the microstructure of the film. Hence it is possible to control the resultant microstructure by controlling the degree of polydomain relaxation. Obviously this affects the electrical and electro-mechanical properties and in turn the device performance. The goal of this research is to study this structure-property relationship of ferroelectric thin films where in the structure has been systematically modified by changing the substrate-induced effect. To investigate the effect of the substrate, epitaxial films of PbZr 0.2Ti0.8O3 were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Epitaxial films reduce the complexities introduced grain boundaries and multiple domain orientations. By systematically changing the thickness the spontaneous strain or c/a ratio can be varied. As a consequence polydomain formation varies as a function of film thickness. Thus this is an effective yet simple method to fully understand the impact of stress on structure-property inter-relationships. The theoretical background for these experiments is first laid out by a thermodynamic analysis of the polydomain formation. It leads to the construction of a domain stability map and indicates a presence of a critical thickness for polydomain formation. This is followed by an investigation of the impact of

  20. Effect of microstructure and non-metallic inclusions on the impact properties of flux-cored weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, G.O.; French, I.E.

    1997-06-15

    Flux-cored weld metals are used in many critical fabricated steel structures such as offshore constructions. In such rigorous conditions, it is essential to maintain good low temperature toughness. In particular failure by cleavage must be avoided. The two basic factors determining fracture toughness are the general microstructure and the non-metallic inclusions. Additional factors that cause embrittlement of the weld metal are segregated microphases, nitrogen, and impurity elements. This work has shown that the amount of large inclusions in conjunction with the amount of grain boundary nucleated ferrite are the major factors, which determine the impact properties of flux-cored welds at all strength levels. Other factors such as segregated microphases, nitrogen and impurity elements may influence the impact properties but appeared minor in this case. The interaction between the inclusions and the grain boundary nucleated ferrite is critical. Good impact properties are achievable, (a) with high amounts of grain boundary nucleated ferrite, provided the amount of large inclusions is very low and (b) with small amounts of large inclusions, provided the amount of allotriomorphic ferrite is low. The frequency of large inclusions is the major factor determining the impact properties for flux-cored welds. A high frequency of large inclusions leads to low impact properties.

  1. Impact of Texture Heterogeneity on Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ravi

    This thesis discusses the impacts of fabric heterogeneity, fluids and fluid saturations, effective pressures, and frequency of investigation on the elastic and viscoelastic properties of calcite-rich limestone and chalk formations. Carbonate reservoirs have been analyzed either with empirical relations and analogs from siliciclastic reservoirs or using simplistic models. However, under the varying parameters mentioned above, their seismic response can be very different. The primary reason is because these rocks of biochemical origins readily undergo textural changes and support heterogeneous distribution of fluid flow and elastic properties. Thus, many current rock physics models are unable to predict the time-lapse elastic response in these reservoirs. I have measured elastic properties of calcite rich rocks in the seismic frequency range of 2 to 2000 Hz and at the ultrasonic frequency of 800 kHz. The samples selected for this study represent the typical heterogeneities found in carbonate formations. These measurements covering a large frequency range provide an understanding of the dispersion and attenuation mechanisms during seismic wave propagation in the subsurface. I find that a heterogeneous formation shows significant velocity dispersion and attenuations when saturated with brine, and even more on saturation with CO2. I also show that the shear modulus of carbonate rocks changes significantly (from 8% for brine saturation to 70% for CO2 saturation) upon fluid saturation with polar fluids. I evaluated rock physics models, such as Gassmann's and with uniform and patchy fluid substitution, and Hashin-Shtrikman to predict saturated elastic properties in carbonates. Fluid sensitivity is directly related to the initial stiffness of the rock instead of porosity, as normally assumed. The Gassmann model can predict elastic properties for uniform saturations - mostly in homogenous rocks. Heterogeneous rocks, however, are better modeled using a patchy fluid saturation

  2. Thermal Properties of Starch From New Corn Lines as Impacted by Environment and During Line Development

    SciTech Connect

    Elizabeth M. Lenihan

    2003-12-12

    The objectives of this research were to further characterize exotic by adapted corn inbreds by studying the impact of environment on their starch thermal properties, and investigating the development of starch thermal properties during kernel maturation by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A method to expedite identification of unusual starch thermal traits was investigated by examining five corn kernels at a time, instead of one kernel, which the previous screening methods used. Corn lines with known thermal functions were blended with background starch (control) in ratios of unique starch to control starch, and analyzed by using DSC. Control starch was representative of typical corn starch. The values for each ratio within a mutant type were unique ({alpha} < 0.01) for most DSC measurements. These results supported the five-kernel method for rapidly screening large amounts of corn germplasm to identify unusual starch traits. The effects of 5 growing locations on starch thermal properties from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines were studied using DSC. The warmest location, Missouri, generally produced starch with greater gelatinization onset temperature (T{sub oG}), narrower range of gelatinization (R{sub G}), and greater enthalpy of gelatinization ({Delta}H{sub G}). The coolest location, Illinois, generally resulted in starch with lower T{sub oG}, wider R{sub G}, and lower {Delta}H{sub G}. Starch from the Ames 1 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Illinois, whereas starch from the Ames 2 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Missouri. The temperature at Ames 2 may have been warmer since it was located near a river; however, soil type and quality also were different. Final corn starch structure and function change during development and maturity. Thus, the changes in starch thermal properties during 5 stages of endosperm development from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines at two locations were studied by using DSC

  3. Spectral properties of Titan's impact craters imply chemical weathering of its surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, C. D.; Barnes, J. W.; Sotin, C.; MacKenzie, S.; Soderblom, J. M.; Le Mouélic, S.; Kirk, R. L.; Stiles, B. W.; Malaska, M. J.; Le Gall, A.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-05-01

    We examined the spectral properties of a selection of Titan's impact craters that represent a range of degradation states. The most degraded craters have rims and ejecta blankets with spectral characteristics that suggest that they are more enriched in water ice than the rims and ejecta blankets of the freshest craters on Titan. The progression is consistent with the chemical weathering of Titan's surface. We propose an evolutionary sequence such that Titan's craters expose an intimate mixture of water ice and organic materials, and chemical weathering by methane rainfall removes the soluble organic materials, leaving the insoluble organics and water ice behind. These observations support the idea that fluvial processes are active in Titan's equatorial regions.

  4. Impact of speciation on the electron charge transfer properties of nanodiamond drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baichuan; Barnard, Amanda S

    2016-08-01

    Unpassivated diamond nanoparticles (bucky-diamonds) exhibit a unique surface reconstruction involving graphitization of certain crystal facets, giving rise to hybrid core-shell particles containing both aromatic and aliphatic carbon. Considerable effort is directed toward eliminating the aromatic shell, but persistent graphitization of subsequent subsurface-layers makes perdurable purification a challenge. In this study we use some simple statistical methods, in combination with electronic structure simulations, to predict the impact of different fractions of aromatic and aliphatic carbon on the charge transfer properties of the ensembles of bucky-diamonds. By predicting quality factors for a variety of cases, we find that perfect purification is not necessary to preserve selectivity, and there is a clear motivation for purifying samples to improve the sensitivity of charge transfer reactions. This may prove useful in designing drug delivery systems where the release of (selected) drugs needs to be sensitive to specific conditions at the point of delivery. PMID:27404991

  5. The impact of whey protein preheating on the properties of emulsion gel bead.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Emilie; Schmit, Tiffany; Lafitte, Géraldine; Dollat, Jean-Marie; Chambin, Odile

    2014-05-15

    Thermal treatment effect (70 or 80 °C for 5 or 30 min) was evaluated on functional properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) dispersions used for the development of novel vitamin A delivery systems based on emulsion gel beads. This process combines an (O/W) emulsion diluted by a polysaccharide solution and a cold-set gelation induced by salt addition. Pre-heated WPI had a significant impact on the denaturation degree and on the surface hydrophobicity, respectively studied by differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence. Stronger heating conditions (i.e. duration or temperature) induced complete denaturation, an increase of surface hydrophobicity and of viscosity. Under these conditions, the final emulsion showed a decrease particle size and an enhancement of stability. The resulting beads offered better vitamin A yield and stability during storage. These delivery systems bring a good protection of vitamin A to pH changes and control the release of this lipophilic component. PMID:24423540

  6. Changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes in the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, I. N.; Novikova, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    Long-term studies of changes in the properties of solonetzic soil complexes of the dry steppe zone under anthropogenic impacts (deep plowing, surface leveling, irrigation, and post-irrigation use) have been performed on the Privolzhskaya sand ridge and the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains. The natural morphology of solonetzic soils was strongly disturbed during their deep ameliorative plowing. At present, the soil cover consists of solonetzic agrozems (Sodic Protosalic Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), textural (clay-illuvial) calcareous agrozems (Eutric Cambisols (Loamic, Aric, Protocalcic)), agrosolonetzes (Endocalcaric Luvisols (Loamic, Aric, Cutanic, Protosodic), agrochestnut soils (Eutric Cambisols (Siltic, Aric)), and meadowchestnut soils (Haplic Kastanozems). No features attesting to the restoration of the initial profile of solonetzes have been found. The dynamics of soluble salts and exchangeable sodium differ in the agrosolonetzes and solonetzic agrozems. A rise in pH values takes place in the middle part of the soil profiles on the Khvalyn and Ergeni plains.

  7. Impact of intrinsic localized modes of atomic motion on materials properties

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, M E

    2010-01-20

    Recent neutron and x-ray scattering measurements show intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) in metallic uranium and ionic sodium iodide. Here, the role ILMs play in the behavior of these materials is examined. With the thermal activation of ILMs, thermal expansion is enhanced, made more anisotropic, and, at a microscopic level, becomes inhomogeneous. Interstitial diffusion, ionic conductivity, the annealing rate of radiation damage, and void growth are all influenced by ILMs. The lattice thermal conductivity is suppressed above the ILM activation temperature while no impact is observed in the electrical conductivity. This complement of transport properties suggests that ILMs could improve thermoelectric performance. Ramifications also include thermal ratcheting, a transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and possibly a phase transformation in uranium.

  8. Impact of the tetrahedral distortion in the superconducting and magnetic properties of iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Belen; Calderon, Maria Jose; Bascones, Elena

    2010-03-01

    The origin of magnetism and superconductivity in iron pnictides is unknown. An added complexity in these materials is the strong impact in the electronic properties brought by small distortions of the As-Fe tetrahedra. We have proposed a five orbital tight binding model using the Slater-Koster framework that with just four parameters reproduce the bands and Fermi surface found with first principle calculations [1]. The good agreement between our results and DFT predictions extends to the orbital weight of each band. Using this model we study the magnetic and superconducting state and analyze how it depends on the distortion of the tetrahedron.[4pt] [1] M.J. Calder'on, B. Valenzuela and E. Bascones, Phys. Rev. B 80, 94531 (2009)

  9. Impact of observational incompleteness on the structural properties of protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnt, Mathias; Glauche, Ingmar; Greiner, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The observed structure of protein interaction networks is corrupted by many false positive/negative links. This observational incompleteness is abstracted as random link removal and a specific, experimentally motivated (spoke) link rearrangement. Their impact on the structural properties of gene-duplication-and-mutation network models is studied. For the degree distribution a curve collapse is found, showing no sensitive dependence on the link removal/rearrangement strengths and disallowing a quantitative extraction of model parameters. The spoke link rearrangement process moves other structural observables, like degree correlations, cluster coefficient and motif frequencies, closer to their counterparts extracted from the yeast data. This underlines the importance to take a precise modeling of the observational incompleteness into account when network structure models are to be quantitatively compared to data.

  10. Phase Stability and Stoichiometry in Thin Film Iron Pyrite: Impact on Electronic Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Scott, Tom; Socha, Tyler; Nielsen, David; Manno, Michael; Johnson, Melissa; Yan, Yuqi; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Dowben, Peter; Aydil, Eray S; Leighton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    The use of pyrite FeS2 as an earth-abundant, low-cost, nontoxic thin film photovoltaic hinges on improved understanding and control of certain physical and chemical properties. Phase stability, phase purity, stoichiometry, and defects, are central in this respect, as they are frequently implicated in poor solar cell performance. Here, phase-pure polycrystalline pyrite FeS2 films, synthesized by ex situ sulfidation, are subject to systematic reduction by vacuum annealing (to 550 °C) to assess phase stability, stoichiometry evolution, and their impact on transport. Bulk probes reveal the onset of pyrrhotite (Fe(1-δ)S) around 400 °C, rapidly evolving into the majority phase by 425 °C. This is supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on (001) crystals, revealing surface Fe(1-δ)S formation as low as 160 °C, with rapid growth near 400 °C. The impact on transport is dramatic, with Fe(1-δ)S minority phases leading to a crossover from diffusive transport to hopping (due to conductive Fe(1-δ)S nanoregions in an FeS2 matrix), followed by metallicity when Fe(1-δ)S dominates. Notably, the crossover to hopping leads to an inversion of the sign, and a large decrease in magnitude of the Hall coefficient. By tracking resistivity, magnetotransport, magnetization, and structural/chemical parameters vs annealing, we provide a detailed picture of the evolution in properties with stoichiometry. A strong propensity for S-deficient minority phase formation is found, with no wide window where S vacancies control the FeS2 carrier density. These findings have important implications for FeS2 solar cell development, emphasizing the need for (a) nanoscale chemical homogeneity, and (b) caution in interpreting carrier types and densities. PMID:26087015

  11. Impacts of hematite nanoparticle exposure on biomechanical, adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-06-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomaterials. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that E. coli cells had noticeable deformation with hematite treatment for 45 min with a statistical significance. The hematite-treated cells became significantly harder or stiffer than untreated ones, as evidenced by indentation and spring constant measurements. The average indentation of the hematite-treated E. coli cells was 120 nm, which is significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the untreated cells (approximately 400 nm). The spring constant of hematite-treated E. coli cells (0.28 ± 0.11 nN/nm) was about 20 times higher than that of untreated ones (0.01 ± 0.01 nN/nm). The zeta potential of E. coli cells, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was shown to shift from -4 ± 2 mV to -27 ± 8 mV with progressive surface adsorption of hematite NPs, a finding which is consistent with the local surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Overall, the reported findings quantitatively revealed the adverse impacts of nanomaterial exposure on physical properties of bacterial cells and should provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanomaterials. PMID:22467500

  12. Impacts of Hematite Nanoparticle Exposure on Biomechanical, Adhesive, and Surface Electrical Properties of Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomaterials. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that E. coli cells had noticeable deformation with hematite treatment for 45 min with a statistical significance. The hematite-treated cells became significantly harder or stiffer than untreated ones, as evidenced by indentation and spring constant measurements. The average indentation of the hematite-treated E. coli cells was 120 nm, which is significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the untreated cells (approximately 400 nm). The spring constant of hematite-treated E. coli cells (0.28 ± 0.11 nN/nm) was about 20 times higher than that of untreated ones (0.01 ± 0.01 nN/nm). The zeta potential of E. coli cells, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), was shown to shift from −4 ± 2 mV to −27 ± 8 mV with progressive surface adsorption of hematite NPs, a finding which is consistent with the local surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Overall, the reported findings quantitatively revealed the adverse impacts of nanomaterial exposure on physical properties of bacterial cells and should provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanomaterials. PMID:22467500

  13. Impact of speciation on the electron charge transfer properties of nanodiamond drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baichuan; Barnard, Amanda S.

    2016-07-01

    Unpassivated diamond nanoparticles (bucky-diamonds) exhibit a unique surface reconstruction involving graphitization of certain crystal facets, giving rise to hybrid core-shell particles containing both aromatic and aliphatic carbon. Considerable effort is directed toward eliminating the aromatic shell, but persistent graphitization of subsequent subsurface-layers makes perdurable purification a challenge. In this study we use some simple statistical methods, in combination with electronic structure simulations, to predict the impact of different fractions of aromatic and aliphatic carbon on the charge transfer properties of the ensembles of bucky-diamonds. By predicting quality factors for a variety of cases, we find that perfect purification is not necessary to preserve selectivity, and there is a clear motivation for purifying samples to improve the sensitivity of charge transfer reactions. This may prove useful in designing drug delivery systems where the release of (selected) drugs needs to be sensitive to specific conditions at the point of delivery.Unpassivated diamond nanoparticles (bucky-diamonds) exhibit a unique surface reconstruction involving graphitization of certain crystal facets, giving rise to hybrid core-shell particles containing both aromatic and aliphatic carbon. Considerable effort is directed toward eliminating the aromatic shell, but persistent graphitization of subsequent subsurface-layers makes perdurable purification a challenge. In this study we use some simple statistical methods, in combination with electronic structure simulations, to predict the impact of different fractions of aromatic and aliphatic carbon on the charge transfer properties of the ensembles of bucky-diamonds. By predicting quality factors for a variety of cases, we find that perfect purification is not necessary to preserve selectivity, and there is a clear motivation for purifying samples to improve the sensitivity of charge transfer reactions. This may prove

  14. Impacts of air pollution exposure on the allergenic properties of Arizona cypress pollens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahali, Y.; Pourpak, Z.; Moin, M.; Zare, A.; Majd, A.

    2009-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that urbanization and high levels of vehicle emissions correlated with the increasing trend of pollen-induced respiratory allergies. Numerous works have investigated the role of pollutants in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases but impacts of anthropogenic pollution on pollen allergenic properties are still poorly understood. The objective of this survey was to evaluate impacts of the traffic-related pollution on the structure and allergenic protein content of Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica, CA) pollens, recognized as a rising cause of seasonal allergy in various regions worldwide. According to our results, traffic-related air pollution by its direct effects on the elemental composition of pollens considerably increased the fragility of the pollen exine, causing numerous cracks in its surface and facilitating pollen content liberation. Pollen grains were also covered by numerous submicronic orbicules which may act as effective vectors for pollen-released components into the lower regions of respiratory organs. On the other hand, this study provides us reliable explications about the low efficiency of standard commercial allergens in the diagnosis of the Arizona cypress pollen allergy in Tehran. Although traffic related pollution affects the allergenic components of CA pollens, the repercussions on the respiratory health of urban populations have yet to be clarified and need further investigations.

  15. Impact of apoptosis on the on-line measured dielectric properties of CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Zalai, Dénes; Tobak, Teodóra; Putics, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis is a common type of cell death in biopharmaceutical cell culture processes which causes decrease in viable cell density and product yield. The progression of apoptosis has been reported to influence the dielectric properties of mammalian cells; however, the on-line detection of these effects has been rarely described. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the on-line detectability of dielectric changes upon apoptosis induction in an industrial fed-batch process of CHO cells expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody. Using capacitance signals, measured at 25 frequencies, the impact of apoptosis on the dielectric spectra was investigated in eight bioreactor cultivations in which various process conditions were combined with two different apoptosis induction strategies (camptothecin treatment and glucose starvation). To differentiate the apoptosis-related information from the cell concentration-associated variance in the multivariate capacitance datasets, principal component analysis (PCA) was used. A second principal component, explaining an explicit proportion (>20%) of the variance, was identified to be related to dielectric changes induced by apoptosis. Furthermore, the analysis of caspase-3 and -7 activation and DNA fragmentation showed that the detected dielectric change occurred in the early phase of apoptosis. The presented results verify that apoptosis has a considerable impact on the dielectric features of CHO cells and it can be monitored on-line with the introduced tool-set combining capacitance measurement with multivariate data analysis. PMID:26440966

  16. The impact of algal properties and pre-oxidation on solid-liquid separation of algae.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Rita; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce

    2008-04-01

    Algae are traditionally classified according to biological descriptors which do not give information on surface characteristics that are important with respect to removal by water treatment processes. This review examines the character of freshwater algal populations from a water treatment perspective and evaluates the impact of their varying properties and the use of pre-oxidation on their removal by solid-liquid separation processes.. The characteristics shown to impact on treatment were morphology, motility, surface charge, cell density and the extracellular organic matter (EOM) composition and concentration. With the exception of density, these are not phyla specific. It was also shown that dissolved air flotation (DAF) was the most robust clarification method, where up to 99.8% removal was achieved compared to 94% for sedimentation when using metal coagulants. However, successful clarification relied heavily on the optimisation of preceding coagulation and flocculation and coagulant demand was important in this respect. Comparison of all available data reveals a relationship between cell surface area and coagulant demand. It is thus suggested that cell surface area would provide a basis for regrouping algae such that the classification is informative with respect to water treatment. However, the absolute coagulant demand is a result of both surface area and EOM influences. The latter are relatively poorly understood in comparison to natural organic matter (NOM) systems and this remains a limit in current knowledge. PMID:18261761

  17. PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K

    2005-09-28

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear and isothermal heating, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to monitor CP decomposition at linear heating rates of 1-7 C min{sup -1} in perforated pans and of 0.1-1.0 C min{sup -1} in sealed pans. The kinetic triplet was calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05, and predictions for 210 and 240 C are compared to isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  18. Impact tensile properties and strength development mechanism of glass for reinforcement fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Oshima, K.; Kawada, H.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, impact tensile properties of E-glass were investigated by fiber bundle testing under a high strain rate. The impact tests were performed employing two types of experiments. One is the tension-type split Hopkinson pressure bar system, and the other is the universal high-speed tensile-testing machine. As the results, it was found that not only the tensile strength but also the fracture strain of E-glass fiber improved with the strain rate. The absorbed strain energy of this material significantly increased. It was also found that the degree of the strain rate dependency of E-glass fibers on the tensile strength was varied according to fiber diameter. As for the strain rate dependency of the glass fiber under tensile loading condition, change of the small crack-propagation behaviour was considered to clarify the development of the fiber strength. The tensile fiber strength was estimated by employing the numerical simulation based on the slow crack-growth model (SCG). Through the parametric study against the coefficient of the crack propagation rate, the numerical estimation value was obtained for the various testing conditions. It was concluded that the slow crack-growth behaviour in the glass fiber was an essential for the increase in the strength of this material.

  19. The influence of body mass index and gender on the impact attenuation properties of flooring systems.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Shivam; Levine, Iris; Laing, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    The biomechanical effectiveness of safety floors has never been assessed during sideways falls with human volunteers. Furthermore, the influence of body mass index (BMI) and gender on the protective capacity of safety floors is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test whether safety floors provide greater impact attenuation compared with traditional flooring, and whether BMI and gender modify their impact attenuation properties. Thirty participants (7 men and 7 women of low BMI; 7 men and 9 women of high BMI) underwent lateral pelvis release trials on 2 common floors and 4 safety floors. As a group, the safety floors reduced peak force (by up to 11.7%), and increased the time to peak force (by up to 25.5%) compared with a traditional institutional grade floor. Force attenuation was significantly higher for the low BMI group, and for males. Force attenuation was greatest for the low BMI males, averaging 26.5% (SD = 3.0) across the safety floors. These findings demonstrate an overall protective effect of safety floors during lateral falls on the pelvis, but also suggest augmented benefits for frail older adults (often with low body mass) who are at an increased risk of hip fracture. PMID:23429161

  20. Impact of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on biochar micropores and sorption properties for sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binbin; Lian, Fei; Bao, Qiongli; Liu, Zhongqi; Song, Zhengguo; Zhu, Lingyan

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between biochar (BC) and antibiotics with the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) is largely unknown, although it is crucial for understanding the role of BC in reducing the bioavailability of antibiotics in rhizosphere. The impacts of two typical LMWOAs (citric and malic acids) on sorption of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) by crop-straw BCs produced at 300 °C (BCs300) and 600 °C (BCs600), respectively, were examined. The sorption of SMX on BCs increased more than 5 times with the concentration of LMWOAs increasing from 0 to 100 mmol/L, which was mainly attributed to the elevated microporosity of BCs (measured by CO2) after treated by LMWOAs. The pore development of BCs was mainly derived from the release of dissolved organic residues from BC by LMWOA washing. For H2O2-oxidized BCs, however, LMWOAs had little effect on SMX sorption by BCs300 but greatly increased that by BCs600, which can be explained by the distinct sorption mechanisms of SMX on BCs300 and BCs600. These results indicate that the impact of LMWOAs on SMX sorption is highly dependent on the properties of BCs and LMWOAs, as well as their interaction mechanisms. PMID:27077553

  1. The impacts of optical properties on radiative forcing due to dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Shi, G. Y.; Li, S. Y.; Li, W.; Wang, B.; Huang, Y. B.

    2006-05-01

    There are large uncertainties in the quantitative assessment of radiative effects due to atmospheric dust aerosol. The optical properties contribute much to those uncertainties. The authors perform several sensitivity experiments to estimate the impacts of optical characteristics on regional radiative forcing in this paper. The experiments involve in refractive indices, single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and optical depth. An updated dataset of refractive indices representing East Asian dust and the one recommended by the World Meteorology Organization (WMO) are contrastively analyzed and used. A radiative transfer code for solar and thermal infrared radiation with detailed aerosol parameterization is employed. The strongest emphasis is on the refractive indices since other optical parameters strongly depend on it, and the authors found a strong sensitivity of radiative forcing on refractive indices. Studies show stronger scattering, weaker absorption and forward scattering of the East Asian dust particles at solar wavelengths, which leads to higher negative forcing, lower positive forcing and bigger net forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) than that of the WMO dust model. It is also found that the TOA forcings resulting from these two dust models have opposite signs in certain regions, which implies the importance of accurate measurements of optical properties in the quantitative estimation of radiative forcing.

  2. Impact of lipid oxidization on biophysical properties of model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Makky, Ali; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-05-01

    The oxidization of glycerophospholipids in cell membranes due to aging and environmental stresses may cause a variety of pathological and physiological consequences. A variety of oxidized phospholipid products (OxPl) are produced by the chemical oxidization of unsaturated hydrocarbon chains, which would significantly change the physicochemical properties of cell membranes. In this work, we constructed cell membrane models in the absence and presence of two stable oxidized lipid products and investigated their impact on physical properties of supported membranes using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and high-energy X-ray reflectivity (XRR). Our experimental findings suggest that the lipid oxidization up to 20 mol % leads to the rupture of vesicles right after the adsorption. Our XRR analysis unravels the membrane thinning and the decrease in the lateral ordering of lipids, which can be explained by the decrease in the lateral packing of hydrocarbon chains. Further studies on mechanics of membranes incorporating oxidized lipids can be attributed to the decrease in the bending rigidity and the increase in the permeability. PMID:25870900

  3. Psychometric Properties of Croatian and Slovenian Short Form of Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Rener-Sitar, Ksenija; Petričević, Nikola; Čelebić, Asja; Marion, Ljubo

    2008-01-01

    Aim To develop Croatian and Slovenian versions of the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) Questionnaire. Methods The English original version of the OHIP questionnaire was translated into Croatian (OHIP-CRO14) and Slovenian (OHIP-SVN14) language by a forward-backward translation method. The psychometric properties of the OHIP-CRO14 and OHIP-SVN14 were tested. Concurrent validity was tested on 623 subjects (193 Croatian and 430 Slovenian), test-retest reliability on 115 subjects (55 Croatian and 60 Slovenian), internal consistency on 678 subjects (218 Croatian and 460 Slovenian), and responsiveness on 51 patients (21 Croatian and 30 Slovenian) in demand of treatment (toothache). Results Concurrent validity was confirmed by the association between the OHIP summary scores and self-reported oral health (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.40 to 0.60, P<0.001). Test-retest reliability showed high intraclass correlation (correlation coefficients, 0.79-0.94). Internal consistency showed high Cronbach α (0.77-0.91). Responsiveness was confirmed by a significant difference between the mean OHIP score at baseline and follow-up (P<0.001 for both Croatian and Slovenian patients) and high effect size in Croatian and Slovenian patients in demand of treatment (3.00 and 0.57, respectively). Conclusion Psychometric properties of OHIP-CRO14 and OHIP-SVN14 render these instruments suitable for the assessment of Oral Health Related Quality of Life in Croatia and Slovenia. PMID:18717001

  4. Using bacterial bioluminescence to evaluate the impact of biofilm on porous media hydraulic properties.

    PubMed

    Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D; Sen, Arindom

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm formation in natural and engineered porous systems can significantly impact hydrodynamics by reducing porosity and permeability. To better understand and characterize how biofilms influence hydrodynamic properties in porous systems, the genetically engineered bioluminescent bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was used to quantify microbial population characteristics and biofilm properties in a translucent porous medium. Power law relationships were found to exist between bacterial bioluminescence and cell density, fraction of void space occupied by biofilm (i.e. biofilm saturation), and hydraulic conductivity. The simultaneous evaluation of biofilm saturation and porous medium hydraulic conductivity in real time using a non-destructive approach enabled the construction of relative hydraulic conductivity curves. Such information can facilitate simulation studies related to biological activity in porous structures, and support the development of new models to describe the dynamic behavior of biofilm and fluid flow in porous media. The bioluminescence based approach described here will allow for improved understanding and control of industrially relevant processes such as biofiltration and bioremediation. PMID:25479429

  5. Impact of agglomeration on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Luc; Gossuin, Yves; Hocq, Aline; Fortin, Marc-André

    2011-07-01

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (US-Gd2O3) are used to provide 'positive' contrast effects in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and are being considered for molecular and cellular imaging applications. However, these nanoparticles can aggregate over time in aqueous medium, as well as when internalized into cells. This study is aimed at measuring in vitro, in aqueous medium, the impact of aggregation on the relaxometric properties of paramagnetic US-Gd2O3 particles. First, the nanoparticle core size as well as aggregation behaviour was assessed by HRTEM. DLS (hydrodynamic diameter) was used to measure the hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles and nanoaggregates. The relaxometric properties were measured by NMRD profiling, as well as with 1H NMR relaxometers. Then, the positive contrast enhancement effect was assessed by using magnetic resonance scanners (at 1.5 and 7 T). At every magnetic field, the longitudinal relaxivity (r1) decreased upon agglomeration, while remaining high enough to provide positive contrast. On the other hand, the transverse relaxivity (r2) slightly decreased at 0.47 and 1.41 T, but it was enhanced at higher fields (7 and 11.7 T) upon agglomeration. All NMRD profiles revealed a characteristic relaxivity peak in the range 60-100 MHz, suggesting the possibility to use US-Gd2O3 as an efficient 'positive-T1' contrast agent at clinical magnetic fields (1-3 T), in spite of aggregation.

  6. Evaluating the impact of aquifer layer properties on geomechanical response during CO2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin

    2013-04-01

    Numerical models play an essential role in understanding the facts of carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration in the life cycle of a storage reservoir. We present a series of test cases that reflect a broad and realistic range of aquifer reservoir properties to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts on the geomechanical response to CO2 injection. In this study, a coupled hydro-mechanical model was introduced to simulate the sequestration process, and a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was introduced to efficiently sample the value of aquifer properties and geometry parameters. Aquifer permeability was found to be of significant importance to the geomechanical response to the injection. To study the influence of uncertainty of the permeability distribution in the aquifer, an additional series of tests is presented, based on a default permeability distribution site sample with various distribution deviations generated by the Monte Carlo sampling method. The results of the test series show that different permeability distributions significantly affect the displacement and possible failure zone.

  7. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Hankin, G.L.

    1998-03-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  8. Impact of single and dual modifications on physicochemical properties of japonica and indica rice starches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Jin; Hong, Joo Yeon; Lee, Eun-Jung; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2015-05-20

    The japonica (JR) and indica (IR) rice starches were modified by acetylation, hydroxypropylation, cross-linking, and dual modification (cross-linked acetylation and cross-linked hydroxypropylation) and the effects of single and dual chemical modifications of JR and WR on the physicochemical properties were investigated. The JR had a greater substitution degree of acetyl or hydroxypropyl groups than IR. The dual-modified JR showed broader gelatinization temperature range than corresponding single-modified starches, but narrower it in IR. The dual-modified JR and IR showed higher pasting temperature and lower breakdown than their corresponding single-modified starches. The dual modification with JR and IR induced significant increase in gel hardness as compared to the corresponding unmodified and single-modified starches. The dual-modified JR had a greater hardness, gumminess, and chewiness than the dual-modified IR. The different impact of single and dual modification with JR and IR on the physicochemical properties could be due to the differences in the location and distribution of substituent groups on the starch molecules. PMID:25817645

  9. Impact of effective ocean optical properties on the Pacific subtropical cell: a CGCM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, G.; Tsujino, H.; Ishizaki, H.; Nakano, H.; Hirabara, M.

    2012-12-01

    The choice of ocean radiant scheme is important for modeling the upper ocean. According to the ocean-only simulation (Yamanaka et al., 2012), introduction of the chlorophyll-a dependent ocean radiant scheme results in the decreased mixed layer depth (MLD), the enhanced subtropical cell (STC), and the cooling of the eastern tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST). They also found that the enhanced STC results from the velocity profile change associated with the decreased Ekman boundary layer. However, the impact is not well understood when the air-sea feedback process is at work. This study examines the impact of the effective ocean optical properties on the Pacific mean fields, especially focusing on the STC, using a coupled general circulation model (CGCM). The CGCM we employed is the Meteorological Research Institute Earth System Model (MRI-ESM1). The atmospheric model is TL159L48, and the ocean model has a horizontal resolution of 1 x 0.5 deg. with 51 levels in vertical. Experimental design basically follows the CMIP5 protocol. Two experiments (CTL and SLR runs) are performed to investigate the impact of the effective ocean optical properties. In the CTL run, a conventional ocean radiant heating scheme (Paul and Simpson, 1977) is used, whereas a new ocean radiant heating scheme is used in the SLR run, where the satellite-derived chlorophyll-a distribution is taken into consideration based on Morel and Antoine (1994) as well as the effect of the varying solar angle (Ishizaki and Yamanaka, 2010). Each experiment is integrated during the period from 1985 to 2005. It is found that introduction of the new ocean radiant scheme (SLR run) changes the long-term mean wind pattern in the Pacific: easterly winds are strengthened in the equatorial Pacific, but weakened in the off-equatorial region. In the tropical Pacific, the enhanced equatorial upwelling cools the equatorial SST and the MLD becomes shallower. This is similar to the ocean-only simulation, but is more

  10. Impact of fluorine based reactive chemistry on structure and properties of high moment magnetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoyu Chen, Lifan; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Lianfeng; Sun, Ming; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jinqiu

    2014-05-07

    The impact of the fluorine-based reactive ion etch (RIE) process on the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of NiFe and CoNiFe-plated materials was investigated. Several techniques, including X-ray fluorescence, 4-point-probe, BH looper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), were utilized to characterize both bulk film properties such as thickness, average composition, Rs, ρ, Bs, Ms, and surface magnetic “dead” layers' properties such as thickness and element concentration. Experimental data showed that the majority of Rs and Bs changes of these bulk films were due to thickness reduction during exposure to the RIE process. ρ and Ms change after taking thickness reduction into account were negligible. The composition of the bulk films, which were not sensitive to surface magnetic dead layers with nano-meter scale, showed minimum change as well. It was found by TEM and EELS analysis that although both before and after RIE there were magnetic dead layers on the top surface of these materials, the thickness and element concentration of the layers were quite different. Prior to RIE, dead layer was actually native oxidation layers (about 2 nm thick), while after RIE dead layer consisted of two sub-layers that were about 6 nm thick in total. Sub-layer on the top was native oxidation layer, while the bottom layer was RIE “damaged” layer with very high fluorine concentration. Two in-situ RIE approaches were also proposed and tested to remove such damaged sub-layers.

  11. Biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon during SAMBBA: impact of chemical composition on radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Liu, Dantong; O'shea, Sebastian; Bauguitte, Stephane; Szpek, Kate; Langridge, Justin; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect but with the uncertainty being 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, both in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated

  12. A Review of the Property Value Approach to Measuring the Welfare Impact of an Externality Excerpt from NUREG/CR-0989, PNL-2952 Vol. II Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    RC. Adams

    1980-08-01

    This paper reviews 1) the quantitative measurement of the welfare impact due to an externality and 2) the empirical estimation of the welfare impact of an externality using the property value approach.

  13. Impact of roots, mycorrhizas and earthworms on soil physical properties as assessed by shrinkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milleret, R.; Le Bayon, R.-C.; Lamy, F.; Gobat, J.-M.; Boivin, P.

    2009-07-01

    SummarySoil biota such as earthworms, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots are known to play a major role in engineering the belowground part of the terrestrial ecosystems, thus strongly influencing the water budget and quality on earth. However, the effect of soil organisms and their interactions on the numerous soil physical properties to be considered are still poorly understood. Shrinkage analysis allows quantifying a large spectrum of soil properties in a single experiment, with small standard errors. The objectives of the present study were, therefore, to assess the ability of the method to quantify changes in soil properties as induced by single or combined effects of leek roots ( Allium porrum), AMF ( Glomus intraradices) and earthworms ( Allolobophora chlorotica). The study was performed on homogenised soil microcosms and the experiments lasted 35 weeks. The volume of the root network and the external fungal hyphae was measured at the end, and undisturbed soil cores were collected. Shrinkage analysis allowed calculating the changes in soil hydro-structural stability, soil plasma and structural pore volumes, soil bulk density and plant available water, and structural pore size distributions. Data analysis revealed different impacts of the experimented soil biota on the soil physical properties. At any water content, the presence of A. chlorotica resulted in a decrease of the specific bulk volume and the hydro-structural stability around 25%, and in a significant increase in the bulk soil density. These changes went with a decrease of the structural pore volumes at any pore size, a disappearing of the thinnest structural pores, a decrease in plant available water, and a hardening of the plasma. On the contrary, leek roots decreased the bulk soil density up to 1.23 g cm -3 despite an initial bulk density of 1.15 g cm -3. This increase in volume was accompanied with a enhanced hydro-structural stability, a larger structural pore volume at any

  14. Vertical migration of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis and the impact on ocean optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Oscar; Kerfoot, John; Mahoney, Kevin; Moline, Mark; Oliver, Matthew; Lohrenz, Steven; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2006-06-01

    Vertical migration behavior is found in many harmful algal blooms; however, the corresponding impact on ocean optical properties has not been quantified. A near-monospecific population of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis was encountered off the west coast of Florida. The community was tracked for 24 hours by following a Lagrangian drifter deployed at the beginning of the experiment. A suite of inherent optical and cellular measurements was made. Over the 24 hour period, the K. brevis population increased during the day with concentrations peaking in the late afternoon (1600 local daylight time) in the upper 2 m of the water column. The increase in K. brevis in surface waters resulted in enhanced reflectance at the sea surface with distinct spectral changes. There was a 22% decrease in the relative amount of the green reflectance due to increased pigment absorption. There was enhanced red (35%) and infrared (75%) light reflectance due to the increased particle backscatter and chlorophyll a fluorescence; however, the relative impact of the fluorescence was relatively small despite high cell numbers due to the significant fluorescence quenching present in K. brevis. The relative change in the blue light reflectance was not as large as the change in green light reflectance, which is surprising given the pigment absorption in the blue wavelengths of light. The increased blue light pigment absorption was offset by a significant decrease in nonalgal particle absorption. The inverse relationship between K. brevis and nonalgal particles was robust. This relationship may reflect low grazing on K. brevis populations due to the neurotoxins associated with this dinoflagellate. The low-grazing pressure may provide the mechanism by which this slow-growing dinoflagellate can achieve high cell numbers in the ocean.

  15. Quantifying the impact of AGN and nebular emission on stellar population properties with REBETIKO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, L. S. M.; Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral synthesis enables the reconstruction of the star formation and chemical evolution histories (SFH & CEH) of a galaxy that are encoded in its spectral energy distribution (SED). Most state-of-the-art population synthesis codes however consider only purely stellar emission and are hence inadequate for modelling studies of galaxies where non-stellar emission components contribute significantly to the SED. This work combines evolutionary and population synthesis techniques to quantify the impact of active galactic nucleus (AGN) and nebular emission on the determination of the stellar population properties in galaxies. We have developed an evolutionary synthesis code called REBETIKO - Reckoning galaxy Emission By means of Evolutionary Tasks with Input Key Observables - to compute and study the time evolution of the SED of AGN-hosts and starburst galaxies. Our code takes into account the main ingredients of a galaxy's SED (e.g. non-thermal emission and/or nebular continuum and lines) for various commonly used parameterizations of the SFH, such as instantaneous burst, constant, exponentially decreasing, and gradually increasing peaking at a redshift between 1-10. Synthetic SEDs computed with REBETIKO have been subsequently fitted with the STARLIGHT population synthesis code (PSC) which can be regarded as representative for currently available state-of-the-art (i.e. purely stellar) PSCs. The objective is to study the impact of non-stellar SED components on the recovery of the true total stellar mass M_{star} and SFH of a galaxy, as well as other evolutionary properties, such as CEH and light- and mass-weighted mean stellar age and metallicity. We find that purely stellar fits in galaxies with a strong non-stellar continuum (e.g. Seyfert and/or starburst galaxies) can for instance overestimate M_{star} by up to 3 orders of magnitude, while the mean stellar age and metallicity can deviate from their true values up to 2 and 4 dex, respectively. These results imply

  16. Martian subsurface properties and crater formation processes inferred from fresh impact crater geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Sarah T.; Valiant, Gregory J.

    2006-10-01

    The geometry of simple impact craters reflects the properties of the target materials, and the diverse range of fluidized morphologies observed in Martian ejecta blankets are controlled by the near-surface composition and the climate at the time of impact. Using the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data set, quantitative information about the strength of the upper crust and the dynamics of Martian ejecta blankets may be derived from crater geometry measurements. Here, we present the results from geometrical measurements of fresh craters 3-50 km in rim diameter in selected highland (Lunae and Solis Plana) and lowland (Acidalia, Isidis, and Utopia Planitiae) terrains. We find large, resolved differences between the geometrical properties of the freshest highland and lowland craters. Simple lowland craters are 1.5-2.0 times deeper (≥5σo difference) with >50% larger cavities (≥2σo) compared to highland craters of the same diameter. Rim heights and the volume of material above the preimpact surface are slightly greater in the lowlands over most of the size range studied. The different shapes of simple highland and lowland craters indicate that the upper ˜6.5 km of the lowland study regions are significantly stronger than the upper crust of the highland plateaus. Lowland craters collapse to final volumes of 45-70% of their transient cavity volumes, while highland craters preserve only 25-50%. The effective yield strength of the upper crust in the lowland regions falls in the range of competent rock, approximately 9-12 MPa, and the highland plateaus may be weaker by a factor of 2 or more, consistent with heavily fractured Noachian layered deposits. The measured volumes of continuous ejecta blankets and uplifted surface materials exceed the predictions from standard crater scaling relationships and Maxwell's Z model of crater excavation by a factor of 3. The excess volume of fluidized ejecta blankets on Mars cannot be explained by concentration of ejecta through

  17. Aircraft Measurements of Saharan dust properties and impact of atmospheric transport during Fennec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Claire; Highwood, Ellie; Rosenberg, Phil; Trembath, Jamie; Brooke, Jennifer; Bart, Mark; Dean, Angela; Dorsey, James; Crosier, Jonny; McQuaid, Jim; Brindley, Helen; Banks, James; Marsham, John; Sodemann, Harald; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of Saharan dust from recent airborne campaigns have found variations in size distributions and optical properties across Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa. These variations have an impact on radiation and thus weather and climate, and are important to characterise and understand, in particular, to understand how they vary with time after dust uplift, transport, and height in the atmosphere. New in-situ aircraft measurements from the Fennec 2011 aircraft campaign over a remote part of the Sahara Desert and the Atlantic Ocean will be presented and compared to previous airborne measurements. Size distributions extending to 300 μm will be shown, representing measurements extending further into the coarse mode than previously published for Saharan dust. The dust sampled by the aircraft covered a wide variety of loadings, dust source regions (Mali, Mauritania and Algeria) and dust ages (from fresh uplift to several days old). A significant coarse mode was present in the size distribution measurements with effective diameter up to 23 μm, and the mean size distribution showed greater concentrations of coarse mode than previous aircraft measurements. Single scattering albedo (SSA) values at 550nm calculated from these size distributions revealed high absorption from 0.77 to 0.95, with a mean of 0.85. Directly measured SSA values were higher (0.91 to 0.99) but new instrumentation revealed that these direct measurements, behind Rosemount inlets, overestimate the SSA by 0.02 to 0.20 depending on the concentration of coarse particles present. This is caused by inlet inefficiencies and pipe losses. Previous measurements of SSA from aircraft measurements may also have been overestimates for this reason. This has a significant impact on atmospheric heating rates. The largest dust particles were encountered closest to the ground, and were most abundant in cases where dust was freshly uplifted. Number concentration, mass loading and extinction coefficient showed inverse

  18. Impact of land use practices on faunal abundance, nutrient dynamics and biochemical properties of desert pedoecosystem.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, G; Sharma, B M

    2005-11-01

    Increased dependence of resource-poor rural communities on soils of low inherent fertility are the major problem of desert agroecosystem. Agrisilviculture practices may help to conserve the soil biota for maintaining essential soil properties and processes in harsh climate. Therefore, the impacts of different land use systems on faunal density, nutrient dynamics and biochemical properties of soil were studied in agrisilviculture system of Indian desert. The selected fields had trees (Zizyphus mauritiana, Prosopis cineraria, Acacia nilotica) and crops (Cuminum cyminum, Brassica nigra, Triticum aestivum) in different combinations. Populations of Acari, Myriapoda, Coleoptera, Collembola, other soil arthropods and total soil fauna showed significant changes with respect to different land use practices and tree species, indicating a strong relation between above and below ground biodiversity. The Coleoptera exhibited greatest association with all agrisilviculture fields. The Z. mauritiana system indicated highest facilitative effects (RTE value) on all groups of soil fauna. Soil temperature, moisture, organic carbon, nitrate- and ammonical-nitrogen, available phosphorus, soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity were greater under tree than that of tree plus cropping system. It showed accumulation of nitrate-nitrogen in tree field and more utilization by crops in cultivated lands. Positive and significant correlation among organic carbon, nitrate- and ammonical-nitrogen, phosphorus, soil respiration and dehydrogenase activity clearly reflects increase in soil nutrients with the increase in microbial and other biotic activity. P. cineraria field was the best pedoecosystem, while C. cyminum was the best winter crop for cultivation in desert agroforestry system for soil biological health and soil sustainability. The increase in organic carbon, soil nutrients and microbial activity is associated with the increase in soil faunal population which reflect role of soil fauna

  19. Modeling of the Tritium Impact on Mechanical Properties of Structural Materials by Radiogenic Helium and Hydrogen Synergetic Effect Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Boitsov, I.E.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Zlatoustovskiy, S.V.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.

    2005-07-15

    The paper presents results of tritium-structural materials interaction modeling by simultaneous exposure to radiogenic helium-3 and hydrogen (both dissolved and external). This method of synergetic effect of radiogenic helium-3 and hydrogen is a radiation-safe technique to study the tritium impact on mechanical properties of structural materials. Applicability of the method is illustrated by technique and research results on the impact of high-pressure hydrogen (80MPa), helium-3 (concentration {approx}140appm) and their synergetic (hydrogen+{sup 3}He) effects on mechanical properties of CrNi40MoCuTiAl alloy in temperature range from 20 to 600 deg. C. It has been shown that joint effect of radiogenic helium-3 and hydrogen on mechanical properties of alloy can not be represented as the result of a simple summation of helium and hydrogen embrittlement. Proposed technique of synergetic impact of radiogenic helium-3 and hydrogen allows more correct simulation and investigation in the tritium impact on mechanical properties of materials than individual research in helium or hydrogen embrittlement.

  20. School Improvement and Urban Renewal: The Impact of a Turnaround School's Performance on Real Property Values in Its Surrounding Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen L.; Szczesek, Jill

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of a "turnaround" school on real property values in its surrounding community as related to the argument introduced by Tiebout in 1956 correlating local public goods, in this case school success, to housing-location decision making. Using single-family home sales found on the Multiple Listing System and…

  1. Impact of the substitution of rice bran on rheological properties of dough and in the new product development.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice bran is a nutrient-rich co-product of the rice milling industries. The impact of adding 2-20% rice bran in wheat flour on the rheological behavior of the dough was investigated using the instruments, Farinograph, Consistograph, and Alveograph. The changes in physico-chemical properties were fo...

  2. 75 FR 65372 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Fee-to-Trust Conveyance of Property for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...This notice advises the public that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is making available for public review the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the proposed conveyance of 125 acres of land that is currently held by the Cayuga Nation of New York in fee status into trust status. The uses of the properties, which include two convenience stores, would not change. The......

  3. Impact of a low intensity controlled-fire in some chemical soil properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Murillo, Juan F.; Hueso-González, Paloma; Aranda-Gómez, Francisco; Damián Ruiz-Sinoga, José

    2014-05-01

    Some changes in chemical soil properties can be observed after fires of low intensities. pH and electric conductivity tend to increase, while C/N ratio decrease. In the case of organic matter, the content can increase due to the massive incorporation of necromass including, especially, plants and roots. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of low intensity and controlled fire in some soil properties in field conditions. El Pinarillo experimental area is located in South of Spain. Two set of closed plots were installed (24 m2: 12 m length x 2 m width). One of them was remained as control with the original vegetation cover (Mediterranean matorral: Rosmarinus officinalis, Cistus clusii, Lavandula stoechas, Chamaeropos humilis, Thymus baetica), and the other one was burnt in a controlled-fire in 2011. Weather conditions and water content of vegetation influenced in the intensity of fire (low). After the controlled-fire, soil surface sample (0-5 cm) were taken in both set of plots (B, burnt soil samples; C, control soil samples). Some soil chemical properties were analysed: organic matter content (OM), C/N ratio, pH and electrical conductivity (EC). Some changes were observed in B corroborating a controlled-fire of low intensity. pH remained equal after fire (B: pH=7.7±0.11; C: pH=7.7±0.04). An increment was obtained in the case of EC (B: EC=0.45 mScm-1±0.08 mScm-1; C: EC=0.35 mScm-1±0.07 mScm-1) and OM (B: OM=8.7%±3.8%; C: pH=7.3%±1.5%). Finally, C/N ratio decreased after fire respect to the control and initial conditions (B: C/N=39.0±14.6; C: C/N =46.5±10.2).

  4. The impact of antibiotics (benzylpenicillin, and nystatin) on the biological properties of ordinary chernozems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimenko, Yu. V.; Kazeev, K. Sh.; Kolesnikov, S. I.

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the input of antibiotics into soils has sharply increased. We studied the impact antibiotics (benzylpenicillin, pharmasin, and nystatin) at different concentrations (100 and 600 mg/kg) on population densities of microorganisms and enzymatic activity of ordinary chernozems in model experiments. The applied doses of antibiotics had definite suppressing effects on population densities of microorganisms (up to 30-70% of the control) and on the soil enzymatic activity (20-70% of the control). Correlation analysis showed close correlation between the concentrations of antibiotics and the population densities of soil microorganisms ( r = -0.68-0.86). Amylolytic bacteria had the highest resistance to the antibiotics, whereas ammonifying bacteria had the lowest resistance. Among the studied enzymes belonging to oxidoreductases and hydrolases, catalase and phosphatase had the highest and the lowest resistance to the antibiotics, respectively. The effect of antibiotics on the biological properties of the chernozem lasted for a long time. The studied parameters were not completely recovered in 120 days.

  5. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    To use graphite/PEEK material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. The mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results are presented for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber interleaved with PEEK film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 98 pct. of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape materials. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 pct. of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of the fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 pct. of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate.

  6. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Velmourougane, Kulandaivelu

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  7. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  8. Impact of Organic and Conventional Systems of Coffee Farming on Soil Properties and Culturable Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken with an objective of evaluating the long-term impacts of organic (ORG) and conventional (CON) methods of coffee farming on soil physical, chemical, biological, and microbial diversity. Electrical conductivity and bulk density were found to increase by 34% and 21%, respectively, in CON compared to ORG system, while water holding capacity was found decreased in both the systems. Significant increase in organic carbon was observed in ORG system. Major nutrients, nitrogen and potassium, levels showed inclination in both ORG and CON system, but the trend was much more pronounced in CON system. Phosphorus was found to increase in both ORG and CON system, but its availability was found to be more with CON system. In biological attributes, higher soil respiration and fluorescein diacetate activity were recorded in ORG system compared to CON system. Higher soil urease activity was observed in CON system, while dehydrogenase activity does not show significant differences between ORG and CON systems. ORG system was found to have higher macrofauna (31.4%), microbial population (34%), and microbial diversity indices compared to CON system. From the present study, it is accomplished that coffee soil under long-term ORG system has better soil properties compared to CON system. PMID:27042378

  9. Modeling the impact of conservation agriculture on crop production and soil properties in Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussadek, Rachid; Mrabet, Rachid; Dahan, Rachid; Laghrour, Malika; Lembiad, Ibtissam; ElMourid, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    In Morocco, rainfed agriculture is practiced in the majority of agricultural land. However, the intensive land use coupled to the irregular rainfall constitutes a serious threat that affect country's food security. Conservation agriculture (CA) represents a promising alternative to produce more and sustainably. In fact, the direct seeding showed high yield in arid regions of Morocco but its extending to other more humid agro-ecological zones (rainfall > 350mm) remains scarce. In order to promote CA in Morocco, differents trials have been installed in central plateau of Morocco, to compare CA to conventional tillage (CT). The yields of the main practiced crops (wheat, lentil and checkpea) under CA and CT were analyzed and compared in the 3 soils types (Vertisol, Cambisol and Calcisol). Also, we studied the effect of CA on soil organic matter (SOM) and soil losses (SL) in the 3 different sites. The APSIM model was used to model the long term impact of CA compared to CT. The results obtained in this research have shown favorable effects of CA on crop production, SOM and soil erosion. Key words: Conservation agriculture, yield, soil properties, modeling, APSIM, Morocco.

  10. Fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties of several RAFMS before and after irradiation in HFIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. A.; Tanigawa, H.; Odette, G. R.; Shiba, K.; Klueh, R. L.

    2007-08-01

    As part of the development of candidate reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion applications, several steels, namely F82H, 9Cr-2WVTa steels and F82H weld metal, are being investigated in the joint DOE-JAEA collaboration program. Within this program, three capsules containing a variety of specimen designs were irradiated at two design temperatures in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Two capsules, RB-11J and RB-12J, were irradiated in the HFIR removable beryllium positions with europium oxide (Eu 2O 3) thermal neutron shields in place. Specimens were irradiated up to 5 dpa. Capsule JP25 was irradiated in the HFIR target position to 20 dpa. The design temperatures were 300 °C and 500 °C. Precracked third-sized V-notch Charpy (3.3 × 3.3 × 25.4 mm) and 0.18 T DC(T) specimens were tested to determine transition and ductile shelf fracture toughness before and after irradiation. The master curve methodology was applied to evaluate the fracture toughness transition temperature, T0. Irradiation induced shifts of T0 and reductions of JQ were compared with Charpy V-notch impact properties. Fracture toughness and Charpy shifts were also compared to hardening results.

  11. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell

    PubMed Central

    Janmaleki, M.; Pachenari, M.; Seyedpour, S. M.; Shahghadami, R.; Sanati-Nezhad, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton. PMID:27581365

  12. Deposition velocities and impact of physical properties on ozone removal for building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the ozone deposition velocities of eight commonly used building materials (BMs) which include calcium silicate board (CSB), green calcium silicate board (GCSB), mineral fiber ceiling (MFC), green mineral fiber ceiling (GMFC), gypsum board (GB), green gypsum board (GGB), wooden flooring (WF) and green wooden flooring (GWF). In addition, the impact of physical properties (specific surface area and total pore volume of BM) on ozone removal ability was also explored and discussed. Studies were conducted in a small-scale environmental stainless steel chamber. CSB and GCSB showed the highest ozone deposition velocities, while WF and GWF showed the lowest ozone deposition velocities among test BMs materials. All reaction probabilities were estimated to fall within the order of magnitude of 10-6. Green BMs showed lower reaction probabilities with ozone comparing with non-green BMs except for GGB. Consistent with the trends for deposition velocity, fleecy and porous materials exhibit higher reaction probabilities than smooth, non-porous surfaces. Specific surface area of BM is more closely related to ozone removal than total pore volume of BM with R2 of 0.93 vs. R2 of 0.84. Discussion of Thiele modulus for all test BMs indicates surface reactions are occurring quickly relative to internal diffusion and ozone removal is internal diffusion-limited.

  13. Chemical precursor impact on the properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashistha, Indu B.; Sharma, Mahesh C.; Sharma, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    In present work impact of different chemical precursor on the deposition of solar absorber layer Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) were studied by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) method without using expensive vacuum facilities and followed by annealing. As compared to the other deposition methods, CBD method is interesting one because it is simple, reproducible, non-hazardous, cost effective and well suited for producing large-area thin films at low temperatures, although effect of precursors and concentration plays a vital role in the deposition. So, the central theme of this work is optimizing and controlling of chemical reactions for different chemical precursors. Further Effect of different chemical precursors i.e. sulphate and chloride is analyzed by structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) of annealed CZTS thin film revealed that films were polycrystalline in nature with kestarite tetragonal crystal structure. The Atomic Force micrographs (AFM) images indicated total coverage compact film and as well as growth of crystals. The band gap of annealed CZTS films was found in the range of optimal band gap by absorption spectroscopy.

  14. Variability of aerosol optical depth and their impact on cloud properties in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan; Khan, Rehana; Blaschke, Thomas; Mukhtiar, Azam

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes seasonal and temporal variations in aerosol optical depth (AOD), and the impact of these variations on the properties of clouds over five cities in Pakistan, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, obtained from the Terra satellite during the period (2001-2011). The obtained results indicated seasonal variation in AOD, with a high value of 2.3, in summer and low values of 0.2, in winter for the costal part of the region. The relationship between AOD and other cloud parameters, namely water vapor (WV), cloud fraction (CF), cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (CLWP), cloud top temperature (CTT), and cloud top pressure (CTP) were analyzed. On a temporal scale, latitudinal variations of both WV and AOD produce high correlations (>0.6) in some regions, and moderate correlations (0.4-0.6) in the other regions. An increasing trend in CF with AOD was found over urban regions in the period of observations. The CF values were higher for Lahore than the other selected regions during the whole period. During autumn and winter seasons the correlation was found to be positive between AOD and CLWP, while negative correlation was observed during the other seasons for all the selected regions. COT showed negative correlation with AOD at all locations except Karachi during spring and summer seasons.

  15. The formation, properties and impact of secondary organic aerosol: current and emerging issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallquist, M.; Wenger, J. C.; Baltensperger, U.; Rudich, Y.; Simpson, D.; Claeys, M.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; George, C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hamilton, J. F.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Iinuma, Y.; Jang, M.; Jenkin, M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Maenhaut, W.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, Th. F.; Monod, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Szmigielski, R.; Wildt, J.

    2009-02-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a significant fraction of ambient tropospheric aerosol and a detailed knowledge of the formation, properties and transformation of SOA is therefore required to evaluate its impact on atmospheric processes, climate and human health. The chemical and physical processes associated with SOA formation are complex and varied, and, despite considerable progress in recent years, a quantitative and predictive understanding of SOA formation does not exist and therefore represents a major research challenge in atmospheric science. This review begins with a description of the current state of knowledge on the global SOA budget and the atmospheric degradation mechanisms for SOA precursors. The topic of gas-particle partitioning theory is followed by an account of the analytical techniques used to determine the chemical composition of SOA. A survey of recent laboratory, field and modeling studies is also presented. The following topical and emerging issues are highlighted and discussed in detail; molecular characterization of biogenic SOA constituents, condensed phase reactions and oligomerization, the interaction of atmospheric organic components with sulfuric acid, the chemical and photochemical processing of organics in the atmospheric aqueous phase, aerosol formation from real plant emissions, interaction of atmospheric organic components with water, thermodynamics and mixtures in atmospheric models. Finally, the major challenges ahead in laboratory, field and modeling studies of SOA are discussed and recommendations for future research directions are proposed.

  16. The formation, properties and impact of secondary organic aerosol: current and emerging issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallquist, M.; Wenger, J. C.; Baltensperger, U.; Rudich, Y.; Simpson, D.; Claeys, M.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; George, C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hamilton, J. F.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Iinuma, Y.; Jang, M.; Jenkin, M. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Maenhaut, W.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, Th. F.; Monod, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Szmigielski, R.; Wildt, J.

    2009-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a significant fraction of ambient tropospheric aerosol and a detailed knowledge of the formation, properties and transformation of SOA is therefore required to evaluate its impact on atmospheric processes, climate and human health. The chemical and physical processes associated with SOA formation are complex and varied, and, despite considerable progress in recent years, a quantitative and predictive understanding of SOA formation does not exist and therefore represents a major research challenge in atmospheric science. This review begins with an update on the current state of knowledge on the global SOA budget and is followed by an overview of the atmospheric degradation mechanisms for SOA precursors, gas-particle partitioning theory and the analytical techniques used to determine the chemical composition of SOA. A survey of recent laboratory, field and modeling studies is also presented. The following topical and emerging issues are highlighted and discussed in detail: molecular characterization of biogenic SOA constituents, condensed phase reactions and oligomerization, the interaction of atmospheric organic components with sulfuric acid, the chemical and photochemical processing of organics in the atmospheric aqueous phase, aerosol formation from real plant emissions, interaction of atmospheric organic components with water, thermodynamics and mixtures in atmospheric models. Finally, the major challenges ahead in laboratory, field and modeling studies of SOA are discussed and recommendations for future research directions are proposed.

  17. Impact of Simulated Microgravity on Cytoskeleton and Viscoelastic Properties of Endothelial Cell.

    PubMed

    Janmaleki, M; Pachenari, M; Seyedpour, S M; Shahghadami, R; Sanati-Nezhad, A

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of simulated microgravity (s-μg) on mechanical properties, major cytoskeleton biopolymers, and morphology of endothelial cells (ECs). The structural and functional integrity of ECs are vital to regulate vascular homeostasis and prevent atherosclerosis. Furthermore, these highly gravity sensitive cells play a key role in pathogenesis of many diseases. In this research, impacts of s-μg on mechanical behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by utilizing a three-dimensional random positioning machine (3D-RPM). Results revealed a considerable drop in cell stiffness and viscosity after 24 hrs of being subjected to weightlessness. Cortical rigidity experienced relatively immediate and significant decline comparing to the stiffness of whole cell body. The cells became rounded in morphology while western blot analysis showed reduction of the main cytoskeletal components. Moreover, fluorescence staining confirmed disorganization of both actin filaments and microtubules (MTs). The results were compared statistically among test and control groups and it was concluded that s-μg led to a significant alteration in mechanical behavior of ECs due to remodeling of cell cytoskeleton. PMID:27581365

  18. Ion-π interaction in impacting the nonlinear optical properties of ion-buckybowl complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Wang, Wen-Yong; Wang, Li; Zhu, Chang-Li; Fang, Xin-Yan; Qiu, Yong-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Ion-buckybowl complexes have received considerable attention in modern chemical research due to its fundamental and practical importance. Herein, we performed density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the geometical structure, binding interactions, dipole moments and the first hyperpolarizabilities (βtot) of ion-buckybowl complexes (ions are Cl(-) and Na(+), buckybowls are quadrannulene, corannulene and sumanene). It is found that the stabilities of ion-buckybowl compounds primarily originate from the interaction energy, which was proved by a new isomerization energy decomposition analysis approach. Plots of reduced density gradient mirror the ion-π weak interaction has been formed between the ions and buckybowls. Significantly, the buckybowl subunits cannot effectively impact the nonlinear optical (NLO), but the kind of ion has marked influence on the second-order NLO responses. The βtot values of Cl(-)-buckybowl complexes are all larger as compared to that of Na(+)-buckybowl complexes, which is attributed to the large charge-transfer (CT) from Cl(-) to buckybowl. Our present work will be beneficial for further theoretical and experimental studies on the NLO properties of ion-buckybowl compounds. PMID:26851864

  19. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2009-12-02

    With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering wind power development nearby, there is an urgent need to empirically investigate common community concerns about wind project development. The concern that property values will be adversely affected by wind energy facilities is commonly put forth by stakeholders. Although this concern is not unreasonable, given property value impacts that have been found near high voltage transmission lines and other electric generation facilities, the impacts of wind energy facilities on residential property values had not previously been investigated thoroughly. The present research collected data on almost 7,500 sales of singlefamily homes situated within 10 miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from eight different hedonic pricing models, as well as both repeat sales and sales volume models. The various analyses are strongly consistent in that none of the models uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts that might be present in communities surrounding wind energy facilities. Specifically, neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have any consistent, measurable, and statistically significant effect on home sales prices. Although the analysis cannot dismiss the possibility that individual homes or small numbers of homes have been or could be negatively impacted, it finds that if these impacts do exist, they are either too small and/or too infrequent to result in any widespread, statistically observable impact.

  20. The Rational Design of Selective Benzoxazepin Inhibitors of the α-Isoform of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Culminating in the Identification of (S)-2-((2-(1-Isopropyl-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-yl)-5,6-dihydrobenzo[f]imidazo[1,2-d][1,4]oxazepin-9-yl)oxy)propanamide (GDC-0326).

    PubMed

    Heffron, Timothy P; Heald, Robert A; Ndubaku, Chudi; Wei, BinQing; Augistin, Martin; Do, Steven; Edgar, Kyle; Eigenbrot, Charles; Friedman, Lori; Gancia, Emanuela; Jackson, Philip S; Jones, Graham; Kolesnikov, Aleksander; Lee, Leslie B; Lesnick, John D; Lewis, Cristina; McLean, Neville; Mörtl, Mario; Nonomiya, Jim; Pang, Jodie; Price, Steve; Prior, Wei Wei; Salphati, Laurent; Sideris, Steve; Staben, Steven T; Steinbacher, Stefan; Tsui, Vickie; Wallin, Jeffrey; Sampath, Deepak; Olivero, Alan G

    2016-02-11

    Inhibitors of the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoform PI3Kα have received substantial attention for their potential use in cancer therapy. Despite the particular attraction of targeting PI3Kα, achieving selectivity for the inhibition of this isoform has proved challenging. Herein we report the discovery of inhibitors of PI3Kα that have selectivity over the other class I isoforms and all other kinases tested. In GDC-0032 (3, taselisib), we previously minimized inhibition of PI3Kβ relative to the other class I insoforms. Subsequently, we extended our efforts to identify PI3Kα-specific inhibitors using PI3Kα crystal structures to inform the design of benzoxazepin inhibitors with selectivity for PI3Kα through interactions with a nonconserved residue. Several molecules selective for PI3Kα relative to the other class I isoforms, as well as other kinases, were identified. Optimization of properties related to drug metabolism then culminated in the identification of the clinical candidate GDC-0326 (4). PMID:26741947

  1. Impact properties of three-dimensional braided graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J. C.; Sankar, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of the response and damage of three-dimensional braided graphite/epoxy composite due to sub-perforation velocity impact was carried out in this research. Simply supported square plates were impacted with an instrumented impact pendulum and also a projectile fired by a gas gun. Hemispherical nose impactors of two different diameters, 12.7 mm and 25.4 mm, were used in the pendulum tests. In addition, static flexure tests were performed. Impact damage was assessed using X-radiography, and compression after impact tests. Damages involved in impacted braided panel are matrix cracking in resin pockets, separation of fiber tows, and fiber two breakage, mostly in fiber bundle crimp areas. A quasi-isotropic laminate was impact tested with pendulum for comparison of impact tolerance between the two composite systems.

  2. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, cloud droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. The effect extends ~800 to 1000 km from shore. The additional particles are mainly sulfates from anthropogenic sources. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Analysis of the droplet residual measurements showed that not only were there more residual nuclei near shore, but that they tended to be larger than those offshore. Single particle analysis over a broad particle size range was used to reveal types and sources of CCN, which were primarily sulfates near shore. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed due to the preferential activation of large aerosol particles. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, which initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. However, the scavenging efficiency is not sharp as expected from a simple parcel activation model. A wide range of

  3. Impact damage resistance and residual property assessment of (0/+/-45/90)s SCS-6/Timetal 21S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jennifer L.; Portanova, Marc A.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1995-01-01

    The impact damage resistance and residual mechanical properties of (0/ +/- 45/90)s SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites were evaluated. Both quasi-static indentation and drop-weight impact tests were used to investigate the impact behavior at two nominal energy levels (5.5 and 8.4 J) and determine the onset of internal damage. Through x-ray inspection, the extent of internal damage was characterized non-destructively. The composite strength and constant amplitude fatigue response were evaluated to assess the effects of the sustained damage. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize internal damage from impact in comparison to damage that occurs during mechanical loading alone. The effect of stacking sequence was examined by using specimens with the long dimension of the specimen both parallel (longitudinal) and perpendicular (transverse) to the 0 deg fiber direction. Damage in the form of longitudinal and transverse cracking occurred in all longitudinal specimens tested at energies greater than 6.3 J. Similar results occurred in the transverse specimens tested above 5.4 J. Initial load drop, characteristic of the onset of damage, occurred on average at 6.3 J in longitudinal specimens and at 5.0 J in transverse specimens. X-ray analysis showed broken fibers in the impacted region in specimens tested at the higher impact energies. At low impact energies, visible matrix cracking may occur, but broken fibers may not. Matrix cracking was noted along fiber swims and it appeared to depend on the surface quality of composite. At low impact energies, little damage has been incurred by the composite and the residual strength and residual life is not greatly reduced as compared to an undamaged composite. At higher impact energies, more damage occurred and a greater effect of the impact damage was observed.

  4. Experimental Techniques for Evaluating the Effects of Aging on Impact and High Strain Rate Properties of Triaxial Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Gilat, Amos; Matrka, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to measure the impact and high strain rate properties of triaxial braided composite materials and to quantify any degradation in properties as a result of thermal and hygroscopic aging typically encountered during service. Impact tests are being conducted on flat panels using a projectile designed to induce high rate deformation similar to that experienced in a jet engine fan case during a fan blade-out event. The tests are being conducted on as-fabricated panels and panels subjected to various numbers of aging cycles. High strain rate properties are being measured using a unique Hopkinson bar apparatus that has a larger diameter than conventional Hopkinson bars. This larger diameter is needed to measure representative material properties because of the large unit cell size of the materials examined in this work. In this paper the experimental techniques used for impact and high strain rate testing are described and some preliminary results are presented for both as-fabricated and aged composites.

  5. The Impacts of Thermal and Smouldering Remediation on Soil Properties Related to Rehabilitation and Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, A.; Knapp, C.; Switzer, C.

    2012-04-01

    Tens of thousands of sites worldwide are contaminated with toxic non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) reducing their economic and environmental value. As a result a number of treatments involving heat and smouldering have been developed to desorb and extract or destroy these contaminants including; steam injection (<110°C), electrical heating (<110°C), microwave heating (ambient to 400°C),conductive heating (ambient to 800°C) and in-situ smouldering (800°C to 1200°C). Implemented correctly these treatments are efficient enough for the soil to be safe for use, but the heating may unintentionally reduce the capability of the soil to act as a growing media. To investigate the effects of elevated temperature soils samples were heated at fixed temperatures (ambient to 1000°C) for one hour or smouldered after artificial contamination. Temperatures up to 105°C resulted in very little change in soil properties but at 250°C nutrients became more available. At 500°C little organic matter or nitrogen remained in the soil and clay sized particles started to decompose and aggregate. By 1000°C total and available phosphorus were very low, cation exchange capacity had been reduced, pH had increased and the clay fraction had been completely lost. Similar changes were observed in smouldered soils with variations dependent upon remediation conditions. As a result the smouldered soils will require nutrient supplementation to facilitate plant growth. Nutrient addition will also improve the physical properties of the soil and serve to re-inoculate it with microbes, particularly if an organic source such as compost or sewage sludge is used. The soils may remain effective growing media during lower temperature treatments; however some sort of soil inoculant would also be beneficial as these temperatures are sufficient to sterilise the system, which may impact nutrient cycling. Further work involving months-long exposure to the elevated temperatures that are typical of thermal

  6. Quantifying the impact of lithology upon the mechanical properties of rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherley, Dion

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of rock, its lithology, undoubtedly influences its deformation under natural or engineering loads. Mineral texture, micro-damage, joints, bedding planes, inclusions, unconformities and faults are all postulated to alter the mechanical response of rock on different scales and under different stressing conditions. Whilst laboratory studies have elucidated some aspects of the relationship between lithology and mechanical properties, these small-scale results are difficult to extrapolate to lithospheric scales. To augment laboratory-derived knowledge, physics-based numerical modelling is a promising avenue [3]. Bonded particle models implemented using the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) are a practical numerical laboratory to investigate the interplay between lithology and the mechanical response of rock specimens [4]. Numerical rock specimens are represented as an assembly of indivisible spherical particles connected to nearest neighbours via brittle-elastic beams which impart forces and moments upon one-another as particles move relative to each other. By applying boundary forces and solving Newton's Laws for each particle, elastic deformation and brittle failure may be simulated [2]. Each beam interaction is defined by four model parameters: Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, cohesive strength and internal friction angle. Beam interactions in different subvolumes of the specimen are assigned different parameters to model different rock types or mineral assemblages. Micro-cracks, joints, unconformities and faults are geometrically incorporated by fitting particles to either side of triangulated surfaces [5]. The utility of this modelling approach is verified by reproducing analytical results from fracture mechanics (Griffith crack propagation and wing-crack formation) and results of controlled laboratory investigations. To quantify the impact of particular lithologic structures on mechanical response, a range of control experiments are

  7. The psychomechanics of simulated sound sources: material properties of impacted bars.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Stephen; Chaigne, Antoine; Roussarie, Vincent

    2004-03-01

    Sound can convey information about the materials composing an object that are often not directly available to the visual system. Material and geometric properties of synthesized impacted bars with a tube resonator were varied, their perceptual structure was inferred from multidimensional scaling of dissimilarity judgments, and the psychophysical relations between the two were quantified. Constant cross-section bars varying in mass density and viscoelastic damping coefficient were synthesized with a physical model in experiment 1. A two-dimensional perceptual space resulted, and the dimensions were correlated with the mechanical parameters after applying a power-law transformation. Variable cross-section bars varying in length and viscoelastic damping coefficient were synthesized in experiment 2 with two sets of lengths creating high- and low-pitched bars. In the low-pitched bars, there was a coupling between the bar and the resonator that modified the decay characteristics. Perceptual dimensions again corresponded to the mechanical parameters. A set of potential temporal, spectral, and spectrotemporal correlates of the auditory representation were derived from the signal. The dimensions related to mass density and bar length were correlated with the frequency of the lowest partial and are related to pitch perception. The correlate most likely to represent the viscoelastic damping coefficient across all three stimulus sets is a linear combination of a decay constant derived from the temporal envelope and the spectral center of gravity derived from a cochlear representation of the signal. These results attest to the perceptual salience of energy-loss phenomena in sound source behavior. PMID:15058353

  8. Impact of controlled particle size nanofillers on the mechanical properties of segmented polyurethane nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Finnigan, Bradley; Casey, Phil; Cookson, David; Halley, Peter; Jack, Kevin; Truss, Rowan; Martin, Darren

    2008-04-02

    The impact of average layered silicate particle size on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanocomposites has been investigated. At fixed addition levels (3 wt% organosilicate), an increase in average particle size resulted in an increase in stiffness. Negligible stiffening was observed for the smallest particles (30 nm) due to reduced long-range intercalation and molecular confinement, as well as ineffective stress transfer from matrix to filler. At low strain ({le}100%), an increase in filler particle size was associated with an increase in the rate of stress relaxation, tensile hysteresis, and permanent set. At high strain (1200%), two coexisting relaxation processes were observed. The rate of the slower (long-term) relaxation process, which is believed to primarily involve the hard segment rich structures, decreased on addition of particles with an average diameter of 200 nm or less. At high strain the tensile hysteresis was less sensitive to particle size, however the addition of particles with an average size of 200 nm or more caused a significant increase in permanent set. This was attributed to slippage of temporary bonds at the polymer-filler interface, and to the formation of voids at the sites of unaligned tactoids. Relative to the host TPU, the addition of particles with an average size of 30 nm caused a reduction in permanent set. This is a significant result because the addition of fillers to elastomers has long been associated with an increase in hysteresis and permanent set. At high strain, well dispersed and aligned layered silicates with relatively small interparticle distances and favourable surface interactions are capable of imparting a resistance to molecular slippage throughout the TPU matrix.

  9. The psychomechanics of simulated sound sources: Material properties of impacted bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, Stephen; Chaigne, Antoine; Roussarie, Vincent

    2004-03-01

    Sound can convey information about the materials composing an object that are often not directly available to the visual system. Material and geometric properties of synthesized impacted bars with a tube resonator were varied, their perceptual structure was inferred from multidimensional scaling of dissimilarity judgments, and the psychophysical relations between the two were quantified. Constant cross-section bars varying in mass density and viscoelastic damping coefficient were synthesized with a physical model in experiment 1. A two-dimensional perceptual space resulted, and the dimensions were correlated with the mechanical parameters after applying a power-law transformation. Variable cross-section bars varying in length and viscoelastic damping coefficient were synthesized in experiment 2 with two sets of lengths creating high- and low-pitched bars. In the low-pitched bars, there was a coupling between the bar and the resonator that modified the decay characteristics. Perceptual dimensions again corresponded to the mechanical parameters. A set of potential temporal, spectral, and spectrotemporal correlates of the auditory representation were derived from the signal. The dimensions related to mass density and bar length were correlated with the frequency of the lowest partial and are related to pitch perception. The correlate most likely to represent the viscoelastic damping coefficient across all three stimulus sets is a linear combination of a decay constant derived from the temporal envelope and the spectral center of gravity derived from a cochlear representation of the signal. These results attest to the perceptual salience of energy-loss phenomena in sound source behavior.

  10. Variability of Aerosol and its Impact on Cloud Properties Over Different Cities of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan

    Interaction between aerosols and clouds is the subject of considerable scientific research, due to the importance of clouds in controlling climate. Aerosols vary in time in space and can lead to variations in cloud microphysics. This paper is a pilot study to examine the temporal and spatial variation of aerosol particles and their impact on different cloud optical properties in the territory of Pakistan using the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra satellite data and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) data. We also use Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for trajectory analysis to obtain origin of air masses in order to understand the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol concentrations. We validate data of MODIS and MISR by using linear correlation and regression analysis, which shows that there is an excellent agreement between data of these instruments. Seasonal study of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) shows that maximum value is found in monsoon season (June-August) over all study areas. We analyze the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and some cloud parameters like water vapor (WV), cloud fraction (CF), cloud top temperature (CTT) and cloud top pressure (CTP). We construct the regional correlation maps and time series plots for aerosol and cloud parameters mandatory for the better understanding of aerosol-cloud interaction. Our analyses show that there is a strong positive correlation between AOD and water vapor in all cities. The correlation between AOD and CF is positive for the cities where the air masses are moist while the correlation is negative for cities where air masses are relatively dry and with lower aerosol abundance. It shows that these correlations depend on meteorological conditions. Similarly as AOD increases Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) is decreasing while Cloud Top Temperature (CTT) is increasing. Key Words: MODIS, MISR, HYSPLIT, AOD, CF, CTP

  11. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems. PMID:23889602

  12. Modeling the Impacts of Spatial Heterogeneity in the Castor Watershed on Runoff, Sediment, and Phosphorus Loss Using SWAT: I. Impacts of Spatial Variability of Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Boluwade, Alaba; Madramootoo, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Spatial accuracy of hydrologic modeling inputs influences the output from hydrologic models. A pertinent question is to know the optimal level of soil sampling or how many soil samples are needed for model input, in order to improve model predictions. In this study, measured soil properties were clustered into five different configurations as inputs to the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) simulation of the Castor River watershed (11-km(2) area) in southern Quebec, Canada. SWAT is a process-based model that predicts the impacts of climate and land use management on water yield, sediment, and nutrient fluxes. SWAT requires geographical information system inputs such as the digital elevation model as well as soil and land use maps. Mean values of soil properties are used in soil polygons (soil series); thus, the spatial variability of these properties is neglected. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the impacts of spatial variability of soil properties on the prediction of runoff, sediment, and total phosphorus using SWAT. The spatial clustering of the measured soil properties was undertaken using the regionalized with dynamically constrained agglomerative clustering and partitioning method. Measured soil data were clustered into 5, 10, 15, 20, and 24 heterogeneous regions. Soil data from the Castor watershed which have been used in previous studies was also set up and termed "Reference". Overall, there was no significant difference in runoff simulation across the five configurations including the reference. This may be attributable to SWAT's use of the soil conservation service curve number method in flow simulation. Therefore having high spatial resolution inputs for soil data may not necessarily improve predictions when they are used in hydrologic modeling. PMID:24273353

  13. Impacts of the Cerro Grande fire on Homestead era and Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, E. D.; Isaacson, J.

    2001-01-01

    In May of 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 8,000 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) managed land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Although the fire was generally of low intensity, it impacted a significant number of LANL's cultural resources. Historic wooden properties were affected more heavily than prehistoric archaeological sites. This paper will provide an overview of the Homestead and Manhattan Project Periods at LANL and will discuss the effects of the Cerro Grande Fire on historic wooden properties. Post-fire cultural resource management issues will also be discussed.

  14. The impact of negative oxygen ion bombardment on electronic and structural properties of magnetron sputtered ZnO:Al films

    SciTech Connect

    Bikowski, Andre; Welzel, Thomas; Ellmer, Klaus

    2013-06-17

    In order to study the impact of negative oxygen ion bombardment on the electronic transport properties of ZnO:Al films, a systematic magnetron sputtering study from ceramic targets with excitation frequencies from DC to 27 MHz, accompanied by strongly varying discharge voltages, has been performed. Higher plasma excitation frequencies significantly improve the transport properties of ZnO:Al films. The effect of the bombardment of the films by energetic particles (negative oxygen ions) can be explained by the dynamic equilibrium between the formation of acceptor-like oxygen interstitials compensating the extrinsic donors and the self-annealing of the interstitial defects at higher deposition temperatures.

  15. Impact of the monetary crisis on statistical properties of the Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur stock exchange indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, T.; Aminoto, T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the tools developed for statistical physics, we simultaneously analyze statistical properties of the Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange indices. In spite of the small number of the data used in the analysis, the result still shows the universal behavior of complex systems previously found in the leading stock indices. We also analyze their properties before and after the crash caused by the monetary crisis. To locate the time position when the crash started we use the Omori law. We found that after the crash both stocks do not show a same statistical behavior. The impact of currency controls is observed in the distribution of the index returns.

  16. The Impact of Specific Prior Experiences on Infants' Extension of Animal Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furrer, Stephanie D.; Younger, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the influence of prior exposure to specific animal properties on 15-month-old infants' inductive generalization. Using picture books, 29 infants were trained on properties linked in a congruent or incongruent manner with four animal categories. A generalized imitation task was then administered to assess patterns of property extension…

  17. Effect of Ultrasonic Treatment on The Tensile and Impact Properties of Thermoplastic Natural Rubber Nanocomposites Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarawneh, Mou'ad A.; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.; Yahya, S. Y.; Rasid, Rozaidi

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of ultrasonic treatment on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) nanocomposites reinforced with multi-walled nanotubes. The TPNR nanocomposites were prepared using melt blending method from polypropylene (PP), natural rubber (NR) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as a compatibilizer, respectively, with 1% of Multi-wall nanotubes. The nanocomposite was prepared using the indirect technique (IDT) with the optimum processing parameters at 180° C with 80 rpm mixing speed and 11 minutes processing time. The results have showed that the good dispersion on nanotubes was achieved by ultrasonic treatment. The optimization of ultrasonic time indicated that the maximum tensile and impact properties occurred with 1 h ultrasonic treatment. The Young's modulus, tensile strength, elongation at break and impact strength have increased by almost 11%, 21%, 43% and 50%, respectively. The results from our study indicate that nanotubes have as excellent reinforcement filler in TPNR matrix.

  18. Effect of Ultrasonic Treatment on The Tensile and Impact Properties of Thermoplastic Natural Rubber Nanocomposites Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tarawneh, Mou'ad A.; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.; Rasid, Rozaidi; Yahya, S. Y.

    2009-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of ultrasonic treatment on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) nanocomposites reinforced with multi-walled nanotubes. The TPNR nanocomposites were prepared using melt blending method from polypropylene (PP), natural rubber (NR) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as a compatibilizer, respectively, with 1% of Multi-wall nanotubes. The nanocomposite was prepared using the indirect technique (IDT) with the optimum processing parameters at 180 deg. C with 80 rpm mixing speed and 11 minutes processing time. The results have showed that the good dispersion on nanotubes was achieved by ultrasonic treatment. The optimization of ultrasonic time indicated that the maximum tensile and impact properties occurred with 1 h ultrasonic treatment. The Young's modulus, tensile strength, elongation at break and impact strength have increased by almost 11%, 21%, 43% and 50%, respectively. The results from our study indicate that nanotubes have as excellent reinforcement filler in TPNR matrix.

  19. Asymmetric Distribution of Lunar Impact Basins Caused by Variations in Target Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miljkovic, Katarina; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Collins, Gareth S.; Laneuville, Matthieu; Neumann, Gregory A.; Melosh, H. Jay; Solomon, Sean C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Maps of crustal thickness derived from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission revealed more large impact basins on the nearside hemisphere of the Moon than on its farside. The enrichment in heat-producing elements and prolonged volcanic activity on the lunar nearside hemisphere indicate that the temperature of the nearside crust and upper mantle was hotter than that of the farside at the time of basin formation. Using the iSALE-2D hydrocode to model impact basin formation, we found that impacts on the hotter nearside would have formed basins up to two times larger than similar impacts on the cooler farside hemisphere. The size distribution of lunar impact basins is thus not representative of the earliest inner Solar system impact bombardment.

  20. Supplemental Information For: Asymmetric Distribution of Lunar Impact Basins Caused by Variations in Target Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miljkovic, Katarina; Wieczorek, Mark; Collins, Gareth S.; Laneuville, Matthieu; Neumann, Gregory A.; Melosh, H. Jay; Solomon, Sean C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    Maps of crustal thickness derived from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission revealed more large impact basins on the nearside hemisphere of the Moon than on its farside. The enrichment in heat-producing elements and prolonged volcanic activity on the lunar nearside hemisphere indicate that the temperature of the nearside crust and uppermantle was hotter than that of the farside at the time of basin formation. Using the iSALE-2D hydrocode to model impact basin formation, we found that impacts on the hotter nearside would have formed basins up to two times larger than similar impacts on the cooler farside hemisphere. The size distribution of lunar impact basins is thus not representative of the earliest inner Solar system impact bombardment

  1. Asymmetric distribution of lunar impact basins caused by variations in target properties.

    PubMed

    Miljkovićć, Katarina; Wieczorek, Mark A; Collins, Gareth S; Laneuville, Matthieu; Neumann, Gregory A; Melosh, H Jay; Solomon, Sean C; Phillips, Roger J; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T

    2013-11-01

    Maps of crustal thickness derived from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission revealed more large impact basins on the nearside hemisphere of the Moon than on its farside. The enrichment in heat-producing elements and prolonged volcanic activity on the lunar nearside hemisphere indicate that the temperature of the nearside crust and upper mantle was hotter than that of the farside at the time of basin formation. Using the iSALE-2D hydrocode to model impact basin formation, we found that impacts on the hotter nearside would have formed basins with up to twice the diameter of similar impacts on the cooler farside hemisphere. The size distribution of lunar impact basins is thus not representative of the earliest inner solar system impact bombardment. PMID:24202170

  2. Recovery of soil physical properties and microbiology in foresty drained peatlands from the impact of forest machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepilin, Dmitrii; Kimura, Bryn; Uusitalo, Jori; Laiho, Raija; Fritze, Hannu; Lauren, Ari; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    Forestry-drained peatlands occupy approximately 5.7 million ha and represent almost one fourth of the total forest surface in Finland. They are subjected to the same silvicultural harvesting operations as upland forests. However, although the potential of timber harvesting to cause detrimental effects on soil is well documented in upland forests, the knowledge on environmental impact of harvesting machinery on peat soils is still lacking. To assess the impact of harvesting machines on peat physical properties and biology we collected soil samples from six peatland forests that were harvested by commonly employed Harvester and Forwarder. Samples were taken from trails formed by harvesting machinery (treatment plots) and outside of trails (control plots unaffected by machinery traffic) to a depth of 15 cm. To adders the recovery of soil properties after disturbance we sampled sites that form a chronosequence in respect to time since harvesting: 1 month (class I), 3-4 years (class II) and 14-15 years (class III). The physical and microbiological properties of soil samples were analyzed in laboratory. Harvesting operations with heavy machinery appeared to significantly increase the bulk density of peat in the machines' trails at recently harvested sites in comparison to control plots. Following change in bulk density there was change of pore size distribution with decreasing macrospores quantity. This led to slight decrease of total porosity and decrease of air filled porosity. Water retention capacity increased with increasing bulk density. CO2 evolution increased in the trails of class I site with where dissolved organic carbon concurrently decreased. While there was not impact of harvesting on microbial biomass or carbon, PLFA analysis indicated that machinery traffic caused a shift in microbial community structure. Results of class II and class III sites showed a recovery of physical properties within 16 years: treatment plots and control plots started to resemble

  3. JV Task 117 - Impact of Lignite Properties on Powerspan's NOx Oxidation System

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Tolbert; Steven Benson

    2008-02-29

    Powerspan's multipollutant control process called electrocatalytic oxidation (ECO) technology is designed to simultaneously remove SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM{sub 2.5}, acid gases (such as hydrogen fluoride [HF], hydrochloric acid [HCl], and sulfur trioxide [SO{sub 3}]), Hg, and other metals from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The core of this technology is a dielectric barrier discharge reactor composed of cylindrical quartz electrodes residing in metal tubes. Electrical discharge through the flue gas, passing between the electrode and the tube, produces reactive O and OH radicals. The O and OH radicals react with flue gas components to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} and a small portion of the SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The oxidized compounds are subsequently removed in a downstream scrubber and wet electrostatic precipitator. A challenging characteristic of selected North Dakota lignites is their high sodium content. During high-sodium lignite combustion and gas cooling, the sodium vaporizes and condenses to produce sodium- and sulfur-rich aerosols. Based on past work, it was hypothesized that the sodium aerosols would deposit on and react with the silica electrodes and react with the silica electrodes, resulting in the formation of sodium silicate. The deposit and reacted surface layer would then electrically alter the electrode, thus impacting its dielectric properties and NO{sub x} conversion capability. The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of lignite-derived flue gas containing sodium aerosols on Powerspan's dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with specific focus on the interaction with the quartz electrodes. Partners in the project were Minnkota Power Cooperative; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Montana Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnesota Power; the North Dakota Industrial Commission, the Lignite Energy Council, and the Lignite Research Council; the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC); and

  4. Tailoring oxide properties: An impact on adsorption characteristics of molecules and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkala, Karoliina

    2014-12-01

    Both density functional theory calculations and numerous experimental studies demonstrate a variety of unique features in metal supported oxide films and transition metal doped simple oxides, which are markedly different from their unmodified counterparts. This review highlights, from the computational perspective, recent literature on the properties of the above mentioned surfaces and how they adsorb and activate different species, support metal aggregates, and even catalyse reactions. The adsorption of Au atoms and clusters on metal-supported MgO films are reviewed together with the cluster's theoretically predicted ability to activate and dissociate O2 at the Au-MgO(100)/Ag(100) interface, as well as the impact of an interface vacancy to the binding of an Au atom. In contrast to a bulk MgO surface, an Au atom binds strongly on a metal-supported ultra-thin MgO film and becomes negatively charged. Similarly, Au clusters bind strongly on a supported MgO(100) film and are negatively charged favouring 2D planar structures. The adsorption of other metal atoms is briefly considered and compared to that of Au. Existing computational literature of adsorption and reactivity of simple molecules including O2, CO, NO2, and H2O on mainly metal-supported MgO(100) films is discussed. Chemical reactions such as CO oxidation and O2 dissociation are discussed on the bare thin MgO film and on selected Au clusters supported on MgO(100)/metal surfaces. The Au atoms at the perimeter of the cluster are responsible for catalytic activity and calculations predict that they facilitate dissociative adsorption of oxygen even at ambient conditions. The interaction of H2O with a flat and stepped Ag-supported MgO film is summarized and compared to bulk MgO. The computational results highlight spontaneous dissociation on MgO steps. Furthermore, the impact of water coverage on adsorption and dissociation is addressed. The modifications, such as oxygen vacancies and dopants, at the oxide

  5. Impact damage resistance and residual property assessment of [0/{+-}45/90]{sub s} SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.L.; Portanova, M.A.; Johnson, W.S.

    1997-12-31

    Titanium-matrix composites (TMCs) are candidate materials for high-temperature structural applications, such as gas turbine engines, where their high specific strength at elevated temperatures and good general corrosion resistance are beneficial. Here, the impact damage resistance and residual mechanical properties of [0/{+-}45/90]{sub s} SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S composites were evaluated.Both quasi-static indentation and drop-weight impact tests were used to investigate the impact behavior at two nominal energy levels and to determine the onset of internal damage. Through X-ray inspection, the extent of internal damage was characterized nondestructively. The composite strength and constant-amplitude fatigue response were evaluated to assess the effects of the sustained damage. SEM was used to characterize internal damage from impact in comparison to damage that occurs during mechanical loading alone. The effect of stacking sequence was examined by using specimens with the long dimension of the specimen both parallel and perpendicular to the 0{degree} fiber direction. Damage in the form of longitudinal and transverse cracking occurred in all longitudinal specimens tested at energies greater than 6.3 J. Similar results occurred in the transverse specimens tested above 5.4 J. Initial load drop, characteristic of the onset of damage, occurred on average at 6.3 J in longitudinal specimens and at 5.0 J in transverse specimens. X-ray analysis showed broken fibers in the impacted region in specimens tested at the higher impact energies. At low impact energies, visible matrix cracking may occur, but broken fibers may not. Matrix cracking was noted along fiber swims, and it appeared to depend on the surface quality of the composite. At low impact energies, little damage had been incurred by the composite and the residual strength and residual life was not greatly reduced as compared to an undamaged composite.

  6. Subtask 12F4: Effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Up-to-date results on the effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented in this paper, with an emphasis on the behavior of the U.S. reference alloys V-4Cr-4Ti containing 500-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and cluctile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests of one-third-size specimens irradiated at 420{degrees}C-600{degrees}C up to {approx}50 dpa in lithium environment in fast fission reactors. To supplement the Charpy impact tests fracture behavior was also characterized by quantitative SEM fractography on miniature tensile and disk specimens that were irradiated to similar conditions and fractured at -196{degrees}C to 200{degrees}C by multiple bending. For similar irradiation conditions irradiation-induced increase in DBTT was influenced most significantly by Cr content, indicating that irradiation-induced clustering of Cr atoms takes place in high-Cr (Cr {ge} 7 wt.%) alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, effects of neutron irradiation on impact properties and fracture behavior were negligible. For example, from the Charpy-impact and multiple-bend tests there was no indication of irradiation-induced embrittlement for V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si and the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti after irradiation to {approx}34 dpa at 420{degrees}C to 600{degrees}C, and only ductile fracture was observed for temperatures as low as -196{degrees}C. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Steel Processing Properties and Their Effect on Impact Deformation of Lightweight Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simunovic, S

    2003-09-23

    The objective of the research was to perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the effects of material and process modeling approaches on performance of UltraLight Steel Auto Body (ULSAB) vehicle models. The research addressed numerous material related effects, impact conditions as well as analyzed the performance of the ULSAB vehicles in crashes against designs representing the current US vehicle fleet. This report is organized into three main sections. The first section describes the results of the computational analysis of ULSAB crash simulations that were performed using advanced material modeling techniques. The effects of strain-rate sensitivity on a high strength steel (HSS) intensive vehicle were analyzed. Frontal and frontal offset crash scenarios were used in a finite element parametric study of the ULSAB body structure. Comparisons are made between the crash results using the piece-wise-linear isotropic plasticity strain-rate dependent material model, and the isotropic plasticity material model based on quasi-static properties. The simulation results show the importance of advanced material modeling techniques for vehicle crash simulations due to strain-rate sensitivity and rapid hardening characteristics of advanced high strength steels. Material substitution was investigated for the main frontal crush structure using the material of similar yield stress a significantly different strain-rate and hardening characteristics. The objective of the research presented in Section 2 was to assess the influence of stamping process on crash response of ULSAB vehicle. Considered forming effects included thickness variations and plastic strain hardening imparted in the part forming process. The as-formed thickness and plastic strain for front crash parts were used as input data for vehicle crash analysis. Differences in structural performance between crash models with and without forming data were analyzed in order to determine the effects and feasibility of

  8. Impact of the seasonal evolution of snow properties on microwave emission model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.; Derksen, C.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Yackel, J.

    2010-12-01

    Snow cover exhibits great spatio-temporal variability, and is dynamically coupled with global hydrological and climatological processes. Accounting for snowpack evolution related to snow accumulation, metamorphosis, and melt are essential for both modeling and remote sensing applications. Microwave emission has frequency dependant relationships with snow water equivalent (SWE), but snow grain-size, snowpack layering, and snow liquid-water content can confuse the estimation of snow parameters with empirical stand-alone algorithms. This work presents an overview of seasonal snow and multi-frequency dual-polarization microwave emission measurements collected during the 2009-2010 winter season at a network of sites near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. These observations were used to parameterize and evaluate model simulations of microwave snow emission using the multiple-layer version of the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) microwave emission model. The HUT model is utilized in the European Space Agency’s (ESA) GlobSnow global snow monitoring service, applied to SWE and snow depth (SD) retrievals for the Northern Hemisphere. The HUT model used for forward brightness temperature simulations in the GlobSnow retrieval scheme is currently limited to one layer which necessitates idealizing physical properties of the entire snow pack. In this study, we explore the performance of simulations with the addition of a depth hoar layer and, when appropriate, an ice lens. Simulations for forest, lake, and open environments were synthesized through a scene simulation formulation of the HUT model to produce output suitable for comparison with measured brightness temperatures from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). While the multi-layer model better represents the vertical complexities of grain size and layering, implementation of a multi-layer approach remains a challenge due to model sensitivity with regard to the method of generalization of a complex snow

  9. Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2012-01-05

    Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity

  10. Impacts of deficit irrigation and altered rooting patterns on soil structure and associated soil properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of belowground systems and overall management impacts on soil health is needed to improve crop production and long-term sustainability under deficit irrigation. This study investigates effects of deficit irrigation on rooting patterns in maize and subsequent impacts on soil pr...