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Sample records for 12d3 fracture properties

  1. Subtask 12D3: Fracture properties of V-5Cr-5Ti Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and fracture toughness of a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy in the range -50-100{degrees}C. Fracture toughness and impact tests were performed on a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Specimens annealed at 1125{degrees}C for 1 h and furnace cooled in a vacuum of 1.33 x 10{sup -5} Pa were brittle at room temperature (RT) and experienced a mixture of intergranular and cleavage fracture. Fracture toughness (J{sub IQ}) at RT was 52 kJ/m{sup 2} and the impact fracture energy (IFE) was 6 J. The IFE at -100{degrees}C was only 1 J. While specimens exhibited high fracture toughness at 100{degrees}C (J{sub IQ} is 485 kj/m{sup 2}), fracture was a mixture of dimple and intergranular failure, with intergranular fracture making up 40% of the total fracture surface. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was estimated to be about 20{degrees}C. When some specimens were given an additional annealing at 890{degrees}C for 24 h, they became very ductile at RT and fractured by microvoid coalescence. The J{sub IQ} value increased from 52 kJ/m{sup 2} to {approximately}1100 kJ/m{sup 2}. The impact test failed to fracture specimens at RT due to a large amount of plastic deformation. 7 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  2. Babesia bovis: biosynthesis and localisation of 12D3 antigen in bovine erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Harper, G S; Hibbs, A R; East, I J; Waltisbuhl, D J; Jorgensen, W K; Riddles, P W

    1996-11-01

    The 12D3 antigen of Babesia bovis was found to be synthesised rapidly in cultured parasites, and localised to both the apical complex of the merozoite and the cytoplasm of the parasitised erythrocyte. Amino-terminal sequencing suggested that the nascent protein had been processed and differences between the predicted and measured molecular weights suggested post-translational modification. The major proportion of 12D3 appeared in the soluble compartment of the parasitised erythrocytes with a molecular weight consistent with no further processing. A significant proportion of the protein required extraction by sodium carbonate, suggesting association with membranous components. The timing of release of soluble 12D3 was coincident with haemoglobin release and this probably reflects a non-specific lysis of the erythrocyte. Synthesis of recombinant BV12D3 was achieved in baculovirus-infected SF9 insect epithelial cells. The product was of the same molecular weight as the native 12D3 and polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant protein reacted with both the recombinant and native forms of the antigen. PMID:9024870

  3. Fracture properties of lightweight concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.P.; Shieh, M.M.

    1996-02-01

    This study presents the experimental results of fracture properties of concrete incorporating two kinds of domestic lightweight aggregate (LWA) manufactured through either a cold-bonding or a sintering process. The cold-bonded aggregates were mainly made of pulverized fly-ash through a cold-pelletization process at ambient temperature, while the sintered aggregates were made of clay and shale expanded by heat at a temperature near 1,200 C. Experimental results show that the 28-day compressive strengths of {phi} 100 x 200 mm cylindrical concrete specimen made of those LWAs range from 30.1 (sintered) to 33.9 MPa (cold-bonded). By means of size effect law, it is found that the fracture energies, G{sub f}, were 34.42 N/m (sintered) and 37.2 N/m (cold-bonded), respectively.

  4. The elastic properties of fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcel, C.; Le Goc, R.; Davy, P.

    2013-12-01

    The consequences of fracturing on rock mass strength still remain an issue for rock engineering practices, including excavation or repository design, support design, slope stability and caving in mines. The difficulty is twice and concerns both the description of the fracturing pattern, and the relationship between fracture characteristics and rock mass mechanical properties. This is generally assessed by empirical knowledge but no complete quantitative and theoretical relations are yet established. To our knowledge, the only theoretical work was to found a relationship between the elastic strength and the percolation parameter (i.e. a normalized sum of the cube of fracture radius) for 3D frictionless fracture networks. The relationship has been demonstrated for Poissonian (randomly distributed) low-density (i.e. where fractures are not almost intersecting) networks, with a narrow range of fracture radius. By means of finite-element models and Green's function methods, we extend the analysis to fracture networks with geologically realistic geometry: i.e. non-Poissonian, relatively high densities, and power-law length distributions. The elastic strength of the fractured rock mass is still found to decrease exponentially with the percolation parameter on average. But large deviations from the mean exist for heavy tailed fracture length distribution, i.e. when the probability of having fractures of the order of the system size is no more negligible. We discuss the way to ameliorate the prediction by taking into account configuration details that are not described by statistical parameters.

  5. Physical Properties of Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, T. E.; Schmitt, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of fractures on the physical properties of porous media is of considerable interest to oil and gas exploration as well as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage. This work represents an attempt to study the effect fractures have on multiple physical properties of rocks. An experimental technique to make simultaneous electric and ultrasonic measurements on cylindrical core plugs is developed. Aluminum end caps are mounted with ultrasonic transducers to transmit pules along the axis of the cylinder while non-polarizing electrodes are mounted on the sides of the core to make complex conductivity measurements perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Electrical measurements are made by applying a sinusoidal voltage across the measurement circuit that consist of a resister and the sample in series. The magnitude and phase of the signal across the sample is recorded relative to the input signal across a range of frequencies. Synthetic rock analogs are constructed using sintered glass beads with fractures imbedded in them. The fracture location, size and orientation are controlled and each fractured specimen has an unfractured counterpart. Porosity, Permeability, electrical conductivity and ultrasonic velocity measurements are conducted on each sample with the complex electrical conductivities recorded at frequencies from 10hz to 1 Mhz. These measurements allow us to examine the changes induced by these mesoscale fractures on the embedding porous medium. Of particular interest is the effect of fracture orientation on electrical conductivity of the rock. Seismic anisotropy caused by fractures is a well understood phenomenon with many rock physics models dedicated to its understanding. The effect of fractures on electrical conductivity is less well understood with electrical anisotropy scarcely investigated in the literature. None the less, using electrical conductivity to characterize fractures can add an extra constraint to characterization based

  6. Macroscopic properties of fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean Francois, T.; Adler, P.; Bogdanov, I.; Mourzenko, V.

    2006-12-01

    There are two basic problems to be addressed. The first one is to solve precisely the partial differential equations which govern the phenomena which occur in these media and which are of interest in a large number of applications. The second one is to define a methodology in order to be able to estimate the macroscopic properties of real media by using quantities which are easily measurable on the field. Two major steps are needed for the numerical solution (1). First, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh of the fractures and of the porous matrix located in between is constructed; second, the governing partial equations are discretized and solved, in a finite volume formulation. A brief overview of the various problems which have been addressed so far, will be given: single and two phase flows, unsteady flows around a well, dispersion of an active and a passive solute, mechanical properties. This set of codes enabled us to cope with the second basic problem. Our approach is based on the systematic use of the excluded volume of fractures (which will be defined). The number of fractures per unit volume can be replaced by the number ρ ' of fractures per excluded volume. When numerical results such as the percolation threshold, the macroscopic permeability are plotted as functions of ρ ' they become independent of the shapes of the fractures which is a decisive simplification. Then, we show how ρ ' can be estimated from measurements performed along lines (2), planes, and galleries. It is interesting to notice that many stereological relations are actually independent of the size and shapes of fractures provided that they are convex (3); such a property adds a lot of generality to our methodology. Some tentative applications of the methodology are given and they show that the estimations are always in good agreement with the data. References (1) I.I. Bogdanov, V.V. Mourzenko, J.-F. Thovert, P.M. Adler, Effective permeability of fractured porous media in steady

  7. Properties of Flow Zones in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salve, R.

    2004-12-01

    Observations over the last 25 years from various field studies suggest that preferential flow is common in soils and rocks. Despite this realization, very little is known about the large-scale properties (e.g., structure, distribution, continuity) of such flow regimes. This information is important for predictive models, but it remains elusive, mainly because of the difficulties involved in characterizing flow that has substantial spatial (both vertical and horizontal) and temporal variability. To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the Topopah Spring tuff found in Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This experiment involved the release of ~22 m3 of ponded water (at a pressure head of ~0.04 m) over a period of 7 months, directly onto a 12 m2 infiltration plot. As water was released, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation ~19-22 m below. Distinct flow zones, with significant differences in flow velocity, size, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the 6-9 m long monitoring boreholes. Further, in some flow zones saturation levels persisted for the time period in which water was released, while in others there were periodic fluctuations. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggested that inconsistencies exist in present conceptual models of flow in fractured rock. Particularly, these observations suggest that isolated conduits within the fractured rock formation encompass a large number of fractures to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. It appears that in fractured welded tuffs, the propensity for vertical dispersion and fracture-matrix interactions may be significantly greater than suggested by existing conceptual models. These observations

  8. When do fractured media become seismically anisotropic? Some implications on quantifying fracture properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, B. M.; Angus, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    Fractures are pervasive features within the Earth's crust and they have a significant influence on the multi-physical response of the subsurface. The presence of coherent fracture sets often leads to observable seismic anisotropy enabling seismic techniques to remotely locate and characterise fracture systems. In this study, we confirm the general scale-dependence of seismic anisotropy and provide new results specific to shear-wave splitting (SWS). We find that SWS develops under conditions when the ratio of wavelength to fracture size (λS / d) is greater than 3, where Rayleigh scattering from coherent fractures leads to an effective anisotropy such that effective medium model (EMM) theory is qualitatively valid. When 1 <λS / d < 3 there is a transition from Rayleigh to Mie scattering, where no effective anisotropy develops and hence the SWS measurements are unstable. When λS / d < 1 we observe geometric scattering and begin to see behaviour similar to transverse isotropy. We find that seismic anisotropy is more sensitive to fracture density than fracture compliance ratio. More importantly, we observe that the transition from scattering to an effective anisotropic regime occurs over a propagation distance between 1 and 2 wavelengths depending on the fracture density and compliance ratio. The existence of a transition zone means that inversion of seismic anisotropy parameters based on EMM will be fundamentally biased. More importantly, we observe that linear slip EMM commonly used in inverting fracture properties is inconsistent with our results and leads to errors of approximately 400% in fracture spacing (equivalent to fracture density) and 60% in fracture compliance. Although EMM representations can yield reliable estimates of fracture orientation and spatial location, our results show that EMM representations will systematically fail in providing quantitatively accurate estimates of other physical fracture properties, such as fracture density and compliance

  9. Fracture properties of the human mandible.

    PubMed

    Unnewehr, M; Homann, C; Schmidt, P F; Sotony, P; Fischer, G; Brinkmann, B; Bajanowski, T; DuChesne, A

    2003-12-01

    A total of seven human mandibles were struck to breaking point under standardised conditions using a pendulum. The cortical deformation for two impact directions was measured with strain gauge strips located at eight defined sites. Fronto-median impacts led to mostly bilateral and always multiple fractures in the posterior area of the bone, especially in the collum and the condyle. The fracture threshold was between 2.5 and 3.1 kN. Lateral impact caused fractures near the impact area as direct fractures of the ipsilateral corpus. Mainly single and double fractures were observed. For lateral impact the fracture threshold was between 0.6 and 0.8 kN. PMID:13680253

  10. Mapping the fracture properties of engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Mike

    2013-09-01

    Among Alan Cottrell's many extraordinary talents was that of an inspirational teacher. He had a masterful ability to explain the underlying physics of the Science of Materials and at the same time to simplify and to present the big picture. His teaching-texts live on, still among the clearest and most insightful expositions of the subject. This paper surveys part of one of the fields to which he contributed so much - Fracture - with education and the big picture in mind.

  11. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  12. Material properties and fracture mechanics in relation to ceramic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, L.V.

    1993-12-02

    Material removal rate, surface finish, and subsurface damage are largely governed by fracture mechanics and plastic deformation, when ceramics are machined using abrasive methods. A great deal of work was published on the fracture mechanics of ceramics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, although this work has never resulted in a comprehensive model of the fixed abrasive grinding process. However, a recently published model describes many of the most important features of the loose abrasive machining process, for example depth of damage, surface roughness, and material removal rate. Many of the relations in the loose abrasive machining model can be readily discerned from fracture mechanics models, in terms of material properties. By understanding the mechanisms of material removal, from a material properties perspective, we can better estimate how one material will machine in relation to another. Although the fracture mechanics models may have been developed for loose abrasive machining, the principles of crack initiation and propagation are equally valuable for fixed abrasive machining. This report provides a brief review of fracture in brittle materials, the stress distribution induced by abrasives, critical indenter loads, the extension of cracks, and the relation of the fracture process to material removal.

  13. Fracture Toughness Properties of Gd123 Superconducting Bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Murakami, A.

    Fracture toughness properties of melt growth GdBa2Cu3Ox (Gd123) large single domain superconducting bulks with Ag2O of 10 wt% and Pt of 0.5 wt%; 45 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness with low void density were evaluated at 77 K through flexural tests of specimens cut from the bulks, and compared to those of a conventional Gd123 with voids. The densified Gd123 bulks were prepared with a seeding and temperature gradient method; first melt processed in oxygen, then crystal growth in air; two-step regulated atmosphere heat treatment. The plane strain fracture toughness, KIC was obtained by the three point flexure test of the specimens with through precrack, referring to the single edge pre-cracked beam (SEPB) method, according to the JIS-R-1607, Testing Methods for Fracture Toughness of High Performance Ceramics. The results show that the fracture toughness of the densified Gd123 bulk with low void density was higher than that of the standard Gd123 bulk with voids, as well as the flexural strength previously reported. We also compared the fracture toughness of as-grown bulks with that of annealed bulks. The relation between the microstructure and the fracture toughness of the Gd123 bulk was clearly shown.

  14. Determining the frequency dependence of elastic properties of fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Benedikt; Renner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the brittle crust, rocks often contain joints or faults on various length scales that have a profound effect on fluid flow and heat transport, as well as on the elastic properties of rocks. Improving the understanding of the effect of fractures and the role of stress state and heterogeneity along the fractures on elastic properties of rocks is potentially important for the characterization of deep geothermal reservoirs. Seismic surveys, typically covering a frequency range of about 1 to 1000 Hz, are a valuable tool to investigate fractured rocks but the extraction of fracture properties remains difficult. The elementary frequency-dependent interaction between fractured rock matrix and viscous pore fluids and the resulting effects on wave propagation require well-founded dispersion analyses of heterogeneous rocks. In this laboratory study, we investigate the stress dependence of the effective elastic properties of fractured reservoir rocks over a broad frequency range. To assess the effect of faults on the effective elastic properties, we performed cyclic axial loading tests on intact and fractured samples of Solnhofen limestone and Padang granodiorite. The samples contained an idealized fault, which was created by stacking two sample discs on top of each other that experienced various surface treatments to vary their roughness. The dynamic loading tests were conducted with frequencies up to 10 Hz and amplitudes reaching 10% of the statically applied stress. Simultaneously, P- and S-wave measurements were performed in the ultrasonic frequency range (above 100 kHz) with a total of 16 sensors, whose positioning above and below the samples guarantees a wide range of transmission and reflection angles. Preliminary results of static and dynamic elastic properties of intact Padang granodiorite show a pronounced increase in Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio with increasing axial stress. Stress relaxation is accompanied by a decrease of the modulus and the Poisson

  15. Structure, mechanical properties, and fracture of 20GL cast steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Klyueva, S. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of 20GL steel are studied. It is shown that a significant decrease in the ductility and impact toughness of the steel is caused by intercrystalline fracture, which is induced by a weakening of the intercrystallite bonds due to the existence of coarse lamellar pearlite and nonmetallic inclusions, namely, film inclusions and eutectic-type oxysulfides, at the boundaries of primary crystals. Annealing from a temperature in the intercritical range is found to improve the mechanical properties.

  16. Cleavage fracture properties of high strength steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.K.; Ritter, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The qualification of consumables and welding of steels in critical naval applications, including submarine construction, is dependent upon the achievement of high levels of toughness at low temperature. The principal technique employed is the Charpy impact test at temperatures down to {minus}115 C ({minus}175 F). In the investigation described here, low temperature toughness properties were investigated by breaking notched specimens in slow four point bending and measuring the critical tensile stress for cleavage initiation. Multi-pass Flux Cored Arc (FCA) welds joining 690 MPa (100 ksi) yield strength, quenched and tempered steel were tested to identify cleavage fracture micromechanisms and to investigate the role of microstructural features in the cleavage fracture process. Cleavage fracture stress values in the range 2,018 to 2,381 MPa were recorded in weld metal when testing at sub-zero temperatures. Detailed examination of fracture surfaces by scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that weld metal inclusions play a critical role in acting as cleavage initiation sites. Changing welding position from downhand to vertical-up resulted in a small number of widely spaced inclusions approaching or exceeding 10 {micro}m in diameter but these were not observed to act as cleavage initiation sites. The cleavage fracture resistance of multi-pass Manual Metal Arc (MMA) welds which are currently under investigation is compared with FCA weldments.

  17. Upscaling Fracture Properties in Support of Dual-Permeability Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, D. M.; Parashar, R.

    2008-12-01

    Rainier Mesa (RM) is a tuffaceous, high elevation plateau on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that has been subjected to numerous nuclear tests between 1957 and 1992. Unlike other tests on the NTS located within or just above the saturated zone, tests at the RM T-tunnel complex were conducted within a variably-saturated sequence of bedded and non-welded vitric and zeolitized tuff units, located approximately 500 m above the regional groundwater flow system. The low permeability and high porosity of the underlying zeolitized tuff units suggest the downward transport of radionuclides released from these tests are minimal through the tuff matrix. However, numerous faults observed to discharge water into tunnel drifts may serve as preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. Data collected from tunnel drifts indicate that faulting within the zeolitized tuff units are sparse with fractal clustering, and that connectivity between adjacent fault clusters is often weak to non-existent. The sparse fault density at RM, in conjunction with the extreme variability in the spatial distribution of faults, poses challenges not readily addressed by existing upscaling methods that upscale fracture properties as equivalent grid tensors. The unique fault statistics at RM has led to the development of a fracture continuum method designed to faithfully preserve flow and transport properties of the sparse fault networks. This method is based on selective mapping and upscaling of fault hydraulic and transport properties onto a continuum grid in support of dual-permeability simulations. Comparisons of global flow and random walk particle breakthrough between two-dimensional discrete fracture network and fracture continuum simulations demonstrate the utility of this method.

  18. Modeling anisotropic properties of media with oriented fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chergoleishvili, T. T.; Balabuyev, A. A.; Mandzhgaladze, P. F.

    1984-05-01

    Fracture formation at the focus of an impending earthquake occurs along a definite orientation governed by tectonic shears. The effectiveness of the many methods used in the theoretical computation of the elastic properties of such media was assessed in laboratory experiments using models with controllable parameters. The propagation velocity of longitudinal and transverse waves were investigated. Experimental results are compared with computations made by different methods. The curves corresponding to different theories quantitatively differ greatly from one another but there is a satisfactory correspondence of the shape of both the theoretical and experimental curves, revealing a uniformity of the dependence of wave propagation velocity on angle of approach to the oriented system of fractures. An attempt is made to resolve various discrepancies.

  19. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  20. Correlations among ultrasonic propagation factors and fracture toughness properties of metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1976-01-01

    Empirical evidence was developed to show that a close relation exists among fracture toughness, yield strength, and ultrasonic attenuation properties of metallic materials. The evidence was obtained by ultrasonic probing of specimens of two maraging steels and a titanium alloy. It was concluded that nondestructive ultrasonic methods can be used to indirectly evaluate fracture-related material properties. The results suggest that these nondestructive ultrasonic measurements can also serve as an adjunct to destructive testing, measurement, and analysis of fracture properties.

  1. Influence of fracture scale heterogeneity on the flow properties of 3D Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; De Dreuzy, J.; Pichot, G.

    2011-12-01

    Flow channeling and permeability scaling in fractured media have been classically addressed either at the fracture- or at the network- scales. In the latter case they are linked to the topological structure of the network, while at the fracture scale they are controlled by the variability of the local aperture distribution inside individual fractures. In this study we analyze these two combined effects, investigating how flow localization below the scale of individual fractures influences that at the network scale and the resulting medium permeability. This is done by use of a new highly-resolved 3D discrete fracture network model (DFN). The local apertures of individual fractures are distributed according to a truncated Gaussian law, and exhibit self-affine spatial correlations that are bounded by an upper cutoff scale Lc; Lc and the fracture closure, defined as the ratio of the aperture fluctuations at scale Lc to the mean aperture, are considered homogeneous over the DFN. The network topology is controlled by a homogeneous scalar fracture density and a power law fracture length distribution. We have varied these features to investigate a large variety of DFN topologies, from sparse networks with varying degrees of fracture interconnections, flow bottlenecks and dead-ends (Fig. 1a), to dense well-connected networks (Fig. 1b). We have also investigated a large range of fracture closures, performing extensive simulations of about 105 different DFN realizations. At the fracture scale, accounting for local aperture fluctuations leads to a monotical deviation (which can exceed 50%) of the equivalent fracture transmissivity from the parallel plate behavior. At the network scale we observe a complex interaction between flow channeling within fracture planes and flow localization in the network. This interaction is controlled by the location of fracture interactions with respect to that of low local transmissivity zones (particularly the closed zones), in the fracture

  2. Flow Rate- and Fracture Property Dependence of Fracture-Matrix Ensemble Relative Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthai, S. K.; Lang, P.; Bazrafkan, S.

    2012-12-01

    The grid-block scale ensemble relative permeability, kri of fractured porous rock with appreciable matrix permeability is of decisive interest to reservoir simulation and the prediction of production, injector-producer water breakthrough, and ultimate recovery. While the dynamic behaviour of naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) already provides many clues about (pseudo) kri on the inter-well length scale, such data are difficult to interpret because, in the subsurface, the exact fracture geometry is unknown. Here we present numerical simulation results from discrete fracture and matrix (DFM) unstructured grid hybrid FEM-FVM simulation models, predicting the shape of fracture-matrix kri curves. In contrast to our earlier work, we also simulate capillary fracture matrix transfer (CFMT) and without relying the frequently made simplifying assumption that fracture saturation reflects fracture-matrix capillary pressure equilibrium. We also employ a novel discretization of saturation which permits jump discontinuities to develop across the fracture-matrix interface. This increased physical realism permits - for the first time - to test our earlier semi-analytical model of the flow rate dependence of relative permeability, ensuing from CFMT. The sensitivity analysis presented here constrains CMFT-related flow rate dependence of kri and illustrates how it manifests itself in two geometries of layer-restricted well-developed fracture patterns mapped in the field. We have also investigated the dependence of kri on fracture aperture as computed using discrete element analysis for plausible states of in situ stress. Our results indicate that fracture-matrix ensemble relative permeability can be matched with a new semi-analytic model taking into account the fracture-matrix flux ratio, the wetted fracture-matrix interface area as a function of saturation and the breakthrough saturation. However, we also detect a scale dependence of kri requiring a more elaborate treatment.

  3. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  4. Inferring the Properties of Fluid-Filled Fractures using Tube Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OReilly, O. J.; Dunham, E. M.; Moos, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a methodology to infer the geometry of fluid-filled fractures (both aperture and length) using the interaction between tube waves in cylindrical fluid-filled conduits and trapped waves in fractures intersecting the conduit. This approach could be applied to study engineered fractures in oil and gas reservoirs as well as volcanic systems. We specifically investigate the reflection and transmission of tube waves, propagating along the cylindrical conduit, from fractures. Pressure changes carried by the tube wave can couple to resonant oscillations of the fractures, and the spectral properties of these oscillations carry information about fracture geometry. The fracture is coupled to the conduit at the fracture mouth by balancing pressure and conserving mass as fluid flows into or out of the fracture. In our linearized theory, the fracture response is quantified through a frequency-domain transfer function relating fluid pressure and velocity at the fracture mouth. For a given transfer function, tube wave seismograms can be obtained using a single, inverse fast Fourier transform. Fracture transfer functions are obtained from numerical simulations of wave propagation along fluid-filled cracks. These simulations rigorously couple an approximate version of the linearized Navier-Stokes equation for a viscous, compressible fluid to the elastic wave equation in the surrounding medium. To solve this problem, we have developed a two-dimensional high-order finite difference method capable of handling complex fracture geometries. Fracture resonance is associated with standing crack waves (also known as Krauklis waves) propagating along the fracture. We find that although details of fracture properties can be revealed by recorded pressure or seismic signals, reductions in aperture, as occur at crack tips, can reduce the amplitude of high frequency resonant modes through increased viscous dissipation.

  5. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Nanoporous Au

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Wang, Y M; Hayes, J R; Hamza, A V

    2005-06-16

    Nanoporous metals have recently attracted considerable interest fueled by potential sensor and actuator applications. From a material science point of view, one of the key issues in this context is the synthesis of nanoporous metals with both high tensile and compressive strength. Nanoporous gold (np-Au) has been suggested as a candidate material for this application due to its monolithic character. The material can be synthesized by electrochemically-driven dealloying of Ag-Au alloys, and exhibits an open sponge-like structure of interconnecting ligaments with a typical pore size distribution on the nanometer length scale. However, besides the observation of a ductile-brittle transition very little is known about the mechanical behavior of this material. Here, we present our results regarding the mechanical properties and the fracture behavior of np-Au. Depth-sensing nanoindentation reveals that the yield strength of np-Au is almost one order of magnitude higher than the value predicted by scaling laws developed for macroscopic open-cell foams. The unexpectedly high value of the yield strength indicates the presence of a distinct size effect of the mechanical properties due to the sub-micron dimensions of the ligaments, thus potentially opening a door to a new class of high yield strength--low density materials. The failure mechanism of np-Au under tensile stress was evaluated by microscopic examination of fracture surfaces using scanning electron microscopy. On a macroscopic level, np-Au is a very brittle material. However, microscopically np-Au is very ductile as ligaments strained by as much as 200% can be observed in the vicinity of crack tips. Cell-size effects on the microscopic failure mechanism were studied by annealing experiments whereby increasing the typical pore size/ligament diameter from {approx}100 nm to {approx}1{micro}m.

  6. Dry fracture method for simultaneous measurement of in-situ stress state and material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Serata, S.; Oka, S.; Kikuchi, S.

    1996-04-01

    Based on the dry fracture principle, a computerized borehole probe has been developed to measure stress state and material properties, simultaneously. The probe is designed to obtain a series of measurements in a continuing sequence along a borehole length, without any interruptive measures, such as resetting packers, taking indentation of borehole wall, overcoming, etc. The new dry fracture probe for the single fracture method is designed to overcome the difficulties posed by its ancestor which was based on the double fracture method. The accuracy of the single fracture method is confirmed by a close agreement with the theory, FE modeling and laboratory testing.

  7. Mechanical rock properties, fracture propagation and permeability development in deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea

    2010-05-01

    Deep geothermal reservoirs are rock units at depths greater than 400 m from which the internal heat can be extracted using water as a transport means in an economically efficient manner. In many geothermal reservoirs, fluid flow is largely, and may be almost entirely, controlled by the permeability of the fracture network. No flow, however, takes place along a particular fracture network unless the fractures are interconnected. For fluid flow to occur from one site to another there must be at least one interconnected cluster of fractures that links these sites, that is, the percolation threshold must be reached. In "hydrothermal systems", only the natural fracture system (extension and shear fractures) creates the rock or reservoir permeability that commonly exceeds the matrix permeability by far; in "petrothermal systems", by contrast, interconnected fracture systems are formed by creating hydraulic fractures and massive hydraulic stimulation of the existing fracture system in the host rock. Propagation (or termination, that is, arrest) of both natural extension and shear fractures as well as man-made hydraulic fractures is mainly controlled by the mechanical rock properties, particularly rock toughness, stiffness and strengths, of the host rock. Most reservoir rocks are heterogeneous and anisotropic, in particular they are layered. For many layered rocks, the mechanical properties, particularly their Young's moduli (stiffnesses), change between layers, that is, the rocks are mechanically layered. Mechanical layering may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content, fracture frequencies, or facies. For example, in sedimentary rocks, stiff limestone or sandstone layers commonly alternate with soft shale layers. In geothermal reservoirs fracture termination is important because non-stratabound fractures, that is, fractures not affected by layering, are more likely to form an interconnected fracture network than stratabound fractures, confined to single rock

  8. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  9. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  10. Studies of Transport Properties of Fractures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Brown

    2006-06-30

    We proposed to study several key factors controlling the character and evolution of fracture system permeability and transport processes. We suggest that due to surface roughness and the consequent channeling in single fractures and in fracture intersections, the tendency of a fracture system to plug up, remain permeable, or for permeability to increase due to chemical dissolution/precipitation conditions will depend strongly on the instantaneous flow channel geometry. This geometry will change as chemical interaction occurs, thus changing the permeability through time. To test this hypothesis and advance further understanding toward a predictive capability, we endeavored to physically model and analyze several configurations of flow and transport of inert and chemically active fluids through channels in single fractures and through fracture intersections. This was an integrated program utilizing quantitative observations of fractures and veins in drill core, quantitative and visual observations of flow and chemical dissolution and precipitation within replicas of real rough-walled fractures and fracture intersections, and numerical modeling via lattice Boltzmann methods.

  11. Alteration of the Hydraulic and Seismic Properties of a Fracture by Mineral Precipitation and Sand Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Colon, A. A.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2006-12-01

    In the near subsurface, rocks are exposed to multiple natural and human made processes that can alter the properties of the rock. These processes can be chemical dissolution, mineral precipitation as well as sand deposition and transport. All these processes alter the hydrological and seismic properties of fractured rock. In this study we used a fractured carbonate rock (150 mm of diameter and 75 mm of height) to study the effect of mineral precipitation and fine sand deposition on the hydrological and seismic properties of the fracture. Prior to geochemical and transport alteration of the fracture, surface roughness measurements were made using laser profilometry to quantify the fracture void geometry. Reconstruction of the fracture void geometry showed quasi-linear channels through the fracture with a correlation length of 20 mm. The long linear channels were not observed in the seismic data for the fracture when it was initially saturated with water. For seismic measurements, water usually masks heterogeneity in a fracture. However, the flow measurements made from eight ports around the sample did indicate flow anisotropy. Next, the fracture void geometry was altered using a solution of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid to alternately etch the fracture and precipitate gypsum in the fracture. This reactive solution resulted in an increase in flow rate for several ports but not all. The seismic data showed that portions of the fracture exhibited enhanced transmission, while other portions exhibited a decrease in transmission. Finally, fine sand transport and deposition were performed by using an aqueous containing solid spherical silica beads (an average radius of 25 micrometers). While the flow rate remained relatively constant in three out of four ports, the seismic transmission across the fracture increased. In addition, the structure of the void geometry became apparent in the seismic data. We hypothesize that the deposition of the fine sand was controlled

  12. Elastic properties and fracture strength of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The layups of the studied laminates are (0, + or - 60) sub s, (0, + or - 45, 90) sub s, (0, + or - 30, + or - 60, 90) sub s (0, + or - 22 1/2, + or - 45, + or - 67 1/2, 90) sub s. The properties determined were tensile modulus, Poisson's ratio, bending stiffness, fracture strength and fracture strain. Measured properties and properties predicted using laminate theory were found to be in reasonable agreement. Reasons for data scatter were determined.

  13. Characterization of hydraulic fractures and reservoir properties of shale using natural tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Gardner, P.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Malama, B.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing plays a major role in the economic production of hydrocarbon from shale. Current fracture characterization techniques are limited in diagnosing the transport properties of the fractures on the near wellbore scale to that of the entire stimulated reservoir volume. Microseismic reveals information on fracture geometries, but not transport properties. Production analysis (e.g., rate transient analysis using produced fluids) estimates fracture and reservoir flow characteristics, but often relies on simplified models in terms of fracture geometries and fluid storage and transport. We present the approach and potential benefits of incorporating natural tracers with production data analysis for fracture and reservoir characterization. Hydraulic fracturing releases omnipresent natural tracers that accumulate in low permeability rocks over geologic time (e.g., radiogenic 4He and 40Ar). Key reservoir characteristics govern the tracer release, which include: the number, connectivity, and geometry of fractures; the distribution of fracture-surface-area to matrix-block-volume; and the nature of hydrocarbon phases within the reservoir (e.g., methane dissolved in groundwater or present as a separate gas phase). We explore natural tracer systematics using numerical techniques under relevant shale-reservoir conditions. We evaluate the impact on natural tracer transport due to a variety of conceptual models of reservoir-transport properties and boundary conditions. Favorable attributes for analysis of natural tracers include the following: tracer concentrations start with a well-defined initial condition (i.e., equilibrium between matrix and any natural fractures); there is a large suite of tracers that cover a range of at least 7x in diffusion coefficients; and diffusive mass-transfer out of the matrix into hydraulic fractures will cause elemental and isotopic fractionation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by

  14. Mechanical properties and fracture strength of cathodically polarized prestressing wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kiszowski, S.; Hartt, W.H.

    1996-11-01

    Constant extension rate testing experiments were performed upon prestressing steel wire specimens prepared from three lots of Grade 270 and one lot of Grade 250 material for the purpose of characterizing susceptibility to environmental cracking under conditions associated with cathodic protection of prestressed concrete components and structures. Smooth, notched (six different geometries) and pitted (four different geometries) specimens were tested in air and deaerated saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}-distilled water at potentials of {minus}0.90 and {minus}1.30 v (SCE) and strength and ductility properties characterized. Relatively low strength was recorded for steel specimens at {minus}09.90 v from material for which the weight percent chromium was relatively high (0.24 w/o compared to 0.02 w/o). Under conditions that are likely to be most relevant to service, fracture load correlated with the amount by which the local wire cross section area was reduced, either from a notch or pit, and was independent of depth of the irregularity and of root radius to the extent to which these were addressed. It was concluded that it may be unsafe to apply cathodically protection to prestressing wire, even in situations where potential is maintained in the regime where hydrogen embrittlement should not occur.

  15. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-04-14

    The fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel were measured for forgings in the unexposed, hydrogen-exposed, and tritium-exposed-and-aged conditions. Fracture toughness samples were cut from conventionally-forged and high-energy-rate-forged forward-extruded cylinders and mechanically tested at room temperature using ASTM fracture-toughness testing procedures. Some of the samples were exposed to either hydrogen or tritium gas (340 MPa, 623 K) prior to testing. Tritium-exposed samples were aged for up to seven years and tested periodically in order to measure the effect on fracture toughness of {sup 3}He from radioactive tritium decay. The results show that hydrogen-exposed and tritium-exposed samples had lower fracture- toughness values than unexposed samples and that fracture toughness decreased with increasing decay {sup 3}He content. Forged steels were more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay {sup 3}He than annealed steels, although their fracture-toughness properties depended on the degree of sensitization that occurred during processing. The fracture process was dominated by microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence; however, the size and spacing of microvoids on the fracture surfaces were affected by hydrogen and tritium with the lowest-toughness samples having the smallest microvoids and finest spacing.

  16. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel

  17. Correlation of physical properties of ceramic materials with resistance to fracture by thermal shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lidman, W G; Bobrowsky, A R

    1949-01-01

    An analysis is made to determine which properties of materials affect their resistance to fracture by thermal stresses.From this analysis, a parameter is evaluated that is correlated with the resistance of ceramic materials to fracture by thermal shock as experimentally determined. This parameter may be used to predict qualitatively the resistance of a material to fracture by thermal shock. Resistance to fracture by thermal shock is shown to be dependent upon the following material properties: thermal conductivity, tensile strength, thermal expansion, and ductility modulus. For qualitative prediction of resistance of materials to fracture by thermal shock, the parameter may be expressed as the product of thermal conductivity and tensile strength divided by the product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion and ductility modulus of the specimen.

  18. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior of single-layer phosphorene at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Ding, Zhiwei; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene, has attracted great attention in recent years due to its superior physical and electrical properties. However, compared to graphene and other 2D materials, phosphorene has a relatively low Young’s modulus and fracture strength, which may limit its applications due to possible structure failures. For the mechanical reliability of future phosphorene-based nanodevices, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene. Previous studies on the mechanical properties of phosphorene were based on first principles calculations at 0 K. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. It is found that temperature has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of phosphorene. The fracture strength and strain reduce by more than 65% when the temperature increases from 0 K to 450 K. Moreover, the fracture strength and strain in the zigzag direction is more sensitive to the temperature rise than that in the armchair direction. More interestingly, the failure crack propagates preferably along the groove in the puckered structure when uniaxial tension is applied in the armchair direction. In contrast, when the uniaxial tension is applied in the zigzag direction, multiple cracks are observed with rough fracture surfaces. Our present work provides useful information about the mechanical properties and failure behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures.

  19. Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-02-01

    To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

  20. Association of microstructural and mechanical properties of cancellous bone and their fracture risk assessment tool scores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dengke; Li, Xin; Tao, Cheng; Dai, Ruchun; Ni, Jiangdong; Liao, Eryuan

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the association between fracture probabilities determined by using the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in osteoporosis (OP) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients with hip replacements. By using FRAX, we evaluated fracture risks of the 102 patients with bone replacements. Using micro CT scanning, we obtained the analysis parameters of microstructural properties of cancellous bone. Through morphometric observations, fatigue tests and compression tests, we obtained parameters of mechanical properties of cancellous bones. Relevant Pearson analysis was performed to investigate the association between the fracture probability and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in patients. Fifteen risk factors in FRAX were compared between OP and OA patients. FRAX hip fracture risk score and major osteoporotic in OP and OA patients were significantly different. FRAX was associated with tissue bone mineral density and volumetric bone mineral density. Our study suggests that the probabilities of major osteoporotic and hip fracture using FRAX is associated with bone mass but not with micro bone quality. PMID:26064297

  1. Association of microstructural and mechanical properties of cancellous bone and their fracture risk assessment tool scores.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dengke; Li, Xin; Tao, Cheng; Dai, Ruchun; Ni, Jiangdong; Liao, Eryuan

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the association between fracture probabilities determined by using the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in osteoporosis (OP) and osteoarthritis (OA) patients with hip replacements. By using FRAX, we evaluated fracture risks of the 102 patients with bone replacements. Using micro CT scanning, we obtained the analysis parameters of microstructural properties of cancellous bone. Through morphometric observations, fatigue tests and compression tests, we obtained parameters of mechanical properties of cancellous bones. Relevant Pearson analysis was performed to investigate the association between the fracture probability and the microstructure and mechanical properties of femoral bone trabecula in patients. Fifteen risk factors in FRAX were compared between OP and OA patients. FRAX hip fracture risk score and major osteoporotic in OP and OA patients were significantly different. FRAX was associated with tissue bone mineral density and volumetric bone mineral density. Our study suggests that the probabilities of major osteoporotic and hip fracture using FRAX is associated with bone mass but not with micro bone quality. PMID:26064297

  2. Local fracture properties and dissimilar weld integrity in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guozhen; Wang, Haitao; Xuan, Fuzhen; Tu, Shantung; Liu, Changjun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the local fracture properties in a Alloy52M dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) between A508 ferritic steel and 316 L stainless steel in nuclear power plants were investigated by using the single-edge notched bend (SENB) specimens, and their use in integrity assessment of DMWJ structures was analyzed. The results show that the local fracture resistance in the DMWJ is determined by local fracture mechanism, and which is mainly related to the microstructures and local strength mismatches of materials at the crack locations. The initial cracks always grow towards the materials with lower strength, and the crack path deviation is mainly controlled by the local strength mismatch. If the local fracture properties could not be used for cracks in the heat affected zones (HAZs), interface and near interface zones, the use of the fracture properties ( J-resistance curves) of base metals or weld metals following present codes will unavoidably produce non-conservative (unsafe) or excessive conservative assessment results. In most cases, the assessment results will be potentially unsafe. Therefore, it is recommended to obtain and use local mechanical and fracture properties in the integrity assessment of DMWJs.

  3. Effect of roughness and material strength on the mechanical properties of fracture replicas

    SciTech Connect

    Wibowo, J.; Amadei, B.; Sture, S.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of 11 rotary shear tests conducted on replicas of three hollow cylinders of natural fractures with JRC values of 7.7, 9.4 and 12.0. The JRC values were determined from the results of laser profilometer measurements. The replicas were created from gypsum cement. By varying the water-to-gypsum cement ratio from 30 to 45%, fracture replicas with different values of compressive strength (JCS) were created. The rotary shear experiments were performed under constant normal (nominal) stresses ranging between 0.2 and 1.6 MPa. In this report, the shear test results are compared with predictions using Barton`s empirical peak shear strength equation. observations during the experiments indicate that only certain parts of the fracture profiles influence fracture shear strength and dilatancy. Under relatively low applied normal stresses, the JCS does not seem to have a significant effect on shear behavior. As an alternative, a new procedure for predicting the shear behavior of fractures was developed. The approach is based on basic fracture properties such as fracture surface profile data and the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and Poisson`s ratio of the fracture walls. Comparison between predictions and actual shear test results shows that the alternative procedure is a reliable method.

  4. Mechanical properties and fracture toughness of rail steels and thermite welds at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-qing; Zhou, Hui; Shi, Yong-jiu; Feng, Bao-rui

    2012-05-01

    Brittle fracture occurs frequently in rails and thermite welded joints, which intimidates the security and reliability of railway service. Railways in cold regions, such as Qinghai-Tibet Railway, make the problem of brittle fracture in rails even worse. A series of tests such as uniaxial tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and three-point bending tests were carried out at low temperature to investigate the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of U71Mn and U75V rail steels and their thermite welds. Fracture micromechanisms were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the fracture surfaces of the tested specimens. The ductility indices (percentage elongation after fracture and percentage reduction of area) and the toughness indices (Charpy impact energy A k and plane-strain fracture toughness K IC) of the two kinds of rail steels and the corresponding thermite welds all decrease as the temperature decreases. The thermite welds are more critical to fracture than the rail steel base metals, as indicated by a higher yield-to-ultimate ratio and a much lower Charpy impact energy. U71Mn rail steel is relatively higher in toughness than U75V, as demonstrated by larger A k and K IC values. Therefore, U71Mn rail steel and the corresponding thermite weld are recommended in railway construction and maintenance in cold regions.

  5. Inverse modeling of the hydraulic properties of fractured media : development of a flow tomography approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, O.; Klepikova, M.; Le Borgne, T.; De Dreuzy, J.

    2013-12-01

    Inverse modeling of hydraulic and geometrical properties of fractured media is a very challenging objective due to the spatial heterogeneity of the medium and the scarcity of data. Here we present a flow tomography approach that permits to characterize the location, the connectivity and the hydraulic properties of main flow paths in fractured media. The accurate characterization of the location, hydraulic properties and connectivity of major fracture zones is essential to model flow and solute transport in fractured media. Cross-borehole flowmeter tests, which consist of measuring changes in vertical borehole flows when pumping a neighboring borehole, were shown to be an efficient technique to provide information on the properties of the flow zones that connect borehole pairs [Paillet, 1998; Le Borgne et al., 2006]. The interpretation of such experiments may however be quite uncertain when multiple connections exist. In this study, we explore the potential of flow tomography (i.e., sequential cross-borehole flowmeter tests) for characterizing aquifer heterogeneity. We first propose a framework for inverting flow and drawdown data to infer fracture connectivity and transmissivities. Here we use a simplified discrete fracture network approach that highlights main connectivity structures. This conceptual model attempts to reproduce fracture network connectivity without taking fracture geometry (length, orientation, dip) into account. We then explore the potential of the method for simplified synthetic fracture network models and quantify the sensitivity of drawdown and borehole flow velocities to the transmissivity of the connecting flowpaths. Flow tomography is expected to be most effective if cross-borehole pumping induces large changes in vertical borehole velocities. The uncertainty of the transmissivity estimates increases for small borehole flow velocities. The uncertainty about the transmissivity of fractures that connect the main flowpath but not the boreholes

  6. Investigating flow properties of partially cemented fractures in Travis Peak Formation using image-based pore-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokan-Lawal, Adenike; Prodanović, Maša.; Eichhubl, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Natural fractures can provide preferred flow pathways in otherwise low-permeability reservoirs. In deep subsurface reservoirs including tight oil and gas reservoirs, as well as in hydrothermal systems, fractures are frequently lined or completely filled with mineral cement that reduces or occludes fracture porosity and permeability. Fracture cement linings potentially reduce flow connectivity between the fracture and host rock and increase fracture wall roughness, which constricts flow. We combined image-based fracture space characterization, mercury injection capillary pressure and permeability experiments, and numerical simulations to evaluate the influence of fracture-lining cement on single-phase and multiphase flows along a natural fracture from the Travis Peak Formation, a tight gas reservoir sandstone in East Texas. Using X-ray computed microtomographic image analysis, we characterized fracture geometry and the connectivity and geometric tortuosity of the fracture pore space. Combining level set method-based progressive quasistatic and lattice Boltzmann simulations, we assessed the capillary-dominated displacement properties and the (relative) permeability of a cement-lined fracture. Published empirical correlations between aperture and permeability for barren fractures provide permeability estimates that vary among each other, and differ from our results, vary by several orders of magnitude. Compared to barren fractures, cement increases the geometric tortuosity, aperture variation of the pore space, and capillary pressure while reducing the single-phase permeability by up to 2 orders of magnitude. For multiphase displacement, relative permeability and fluid entrapment geometry resemble those of porous media and differ from those characteristic of barren fractures.

  7. Influence of mechanical rock properties and fracture healing rate on crustal fluid flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel; de Riese, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust is very slow over extended periods of time, during which it occurs within the connected pore space of rocks. If the fluid production rate exceeds a certain threshold, matrix permeability alone is insufficient to drain the fluid volume and fluid pressure builds up, thereby reducing the effective stress supported by the rock matrix. Hydraulic fractures form once the effective pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the rock matrix and act subsequently as highly effective fluid conduits. Once local fluid pressure is sufficiently low again, flow ceases and fractures begin to heal. Since fluid flow is controlled by the alternation of fracture permeability and matrix permeability, the flow rate in the system is strongly discontinuous and occurs in intermittent pulses. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and subsequent healing of hydraulic fractures depends on the local fluid pressure and on the time-span between fluid pulses. We simulate this process with a computer model and describe the resulting dynamics statistically. Special interest is given to a) the spatially and temporally discontinuous formation and closure of fractures and fracture networks and b) the total flow rate over time. The computer model consists of a crustal-scale dual-porosity setup. Control parameters are the pressure- and time-dependent fracture healing rate, and the strength and the permeability of the intact rock. Statistical analysis involves determination of the multifractal properties and of the power spectral density of the temporal development of the total drainage rate and hydraulic fractures. References Bons, P. D. (2001). The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics, 336, 1-17. Miller, S. a., & Nur, A. (2000). Permeability as a toggle switch in fluid-controlled crustal processes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 183(1-2), 133-146. Sachau, T., Bons, P. D

  8. The relation of microdamage to fracture and material property degradation in human cortical bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkus, Ozan

    This dissertation investigates the relation of microdamage to fracture and material property degradation of human cortical bone tissue. Fracture resistance and fatigue crack growth of microcracks were examined experimentally and material property degradation was examined through theoretical modeling. To investigate the contribution of microdamage to static fracture resistance, fracture toughness tests were conducted in the transverse and longitudinal directions to the osteonal orientation of normal bone tissue. Damage accumulation was monitored by acoustic emission during testing and was spatially observed by histological observation following testing. The results suggested that the propagation of the main crack involved weakening of the tissue by diffuse damage at the fracture plane and by formation of linear microcracks away from the fracture plane for the transverse specimens. For the longitudinal specimens, growth of the main crack occurred in the form of separations at lamellar interfaces. Acoustic emission results supported the histological observations. To investigate the contribution of ultrastructure to static fracture resistance, fracture toughness tests were conducted after altering the collagen phase of the bone tissue by gamma radiation. A significant decrease in the fracture toughness, Work-to-Fracture and the amount damage was observed due to irradiation in both crack growth directions. For cortical bone irradiated at 27.5kGy, fracture toughness is reduced due to the inhibition of damage formation at and near the crack tip. Microcrack fatigue crack growth and arrest were investigated through observations of surface cracks during cyclic loading. At the applied cyclic stresses, the microcracks propagated and arrested in less than 10,000 cycles. In addition, the microcracks were observed not to grow beyond a length of 150mum and a DeltaK of 0.5MNm-3/2, supporting a microstructural barrier concept. Finally, the contribution of linear microcracks to

  9. Permeability, porosity, and percolation properties of two-dimensional disordered fracture networks.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Hamzehpour, Hossein; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    Using extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we study the effective permeability, porosity, and percolation properties of two-dimensional fracture networks in which the fractures are represented by rectangles of finite widths. The parameters of the study are the width of the fractures and their number density. For low and intermediate densities, the average porosity of the network follows a power-law relation with the density. The exponent of the power law itself depends on the fractures' width through a power law. For an intermediate range of the densities, the effective permeability scales with the fractures' width as a power law, with an exponent that depends on the density. For high densities the effective permeability also depends on the porosity through a power law, with an exponent that depends on the fractures' width. In agreement with the results, experimental data also indicate the existence of a power-law relationship between the effective permeability and porosity in consolidated sandstones and sedimentary rocks with a nonuniversal exponent. The percolation threshold or critical number density of the fractures depends on their width and is maximum if they are represented by squares, rather than rectangles. PMID:22181271

  10. High temperature tensile properties and fracture characteristics of bimodal 12Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Ankur; Litvinov, Dimitri; Aktaa, Jarir

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the tensile properties and fracture characteristics of a 12Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with unique elongated bimodal grain size distribution. The tensile tests were carried out at four different temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 700 °C, at a nominal strain rate of 10-3 s-1. At room temperature the material exhibits a high tensile strength of 1294 MPa and high yield strength of 1200 MPa. At 700 °C, the material still exhibits relatively high tensile strength of 300 MPa. The total elongation-to-failure exceeds 18% over the whole temperature range and has a maximum value of 29% at 600 °C. This superior ductility is attributed to the material's bimodal grain size distribution. In comparison to other commercial, as well as experimental, ODS steels, the material shows an excellent compromise between strength and ductility. The fracture surface studies reveal a change in fracture behavior from a mixed mode fracture at room temperature to fully ductile fracture at 600 °C. At 700 °C, the fracture path changes from intragranular to intergranular fracture, which is associated with a reduced ductility.

  11. Macroscopic properties of isotropic and anisotropic fracture networks from the percolation threshold to very large densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J.; Mourzenko, V.

    2011-12-01

    The main purpose of this review paper is to summarize some recent studies of fracture networks. Progress has been made possible thanks to a very versatile numerical technique based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture networks. Any network geometry, any boundary condition, and any distribution of the fractures can be addressed. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. The second step consists in the discretization of the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Two important properties were systematically studied, namely the percolation threshold rho_c and the macroscopic permeability K_n of the fracture network. Dimensionless quantities are denoted by a prime. The numerical results are interpreted in a systematic way with the concept of excluded volume which enables us to define a dimensionless fracture density rho' equal in the average to the average number of intersections per fracture. 1. Isotropic networks of identical fractures The dimensionless percolation threshold rho'_c of such networks was systematically studied for fractures of various shapes. rho'_c was shown to be almost independent of the shape except when one has very elongated rectangles. A formula is proposed for rho'_c. The permeability of these networks was calculated for a wide range of fracture densities and shapes. K'_n(rho') is almost independent of the fracture shape; an empirical formula is proposed for any value of rho' between rho'_c and infinity. For large rho', K_n is well approximated by the Snow formula initially derived for infinite fractures. 2. Anisotropic networks of identical fractures The fracture orientations are supposed to follow a Fisher distribution characterized by the parameter kappa; when kappa=0, the fractures are isotropic; when kappa=infinity, the fractures are perpendicular to a given direction. rho'_c does not depend significantly on kappa and the general formula proposed in 1

  12. Macroscopic properties of fracture networks from the percolation threshold to very large densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P.; Thovert, J.-F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2012-04-01

    Progress has been made possible thanks to a very versatile numerical technique based on a three-dimensional discrete description of the fracture networks. Any network geometry, any boundary condition, and any distribution of the fractures can be addressed. The first step is to mesh the fracture network as it is by triangles of a controlled size. The second step consists in the discretization of the conservation equations by the finite volume technique. Two important properties were systematically studied, namely the percolation threshold rhoc and the macroscopic permeability Kn of the fracture network. Dimensionless quantities are denoted by a prime. The numerical results are interpreted in a systematic way with the concept of excluded volume which enables us to define a dimensionless fracture density rho' equal in the average to the average number of intersections per fracture. 1. Isotropic networks of identical fractures The dimensionless percolation threshold rho'c of such networks was systematically studied for fractures of various shapes. rho'c was shown to be almost independent of the shape except when one has very elongated rectangles. A formula is proposed for rho'_c. The permeability of these networks was calculated for a wide range of fracture densities and shapes. K'_n(rho') is almost independent of the fracture shape; an empirical formula is proposed for any value of rho' between rho'c and infinity. For large rho', Kn is well approximated by the Snow formula initially derived for infinite fractures. 2. Anisotropic networks of identical fractures The fracture orientations are supposed to follow a Fisher distribution characterized by the parameter kappa; when kappa=0, the fractures are isotropic; when kappa=infinity, the fractures are perpendicular to a given direction. rho'c does not depend significantly on kappa and the general formula proposed in 1 can be used as a first approximation. A considerable simplification occurs for permeability. The

  13. Stratigraphic variations in oil-shale fracture properties. [Colorado and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Patti, N. C.; Trent, B. C.

    1982-09-01

    The proper design and evaluation of in situ oil shale fracture and retorting experiments require that both the extreme values and spatial distribution of the controlling rock properties be adequately known. Many of the in situ technologies being considered for processing within the Green River Formation in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah depend upon the carefully controlled explosive fracturing of the rock such that suitably uniform permeabilities are achieved. The prediction, control and evaluation of explosive oil shale fracturing require a detailed knowledge of tensile strength behavior as a function of shale grade and stratigraphic position. Direct-pull tensile tests, point-load pinch tests, and four-point-bend fracture toughness tests have been utilized to develop detailed logs of the relevant fracture properties for the 37 m thick Mahogany Zone section of the Green River Formation near Anvil Points, Colorado and for the rich, upper 13 m of the Tipton Member near Rock Springs, Wyoming. For the Mahogany Zone shale tensile strengths ranged up to 15.3 MPa for direct-pull tests and 43.4 MPa for indirect tests. Fracture energy values for this shale ranged from 8 J/m/sup 2/ to 191 J/m/sup 2/. For the Tipton shale tensile strengths ranged up to 3.7 MPa for direct-pull tests and 12.6 MPa for indirect tests. Fracture energy values for the Tipton averaged from 5 J/m/sup 2/ to 91 J/m/sup 2/. Detailed statistical analyses were performed on these data and on Fischer assay oil yield data to establish the correlations between them. Data from both tensile strength and fracture energy tests correlate well with lithologic and oil yield characteristics of the Mahogany Zone shale while poor correlations were found for the Tipton shale. 27 figures, 8 tables.

  14. The Thermal Expansion, Elastic and Fracture Properties of Porous Cordierite at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Pandey, Amit; Watkins, Thomas R; More, Karren

    2012-01-01

    The properties that determine the thermal shock resistance in materials are reported for porous cordierite, a leading candidate material for the fabrication of diesel particulate filters. Fracture toughness and slow crack growth tests were performed on test specimens obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter monolithic substrates using the double-torsion test method at temperatures between 20 C and 900 C. The thermal expansion and elastic properties were characterized between 20 C and 1000 C. The role of the microstructure of porous cordierite in determining its unusual thermal expansion and elevated temperature Young's modulus and fracture toughness are discussed.

  15. Flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: effects of multiscale heterogeneity of hydrogeologic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S; Oldenburg, Curtis M

    2003-01-01

    The heterogeneity of hydrogeologic properties at different scales may have different effects on flow and transport processes in a subsurface system. A model for the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is developed to represent complex heterogeneity at two different scales: (1) layer scale corresponding to geologic layering and (2) local scale. The layer-scale hydrogeologic properties are obtained using inverse modeling, based on the available measurements collected from the Yucca Mountain site. Calibration results show a significant lateral and vertical variability in matrix and fracture properties. Hydrogeologic property distributions in a two-dimensional, vertical cross-section of the site are generated by combining the average layer-scale matrix and fracture properties with local-scale perturbations generated using a stochastic simulation method. The unsaturated water flow and conservative (nonsorbing) tracer transport through the cross-section are simulated for different sets of matrix and fracture property fields. Comparison of simulation results indicates that the local-scale heterogeneity of matrix and fracture properties has a considerable effect on unsaturated flow processes, leading to fast flow paths in fractures and the matrix. These paths shorten the travel time of a conservative tracer from the source (repository) horizon in the unsaturated zone to the water table for small fractions of total released tracer mass. As a result, the local-scale heterogeneity also has a noticeable effect on global tracer transport processes, characterized by an average breakthrough curve at the water table, especially at the early arrival time of tracer mass. However, the effect is not significant at the later time after 20% tracer mass reaches the water table. The simulation results also verify that matrix diffusion plays an important role in overall solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. PMID:12498572

  16. Experimental Investigation of Seepage Properties of Fractured Rocks Under Different Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Miao, X. X.; Chen, Z. Q.; Mao, X. B.

    2013-09-01

    The effectiveness of transmitting underground water in rock fractures is strongly influenced by the widths of the fractures and their interconnections. However, the geometries needed for water flow in fractured rock are also heavily controlled by the confining pressure conditions. This paper is intended to study the seepage properties of fractured rocks under different confining pressures. In order to do this, we designed and manufactured a water flow apparatus that can be connected to the electro-hydraulic servo-controlled test system MTS815.02, which provides loading and exhibits external pressures in the test. Using this apparatus, we tested fractured mudstone, limestone and sandstone specimens and obtained the relationship between seepage properties and variations in confining pressure. The calculation of the seepage properties based on the collection of water flow and confining pressure differences is specifically influenced by non-Darcy flow. The results show that: (1) The seepage properties of fractured rocks are related to confining pressure, i.e. with the increase of confining pressure, the permeability decreases and the absolute value of non-Darcy flow coefficient increases. (2) The sandstone coefficients and range from to m2 and to m-1, respectively, and exhibit a greater change compared to coefficients of mudstone and limestone. (3) From the regression analysis of experimental data, it is concluded that the polynomial function is a better fit than the power and logarithmic functions. The results obtained can provide an important reference for understanding the stability of rock surrounding roadways toward prevention of underground water gushing-out, and for developing underground resources (e.g. coal).

  17. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Directionally Solidified NiAl-V Eutectic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Caram, Rubens

    2015-02-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys has been recognized as promising technique for producing in situ composite materials exhibiting balance of properties. Therefore, an in situ NiAl-V eutectic composite has been successfully directionally solidified using Bridgman technique. The mechanical behavior of the composite including fracture resistance, microhardness, and compressive properties at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. Damage evolution and fracture characteristics were also discussed. The obtained results indicate that the NiAl-V eutectic retains high yield strength up to 1073 K (800 °C), above which there is a rapid decrease in strength. Its yield strength is higher than that of binary NiAl and most of the NiAl-based eutectics. The exhibited fracture toughness of 28.5 MPa√m is the highest of all other NiAl-based systems investigated so far. The material exhibited brittle fracture behavior of transgranular type and all observations pointed out that the main fracture micromechanism was cleavage.

  18. Fracture Toughness Properties of Savannah River Site Storage Tank ASTM A285 Low Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2002-05-22

    A materials test program was developed to measure mechanical properties of ASTM A285 Grade B low carbon steel for application to structural and flaw stability analysis of storage tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). Under this plan, fracture toughness and tensile testing are being performed at conditions that are representative of storage tank

  19. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown. PMID:27263108

  20. Fracture properties from tight reservoir outcrop analogues with application to geothermal exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Sonja L.; Reyer, Dorothea; Afsar, Filiz; Bauer, Johanna F.; Meier, Silke; Reinecker, John

    2015-04-01

    In geothermal reservoirs, similar to other tight reservoirs, fluid flow may be intensely affected by fracture systems, in particular those associated with fault zones. When active (slipping) the fault core, that is, the inner part of a fault zone, which commonly consists of breccia or gouge, can suddenly develop high permeability. Fault cores of inactive fault zones, however, may have low permeabilities and even act as flow barriers. In the outer part of a fault zone, the damage zone, permeability depends mainly on the fracture properties, that is, the geometry (orientation, aperture, density, connectivity, etc.) of the fault-associated fracture system. Mineral vein networks in damage zones of deeply eroded fault zones in palaeogeothermal fields demonstrate their permeability. In geothermal exploration, particularly for hydrothermal reservoirs, the orientation of fault zones in relation to the current stress field as well as their internal structure, in particular the properties of the associated fracture system, must be known as accurately as possible for wellpath planning and reservoir engineering. Here we present results of detailed field studies and numerical models of fault zones and associated fracture systems in palaeogeo¬thermal fields and host rocks for geothermal reservoirs from various stratigraphies, lithologies and tectonic settings: (1) 74 fault zones in three coastal sections of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic age (mudstones and limestone-marl alternations) in the Bristol Channel Basin, UK. (2) 58 fault zones in 22 outcrops from Upper Carboniferous to Upper Cretaceous in the Northwest German Basin (siliciclastic, carbonate and volcanic rocks); and (3) 16 fault zones in 9 outcrops in Lower Permian to Middle Triassic (mainly sandstone and limestone) in the Upper Rhine Graben shoulders. Whereas (1) represent palaeogeothermal fields with mineral veins, (2) and (3) are outcrop analogues of reservoir horizons from geothermal exploration. In the study

  1. Are the High Hip Fracture Rates Among Norwegian Women Explained by Impaired Bone Material Properties?

    PubMed

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Vilaplana, Laila; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Wang-Fagerland, Morten; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; F Eriksen, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture rates in Norway rank among the highest in the world, more than double that of Spanish women. Previous studies were unable to demonstrate significant differences between the two populations with respect to bone mass or calcium metabolism. In order to test whether the difference in fracture propensity between both populations could be explained by differences in bone material quality we assessed bone material strength using microindentation in 42 Norwegian and 46 Spanish women with normal BMD values, without clinical or morphometric vertebral fractures, no clinical or laboratory signs of secondary osteoporosis, and without use of drugs with known influence on bone metabolism. Bone material properties were assessed by microindentation of the thick cortex of the mid tibia following local anesthesia of the area using the Osteoprobe device (Active Life Scientific, Santa Barbara, CA, USA). Indentation distance was standardized against a calibration phantom of methylmethacrylate and results, as percentage of this reference value, expressed as bone material strength index units (BMSi). We found that the bone material properties reflected in the BMSi value of Norwegian women was significantly inferior when compared to Spanish women (77 ± 7.1 versus 80.7 ± 7.8, p < 0.001). Total hip BMD was significantly higher in Norwegian women (1.218 g/cm(2) versus 0.938 g/cm(2) , p < 0.001) but regression analysis revealed that indentation values did not vary with BMD r(2)  = 0.03 or age r(2)  = 0.04. In conclusion Norwegian women show impaired bone material properties, higher bone mass, and were taller than Spanish women. The increased height will increase the impact on bone after falls, and impaired bone material properties may further enhance the risk fracture after such falls. These ethnic differences in bone material properties may partly explain the higher propensity for fracture in Norwegian women. PMID:25900016

  2. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume 1. Fracturing proppants and their properties

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    A review of previously published literature on proppant permeability is presented. This data will be used in the subsequent phases of the geothermal stimulation project. Much information comes from the oil and gas industry which has tested various proppants during the past thirty years over a range of different closure stresses at the lower temperatures found in oil reservoirs. The historical development of proppants is summarized and reviewed and a variety of data on proppants found in today's literature is presented. Also included are several standard test procedures and equipment setups used in measuring proppant properties and in proppant testing.

  3. Effects of chemical alteration on fracture mechanical properties in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, O. A.; Eichhubl, P.; Olson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fault and fracture networks often control the distribution of fluids and heat in hydrothermal and epithermal systems, and in related geothermal and mineral resources. Additional chemical influences on conduit evolution are well documented, with dissolution and precipitation of mineral species potentially changing the permeability of fault-facture networks. Less well understood are the impacts of chemical alteration on the mechanical properties governing fracture growth and fracture network geometry. We use double-torsion (DT) load relaxation tests under ambient air conditions to measure the mode-I fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical fracture growth index (SCI) of variably altered rock samples obtained from outcrop in Dixie Valley, NV. Samples from southern Dixie Valley include 1) weakly altered granite, characterized by minor sericite in plagioclase, albitization and vacuolization of feldspars, and incomplete replacement of biotite with chlorite, and 2) granite from an area of locally intense propylitic alteration with chlorite-calcite-hematite-epidote assemblages. We also evaluated samples of completely silicified gabbro obtained from the Dixie Comstock epithermal gold deposit. In the weakly altered granite KIC and SCI are 1.3 ±0.2 MPam1/2 (n=8) and 59 ±25 (n=29), respectively. In the propylitic assemblage KIC is reduced to 0.6 ±0.1 MPam1/2 (n=11), and the SCI increased to 75 ±36 (n = 33). In both cases, the altered materials have lower fracture toughness and higher SCI than is reported for common geomechanical standards such as Westerly Granite (KIC ~1.7 MPam1/2; SCI ~48). Preliminary analysis of the silicified gabbro shows a significant increase in fracture toughness, 3.6 ±0.4 MPam1/2 (n=2), and SCI, 102 ±45 (n=19), compared to published values for gabbro (2.9 MPam1/2 and SCI = 32). These results suggest that mineralogical and textural changes associated with different alteration assemblages may result in spatially variable rates of fracture

  4. Effect of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M. J.; West, S.; Tosten, M. H.

    2008-07-15

    J-Integral fracture toughness tests were conducted on tritium-exposed-and- aged Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments in order to measure the combined effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3 on the fracture toughness properties. Initially, weldments have fracture toughness values about three times higher than base-metal values. Delta-ferrite phase in the weld microstructure improved toughness provided no tritium was present in the microstructure. After a tritium-exposure-and-aging treatment that resulted in {approx}1400 atomic parts per million (appm) dissolved tritium, both weldments and base metals had their fracture toughness values reduced to about the same level. The tritium effect was greater in weldments (67 % reduction vs. 37% reduction) largely because the ductile discontinuous delta-ferrite phase was embrittled by tritium and decay helium. For both base metals and weldments, fracture toughness values decreased with increasing decay helium content in the range tested (50-800 appm). (authors)

  5. TRITIUM AND DECAY HELIUM EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Scott West, S; Michael Tosten, M

    2007-08-31

    J-Integral fracture toughness tests were conducted on tritium-exposed-and-aged Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments in order to measure the combined effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3 on the fracture toughness properties. Initially, weldments have fracture toughness values about three times higher than base-metal values. Delta-ferrite phase in the weld microstructure improved toughness provided no tritium was present in the microstructure. After a tritium-exposure-and-aging treatment that resulted in {approx}1400 atomic parts per million (appm) dissolved tritium, both weldments and base metals had their fracture toughness values reduced to about the same level. The tritium effect was greater in weldments (67 % reduction vs. 37% reduction) largely because the ductile discontinuous delta-ferrite interfaces were embrittled by tritium and decay helium. Fracture toughness values decreased for both base metals and weldments with increasing decay helium content in the range tested (50-200 appm).

  6. Fracture properties of neutron-irradiated martensitic 9Cr-WVTa steels below room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Narui, M.; Kayano, H.

    1994-09-01

    Fracture properties of the reduced activation martensitic 9Cr-1WVTa and 9Cr-3WVTa steels were investigated by carrying out instrumented Charpy impact tests and tensile tests at temperatures below room temperature after irradiation in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor at 493 and 538 K. Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel was also examined for comparison. The irradiation-induced increase in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was 53, 26 and 40 K for the {1}/{3} size Charpy specimens of 9Cr-1WVTa, 9Cr-3WVTa and 9Cr-1MoVNb steels, respectively, which resulted primarily from the irradiation-induced increase in yield stress. The cleavage fracture stress was 1820-1870 MPa for the three steels in unirradiated conditions, which was scarcely affected by irradiation. The deflections to the maximum load and to the brittle fracture initiation were decreased by irradiation. In the tensile test, quasi-cleavage fracture occurred at 77 K in both unirradiated and irradiated conditions. The cleavage fracture stress was 1320-1380 MPa for the tensile specimens of the three steels, which was about 1.4 times smaller than that for the Charpy specimens.

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic field treatment enhances healing callus biomechanical properties in an animal model of osteoporotic fracture.

    PubMed

    Androjna, Caroline; Fort, Brian; Zborowski, Maciej; Midura, Ronald J

    2014-09-01

    Delayed bone healing has been noted in osteoporosis patients and in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of estrogen-depletion osteopenia. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) devices are clinically approved as an adjunct to cervical fusion surgery in patients at high risk for non-fusion and for the treatment of fracture non-unions. These bone growth stimulating devices also accelerate the healing of fresh fracture repair in skeletally mature normal rats but have not been tested for efficacy to accelerate and/or enhance the delayed bone repair process in OVX rats. The current study tested the hypothesis that daily PEMF treatments would improve the fracture healing response in skeletally mature OVX rats. By 6 weeks of healing, PEMF treatments resulted in improved hard callus elastic modulus across fibula fractures normalizing the healing process in OVX rats with respect to this mechanical property. Radiographic evidence showed an improved hard callus bridging across fibula fractures in OVX rats treated with PEMF as compared to sham treatments. These findings provide a scientific rationale for investigating whether PEMF might improve bone-healing responses in at-risk osteoporotic patients. PMID:24764277

  8. Estimating large-scale fractured rock properties from radon data collected in a ventilated tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Andre; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2003-05-12

    To address regulatory issues regarding worker safety, radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a deep tunnel excavated from a highly fractured tuff formation. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured rock. An iTOUGH2 model was developed to predict radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation rates. The numerical model was used (1) to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractured formation at the length scale of the tunnel and extending tens of meters into the surrounding rock, and (2) to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations that potentially exceed the regulatory limit. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the tunnel is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations propagated down the tunnel. In addition, a slight suction is induced by the ventilation system. The pressure fluctuations are dampened in the fractured formation according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the tunnel drops, formation gases from the rock are pulled into the opening, resulting in high radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentration data measured in the tunnel and gas phase pressure fluctuations observed in the formation yielded independent estimates of effective, large-scale fracture permeability and porosity. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability that radon gas concentrations will exceed the regulatory limit.

  9. Planar Porous Graphene Woven Fabric/Epoxy Composites with Exceptional Electrical, Mechanical Properties, and Fracture Toughness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Sun, Xinying; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Xi; Wu, Ying; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2015-09-30

    Planar interconnected graphene woven fabrics (GWFs) are prepared by template-based chemical vapor deposition and the GWFs are employed as multifunctional filler for epoxy-based composites. Apart from flexibility, transparency, lightweight, and high electrical conductivity, the GWFs have unique morphological features consisting of orthogonally interweaved, inherently percolated, hollow graphene tubes (GTs). The orthogonal GT structure means that the GWF/epoxy composites hold significant anisotropy in mechanical and fracture properties. The composites with 0.62 wt % graphene deliver a combination of excellent electrical and fracture properties: e.g., an electrical conductivity of ~0.18 S/cm; and fracture toughness of 1.67 and 1.78 MPa·m(1/2) when loaded along the 0° and 45° directions relative to the GT direction, respectively, equivalent to notable 57% and 67% rises compared to the solid epoxy. Unique fracture processes in GWF/epoxy composites are identified by in situ examinations, revealing crack tip blunting that occurs when the crack impinges GTs, especially those at 45° to the crack growth direction, as well as longitudinal tearing of hollow GTs as the two major toughening mechanisms. PMID:26331902

  10. An automated system for measuring multi-dimensional, time dependent mechanical properties of a human tibial fracture.

    PubMed

    Ogrodnik, Peter J; Moorcroft, C Ian; Thomas, Peter B M

    2007-12-01

    An automated loading and measurement device has been developed for assessment of the mechanical properties of a healing human tibial fracture. The characteristics of the device are presented with assessments of errors. This paper constitutes a small part of a long term research project determining a clinically quantifiable end point for fracture healing in humans, hence a sample of results is presented to demonstrate the potential application of the device. A more detailed analysis of the results will be the basis of further publications. The initial results confirm that the non-linear behaviour of callus cannot be ignored in fracture assessment methodologies. They further reinforce the requirement to measure load-rate when measuring fracture stiffness. Polar plots of stiffness demonstrate that when measuring fracture stiffness not only should load-rate be considered, but also the orientation of measurement. The results from this work support the view that fracture stiffness should be measured in at least two planes. A new material property for the assessment of fracture healing, the gamma ratio gamma, is examined and preliminary results are shown. The paper also demonstrates how creep properties of a healing tibia can be assessed and proposes that this property may form the basis for future fracture assessment investigations. PMID:17875395

  11. Permanent effect of a cryogenic spill on fracture properties of structural steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keseler, H.; Westermann, I.; Kandukuri, S. Y.; Nøkleby, J. O.; Holmedal, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fracture analysis of a standard construction steel platform deck, which had been exposed to a liquid nitrogen spill, showed that the brittle fracture started at a flaw in the weld as a consequence of low-temperature embrittlement and thermal stresses experienced by the material. In the present study, the permanent effect of a cryogenic spill on the fracture properties of carbon steels has been investigated. Charpy V-notch impact testing was carried out at 0 °C using specimens, from the platform deck material. The average impact energy appeared to be below requirements only for transverse specimens. No pre-existing damage was found when examining the fracture surfaces and cross sections in the scanning electron microscope. Specimens of the platform deck material and a DOMEX S355 MCD carbon steel were tensile tested immersed in liquid nitrogen. Both steels showed a considerable increase in yield- and fracture strength and a large increase in the Lüders strain compared to the room temperature behavior. A cryogenic spill was simulated by applying a constant tensile force to the specimens for 10 min, at -196 C. Subsequent tensile tests at room temperature showed no significant influence on the stress-strain curve of the specimens. A small amount of microcracks were found after holding a DOMEX S355 MCD specimen at a constant force below the yield point. In a platform deck material tensile tested to fracture in liquid nitrogen, cracks associated with elongated MnS inclusions were found through the whole test region. These cracks probably formed as a result of the inclusions having a higher thermal contraction rate than the steel, causing decohesion at the inclusion-matrix interface on cooling. Simultaneous deformation may have caused formation of cracks. Both the microcracks and sulphide related damage may give permanently reduced impact energy after a cryogenic exposure.

  12. Flow intrusion characteristics and fracture properties of titanium-fibre-reinforced bone cement.

    PubMed

    Topoleski, L D; Ducheyne, P; Cuckler, J M

    1998-09-01

    Two clinically relevant considerations for a new bone cement are its fracture properties and flow intrusion characteristics. We present data for a titanium-fibre-reinforced poly(methyl methacrylate) (Ti-PMMA). The fracture properties presented are a concise review of previously published material, while the flow intrusion observations are new. We performed fracture toughness and fatigue fracture experiments. Two types of fatigue specimens were designed and tested. A 'smooth' specimen represented the extreme case of minimum surface flaws. The lifetime of a 'smooth' specimen incorporates fatigue crack initiation (FCI) and fatigue crack propagation (FCP). 'Notched' specimens were created by machining a sharp notch into cylindrical specimens. The sharp notch effectively eliminated FCI from a random surface flaw and thus we made the assumption that the lifetime of the notched specimen was a function of FCP only. Fatigue testing was performed on rotating-bending fatigue machines until failure. Fibre addition resulted in a significant increase in fracture toughness over the control bone cement. Fibre addition and the combination of fibre addition and centrifugation increased the fatigue crack initiation and propagation resistance of the bone cement. For the intrusion studies, eight femurs were obtained from four dogs. The femurs were prepared following a procedure similar to that in human hip replacement surgery. One of the pair of femurs from each dog was filled with non-reinforced bone cement and the other was filled with Ti-PMMA. A stainless-steel rod was inserted into the cement to simulate the insertion of a prosthesis stem. The cemented bones were sectioned and then stained with Alizarin Red S to distinguish the bone from the PMMA or Ti-PMMA. Because of the irregular bone morphology, it was not practical to quantify intrusion depth, but instead to make general observations on the intrusion characteristics. The Ti fibres did not generally flow into the small openings

  13. Determination of design allowable properties. Fracture of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engstrom, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to provide a comprehensive report of available valid data on tensile properties, fracture toughness, fatigue crack propagation, and sustained load behavior of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy base metal and weldments, as applicable to manned spacecraft tankage. Most of the data found were from tests conducted at room temperature, -320 F and -423 F. Data are presented in graphical and tabular form, and areas in which data are lacking are established.

  14. Tiltmeters as Tools for Characterizing Geometrical and Hydrodynamical Properties of Fractured Crystalline Aquifers and Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuite, J.; Longuevergne, L.; Bour, O.; Lavenant, N.; Boudin, F.

    2014-12-01

    In many geological reservoirs, open fractures or fault zones generally induce high spatial variability of hydrodynamical properties and shape the main deep-seated flow paths. It is of crucial interest to determine their structure and properties in order to achieve a sound and sustained exploitation of resources or to estimate the risk of failure of any underground storage. Tiltmeters have emerged as new tools to observe deformation generated by groundwater flow. As such instruments are highly sensitive to pressure gradients, they are perfectly suited for monitoring channelized flow in connected fractures and fault zones. Hence, they provide a unique insight of these reservoirs' geometry and dynamics over broad time scales. Here we demonstrate that continuous tilt data from surface long baseline tiltmeters (LBT) can be used alone to evaluate the general functioning of a fractured hardrock system and estimate the hydraulic properties of its main conductive features. The study is applied to the pumping site of Ploemeur observatory (Brittany, France) which is well documented and instrumented, and therefore forms a convenient setting for introducing LBT as tools for fractured media hydrology. On the short term, tilt signals are strongly correlated with pumping cycles and associated head level changes in well-connected boreholes. Besides, when pumps are stopped the maximal tilt direction is systematically perpendicular to a subvertical fault zone whose azimuth of strike has thereby been refined down to degree precision. By using a semi-analytical model of deformation, we establish the link between tilt and pressure change during pumping interruptions which then allows for hydraulic properties estimation from tilt measurements only. Finally, we validate our results with previous estimates obtained from other studies and discuss the orientation of future work that could enhance these estimates.

  15. Characterization of the Microstructure, Fracture, and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys 7085-O and 7175-T7452 Hollow Cylinder Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Samuel G.; Chalivendra, Vijaya B.; Rice, Matthew A.; Doleski, Robert F.

    2016-06-01

    Microstructural, tensile, and fracture characterizations of cylindrically forged forms of aluminum alloys AA7085-O and AA7175-T7452 were performed. Mechanical and fracture properties were investigated along radial, circumferential, and longitudinal directions to determine directional dependency. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) test methods (ASTM E8-04 and ASTM E1820) were employed for both the tensile and fracture characterizations, respectively. The tensile and fracture properties were related to microstructure in each direction. The strength, elongation at break, and ultimate tensile strength of AA7085-O were higher than those of AA7175-T7452. AA7175-T7452 alloy failed in a brittle manner during fracture studies. AA7085-O outperformed AA7175-T7452 on fracture energy in all of the orientations studied. Smaller grain sizes on the planes normal to circumferential and longitudinal directions showed improvement in both elongation at break and fracture energy values compared to those of radial direction. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated cleavage fracture in AA7175-T7452 and transgranular fracture in AA7085-O.

  16. Characterization of the Microstructure, Fracture, and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys 7085-O and 7175-T7452 Hollow Cylinder Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Samuel G.; Chalivendra, Vijaya B.; Rice, Matthew A.; Doleski, Robert F.

    2016-09-01

    Microstructural, tensile, and fracture characterizations of cylindrically forged forms of aluminum alloys AA7085-O and AA7175-T7452 were performed. Mechanical and fracture properties were investigated along radial, circumferential, and longitudinal directions to determine directional dependency. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) test methods (ASTM E8-04 and ASTM E1820) were employed for both the tensile and fracture characterizations, respectively. The tensile and fracture properties were related to microstructure in each direction. The strength, elongation at break, and ultimate tensile strength of AA7085-O were higher than those of AA7175-T7452. AA7175-T7452 alloy failed in a brittle manner during fracture studies. AA7085-O outperformed AA7175-T7452 on fracture energy in all of the orientations studied. Smaller grain sizes on the planes normal to circumferential and longitudinal directions showed improvement in both elongation at break and fracture energy values compared to those of radial direction. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated cleavage fracture in AA7175-T7452 and transgranular fracture in AA7085-O.

  17. Study of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mode of Alumina-Silicon Carbide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimnezhad Yazdi, A.; Baharvandi, H. R.; Abdizadeh, H.; Ehsani, N.

    In this study Al2O3-SiC nanocomposites have been fabricated by mixing of alumina and silicon carbide nano powders, followed by hot pressing at 1700°C. The mechanical properties and fracture mode of Al2O3-SiC nanocomposites containing different volume fractions (5, 10 and 15%) of nano scale SiC particles were investigated and compared with those of alumina. Al2O3-SiC powders were prepared by planetary milling in isopropanol. Fracture mode of specimens was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. Nanocomposites were tougher than alumina when they were hot pressed at the same temperature, and the values of nanocomposite's flexural strength and hardness were higher than those of alumina. Flexural strength, hardness and fracture toughness of the nanocomposites increase by increasing the volume percent of SiC up to 10% and then decrease slightly. The Scanning electron microscopy observations showed that fracture mode changes from intergranular for alumina to transgranular for nanocomposites. Finally X-ray diffraction analysis couldn't detect any chemical reactions between Al2O3 and SiC particles.

  18. Effects of UV cure on glass structure and fracture properties of nanoporous carbon-doped oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, David M.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Peng Luming; Cui Zhenjiang; Al-Bayati, Amir; MacWilliams, Kenneth P.; M'Saad, Hichem

    2008-08-15

    The effects of UV radiation curing on the glass structure and fracture properties were examined for a class of nanoporous organosilicate low dielectric constant films. A detailed characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed significant changes in the glass structure with increasing curing time, marked by the removal of terminal organic groups and increased network-forming bonds following the initial removal of porogen material. The higher degree of film connectivity brought about by an increased cure duration is demonstrated to significantly enhance adhesive fracture properties and to moderately improve cohesive fracture resistance. Explanations for the enhanced fracture behavior are considered in terms of the glass structure. The important role of crack path selection during adhesive and cohesive fracture processes is used to rationalize the observed behavior.

  19. Quantifying mechanical properties in a murine fracture healing system using inverse modeling: preliminary work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miga, Michael I.; Weis, Jared A.; Granero-Molto, Froilan; Spagnoli, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Understanding bone remodeling and mechanical property characteristics is important for assessing treatments to accelerate healing or in developing diagnostics to evaluate successful return to function. The murine system whereby mid-diaphaseal tibia fractures are imparted on the subject and fracture healing is assessed at different time points and under different therapeutic conditions is a particularly useful model to study. In this work, a novel inverse geometric nonlinear elasticity modeling framework is proposed that can reconstruct multiple mechanical properties from uniaxial testing data. To test this framework, the Lame' constants were reconstructed within the context of a murine cohort (n=6) where there were no differences in treatment post tibia fracture except that half of the mice were allowed to heal 4 days longer (10 day, and 14 day healing time point, respectively). The properties reconstructed were a shear modulus of G=511.2 +/- 295.6 kPa, and 833.3+/- 352.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. The second Lame' constant reconstructed at λ=1002.9 +/-42.9 kPa, and 14893.7 +/- 863.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. An unpaired Student t-test was used to test for statistically significant differences among the groups. While the shear modulus did not meet our criteria for significance, the second Lame' constant did at a value p<0.0001. Traditional metrics that are commonly used within the bone fracture healing research community were not found to be statistically significant.

  20. ABSTRACT: Upscaling Fracture Properties in Support of Dual-permeability Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rishi Parashar; Donald M. Reeves

    2008-09-15

    Rainier Mesa (RM) is a tuffaceous, high-elevation plateau on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that has been subjected to numerous nuclear tests between 1957 and 1992. Unlike other tests on the NTS located within or just above the saturated zone, tests at the RM T-tunnel complex were conducted within a variably saturated sequence of bedded and non-welded vitric and zeolitized tuff units, located approximately 500 m above the regional groundwater flow system. The low permeability and high porosity of the underlying zeolitized tuff units suggest the downward transport of radionuclides released from these tests are minimal through the tuff matrix. However, numerous faults observed to discharge water into tunnel drifts may serve as preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. Data collected from tunnel drifts indicate that faulting within the zeolitized tuff units is sparse with fractal clustering, and that connectivity between adjacent fault clusters is often weak to non-existent. The sparse fault density at RM, in conjunction with the extreme variability in the spatial distribution of faults, poses challenges not readily addressed by existing upscaling methods that upscale fracture properties as equivalent grid tensors. The unique fault statistics at RM has led to the development of a fracture continuum method designed to faithfully preserve flow and transport properties of the sparse fault networks. This method is based on selective mapping and upscaling of fault hydraulic and transport properties onto a continuum grid in support of dual-permeability simulations. Comparisons of global flow and random walk particle breakthrough between two-dimensional discrete fracture network and fracture continuum simulations demonstrate the utility of this method.

  1. Molecular composites via ionic interactions and their deformation/fracture properties

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.; Chen, W.; Hara, M.

    1995-12-01

    Homogeneous molecular composites have been made from ionic PPTA and PVP, in which a good dispersion of rod molecules is achieved via ion-dipole interactions. Appearance of a single T{sub g} as well as morphological observations by TEM have indicated good dispersion of the rigid-rod PPTA molecules. The deformation mode of the matrix polymer is modified significantly with the addition of rod molecules: while crazing is the only deformation mechanism of PVP, an addition of ionic PPTA molecules into the PVP matrix induces shear deformation. This suggests better fracture properties of these molecular composites. Initial studies have indicated significant enhancement in mechanical properties.

  2. Martensitic stainless steel AISI 420—mechanical properties, creep and fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brnic, J.; Turkalj, G.; Canadija, M.; Lanc, D.; Krscanski, S.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper some experimental results and analyses regarding the behavior of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel under different environmental conditions are presented. That way, mechanical properties like ultimate tensile strength and 0.2 percent offset yield strength at lowered and elevated temperatures as well as short-time creep behavior for selected stress levels at selected elevated temperatures of mentioned material are shown. The temperature effect on mentioned mechanical properties is also presented. Fracture toughness was calculated on the basis of Charpy impact energy. Experimentally obtained results can be of importance for structure designers.

  3. Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V: Microstructure, Mechanical and Fracture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. G.; Edwards, P.; Cantrell, A. M.; Gangwar, K.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been refined to create butt welds from two sheets of Ti-6Al-4V alloy to have an ultra-fine grain size. Weld specimen testing was completed for three different FSW process conditions: As welded, stress relieved, stress relieved and machined, and for the un-welded base material. The investigation includes macrostructure, microstructure, microhardness, tensile property testing, notched bar impact testing, and fracture toughness evaluations. All experiments were conducted in accordance with industry standard testing specifications. The microstructure in the weld nugget was found to consist of refined and distorted grains of alpha in a matrix of transformed beta containing acicular alpha. The enhanced fracture toughness of the welds is a result of increased hardness, which is attributed to an increase in alpha phase, increase in transformed beta in acicular alpha, and grain refinement during the weld process. The noted general trend in mechanical properties from as welded, to stress relieved, to stress relieved and machined conditions exhibited a decrease in ultimate tensile strength, and yield strength with a small increase in ductility and a significant increase in fracture toughness.

  4. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  5. Characterization of Mode I Fracture and Morphological Properties of PLLA Blends with Addition of Lysine Triisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannaladsaysy, Vilay; Todo, Mitsugu

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was toughened by blending with three different ductile biopolymers such as poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(butylene succinate-co-e-caprolactone) (PBSC), poly (butylene succinate-co-L-lactate) (PBSL). The blend ratio was fixed to 50:50. Lysine triisocyanate (LTI) was added to the blends as a compatibilizer. Characterizations such as Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope (FE-SEM), and mode I fracture test were used to characterize the effectiveness of LTI on the mechanical and morphological properties of various PLLA blends. It was found that PLLA/PCL blend shows the highest toughness energy among the binary blends. On the other hand, addition of LTI in PLLA/PBSC blend exhibits the best toughness property. Based on the FE-SEM observation, fractured surfaces of PLLA blends with LTI indicate ductile fracture with dense elongated fibrils. The largest damage zone is generated in the vicinity of crack-trip, suggesting that high energy dissipation occurred in the crack-trip region. FT-IR analysis also suggested that the NCO groups of LTI were acted as a compatibilizer, as the results of interaction between the two phases of the polymer blends.

  6. Measuring multi-dimensional, time-dependent mechanical properties of a human tibial fracture using an automated system.

    PubMed

    Ogrodnik, P J; Moorcroft, C I; Thomas, P B

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents an element of a long-term research project determining a clinically quantifiable end point for fracture healing in humans. An automated loading and measurement device is presented. It has been developed as a research tool for the assessment of the mechanical properties of a healing human tibial fracture. The device has been specifically designed for use with patients treated with external fixation. The characteristics of the device have been presented together with an assessment of errors. A typical sample of results has been presented to demonstrate the significance of the device; subsequent papers will examine the whole data set in greater depth. The results presented here confirm the non-linear behaviour of callus and reinforce the requirement to measure the load rate when measuring the fracture stiffness. A new material property for the assessment of fracture healing, namely gamma, is examined and preliminary results are shown. Polar plots of stiffness demonstrate that, when measuring fracture stiffness, not only should the load rate be considered, but also the orientation of measurement. The results from this work support the view that the fracture stiffness should be measured in at least two planes. Currently a fracture can be considered healed when the fracture stiffness exceeds 15 N m/deg; this paper questions whether this value is now valid and suggests that it should be re-examined. PMID:17937203

  7. Correlation of Mechanical Properties with Fracture Surface Features in a Newly Developed Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Saeidi, N.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.

    2015-04-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steels were produced by a newly developed method utilizing simple cold-rolling and subsequent short intercritical annealing of a martensite-ferrite duplex starting structure. Tensile testing revealed an excellent strength-elongation balance (UTS × UE ≈ 110-150 J/cm3) for the DP steels in comparison with the commercially used high strength steels. Fracture surfaces of the tensile specimens were studied by scanning electron microscopy analysis and image processing. Mechanical properties were correlated with fracture surface features. It was found that the variation of the total elongation and strength-elongation balance with the martensite volume fraction could be well correlated with the variation of the average dimple area. The variation of the yield strength and dimple areal density with the martensite volume fraction followed the same trend.

  8. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  9. Control On Fluid Flow Properties In Sandstone: Interactions Between Diagenesis Processes And Fracture Corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossennec, Claire; Géraud, Yves; Moretti, Isabelle; Mattioni, Luca

    2016-04-01

    During the development of a fault zone, processes occur at different scales: secondary faults and fractures development in the damage zone while "diagenetic" processes, i.e: fluid rock interaction at the grains size scale, contribute to modify the matrix features. Spatial distribution of these processes is clearly controlled by microstructural transformations induced by fractured corridors and their location. Understanding flowing properties in the associated damage zone contributes to the better modeling of the fluid flow in faulted and fractured reservoirs which could be oil, gas or water bearing. The Lower Triassic Buntsandstein sandstones outcrop of Cleebourg is located in the Hochwald Horst affected by a major NNE-SSW striking fault, and the structure globally dips with 30° toward Rhenish Fault (Upper Rhine Graben main western border fault). The study of the outcrop aims to decipher the fluid-flow scheme and interactions between fracture network and diagenetic features distribution in the damage zone of a fault, located close to major faulted areas, through field and laboratories petrophysical measurements (permeability, thermic conductivity), and samples microstructural and diagenetical descriptions. The outcrop is structurally divided into a 14 meters thick fault core, surrounded by 5 meters thick transition zones, and damage zone of minimum thickness of 40 meters (total thickness unknown, due to the limits of the outcrop). Damage zone includes three fractured corridors, perpendicular to bedding and from 2 to 5 meters thick. Results presented here were acquired in 2 different layers with similar lithology but only on damage zone samples. In entire damage zone, porosity results and thin section description allow to distinguish two different facies: • Fa1 Intermediate porous (porosity of 12%) sandstone with major illite cement and clay content up to 20% (detrital and diagenetic); • Fa2 High porous (porosity >15%) sandstone with quartz feeding

  10. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL BASE METAL AND WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2009-07-30

    Tritium reservoirs are constructed from welded stainless steel forgings. While these steels are highly resistant to the embrittling effects of hydrogen isotopes and helium from tritium decay; they are not immune. Tritium embrittlement is an enhanced form of hydrogen embrittlement because of the presence of helium-3 from tritium decay which nucleates as nanometer-sized bubbles on dislocations, grain boundaries, and other microstructural defects. Steels with decay helium bubble microstructures are hardened and less able to deform plastically and become more susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and its isotopes. Ductility, elongation-to-failure, and fracture toughness are reduced by exposures to tritium and the reductions increase with time as helium-3 builds into the material from tritium permeation and radioactive decay. Material and forging specifications have been developed for optimal material compatibility with tritium. These specifications cover composition, mechanical properties, and select microstructural characteristics like grain size, flow-line orientation, inclusion content, and ferrite distribution. For many years, the forming process of choice for reservoir manufacturing was high-energy-rate forging (HERF), principally because the DOE forging facility owned only HERF hammers. Today, some reservoir forgings are being made that use a conventional, more common process known as press forging (PF or CF). One of the chief differences between the two forging processes is strain rate: Conventional hydraulic or mechanical forging presses deform the metal at 4-8 ft/s, about ten-fold slower than the HERF process. The material specifications continue to provide successful stockpile performance by ensuring that the two forging processes produce similar reservoir microstructures. While long-term life storage tests have demonstrated the general tritium compatibility of tritium reservoirs, fracture-toughness properties of both conventionally forged and high

  11. Cryogenic Interlaminar Fracture Properties of Woven Glass/Epoxy Composite Laminates Under Mixed-Mode I/III Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Takeda, Tomo; Narita, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    We characterize the combined Mode I and Mode III delamination fracture behavior of woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates at cryogenic temperatures. The eight-point bending plate (8PBP) tests were conducted at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K) using a new test fixture. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was also performed to calculate the energy release rate distribution along the delamination front, and the delamination fracture toughnesses were evaluated for various mixed-mode I/III ratios. Furthermore, the microscopic examinations of the fracture surfaces were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the mixed-mode I/III delamination fracture mechanisms in the woven GFRP laminates at cryogenic temperatures were assessed. The fracture properties were then correlated with the observed characteristics.

  12. Reaction mechanisms, microstructure, and fracture properties of thermoplastic polysulfone-modified epoxy resin

    SciTech Connect

    Min, B.G.; Stachurski, Z.H. . Dept. of Materials Engineering); Hodgkin, J.H. . Div. of Chemicals and Polymers)

    1993-11-10

    The microstructure and fracture properties of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resins modified with phenolic hydroxyl-terminated polysulfone (PSF) and cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) hardener have been investigated as a function of the molecular weight and concentration of PSF. The microstructure changed from a typical particulate structure to a phase-inverted structure as the molecular weight and/or the concentration of the modifier increased. The fracture toughness, measured by compact tension tests, increased with the microstructural changes toward the phase-inverted structure. The level of minor reactions such as etherification and homopolymerization reactions increased with increasing molecular weight and/or concentration of the modifier, in line with the tendencies observed in microstructure and fracture toughness. In the system containing 20 wt% of M[sub n] 10,000 PSF, about 30% of the epoxy groups were consumed by etherification and homopolymerization reactions, whereas none of these reactions occurred in the unmodified system. The increase in minor reactions in the modified systems may be to be due to the restricted molecular mobility, resulting from the increase of system viscosity caused by the modification.

  13. The microstructural, mechanical, and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolman, D. G.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.

    2004-11-01

    The mechanical and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) alloyed with gallium require assessment in order to determine the likelihood of premature storage-container failure following Ga uptake. AISI 304 L SS was cast with 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 wt pct Ga. Increased Ga concentration promoted duplex microstructure formation with the ferritic phase having a nearly identical composition to the austenitic phase. Room-temperature tests indicated that small additions of Ga (less than 3 wt pct) were beneficial to the mechanical behavior of 304 L SS but that 12 wt pct Ga resulted in a 95 pct loss in ductility. Small additions of Ga are beneficial to the cracking resistance of stainless steel. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis indicated that 3 wt pct Ga alloys showed the greatest resistance to crack initiation and propagation as measured by fatigue crack growth rate, fracture toughness, and tearing modulus. The 12 wt pct Ga alloys were least resistant to crack initiation and propagation and these alloys primarily failed by transgranular cleavage. It is hypothesized that Ga metal embrittlement is partially responsible for increased embrittlement.

  14. Fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties of several RAFMS before and after irradiation in HFIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. A.; Tanigawa, H.; Odette, G. R.; Shiba, K.; Klueh, R. L.

    2007-08-01

    As part of the development of candidate reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion applications, several steels, namely F82H, 9Cr-2WVTa steels and F82H weld metal, are being investigated in the joint DOE-JAEA collaboration program. Within this program, three capsules containing a variety of specimen designs were irradiated at two design temperatures in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Two capsules, RB-11J and RB-12J, were irradiated in the HFIR removable beryllium positions with europium oxide (Eu 2O 3) thermal neutron shields in place. Specimens were irradiated up to 5 dpa. Capsule JP25 was irradiated in the HFIR target position to 20 dpa. The design temperatures were 300 °C and 500 °C. Precracked third-sized V-notch Charpy (3.3 × 3.3 × 25.4 mm) and 0.18 T DC(T) specimens were tested to determine transition and ductile shelf fracture toughness before and after irradiation. The master curve methodology was applied to evaluate the fracture toughness transition temperature, T0. Irradiation induced shifts of T0 and reductions of JQ were compared with Charpy V-notch impact properties. Fracture toughness and Charpy shifts were also compared to hardening results.

  15. Anomalous surface states modify the size-dependent mechanical properties and fracture of silica nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chun; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous silica nanowires under tension were analyzed for size and surface stress effects on mechanical properties and for structural modifications via bond angle distributions. Their fracture behavior was also investigated beyond the elastic limit. The Young’s moduli of silica nanowires were predicted to be about 75-100 GPa, depending on the nanowire size. The ultimate strength was calculated to be ˜10 GPa, depending on the diameter, which is in excellent agreement with the experiments. The dependence of the Young’s modulus on nanowire diameter is explained in terms of surface compressive stress effects. The fracture behavior of nanowires was also found to be influenced by surface compressive stresses. Bond angle distribution analysis of various nanowires reveals significant compressive surface states, as evidenced by the appearance of a secondary peak in the Si-O-Si bond angle distribution at ˜97°, which is absent in bulk silica. The strain rate was found to have a negligible effect on the Young’s modulus of the silica nanowires, but it has a critical role in determining their fracture mode.

  16. The effect of thermal treatment on the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, R.; Elliott, C.S.; Hwang, I.S.; Prybylowski, J.

    1993-05-01

    Alloy X-750 is a high strength, age hardenable nickel-base alloy used in light water nuclear reactors. The excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature strength of alloy X-750 make it suitable for use in a variety of structure components in both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. These applications involve exposure of highly stressed material to aqueous media. Operational stresses are subject to low frequency thermally induced fluctuations and high frequency flow induced fluctuations. In general, alloy X-750 has performed well in light water reactors. However, an economically significant number of components have failed unexpectedly due to localized forms of attack such as corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Thermal processing history is known to play a significant role in the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments. While thermal treatments have been developed recently to improve performance, in many cases the reason for improved performance remains unclear. Therefore, identification of the mechanisms responsible for the degradation of fracture properties in aqueous environments is necessary. As a corollary it is necessary to achieve an understanding of how thermal treatment influences microstructure and, in turn, how microstructure influences fracture properties in aqueous environments. This report discusses five thermal treatments which were studied: (1) SA-1 hr at 1093{degree}C, (2) AH - 24 hr at 885{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, (3) HTH - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, (4) AHTH - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 24 hr at 885{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, and (5) HOA - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 100 hrs at 760{degree}C. Microstructural characterization of these materials was accomplished through the use of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy,scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffractometry.

  17. Quantitative local topological texture properties obtained from radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with pertrochanteric and transcervical hip fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporosis and associated fractures becomes an increasingly relevant issue for the public health institutions of industrialized nations. Fractures of the hip represent the worst complication of osteoporosis with a significantly elevated rate of mortality. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus of osteoporosis research and, over the years, has been approched from different angles. There exist two distinct subtypes of transcervical and pertrochanteric hip fracture that can be distinguished on the basis of the anatomical location of the injury. While the epidemiology of hip fractures has been well described, typically, little or no distinction is made between the subtypes. The object of this study was to determine whether local topological texture properties based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) obtained from standard radiographs of the proximal femur in patients with hip fracture can be used to differentiate between the two types of fracture pattern. The texture features were extracted from standardized regions of interest (femoral head, neck, and pertrochanteric region) in clinical radiographs of the hip obtained from 90 post-menopausal women (69.8 +/- 7.9 yrs). 30 of the women had sustained pertrochanteric fractures, 30 had transcervical hip fractures and 30 were age-matched controls. We determined an optimized topological parameter MF2Dloc using an integrative filtering procedure based on a sliding-windows algorithm. Statistical relationship between the fracture type (pertrochanteric/transcervical) and the value of MF2Dloc was assessed by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Depending on the anatomical location of the region of interest for texture analysis correct classification of tanscervial and pertrochanteric fractures ranged from AUC = 0.79 to 0.98. In conclusion, quantitative texture properties of trabecular bone extracted from radiographs of the hip can be used to identify patients with hip fracture and to distinguish

  18. Modeling and additive manufacturing of bio-inspired composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Dimas, Leon S; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-07-01

    Flaws, imperfections and cracks are ubiquitous in material systems and are commonly the catalysts of catastrophic material failure. As stresses and strains tend to concentrate around cracks and imperfections, structures tend to fail far before large regions of material have ever been subjected to significant loading. Therefore, a major challenge in material design is to engineer systems that perform on par with pristine structures despite the presence of imperfections. In this work we integrate knowledge of biological systems with computational modeling and state of the art additive manufacturing to synthesize advanced composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties. Supported by extensive mesoscale computer simulations, we demonstrate the design and manufacturing of composites that exhibit deformation mechanisms characteristic of pristine systems, featuring flaw-tolerant properties. We analyze the results by directly comparing strain fields for the synthesized composites, obtained through digital image correlation (DIC), and the computationally tested composites. Moreover, we plot Ashby diagrams for the range of simulated and experimental composites. Our findings show good agreement between simulation and experiment, confirming that the proposed mechanisms have a significant potential for vastly improving the fracture response of composite materials. We elucidate the role of stiffness ratio variations of composite constituents as an important feature in determining the composite properties. Moreover, our work validates the predictive ability of our models, presenting them as useful tools for guiding further material design. This work enables the tailored design and manufacturing of composites assembled from inferior building blocks, that obtain optimal combinations of stiffness and toughness. PMID:24700202

  19. Effect of property gradients on enamel fracture in human molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark B; Lawn, Brian R

    2012-11-01

    A model for the fracture of tooth enamel with graded elastic modulus and toughness is constructed using an extended finite element modeling (XFEM) package. The property gradients are taken from literature data on human molars, with maximum in modulus at the outer enamel surface and in toughness at the inner surface. The tooth is modeled as a brittle shell (enamel) and a compliant interior (dentin), with occlusal loading from a hard, flat contact at the cusp. Longitudinal radial (R) and margin (M) cracks are allowed to extend piecewise along the enamel walls under the action of an incrementally increasing applied load. A simple stratagem is deployed in which fictitious temperature profiles generate the requisite property gradients. The resulting XFEM simulations demonstrate that the crack fronts become more segmented as the property gradients become more pronounced, with enhanced propagation at the outer surface and inhibited propagation at the inner. Whereas the growth history of the cracks is profoundly influenced by the gradients, the ultimate critical loads required to attain full fractures are relatively unaffected. Some implications concerning dentistry are considered. PMID:23032432

  20. A Stochastic XFEM Model to Study Delamination in PPS/Glass UD Composites: Effect of Uncertain Fracture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, D.; Milani, A. S.; Komeili, M.; Bureau, M. N.; Thibault, F.; Trudel-Boucher, D.

    2014-04-01

    A nonlinear extended finite element (XFEM) modeling framework under a stochastic cohesive zone is presented for realistic prediction of delamination in polyphenylene sulfide (PPS)/glass composites in mode I of fracture. The cohesive zone model adopts damage evolution of the material based on a bilinear traction-separation law, the critical energy release rate and the J-integral method to formulate the delamination interface under stochastic fracture properties. To demonstrate the application of the approach, numerical predictions are compared to experimental data using Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests. In particular, it is shown how the XFEM model can be used to capture test non-repeatability due to uncertain fracture properties, which is often the case during the characterization of composites using standard fracture tests.

  1. Correlation of microstructure and fracture properties of API X70 pipeline steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byoungchul; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Nack J.; Ahn, Seong Soo

    2005-03-01

    Effects of microstructure on fracture toughness and transition temperature of high-toughness X70 pipeline steels were investigated in this study. Three types of steels were fabricated by varying alloying elements such as C, Cu, and Mo, and their microstructures were varied by rolling conditions such as finish rolling temperature and finish cooling temperature. Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact tests and pressed notch drop-weight tear tests (DWTT) were conducted on the rolled steel specimens. The charpy impact test results indicated that the specimens rolled in the single-phase region of the steel containing a reduced amount of C and Mo had the highest upper shelf energy (USE) and the lowest energy transition temperature (ETT) because of the appropriate formation of acicular, quasipolygonal, or polygonal ferrite and the decreased fraction of martensite-austenite constituents. Most of the specimens rolled in the single-phase region also showed excellent DWTT properties as the percent shear area (pct SA) well exceeded 85 pct, irrespective of finish cooling temperatures, while their USE was higher than that of the specimens rolled in the two-phase region. Thus, overall fracture properties of the specimens rolled in the single-phase region were better than those of the specimens rolled in the two-phase region, considering both USE and pct SA.

  2. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    PubMed

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p < 0.05). The factors 'alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property. PMID:22641437

  3. Fatigue Properties and Fracture Mechanism of Steel Coated with Diamond-Like Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akebono, Hiroyuki; Kato, Masahiko; Sugeta, Atsushi

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have attracted much attention in many industrial fields because of their excellent tribological properties, high hardness, chemical inertness and biocompatibility. In order to examine the fatigue properties and to clear the fracture mechanism of DLC coated materials, AISI4140 steel coated with DLC films by using unbalanced magnetron sputtering method was prepared and two types of fatigue test were carried out by using a tension and compression testing machine with stress ratio -1 and a bending testing machine with stress ratio -1 with a focused on the fatigue crack behavior in detail. The fracture origin changed from the slip deformation to micro defects at surface whose size didn't affect the fatigue crack initiation behavior in the case of Virgin series because the hard coating like DLC films make the defect sensitivity of coated material higher. However, DLC series indicated higher fatigue strengths in finite life region and fatigue limit compared with Virgin series. From the continuously observation by using a plastic replicas technique, it is clear that there are no noticeable differences on fatigue crack propagation rate between the Virgin and DLC series, however the fatigue crack initiation of DLC series was delayed significantly by existence of DLC films compared with Virgin series.

  4. Scaling and geometric properties of extensional fracture systems in the proterozoic basement of Yemen. Tectonic interpretation and fluid flow implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Garzic, Edouard; de L'Hamaide, Thibaut; Diraison, Marc; Géraud, Yves; Sausse, Judith; de Urreiztieta, Marc; Hauville, Benoît; Champanhet, Jean-Michel

    2011-04-01

    Multi-scale mappings of fracture systems in the crystalline basement of Yemen are presented. Fracture datasets are described through statistical analyses of direction, length, spacing, density, and spatial distribution. Results are combined with field observations and can be directly used to model the geometry of the fracture networks in analog basement rocks, from multi-kilometric to decametric scales. The fractured reservoir analog is defined with a dual porosity model in which tectonic and joint systems correspond to the basement reservoir "backbone" and "matrix" respectively. These two end-members reveal contrasting geometrical, reservoir, and scaling properties. In tectonic systems, multi-scale geometries are "self-similar", the fracture network shows fractal behavior (power-law length distribution and clustered spacing), and fault zones show hierarchical organization of geometrical parameters such as length, thickness, and spacing. In joint systems, the fracture network is scale dependent with exponential length distribution, and shows anti-clustered spacing. However, these two end-members have both well-connected properties, with fault zones acting as main drain and joint systems acting as the fluid supply.

  5. Epidemiologic Properties of Pediatric Fractures in a Metropolitan Area of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Issin, Ahmet; Kockara, Nizamettin; Oner, Ali; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-10-01

    Occurrence of fractures is highly dependent on lifestyle. Domestic data should be used when needed. In this cross-sectional study, the authors aim to find the most recent distribution of pediatric fracture types and the attributes of fracture occurrence within a large sample size in a metropolitan area of Turkey.This study consists of 4879 pediatric age patients with a fracture who took advantage of the emergency service of a trauma center in a metropolitan area between March 2010 and December 2013 (1397 days). Date, hour, age, sex, fracture type, and social security status of the patients were studied.A total of 65% of the patients were men and 35% were women. A total of 81% of the fractures were in the upper extremities, whereas 19% of them were in the lower extremities. In 22 patients (0.5%), there were open fractures. Fractures showed some seasonal, daily, and circadian variations. Different types of fractures showed some specific patterns in different age groups. Ankle, elbow, and shoulder fractures were more common in girls, whereas wrist and forearm fractures were more in boys and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05).Fractures in pediatric ages vary depending on the age, sex, season, and the hour of the day. Types of fractures show some obvious patterns especially depending on the age. This data can be useful in making optimizations in fracture care units. Considering these specific patterns would enable more effective planning of providing preventive measures for pediatric injuries. PMID:26512602

  6. Microindentation for in vivo measurement of bone tissue material properties in atypical femoral fracture patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, Roberto C; Nogués, Xavier; Quesada Gómez, José M; Torres Del Pliego, Elisa; Puig, Lluís; García-Giralt, Natalia; Yoskovitz, Guy; Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Hansma, Paul K; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Atypical femoral fractures (AFF) associated with long-term bisphosphonates (LTB) are a growing concern. Their etiology is unknown, but bone material properties might be deteriorated. In an AFF series, we analyzed the bone material properties by microindentation. Four groups of patients were included: 6 AFF, 38 typical osteoporotic fractures, 6 LTB, and 20 controls without fracture. Neither typical osteoporotic fractures nor controls have received any antiosteoporotic medication. A general laboratory workup, bone densitometry by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and microindentation testing at the tibia were done in all patients. Total indentation distance (Total ID), indentation distance increase (IDI), and creep indentation distance (Creep ID) were measured (microns). Age-adjusted analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used for comparisons. Controls were significantly younger than fracture groups. Bisphosphonate exposure was on average 5.5 years (range 5 to 12 years) for the AFF and 5.4 years (range 5 to 8 years) for the LTB groups. Total ID (microns) showed better material properties (lower Total ID) for controls 36 (± 6; mean ± SD) than for AFF 46 (± 4) and for typical femoral fractures 47 (± 13), respectively. Patients on LTB showed values between controls and fractures, 38 (± 4), although not significantly different from any of the other three groups. IDI values showed a similar pattern 13 (± 2), 16 (± 6), 19 (± 3), and 18 (± 5). After adjusting by age, significant differences were seen between controls and typical (p < 0.001) and atypical fractures (p = 0.03) for Total ID and for IDI (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). There were no differences in Creep ID between groups. Our data suggest that patients with AFF have a deep deterioration in bone material properties at a tissue level similar to that for the osteoporotic fracture group. The LTB group shows levels that are in between controls and both type of

  7. Measuring Fracture Properties of Meteorites: 3D Scans and Disruption Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The Arizona State University (ASU) Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) houses over 30,000 specimens that represent almost every known meteorite type. A number of these are available for fragmentation experiments in small samples, but in most cases non-destructive experiments are desired in order to determine the fundamental mechanical properties of meteorites, and by extension, the Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and other planetary bodies they derive from. We present results from an ongoing suite of measurements and experiments, featuring automated 3D topographic scans of a comprehensive suite of meteorites in the CMS collection, basic mechanical studies, and culminating in catastrophic fragmentation of four representative meteorites: Tamdakht (H5), Allende (CV3), Northwest Africa 869 (L3-6) and Chelyabinsk (LL5). Results will include high-resolution 3D color-shape models of meteorites, including specimens such as the 349g oriented and fusion crusted Martian (shergottite) Tissint, and the delicately fusion crusted and oriented 131g Whetstone Mountains (H5) ordinary chondrite. The 3D color-shape models will allow us to obtain basic physical properties (such as volume to derive density) and to derive fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces. Fractal dimension is closely related to the internal structural heterogeneity and fragmentation of the material, to macroscopic optical properties, and to rubble friction and cohesion. Freshly fractured surfaces of fragments that will result from catastrophic hypervelocity impact experiments will be subsequently scanned and analyzed in order to determine whether fractal dimension is preserved or if it changes with surface maturation.

  8. Effects of H content on the tensile properties and fracture behavior of SA508-III steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-hua; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yang; Song, Xiu; Luo, Jiong; Yuan, Dan

    2015-08-01

    SA508-III steel was charged with different hydrogen (H) contents using a high-pressure thermal charging method to study the effects of H content on the tensile properties and evaluate the H embrittlement behavior of the steel. The results indicate that the ultimate tensile strength remains nearly unchanged with the addition of H. In contrast, the yielding strength slightly increases, and the elongation significantly decreases with increasing H content, especially at concentrations exceeding 5.6 × 10-6. On the basis of fractographic analysis, it is clear that the addition of H changes the fracture mode from microvoid coalescence to a mixture of river patterns and dimples. Carbides are strong traps for H; thus, the H atoms easily migrate in the form of Cottrell atmosphere toward the carbides following moving dislocations during tensile deformation. In addition, stress-induced H atoms accumulate at the interface between carbides and the matrix after necking under three-dimensional stress, which weakens the interfacial bonding force. Consequently, when the local H concentration reaches a critical value, microcracks occur at the interface, resulting in fracture.

  9. Effect of a high helium content on the flow and fracture properties of a 9Cr martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, J.; Vincent, L.; Averty, X.; Marini, B.; Jung, P.

    2007-08-01

    An experimental characterization was conducted of helium effects on the mechanical properties of a 9Cr martensitic steel. Six sub-size Charpy samples were implanted in the notch region at 250 °C with 0.25 at.% helium and subsequently tested in 3-point bending at room temperature. Brittle fracture mode (cleavage and intergranular fracture) was systematically observed in the implanted zones of the samples. Finite element calculations of the tests, using as input the tensile properties measured on a helium loaded sample, were performed in order to determine the fracture stress at the onset of brittle crack propagation. Preliminary TEM investigations of the implantation-induced microstructure revealed a high density of small helium bubbles.

  10. Inferring field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer from ground surface deformation during a well test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane; Lavenant, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Fractured aquifers which bear valuable water resources are often difficult to characterize with classical hydrogeological tools due to their intrinsic heterogeneities. Here we implement ground surface deformation tools (tiltmetry and optical leveling) to monitor groundwater pressure changes induced by a classical hydraulic test at the Ploemeur observatory. By jointly analyzing complementary time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement), our results strongly suggest that the use of these surface deformation observations allows for estimating storativity and structural properties (dip, root depth, and lateral extension) of a large hydraulically active fracture, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence, we demonstrate that ground surface deformation is a useful addition to traditional hydrogeological techniques and opens possibilities for characterizing important large-scale properties of fractured aquifers with short-term well tests as a controlled forcing.

  11. Predicting Fracture Toughness of TRIP 800 using Phase Properties Characterized by In-Situ High Energy X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2010-05-01

    TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is a typical representative of 1st generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) which exhibits a combination of high strength and excellent ductility due to its multiphase microstructure. In this paper, we study the crack propagation behavior and fracture resistance of a TRIP 800 steel using a microstructure-based finite element method with the various phase properties characterized by in-situ high energy Xray diffraction (HEXRD) technique. Uniaxial tensile tests on the notched TRIP 800 sheet specimens were also conducted, and the experimentally measured tensile properties and R-curves (Resistance curves) were used to calibrate the modeling parameters and to validate the overall modeling results. The comparison between the simulated and experimentally measured results suggests that the micromechanics based modeling procedure can well capture the overall complex crack propagation behaviors and the fracture resistance of TRIP steels. The methodology adopted here may be used to estimate the fracture resistance of various multiphase materials.

  12. Externally applied stress sign and film elastic properties effects on brittle film fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tao; Pang, Xiaolu; Xi, Yeting; Volinsky, Alex A.; Qiao, Lijie

    2016-02-01

    Rectangular stainless steel samples with TiN film deposited on the front lateral surface were loaded in three-point bending to the maximum normal strain of 6%. Scanning electron microscopy showed that vertical cracks appeared in the tension zone when the tensile strain exceeded 1.5%, while horizontal cracks appeared in the compression zone when the compressive strain exceeded -2.9%. Film cracks in the compressive zone originate from the tensile stress imposed by the plastically deformed substrate due to the Poisson's expansion. Taking plastic deformation and Poisson's expansion of the substrate in compression into account, theoretical analysis of normal stress distribution along the cracked film segment in compression is presented. Substrate strain and film elastic properties affect film cracking in the compressive zone. At larger compressive strain, some transverse cracks along with buckling cause the film spallation. The presented method is useful for studying brittle film fracture with variable strain levels in a single sample.

  13. Review of fracture properties of nuclear materials determined by Hertzian indentation

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.; Matzke, H.

    1985-01-01

    A brief description of the determination of the surface fracture energy and the fracture toughness from a Hertzian indentation test is given. A number of theoretical and experimental problems are discussed. Results obtained on a variety of nuclear fuels and nuclear-waste-containment materials are reviewed and compared with values measured by other techniques. The Hertzian indentation test yields reliable fracture parameters.

  14. Determination of Transport Properties From Flowing Fluid Temperature LoggingIn Unsaturated Fractured Rocks: Theory And Semi-Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    2008-08-01

    Flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) has been recently proposed as a method to locate flowing fractures. We argue that FFTL, backed up by data from high-precision distributed temperature sensors, can be a useful tool in locating flowing fractures and in estimating the transport properties of unsaturated fractured rocks. We have developed the theoretical background needed to analyze data from FFTL. In this paper, we present a simplified conceptualization of FFTL in unsaturated fractured rock, and develop a semianalytical solution for spatial and temporal variations of pressure and temperature inside a borehole in response to an applied perturbation (pumping of air from the borehole). We compare the semi-analytical solution with predictions from the TOUGH2 numerical simulator. Based on the semi-analytical solution, we propose a method to estimate the permeability of the fracture continuum surrounding the borehole. Using this proposed method, we estimated the effective fracture continuum permeability of the unsaturated rock hosting the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our estimate compares well with previous independent estimates for fracture permeability of the DST host rock. The conceptual model of FFTL presented in this paper is based on the assumptions of single-phase flow, convection-only heat transfer, and negligible change in system state of the rock formation. In a sequel paper [Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008], we extend the conceptual model to evaluate some of these assumptions. We also perform inverse modeling of FFTL data to estimate, in addition to permeability, other transport parameters (such as porosity and thermal conductivity) of unsaturated fractured rocks.

  15. Determination of transport properties from flowing fluid temperature logging in unsaturated fractured rocks: Theory and semi-analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    2008-10-01

    Flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) has recently been proposed as a method to locate flowing fractures. We argue that FFTL, backed up by data from high-precision distributed temperature sensors, can be a useful tool in locating flowing fractures and in estimating the transport properties of unsaturated fractured rocks. We have developed the theoretical background needed to analyze data from FFTL. In this article, we present a simplified conceptualization of FFTL in unsaturated fractured rock and develop a semi-analytical solution for spatial and temporal variations of pressure and temperature inside a borehole in response to an applied perturbation (pumping of air from the borehole). We compare the semi-analytical solution with predictions from the TOUGH2 numerical simulator. On the basis of the semi-analytical solution, we propose a method to estimate the permeability of the fracture continuum surrounding the borehole. Using this proposed method, we estimated the effective fracture continuum permeability of the unsaturated rock hosting the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Our estimate compares well with previous independent estimates for fracture permeability of the DST host rock. The conceptual model of FFTL presented in this article is based on the assumptions of single-phase flow, convection-only heat transfer, and negligible change in system state of the rock formation. In a sequel article, we extend the conceptual model to evaluate some of these assumptions. In that paper, we also perform inverse modeling of FFTL data to estimate, in addition to permeability, other transport parameters (such as porosity and thermal conductivity) of unsaturated fractured rocks.

  16. Innovative Field Methods for Characterizing the Hydraulic Properties of a Complex Fractured Rock Aquifer (Ploemeur, Brittany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Longuevergne, L.; Lavenant, N.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Schuite, J.; Boudin, F.; Labasque, T.; Aquilina, L.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic properties of heterogeneous and complex aquifers often requires field scale investigations at multiple space and time scales to better constrain hydraulic property estimates. Here, we present and discuss results from the site of Ploemeur (Brittany, France) where complementary hydrological and geophysical approaches have been combined to characterize the hydrogeological functioning of this highly fractured crystalline rock aquifer. In particular, we show how cross-borehole flowmeter tests, pumping tests and frequency domain analysis of groundwater levels allow quantifying the hydraulic properties of the aquifer at different scales. In complement, we used groundwater temperature as an excellent tracer for characterizing groundwater flow. At the site scale, measurements of ground surface deformation through long-base tiltmeters provide robust estimates of aquifer storage and allow identifying the active structures where groundwater pressure changes occur, including those acting during recharge process. Finally, a numerical model of the site that combines hydraulic data and groundwater ages confirms the geometry of this complex aquifer and the consistency of the different datasets. The Ploemeur site, which has been used for water supply at a rate of about 106 m3 per year since 1991, belongs to the French network of hydrogeological sites H+ and is currently used for monitoring groundwater changes and testing innovative field methods.

  17. Effect of thickness and loading mode on the fracture properties of V 4Cr 4Ti at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Kurtz, R. J.; Jones, R. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of thickness on the room temperature (RT) mode I fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated. Mode I fracture properties were measured from J-integral tests of compact tension (CT) specimens ranging in thickness from 6.4 to 25.4 mm. All specimens were machined in the T-L orientation and vacuum annealed following final machining. Two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti were tested. Specimens 6.4 and 12.7 mm thick were taken from Wah Chang Heat No. 832665. The 25.4 mm thick specimens were obtained from Wah Chang Heat No. 832864. The effect of loading mode on fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti at RT was also studied using material from Heat No. 832665. Mode I fracture behavior was compared to mixed-mode (I/III) fracture properties obtained from modified CT specimens. Crack angles of 0° and 25° were used to vary the ratio of mode III to mode I loading. J- R curves were generated as the basis for determining the affect of loading mode. The specimen loaded in mixed-mode exhibited lower resistance to crack initiation and propagation than pure mode I specimens.

  18. Effects of Annealing Treatment Prior to Cold Rolling on Delayed Fracture Properties in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Seok Su; Song, Hyejin; Kim, Jung Gi; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-02-01

    Tensile properties of recently developed automotive high-strength steels containing about 10 wt pct of Mn and Al are superior to other conventional steels, but the active commercialization has been postponed because they are often subjected to cracking during formation or to the delayed fracture after formation. Here, the delayed fracture behavior of a ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steel whose microstructure was modified by a batch annealing treatment at 1023 K (750 °C) prior to cold rolling was examined by HCl immersion tests of cup specimens, and was compared with that of an unmodified steel. After the batch annealing, band structures were almost decomposed as strong textures of {100}<011> α-fibers and {111}<112> γ-fibers were considerably dissolved, while ferrite grains were refined. The steel cup specimen having this modified microstructure was not cracked when immersed in an HCl solution for 18 days, whereas the specimen having unmodified microstructure underwent the delayed fracture within 1 day. This time delayed fracture was more critically affected by difference in deformation characteristics such as martensitic transformation and deformation inhomogeneity induced from concentration of residual stress or plastic strain, rather than the difference in initial microstructures. The present work gives a promise for automotive applications requiring excellent mechanical and delayed fracture properties as well as reduced specific weight.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF HYDROGEN, TRITIUM, AND HEAT TREATMENT ON THE DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.; Tosten, M.; Chapman, G.

    2013-09-06

    The deformation and fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium were compared to the deformation and fracture toughness properties of the same steels heat treated at 773 K or 873 K and precharged with hydrogen. Forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with aging time after precharging because of the increase in concentration of helium from tritium decay. This study shows that forged stainless steels given a prior heat treatment and then pre-charged with hydrogen also exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with increasing time at temperature. A microstructural analysis showed that the fracture toughness reduction in the heat-treated steels was due to patches of recrystallized grains that form within the forged matrix during the heat treatment. The combination of hydrogen and the patches of recrystallized grains resulted in more deformation twinning. Heavy deformation twinning on multiple slip planes was typical for the hydrogen-charged samples; whereas, in the non-charged samples, less twinning was observed and was generally limited to one slip plane. Similar effects occur in tritium pre-charged steels, but the deformation twinning is brought on by the hardening associated with decay helium bubbles in the microstructure.

  20. Effective Hydro-Mechanical Properties of Fluid-Saturated Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, N.; Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of hydro-mechanical processes is essential for the characterization of liquid-resources as well as for many engineering applications. Furthermore, the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media finds application not only in geophysical exploration but also reservoir management. Fractures exhibit high-aspect-ratio geometries, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits. Motivated by this peculiar geometry, the investigation of the hydro-mechanically coupled processes is performed by means of a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach. The effective material behavior of domains including complex fracture patterns in a porous rock is assessed by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Classical balance equations are combined with a Poiseuille-type flow in the dimensionally reduced fracture. In the porous surrounding rock, the classical Biot-theory is applied. For simple geometries, our findings show that two main fluid-flow processes occur, leak-off from fractures to the surrounding rock and fracture flow within and between the connected fractures. The separation of critical frequencies of the two flow processes is not straightforward, in particular for systems containing a large number of fractures. Our aim is to model three dimensional hydro-mechanically coupled processes within complex fracture patterns and in particular determine the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of asperities of the fracture surfaces on the fracture stiffness and on the hydraulic conductivity will be added to the approach.

  1. The influence of fracture density and burial depth on the static and dynamic elastic properties of crystalline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, O. O.; Faulkner, D. R.; Tatham, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fracture in rock is a major factor that affects the rock's elastic properties. Elastic properties can be measured statically where stress and strain data are recorded during slow loading of a specimen, or dynamically, where the elasticity can be calculated from P- and S- wave velocity. During crustal deformation, rocks deform nearly statically, hence the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic properties must be known so that the dynamic elastic properties can be converted to static elastic properties to allow geomechanical and geodynamic modelling. In this study, the dynamic and static elastic properties were measured for dry crystalline rocks (Westerly granite) that were thermally treated to 250, 450, 650 and 850°C. Increasing the temperature produces an increased fracture density that is isotropically distributed. Experiments were carried out under confining pressure up to crack-closure pressure, 130MPa (~8km burial depth under hydrostatic pore pressure conditions). Increased fracture density within the rock results in a reduction in Young modulus and an increase in the Poisson's ratio, in both the static and dynamic case which is very significant above 573°C. The reduction and increase are retarded with increasing confining pressure. At crack-closure pressure the fracture density, in terms of effective medium models, is zero even though the rock still contains cracks. The crack-closure pressure is independent of fracture damage incurred in the rock. We compared the static and dynamic measurements and found a linear relationship between the static and dynamic Young's modulus with very high correlation and a gradient of one which is independent of confining pressure and the amount of fracturing incurred in the samples from thermal treatment. We also found that the static and dynamic Poisson's ratio are in agreement for values less than 0.34. Above this value, the static Poisson's ratio is much higher than the dynamic Poisson's ratio. Voigt

  2. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  3. Structural control of weathering processes within exhumed granitoids: Compartmentalisation of geophysical properties by faults and fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, J.; Géraud, Y.; Diraison, M.; Herquel, G.; Edel, J.-B.; Bano, M.; Le Garzic, E.; Walter, B.

    2016-03-01

    In the latter stages of exhumation processes, rocks undergo weathering. Weathering halos have been described in the vicinity of structures such as faults, veins or dykes, with a lateral size gradually narrowing with depth, symmetrically around the structures. In this paper, we describe the geophysical characterisation of such alteration patterns on two granitoid outcrops of the Catalan Coastal Ranges (Spain), each of which is affected by one major fault, as well as minor faults and fractures. Seismic, electric and ground penetrating radar surveys were carried out to map the spatial distribution of P-wave velocity, electrical resistivity and to identify reflectors of electromagnetic waves. The analysis of this multi-method and complementary dataset revealed that, at shallow depth, geophysical properties of the materials are compartmentalised and asymmetric with respect to major and subsidiary faults affecting the rock mass. This compartmentalisation and asymmetry both tend to attenuate with depth, whereas the effect of weathering is more symmetric with respect to the major structure of the outcrops. We interpret such compartmentalisation as resulting from the role of hydraulic and mechanical boundaries played by subsidiary faults, which tend to govern both the chemical and physical alterations involved in weathering. Thus, the smoothly narrowing halo model is not always accurate, as weathering halos can be strongly asymmetrical and present highly irregular contours delimiting sharp contrasts of geophysical properties. These results should be considered when investigating and modelling fluid storage and transfer in top crystalline rock settings for groundwater applications, hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs, as well as mineral deposits.

  4. Effect of thickness and loading mode on the fracture properties of V-4Cr-4Ti at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of thickness on the room temperature (RT) mode I fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated. Mode i fracture properties were measured from J-integral tests of compact tension (CT) specimens ranging in thickness from 6.4 mm to 25.4 mm. All specimens were machined in the T-L orientation and vacuum annealed following final matching. Two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti were tested. Specimens 6.4 mm and 12.7 mm thick were taken from ANL Heat No. 832665. The 25.4 mm thick specimens were obtained from GA Heat No. 832864. J-R curves were generated by the single specimen unload-compliance test technique in accordance with ASTM E813. All tests were performed in laboratory air at 25 C. Fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti under mixed-mode loading conditions showed the same trend observed previously for V-5Cr-5Ti and for other tough materials. For materials which fail by microvoid coalescence, the addition of an out-of-plane shear loading component introduces incompatibility stresses at particle interfaces in the trajectory of the crack. These incompatibility stresses cause particle/matrix decohesion or particle fracture which leads to void formation that limits the mode i plastic flow field. The present results demonstrates that fracture of V-4Cr-4Ti is sensitive to the addition of shear loading components and that model fracture toughness tests may not give the most conservative measure of resistance to ductile fracture.

  5. Architecture, fracture system, mechanical properties and permeability structure of a fault zone in Lower Triassic sandstone, Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johanna F.; Meier, Silke; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2015-04-01

    Close to the western Upper Rhine Graben Main Fault, Alsace, a NNE-SSW-striking fault zone, crosscutting porous, thick bedded Lower Triassic Bunter sandstone was investigated in detail, including its architecture, discontinuity system, mechanical rock properties and implications on its permeability structure and fault zone type. Field observations indicate a three-part fault zone structure including core-, transition- and damage zone. The at least 14 m thick fault core is composed of various slip surfaces and deformation bands, which encompass fractured host rock lenses. When connected, host rock lenses may transport fluids through the core zone. Adjacent transition zones are highly fractured in R1-orientation, show folded beds and contain P1-oriented deformation bands. R1 and P1-fractures are synthetic shear fractures and project with an acute angle (10-20°) toward the fault plane. Only in the damage zone, fault-parallel striking fractures occur. Here, increasing fracture apertures and connectivity may increase the permeability toward the fault core. Mechanical rock properties from 12 rock samples (Young's modulus, uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength) measured in all the parts of the fault zone, show highest values within the transition zone. In-situ measurements of rebound-hardnesses with a Schmidt-Hammer and analytical approaches, however, indicate that effective Young's moduli are two to sixteen times lower than the Young's moduli of intact rock. Values clearly decrease toward the fault core, even in the transition zone and are in average lower than effective Young's moduli in the damage zone. Although many fault zones in sandstone are sealing structures these field study show, that fault zones in porous sandstone may allow fluid flow.

  6. J-integral fracture toughness, Tearing modulus and tensile properties of Vitamin E stabilized radiation crosslinked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Bellare, Anuj; Dorfman, Robert; Samuel, Ashwanth; Thornhill, Thomas S

    2016-08-01

    Radiation crosslinking of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) increases its wear resistance in total joint replacement prostheses. Unfortunately, it is accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in several mechanical properties. In this study, the tensile properties and fracture behavior of radiation crosslinked, Vitamin E stabilized UHMWPE was studied as a function of radiation dose. The Rice and Sorensen model, applicable to elastic-plastic materials, was utilized to obtain the initial crack driving force, J1c, steady state J-integral fracture toughness, Jss and the Tearing modulus. Tensile tests showed the dependence of tensile properties on radiation dose. Jss of non-crosslinked UHMWPE was higher than for crosslinked UHMWPE׳s but there was no dose dependent change in Jss whereas there was almost no change in J1c over the entire dose range. Finally, a monotonic decrease in Tearing modulus was observed with radiation dose. PMID:27128734

  7. At the moment of occurrence of a fragility hip fracture, men have higher mechanical properties values in comparison with women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well established that males have lower fracture risk in comparison with females, which suggests a higher bone resistance in men. The aim of our study was to find out if in older patients with hip fragility fractures, gender has also an impact on trabecular bone material behaviour, specifically to determine whether trabecular mechanical properties under compressive loading differ between men and women who suffered a fragility hip fracture. Methods Femoral epiphyses were consecutively collected during hip replacement surgery due to proximal femur fragility fracture. Trabecular bone cylinders were drilled and submitted to uniaxial compression tests and mechanical properties were assessed. Results Seventy-three patients, 55 women (mean age 81 years and standard deviation of 7 years) and 18 men (mean age 81 years and standard deviation of 8 years) were evaluated. The ultimate stress of trabecular bone was significantly higher in men than in women: the median values and the interquartile range (IQR) were respectively 8.04(5.35-10.90) MPa vs. 4.46(3.02-7.73) MPa, (p-value = 0.005). The same difference between male and female was observed in the Young’s modulus: 293.68(166.67-538.18) MPa vs. 174.26(73.07-322.28) MPa, (p-value = 0.028), and also in the energy to failure: 0.25(0.07-0.42) MJ/m3 vs. 0.11(0.05-0.25) MJ/m3, (p-value = 0.058). These differences were also verified after adjusting the analysis for age in a multivariate model analysis. Conclusions Our observations demonstrated that, even in a population who suffered a fragility hip fracture, men still have higher trabecular bone mechanical properties in comparison with women. PMID:24131745

  8. Characterization of Spatial Variability of Hydrogeologic Properties for Unsaturated Flow in the Fractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Liu, Hui-Hai; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2002-05-21

    The spatial variability of layer-scale hydrogeologic properties of the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is investigated using inverse modeling. The thick UZ is grouped into five hydrostratigraphic units and further into 35 hydrogeologic layers. For each layer, lateral variability is represented by the variations in calibrated values of layer-scale properties at different individual deep boreholes. In the calibration model, matrix and fracture properties are calibrated for the one-dimensional vertical column at each individual borehole using the ITOUGH2 code. The objective function is the summation of the weighted misfits between the ambient unsaturated flow (represented by measured state variables: water saturation, water potential, and pneumatic pressure) and the simulated one in the one-dimensional flow system. The objective function also includes the weighted misfits between the calibrated properties and their prior information. Layer-scale state variables and prior rock properties are obtained from their core-scale measurements. Because of limited data, the lateral variability of three most sensitive properties (matrix permeability, matrix of the van Genuchten characterization, and fracture permeability) is calibrated, while all other properties are fixed at their calibrated layer-averaged values. Considerable lateral variability of hydrogeologic properties is obtained. For example, the lateral variability of is two to three orders of magnitude and that of and is one order of magnitude. The effect of lateral variability on site-scale flow and transport will be investigated in a future study.

  9. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-02-15

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system.

  10. Architectural characteristics and petrophysical properties evolution of a strike-slip fault zone in a fractured porous carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanne, Pierre; Guglielmi, Yves; Lamarche, Juliette; Cappa, Frédéric; Marié, Lionel

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the structural, petrophysical and hydromechanical properties relationships between a small fault zone and the porous layered carbonate series which host it. In a gallery located at 250-m depth, the deformation of a 22-m thick section of layered carbonates-, affected by a strike slip-fault have been characterized by means of structural (Q-value), acoustic velocities (Vp), porosity and uniaxial compressive strength (σc) measurements conducted in situ at the meter scale, and on laboratory samples at the infra-centimeter scale. A clear influence of the layers initial properties on fault architecture and properties evolution is underlined. In the porous layers with a low σc, there is an important accommodation of the deformation by micro-mechanisms resulting in a progressive decrease in the porosity toward the fault core. In the low-porosity layers with a high σc, deformations are accommodated toward the fault core by: an increase in the fracture porosity, in the micro-cracks porosity, and by displacements along pre-existing fractures resulting from a joint roughness decrease. The fault zone appears as relatively stiff and low permeable zones intercalated with low stiffness and high fracture permeability zones that extend one to tens of meters from the fault following the initial properties contrasts and geometry of the sedimentary layers.

  11. The fracture energy and some mechanical properties of a polyurethane elastomer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, H. K.; Knauss, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    The energy required to form a unit of new surface in the fracture of a polyurethane elastomer is determined. The rate sensitivity of the material has been reduced by swelling it in toluene. This paper primarily describes the experimental work of measuring the lower limit of the fracture energy. With this value and the creep compliance as a basis, the rate dependence of fracture energy for the unswollen material has been determined. It is thus shown that the dependence of the fracture energy on the rate of crack propagation can be explained by energy dissipation around the tip of the crack. Good agreement between the theoretically and experimentally determined relationships for the rate-sensitive fracture energy is demonstrated.

  12. An Experimental Evaluation of Material Properties and Fracture Simulation of Cryorolled 7075 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prosenjit; Singh, I. V.; Jayaganthan, R.

    2012-07-01

    This work presents an experimental evaluation of yield strength, tensile strength, and impact toughness of 7075 Al alloy. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has been chosen for quasi-static crack growth simulations using Charpy impact energy as the crack growth criterion for both Bulk and ultrafine-grained (UFG) 7075 Al alloy. The 7075 Al alloy is rolled for different thickness reductions (40 and 70%) at cryogenic (liquid nitrogen) temperature, and its mechanical properties are studied by performing the tensile and Charpy impact testing. The microstructural characterization of the alloy was carried out using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The rolling of the Al alloy at cryogenic temperature suppresses dynamic recovery, and dislocation cells formed during processing, transformed into fully formed ultrafine-grains (600 nm) at 70% thickness reduction. The impact energy used as the crack growth criterion under quasi-static loading condition based on the Griffith energy concept. The elastic-plastic ductile fracture simulations are performed by XFEM using ABAQUS Software (Version 6.9). For crack modeling, two different types of functions are used to model a crack based on partition of unity concept. A discontinuous function is used to model the portion behind the crack tip, whereas crack tip is modeled by near-tip asymptotic functions. This permits the crack is to be represented explicitly without meshing the crack surfaces, thus crack propagation simulations can be carried out without a need of re-meshing. Strain energy release and stress distribution ahead of the crack tip is found for some practical crack problems. The numerical examples indicate a significant improvement in crack growth properties of UFG 7075 Al alloy as compared to its bulk form due to an effective grain refinement.

  13. Fatigue and fracture properties of a super-austenitic stainless steel at 295 K and 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, D. M.; Walsh, R. P.; Dalder, E. N. C.; Litherland, S.; Trosen, M.; Kuhlmann, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The tie plate structure for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) is required to have high strength and good fatigue and fracture behavior at both room temperature and 4 K. A super-austenitic stainless steel - UNS 20910, commonly referred to by its trade name, Nitronic 50 (N50) - has been chosen for consideration to fulfill this task, due to its good room temperature and cryogenic yield strengths and weldability. Although N50 is often considered for cryogenic applications, little published data exists at 4 K. Here, a full series of tests have been conducted at 295 K and 4 K, and static tensile properties of four forgings of commercially-available N50 are reported along with fatigue life, fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR), and fracture toughness data. This study makes a significant contribution to the cryogenic mechanical properties database of high strength, paramagnetic alloys with potential for superconducting magnet applications.

  14. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It usually occurs after an injury and often occurs with ...

  15. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and cryogenic fracture properties in 5Ni and 9Ni steel

    SciTech Connect

    Strife, J.R.; Passoja, D.E.

    1980-08-01

    Heat treatments were utilized in 5Ni and 9Ni steel which resulted in the development of tempered microstructures which contained either no measurable retained austenite (<0.5 pct) or approximately 4 to 5 pct retained austenite as determined by X-ray diffraction. Microstructural observations coupled with the results of tensile testing indicated that the formation of retained austenite correlated with a decrease in carbon content of the matrix. Relative values of K/sub IC/ at 77 K were estimated from slow bend precracked Charpy data using both the COD and equivalent energy measurements. In addition, Charpy impact properties at 77/sup 0/K were determined. In the 9Ni alloy, optimum fracture toughness was achieved in specimens which contained retained austenite. This was attributed to changes in yield and work hardening behavior which accompanied the microstructural changes. In the 5Ni alloy, fracture toughness equivalent to that observed in the 9Ni alloy was developed in grain refined and tempered microstructures containing <0.5 pct retained austenite. A decrease in fracture toughness was observed in grain refined 5Ni specimens containing 3.8 pct retained austenite due to the premature onset of unstable cracking. This was attributed to the transformation of retained austenite to brittle martensite during deformation. It was concluded that the formation of thermally stable retained austenite is beneficial to the fracture toughness of Ni steels at 77/sup 0/K as a result of austenite gettering carbon from the matrix during tempering. However, it was also concluded that the mechanical stability of the retained austenite is critical in achieving a favorable enhancement of cryogenic fracture toughnes properties.

  16. The effect of heat treatment on microstructure and cryogenic fracture properties in 5Ni and 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strife, J. R.; Passoja, D. E.

    1980-08-01

    Heat treatments were utilized in 5Ni and 9Ni steel which resulted in the development of tempered microstructures which contained either no measurable retained austenite (<0.5 pct) or approximately 4 to 5 pct retained austenite as determined by X-ray diffraction. Microstructural observations coupled with the results of tensile testing indicated that the formation of retained austenite correlated with a decrease in carbon content of the matrix. Relative values of K IC at 77 K were estimated from slow bend precracked Charpy data using both the COD and equivalent energy measurements. In addition, Charpy impact properties at 77 K were determined. In the 9Ni alloy, optimum fracture toughness was achieved in specimens which contained retained austenite. This was attributed to changes in yield and work hardening behavior which accompanied the microstructural changes. In the 5Ni alloy, fracture toughness equivalent to that observed in the 9Ni alloy was developed in grain refined and tempered microstructures containing <0.5 pct retained austenite. A decrease in fracture toughness was observed in grain refined 5Ni specimens containing 3.8 pct retained austenite due to the premature onset of unstable cracking. This was attributed to the transformation of retained austenite to brittle martensite during deformation. It was concluded that the formation of thermally stable retained austenite is beneficial to the fracture toughness of Ni steels at 77 K as a result of austenite gettering carbon from the matrix during tempering. However, it was also concluded that the mechanical stability of the retained austenite is critical in achieving a favorable enhancement of cryogenic fracture toughness properties.

  17. Subtask 12F4: Effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Up-to-date results on the effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented in this paper, with an emphasis on the behavior of the U.S. reference alloys V-4Cr-4Ti containing 500-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and cluctile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests of one-third-size specimens irradiated at 420{degrees}C-600{degrees}C up to {approx}50 dpa in lithium environment in fast fission reactors. To supplement the Charpy impact tests fracture behavior was also characterized by quantitative SEM fractography on miniature tensile and disk specimens that were irradiated to similar conditions and fractured at -196{degrees}C to 200{degrees}C by multiple bending. For similar irradiation conditions irradiation-induced increase in DBTT was influenced most significantly by Cr content, indicating that irradiation-induced clustering of Cr atoms takes place in high-Cr (Cr {ge} 7 wt.%) alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, effects of neutron irradiation on impact properties and fracture behavior were negligible. For example, from the Charpy-impact and multiple-bend tests there was no indication of irradiation-induced embrittlement for V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si and the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti after irradiation to {approx}34 dpa at 420{degrees}C to 600{degrees}C, and only ductile fracture was observed for temperatures as low as -196{degrees}C. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.

  19. Influence of injection mode on transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Painter, S. L.; Viswanathan, H.; Makedonska, N.; Karra, S.

    2015-09-12

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident and flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large-scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high-performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approachmore » to simulate transport therein. Results show that after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region, both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than 2. Lastly, the physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures, which offer reduced resistance to flow, and in-fracture channeling, which results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  20. Effect of tempering on quasi-static and impact fracture toughness and mechanical properties for 5140 H steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepaczko, J. R.; Solecki, A.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of various thermal treatments, i.e., oil quench and different tempering conditions, on quasi-static and impact fracture toughness, stress-strain characteristics, hardness, and Charpy energy of 5140 H steel were examined. During quasi-static and impact loading notched round tensile specimens were used with a prefatigued crack. A specially designed device together with a pendulum hammer and electronic measuring system was used enabling testing of the opening mode fracture toughness at loading rates up to K1 = 3 x 106 MPa√m per second. It has been found that within the region of the lower tempering temperatures, 500 K≤ 650 K, the critical stress intensity factor KIc determined from impact testing is lower than that obtained during slow loading, whereas at the higher tempering temperatures, 650 K ≤ T* ≤ 900 K, dynamic KIu values show a tendency to be higher than their quasi-static counterparts. This behavior was analyzed quantitatively using the Hahn-Rosenfield model which relates tensile properties to fracture toughness. A good agreement was found between quasi-static experimental results and the model. The relation between Charpy energy Kv and the critical stress intensity factor KIc was also evaluated. Changes of the fracture toughness are discussed within the framework of SEM fractographs taken after quasi-static and impact tests.

  1. Influence of Injection Mode on Transport Properties in Kilometer-Scale Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hyman, Jeffrey; Painter, Scott L; Viswanathan, Hari; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident or flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt amore » Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that a after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than two. The physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures which o er reduced resistance to flow and in-fracture channeling that results from the topology of the DFN.« less

  2. Influence of Injection Mode on Transport Properties in Kilometer-Scale Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, Jeffrey; Painter, Scott L; Viswanathan, Hari; Makedonska, Nataliia; Karra, Satish

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the choice of injection mode impacts transport properties in kilometer-scale three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN). The choice of injection mode, resident or flux-weighted, is designed to mimic different physical phenomena. It has been hypothesized that solute plumes injected under resident conditions evolve to behave similarly to solutes injected under flux-weighted conditions. Previously, computational limitations have prohibited the large scale simulations required to investigate this hypothesis. We investigate this hypothesis by using a high performance DFN suite, dfnWorks, to simulate flow in kilometer-scale three-dimensional DFNs based on fractured granite at the Forsmark site in Sweden, and adopt a Lagrangian approach to simulate transport therein. Results show that a after traveling through a pre-equilibrium region both injection methods exhibit linear scaling of the first moment of travel time and power law scaling of the breakthrough curve with similar exponents, slightly larger than two. The physical mechanisms behind this evolution appear to be the combination of in-network channeling of mass into larger fractures which o er reduced resistance to flow and in-fracture channeling that results from the topology of the DFN.

  3. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture ... Skull fractures may occur with head injuries . The skull provides good protection for the brain. However, a severe impact ...

  4. The Impacts of Rock Composition and Properties on the Ability to Stimulate Production of Ultra-Low Permeability Oil and Gas Reservoirs Through Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Sone, H.; Kohli, A. H.; Heller, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we present the results of several research projects investigating how rock properties, natural fractures and the state of stress affect the success of hydraulic fracturing operations during stimulation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. First, through laboratory measurements on samples of the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Horn River shales, we discuss pore structure, adsorption and permeability as well as the importance of clay content on the viscoplastic behavior of shale formations. Second, we present several lines of evidence that indicates that the principal way in which hydraulic fracturing stimulates production from shale gas reservoirs is by inducing slow slip on pre-existing fractures and faults, which are not detected by conventional microseismic monitoring, Finally, we discuss how hydraulic fracturing can be optimized in response to variations of rock properties.

  5. Fracture properties of growth plate cartilage compared to cortical and trabecular bone in ovine femora.

    PubMed

    Tschegg, E K; Celarek, A; Fischerauer, S F; Stanzl-Tschegg, S; Weinberg, A M

    2012-10-01

    Fracture mechanical parameters (notch tensile strength, specific fracture energy/crack resistance and specific crack initiation energy) of epiphyseal plate cartilage, trabecular bone (metaphysis) and cortical bone (diaphysis) were determined on ovine femur specimens. The fracture behaviour before and after crack initiation was recorded in force-displacement diagrams from wedge splitting tests. Crack propagation was stable both during and after the formation of a principal crack. This is the main advantage of the wedge-splitting method by Tschegg in comparison with tensile tests. Microscopy of the epiphyseal plate during fracture showed fibre elongation and tearing in the crack tip region. The results of this study can help to understand the mechanics of epiphyseal plate injuries and the obtained values can be used for computational simulations and models. PMID:23022566

  6. Effect of service usage on tensile, fatigue, and fracture properties of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made to determine the effects of extensive service usage on some basic material properties of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloy materials. The effects of service usage were determined by comparing material properties for new material (generally obtained from the literature) with those for material cut from the center wing box of a C-130B transport airplane with 6385 flight-hours of service. The properties investigated were notched and unnotched fatigue strengths, fatigue-crack-growth rate, fracture toughness, and tensile properties. For the properties investigated and the parameter ranges considered (crack length, stress ratio, etc.), the results obtained showed no significant difference between service and new materials.

  7. The effect of nonsetting calcium hydroxide on root fracture and mechanical properties of radicular dentine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yassen, G H; Platt, J A

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this review was to identify and analyse all studies related to the effect of nonsetting calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)(2)] on root fracture and various mechanical properties of radicular dentine. A PubMed search was conducted using the keywords 'calcium hydroxide' and 'dentistry' combined with MeSH terms 'tooth fractures' or 'mechanical phenomena' or 'compressive strength'. The search was expanded by including Embase and Web of Science databases, using the keywords 'calcium hydroxide' and 'root' and 'fracture'. The search was supplemented by checking the reference lists from each selected article. Each study had to meet the following criteria to be selected for review: (i) Inclusion of at least one experimental group with root or radicular dentine either filled with or exposed to nonsetting Ca(OH)(2); (ii) inclusion of at least one appropriate control group; and (iii) a minimum of five samples per experimental group. Only articles written in English were included. Of the 16 studies selected initially, 12 in vitro studies fulfilled the selection criteria for inclusion in the final review. No clinical studies that directly supported the correlation between Ca(OH)(2) intracanal dressing and root fracture were found in the literature. However, the majority of in vitro studies showed reduction in the mechanical properties of radicular dentine after exposure to Ca(OH)(2) for 5 weeks or longer. Conversely, the data were inconclusive regarding whether Ca(OH)(2) exposure for 1 month or less had a negative effect on the mechanical properties of radicular dentine. PMID:22970899

  8. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  9. Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

    1999-01-01

    The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

  10. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Different Carbon Nanotube-Grafted Polyacrylonitrile-Based Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of different carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted polyacrylonitrile-based (T1000GB) single carbon fibers were investigated. Grafting of CNTs was achieved via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). When Fe(C5H5)2 (also applied via CVD) was used as the catalyst, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of the carbon fibers were improved, possibly due to the growth of dense CNT networks on the carbon fibers, which may have led to a reduction in the number of strength-limiting defects. Separately, at lower concentrations of an Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in ethanol, which was applied via dipping, the tensile strength of CNT-grafted fibers was nearly identical to that of the as-received fibers, although the Weibull modulus was higher. For higher concentrations of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst, however, the tensile strength and the Weibull modulus were lower than those for the as-received material. Although the density of the CNT network increased with the concentration of the Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst in the ethanol solution, heating of the ethanolic Fe(NO3)3·9H2O catalyst solution generated nitric acid (HNO3) due to decomposition, which damaged the fiber surfaces, resulting in an increase in the number of flaws and consequently a reduction in the tensile strength. Therefore, the tensile strength and Weibull modulus of CNT-grafted carbon fibers vary due to the combination of these effects and as a function of the catalyst concentration.

  11. Influence of repair welding of aged 18Ni 250 maraging steel weldments on tensile and fracture properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, P.P.; Arumugham, S.; Nagarajan, K.V. . Materials and Metallurgy Group)

    1993-08-01

    The effects of repair welding on tensile strength and fracture toughness of aged weldments of 18 Ni 250-grade maraging steel have been studied. It has been established that aged weldments in the steel can be repaired and approximately 95% of the tensile strength of the initial welds could be achieved by postrepair aging treatment. Also, the repairs had practically no effect on the fracture toughness (K[sub IC]) of the weldment. These results have been discussed in terms of microstructural conditions in the various affected and unaffected zones of the initial weld. One important inference that emerges from the mechanical properties-microstructural correlation in the study is that (K[sub IC]) of the weld is independent of the gross microstructural features of the dendritic size and shapes in the ranges observed in this study. It has, however, been cautioned that the above statement is not valid in cases in which heavy segregation occurs along the interdendritic boundaries resulting in heavily banded microstructure. This can result from faulty weld parameters such as excessive heat input. A second aging to recover the mechanical properties of the repaired zone has additional beneficial effects on tensile strengths and helps in maintaining fracture toughness to the original level of the initial weld.

  12. Tensile properties and translaminar fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced unsaturated polyester resin composites aged in distilled and salt water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiman, Gozali, M. Hulaifi; Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi

    2016-03-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer has been widely used in chemical industry and transportation due to lightweight and cost effective manufacturing. However due to the ability to absorb water from the environment, the durability issue is of interest for up to days. This paper investigated the water uptake and the effect of absorbed water on the tensile properties and the translaminar fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced unsaturated polyester composites (GFRP) aged in distilled and salt water up to 30 days at a temperature of 50°C. It has been shown that GFRP absorbed more water in distilled water than in salt water. In distilled water, the tensile strength of GFRP tends to decrease steeply at 7 days and then slightly recovered for further immersion time. In salt water, the tensile strength tends to decrease continually up to 30 days immersion. The translaminar fracture toughness of GFRP aged in both distilled and salt-water shows the similar behavior. The translaminar fracture toughness increases after 7 days immersion and then tends to decrease beyond that immersion time. In the existence of ionics content in salt water, it causes more detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of fiberglass/unsaturated polyester composites compared to that of distilled water.

  13. Measurement of effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of fractured glass media using a tri-axial flow and transport apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, K. Prasad; Lindberg, Michael J.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryUnderstanding the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of sub-surface media is critical to many natural and engineered sub-surface systems. Methods and information for such characterization of fractured media are severely lacking. Influence of glass corrosion (precipitation and dissolution) reactions on fractured glass blocks HAN28 and LAWBP1, two candidate waste glass forms for a proposed immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) disposal facility at the Hanford, WA site, was investigated. Flow and tracer transport experiments were conducted in such randomly and multiply fractured ILAW glass blocks, before and after subjecting them to corrosion using vapor hydration testing (VHT) at 200 °C temperature and 200 psig (1379 KPa) pressure, causing the precipitation of alteration products. A tri-axial fractured media flow and transport experimental apparatus, which allows the simultaneous measurement of flow and transport properties and their anisotropy, has been designed and built for this purpose. Such apparatus for fractured media characterization are being reported in the literature only recently. Hydraulic properties of fractured blocks were measured in different orientations and along different cardinal directions, before and after glass corrosion reactions. Miscible displacement experiments using a non-reactive dye were also conducted, before and after glass corrosion reactions, to study the tracer transport behavior through such media. Initial efforts to analyze breakthrough curve (BTC) data using a 1D advection dispersion equation (ADE) solution revealed that a different fractured media transport model, which accurately accounts for the heterogeneous transport behavior in 3D, may be necessary for such interpretation. It was found that glass reactions could have a significant influence on the hydrologic properties of fractured ILAW glass media. The methods and results are useful to better understand the effect of chemical reactions on

  14. Flow properties through a single fracture in Neogene-Quaternary siltstone on effective pressure increasing and decreasing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, S. I.; Noguchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate flow (or seal) properties of mudstone layers, it is essential to reveal stress conditions at which fractures in mudstone can act as effective flow channels. Dependencies of an effective pressure Pe on a fracture permeability should be examined, because Pe conditions of mudstone layers may change in some cases such as tectonic subsidence and uplifting, or CO2 injection at geological storage processes. The purpose of this study is to reveal how a fracture permeability in mudstone changes at Pe increasing and decreasing processes, and how the features depend on yield stress condition of the rock. This study conducted water permeability tests with Neogene-Quaternary siltstones from the Kazusa Group, Japan; siltstones from the Ohara Formation (OHR3) and the Kiwada Formation (KWD2), of which the yield stress conditions are different from each other. A tensile fracture was artificially made in these cylinder rock specimens, and permeability was measured under several Pe compression-and-decompression cycles with increasing the maximum Pe (2-21 MPa). All results had two characteristic Pe cycles; a cycle at which differences in permeability between process of compression and decompression become clear (a cycle Y), and a cycle at which the permeability becomes almost the same as the intact rock permeability (a cycle C). The maximum Pe of the cycles C is 5-9 MPa for OHR3 and 17-21 MPa for KWD2, and the maximum Pe of the cycles Y is 5 MPa for OHR3 and 3-9 MPa for KWD2. The maximum Pe conditions for the cycles C almost equal the yield conditions of the intact rocks obtained by isotropic compressional test. While, the cycles Y tend to appear lower pressure conditions than the yield conditions of the intact rocks, which may be because stress at real contact areas is larger than Pe: that is, conditions for fracture closure depend on the yield condition of rock, while conditions for initiation of fracture surface yielding also depend on conditions of fracture occlusion.

  15. Characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almrabat, Abdulhadi M.

    The thesis presents the results of a study of the characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks. A new laboratory High Pressure and High Temperature (HPHT) triaxial testing system was developed to characterize the seismic properties of sandstone under different levels of effective stress confinement and changes in pore-fluid composition. An intact and fractured of Berea sandstones core samples were used in the experimental studies. The laboratory test results were used to develop analytical models for stress-level and pore-fluid dependent seismic velocity of sandstones. Models for stress-dependent P and S-wave seismic velocities of sandstone were then developed based on the assumption that stress-dependencies come from the nonlinear elastic response of micro-fractures contained in the sample under normal and shear loading. The contact shear stiffness was assumed to increase linearly with the normal stress across a micro-fracture, while the contact normal stiffness was assumed to vary as a power law with the micro-fracture normal stress. Both nonlinear fracture normal and shear contact models were validated by experimental data available in the literature. To test the dependency of seismic velocity of sandstone on changes in pore-fluid composition, another series of tests were conducted where P and S-wave velocities were monitored during injection of supercritical CO 2 in samples of Berea sandstone initially saturated with saline water and under constant confining stress. Changes in seismic wave velocity were measured at different levels of supercritical CO2 saturation as the initial saline water as pore-fluid was displaced by supercritical CO 2. It was found that the P- iv wave velocity significantly decreased while the S-wave velocity remained almost constant as the sample supercritical CO2 saturation increased. The dependency of the seismic velocity on changes on pore fluid composition during

  16. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  17. Fault zone hydraulic properties provide an independent estimate of coseismic fracturing at 8 km depth (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steven; Mittempergher, Silvia; Garofalo, Paolo; Vho, Alice

    2015-04-01

    The Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ, Italian S Alps) was exhumed from c. 8 km, where it was characterized by seismic activity (pseudotachylytes) but also by hydrous fluid flow (alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and cataclasites). The fault zone has previously been quantitatively characterized (Bistacchi 2011, PAGEOPH; Smith 2013, JSG) providing a rich dataset to generate 3D Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models and simulate fault hydraulic properties. A fundamental parameter that cannot be directly evaluated in the field is the fraction of fractures-faults that were open over a certain time period in the evolution of the fault zone. Based on field and microstructural evidence, we infer that the opening and closing of fractures resulted in a toggle-switch mechanism for fluid flow during the seismic cycle: higher permeability was obtained in the syn- to post-seismic period, when the largest number of fractures was (re)opened by off-fault deformation, then permeability dropped due to fracture cementation. Postseismic permeability has been evaluated in a few cases in the world thanks to seismological evidence of fluid migration along active fault systems. Therefore, we were able to develop a parametric hydraulic model of the GLFZ and calibrate it to obtain the fraction of faults-fractures that were open in the postseismic period to obtain realistic fluid flow and permeability values. This fraction is very close to the percolation threshold of the DFN, and it can be converted to fracture intensity (fracture surface per unit volume in the fault zone), which could be integrated to obtain the fracture energy due to off-fault fracturing. Since the fracture energy due to on-fault processes has already been estimated for the GLFZ (Pittarello, 2008, EPSL), this also allows us to estimate the total fracture energy.

  18. Tissue level microstructure and mechanical properties of the femoral head in the proximal femur of fracture patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linwei; Meng, Guangwei; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Gao, Jiazi; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the regional variations of trabecular morphological parameters and mechanical parameters of the femoral head, as well as to determine the relationship between trabecular morphological and mechanical parameters. Seven femoral heads from patients with fractured proximal femur were scanned using a micro-CT system. Each femoral head was divided into 12 sub-regions according to the trabecular orientation. One trabecular cubic model was reconstructed from each sub-region. A total of 81 trabecular models were reconstructed, except three destroyed sub-regions from two femoral heads during the surgery. Trabecular morphological parameters, i.e. trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), specific bone surface (BS/BV), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), structural model index (SMI), and degree of anisotropy (DA) were measured. Micro-finite element analyses were performed for each cube to obtain the apparent Young's modulus and tissue level von Mises stress distribution under 1 % compressive strain along three orthogonal directions, respectively. Results revealed significant regional variations in the morphological parameters (). Young's moduli along the trabecular orientation were significantly higher than those along the other two directions. In general, trabecular mechanical properties in the medial region were lower than those in the lateral region. Trabecular mechanical parameters along the trabecular orientation were significantly correlated with BS/BV, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and DA. In this study, regional variations of microstructural features and mechanical properties in the femoral head of patients with proximal femur fracture were thoroughly investigated at the tissue level. The results of this study will help to elucidate the mechanism of femoral head fracture for reducing fracture risk and developing treatment strategies for the elderly.

  19. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surfaces of Thixoformed HP9/4/30 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M. Z.; Jaharah, A. G.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-07

    Most work in semi-solid metal processing has been focused on relatively low-melting temperature materials such as aluminium, magnesium, tin, lead and their composites. Because of the high melting temperatures and related measurement difficulties, there is relatively small amount of experimental data available on the thixoforming of high temperature materials such as steels. This paper discusses the relationships between tensile tests data and the fracture surfaces of HP9/4/30 steel samples, in as-received and as-thixoformed conditions. Some of the as-thixoformed samples were subjected to commercial heat treatments before the tests were carried out. The as-received samples showed a typical ductile fracture of 'cup' and 'cone' surface appearance. The thixoformed samples, although showing some significant increase in tensile strength values, failed in a brittle manner, with the fracture surfaces showing a 'cobbled' surface appearance. The application of the commercial heat treatment to the thixoformed samples has significantly improved their ductility.

  20. Fracture properties of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide free-standing membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Berdova, Maria Rontu, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ylivaara, Oili M. E.; Puurunen, Riikka L.; Törmä, Pekka T.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture strength of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes deposited by atomic layer deposition at 110, 150, 200, and 300 °C was investigated. The fracture strength was found to be in the range of 2.25–3.00 GPa using Weibull statistics and nearly constant as a function of deposition temperature. This strength is superior to common microelectromechanical systems materials such as diamondlike carbon, SiO{sub 2}, or SiC. As-deposited membranes sustained high cycling pressure loads >10 bar/s without fracture. Films featured, however, significant reduction in the resistance to failure after annealing (800 °C) or high humidity (95%, 60 °C) treatments.

  1. Double torsion testing and finite element analysis for determining the electric fracture properties of piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio; Mikami, Masaru

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental and numerical investigation in electric fracture behavior of composite [Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}] double torsion (DT) specimens. DT tests were conducted on a commercial piezoelectric ceramic bonded between two metals. Fracture loads under different electric fields were obtained from the experiment. Nonlinear three-dimensional finite element analysis was also employed to calculate the energy release rate for DT specimens based on the exact (permeable) and approximate (impermeable) crack models. The effects of applied electric field and domain switching on the energy release rate are discussed, and the model predictions are compared with the results of the experiments.

  2. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  3. Characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almrabat, Abdulhadi M.

    The thesis presents the results of a study of the characterization and modeling of the stress and pore-fluid dependent acoustic properties of fractured porous rocks. A new laboratory High Pressure and High Temperature (HPHT) triaxial testing system was developed to characterize the seismic properties of sandstone under different levels of effective stress confinement and changes in pore-fluid composition. An intact and fractured of Berea sandstones core samples were used in the experimental studies. The laboratory test results were used to develop analytical models for stress-level and pore-fluid dependent seismic velocity of sandstones. Models for stress-dependent P and S-wave seismic velocities of sandstone were then developed based on the assumption that stress-dependencies come from the nonlinear elastic response of micro-fractures contained in the sample under normal and shear loading. The contact shear stiffness was assumed to increase linearly with the normal stress across a micro-fracture, while the contact normal stiffness was assumed to vary as a power law with the micro-fracture normal stress. Both nonlinear fracture normal and shear contact models were validated by experimental data available in the literature. To test the dependency of seismic velocity of sandstone on changes in pore-fluid composition, another series of tests were conducted where P and S-wave velocities were monitored during injection of supercritical CO 2 in samples of Berea sandstone initially saturated with saline water and under constant confining stress. Changes in seismic wave velocity were measured at different levels of supercritical CO2 saturation as the initial saline water as pore-fluid was displaced by supercritical CO 2. It was found that the P- iv wave velocity significantly decreased while the S-wave velocity remained almost constant as the sample supercritical CO2 saturation increased. The dependency of the seismic velocity on changes on pore fluid composition during

  4. Structural analysis of an outcropping granite (Proterozoic basement of Yémen): faults and fractures distributions and scaling properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Garzic, Edouard; de L'Hamaide, Thibaut; Diraison, Marc; Géraud, Yves; de Urreiztieta, Marc; Hauville, Benoit; Champanhet, Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Numerous deep fractured reservoirs in basement have risen in recent years for oil or geothermal production. Such reservoirs are often badly-known because of a lack of direct information. Indeed, structural models proposed are mostly based on 1D borehole data, and conventional geophysical methods like seismic profiles are not so good techniques to image basement structures. Therefore, understanding the effects of scale in the organization of fracture system is a key problem in modelling geometry of deep fractured reservoir. The aim of this study is to present a detailed structural analysis of an outcropping granite at different scales and to contribute to comprehension of scaling properties of faults systems. Multi-scale structural maps were produced by remote sensing techniques and field approaches in the granitic Proterozoic basement of Al-Mukalla (Yémen). This region, located at the Southern boundary of the Arabian Plate, has a Pan-African tectonic signature and then has undergone two phases of continental extension since Mesozoic times: Jurassic-Cretaceous and Oligo-Miocene rifting (i.e. Gulf of Aden opening). In a first time, very high resolution satellite imagery (QUICKBIRD) was used to construct map of structural lineaments from regional scale to micro-block scale (~1 km x 1 km). In a second time, field observations and fractures measurements performed at outcrop scale allow us to confirm suitability of satellite picking. Finally, description of the various structures existing in Burum's granite and characterization of geometrical and morphological features of faults, fractured corridors and joints enable us to interpret structural lineaments with better accuracy. Major faults strike N090°E and N120°E, whereas secondary structures strike N000°E and N040°E and are interpreted as minor faults, fractured corridors or joints. Consequently, brittle deformation is mainly characterised by structural blocks with parallelogram shaped with fault segments

  5. Measurement of adhesive joint fracture properties as a function of environmental degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wylde, J.W.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The increased use of structural adhesives in industry would benefit from a comprehensive failure load prediction tool to ensure competent design. The work of Fernlund and Spelt has proposed a fracture envelope that relates the critical strain energy release rate to the nominal phase angle of loading. The work of Plasinus and Spelt extended this work to incorporate the viscoelastic effect of the adhesive. The objective of the present research is to incorporate the effects of temperature and water absorption into the prediction of adhesive joint fracture. Ample evidence exists to demonstrate the notion that absorbed water has an effect predominantly detrimental, on the strength of an adhesive joint. Past work was concentrated on degrading typical, in service joints such as the Single Lap Shear (SLS) joint or the Cracked Lap Shear (CLS) joint. Since water is absorbed through the exposed edges, typically small in area compared to the volume of the joint, degradation times are usually long and the water concentration varies both with time and spatially throughout the joint. In this research, a novel method of degrading adhesive fracture specimens to a spatially constant degradation condition is being used to incorporate environmental effects into the fracture load prediction tool of Spelt et al.

  6. Cotton properties: relative humidity and its effect on flat bundle strength elongation and fracture morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of the relative humidity (RH) of testing conditions on stelometer cotton flat bundle strength and elongation measurements, and on the morphology of fiber fractures will be discussed in this talk. We observed a trend for stelometer strength and elongations measurements. Testing in conditi...

  7. Fractured cement reactivity during CO2-rich brine leakage: Consequences on hydrodynamic and structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    abdelghafour, H.; Luquot, L.; Gouze, P.

    2013-12-01

    So far, cement alteration was principally studied experimentally using batch reactor (with static or renewed fluid). All exhibit similar carbonation mechanisms. The acidic solution, formed by the dissolution of the CO2 into the pore water or directly surrounding the cement sample, diffuses into the cement and induces dissolution reactions of the cement hydrates in particular portlandite and CSH. The calcium released by the dissolution of these calcium bearing phases combining with carbonate ions of the fluid forms calcium carbonates. The cement pH, initially around 13, falls to values where carbonate ion is the most dominant element (pH ~ 9), then CaCO3 phases can precipitate. These studies mainly associate carbonation process with a reduction of porosity and permeability. Indeed an increase of volume (about 10%) is expected during the formation of calcite from portlandite assuming a stoichiometric reaction. Here we investigated the cement alteration mechanisms in the frame of a controlled continuous renewal of CO2-rich fluid in a fracture. This situation is that expected when seepage is activated by the mechanical failure of the cement material that initially seals two layers of distinctly different pressure: the storage reservoir and the aquifer above the caprock, for instance. We study the effect of flow rates from quasi-static flow to higher flow rates for well-connected fractures. In the quasi-static case we observed an extensive conversion of portlandite (Ca(OH)2) to calcite in the vicinity of the fracture similar to that observed in the published batch experiments. Eventually, the fracture was almost totally healed. The experiments with constant flow revealed a different behavior triggered by the continuous renewing of the reactants and withdrawal of the reaction products. We showed that calcite precipitation is more efficient for low flow rate. With intermediate flow rate, we measured that permeability increases slowly at the beginning of the experiment and

  8. Effect of an Aging Heat Treatment on the 4 K Fracture and Fatigue Properties of 316LN and Haynes 242

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R. P.; Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Miller, J. R.

    2006-03-31

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the liquid helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet coils. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, fatigue crack resistance, and fabricability. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn superconductor, the conduit alloy must retain good mechanical properties after exposure to the superconductor's reaction heat treatment. Here we present data from cryogenic fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth rate tests on 316LN and a Cr-Mo-Ni base super-alloy (Haynes 242) at 4 K before and after the exposure to the heat treatment. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation series connected hybrid magnet for the NHMFL. Both of the alloys are found to have adequate fatigue and fracture properties for the CICC application while the superalloy has distinctly better elastic properties of modulus and thermal expansion.

  9. Effect of an Aging Heat Treatment on the 4 K Fracture and Fatigue Properties of 316LN and Haynes 242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Miller, J. R.

    2006-03-01

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the liquid helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet coils. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, fatigue crack resistance, and fabricability. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn superconductor, the conduit alloy must retain good mechanical properties after exposure to the superconductor's reaction heat treatment. Here we present data from cryogenic fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth rate tests on 316LN and a Cr-Mo-Ni base super-alloy (Haynes 242) at 4 K before and after the exposure to the heat treatment. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation series connected hybrid magnet for the NHMFL. Both of the alloys are found to have adequate fatigue and fracture properties for the CICC application while the superalloy has distinctly better elastic properties of modulus and thermal expansion.

  10. Fundamental properties of fracture and seismicity in a non extensive statistical physics framework.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos

    2010-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in many scientific disciplines concerns upscaling, that is, of determining the regularities and laws of evolution at some large scale, from those known at a lower scale. Earthquake physics is no exception, with the challenge of understanding the transition from the laboratory scale to the scale of fault networks and large earthquakes. In this context, statistical physics has a remarkably successful work record in addressing the upscaling problem in physics. It is natural then to consider that the physics of many earthquakes has to be studied with a different approach than the physics of one earthquake and in this sense we can consider the use of statistical physics not only appropriate but necessary to understand the collective properties of earthquakes [see Corral 2004, 2005a,b,c;]. A significant attempt is given in a series of works [Main 1996; Rundle et al., 1997; Main et al., 2000; Main and Al-Kindy, 2002; Rundle et al., 2003; Vallianatos and Triantis, 2008a] that uses classical statistical physics to describe seismicity. Then a natural question arises. What type of statistical physics is appropriate to commonly describe effects from fracture level to seismicity scale?? The application of non extensive statistical physics offers a consistent theoretical framework, based on a generalization of entropy, to analyze the behavior of natural systems with fractal or multi-fractal distribution of their elements. Such natural systems where long - range interactions or intermittency are important, lead to power law behavior. We note that this is consistent with a classical thermodynamic approach to natural systems that rapidly attain equilibrium, leading to exponential-law behavior. In the frame of non extensive statistical physics approach, the probability function p(X) is calculated using the maximum entropy formulation of Tsallis entropy which involves the introduction of at least two constraints (Tsallis et al., 1998). The first one is the

  11. Effects of Oxides on Tensile and Charpy Impact Properties and Fracture Toughness in Heat Affected Zones of Oxide-Containing API X80 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Sohn, Seok Su; Shin, Sang Yong; Oh, Kyung Shik; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-06-01

    This study is concerned with effects of complex oxides on acicular ferrite (AF) formation, tensile and Charpy impact properties, and fracture toughness in heat affected zones (HAZs) of oxide-containing API X80 linepipe steels. Three steels were fabricated by adding Mg and O2 to form oxides, and various HAZ microstructures were obtained by conducting HAZ simulation tests under different heat inputs. The no. of oxides increased with increasing amount of Mg and O2, while the volume fraction of AF present in the steel HAZs increased with increasing the no. of oxides. The strengths of the HAZ specimens were generally higher than those of the base metals because of the formation of hard microstructures of bainitic ferrite and granular bainite. When the total Charpy absorbed energy was divided into the fracture initiation and propagation energies, the fracture initiation energy was maintained constant at about 75 J at room temperature, irrespective of volume fraction of AF. The fracture propagation energy rapidly increased from 75 to 150 J and saturated when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 30 pct. At 253 K (-20 °C), the total absorbed energy increased with increasing volume fraction of AF, as the cleavage fracture was changed to the ductile fracture when the volume fraction of AF exceeded 45 pct. Thus, 45 vol pct of AF at least was needed to improve the Charpy impact energy, which could be achieved by forming a no. of oxides. The fracture toughness increased with increasing the no. of oxides because of the increased volume fraction of AF formed around oxides. The fracture toughness did not show a visible correlation with the Charpy absorbed energy at room temperature, because toughness properties obtained from these two toughness testing methods had different significations in view of fracture mechanics.

  12. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  13. Characterization of Gas Transport Properties of Fractured Rocks By Borehole and Chamber Tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Shimaya, S.; Maejima, T.

    2014-12-01

    Gas transport characteristics of fractured rocks is a great concern to variety of engineering applications such as underground storage of LPG, nuclear waste disposal, CCS and gas flooding in the oil field. Besides absolute permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressure as a function of water saturation have direct influences to the results of two phase flow simulation. However, number of the reported gas flow tests for fractured rocks are limited, therefore, the applicability of the conventional two-phase flow functions used for porous media, such as Mualem-van Genuchten model, to prediction of the gas transport in the fractured rock mass are not well understood. The authors conducted the two types of in-situ tests, with different scales, a borehole gas-injection test and a chamber gas-injection test in fractured granitic rock. These tests were conducted in the Cretaceous granitic rocks at the Namikata underground LPG storage cavern construction site in Ehime Prefecture in Japan, preceding to the cavern scale gas-tightness test. A borehole injection test was conducted using vertical and sub-vertical boreholes drilled from the water injection tunnel nearly at the depth of the top of the cavern, EL-150m. A new type downhole gas injection equipment that is capable to create a small 'cavern' within a borehole was developed. After performing a series of preliminary tests to investigate the hydraulic conductivity and gas-tightness, i.e. threshold pressure, gas injection tests were conducted under different gas pressure. Fig.1 shows an example of the test results From a chamber test using a air pressurizing chamber with volume of approximately166m3, the gas-tightness was confirmed within the uncertainty of 22Pa under the storage pressure of 0.7MPa, however, significant air leakage occurred possibly through an open fracture intersecting the chamber just after cavern pressure exceeds the initial hydrostatic pressure at the ceiling level of the chamber. Anomalies

  14. Fracture Toughness, Mechanical Property, And Chemical Characterization Of A Critical Modification To The NASA SLS Solid Booster Internal Material System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pancoast, Justin; Garrett, William; Moe, Gulia

    2015-01-01

    A modified propellant-liner-insulation (PLI) bondline in the Space Launch System (SLS) solid rocket booster required characterization for flight certification. The chemical changes to the PLI bondline and the required additional processing have been correlated to mechanical responses of the materials across the bondline. Mechanical properties testing and analyses included fracture toughness, tensile, and shear tests. Chemical properties testing and analyses included Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cross-link density, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and wave dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF). The testing identified the presence of the expected new materials and found the functional bondline performance of the new PLI system was not significantly changed from the old system.

  15. Measuring single-nanoparticle wetting properties by freeze-fracture shadow-casting cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Lucio; Lucas, Falk; Wepf, Roger; Reimhult, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles at fluid interfaces are central to a rapidly increasing range of cutting-edge applications, including drug delivery, uptake through biological membranes, emulsion stabilization and the fabrication of nanocomposites. Understanding nanoscale wetting is a challenging issue, still unresolved for individual nanoparticles, and is essential in designing nanoparticle-building blocks with controlled surface properties. The core information about the structural and thermodynamic properties of particles at fluid interfaces is enclosed in the three-phase contact angle θ. Here we present a novel in situ method, on the basis of freeze-fracture shadow-casting cryo-scanning electron microscopy, that allows the measurement of contact angles of individual nanoparticles with 10 nm diameter, and thus greatly surpasses the current state of the art. We study hydrophilic and hydrophobic, organic and inorganic nanoparticles, demonstrating general applicability to systems of fundamental and applied nanotechnological interest. Significant heterogeneity in the wetting of nanoparticles is observed. PMID:21847112

  16. Fracture toughness and mechanical properties of C-Mn steels exposed to wet H{sub 2}S environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cayard, M.S.; Joia, C.J.B.; Bezerra, P.S.; Assun, F.C.R.

    1999-11-01

    C-Mn steel is heavily utilized in the oil and gas industry, primarily in upstream operations and downstream refining. Many of these vessels are exposed to wet hydrogen sulfide environments and as a consequence become damaged. Assessment of these damaged vessels is a key point for continued safe operations. This paper addresses several of the key material properties of C-Mn steels required to perform such assessments. Guidelines on the influence of welding, stress relief treatments, crack location and hydrogen charging on the mechanical properties and fracture toughness are detailed. Results showed elongation and reduction in area were greatly affected by hydrogen charging, however, yield and tensile strength were only mildly affected. Regarding toughness, the parent metal and heat affected regions of hydrogen charged material exhibited a factor of three decrease in toughness compared to baseline values, while the toughness of the weld metal remained relatively unchanged.

  17. Inferring Hydraulic and Fracture Properties of a Fracked Coal Seam Aquifer by Using GLUE Uncertainty Analysis using TOUGH2 reservoir simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willgoose, G. R.; Askarimarnani, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Coal seam gas (also called coal bed methane) is a form of natural gas that occurs in some coal seams. In the coal seam gas industry, hydraulic fracturing is performed to enhance the extraction of the gas from the coal seam. This paper presents flow simulation results for a fractured coal seam and its associate production well, and an investigation of the well piezometric head drawdown curves resulting from hydraulic pumping tests. The aim is to infer the hydraulic and fracture properties of the coal and associated well, such as length, width, conductivity of fractures, and the proportion of the water and gas contained in the coal seam. For this purpose the TOUGH2/EOS7C numerical simulator is applied. It is capable of modelling multiphase flow in fractured and porous system. The EOS7C is an "equation of state" module for TOUGH2 that is used to model the methane dissolved and free gas multiphase component. The Wingridder grid generator has been used to generate the 2D, 3D and MINCE (multiple interacting continua) grids for TOUGH2. The simulation results provide some constraints on hydraulic and fracture properties. However, there is still have significant uncertainty. In order to assess the uncertainty and increase our knowledge of the hydraulic properties, uncertainty analysis using the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE), which is a Monte-Carlo methodology, is applied. We will discuss how the Monte-Carlo uncertainty analyses is used to infer the properties of a hydraulically fractured well from pump test data. One major outcome of this work will be the development of a fast and routine method for assessing the post-development performance and safety of a production gas well, and to provide reassurance that the fracking that has actually occurred in the field is within design parameters.

  18. Inhibition of GSK-3β Rescues the Impairments in Bone Formation and Mechanical Properties Associated with Fracture Healing in Osteoblast Selective Connexin 43 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Alayna E.; Lloyd, Shane A. J.; Paul, Emmanuel M.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Donahue, Henry J.

    2013-01-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the most abundant gap junction protein in bone and is required for osteoblastic differentiation and bone homeostasis. During fracture healing, Cx43 is abundantly expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while Cx43 deficiency impairs bone formation and healing. In the present study we selectively deleted Cx43 in the osteoblastic lineage from immature osteoblasts through osteocytes and tested the hypothesis that Cx43 deficiency results in delayed osteoblastic differentiation and impaired restoration of biomechanical properties due to attenuated β-catenin expression relative to wild type littermates. Here we show that Cx43 deficiency results in alterations in the mineralization and remodeling phases of healing. In Cx43 deficient fractures the mineralization phase is marked by delayed expression of osteogenic genes. Additionally, the decrease in the RankL/ Opg ratio, osteoclast number and osteoclast size suggest decreased osteoclast bone resorption and remodeling. These changes in healing result in functional deficits as shown by a decrease in ultimate torque at failure. Consistent with these impairments in healing, β-catenin expression is attenuated in Cx43 deficient fractures at 14 and 21 days, while Sclerostin (Sost) expression, a negative regulator of bone formation is increased in Cx43cKO fractures at 21 days, as is GSK-3β, a key component of the β-catenin proteasomal degradation complex. Furthermore, we show that alterations in healing in Cx43 deficient fractures can be rescued by inhibiting GSK-3β activity using Lithium Chloride (LiCl). Treatment of Cx43 deficient mice with LiCl restores both normal bone formation and mechanical properties relative to LiCl treated WT fractures. This study suggests that Cx43 is a potential therapeutic target to enhance fracture healing and identifies a previously unknown role for Cx43 in regulating β-catenin expression and thus bone formation during fracture repair. PMID:24260576

  19. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  20. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, Volumes, and Physical-chemical Properties of Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightes, C. D.; Daiss, R.; Williams, L.; Singer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base fluid, proppant, and additives. Additives, comprised of one or more chemicals, are serve a specific engineering purpose (e.g., friction reducer, scale inhibitor, biocide). As part of the USEPA's Draft Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources, we investigated the different types, volumes injected, and physical-chemical properties of HF fluid chemicals. The USEPA identified 1,076 chemicals used in HF fluids, based on 10 sources covering chemical use from 2005 to 2013. These chemicals fall into different classes: acids, alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, bases, hydrocarbon mixtures, polysaccharides, and surfactants. The physical-chemical properties of these chemicals vary, which affects their movement through the environment if spilled. Properties range from fully miscible to insoluble, from highly hydrophobic to highly hydrophilic. Most of these chemicals are not volatile. HF fluid composition varies from site to site depending on a range of factors. No single chemical or set of chemicals are used at every site. A median of 14 chemicals are used per well, with a range of four to 28 (5th and 95th percentiles). Methanol was the chemical most commonly reported in FracFocus 1.0 (72% of disclosures), and hydrotreated light petroleum distillates and hydrochloric acid were both reported in over half the disclosures. Operators store chemicals on-site, often in multiple containers (typically in 760 to 1,500 L totes). We estimated that the total volume of all chemicals used per well ranges from approximately 10,000 to 110,000 L. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the USEPA.

  1. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  2. The effect of material properties and tooling design on deformation and fracture during equal channel angular extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Delo, D.P.; Shell, E.B.

    2000-05-11

    The effects of material constitutive behavior, tooling design, and friction conditions on metal flow, stress fields, and the tendency for tensile fracture during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) were established using a finite element modeling (FEM) technique. Three different material behaviors, typical of those encountered during cold and hot working, were investigated; these comprised (1) string hardening, (2) rigid, perfectly plastic, and (3) flow softening types of behavior. The tooling geometries consisted of a so-called simple design with no moving channel members and a complex design with a sliding bottom floor. The FEM results indicated that the most uniform flow was obtained during ECAE of a strain-hardening material having a low strain-rate sensitivity in tolling with a sharp inner corner (front leg) radius. The ECAE of materials with other constitutive behaviors or in tooling with a radiused front leg showed some degree of flow nonuniformity, even away from the head and tail of the extrusion. Tooling design and material properties were also predicted to have an important influence on the tensile stresses and hence tensile damage developed during ECAE. The FEM results were validated using visioplasticity and fracture observations for AISI 4340 steel and a near-gamma titanium aluminide alloy.

  3. The Derivation of Fault Volumetric Properties from 3D Trace Maps Using Outcrop Constrained Discrete Fracture Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgetts, David; Seers, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fault systems are important structural elements within many petroleum reservoirs, acting as potential conduits, baffles or barriers to hydrocarbon migration. Large, seismic-scale faults often serve as reservoir bounding seals, forming structural traps which have proved to be prolific plays in many petroleum provinces. Though inconspicuous within most seismic datasets, smaller subsidiary faults, commonly within the damage zones of parent structures, may also play an important role. These smaller faults typically form narrow, tabular low permeability zones which serve to compartmentalize the reservoir, negatively impacting upon hydrocarbon recovery. Though considerable improvements have been made in the visualization field to reservoir-scale fault systems with the advent of 3D seismic surveys, the occlusion of smaller scale faults in such datasets is a source of significant uncertainty during prospect evaluation. The limited capacity of conventional subsurface datasets to probe the spatial distribution of these smaller scale faults has given rise to a large number of outcrop based studies, allowing their intensity, connectivity and size distributions to be explored in detail. Whilst these studies have yielded an improved theoretical understanding of the style and distribution of sub-seismic scale faults, the ability to transform observations from outcrop to quantities that are relatable to reservoir volumes remains elusive. These issues arise from the fact that outcrops essentially offer a pseudo-3D window into the rock volume, making the extrapolation of surficial fault properties such as areal density (fracture length per unit area: P21), to equivalent volumetric measures (i.e. fracture area per unit volume: P32) applicable to fracture modelling extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate an approach which harnesses advances in the extraction of 3D trace maps from surface reconstructions using calibrated image sequences, in combination with a novel semi

  4. Processing and properties of ceramic nanocomposites designed for improved fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2005-11-01

    Nanocrystalline-matrix ceramic composites specifically designed for applications requiring improved fracture toughness were investigated. While the models and theory of toughening mechanisms for microcrystalline composites are well developed, the same cannot be said for their nanocrystalline counterparts. The mechanisms of ductile-phase toughening, fiber toughening, transformation toughening, and microcrack toughening have been fully investigated in microcrystalline-matrix ceramics. Both ductile-phase toughening and fiber toughening are theoretically viable as toughening mechanisms in nanocrystalline ceramics. The experimental demonstration of these mechanisms has been investigated through alumina-matrix nanocomposites with second phases of niobium (ductile-phase toughening) and carbon nanotubes (fiber toughening). The difficulty in producing fully consolidated ceramic composites that retain a nanocrystalline structure is the main hurdle to thorough investigations in this area. Thus, much of the research currently in the literature on so-called "nanocomposites" has been on materials with microcrystalline matrices and nanometric second phases. Using novel processing techniques, fully dense composites with nanocrystalline matrices were produced from commercially available starting powders. The consolidation technique, which allowed the retention of the nanocrystalline grain size, was spark plasma sintering (SPS). SPS is a moderate-pressure sintering method based on the theory of plasma momentarily generated in the gaps between powder materials by electrical discharge during DC pulsing. It has been proposed that the on--off DC pulse energizing method could generate (1) spark plasma, (2) spark impact pressure, (3) Joule heating, and (4) an electrical-field diffusion effect. SPS can rapidly consolidate powders to full density through the combined actions of rapid heating, applying pressure, and proposed powder surface cleaning. Al2O3-10 vol.% Nb ductile-phase toughened

  5. Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Growth and Fracture Properties of Cryogenic Model Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Forth, Scott C.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Kimmel, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The criteria used to prevent failure of wind-tunnel models and support hardware were revised as part of a project to enhance the capabilities of cryogenic wind tunnel testing at NASA Langley Research Center. Specifically, damage-tolerance fatigue life prediction methods are now required for critical components, and material selection criteria are more general and based on laboratory test data. The suitability of two candidate model alloys (AerMet 100 and C-250 steel) was investigated by obtaining the fatigue crack growth and fracture data required for a damage-tolerance fatigue life analysis. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the newly implemented damage tolerance analyses required of wind-tunnel model system components.

  6. An ORMOSIL-Containing Orthodontic Acrylic Resin with Concomitant Improvements in Antimicrobial and Fracture Toughness Properties

    PubMed Central

    Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Blizzard, John D.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances. PMID:22870322

  7. Anisotropic and heterogeneous mechanical properties of a stratified shale/limestone sequence at Nash Point, South Wales: A case study for hydraulic fracture propagation through a layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes Inskip, Nathaniel; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    While considerable effort has been expended on the study of fracture propagation in rocks in recent years, our understanding of how fractures propagate through layered sedimentary rocks with different mechanical and elastic properties remains poorly constrained. Yet this is a key issue controlling the propagation of both natural and anthropogenic hydraulic fractures in layered sequences. Here we report measurements of the contrasting mechanical and elastic properties of the Lower Lias at Nash Point, South Wales, which comprises an interbedded sequence of shale and limestone layers, and how those properties may influence fracture propagation. Elastic properties of both materials have been characterised via ultrasonic wave velocity measurements as a function of azimuth on samples cored both normal and parallel to bedding. The shale is highly anisotropic, with P-wave velocities varying from 2231 to 3890 m s-1, giving an anisotropy of ~55%. By contrast, the limestone is essentially isotropic, with a mean P-wave velocity of 5828 m s-1 and an anisotropy of ~2%. The dynamic Young's modulus of the shale, calculated from P- and S-wave velocity data, is also anisotropic with a value of 36 GPa parallel to bedding and 12 GPa normal to bedding. The modulus of the limestone is again isotropic with a value of 80 GPa. It follows that for a vertical fracture propagating (i.e. normal to bedding) the modulus contrast is 6.6. This is important because the contrast in elastic properties is a key factor in controlling whether fractures arrest, deflect, or propagate across interfaces between layers in a sequence. There are three principal mechanisms by which a fracture may deflect across or along an interface, namely: Cook-Gordon debonding, stress barrier, and elastic mismatch. Preliminary numerical modelling results (using a Finite Element Modelling software) of induced fractures at Nash Point suggest that all three are important. The results demonstrate a rotation of the maximum

  8. Evaluation of Wave Propagation Properties during a True-Triaxial Rock Fracture Experiment using Acoustic Emission Frequency Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Nasseri, M. B.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A true-triaxial deformation experiment was conducted to study the evolution of wave propagation properties by using frequency characteristics of AE waveforms to diagnose the state of fracturing in a sample of sandstone. Changes in waveform frequency content has been interpreted as either the generation of progressively larger fractures or the relative attenuation of high-frequency wave components as a result of micro-crack formation. A cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone was initially loaded to a stress state of σ1 = σ2 = 35 MPa, σ3 = 5 MPa at which point σ1¬ was increased until failure. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored by 18 PZT transducers, three embedded in each platen. The sensor amplitude response spectrum was determined by following an absolute source calibration procedure and showed a relatively constant sensitivity in the frequency range between 20 kHz and 1200 kHz. Amplified waveforms were continuously recorded at a sampling rate of 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution. Continuous acoustic emission waveforms were harvested to extract discrete events. Using a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model, 48,502 events were locatable inside the sample volume. Prior to peak-stress, AE activity was associated with stable quasi-static growth of fractures coplanar with σ1 and σ2 located near the platen boundaries. In the post peak-stress regime, fracture growth displays unstable ¬dynamic propagation. Analysis of waveform frequency characteristics was limited to the pre peak-stress regime. Analysis of AE frequency characteristics was conducted on all 48,502 located AE events; each event file containing 18 waveforms of varied quality. If the signal to noise ratio was greater than 5, the waveforms power spectrum was estimated and the source-receiver raypath vector was calculated. The power spectrum of each waveform was divided into three frequency bands (Low: 100 - 300 kHz, Medium: 300 - 600 kHz and High: 600 - 1000 kHz) and the power in each

  9. Structure, Mechanics and Flow Properties of Fractured Shale: Core-Scale Experimentation and In-situ Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalek, B. F.; Karpyn, Z.; Liu, S.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last several years, hydrocarbon exploitation and development in North America has been heavily centered on shale gas plays. However, the physical attributes of shales and their manifestation on transport properties and storage capacity remain poorly understood. Therefore, more experimentally based data are needed to fill the gaps in understanding both transport and storage of fluids in shale. The proposed work includes installation and testing of an experimental system which is capable of monitoring the dynamic evolution of shale core permeability under variable loading conditions and in coordination with X-ray microCT imaging. The goal of this study is to better understand and quantify fluid flow patterns and associated transport dynamics of fractured shale samples. The independent variables considered in this study are: mechanical loading and pore pressure. The mechanical response of shale core is captured for different loading paths. To best replicate the in-situ production scenario, the pore pressure is progressively depleted to mimic pressure decline. During the course of experimentation, permeability is estimated using the pulse-decay method under tri-axial stress boundary conditions. Simultaneously, X-ray microCT imaging is used with a tracer gas that is allowed to flow through the sample as an illuminating agent. In the presence of an illuminating agent, either Xenon or Krypton, the X-ray CT scanner can image fractures, global pathways and diffusional fronts in the matrix, as well as sorption sites that reflect heterogeneities in the sample and localized deformation. Anticipated results from these experiments will help quantify permeability evolution as a function of different loading conditions and pore pressure depletion. Also, the X-ray images will help visualize the change of flow patterns and the intensity of sorption as a function of mechanical loading and pore pressure.

  10. Subtask 12G3: Fracture properties of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.J.; Busch, D.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of simultaneous displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on the ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti specimens irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage under conditions relevant to fusion reactor operation. In the present DHCE, helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates ranging from {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in Li-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti, recently identified as the most promising vanadium-base alloy for fusion reactor use, was determined from multiple-bending tests (at -196{degrees}C to 50{degrees}C) and quantitative SEM fractography on TEM disks (0.3-mm thick) and broken tensile specimens (1.0-mm thick). No brittle behavior was observed at temperatures >-150{degrees}C, and predominantly brittle-cleavage fracture morphologies were observed only at -196{degrees}C in some specimens irradiated to 31 dpa at 425{degrees}C during DHCE. Ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) were -200{degrees}C to -175{degrees}C for both types of specimens. In strong contrast to tritium-trick experiments in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in the bend-tested specimens irradiated in the DHCE. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Mechanical properties of fractures from drillholes, UE25-NRG-4; USW-NRG-6; USW-NRG-7; USW-SD-9, at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.; Brown, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    Rock cores from drillholes UE25-NRG-4, USW-NRG-6, USW-NRG-7, and USW-SD-9 containing natural fractures were obtained from the Sample Management Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. All recoverable fractures were sheared at constant normal stresses from 2.5 to 15 MPa, in the as-received condition (air-dry). Detailed profilometer data were collected from each fracture surface before testing. The tests yielded the normal closure as a function of normal stress, and the shear stress and dilation as functions of shear offset. The constitutive properties obtained from these stress-displacement relations were: normal stiffness, shear stiffness, shear strength, and dilation angle at peak shear stress. Shear strength plotted against normal stress for four thermomechanical units shows that friction angle varies from 370 to 460 and cohesion varies from 0.02 to 1.71 MPa.

  12. Fracture Healing in Mice Lacking Pten in Osteoblasts: A Micro-Computed Tomography Image-Based Analysis of the Mechanical Properties of the Femur

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Caitlyn J.; Vivanco, Juan; Sokn, Scott; Williams, Bart O.; Burgers, Travis A.; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 8 million osseous fractures are reported annually, of which 5-10% fail to create a bony union. Osteoblast-specific deletion of the gene Pten in mice has been found to stimulate bone growth and accelerate fracture healing. Healing rates at four weeks increased in femurs from Pten osteoblast conditional knock-out mice (Pten-CKO) compared to wild-type mice (WT) of the same genetic strain as measured by an increase in mechanical stiffness and failure load in four-point bending tests. Preceding mechanical testing, each femur was imaged using a Skyscan 1172 micro-computed tomography (μCT) scanner (Skyscan, Kontich, Belgium). The present study used μCT image-based analysis to test the hypothesis that the increased femoral fracture force and stiffness in Pten-CKO were due to greater section properties with the same effective material properties as that of the WT. The second moment of area and section modulus were computed in ImageJ 1.46 (National Institutes of Health) and used to predict the effective flexural modulus and the stress at failure for fourteen pairs of intact and callus WT and twelve pairs of intact and callus Pten-CKO femurs. For callus and intact femurs, the failure stress and tissue mineral density of the Pten-CKO and WT were not different; however, the section properties of the Pten-CKO were more than twice as large 28 days post-fracture. It was therefore concluded, when the gene Pten was conditionally knocked-out in osteoblasts, the resulting increased bending stiffness and force to fracture were due to increased section properties. PMID:25498366

  13. Cotton fiber properties relative humidity and its effect on flat bundle strength elongation and fracture morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well known that cotton fibers readily exchange moisture content with their surrounding atmosphere. As moisture exchange progresses, several physical properties of the fiber are significantly affected. In this study, the effects of relative humidity (RH), a factor that affects the atmospheric m...

  14. Heterogeneity of hydrodynamic properties and groundwater circulation of a coastal andesitic volcanic aquifer controlled by tectonic induced faults and rock fracturing - Martinique island (Lesser Antilles - FWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittecoq, B.; Reninger, P. A.; Violette, S.; Martelet, G.; Dewandel, B.; Audru, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a multidisciplinary study to analyze the structure and the hydrogeological functioning of an andesitic coastal aquifer and to highlight the importance of faults and associated rock fracturing on groundwater flow. A helicopter-borne geophysical survey with an unprecedented resolution (SkyTEM) was flown over this aquifer in 2013. TDEM resistivity, total magnetic intensity, geological and hydrogeological data from 30 boreholes and two pumping tests were correlated, including one which lasted an exceptional 15 months. We demonstrate that heterogeneous hydrodynamic properties and channelized flows result from tectonically-controlled aquifer compartmentalization along the structural directions of successive tectonic phases. Significant fracturing of the central compartment results in enhanced hydrodynamic properties of the aquifer and an inverse relationship between electrical resistivity and transmissivity. Basalts within the fractured compartment have lower resistivity and higher permeability than basalts outside the compartment. Pumping tests demonstrate that the key factor is the hydraulic conductivity contrast between compartments rather than the hydrodynamic properties of the fault structure. In addition, compartmentalization and associated transmissivity contrasts protect the aquifer from seawater intrusion. Finally, unlike basaltic volcanic islands, the age of the volcanic formations is not the key factor that determines hydrodynamic properties of andesitic islands. Basalts that are several million years old (15 Ma here) have favorable hydrodynamic properties that are generated or maintained by earthquakes/faulting that result from active subduction beneath these islands, which is superimposed on their primary permeability.

  15. Relation between mass balance aperture and hydraulic properties from field experiments in fractured rock in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjerne, Calle; Nordqvist, Rune

    2014-09-01

    Results from tracer tests are often used to infer connectivity and transport properties in bedrock. However, the amount of site-specific data from tracer tests is often very limited, while data from hydraulic tests are more abundant. It is therefore of great interest for predictive transport modeling to use hydraulic data to infer transport properties. In this study, data from cross-hole tracer tests carried out in crystalline bedrock in Sweden were compiled and analysed. The tests were performed within investigations made by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) between 1978 and 2009 at five different locations. An empirical relationship between mass balance aperture and transmissivity was found and quantified by using 74 observations. The empirical relationship deviates considerably from the cubic law aperture, as mass balance aperture is found to be at least one order of magnitude larger than cubic law aperture. Hence, usage of cubic law aperture, derived from hydraulic testing, for transport predictions is unsuitable, as the advective transport time will be considerably underestimated. Another result, from the data set studied, is that mass balance aperture appears to correlate better to apparent storativity than to transmissivity.

  16. Inference of Fractured Rock Transport Properties by Joint Inversion of Push-Pull and Single-Hole Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, A.; Linde, N.; Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.

    2015-12-01

    Flow and transport characterization of fractured rock formations is very challenging and important for a multitude of applications that include groundwater extraction, nuclear waste storage and geothermal energy production. One popular hydrogeological method to study fractured rock is a push-pull test, in which injection and retrieval of a tracer is made at the same depth interval in a borehole. In theory, push-pull tests are not sensitive to changes in the heterogeneity of the tracer flow path since the retrieval at the injection location minimizes advective effects and makes the test more sensitive to time-dependent transport processes. This assumption is limiting in the presence of a natural hydraulic gradient or if non-neutrally buoyant tracers are used, but these limitations can be reduced by monitoring push-pull tests with ground penetrating radar (GPR). We present a methodology for combined modeling and inversion of a series of push-pull tests that we monitored with the single hole ground penetrating radar (GPR) method. For the GPR modeling we use a newly developed approach to simulate the GPR response in fractured rock. We coupled the GPR model to a flow-and-transport simulator that we use to define the electrical properties of the fracture filling. The combined model can cope with heterogeneous fractures of any orientation, aperture and size and allows for the effect of density driven flow (that is strong during the saline tracer tests). We use the combined simulator to create synthetic datasets for both the time-series of the GPR traces at different locations and the tracer breakthrough curves. Since the combined problem is highly non-linear and the inverse solution is ill-posed, we use stochastic inversion techniques to obtain probabilistic estimates of the parameters of interest (fracture length, orientation and aperture distribution) and assess the use of different measures to compare the simulated and experimental data.

  17. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide by thermal induced fracturing of the hydrates.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, Shahram; Van Opdenbosch, Daniel; Fey, Tobias; Koch, Marcus; Kraus, Tobias; Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Zollfrank, Cordt

    2016-01-01

    The oxides of the transition metal molybdenum exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties. We present the preparation of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO3 × 2H2O) by an acidification method and demonstrate the thermal phase development and morphological evolution during and after calcination from 25 °C to 600 °C. The thermal dehydration of the material was found to proceed in two steps. Microbiological roll-on tests using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed and exceptional antimicrobial activities were determined for anhydrous samples with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and a large specific surface area. The increase in the specific surface area is due to crack formation and to the loss of the hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. The results support the proposed antimicrobial mechanism for transition metal oxides, which based on a local acidity increase as a consequence of the augmented specific surface area. PMID:26478404

  18. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies in Unnotched Specimens of Rubber-PMMA Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shiyun; Bandyopadhyay, Sri

    2007-10-01

    Correlations between mechanical properties and microscopic features were investigated using unnotched specimens of rubber-PMMA composites in very low to medium range of cross head speeds. It is found that: (1) a trapezoid-shaped smooth region and fish scale-like texture with bands in rough region correlates with brittle failure in pure PMMA, while a quarter circle-shaped smooth region and hackle-like texture, and the presence of dimples and/or voids correlate with ductile failure in rubber-PMMA composites; (2) decrease in degree of roughness in rubber-PMMA composites can be correlated with decrease in Young’s modulus; (3) decrease in size of the smooth region with increasing speed can be correlated with decrease in modulus of toughness; (4) larger smooth region in rubber-PMMA composites containing more rubber correlates with higher modulus of toughness.

  19. Method of evaluating subsurface fracturing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, M.Y.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a method of determining parameters of a subsurface operation fracturing an earth formation, comprising: fracturing the formation with a fracturing fluid; determining a first pressure decline value representative of the observed pressure decline of the fractured formation over a time interval. The first pressure decline value functionally related to the properties of the fracturing fluid during the fracturing of the formation; determining a second pressure decline value representative of the pressure decline which should have been observed if the fracturing fluid was incompressible; and determining the parameters of the fracturing operation in response to the pressure decline value.

  20. Fracture Property of Y-Shaped Cracks of Brittle Materials under Compression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zheming; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the properties of Y-shaped cracks of brittle materials under compression, compression tests by using square cement mortar specimens with Y-shaped crack were conducted. A true triaxial loading device was applied in the tests, and the major principle stresses or the critical stresses were measured. The results show that as the branch angle θ between the branch crack and the stem crack is 75°, the cracked specimen has the lowest strength. In order to explain the test results, numerical models of Y-shaped cracks by using ABAQUS code were established, and the J-integral method was applied in calculating crack tip stress intensity factor (SIF). The results show that when the branch angle θ increases, the SIF KI of the branch crack increases from negative to positive and the absolute value KII of the branch crack first increases, and as θ is 50°, it is the maximum, and then it decreases. Finally, in order to further investigate the stress distribution around Y-shaped cracks, photoelastic tests were conducted, and the test results generally agree with the compressive test results. PMID:25013846

  1. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Reconstruction of sub-wavelength fractures and physical properties of masonry media using full-waveform inversion of proximal penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, Claudio; Lambot, Sébastien; Mahmoudzadeh, M. R.; Minet, Julien; Slob, Evert

    2011-05-01

    High-frequency, ultra-wideband penetrating radar has the potential to be used as a non-invasive inspection technique for buildings, providing high-resolution images of structures and possible fractures affecting constructions. To test this possibility, numerical and laboratory experiments have been conducted using a proximal, stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar system operating in zero-offset mode, spanning the 3-8 GHz frequency range. The reconstruction of the material electrical properties is achieved by resorting to full-waveform inverse modeling. Numerical experiments showed that for typical electric permittivity and electrical conductivity values of concrete and plaster, it is possible to retrieve the physical properties of the material and to detect fractures less than 1 mm thick. Laboratory experiments were conducted on non-reinforced concrete and plaster test slabs in different configurations. The results showed the good potential of this method: (1) to provide a thorough fracture response model in buildings or artworks and (2) to non-invasively characterize the samples in terms of their electromagnetic properties.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  4. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  5. Phenomenological and mechanics aspects of nondestructive evaluation and characterization by sound and ultrasound of material and fracture properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S. W.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in fracture mechanics and elastic wave theory enhance the understanding of many physical phenomena in a mathematical context. Available literature in the material, and fracture characterization by NDT, and the related mathematical methods in mechanics that provide fundamental underlying principles for its interpretation and evaluation are reviewed. Information on the energy release mechanism of defects and the interaction of microstructures within the material is basic in the formulation of the mechanics problems that supply guidance for nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  6. Earth-Tide Derived Aquifer Properties in Fractured Granite: Results from a Groundwater Monitoring Well Network in the Peninsular Ranges Batholith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, J. L.; Quinlan, P. T.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fractured rock aquifers are difficult to characterize because of the three dimensional spatial heterogeneity of the fracture networks. Aquifer properties cannot be determined from a single borehole and traditional aquifer tests are difficult to design and analyze without prior knowledge of the subsurface permeability distribution. Using passive monitoring of the water level responses to tidal strains in wells allows for characterization of the aquifer over greater spatial extent and can be used to guide the design and implementation of aquifer tests. In this study, the water level response to tidal strains measured in over 20 groundwater wells, spaced irregularly over an approximately 48 km2 area, was used to estimate the specific storage and transmissivity of the surrounding granite aquifer. The water level data were corrected to remove barometric pressure effects before the amplitude and phase shifts for the O1 and M2 components of the tidal potential were calculated. Systematic differences in the calculated aquifer characteristics were observed. The differences correlate with the density of fractures observed in borehole geophysical logs. The aquifer properties derived from the earth-tide analysis were compared to those derived from aquifer tests conducted at two of the wells analyzed. The two methods yielded similar results.

  7. Elbow Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and held together with pins and wires or plates and screws. Fractures of the distal humerus (see ... doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are stable. SIGNS ...

  8. Suspensions in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.N.

    1996-12-31

    Suspensions or slurries are widely used in well stimulation and hydraulic fracturing processes to enhance the production of oil and gas from the underground hydrocarbon-bearing formation. The success of these processes depends significantly upon having a thorough understanding of the behavior of suspensions used. Therefore, the characterization of suspensions under realistic conditions, for their rheological and hydraulic properties, is very important. This chapter deals with the state-of-the-art hydraulic fracturing suspension technology. Specifically it deals with various types of suspensions used in well stimulation and fracturing processes, their rheological characterization and hydraulic properties, behavior of suspensions in horizontal wells, review of proppant settling velocity and proppant transport in the fracture, and presently available measurement techniques for suspensions and their merits. Future industry needs for better understanding of the complex behavior of suspensions are also addressed. 74 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Characterisation of the mechanical and fracture properties of a uni-weave carbon fibre/epoxy non-crimp fabric composite

    PubMed Central

    Bru, Thomas; Hellström, Peter; Gutkin, Renaud; Ramantani, Dimitra; Peterson, Göran

    2016-01-01

    A complete database of the mechanical properties of an epoxy polymer reinforced with uni-weave carbon fibre non-crimp fabric (NCF) is established. In-plane and through-the-thickness tests were performed on unidirectional laminates under normal loading and shear loading. The response under cyclic shear loading was also measured. The material has been characterised in terms of stiffness, strength, and failure features for the different loading cases. The critical energy release rates associated with different failure modes in the material were measured from interlaminar and translaminar fracture toughness tests. The stress–strain data of the tensile, compressive, and shear test specimens are included. The load–deflection data for all fracture toughness tests are also included. The database can be used in the development and validation of analytical and numerical models of fibre reinforced plastics (FRPs), in particular FRPs with NCF reinforcements. PMID:26958626

  10. Characterisation of the mechanical and fracture properties of a uni-weave carbon fibre/epoxy non-crimp fabric composite.

    PubMed

    Bru, Thomas; Hellström, Peter; Gutkin, Renaud; Ramantani, Dimitra; Peterson, Göran

    2016-03-01

    A complete database of the mechanical properties of an epoxy polymer reinforced with uni-weave carbon fibre non-crimp fabric (NCF) is established. In-plane and through-the-thickness tests were performed on unidirectional laminates under normal loading and shear loading. The response under cyclic shear loading was also measured. The material has been characterised in terms of stiffness, strength, and failure features for the different loading cases. The critical energy release rates associated with different failure modes in the material were measured from interlaminar and translaminar fracture toughness tests. The stress-strain data of the tensile, compressive, and shear test specimens are included. The load-deflection data for all fracture toughness tests are also included. The database can be used in the development and validation of analytical and numerical models of fibre reinforced plastics (FRPs), in particular FRPs with NCF reinforcements. PMID:26958626

  11. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of soft magnetic Nd2Co17 micron flakes fractured along c crystal plane with natural resonance frequency exceeding 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbo; Wang, Peng; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Planar anisotropy Nd2Co17 flakes fractured along c crystal plane were fabricated by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling technique. The magnetic flakes have a diameter range of 5-20 μm and a typical thickness of approximately 120 nm. The frequency dependence of complex permeability of Nd2Co17 epoxy resin composite has been investigated in the frequency range of 0.1-18 GHz. The measurement results show that the natural resonance frequency reaches 12.5 GHz while the initial permeability survives up to 2.26. The superior high frequency properties come from the large out-of-plane anisotropy field and the flake structure fractured along the c crystal plane of Nd2Co17. The planar anisotropic Nd2Co17 flakes have significant potential applications in the high-frequency devices working in the frequency beyond 10 GHz.

  12. Olecranon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Tyler J; Throckmorton, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Olecranon fractures are common upper extremity injuries, with all but nondisplaced fractures treated surgically. There has been a recent shift in the surgical management of these fractures from tension band wiring to locking plate fixation and intramedullary nailing; however, this comes with increased implant cost. Although most patients can expect good outcomes after these various techniques, there is little information to guide a surgeon's treatment plan. This article reviews the epidemiology, classification, treatment, and outcomes of olecranon fractures. PMID:26498547

  13. Dynamic fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Yang, K.-H.; Kang, B. S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relations of Homalite-100, polycarbonate, hardened 4340 steel and reaction bonded silicon nitride are reviewed and discrepancies with published data and their probable causes are discussed. Data scatter in published data are attributed in part to the observed fluctuations in crack velocities. The results reaffirmed our previous conclusion that the dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relation is specimen dependent and that the dynamic arrest stress intensity factor is not a unique material property.

  14. Structure-Property-Fracture Mechanism Correlation in Heat-Affected Zone of X100 Ferrite-Bainite Pipeline Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueda; Ma, Xiaoping; Subramanian, S. V.; Misra, R. D. K.; Shang, Chengjia

    2015-03-01

    Structural performance of a weld joint primarily depends on the microstructural characteristics of heat-affected zone (HAZ). In this regard, the HAZ in X100 ferrite-bainite pipeline steel was studied by separating the HAZ into intercritically reheated coarse-grained (ICCG) HAZ containing and non-containing regions. These two regions were individually evaluated for Charpy impact toughness and characterized by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). Low toughness of ~50 J was obtained when the notch of impact specimen encountered ICCGHAZ and high toughness of ~180 J when the notch did not contain ICCGHAZ. Fracture surface was ~60 pct brittle in the absence of ICCGHAZ, and 95 pct brittle (excluding shear lip) in the presence of ICCGHAZ in the impact tested samples. The underlying reason is the microstructure of ICCGHAZ consisted of granular bainite and upper bainite with necklace-type martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent along grain boundaries. The presence of necklace-type M-A constituent notably increases the susceptibility of cleavage microcrack nucleation. ICCGHAZ was found to be both the initiation site of the whole fracture and cleavage facet initiation site during brittle fracture propagation stage. Furthermore, the study of secondary microcracks beneath CGHAZ and ICCGHAZ through EBSD suggested that the fracture mechanism changes from nucleation-controlled in CGHAZ to propagation-controlled in ICCGHAZ because of the presence of necklace-type M-A constituent in ICCGHAZ. Both fracture mechanisms contribute to the poor toughness of the sample contained ICCGHAZ.

  15. Sports fractures.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, T. A.; Stevens, M. A.; Albright, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Fractures occur in athletes and dramatically influence performance during competitive and recreational activities. Fractures occur in athletes as the result of repetitive stress, acute sports-related trauma and trauma outside of athletics. The literature provides general guidelines for treatment as well as a variety of statistics on the epidemiology of fractures by sport and level of participation. Athletes are healthy and motivated patients, and have high expectations regarding their level of function. These qualities make them good surgical candidates. Although closed treatment methods are appropriate for most sports fractures, an aggressive approach to more complicated fractures employing current techniques may optimize their subsequent performance. PMID:7719781

  16. Anisotropy in Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of an Oxide Dispersion Fe20Cr5Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.

    2014-08-01

    Anisotropy of fracture toughness and fracture behavior of Fe20Cr5Al oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy has been investigated by means of compression tests, hardness tests, and wedge splitting test. The results show a small effect of the compression direction on yield strength (YS) and strain hardening. The YS is minimum for longitudinal direction and maximum for the tangential direction. The transverse plastic strain ratio is similar for tangential and longitudinal directions but very different from that in normal direction. Hardness depends on the indentation plane; it is lower for any plane parallel to the L-T plane and of similar magnitude for the other orthogonal planes, i.e., the L-S and T-S planes. Macroscopically, two failure modes have been observed after wedge-splitting tests, those of LS and TS specimens in which fracture deviates along one or two branches normal to the notch plane, and those of LT, TL, SL, and ST specimens in which fracture propagates along the notch plane. Besides LT and TL specimens present delaminations parallel to L-T plane. Both, the fracture surface of branching cracks and that of the delaminations, show an intergranular brittle fracture appearance. It is proposed that the main cause of the delamination and crack branching is the alignment in the mesoscopic scale of the ultrafine grains structure which is enhanced by the <110>-texture of the material and by the presence in the grain boundaries of both yttria dispersoids and impurity contaminations. An elastoplastic finite element analysis was performed to study what stress state is the cause of the branches and delaminations. It is concluded that the normal to the crack branches and/or the shear stress components could determine the crack bifurcation mechanism, whereas the delamination it seems that it is controlled by the magnitude of the stress component normal to the delamination plane.

  17. A metallographic study of porosity and fracture behavior in relation to the tensile properties in 319.2 end chill castings

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, A.M.; Samuel, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    A metallographic study of the porosity and fracture behavior in unidirectionally solidified end chill castings of 319.2 aluminum alloy (Al-6.2 pct Si-3.8 pct Cu-0.5 pct Fe-0.14 pct Mn-0.06 pct Mg-0.073 pct Ti) was carried out using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their relationship with the tensile properties. The parameters varied in the production of these castings were the hydrogen ({approximately}0.1 and {approximately}0.37 mL/100 g Al), modifier (0 and 300 ppm Sr), and grain refiner (0 and 0.03 wt pct Ti) concentrations, as well as the solidification time, which increased with decreasing distance from the end chill bottom of the casting, giving dendrite arm spacings (DASs) ranging from {approximately}15 to {approximately}95 {micro}m. Image analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were employed for quantification of porosity/microstructural constituents and fracture surface analysis (phase identification), respectively. The results showed that the local solidification time (viz. DAS) significantly influences the ductility at low hydrogen levels; at higher levels, however, hydrogen has a more pronounced effect (porosity related) on the drop in ductility. Porosity is mainly observed in the form of elongated pores along the grain boundaries, with Sr increasing the porosity volume percent and grain refining increasing the probability for pore branching. The beneficial effect of Sr modification, however, improves the alloy ductility. Fracture of the Si, {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi, {alpha}-Al{sub 15}(Fe,Mn){sub 3}Si{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}Cu phases takes place within the phase particles rather than at the particle/Al matrix interface. Sensitivity of tensile properties to DAS allows for the use of the latter as an indicator of the expected properties of the alloy.

  18. Mechanical properties of heterophase polymer blends of cryogenically fractured soy flour composite filler and poly(styrene-butadiene)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reinforcement effect of cryogenically fractured soy Flour composite filler in soft polymer was investigated in this study. Polymer composites were prepared by melt-mixing polymer and soy flour composite fillers in an internal mixer. Soy flour composite fillers were prepared by blending aqueous dis...

  19. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, volumes, and physical-chemical properties of chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base flui...

  20. Transport of radon gas into a tunnel at Yucca Mountain—estimating large-scale fractured tuff hydraulic properties and implications for the operation of the ventilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, André; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2004-06-01

    Radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a tunnel (the Exploratory Studies Facility—ESF) at Yucca Mountain to ensure worker safety. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured tuffs. This objective was examined by developing a numerical model, based upon the characteristics of the ESF and the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) tuff unit, capable of predicting radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation conditions. The model was used to address two specific issues. First, it was used to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractures in the TSw at the length scale of the ESF and extending tens of meters into the TSw, which surrounds the ESF. Second, the model was used to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations exceeding a specified level within the ESF. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the ESF is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations being propagated down the ESF along with ventilated air flow and the slight suction induced by the ventilation exhaust fans at the South Portal of the ESF. These pressure fluctuations are dampened in the TSw fracture continuum according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the ESF drops rapidly, formation gases from the TSw are pulled into the ESF, resulting in an increase in radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentrations measured in the ESF and gas-phase pressure fluctuations in the TSw yielded concurrent estimates of TSw fracture permeability and porosity of 1×10 -11 m 2 and 0.00034, respectively. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the current ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability of radon gas concentrations exceeding a specified level.

  1. Transport of radon gas into a tunnel at Yucca Mountain--estimating large-scale fractured tuff hydraulic properties and implications for the operation of the ventilation system.

    PubMed

    Unger, André; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2004-06-01

    Radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a tunnel (the Exploratory Studies Facility-ESF) at Yucca Mountain to ensure worker safety. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured tuffs. This objective was examined by developing a numerical model, based upon the characteristics of the ESF and the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) tuff unit, capable of predicting radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation conditions. The model was used to address two specific issues. First, it was used to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractures in the TSw at the length scale of the ESF and extending tens of meters into the TSw, which surrounds the ESF. Second, the model was used to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations exceeding a specified level within the ESF. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the ESF is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations being propagated down the ESF along with ventilated air flow and the slight suction induced by the ventilation exhaust fans at the South Portal of the ESF. These pressure fluctuations are dampened in the TSw fracture continuum according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the ESF drops rapidly, formation gases from the TSw are pulled into the ESF, resulting in an increase in radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentrations measured in the ESF and gas-phase pressure fluctuations in the TSw yielded concurrent estimates of TSw fracture permeability and porosity of 1 x 10(-11) m2 and 0.00034, respectively. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the current ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability of radon gas concentrations exceeding a specified level. PMID:15134873

  2. Transport of Radon Gas into a Tunnel at Yucca Mountain-Estimating Large-Scale Fractured Tuff Hydraulic Properties and Implications for the Operation of the Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect

    A. Unger; S. Finsterle; G. Bodvarsson

    2003-06-06

    Radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a tunnel (the Exploratory Studies Facility-ESF) at Yucca Mountain to ensure worker safety. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured tuffs. This objective was examined by developing a numerical model, based upon the characteristics of the ESF and the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) tuff unit, capable of predicting radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation conditions. The model was used to address two specific issues. First, it was used to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractures in the TSw at the length scale of the ESF and extending tens of meters into the TSw, which surrounds the ESF. Second, the model was used to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations exceeding a specified level within the ESF. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the ESF is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations being propagated down the ESF along with ventilated air flow and the slight suction induced by the ventilation exhaust fans at the South Portal of the ESF. These pressure fluctuations are dampened in the TSw fracture continuum according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the ESF drops rapidly, formation gases from the TSw are pulled into the ESF, resulting in an increase in radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentrations measured in the ESF and gas-phase pressure fluctuations in the TSw yielded concurrent estimates of TSw fracture permeability and porosity of l x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2} and 0.00034, respectively. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the current ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability of radon gas concentrations exceeding a specified level.

  3. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behaviors of the As-Extruded Mg-5Al-3Ca Alloys Containing Yttrium at Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeon-Taek; Kim, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Seong-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Effects of yttrium (Y) addition on mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the as-extruded Mg-Al-Ca based alloys at elevated temperature were investigated by a tensile test. After hot extrusion, the average grain size was refined by Y addition and eutectic phases were broken down into fine particles. Y addition to Mg-5Al-3Ca based alloy resulted in the improvement of strength and ductility at elevated temperature due to fine grain and suppression of grain growth by formation of thermally stable Al2Y intermetallic compound. PMID:27433675

  4. Effect of Interfacial Microstructure Evolution on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Al-Cu Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, P.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2015-07-01

    The interfacial microstructure evolution of Al-Cu joints during friction stir welding and post-welding annealing and its influence on the tensile strength and the fracture behavior were investigated in detail. An obvious interface including three sub-layers of α-Al, Al2Cu, and Al4Cu9 intermetallic compound (IMC) layers is generated in the as-FSW joint. With the development of annealing process, the α-Al layer disappeared and a new IMC layer of AlCu formed between initial two IMC layers of Al2Cu and Al4Cu9. The growth rate of IMC layers was diffusion controlled before the formation of Kirkendall voids, with activation energy of 117 kJ/mol. When the total thickness of IMC layers was less than the critical value of 2.5 μm, the FSW joints fractured at the heat-affected zone of Al side with a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of ~100 MPa. When the thickness of IMC layers exceeded 2.5 μm, the joints fractured at the interface. For relatively thin IMC layer, the joints exhibited a slightly decreased UTS of ~90 MPa and an inter-granular fracture mode with crack propagating mainly between the Al2Cu and AlCu IMC layers. However, when the IMC layer was very thick, crack propagated in the whole IMC layers and the fracture exhibited trans-granular mode with a greatly decreased UTS of 50-60 MPa.

  5. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - discharge

  6. A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kazumasa; Yongkoo, Seol

    2003-04-09

    Water fluxes in unsaturated, fractured rock involve the physical processes occurring at fracture-matrix interfaces within fracture networks. Modeling these water fluxes using a discrete fracture network model is a complicated effort. Existing preprocessors for TOUGH2 are not suitable to generate grids for fracture networks with various orientations and inclinations. There are several 3-D discrete-fracture-network simulators for flow and transport, but most of them do not capture fracture-matrix interaction. We have developed a new 3-D discrete-fracture-network mesh generator, FRACMESH, to provide TOUGH2 with information about the fracture network configuration and fracture-matrix interactions. FRACMESH transforms a discrete fracture network into a 3 dimensional uniform mesh, in which fractures are considered as elements with unique rock material properties and connected to surrounding matrix elements. Using FRACMESH, individual fractures may have uniform or random aperture distributions to consider heterogeneity. Fracture element volumes and interfacial areas are calculated from fracture geometry within individual elements. By using FRACMESH and TOUGH2, fractures with various inclinations and orientations, and fracture-matrix interaction, can be incorporated. In this paper, results of flow and transport simulations in a fractured rock block utilizing FRACMESH are presented.

  7. Experimental study of step-displacement hydraulic fracturing on naturally fractured shale outcrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wan; Jin, Yan; Chen, Mian

    2015-08-01

    Low porosity and permeability make it extremely difficult to develop shale oil and gas reservoirs. The stimulated reservoir volume is believed to have potential to obtain industry production by multi-stage or simultaneous fracturing in horizontal wells. The formation mechanism of network hydraulic fractures in fractured shale reservoirs remains poorly understood. In this article, a true tri-axial hydraulic fracturing system associated acoustic emission monitor was deployed to simulate hydraulic fracturing on shale outcrops. Results showed that the properties of natural fractures (such as aperture, orientation), compared to the viscosity and displacement of the fracturing fluid, affect the propagation direction of hydraulic fractures more predominantly. Each natural fracture in a natural fracture network can independently affect the hydraulic fracture. Low displacement (below the diffusion ability of a reservoir) fracturing tends to connect pre-existing fractures, while high displacement (surpass the diffusion ability of a reservoir) tends to create new fractures. After the breakdown pressure, an increase in injection rate results in more acoustic emission energy and induces new fractures. These results suggest that step-displacement fracturing technology is a possible mechanism to obtain effective fracture networks. Such an understanding would help to avoid unproductive, or sometimes destructive, costly segments of the hydraulic fracturing treatment design.

  8. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    pressure measurements between an obturated borehole and the tunnel is conducted to monitor the possible modifications of the transport properties of the EDZ due to hydraulical and/or mechanical sollicitations of the nearby Roselend reservoir lake. As radon level is controlled by emanation and transport path through the medium. The observed bursts of radon should be due to changes of the radon transport properties (Trique et al. 1999) of the EDZ. A correlation between the differential pressure variations and radon bursts is clearly observed. Radon bursts seem to be related to overpressure events that take place in the instrumented borehole. Which external sollicitations, hydraulical or mechanical, or both, induce such a behaviour? References Bossart, P., Meier, P. M., Moeri, A., Trick, T., and J.-C. Mayor (2002). Geological and hydraulic characterisation of the excavation disturbed zone in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Engineering Geology, 66, 19-38. Dezayes, C., and T. Villemin (2002). Etat de la fracturation dans la galerie CEA de Roselend et analyse de la déformation cassante dans le massif du Méraillet, technical report, Lab. de Geodyn. de Chaisnes Alp., Univ. de Savoie, Savoie, France. Jakubick, A. T., and T. Franz (1993). Vacuum testing of the permeability of the excavation damaged zone, Rock Mech. Rock Engng., 26(2), 165-182. Patriarche, D., Pili, E., Adler, P. M., and J.-F. Thovert (2007). Stereological analysis of fractures in the Roselend tunnel and permeability determination, Water Resour. Res., 43, W09421. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Sabroux, J.-C., Trique, M., Ferry, C., Voisin, V., and E. Pili (2004). Spatial and time variations of radon-222 concentration in the atmosphere of a dead-end horizontal tunnel, J. Environ. Radioact., 78, 179-198. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Pili, E., and J.-C. Sabroux (2009). Detectability and significance of the 12hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide

  9. An evaluation of the fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness properties of beryllium-copper alloy CDA172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Henkener, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests, using the Be-Cu alloy CDA172 in the round rod product form, was conducted in a lab air environment at room temperature. Tensile data is presented in both the L and C directions and K sub Ic data in both the C-R and C-L orientations. Fracture toughness values were derived from M(T) (center cracked), PS(T) (surface cracked) and CC01 (corner cracked) specimens of varying thickness. Fatigue crack growth data were obtained for the C-R orientation at stress ratio of 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 and for the C-L orientation at stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7.

  10. Effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact and interlaminar fracture properties of textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Suresh K.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and mode I and mode II fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates. Uniweave resin-transfer-molded 48 ply graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) laminates were stitched with Kevlar and glass yarns of different linear densities and stitch spacings. Delaminations were implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed to determine the effects of stitching on the compressive strength. The results showed outstanding improvements of up to 400 percent in the compression strength over the unstitched laminates. In impact and static indentation tests the onset of damage occurred at the same level, but the extent of damage was less in stitched laminates. Mode I fracture toughness of 24 ply Uniweave unidirectional (AS4/3501-6) stitched laminates was measured by conducting double-cantilever-beam tests. The critical strain energy release rate (G(sub Ic)) was found to be up to 30 times higher than the unstitched laminates. Mode II fracture toughness of the Uniweave laminates was measured by performing end-notched-flexure tests. Two new methods to compute the apparent G(sub IIc) are presented. The apparent G(sub IIc) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates.

  11. Diminished Cartilage Creep Properties and Increased Trabecular Bone Density Following a Single, Sub-Fracture Impact of the Rabbit Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Joseph; Zaegel, Melissa A.; Martinez, Mario D.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to articular cartilage can lead to post-traumatic arthritis. We used a custom pendulum device to deliver a single, near-fracture impact to the medial femoral condyles of rabbits. Impact was localized to a region ~3 mm in diameter, and impact stress averaged ~100 MPa. Animals were euthanized at 0, 1 and 6 months after impact. Cartilage mechanical properties from impacted and sham knees were evaluated by creep-indentation testing and periarticular trabecular bone was evaluated by microCT and histomorphometry. Impact caused immediate and statistically significant loss of cartilage thickness (-40% vs. sham) and led to a greater than two-fold increase in creep strain. From 0 to 6 months after impact, the ability of cartilage to recover from creep deformation became significantly impaired (percent recovery different from control at 1 and 6 months). At 1 month, there was a 33% increase in the trabecular bone volume fraction of the epiphysis beneath the site of impact compared to control, and increased bone formation was observed histologically. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that a single, high-energy impact below the fracture threshold leads to acute deleterious changes in the viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage that worsen with time, while at the same time stimulating increased bone formation beneath the impact site. PMID:20225288

  12. Fracture Networks in Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vevatne, Jonas; Rimstad, Eivind; Hansen, Alex; Korsnes, Reinert; Hope, Sigmund

    2014-04-01

    Fracturing and refreezing of sea ice in the Kara sea are investigated using complex networkanalysis. By going to the dual network, where the fractures are nodes and their intersectionslinks, we gain access to topological features which are easy to measure and hence comparewith modeled networks. Resulting network reveal statistical properties of the fracturing process.The dual networks have a broad degree distribution, with a scale-free tail, high clusteringand efficiency. The degree-degree correlation profile shows disassortative behavior, indicatingpreferential growth. This implies that long, dominating fractures appear earlier than shorterfractures, and that the short fractures which are created later tend to connect to the longfractures.The knowledge of the fracturing process is used to construct growing fracture network (GFN)model which provides insight into the generation of fracture networks. The GFN model isprimarily based on the observation that fractures in sea ice are likely to end when hitting existingfractures. Based on an investigation of which fractures survive over time, a simple model forrefreezing is also added to the GFN model, and the model is analyzed and compared to the realnetworks.

  13. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L.; McEvilly, T.V. |; Morrison, H.F. |

    1990-01-01

    One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Fracture technology for brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    1988-01-01

    Ceramics materials have the potential for use in high-temperature, fuel-efficient engines. However, because these materials are brittle, their fracture characteristics must be well documented prior to their application. Thus Lewis is working to understand the fracture and strength properties of brittle ceramic and ceramic matrix materials. An understanding of fracture properties aids both designers who are attempting to design high-temperature structures and materials scientists who seek to design more temperature-resistant materials. Both analytical and experimental approaches to fracture analysis are being taken. Methods for testing fracture toughness, crack growth resistance, and strength are being developed. The failure mechanisms at both room and elevated temperatures are also being investigated. Such investigations aid materials scientists in developing better high-temperature materials. Of concern is the anisotropy of ceramic materials and the experimental verification of ceramic design codes that will allow brittle material behavior to be accurately predicted at high temperature.

  15. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering--Poroelastic linear-slip interface model for heterogeneous fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2009-06-15

    Schoenberg's Linear-slip Interface (LSI) model for single, compliant, viscoelastic fractures has been extended to poroelastic fractures for predicting seismic wave scattering. However, this extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we proposed a variant of the LSI model considering the heterogeneity in the in-plane fracture properties. This modified model considers wave-induced, fracture-parallel fluid flow induced by passing seismic waves. The research discussed in this paper applies this new LSI model to heterogeneous fractures to examine when and how the permeability of a fracture is reflected in the scattering of seismic waves. From numerical simulations, we conclude that the heterogeneity in the fracture properties is essential for the scattering of seismic waves to be sensitive to the permeability of a fracture.

  16. Growth Kinematics of Opening-Mode Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Alzayer, Y.; Laubach, S.; Fall, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fracture aperture is a primary control on flow in fractured reservoirs of low matrix permeability including unconventional oil and gas reservoirs and most geothermal systems. Guided by principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, fracture aperture is generally assumed to be a linear function of fracture length and elastic material properties. Natural opening-mode fractures with significant preserved aperture are observed in core and outcrop indicative of fracture opening strain accommodated by permanent solution-precipitation creep. Fracture opening may thus be decoupled from length growth if the material effectively weakens after initial elastic fracture growth by either non-elastic deformation processes or changes in elastic properties. To investigate the kinematics of fracture length and aperture growth, we reconstructed the opening history of three opening-mode fractures that are bridged by crack-seal quartz cement in Travis Peak Sandstone of the SFOT-1 well, East Texas. Similar crack-seal cement bridges had been interpreted to form by repeated incremental fracture opening and subsequent precipitation of quartz cement. We imaged crack-seal cement textures for bridges sampled at varying distance from the tips using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence, and determined the number and thickness of crack-seal cement increments as a function of position along the fracture length and height. Observed trends in increment number and thickness are consistent with an initial stage of fast fracture propagation relative to aperture growth, followed by a stage of slow propagation and pronounced aperture growth. Consistent with fluid inclusion observations indicative of fracture opening and propagation occurring over 30-40 m.y., we interpret the second phase of pronounced aperture growth to result from fracture opening strain accommodated by solution-precipitation creep and concurrent slow, possibly subcritical, fracture propagation. Similar deformation

  17. Effect of strain rate on shear properties and fracture characteristics of DP600 and AA5182-O sheet metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmaan, Taamjeed; Butcher, Cliff; Abedini, Armin; Worswick, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Shear tests were performed at strain rates ranging from quasi-static (.01 s-1) to 600 s-1 for DP600 steel and AA5182-O sheet metal alloys at room temperature. A miniature sized shear specimen was modified and validated in this work to perform high strain rate shear testing. Digital image correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to measure the strains in the experiments, and a criterion to detect the onset of fracture based on the hardening rate of the materials is proposed. At equivalent strains greater than 20%, the DP600 and AA5182 alloys demonstrated a reduced work hardening rate at elevated strain rates. At lower strains, the DP600 shows positive rate sensitivity while the AA5182 was not sensitive to strain rate. For both alloys, the equivalent fracture strain and elongation to failure decreased with strain rate. A conversion of the shear stress to an equivalent stress using the von Mises yield criterion provided excellent agreement with the results from tensile tests at elevated strain rates. Unlike the tensile test, the shear test is not limited by the onset of necking so the equivalent stress can be determined over a larger range of strain.

  18. The influence of Mg on creep properties and fracture behaviors of Mar-M247 superalloy under 1255 K/200 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bor, H.Y.; Chao, C.G.; Ma, C.Y.

    2000-05-01

    The effects of Mg microadditions on the high-temperature/low stress (1,255 K/200 MPa) creep properties and fracture behavior of a Mar-M247 supralloy were investigated in this study. The results of quantitative statistical analyses showed that when Mg microadditions up to 50 ppm were made, the MC carbides located at grain boundaries (designated GB MC) were significantly refined and spheroidized and the number of MC carbides decreased. In addition, the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides present on GBs dramatically increased with increasing Mg contents up to 50 ppm, and the creep resistance was enhanced under the test condition of 1,255 K/200 MPa. However, the creep performance of a Mar-M247 superalloy containing 80 ppm Mg deteriorated due to the formation of an extremely large amount of MC carbide and a decrease in the number of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at GBs. The cracks mainly initiated and propagated along GBs in both the Mg-free and Mg-containing Mar-M247 superalloys under 1,255 K/200 MPa, and the final rupture was caused by intergranular fracture. Under the present creep condition, the optimal Mg microaddition to a Mar-M247 superalloy should be 30 to 50 ppm.

  19. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  20. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  1. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-12-08

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  2. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-06-08

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  3. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  4. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  5. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  6. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  7. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  8. Microearthquake Fracture Properties and Fluid-Driven Lubrication Processes Along a Complex Normal Fault System in Southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orefice, Antonella; Zollo, Aldo; Convertito, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    We analyzed the P- and S-wave displacement spectra of 700 microearthquakes in the moment range 4×109 - 2×1014 Nm and recorded at the dense, wide-dynamic range, seismic networks operating in southern Apennines (Italy). Source parameters are estimated by a parametric modeling approach which is combined with a multi-step, non-linear inversion strategy. In the analyzed frequency range (0.4-50 Hz), statistical tests show that the constant-Q, attenuation model has to preferred to frequency dependent Q-models, both for P- and S-waves. Consistent estimates of the attenuation parameter t*=T/Q are obtained from the spectral decay of small earthquakes below the corner frequency and from the inversion of displacement spectra of relatively larger magnitude events. A crustal QS higher than Qp and a Qs/Qp greater than 1 is found in the same depth range where high Vp/Vs and a peak in seismicity distribution are observed. This is the evidence for a highly fractured, partially fluid-saturated medium embedding the Irpinia fault zone, down to crustal depths of 15-20 km. A nearly constant stress drop (8.3 MPa) and apparent stress (3.1 MPa) scaling of P- and S-corner frequencies and seismic energies is observed above a seismic moment value of about 1011 Nm. Below this value the corner frequencies and seismic energy are not measurable, due to the instrument band-limitation and noise effect at high frequencies. The ratio between apparent stress and static stress drop (Savage-Wood seismic efficiency) is relatively high (0.5), indicating that the radiated energy is a very large fraction of the sum of energies spent by friction and fracture development. It remains approximately constant over about four orders of magnitude, indicating that apparent stress and static stress drop co-varies, independently on the fracture size, at least in the explored magnitude range. Seismic efficiency appears to be higher in the same depth range where high Vp/Vs and Qs/Qp values are also observed. This

  9. Ambient and elevated temperature fracture and cyclic-fatigue properties in a series of Al-containing silicon carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Rong

    2004-08-30

    A series of in situ toughened, Al, B and C containing, silicon carbide ceramics (ABC-SiC) has been examined with Al contents varying from 3 to 7 wt%. With increasing Al additions, the grain morphology in the as-processed microstructures varied from elongated to bimodal to equiaxed, with a change in the nature of the grain-boundary film from amorphous to partially crystalline to fully crystalline. Fracture toughness and cyclic fatigue tests on these microstructures revealed that although the 7 wt.% Al containing material (7ABC) was extremely brittle, the 3 and particularly 5 wt.% Al materials (3ABC and 5ABC, respectively) displayed excellent crack-growth resistance at both ambient (25 C) and elevated (1300 C) temperatures. Indeed, no evidence of creep damage, in the form of grain-boundary cavitation, was seen at temperatures at 1300 C or below. The enhanced toughness of the higher Al-containing materials was associated with extensive crack bridging from both interlocking grains (in 3ABC) and uncracked ligaments (in 5ABC); in contrast, the 7ABC SiC showed no such bridging, concomitant with a marked reduction in the volume fraction of elongated grains. Mechanistically, cyclic fatigue-crack growth in 3ABC and 5ABC SiC involved the progressive degradation of such bridging ligaments in the crack wake, with the difference in the degree of elastic vs. frictional bridging affecting the slope, i.e., Paris law exponent, of the crack-growth curve. In addition an investigation of fracture resistance in non-transforming ceramics toughened by grain bridging mechanism is presented using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). Linear superposition theorems are used for the superposition of crack opening displacements, as well as stress intensity factors, resulting from the external tractions and the internal compressive bridging stresses. Specifically weight functions are used to relate the CODs, stress intensity factors, and tractions and the bridging stress. Expressions are

  10. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...