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Sample records for 12s-lipoxygenase protein associates

  1. 12S-lipoxygenase protein associates with {alpha}-actin fibers in human umbilical artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisinger, Gary . E-mail: gary_w@tasmc.health.gov.il; Limor, Rona; Marcus-Perlman, Yonit; Knoll, Esther; Kohen, Fortune; Schinder, Vera; Firer, Michael; Stern, Naftali

    2007-05-11

    The current study sets out to characterize the intracellular localization of the platelet-type 12S-lipoxygenase (12-LO), an enzyme involved in angiotensin-II induced signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Immunohistochemical analysis of VSMC in vitro or human umbilical arteries in vivo showed a clear cytoplasmic localization. On immunogold electron microscopy, 12-LO was found primarily associated with cytoplasmic VSMC muscle fibrils. Upon angiotensin-II treatment of cultured VSMC, immunoprecipitated 12-LO was found bound to {alpha}-actin, a component of the cytoplasmic myofilaments. 12-LO/{alpha}-actin binding was blocked by VSMC pretreatment with the 12-LO inhibitors, baicalien or esculetine and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, the binding of 12-LO to {alpha}-actin was not associated with 12-LO serine or tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest a previously unrecognized angiotensin-II dependent protein interaction in VSMC through which 12-LO protein may be trafficked, for yet undiscovered purposes towards the much more abundantly expressed cytoskeletal protein {alpha}-actin.

  2. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for longer times. The appearance of three distinct RET states suggested a spatially heterogeneous surface – with areas of high protein density (i.e. strongly-interacting clusters) coexisting with mobile monomers. Distinct association states exhibited characteristic behavior, i.e. partial-RET (monomer-monomer) associations were shorter-lived than complete-RET (protein-cluster) associations. While the fractional surface area covered by regions with high protein density (i.e. clusters) increased with increasing concentration, the distribution of contact times between monomers and clusters was independent of solution concentration, suggesting that associations were a local phenomenon, and independent of the global surface coverage. PMID:24274729

  3. Designed protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Treiber, Nora; Ziegler, Mathias O P; Koetter, Jochen W A; Schulze, Monika-Sarah; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-11

    The analysis of natural contact interfaces between protein subunits and between proteins has disclosed some general rules governing their association. We have applied these rules to produce a number of novel assemblies, demonstrating that a given protein can be engineered to form contacts at various points of its surface. Symmetry plays an important role because it defines the multiplicity of a designed contact and therefore the number of required mutations. Some of the proteins needed only a single side-chain alteration in order to associate to a higher-order complex. The mobility of the buried side chains has to be taken into account. Four assemblies have been structurally elucidated. Comparisons between the designed contacts and the results will provide useful guidelines for the development of future architectures. PMID:18187656

  4. Microtubules, Tubulins and Associated Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raxworthy, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews much of what is known about microtubules, which are biopolymers consisting predominantly of subunits of the globular protein, tubulin. Describes the functions of microtubules, their structure and assembly, microtube associated proteins, and microtubule-disrupting agents. (TW)

  5. A Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Jason M.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Sharp, Julia L.; White, Amanda M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.

    2008-07-01

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein pull-down LC-MS assay experiments. BEPro3 is open source software that runs on both Windows XP and Mac OS 10.4 or newer versions, and is freely available from http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/BEPro3.

  6. Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-05-28

    The Bayesian Estimator of Protein-Protein Association Probabilities (BEPro3) is a software tool for estimating probabilities of protein-protein association between bait and prey protein pairs using data from multiple-bait, multiple-replicate, protein LC-MS/MS affinity isolation experiments. BEPro3 is public domain software, has been tested on Windows XP and version 10.4 or newer of the Mac OS 10.4, and is freely available. A user guide, example dataset with analysis and additional documentation are included with the BEPro3 download.

  7. DAPD: A Knowledgebase for Diabetes Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Krishnasamy; Jayakumararaj, Ramaraj; Karthikeyan, Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in genomics and proteomics provide a solid foundation for understanding the pathogenesis of diabetes. Proteomics of diabetes associated pathways help to identify the most potent target for the management of diabetes. The relevant datasets are scattered in various prominent sources which takes much time to select the therapeutic target for the clinical management of diabetes. However, additional information about target proteins is needed for validation. This lacuna may be resolved by linking diabetes associated genes, pathways and proteins and it will provide a strong base for the treatment and planning management strategies of diabetes. Thus, a web source "Diabetes Associated Proteins Database (DAPD)" has been developed to link the diabetes associated genes, pathways and proteins using PHP, MySQL. The current version of DAPD has been built with proteins associated with different types of diabetes. In addition, DAPD has been linked to external sources to gain the access to more participatory proteins and their pathway network. DAPD will reduce the time and it is expected to pave the way for the discovery of novel anti-diabetic leads using computational drug designing for diabetes management. DAPD is open accessed via following url www.mkarthikeyan.bioinfoau.org/dapd. PMID:26357271

  8. Targeted knock-down of a structurally atypical zebrafish 12S-lipoxygenase leads to severe impairment of embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Ulrike; Raschperger, Elisabeth; Hamberg, Mats; Samuelsson, Bengt; Tryggvason, Karl; Haeggström, Jesper Z.

    2011-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LO) are a class of dioxygenases, which form hydroperoxy, hydroxy, and epoxy derivatives of arachidonic acid with distinct positional and stereochemical configurations. In man, there are two known types of 12-LO that are distinguished by their expression patterns and catalytic properties. The platelet 12S-LO plays a role in platelet aggregation and 12R-LO seems to be important for normal skin function. Using BLAST searches of the zebrafish (zf) genome we identified one candidate zf12-LO gene with 43% identity with human 12R-LO at the mRNA level and the deduced primary sequence carried the so called “Coffa” structural determinant (Gly residue) for R stereoselectivity of LOs. However, incubations of recombinant, purified, zf12-LO with arachidonic acid revealed exclusive formation of 12(S)-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid. Further studies with immunohistochemistry showed prominent expression of zf12-LO in the cell nuclei of skin epithelium, the epithelial lining of the stomodeum, and the pharyngeal pouches in zf embryos. To probe its function, zf12-LO was subjected to targeted knock-down in zf embryos, resulting in the development of a severe phenotype, characterized by abnormal development of the brain, the eyes, and the tail as well as pericardial and yolk sac edema. Hence, we have identified a unique vertebrate 12S-LO that breaks the current structure-function paradigms for S and R stereo-specificity and with critical roles in normal embryonic development. PMID:22143766

  9. Tracking Membrane Protein Association in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reffay, Myriam; Gambin, Yann; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Phan, Gilles; Taulier, Nicolas; Ducruix, Arnaud; Hodges, Robert S.; Urbach, Wladimir

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue. We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well. After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 Å, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the bilayers. We

  10. Multifunctional Microtubule-Associated Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Krtková, Jana; Benáková, Martina; Schwarzerová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are involved in key processes in plant cells, including cell division, growth and development. MT-interacting proteins modulate MT dynamics and organization, mediating functional and structural interaction of MTs with other cell structures. In addition to conventional microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in plants, there are many other MT-binding proteins whose primary function is not related to the regulation of MTs. This review focuses on enzymes, chaperones, or proteins primarily involved in other processes that also bind to MTs. The MT-binding activity of these multifunctional MAPs is often performed only under specific environmental or physiological conditions, or they bind to MTs only as components of a larger MT-binding protein complex. The involvement of multifunctional MAPs in these interactions may underlie physiological and morphogenetic events, e.g., under specific environmental or developmental conditions. Uncovering MT-binding activity of these proteins, although challenging, may contribute to understanding of the novel functions of the MT cytoskeleton in plant biological processes. PMID:27148302

  11. Adaptable Lipid Matrix Promotes Protein-Protein Association in Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Polyansky, Anton A; Fleck, Markus; Volynsky, Pavel E; Efremov, Roman G

    2015-09-01

    The cell membrane is "stuffed" with proteins, whose transmembrane (TM) helical domains spontaneously associate to form functionally active complexes. For a number of membrane receptors, a modulation of TM domains' oligomerization has been shown to contribute to the development of severe pathological states, thus calling for detailed studies of the atomistic aspects of the process. Despite considerable progress achieved so far, several crucial questions still remain: How do the helices recognize each other in the membrane? What is the driving force of their association? Here, we assess the dimerization free energy of TM helices along with a careful consideration of the interplay between the structure and dynamics of protein and lipids using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in the hydrated lipid bilayer for three different model systems - TM fragments of glycophorin A, polyalanine and polyleucine peptides. We observe that the membrane driven association of TM helices exhibits a prominent entropic character, which depends on the peptide sequence. Thus, a single TM peptide of a given composition induces strong and characteristic perturbations in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which may facilitate the initial "communication" between TM helices even at the distances of 20-30 Å. Upon tight helix-helix association, the immobilized lipids accommodate near the peripheral surfaces of the dimer, thus disturbing the packing of the surrounding. The dimerization free energy of the modeled peptides corresponds to the strength of their interactions with lipids inside the membrane being the lowest for glycophorin A and similarly higher for both homopolymers. We propose that the ability to accommodate lipid tails determines the dimerization strength of TM peptides and that the lipid matrix directly governs their association. PMID:26575933

  12. Protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated protein via bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are essential biological reactions occurring at inter- and intra-cellular levels. The analysis of their mechanism is generally required in order link to understand their various cellular functions. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), which is based on an enzymatic activity of luciferase, is a useful tool for investigating protein-protein interactions in live cells. The combination of the BRET system and biomolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) would provide us a better understanding of the hetero-oligomeric structural states of protein complexes. In this review, we discuss the application of BRET to the protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated proteins and discuss its physiological relevance. PMID:27493852

  13. Lipid droplets and associated proteins in sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marlon R

    2016-01-15

    Mammalian skin is characterized by the presence of sebaceous glands (SGs), which develop with the hair follicle and whose predominant cell type is the sebocyte. Sebocytes are epithelial cells that progressively accumulate lipids and eventually release their content (sebum) by holocrine secretion as cells disrupt. In addition to thermoregulatory and pheromonal actions, numerous additional functions have been demonstrated or postulated for sebum, including antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The SG has also been involved in the pathogenesis of skin diseases as acne vulgaris and some forms of alopecia. Although lipid accumulation culminating in cell disruption and content release is the hallmark of sebocyte differentiation, only a surprisingly low number of studies have so far focused on sebocyte lipid droplets and their associated proteins. PMID:26571075

  14. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region – the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure–function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models’ overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs. PMID:24523717

  15. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region - the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure-function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models' overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs. PMID:24523717

  16. A marginal band-associated protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The marginal band of nucleated erythrocytes is a microtubule organelle under rigorous quantitative and spatial control, with properties quite different from those of the microtubule organelles of cultured cells. Previous results suggest that proteins other than tubulin may participate in organizing the marginal band, and may interact with elements of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton in addition to microtubules. To identify such species, we raised mAbs against the proteins that assemble from chicken brain homogenates with tubulin. One such antibody binds to a single protein in chicken erythrocytes, and produces an immunofluorescence pattern colocalizing with marginal band microtubules. Several properties of this protein are identical to those of ezrin, a protein isolated from brush border and localized to motile elements of cultured cells. A significant proportion of the antigen is not soluble in erythrocytes, as determined by extraction with nonionic detergent. This cytoskeleton-associated fraction is unaffected by treatments that solubilize the marginal band microtubules. The protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins. In the accompanying manuscript (Goslin, K., E. Birgbauer, G. Banker, and F. Solomon. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:1621-1631), we show that the same antibody recognizes a component of growth cones with a similar dual nature. In early embryonic red blood cells, the antigen is dispersed throughout the cell and does not colocalize with assembled tubulin. Its confinement to the marginal band during development follows rather than precedes that of microtubules. These results, along with previous work, suggest models for the formation of the marginal band. PMID:2677023

  17. Shedding Light on Selenium Biomineralization: Proteins Associated with Bionanominerals ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Markus; Kolvenbach, Boris; Gygax, Benjamin; Moes, Suzette; Corvini, Philippe F. X.

    2011-01-01

    Selenium-reducing microorganisms produce elemental selenium nanoparticles with particular physicochemical properties due to an associated organic fraction. This study identified high-affinity proteins associated with such bionanominerals and with nonbiogenic elemental selenium. Proteins with an anticipated functional role in selenium reduction, such as a metalloid reductase, were found to be associated with nanoparticles formed by one selenium respirer, Sulfurospirillum barnesii. PMID:21602371

  18. Expression of two membrane fusion proteins, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, I; Burkart, A; Szmydynger-Chodobska, J; Dodd, K A; Trimble, W S; Miller, K V; Shim, M; Chodobski, A

    2003-01-01

    In addition to being the major site of cerebrospinal fluid formation, the choroid plexus epithelium emerges as an important source of polypeptides in the brain. Physiologically regulated release of some polypeptides synthesized by the choroid plexus has been shown. The molecular mechanisms underlying this polypeptide secretion have not been characterized, however. In the present study, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, two membrane fusion proteins playing a critical role in exocytosis in neurons and endocrine cells, were found to be expressed in the choroid plexus epithelium. It was also shown that in choroidal epithelium, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein stably interact. Two members of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, were expressed in the rat choroid plexus at the messenger RNA and protein level. However, their newly discovered isoforms, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1b and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2b, produced by alternative RNA splicing, were not detected in choroidal tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vesicle-associated membrane protein is confined to the cytoplasm of choroidal epithelium, whereas synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa is associated with plasma membranes, albeit with a varied cellular distribution among species studied. Specifically, in the rat choroid plexus, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was localized to the basolateral membrane domain of choroidal epithelium and was expressed in small groups of cells. In comparison, in ovine and human choroidal tissues, apical staining for synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was found in the majority of epithelial cells. These species-related differences in cellular synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa distribution suggested that the synaptosome-associated protein of

  19. Neurodegenerative diseases and widespread aggregation are associated with supersaturated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ciryam, Prajwal; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Morimoto, Richard I.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Summary The maintenance of protein solubility is a fundamental aspect of protein homeostasis, as aggregation is associated with cytotoxicity and a variety of human diseases. Numerous proteins unrelated in sequence and structure, however, can misfold and aggregate, and widespread aggregation can occur in living systems under stress or ageing. A crucial question in this context is why only certain proteins aggregate in vivo while others do not. We identify here the proteins most vulnerable to aggregation as those whose cellular concentrations are high relative to their solubilities. These supersaturated proteins represent a metastable sub-proteome involved in pathological aggregation during stress and ageing, and are overrepresented in biochemical processes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Consequently, such cellular processes become dysfunctional when the ability to keep intrinsically supersaturated proteins soluble is compromised. Thus, the simultaneous analysis of abundance and solubility can rationalize the diverse cellular pathologies linked to neurodegenerative diseases and aging. PMID:24183671

  20. 48-Kilodalton intermediate-filament-associated protein in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Basset, E M; Kalnins, V I; Subrahmanyan, L; Ahmed, I; Fedoroff, S

    1988-01-01

    We provide evidence that a protein of 48 kilodaltons (KD), recognized by a normal rabbit serum (F2N), is associated with intermediate filaments (IF) of astrocytes both in cell cultures and in situ. Immunofluorescence staining shows that the F2N serum gives a fibrous staining pattern similar to that seen with anti-serum to glial filament protein (GFP), a protein specific for IF of astrocytes, and that both proteins are present in the perinuclear fibrous aggregates of IF produced by treating the cells with colchicine. At the ultrastructural level the gold particles decorating the 48-KD protein are localized in clusters along the IF, whereas the gold particles decorating the GFP are localized on the IF in a linear pattern. This difference in distribution and the fact that the two proteins have different electrophoretic mobilities on SDS gels indicates that the 48-KD protein although associated with IF is different from GFP. The 48-KD protein appears to be a distinct, developmentally regulated intermediate-filament-associated protein (IFAP), different from other IFAPs reported to date and the first IFAP described in astrocytes. Its appearance in late developmental stages when motile astroblasts are changing into nonmotile stellate cells suggests that the 48-KD protein may be involved in cross-linking the GFP-containing IF to provide more tensile strength to the cytoplasm at the expense of flexibility. PMID:2449542

  1. Proteins associated with human parainfluenza virus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Jambou, R C; Elango, N; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The polypeptides associated with human parainfluenza virus type 3 were identified. Five proteins were present in detergent- and salt-resistant viral cores. Of these, three proteins designated NP0, NP1, and NP2 of 68,000, 58,000, and 52,000 daltons, respectively, were stably associated with 50S RNA in CsCl gradient-purified nucleocapsids. The amounts of NP1 and NP2 were variable, and these proteins were shown to be structurally related to the major nucleocapsid protein (NP0) by partial Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease mapping. The other core proteins included a 240K protein designated L (candidate for the viral polymerase) and an 84K protein designated as the phosphoprotein (P) on the basis of a predominant incorporation of Pi. The viral envelope had four prominent proteins (72, 53, 40, and 12K) under reducing conditions of electrophoresis. The 72 and 53K proteins were specifically labeled with [3H]glucosamine and [3H]mannose. When sulfhydryl reagents were removed, a new 62K protein was visualized in place of the 72, 53, and 12K proteins. The 53 and 12K proteins were interpreted to be the two subunits (F1 and F2) of the fusion protein, and the 72K protein was designated as the HN (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase) glycoprotein. The unglycosylated 40K protein represented the viral matrix protein (M). Immunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates with rabbit hyperimmune antiserum against purified virus confirmed the viral origin of these polypeptides. Images PMID:2993658

  2. Programming Molecular Association and Viscoelastic Behavior in Protein Networks.

    PubMed

    Dooling, Lawrence J; Buck, Maren E; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Tirrell, David A

    2016-06-01

    A set of recombinant artificial proteins that can be cross-linked, by either covalent bonds or association of helical domains or both, is described. The designed proteins can be used to construct molecular networks in which the mechanism of crosslinking determines the time-dependent responses to mechanical deformation. PMID:27061171

  3. Expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 by reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Geisert, E E; Johnson, H G; Binder, L I

    1990-01-01

    After an injury to the central nervous system, a dramatic change in the astrocytes bordering the wound occurs. The most characteristic feature of this process, termed reactive gliosis, is the upregulation of the intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the present study, we show that reactive astrocytes express high levels of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), a protein normally found in the somatodendritic compartment of neurons. When sections of injured brain are double-stained with antibodies directed against MAP-2 and glial fibrillary protein, all of the reactive astrocytes are found to contain MAP-2. The high levels of this protein appear to represent a permanent change in reactive astrocytes. In parallel quantitative studies, an elevated level of MAP-2 in the injured brain is confirmed by an immunoblot analysis of injured and normal white matter. This report demonstrates the direct involvement of a microtubule protein in the process of reactive gliosis. Images PMID:1692628

  4. BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehus, Aaron A; Anderson, Ruthellen H; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    A- and B-type lamins support the nuclear envelope, contribute to heterochromatin organization, and regulate a myriad of nuclear processes. The mechanisms by which lamins function in different cell types and the mechanisms by which lamin mutations cause over a dozen human diseases (laminopathies) remain unclear. The identification of proteins associated with lamins is likely to provide fundamental insight into these mechanisms. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a unique and powerful method for identifying protein-protein and proximity-based interactions in living cells. BioID utilizes a mutant biotin ligase from bacteria that is fused to a protein of interest (bait). When expressed in living cells and stimulated with excess biotin, this BioID-fusion protein promiscuously biotinylates directly interacting and vicinal endogenous proteins. Following biotin-affinity capture, the biotinylated proteins can be identified using mass spectrometry. BioID thus enables screening for physiologically relevant protein associations that occur over time in living cells. BioID is applicable to insoluble proteins such as lamins that are often refractory to study by other methods and can identify weak and/or transient interactions. We discuss the use of BioID to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provide detailed protocols to guide new applications. PMID:26778550

  5. Identification of a Novel Inhibitory Actin-capping Protein Binding Motif in CD2-associated Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Serawit; Huber, Tobias B.; Ingham, Robert J.; Kim, Kyoungtae; Niederstrasser, Hanspeter; Allen, Paul M.; Pawson, Tony; Cooper, John A.; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2008-01-01

    CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) is a scaffold molecule that plays a critical role in the maintenance of the kidney filtration barrier. Little, however, is understood about its mechanism of function. We used mass spectrometry to identify CD2AP-interacting proteins. Many of the proteins that we identified suggest a role for CD2AP in endocytosis and actin regulation. To address the role of CD2AP in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, we focused on characterizing the interaction of CD2AP with actin-capping protein CP. We identified a novel binding motif LXHXTXXRPK(X)6P present in CD2AP that is also found in its homolog Cin85 and other capping protein-associated proteins such as CARMIL and CKIP-1. CD2AP inhibits the function of capping protein in vitro. Therefore, our results support a role of CD2AP in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:16707503

  6. Low protein silage associated with rumen impaction in suckler cows.

    PubMed

    2016-04-23

    Rumen impaction associated with low protein diets in a suckler cowCampylobacteriosis in suckler cowsPlant toxicity in ewesListerial encephalitis in ewes ITALIC! Chorioptes bovis-associated infertility in ramsThese are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for January 2016 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:27103691

  7. Cullin Family Proteins and Tumorigenesis: Genetic Association and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Sui, Jie; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Caiguo

    2015-01-01

    Cullin family proteins function as scaffolds to form numerous E3 ubiquitin ligases with RING proteins, adaptor proteins and substrate recognition receptors. These E3 ligases further recognize numerous substrates to participate in a variety of cellular processes, such as DNA damage and repair, cell death and cell cycle progression. Clinically, cullin-associated E3 ligases have been identified to involve numerous human diseases, especially with regard to multiple cancer types. Over the past few years, our understanding of cullin proteins and their functions in genome stability and tumorigenesis has expanded enormously. Herein, this review briefly provides current perspectives on cullin protein functions, and mainly summarizes and discusses molecular mechanisms of cullin proteins in tumorigenesis. PMID:25663940

  8. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchetti, S.; Digiacomo, L.; Pozzi, D.; Peruzzi, G.; Micarelli, E.; Mahmoudi, M.; Caracciolo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells.In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a ``protein corona'' layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø ~ 100-250 nm) and surface

  9. The Cdc48 machine in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Dieter H; Stolz, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The AAA-type ATPase Cdc48 (named p97/VCP in mammals) is a molecular machine in all eukaryotic cells that transforms ATP hydrolysis into mechanic power to unfold and pull proteins against physical forces, which make up a protein's structure and hold it in place. From the many cellular processes, Cdc48 is involved in, its function in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) is understood best. This quality control process for proteins of the secretory pathway scans protein folding and discovers misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the organelle, destined for folding of these proteins and their further delivery to their site of action. Misfolded lumenal and membrane proteins of the ER are detected by chaperones and lectins and retro-translocated out of the ER for degradation. Here the Cdc48 machinery, recruited to the ER membrane, takes over. After polyubiquitylation of the protein substrate, Cdc48 together with its dimeric co-factor complex Ufd1-Npl4 pulls the misfolded protein out and away from the ER membrane and delivers it to down-stream components for degradation by a cytosolic proteinase machine, the proteasome. The known details of the Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 motor complex triggered process are subject of this review article. PMID:21945179

  10. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  11. Urease-associated heat shock protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D J; Evans, D G; Engstrand, L; Graham, D Y

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori urease is an extracellular, cell-bound enzyme with a molecular weight of approximately 600,000 (600K enzyme) comprising six 66K and six 31K subunits. A 62K protein is closely associated with the H. pylori urease, both in crude preparations and after gel filtration; this protein can be removed from the urease by ion-exchange chromatography without inactivating the enzyme. We purified this urease-associated protein and determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence. The sequence is 80% homologous (identical plus conserved amino acid residues) to the Escherichia coli GroEL heat shock protein (HSP), 75% homologous to the human homolog, and 84% homologous to the HSP homolog found in species of Chlamydia. Thus, the 62K urease-associated protein of H. pylori belongs to the HSP60 family of stress proteins known as chaperonins. Evidently this protein, HSP62, participates in the extracellular assembly and/or protection of the urease against inactivation in the hostile environment of the stomach. Images PMID:1348725

  12. Analysis of alpha-synuclein-associated proteins by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Gu, Guangyu; Goodlett, David R; Zhang, Terry; Pan, Catherine; Montine, Thomas J; Montine, Kathleen S; Aebersold, Ruedi H; Zhang, Jing

    2004-09-10

    To identify the proteins associated with soluble alpha-synuclein (AS) that might promote AS aggregation, a key event leading to neurodegeneration, we quantitatively compared protein profiles of AS-associated protein complexes in MES cells exposed to rotenone, a pesticide that produces parkinsonism in animals and induces Lewy body (LB)-like inclusions in the remaining dopaminergic neurons, and to vehicle. We identified more than 250 proteins associated with Nonidet P-40 soluble AS, and demonstrated that at least 51 of these proteins displayed significant differences in their relative abundance in AS complexes under conditions where rotenone was cytotoxic and induced formation of cytoplasmic inclusions immunoreactive to anti-AS. Overexpressing one of these proteins, heat shock protein (hsp) 70, not only protected cells from rotenone-mediated cytotoxicity but also decreased soluble AS aggregation. Furthermore, the protection afforded by hsp70 transfection appeared to be related to suppression of rotenone-induced oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial and proteasomal dysfunction. PMID:15234983

  13. Engineering nanoparticle-protein associations for protein crystal nucleation and nanoparticle arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Denise N.

    Engineering the nanoparticle - protein association offers a new way to form protein crystals as well as new approaches for arrangement of nanoparticles. Central to this control is the nanoparticle surface. By conjugating polymers on the surface with controlled molecular weights many properties of the nanoparticle can be changed including its size, stability in buffers and the association of proteins with its surface. Large molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings allow for weak associations between proteins and nanoparticles. These interactions can lead to changes in how proteins crystallize. In particular, they decrease the time to nucleation and expand the range of conditions over which protein crystals form. Interestingly, when PEG chain lengths are too short then protein association is minimized and these effects are not observed. One important feature of protein crystals nucleated with nanoparticles is that the nanoparticles are incorporated into the crystals. What results are nanoparticles placed at well-defined distances in composite protein-nanoparticle crystals. Crystals on the size scale of 10 - 100 micrometers exhibit optical absorbance, fluorescence and super paramagnetic behavior derivative from the incorporated nanomaterials. The arrangement of nanoparticles into three dimensional arrays also gives rise to new and interesting physical and chemical properties, such as fluorescence enhancement and varied magnetic response. In addition, anisotropic nanomaterials aligned throughout the composite crystal have polarization dependent optical properties.

  14. Nanoparticles-cell association predicted by protein corona fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Palchetti, S; Digiacomo, L; Pozzi, D; Peruzzi, G; Micarelli, E; Mahmoudi, M; Caracciolo, G

    2016-07-01

    In a physiological environment (e.g., blood and interstitial fluids) nanoparticles (NPs) will bind proteins shaping a "protein corona" layer. The long-lived protein layer tightly bound to the NP surface is referred to as the hard corona (HC) and encodes information that controls NP bioactivity (e.g. cellular association, cellular signaling pathways, biodistribution, and toxicity). Decrypting this complex code has become a priority to predict the NP biological outcomes. Here, we use a library of 16 lipid NPs of varying size (Ø≈ 100-250 nm) and surface chemistry (unmodified and PEGylated) to investigate the relationships between NP physicochemical properties (nanoparticle size, aggregation state and surface charge), protein corona fingerprints (PCFs), and NP-cell association. We found out that none of the NPs' physicochemical properties alone was exclusively able to account for association with human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). For the entire library of NPs, a total of 436 distinct serum proteins were detected. We developed a predictive-validation modeling that provides a means of assessing the relative significance of the identified corona proteins. Interestingly, a minor fraction of the HC, which consists of only 8 PCFs were identified as main promoters of NP association with HeLa cells. Remarkably, identified PCFs have several receptors with high level of expression on the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. PMID:27279572

  15. A novel single-molecule study to determine protein--protein association constants.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, G C; Erie, D A

    2001-06-20

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is traditionally used as an imaging technique to gain qualitative information for a biological system. We have successfully used the imaging capabilities of the AFM to determine protein-protein association constants. We have developed a method to measure the molecular weight of a protein based on its volume determined from AFM images. Our volume determination method allows for rapid, accurate analysis of large protein populations. On the basis of the measured volume, the fraction of monomers as dimers was determined for the DNA helicase UvrD, and the dissociation constant (K(d)) for the helicase was calculated. We determined a K(d) for UvrD of 1.4 microM, which is in good agreement with published K(d) data obtained from analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) studies. Our method provides a rapid method for determining protein-protein association constants. PMID:11403593

  16. VAMP-1: a synaptic vesicle-associated integral membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Trimble, W S; Cowan, D M; Scheller, R H

    1988-06-01

    Several proteins are associated with, or are integral components of, the lipid bilayer that forms the delineating membrane of neuronal synaptic vesicles. To characterize these molecules, we used a polyclonal antiserum raised against purified cholinergic synaptic vesicles from Torpedo to screen a cDNA expression library constructed from mRNA of the electromotor nucleus. One clone encodes VAMP-1 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 1), a nervous-system-specific protein of 120 amino acids whose primary sequence can be divided into three domains: a proline-rich amino terminus, a highly charged internal region, and a hydrophobic carboxyl-terminal domain that is predicted to comprise a membrane anchor. Tryptic digestion of intact and lysed vesicles suggests that the protein faces the cytoplasm, where it may play a role in packaging, transport, or release of neurotransmitters. PMID:3380805

  17. Radioimmunoassay for pregnancy-associated plasma protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Sinosich, M.J.; Teisner, B.; Folkerson, J.; Saunders, D.M.; Grudzinskas, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    A specific and highly sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in human serum is described. The minimum detection limit for this protein was 2.9 ..mu..g/L. The within- and between-assay coefficients of variation were 4.0 and 4.5%, respectively. The circulating protein was detected within 32 days of conception in eight normal pregnancies and within 21 days in a twin pregnancy. Circulating concentrations in the mother at term were consistently higher (10-fold) than in matched amniotic fluid; none was detected in the umbilical circulation. This protein was also detected in the circulation of patients with hydatidiform mole. This assay will permit investigations into the clinical evaluation of measurements of the protein during early pregnancy and trophoblastic disease.

  18. Proteins associated with RNase E in a multicomponent ribonucleolytic complex.

    PubMed Central

    Miczak, A; Kaberdin, V R; Wei, C L; Lin-Chao, S

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease RNase E is essential for RNA processing and degradation. Earlier work provided evidence that RNase E exists intracellularly as part of a multicomponent complex and that one of the components of this complex is a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8). To isolate and identify other components of the RNase E complex, FLAG-epitope-tagged RNase E (FLAG-Rne) fusion protein was purified on a monoclonal antibody-conjugated agarose column. The FLAG-Rne fusion protein, eluted by competition with the synthetic FLAG peptide, was found to be associated with other proteins. N-terminal sequencing of these proteins revealed the presence in the RNase E complex not only of polynucleotide phosphorylase but also of DnaK, RNA helicase, and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11). Another protein associated only with epitope-tagged temperature-sensitive (Rne-3071) mutant RNase E but not with the wild-type enzyme is GroEL. The FLAG-Rne complex has RNase E activity in vivo and in vitro. The relative amount of proteins associated with wild-type and Rne-3071 expressed at an elevated temperature differed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8632981

  19. Protein-Based Three-Dimensional Memories and Associative Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birge, Robert

    2008-03-01

    The field of bioelectronics has benefited from the fact that nature has often solved problems of a similar nature to those which must be solved to create molecular electronic or photonic devices that operate with efficiency and reliability. Retinal proteins show great promise in bioelectronic devices because they operate with high efficiency (˜0.65%), high cyclicity (>10^7), operate over an extended wavelength range (360 -- 630 nm) and can convert light into changes in voltage, pH, absorption or refractive index. This talk will focus on a retinal protein called bacteriorhodopsin, the proton pump of the organism Halobacterium salinarum. Two memories based on this protein will be described. The first is an optical three-dimensional memory. This memory stores information using volume elements (voxels), and provides as much as a thousand-fold improvement in effective capacity over current technology. A unique branching reaction of a variant of bacteriorhodopsin is used to turn each protein into an optically addressed latched AND gate. Although three working prototypes have been developed, a number of cost/performance and architectural issues must be resolved prior to commercialization. The major issue is that the native protein provides a very inefficient branching reaction. Genetic engineering has improved performance by nearly 500-fold, but a further order of magnitude improvement is needed. Protein-based holographic associative memories will also be discussed. The human brain stores and retrieves information via association, and human intelligence is intimately connected to the nature and enormous capacity of this associative search and retrieval process. To a first order approximation, creativity can be viewed as the association of two seemingly disparate concepts to form a totally new construct. Thus, artificial intelligence requires large scale associative memories. Current computer hardware does not provide an optimal environment for creating artificial

  20. Dickkopf-related protein 3 is a potential Aβ-associated protein in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Kim A; Kuiperij, H Bea; Gloerich, Jolein; Otte-Höller, Irene; Rozemuller, Annemieke J M; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Küsters, Benno; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is the most prominent protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) senile plaques. In addition, Aβ interacts with a variety of Aβ-associated proteins (AAPs), some of which can form complexes with Aβ and influence its clearance, aggregation or toxicity. Identification of novel AAPs may shed new light on the pathophysiology of AD and the metabolic fate of Aβ. In this study, we aimed to identify new AAPs by searching for proteins that may form soluble complexes with Aβ in CSF, using a proteomics approach. We identified the secreted Wnt pathway protein Dickkopf-related protein 3 (Dkk-3) as a potential Aβ-associated protein. Using immunohistochemistry on human AD brain tissue, we observed that (i) Dkk-3 co-localizes with Aβ in the brain, both in diffuse and classic plaques. (ii) Dkk-3 is expressed in neurons and in blood vessel walls in the brain and (iii) is secreted by leptomeningeal smooth muscle cells in vitro. Finally, measurements using ELISA revealed that (iv) Dkk-3 protein is abundantly present in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum, but its levels are similar in non-demented controls and patients with AD, Lewy body dementia, and frontotemporal dementia. Our study demonstrates that Dkk-3 is a hitherto unidentified Aβ-associated protein which, given its relatively high cerebral concentrations and co-localization with Aβ, is potentially involved in AD pathology. In this study, we propose that Dickkopf-related protein-3 (Dkk-3) might be a novel Amyloid-β (Aβ) associated protein. We demonstrate that Dkk-3 is expressed in the brain, especially in vessel walls, and co-localizes with Aβ in senile plaques. Furthermore, Dkk-3 levels in cerebrospinal fluid strongly correlate with Aβ40 levels, but were not suitable to discriminate non-demented controls and patients with dementia. PMID:26119087

  1. Encounter complexes and dimensionality reduction in protein–protein association

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Li, Keyong; Hall, David R; Beglov, Dmitri; Zheng, Jiefu; Vakili, Pirooz; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Clore, G Marius; Vajda, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    An outstanding challenge has been to understand the mechanism whereby proteins associate. We report here the results of exhaustively sampling the conformational space in protein–protein association using a physics-based energy function. The agreement between experimental intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data and the PRE profiles calculated from the docked structures shows that the method captures both specific and non-specific encounter complexes. To explore the energy landscape in the vicinity of the native structure, the nonlinear manifold describing the relative orientation of two solid bodies is projected onto a Euclidean space in which the shape of low energy regions is studied by principal component analysis. Results show that the energy surface is canyon-like, with a smooth funnel within a two dimensional subspace capturing over 75% of the total motion. Thus, proteins tend to associate along preferred pathways, similar to sliding of a protein along DNA in the process of protein-DNA recognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01370.001 PMID:24714491

  2. Thermodynamics of folding and association of lattice-model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellmer, Troy; Bratko, Dusan; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey

    2005-05-01

    Closely related to the "protein folding problem" is the issue of protein misfolding and aggregation. Protein aggregation has been associated with the pathologies of nearly 20 human diseases and presents serious difficulties during the manufacture of pharmaceutical proteins. Computational studies of multiprotein systems have recently emerged as a powerful complement to experimental efforts aimed at understanding the mechanisms of protein aggregation. We describe the thermodynamics of systems containing two lattice-model 64-mers. A parallel tempering algorithm abates problems associated with glassy systems and the weighted histogram analysis method improves statistical quality. The presence of a second chain has a substantial effect on single-chain conformational preferences. The melting temperature is substantially reduced, and the increase in the population of unfolded states is correlated with an increase in interactions between chains. The transition from two native chains to a non-native aggregate is entropically favorable. Non-native aggregates receive ˜25% of their stabilizing energy from intraprotein contacts not found in the lowest-energy structure. Contact maps show that for non-native dimers, nearly 50% of the most probable interprotein contacts involve pairs of residues that form native contacts, suggesting that a domain-swapping mechanism is involved in self-association.

  3. Protein landscape at Drosophila melanogaster telomere-associated sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Antão, José M; Mason, James M; Déjardin, Jérôme; Kingston, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    The specific set of proteins bound at each genomic locus contributes decisively to regulatory processes and to the identity of a cell. Understanding of the function of a particular locus requires the knowledge of what factors interact with that locus and how the protein composition changes in different cell types or during the response to internal and external signals. Proteomic analysis of isolated chromatin segments (PICh) was developed as a tool to target, purify, and identify proteins associated with a defined locus and was shown to allow the purification of human telomeric chromatin. Here we have developed this method to identify proteins that interact with the Drosophila telomere-associated sequence (TAS) repeats. Several of the purified factors were validated as novel TAS-bound proteins by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and the Brahma complex was confirmed as a dominant modifier of telomeric position effect through the use of a genetic test. These results offer information on the efficacy of applying the PICh protocol to loci with sequence more complex than that found at human telomeres and identify proteins that bind to the TAS repeats, which might contribute to TAS biology and chromatin silencing. PMID:22493064

  4. Virulent strain associated outer membrane proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Skare, J T; Shang, E S; Foley, D M; Blanco, D R; Champion, C I; Mirzabekov, T; Sokolov, Y; Kagan, B L; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and purified outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Borrelia burgdorferi strain B31 based on methods developed for isolation of Treponema pallidum OMV. Purified OMV exhibited distinct porin activities with conductances of 0.6 and 12.6 nano-Siemen and had no detectable beta-NADH oxidase activity indicating their outer membrane origin and their lack of inner membrane contamination, respectively. Hydrophobic proteins were identified by phase partitioning with Triton X-114. Most of these hydrophobic membrane proteins were not acylated, suggesting that they are outer membrane-spanning proteins. Identification of palmitate-labeled lipoproteins revealed that several were enriched in the OMV, several were enriched in the protoplasmic cylinder inner membrane fraction, and others were found exclusively associated with the inner membrane. The protein composition of OMV changed significantly with successive in vitro cultivation of strain B31. Using antiserum with specificity for virulent strain B31, we identified OMV antigens on the surface of the spirochete and identified proteins whose presence in OMV could be correlated with virulence and protective immunity in the rabbit Lyme disease model. These virulent strain associated outer membrane-spanning proteins may provide new insight into the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Images PMID:7593626

  5. Proteins that associate with lamins: Many faces, many functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Eric C. . E-mail: e.schirmer@ed.ac.uk; Foisner, Roland . E-mail: roland.foisner@meduniwien.ac.at

    2007-06-10

    Lamin-associated polypeptides (LAPs) comprise inner nuclear membrane proteins tightly associated with the peripheral lamin scaffold as well as proteins forming stable complexes with lamins in the nucleoplasm. The involvement of LAPs in a wide range of human diseases may be linked to an equally bewildering range of their functions, including sterol reduction, histone modification, transcriptional repression, and Smad- and {beta}-catenin signaling. Many LAPs are likely to be at the center of large multi-protein complexes, components of which may dictate their functions, and a few LAPs have defined enzymatic activities. Here we discuss the definition of LAPs, review their many binding partners, elaborate their functions in nuclear architecture, chromatin organization, gene expression and signaling, and describe what is currently known about their links to human disease.

  6. Nanoforms: a new type of protein-associated mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, Hojatollah; McKee, Marc D.; Çiftçioglu, Neva; Sears, S. Kelly; Plows, Fiona L.; Chevet, Eric; Ghiabi, Pegah; Plavsic, Marc; Kajander, E. Olavi; Zare, Richard N.

    2001-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the interpretation of various nano-phenomena as being living organisms. Incubation of fetal bovine serum under standard cell culture conditions results in the formation of free entities in solution, here referred to as nanoforms. These nanoforms, when examined by transmission electron microscopy, have a distinct ovoid morphology ranging in size from tens to hundreds of nanometers. They are composed of hydroxyapatite and proteins and constitute a novel form of protein-associated mineralization. No detectable cell structure resembling bacteria is apparent. However, immunodetection of the proteins associated with the nanoforms, by two specific monoclonal antibodies, suggests a possible biogenic origin. The significance of nanoforms for the recognition of biological activity in ancient geological systems is discussed. The mode of mineralization in nanoforms is also compared to matrix-mediated calcification in vertebrates.

  7. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  8. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  9. Intrinsic membrane association of Drosophila cysteine string proteins.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, A; Kohan, S A; Whitelegge, J P; Gundersen, C B

    1998-09-25

    Cysteine string proteins (csps) are highly conserved constituents of vertebrate and invertebrate secretory organelles. Biochemical and immunoprecipitation experiments implied that vertebrate csps were integral membrane proteins that were tethered to the outer leaflet of secretory vesicles via the fatty acyl residues of their extensively acylated cysteine string. Independently, work of others suggested that Drosophila csps were peripheral membrane proteins that were anchored to membranes by a mechanism that was independent of the cysteine string and its fatty acyl residues. We extended these investigation and found first that sodium carbonate treatment partially stripped both csps and the integral membrane protein, synaptotagmin, from Drosophila membranes. Concomitantly, carbonate released fatty acids into the medium, arguing that it has a mild, solubilizing effect on these membranes. Second, we observed that Drosophila csps behaved like integral membrane proteins in Triton X-114 partitioning experiments. Third, we found that when membrane-bound csps were deacylated, they remained membrane bound. Moreover, it appeared that hydrophobic interactions were necessary for this persistent membrane association of csps. Thus, neither reducing conditions, urea, nor chaotropic agents displaced deacylated csps from membranes. Only detergents were effective in solubilizing deacylated csps. Finally, by virtue of the inaccessibility of deacylated csps to thiol alkylation by the membrane-impermeant alkylating reagent, iodoacetic acid, we inferred that it was the cysteine string domain that mediated the membrane association of deacylated csps. Thus, we conclude that under physiological conditions csps are integral membrane proteins of secretory organelles, and that the cysteine string domain plays a vital role in the membrane association of these proteins. PMID:9771899

  10. Building a Hierarchical Organization of Protein Complexes Out of Protein Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Organizing experimentally determined protein associations as a hierarchy can be a good approach to elucidating the content of protein complexes and the modularity of subcomplexes. Several challenges exist. First, intrinsically sticky proteins, such as chaperones, are often falsely assigned to many functionally unrelated complexes. Second, the reported collections of proteins may not be true “complexes” in the sense that they bind together and perform a joint cellular function. Third, due to imperfect sensitivity of protein detection methods, both false positive and false negative assignments of a protein to complexes may occur. We mitigate the first issue by down-weighting sticky proteins by their occurrence frequencies. We approach the other two problems by merging nearly identical complexes and by constructing a directed acyclic graph (DAG) based on the relationship of partial inclusion. The constructed DAG, within which smaller complexes form parts of the larger, can reveal how different complexes are joined. By merging almost identical complexes one can deemphasize the influence of false positives, while allowing false negatives to be rescued by other nearly identical association data. We investigate several protein weighting schemes and compare their corresponding DAGs using yeast and human complexes. We find that the scheme incorporating weights based on information flow in the network of direct protein–protein interactions produces biologically most meaningful DAGs. In either yeast or human, isolated nodes form a large proportion of the final hierarchy. While most connected components encompass very few nodes, the largest one for each species contains a sizable portion of all nodes. By considering examples of subgraphs composed of nodes containing a specified protein, we illustrate that the graphs' topological features can correctly suggest the biological roles of protein complexes. The input data, final results and the source code are available at ftp

  11. Association of ebola virus matrix protein VP40 with microtubules.

    PubMed

    Ruthel, Gordon; Demmin, Gretchen L; Kallstrom, George; Javid, Melodi P; Badie, Shirin S; Will, Amy B; Nelle, Timothy; Schokman, Rowena; Nguyen, Tam L; Carra, John H; Bavari, Sina; Aman, M Javad

    2005-04-01

    Viruses exploit a variety of cellular components to complete their life cycles, and it has become increasingly clear that use of host cell microtubules is a vital part of the infection process for many viruses. A variety of viral proteins have been identified that interact with microtubules, either directly or via a microtubule-associated motor protein. Here, we report that Ebola virus associates with microtubules via the matrix protein VP40. When transfected into mammalian cells, a fraction of VP40 colocalized with microtubule bundles and VP40 coimmunoprecipitated with tubulin. The degree of colocalization and microtubule bundling in cells was markedly intensified by truncation of the C terminus to a length of 317 amino acids. Further truncation to 308 or fewer amino acids abolished the association with microtubules. Both the full-length and the 317-amino-acid truncation mutant stabilized microtubules against depolymerization with nocodazole. Direct physical interaction between purified VP40 and tubulin proteins was demonstrated in vitro. A region of moderate homology to the tubulin binding motif of the microtubule-associated protein MAP2 was identified in VP40. Deleting this region resulted in loss of microtubule stabilization against drug-induced depolymerization. The presence of VP40-associated microtubules in cells continuously treated with nocodazole suggested that VP40 promotes tubulin polymerization. Using an in vitro polymerization assay, we demonstrated that VP40 directly enhances tubulin polymerization without any cellular mediators. These results suggest that microtubules may play an important role in the Ebola virus life cycle and potentially provide a novel target for therapeutic intervention against this highly pathogenic virus. PMID:15795257

  12. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance. PMID:26485361

  13. Association of the P6 protein of Cauliflower mosaic virus with plasmodesmata and plasmodesmal proteins.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Andres; Angel, Carlos A; Lutz, Lindy; Leisner, Scott M; Nelson, Richard S; Schoelz, James E

    2014-11-01

    The P6 protein of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is responsible for the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs), which are the sites for viral gene expression, replication, and virion assembly. Moreover, recent evidence indicates that ectopically expressed P6 inclusion-like bodies (I-LBs) move in association with actin microfilaments. Because CaMV virions accumulate preferentially in P6 IBs, we hypothesized that P6 IBs have a role in delivering CaMV virions to the plasmodesmata. We have determined that the P6 protein interacts with a C2 calcium-dependent membrane-targeting protein (designated Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] Soybean Response to Cold [AtSRC2.2]) in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screen and have confirmed this interaction through coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization assays in the CaMV host Nicotiana benthamiana. An AtSRC2.2 protein fused to red fluorescent protein (RFP) was localized to the plasma membrane and specifically associated with plasmodesmata. The AtSRC2.2-RFP fusion also colocalized with two proteins previously shown to associate with plasmodesmata: the host protein Plasmodesmata-Localized Protein1 (PDLP1) and the CaMV movement protein (MP). Because P6 I-LBs colocalized with AtSRC2.2 and the P6 protein had previously been shown to interact with CaMV MP, we investigated whether P6 I-LBs might also be associated with plasmodesmata. We examined the colocalization of P6-RFP I-LBs with PDLP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and aniline blue (a stain for callose normally observed at plasmodesmata) and found that P6-RFP I-LBs were associated with each of these markers. Furthermore, P6-RFP coimmunoprecipitated with PDLP1-GFP. Our evidence that a portion of P6-GFP I-LBs associate with AtSRC2.2 and PDLP1 at plasmodesmata supports a model in which P6 IBs function to transfer CaMV virions directly to MP at the plasmodesmata. PMID:25239023

  14. Root carbon and protein metabolism associated with heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingru; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Xu, Jichen

    2012-05-01

    Extensive past efforts have been taken toward understanding heat tolerance mechanisms of the aboveground organs. Root systems play critical roles in whole-plant adaptation to heat stress, but are less studied. This review discusses recent research results revealing some critical physiological and metabolic factors underlying root thermotolerance, with a focus on temperate perennial grass species. Comparative analysis of differential root responses to supraoptimal temperatures by a heat-adapted temperate C3 species, Agrostis scabra, which can survive high soil temperatures up to 45 °C in geothermal areas in Yellow Stone National Park, and a heat-sensitive cogeneric species, Agrostis stolonifera, suggested that efficient carbon and protein metabolism is critical for root thermotolerance. Superior root thermotolerance in a perennial grass was associated with a greater capacity to control respiratory costs through respiratory acclimation, lowering carbon investment in maintenance for protein turnover, and efficiently partitioning carbon into different metabolic pools and alternative respiration pathways. Proteomic analysis demonstrated that root thermotolerance was associated with an increased maintenance of stability and less degradation of proteins, particularly those important for metabolism and energy production. In addition, thermotolerant roots are better able to maintain growth and activity during heat stress by activating stress defence proteins such as those participating in antioxidant defence (i.e. superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase) and chaperoning protection (i.e. heat shock protein). PMID:22328905

  15. Heat Shock Proteins in Association with Heat Tolerance in Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhan, Chenyang; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    The grass family Poaceae includes annual species cultivated as major grain crops and perennial species cultivated as forage or turf grasses. Heat stress is a primary factor limiting growth and productivity of cool-season grass species and is becoming a more significant problem in the context of global warming. Plants have developed various mechanisms in heat-stress adaptation, including changes in protein metabolism such as the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). This paper summarizes the structure and function of major HSPs, recent research progress on the association of HSPs with grass tolerance to heat stress, and incorporation of HSPs in heat-tolerant grass breeding. PMID:22084689

  16. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming α-helix and β-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  17. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  18. Adeno-associated virus rep protein synthesis during productive infection

    SciTech Connect

    Redemann, B.E.; Mendelson, E.; Carter, B.J.

    1989-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate viral DNA replication and can regulate expression from AAV genes. The authors studied the kinetics of synthesis of the four Rep proteins, Rep78, Rep68, Rep52, and Rep40, during infection of human 293 or KB cells with AAV and helper adenovirus by in vivo labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting analyses. Rep78 and Rep52 were readily detected concomitantly with detection of viral monomer duplex DNA replicating about 10 to 12 h after infection, and Rep68 and Rep40 were detected 2 h later. Rep78 and Rep52 were more abundant than Rep68 and Rep40 owing to a higher synthesis rate throughout the infectious cycle. In some experiments, very low levels of Rep78 could be detected as early as 4 h after infection. The synthesis rates of Rep proteins were maximal between 14 and 24 h and then decreased later after infection. Isotopic pulse-chase experiments showed that each of the Rep proteins was synthesized independently and was stable for at least 15 h. A slower-migrating, modified form of Rep78 was identified late after infection. AAV capsid protein synthesis was detected at 10 to 12 h after infection and also exhibited synthesis kinetics similar to those of the Rep proteins. AAV DNA replication showed at least two clearly defined stages. Bulk duplex replicating DNA accumulation began around 10 to 12 h and reached a maximum level at about 20 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis was maximal. Progeny single-stranded DNA accumulation began about 12 to 13 h, but most of this DNA accumulated after 24 h when Rep and capsid protein synthesis had decreased.

  19. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  20. Large-scale de novo prediction of physical protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Elefsinioti, Antigoni; Saraç, Ömer Sinan; Hegele, Anna; Plake, Conrad; Hubner, Nina C; Poser, Ina; Sarov, Mihail; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias; Schroeder, Michael; Stelzl, Ulrich; Beyer, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Information about the physical association of proteins is extensively used for studying cellular processes and disease mechanisms. However, complete experimental mapping of the human interactome will remain prohibitively difficult in the near future. Here we present a map of predicted human protein interactions that distinguishes functional association from physical binding. Our network classifies more than 5 million protein pairs predicting 94,009 new interactions with high confidence. We experimentally tested a subset of these predictions using yeast two-hybrid analysis and affinity purification followed by quantitative mass spectrometry. Thus we identified 462 new protein-protein interactions and confirmed the predictive power of the network. These independent experiments address potential issues of circular reasoning and are a distinctive feature of this work. Analysis of the physical interactome unravels subnetworks mediating between different functional and physical subunits of the cell. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the network for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of complex diseases by applying it to genome-wide association studies of neurodegenerative diseases. This analysis provides new evidence implying TOMM40 as a factor involved in Alzheimer's disease. The network provides a high-quality resource for the analysis of genomic data sets and genetic association studies in particular. Our interactome is available via the hPRINT web server at: www.print-db.org. PMID:21836163

  1. Large-scale De Novo Prediction of Physical Protein-Protein Association*

    PubMed Central

    Elefsinioti, Antigoni; Saraç, Ömer Sinan; Hegele, Anna; Plake, Conrad; Hubner, Nina C.; Poser, Ina; Sarov, Mihail; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias; Schroeder, Michael; Stelzl, Ulrich; Beyer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Information about the physical association of proteins is extensively used for studying cellular processes and disease mechanisms. However, complete experimental mapping of the human interactome will remain prohibitively difficult in the near future. Here we present a map of predicted human protein interactions that distinguishes functional association from physical binding. Our network classifies more than 5 million protein pairs predicting 94,009 new interactions with high confidence. We experimentally tested a subset of these predictions using yeast two-hybrid analysis and affinity purification followed by quantitative mass spectrometry. Thus we identified 462 new protein-protein interactions and confirmed the predictive power of the network. These independent experiments address potential issues of circular reasoning and are a distinctive feature of this work. Analysis of the physical interactome unravels subnetworks mediating between different functional and physical subunits of the cell. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the network for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of complex diseases by applying it to genome-wide association studies of neurodegenerative diseases. This analysis provides new evidence implying TOMM40 as a factor involved in Alzheimer's disease. The network provides a high-quality resource for the analysis of genomic data sets and genetic association studies in particular. Our interactome is available via the hPRINT web server at: www.print-db.org. PMID:21836163

  2. Phytoferritin association induced by EGCG inhibits protein degradation by proteases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aidong; Zhou, Kai; Qi, Xin; Zhao, Guanghua

    2014-12-01

    Phytoferritin is a promising resource of non-heme iron supplementation, but it is not stable against degradation by proteases in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, how to improve the stability of ferritin in the presence of proteases is a challenge. Since (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is rich in phenolic-hydroxyl groups, it could interact with ferritin through hydrogen bonds, thereby preventing protein from degradation. To confirm this idea, we focus on the interaction between EGCG and phytoferritin, and the consequence of such interaction. Results demonstrated that EGCG did interact with ferritin, and such interaction induced the change in the tertiary/quaternary structure of protein but not in its secondary structure. Furthermore, stopped-flow and dynamic light scattering (DLS) results showed that EGCG could trigger ferritin association. Consequently, such protein association markedly inhibited protein digestion by pepsin at pH 4.0 and by trypsin at pH 7.5. These findings raise the possibility to improve the stability of phytoferritin in the presence of proteases. PMID:25384342

  3. Assessing association between protein truncating variants and quantitative traits

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Neville, Matthew J.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Karpe, Fredrik; McCarthy, Mark I.; Donnelly, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: In sequencing studies of common diseases and quantitative traits, power to test rare and low frequency variants individually is weak. To improve power, a common approach is to combine statistical evidence from several genetic variants in a region. Major challenges are how to do the combining and which statistical framework to use. General approaches for testing association between rare variants and quantitative traits include aggregating genotypes and trait values, referred to as ‘collapsing’, or using a score-based variance component test. However, little attention has been paid to alternative models tailored for protein truncating variants. Recent studies have highlighted the important role that protein truncating variants, commonly referred to as ‘loss of function’ variants, may have on disease susceptibility and quantitative levels of biomarkers. We propose a Bayesian modelling framework for the analysis of protein truncating variants and quantitative traits. Results: Our simulation results show that our models have an advantage over the commonly used methods. We apply our models to sequence and exome-array data and discover strong evidence of association between low plasma triglyceride levels and protein truncating variants at APOC3 (Apolipoprotein C3). Availability: Software is available from http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/~rivas/mamba Contact: donnelly@well.ox.ac.uk PMID:23860716

  4. Altered sodium channel-protein associations in critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the acute phase of critical illness myopathy (CIM) there is inexcitability of skeletal muscle. In a rat model of CIM, muscle inexcitability is due to inactivation of sodium channels. A major contributor to this sodium channel inactivation is a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage dependence of sodium channel inactivation. The goal of the current study was to find a biochemical correlate of the hyperpolarized shift in sodium channel inactivation. Methods The rat model of CIM was generated by cutting the sciatic nerve and subsequent injections of dexamethasone for 7 days. Skeletal muscle membranes were prepared from gastrocnemius muscles, and purification and biochemical analyses carried out. Immunoprecipitations were performed with a pan-sodium channel antibody, and the resulting complexes probed in Western blots with various antibodies. Results We carried out analyses of sodium channel glycosylation, phosphorylation, and association with other proteins. Although there was some loss of channel glycosylation in the disease, as assessed by size analysis of glycosylated and de-glycosylated protein in control and CIM samples, previous work by other investigators suggest that such loss would most likely shift channel inactivation gating in a depolarizing direction; thus such loss was viewed as compensatory rather than causative of the disease. A phosphorylation site at serine 487 was identified on the NaV 1.4 sodium channel α subunit, but there was no clear evidence of altered phosphorylation in the disease. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments carried out with a pan-sodium channel antibody confirmed that the sodium channel was associated with proteins of the dystrophin associated protein complex (DAPC). This complex differed between control and CIM samples. Syntrophin, dystrophin, and plectin associated strongly with sodium channels in both control and disease conditions, while β-dystroglycan and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) associated

  5. 14-3-3 protein targets misfolded chaperone-associated proteins to aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe; Graham, Kourtney; Foote, Molly; Liang, Fengshan; Rizkallah, Raed; Hurt, Myra; Wang, Yanchang; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aggresome is a key cytoplasmic organelle for sequestration and clearance of toxic protein aggregates. Although loading misfolded proteins cargos to dynein motors has been recognized as an important step in the aggresome formation process, the molecular machinery that mediates the association of cargos with the dynein motor is poorly understood. Here, we report a new aggresome-targeting pathway that involves isoforms of 14-3-3, a family of conserved regulatory proteins. 14-3-3 interacts with both the dynein-intermediate chain (DIC) and an Hsp70 co-chaperone Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), thereby recruiting chaperone-associated protein cargos to dynein motors for their transport to aggresomes. This molecular cascade entails functional dimerization of 14-3-3, which we show to be crucial for the formation of aggresomes in both yeast and mammalian cells. These results suggest that 14-3-3 functions as a molecular adaptor to promote aggresomal targeting of misfolded protein aggregates and may link such complexes to inclusion bodies observed in various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23843611

  6. Protein 600 is a microtubule/endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein in CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Shim, Su Yeon; Wang, Jian; Asada, Naoyuki; Neumayer, Gernot; Tran, Hong Chi; Ishiguro, Kei-ichiro; Sanada, Kamon; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Nguyen, Minh Dang

    2008-04-01

    There is an increasing body of literature pointing to cytoskeletal proteins as spatial organizers and interactors of organelles. In this study, we identified protein 600 (p600) as a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP) developmentally regulated in neurons. p600 exhibits the unique feature to interact with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Silencing of p600 by RNA interference (RNAi) destabilizes neuronal processes in young primary neurons undergoing neurite extension and containing scarce staining of the ER marker Bip. Furthermore, in utero electroporation of p600 RNAi alters neuronal migration, a process that depends on synergistic actions of microtubule dynamics and ER functions. p600-depleted migrating neurons display thin, crooked, and "zigzag" leading process with very few ER membranes. Thus, p600 constitutes the only known MAP to associate with the ER in neurons, and this interaction may impact on multiple cellular processes ranging from neuronal development to neuronal maturation and plasticity. PMID:18385319

  7. Altered surfactant protein A gene expression and protein metabolism associated with repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    George, Caroline L S; White, Misty L; O'Neill, Marsha E; Thorne, Peter S; Schwartz, David A; Snyder, Jeanne M

    2003-12-01

    Chronically inhaled endotoxin, which is ubiquitous in many occupational and domestic environments, can adversely affect the respiratory system resulting in an inflammatory response and decreased lung function. Surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) is part of the lung innate immune system and may attenuate the inflammatory response in various types of lung injury. Using a murine model to mimic occupational exposures to endotoxin, we hypothesized that SP-A gene expression and protein would be elevated in response to repeat exposure to inhaled grain dust and to purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results demonstrate that repeat exposure to inhaled endotoxin, either in the form of grain dust or purified LPS, results in increased whole lung SP-A gene expression and type II alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia, whereas SP-A protein levels in lung lavage fluid are decreased. Furthermore, these alterations in SP-A gene activity and protein metabolism are dependent on an intact endotoxin signaling system. PMID:12922979

  8. Why are proteins with glutamine- and asparagine-rich regions associated with protein misfolding diseases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, Leonor

    2005-12-01

    The possibility that vibrational excited states (VESs) are the drivers of protein folding and function (the VES hypothesis) is explored to explain the reason why Gln- and Asn-rich proteins are associated with degenerative diseases. The Davydov/Scott model is extended to describe energy transfer from the water solution to the protein and vice versa. Computer simulations show that, on average, Gln and Asn residues lead to an initial larger absorption of energy from the environment to the protein, something that can explain the greater structural instability of prions. The sporadic, inherited and infectious character of prion diseases is discussed in the light of the VES hypothesis. An alternative treatment for prion diseases is suggested.

  9. Carboxy terminus heat shock protein 70 interacting protein reduces tau-associated degenerative changes.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Laiq-Jan; Polydoro, Manuela; Kay, Kevin R; Sanchez, Laura; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Hyman, Bradley T; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated, mislocalized tau protein, which are associated with neuronal loss. Changes in tau are known to impair cellular transport (including that of mitochondria) and are associated with cell death in cell culture and mouse models of tauopathy. Thus clearing pathological forms of tau from cells is a key therapeutic strategy. One critical modulator in the degradation and clearance of misfolded proteins is the co-chaperone CHIP (Carboxy terminus Hsp70 interacting Protein), which is known to play a role in refolding and clearance of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CHIP could ameliorate pathological changes associated with tau. We find that co-expressing CHIP with full-length tau, tau truncated at D421 mimicking caspase cleavage, or the short tauRDΔK280 tau construct containing only the tau repeat domain with a tauopathy mutation, decreases tau protein levels in human H4 neuroglioma cells in a manner dependent on the Hsp70-binding TPR domain of CHIP. The observed reduction in tau levels by CHIP is associated with a decrease of tau phosphorylation and reduced levels of cleaved Caspase 3 indicating that CHIP plays an important role in preventing tau-induced pathological changes. Furthermore, tau-associated mitochondrial transport deficits are rescued by CHIP co-expression in H4 cells. Together, these data suggest that the co-chaperone CHIP can rescue the pathological effects of tau, and indicate that other diseases of protein misfolding and accumulation may also benefit from CHIP upregulation. PMID:25374103

  10. Electrostatic Rate Enhancement and Transient Complex of Protein-Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    Alsallaq, Ramzi; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The association of two proteins is bounded by the rate at which they, via diffusion, find each other while in appropriate relative orientations. Orientational constraints restrict this rate to ~105 – 106 M−1s−1. Proteins with higher association rates generally have complementary electrostatic surfaces; proteins with lower association rates generally are slowed down by conformational changes upon complex formation. Previous studies (Zhou, Biophys. J. 1997;73:2441–2445) have shown that electrostatic enhancement of the diffusion-limited association rate can be accurately modeled by kD = kD0 exp(−*/ kBT), where kD and kD0 are the rates in the presence and absence of electrostatic interactions, respectively, * is the average electrostatic interaction energy in a “transient-complex” ensemble, and kBT is thermal energy. The transient-complex ensemble separates the bound state from the unbound state. Predictions of the transient-complex theory on four protein complexes were found to agree well with experiment when the electrostatic interaction energy was calculated with the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation (Alsallaq and Zhou, Structure 2007, 15:215–224). Here we show that the agreement is further improved when the nonlinear PB equation is used. These predictions are obtained with the dielectric boundary defined as the protein van der Waals surface. When the dielectric boundary is instead specified as the molecular surface, electrostatic interactions in the transient complex become repulsive and are thus predicted to retard association. Together these results demonstrate that the transient-complex theory is predictive of electrostatic rate enhancement and can help parameterize PB calculations. PMID:17932929

  11. An aquaporin protein is associated with drought stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Ban, Liping; Wen, Hongyu; Wang, Zan; Dzyubenko, Nikolay; Chapurin, Vladimir; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2015-04-01

    Water channel proteins known as aquaporins (AQPs) regulate the movement of water and other small molecules across plant vacuolar and plasma membranes; they are associated with plant tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, a PIP type AQPs gene, designated as GoPIP1, was cloned from Galega orientalis, a high value leguminous forage crop. The GoPIP1 gene consists of an 870 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 289 amino acids, and belongs to the PIP1 subgroup of the PIP subfamily. The transcript level of GoPIP1 was higher in the root of G. orientalis than in the leaf and stem. The level of GoPIP1 transcript increased significantly when treated with 200 mM NaCl or 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. Transient expression of GoPIP1 in onion epidermal cells revealed that the GoPIP1 protein was localized to the plasma membrane. Over-expression of GoPIP1 increased the rosette/root ratio and increased sensitivity to drought in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. However, GoPIP1 over-expression in Arabidopsis had no significant effect under saline condition. The present data provides a gene resource that contributes to furthering our understanding of water channel protein and their application in plant stress tolerance. PMID:25701792

  12. Association between milk protein gene variants and protein composition traits in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Peñagaricano, F; Ahmad, K R; Lucey, J A; Weigel, K A; Khatib, H

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify DNA markers in the 4 casein genes (CSN1S1, CSN1S2, CSN2, and CSN3) and the 2 major whey protein genes (LALBA and LGB) that show associations with milk protein profile measured by reverse-phase HPLC. Fifty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were genotyped for cows in a unique resource population consisting of purebred Holstein and (Holstein × Jersey) × Holstein crossbred animals. Seven traits were analyzed, including concentrations of α(S)-casein (CN), β-CN, κ-CN, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and 2 additional secondary traits, the total concentration of the above 5 milk proteins and the α(S)-CN to β-CN ratio. A substantial fraction of phenotypic variation could be explained by the additive genetic component for the 7 milk protein composition traits studied. Moreover, several SNP were significantly associated with all examined traits at an experiment-wise error rate of 0.05, except for α-lactalbumin. Importantly, the significant SNP explained a large proportion of the phenotypic variation of milk protein composition. Our findings could be used for selecting animals that produce milk with desired composition or desired processing and manufacturing properties. PMID:22192223

  13. Detecting protein association at the T cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Florian; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-04-01

    At the moment, many models on T cell signaling rely on results obtained via rather indirect methodologies, which makes direct comparison and conclusions to the in vivo situation difficult. Recently, a variety of new imaging methods were developed, which have the potential to directly shed light onto the mysteries of protein association at the T cell membrane. While the new modalities are extremely promising, for a broad readership it may be difficult to judge the results, since technological shortcomings are not always obvious. In this review article, we put key questions on the mechanism of protein interactions in the T cell plasma membrane into relation with techniques that allow to address such questions. We discuss applicability of the techniques, their strengths and weaknesses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling. PMID:25300585

  14. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html. PMID:26044949

  15. Hematopoietic lineage cell specific protein 1 associates with and down-regulates protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Ruzzene, M; Brunati, A M; Sarno, S; Donella-Deana, A; Pinna, L A

    1999-11-12

    The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 and the hematopoietic specific protein 1 (HS1) display opposite effects on Ha-ras induced fibroblast transformation, by enhancing and counteracting it, respectively. Here we show the occurrence of physical association between HS1 and CK2alpha as judged from both far Western blot and plasmon resonance (BIAcore) analysis. Association of HS1 with CK2alpha is drastically reduced by the deletion of the HS1 C-terminal region (403-486) containing an SH3 domain. HS1, but not its deletion mutant HS1 Delta324-393, lacking a sequence similar to an acidic stretch of the regulatory beta-subunit of CK2, inhibits calmodulin phosphorylation by CK2alpha. These data indicate that HS1 physically interacts with CK2alpha and down-regulates its activity by a mechanism similar to the beta-subunit. PMID:10561491

  16. Protein aggregates are associated with replicative aging without compromising protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Saarikangas, Juha; Barral, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of cellular lineages is facilitated by asymmetric segregation of fate determinants between dividing cells. In budding yeast, various aging factors segregate to the aging (mother)-lineage, with poorly understood consequences. In this study, we show that yeast mother cells form a protein aggregate during early replicative aging that is maintained as a single, asymmetrically inherited deposit over the remaining lifespan. Surprisingly, deposit formation was not associated with stress or general decline in proteostasis. Rather, the deposit-containing cells displayed enhanced degradation of cytosolic proteasome substrates and unimpaired clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates. Deposit formation was dependent on Hsp42, which collected non-random client proteins of the Hsp104/Hsp70-refolding machinery, including the prion Sup35. Importantly, loss of Hsp42 resulted in symmetric inheritance of its constituents and prolonged the lifespan of the mother cell. Together, these data suggest that protein aggregation is an early aging-associated differentiation event in yeast, having a two-faceted role in organismal fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06197.001 PMID:26544680

  17. The evolution and diversification of plant microtubule-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, John

    2013-07-01

    Plant evolution is marked by major advances in structural characteristics that facilitated the highly successful colonization of dry land. Underlying these advances is the evolution of genes encoding specialized proteins that form novel microtubular arrays of the cytoskeleton. This review investigates the evolution of plant families of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) through the recently sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Selaginella moellendorffii, Physcomitrella patens, Volvox carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The families of MAPs examined are AIR9, CLASP, CRIPT, MAP18, MOR1, TON, EB1, AtMAP70, SPR2, SPR1, WVD2 and MAP65 families (abbreviations are defined in the footnote to Table 1). Conjectures are made regarding the evolution of MAPs in plants in relation to the evolution of multicellularity, oriented cell division and vasculature. Angiosperms in particular have high numbers of proteins that are involved in promotion of helical growth or its suppression, and novel plant microtubular structures may have acted as a catalyst for the development of novel plant MAPs. Comparisons of plant MAP gene families with those of animals show that animals may have more flexibility in the structure of their microtubule cytoskeletons than plants, but with both plants and animals possessing many MAP splice variants. PMID:23551562

  18. Protein kinase activity associated with simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, J D; Spangler, G; Livingston, D M

    1979-01-01

    Incubation of simian virus 40 (SV40) tumor (T) antigen-containing immunoprecipitates with [gamma-32P]ATP results in the incorporation of radioactive phosphate into large T antigen. Highly purified preparations of large T antigen from a SV40-transformed cell line, SV80, are able to catalyze the phosphorylation of a known phosphate acceptor, casein. The kinase activity migrates with large T antigen through multiple purification steps. Sedimentation analysis under non-T-antigen-aggregating conditions reveals that kinase activity and the immunoreactive protein comigrate as a 6S structure. The kinase activity of purified preparations of large T antigen can be specifically adsorbed to solid-phase anti-T IgG, and partially purified T antigen from a SV40 tsA transformation is thermolabile in its ability to phosphorylate casein when compared to comparably purified wild-type T antigen. These observations indicate that the SV40 large T antigen is closely associated with protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) activity. Images PMID:223152

  19. Protein kinase CK2 and protein kinase D are associated with the COP9 signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Uhle, Stefan; Medalia, Ohad; Waldron, Richard; Dumdey, Renate; Henklein, Peter; Bech-Otschir, Dawadschargal; Huang, Xiaohua; Berse, Matthias; Sperling, Joseph; Schade, Rüdiger; Dubiel, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) purified from human erythrocytes possesses kinase activity that phosphoryl ates proteins such as c-Jun and p53 with consequence for their ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent degradation. Here we show that protein kinase CK2 (CK2) and protein kinase D (PKD) co-purify with CSN. Immunoprecipi tation and far-western blots reveal that CK2 and PKD are in fact associated with CSN. As indicated by electron microscopy with gold-labeled ATP, at least 10% of CSN particles are associated with kinases. Kinase activity, most likely due to CK2 and PKD, co-immuno precipitates with CSN from HeLa cells. CK2 binds to ΔCSN3(111–403) and CSN7, whereas PKD interacts with full-length CSN3. CK2 phosphorylates CSN2 and CSN7, and PKD modifies CSN7. Both CK2 and PKD phosphorylate c-Jun as well as p53. CK2 phosphoryl ates Thr155, which targets p53 to degradation by the Ub system. Curcumin, emodin, DRB and resveratrol block CSN-associated kinases and induce degradation of c-Jun in HeLa cells. Curcumin treatment results in elevated amounts of c-Jun–Ub conjugates. We conclude that CK2 and PKD are recruited by CSN in order to regulate Ub conjugate formation. PMID:12628923

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein mediates yes-associated protein 1 upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Junhe; Zhang, Huaihong; Zhai, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP) is an important proto-oncogene, which is a downstream effector molecule in the Hippo signaling pathway. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between HBx expression in HCC samples and YAP expression in the Hippo pathway. A total of 20 pathologically confirmed HCC samples, 20 corresponding adjacent non-tumor liver tissues and 5 normal liver tissue samples were collected. The expression of HBx and YAP in the tissues was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The intensity and location of YAP expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. YAP mRNA and protein expression levels in HCC samples infected with HBV were significantly higher than those of normal liver tissues. Furthermore, YAP expression was positively correlated with HBx expression in HBV-positive HCC samples. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that YAP was predominantly expressed in the nuclei in HBV-positive HCC tissues. YAP expression was significantly decreased in the normal liver tissue and corresponding adjacent liver tissue when compared with the HCC tissues and by contrast to HCC tissues, YAP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, these results indicate that the YAP gene is a key driver of HBx-induced liver cancer. Therefore, YAP may present a novel target in the treatment of HBV-associated HCC.

  1. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A.

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  2. Atomistic Simulation of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Associated Cellulosomal Protein Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Crowley, Michael F; Smith, Jeremy C

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations have been performed to obtain an atomic-level understanding of lignocellulose structure and the assembly of its associated cellulosomal protein complexes. First, a CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived and validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work provides the basis for full simulations of lignocellulose. Second, the underlying molecular mechanism governing the assembly of various cellulosomal modules is investigated by performing a novel free-energy calculation of the cohesin-dockerin dissociation. Our calculation indicates a free-energy barrier of ~17 kcal/mol and further reveals a stepwise dissociation pathway involving both the central -sheet interface and its adjacent solvent-exposed loop/turn regions clustered at both ends of the -barrel structure.

  3. Golgi protein ACBD3 mediates neurotoxicity associated with Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sbodio, Juan I.; Paul, Bindu D.; Machamer, Carolyn E.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the gene for huntingtin (Htt). In HD the corpus striatum selectively degenerates despite uniform expression of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) throughout the brain and body. Striatal selectivity reflects the binding of the striatal-selective protein Rhes to mHtt to augment cytotoxicity, but molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity have been elusive. Here we report that the Golgi protein ACBD3 (Acyl-CoA binding Domain Containing 3) mediates mHtt cytotoxicity via a Rhes/mHtt/ACBD3 complex. ACBD3 levels are markedly elevated in the striatum of HD patients, in a striatal cell line harboring polyglutamine repeats, and in the brains of HD mice. Moreover, ACBD3 deletion abolishes HD neurotoxicity, which is increased by ACBD3 overexpression. Enhanced levels of ACBD3 elicited by ER, mitochondrial and Golgi stresses may account for HD associated augmentation of ACBD3 and neurodegeneration. PMID:24012756

  4. Staphylococcus saprophyticus surface-associated protein (Ssp) is associated with lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Szabados, Florian; Mohner, Amelie; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcal lipases have been proposed as pathogenicity factors. In Staphylococcus saprophyticus the surface-associated protein (Ssp) has been previously characterized as a cell wall-associated true lipase. A S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutant has been described as less virulent in an in vivo model of urinary tract infection compared with its wild-type. This is the first report showing that S. saprophyticus induced a lifespan reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans similar to that of S. aureus RN4220. In two S. saprophyticus Δssp::ermB mutants lifespan reduction in C. elegans was partly abolished. In order to attribute virulence to the lipase activity itself and distinguish this phenomenon from the presence of the Ssp-protein, the conserved active site of the lipase was modified by site-directed ligase-independent mutagenesis and lipase activity-deficient mutants were constructed. These results indicate that the Ssp is associated with pathogenicity in C. elegans and one could speculate that the lipase activity itself is responsible for this virulence. PMID:23959029

  5. Heavy path mining of protein-protein associations in the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinran; Korkmaz, Turgay; Lilburn, Timothy G; Cai, Hong; Gu, Jianying; Wang, Yufeng

    2015-07-15

    Annotating and understanding the function of proteins and other elements in a genome can be difficult in the absence of a well-studied and evolutionarily close relative. The causative agent of malaria, one of the oldest and most deadly global infectious diseases, is a good example of this problem. The burden of malaria is huge and there is a pressing need for new, more effective antimalarial strategies. However, techniques such as homology-dependent annotation transfer are severely impaired in this parasite because there are no well-understood close relatives. To circumvent this approach we developed a network-based method that uses a heavy path network-mining algorithm. We uncovered the protein-protein associations that are implicated in important cellular processes including genome integrity, DNA repair, transcriptional regulation, invasion, and pathogenesis, thus demonstrating the utility of this method. The URL of the source code for super-sequence mining method is http://www.cs.utsa.edu/~korkmaz/research/heavy-path-mining/. PMID:25861922

  6. Integrated protein function prediction by mining function associations, sequences, and protein–protein and gene–gene interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Motivations Protein function prediction is an important and challenging problem in bioinformatics and computational biology. Functionally relevant biological information such as protein sequences, gene expression, and protein–protein interactions has been used mostly separately for protein function prediction. One of the major challenges is how to effectively integrate multiple sources of both traditional and new information such as spatial gene–gene interaction networks generated from chromosomal conformation data together to improve protein function prediction. Results In this work, we developed three different probabilistic scores (MIS, SEQ, and NET score) to combine protein sequence, function associations, and protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks for protein function prediction. The MIS score is mainly generated from homologous proteins found by PSI-BLAST search, and also association rules between Gene Ontology terms, which are learned by mining the Swiss-Prot database. The SEQ score is generated from protein sequences. The NET score is generated from protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks. These three scores were combined in a new Statistical Multiple Integrative Scoring System (SMISS) to predict protein function. We tested SMISS on the data set of 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). The method performed substantially better than three base-line methods and an advanced method based on protein profile–sequence comparison, profile–profile comparison, and domain co-occurrence networks according to the maximum F-measure. PMID:26370280

  7. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  8. Nesprin-3, a novel outer nuclear membrane protein, associates with the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Litjens, Sandy H.M.; Kuikman, Ingrid; Tshimbalanga, Ntambua; Janssen, Hans; van den Bout, Iman; Raymond, Karine; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2005-01-01

    Despite their importance in cell biology, the mechanisms that maintain the nucleus in its proper position in the cell are not well understood. This is primarily the result of an incomplete knowledge of the proteins in the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) that are able to associate with the different cytoskeletal systems. Two related ONM proteins, nuclear envelope spectrin repeat (nesprin)–1 and –2, are known to make direct connections with the actin cytoskeleton through their NH2-terminal actin-binding domain (ABD). We have now isolated a third member of the nesprin family that lacks an ABD and instead binds to the plakin family member plectin, which can associate with the intermediate filament (IF) system. Overexpression of nesprin-3 results in a dramatic recruitment of plectin to the nuclear perimeter, which is where these two molecules are colocalized with both keratin-6 and -14. Importantly, plectin binds to the integrin α6β4 at the cell surface and to nesprin-3 at the ONM in keratinocytes, suggesting that there is a continuous connection between the nucleus and the extracellular matrix through the IF cytoskeleton. PMID:16330710

  9. Establishing an osteosarcoma associated protein-protein interaction network to explore the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish an osteosarcoma (OS) associated protein-protein interaction network and explore the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Methods The gene expression profile GSE9508 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, including five samples of non-malignant bone (the control), seven samples for non-metastatic patients (six of which were analyzed in duplicate), and 11 samples for metastatic patients (10 of which were analyzed in duplicate). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between osteosarcoma and control samples were identified by packages in R with the threshold of |logFC (fold change)| > 1 and false discovery rate < 0.05. Osprey software was used to construct the interaction network of DEGs, and genes at protein-protein interaction (PPI) nodes with high degrees were identified. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and WebGestalt software were then used to perform functional annotation and pathway enrichment analyses for PPI networks, in which P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Compared to the control samples, the expressions of 42 and 341 genes were altered in non-metastatic OS and metastatic OS samples, respectively. A total of 15 significantly enriched functions were obtained with Gene Ontology analysis (P < 0.05). The DEGs were classified and significantly enriched in three pathways, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, lysosome and axon guidance. Genes such as HRAS, IDH3A, ATP6ap1, ATP6V0D2, SEMA3F and SEMA3A were involved in the enriched pathways. Conclusions The hub genes from metastatic OS samples are not only bio-markers of OS, but also help to improve therapies for OS. PMID:24330838

  10. Uncoupling protein 2 gene polymorphisms are associated with obesity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) gene polymorphisms have been reported as genetic risk factors for obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We examined the association of commonly observed UCP2 G(−866)A (rs659366) and Ala55Val (C > T) (rs660339) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with obesity, high fasting plasma glucose, and serum lipids in a Balinese population. Methods A total of 603 participants (278 urban and 325 rural subjects) were recruited from Bali Island, Indonesia. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC) were measured. Obesity was determined based on WHO classifications for adult Asians. Participants were genotyped for G(−866)A and Ala55Val polymorphisms of the UCP2 gene. Results Obesity prevalence was higher in urban subjects (51%) as compared to rural subjects (23%). The genotype, minor allele (MAF), and heterozygosity frequencies were similar between urban and rural subjects for both SNPs. All genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. A combined analysis of genotypes and environment revealed that the urban subjects carrying the A/A genotype of the G(−866)A SNP have higher BMI than the rural subjects with the same genotype. Since the two SNPs showed strong linkage disequilibrium (D’ = 0.946, r2 = 0.657), a haplotype analysis was performed. We found that the AT haplotype was associated with high BMI only when the urban environment was taken into account. Conclusions We have demonstrated the importance of environmental settings in studying the influence of the common UCP2 gene polymorphisms in the development of obesity in a Balinese population. PMID:22533685

  11. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  12. Analysis of p107-associated proteins: p107 associates with a form of E2F that differs from pRB-associated E2F-1.

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, N; Dembski, M; Fattaey, A; Ngwu, C; Ewen, M; Helin, K

    1993-01-01

    The binding of viral oncogenes to cellular proteins is thought to modulate the activities of these cellular targets. The p107 protein is targeted by many viral proteins, including adenovirus E1A, simian virus 40 large T antigen, and human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein. A panel of monoclonal antibodies against p107 was raised and used to identify cellular proteins that interact with the p107 protein in vivo. p107-associated proteins included cyclin A, cyclin E, and cdk2. In addition, p107 was found to associate with 62- to 65- and 50-kDa phosphoproteins in ML-1 cells, a human myeloid leukemia cell line. The 62- to 65-kDa proteins have many of the properties of the transcription factor E2F but were distinguished from pRB-associated E2F-1 by both immunologic and biochemical properties. Images PMID:8230483

  13. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review).

    PubMed

    Plakkal Ayyappan, Janeesh; Paul, Antoni; Goo, Young-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL‑derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD‑associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell‑targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  14. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    AYYAPPAN, JANEESH PLAKKAL; PAUL, ANTONI; GOO, YOUNG-HWA

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL-derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD-associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell-targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  15. Lacritin and other autophagy associated proteins in ocular surface health.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Roy; Talla, Venu; Peterson, Katherine; Laurie, Gordon W

    2016-03-01

    Advantage may be taken of macroautophagy ('autophagy') to promote ocular health. Autophagy continually captures aged or damaged cellular material for lysosomal degradation and recyling. When autophagic flux is chronically elevated, or alternatively deficient, health suffers. Chronic elevation of flux and stress are the consequence of inflammatory cytokines or of dry eye tears but not normal tears invitro. Exogenous tear protein lacritin transiently accelerates flux to restore homeostasis invitro and corneal health invivo, and yet the monomeric active form of lacritin appears to be selectively deficient in dry eye. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent cross-linking of monomer decreases monomer quantity and monomer affinity for coreceptor syndecan-1 thereby abrogating activity. Tissue transglutaminase is elevated in dry eye. Mutation of arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal 3, mucolipin, or Niemann-Pick disease type C1 respectively underlie several diseases of apparently insufficient autophagic flux that affect the eye, including: metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, juvenile-onset Batten disease, mucolipidosis IV, and Niemann-Pick type C associated with myelin sheath destruction of corneal sensory and ciliary nerves and of the optic nerve; corneal clouding, ocular hypertension, glaucoma and optic nerve atrophy; accumulation of 'ceroid-lipofuscin' in surface conjunctival cells, and in ganglion and neuronal cells; decreased visual acuity and retinal dystrophy; and neurodegeneration. For some, enzyme or gene replacement, or substrate reduction, therapy is proving to be successful. Here we discuss examples of restoring ocular surface homeostasis through alteration of autophagy, with particular attention to lacritin. PMID:26318608

  16. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangdi; De Clercq, Erik

    2016-09-01

    The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle. PMID:27357278

  17. Calculating the Bimolecular Rate of Protein-Protein Association with Interacting Crowders.

    PubMed

    Yap, Eng-Hui; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2013-05-14

    We have recently introduced a method termed Poisson-Boltzmann semianalytical method (PB-SAM) for solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for large numbers of arbitrarily shaped dielectric cavities with controlled precision. In this work we extend the applicability of the PB-SAM approach by deriving force and torque expressions that fully account for mutual polarization in both the zero- and first-order derivatives of the surface charges, that can now be embedded into a Brownian dynamics scheme to look at electrostatic-driven mesoscale assembly and kinetics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the PB-SAM approach by simulating the protein concentration effects on the bimolecular rate of association of barnase and barstar, under periodic boundary conditions and evaluated through mean first passage times. We apply PB-SAM to the pseudo-first-order reaction rate conditions in which either barnase or barstar are in great excess relative to the other protein (124:1). This can be considered a specific case in which the PB-SAM approach can be applied to crowding conditions in which crowders are not inert but can form interactions with other molecules. PMID:26583736

  18. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  19. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis. PMID:26776680

  20. Simulations of HIV Capsid Protein Dimerization Reveal the Effect of Chemistry and Topography on the Mechanism of Hydrophobic Protein Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Naiyin; Hagan, Michael F.

    2012-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the hydrophobic protein surfaces in aqueous solution sit near a drying transition. The tendency for these surfaces to expel water from their vicinity leads to self assembly of macromolecular complexes. In this article we show with a realistic model for a biologically pertinent system how this phenomenon appears at the molecular level. We focus on the association of the C-terminal domain (CA-C) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid protein. By combining all-atom simulations with specialized sampling techniques we measure the water density distribution during the approach of two CA-C proteins as a function of separation and amino acid sequence in the interfacial region. The simulations demonstrate that CA-C protein-protein interactions sit at the edge of a dewetting transition and that this mesoscopic manifestation of the underlying liquid-vapor phase transition can be readily manipulated by biology or protein engineering to significantly affect association behavior. While the wild type protein remains wet until contact, we identify a set of in silico mutations, in which three hydrophilic amino acids are replaced with nonpolar residues, that leads to dewetting prior to association. The existence of dewetting depends on the size and relative locations of substituted residues separated by nm length scales, indicating long range cooperativity and a sensitivity to surface topography. These observations identify important details which are missing from descriptions of protein association based on buried hydrophobic surface area.

  1. Surface Association of Pht Proteins of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Plumptre, Charles D.; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen responsible for massive global morbidity and mortality. The pneumococcus attaches a variety of proteins to its cell surface, many of which contribute to virulence; one such family are the polyhistidine triad (Pht) proteins PhtA, PhtB, PhtD, and PhtE. In this study, we have examined the mechanism of Pht surface attachment using PhtD as a model. Analysis of deletion and point mutants identified a three-amino-acid region of PhtD (Q27-H28-R29) that is critical for the process. The analogous region in PhtE was also necessary for its attachment to the cell surface. Furthermore, we show that a large proportion of the total amount of each Pht protein is released into bacterial culture supernatants. Other surface proteins were also released, albeit to lesser extents, and this was not due to pneumococcal autolysis. The extent of release of surface proteins was strain dependent and was not affected by the capsule. Lastly, we compared the fitness of wild-type and ΔphtABDE pneumococci in vivo in a mouse coinfection model. Release of Pht proteins by the wild type did not complement the mutant strain, consistent with surface-attached rather than soluble forms of the Pht proteins playing the major role in virulence. The significant degree of release of Pht proteins from intact bacteria may have implications for the use of these proteins in novel vaccines. PMID:23876799

  2. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates. PMID:26971466

  3. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Cornelia; Terrao, Monica; Inchaustegui Gil, Diana; Clayton, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites. PMID:26287607

  4. Proteome analysis of microtubule-associated proteins and their interacting partners from mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Frank; Riaz, Tahira; DeBonis, Salvatore; Koehler, Christian J; Kroening, Mario; Panse, Isabel; Strozynski, Margarita; Donaldson, Ian M; Thiede, Bernd

    2011-07-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for a variety of cellular processes. MTs are finely regulated by distinct classes of MT-associated proteins (MAPs), which themselves bind to and are regulated by a large number of additional proteins. We have carried out proteome analyses of tubulin-rich and tubulin-depleted MAPs and their interacting partners isolated from bovine brain. In total, 573 proteins were identified giving us unprecedented access to brain-specific MT-associated proteins from mammalian brain. Most of the standard MAPs were identified and at least 500 proteins have been reported as being associated with MTs. We identified protein complexes with a large number of subunits such as brain-specific motor/adaptor/cargo complexes for kinesins, dynein, and dynactin, and proteins of an RNA-transporting granule. About 25% of the identified proteins were also found in the synaptic vesicle proteome. Analysis of the MS/MS data revealed many posttranslational modifications, amino acid changes, and alternative splice variants, particularly in tau, a key protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Bioinformatic analysis of known protein-protein interactions of the identified proteins indicated that the number of MAPs and their associated proteins is larger than previously anticipated and that our database will be a useful resource to identify novel binding partners. PMID:20567863

  5. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  6. Protein kinase activity associated with pancreatic zymogen granules.

    PubMed

    Burnham, D B; Munowitz, P; Thorn, N; Williams, J A

    1985-05-01

    Purified zymogen granules were prepared from rat pancreas by using an iso-osmotic Percoll gradient. In the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, phosphorylation of several granule proteins was induced by Ca2+, most notably a Mr-13 000 protein, whereas addition of cyclic AMP was without effect. When phosphatidylserine was also added, Ca2+ increased the phosphorylation of additional proteins, with the largest effect on a protein of Mr 62 000. Purified granules were also able to phosphorylate exogenous substrates. Ca2+-induced phosphorylation of lysine-rich histone was enhanced over 3-fold in the presence of phosphatidylserine, and cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase activity was revealed with mixed histone as substrate. The concentrations of free Ca2+ and cyclic AMP required for half-maximal phosphorylation of both endogenous and exogenous proteins were 1-3 microM and 57 nM respectively. Treatment of granules with 0.25 M-KCl resulted in the release of phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase activity into a high-speed granule supernatant. In contrast, granule-protein substrates of Ca2+-activated kinase activity were resistant to KCl extraction, and in fact were present in purified granule membranes. Kinase activity activated by cyclic AMP was not extracted by KCl treatment. It is concluded that phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins in the zymogen granule can be induced by one or more Ca2+-activated protein kinases. Such a reaction is a potential mechanism by which exocytosis may be regulated in the exocrine pancreas by Ca2+-mediated secretagogues. PMID:4004796

  7. Protein kinase activity associated with pancreatic zymogen granules.

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, D B; Munowitz, P; Thorn, N; Williams, J A

    1985-01-01

    Purified zymogen granules were prepared from rat pancreas by using an iso-osmotic Percoll gradient. In the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, phosphorylation of several granule proteins was induced by Ca2+, most notably a Mr-13 000 protein, whereas addition of cyclic AMP was without effect. When phosphatidylserine was also added, Ca2+ increased the phosphorylation of additional proteins, with the largest effect on a protein of Mr 62 000. Purified granules were also able to phosphorylate exogenous substrates. Ca2+-induced phosphorylation of lysine-rich histone was enhanced over 3-fold in the presence of phosphatidylserine, and cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase activity was revealed with mixed histone as substrate. The concentrations of free Ca2+ and cyclic AMP required for half-maximal phosphorylation of both endogenous and exogenous proteins were 1-3 microM and 57 nM respectively. Treatment of granules with 0.25 M-KCl resulted in the release of phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase activity into a high-speed granule supernatant. In contrast, granule-protein substrates of Ca2+-activated kinase activity were resistant to KCl extraction, and in fact were present in purified granule membranes. Kinase activity activated by cyclic AMP was not extracted by KCl treatment. It is concluded that phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins in the zymogen granule can be induced by one or more Ca2+-activated protein kinases. Such a reaction is a potential mechanism by which exocytosis may be regulated in the exocrine pancreas by Ca2+-mediated secretagogues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:4004796

  8. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:22483848

  9. Identification of novel proteins associated with both alpha-synuclein and DJ-1.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinghua; Li, G Jane; Davis, Jeanne; Zhu, David; Wang, Yan; Pan, Catherine; Zhang, Jing

    2007-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease (PD) remain elusive, although many lines of evidence have indicated that alpha-synuclein and DJ-1, two critical proteins in PD pathogenesis, interact with each other functionally. The investigation on whether alpha-synuclein directly interacts with DJ-1 has been controversial. In the current study, we analyzed proteins associated with alpha-synuclein and/or DJ-1 with a robust proteomics technique called stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in dopaminergic MES cells exposed to rotenone versus controls. We identified 324 and 306 proteins in the alpha-synuclein- and DJ-1-associated protein complexes, respectively. Among alpha-synuclein-associated proteins, 141 proteins displayed significant changes in the relative abundance (increase or decrease) after rotenone treatment; among DJ-1-associated proteins, 119 proteins displayed significant changes in the relative abundance after rotenone treatment. Although no direct interaction was observed between alpha-synuclein and DJ-1, whether analyzed by affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry or subsequent direct co-immunoprecipitation, 144 proteins were seen in association with both alpha-synuclein and DJ-1. Of those, 114 proteins displayed significant changes in the relative abundance in the complexes associated with alpha-synuclein, DJ-1, or both after rotenone treatment. A subset of these proteins (mortalin, nucleolin, grp94, calnexin, and clathrin) was further validated for their association with both alpha-synuclein and DJ-1 using confocal microscopy, Western blot, and/or immunoprecipitation. Thus, we not only confirmed that there was no direct interaction between alpha-synuclein and DJ-1 but also, for the first time, report these five novel proteins to be associating with both alpha-synuclein and DJ-1. Further characterization of these docking proteins will likely shed more light on the mechanisms by which DJ-1

  10. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  11. Methyl-accepting protein associated with bacterial sensory phodopsin I

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, E.N.; Hasselbacher, C.A. ); Spudich, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of Halaobacterium halobium phototaxis mutants and revertants with L-(methyl-{sup 3}H) methionine implicated seven methyl-accepting protein bands with apparent molecular masses from 65 to 150 kilodaltons (kDa) in adaptation of the organism to chemo and photo stimuli, and one of these (94 kDa) was specifically implicated in photoaxis. The lability of the radiolabeled bands to mild base treatment indicated the the methyl linkages are carboxylmethylesters, as is the case in the eubacterial chemotaxis receptor-transducers. The 94-kDa protein was present in increased amounts in an overproducer of the apoprotein of sensory rhodopsin I, one of two retinal-containing photoaxis receptors in H. halobium. It was absent in a strain the contained sensory rhodopsin II and that lacked sensory rhodopsin I and was also absent in a mutant that lacked both photoreceptors. Based in the role of methyl-accepting proteins in chemotaxis in other bacteria, we suggest that the 94-kDa protein is the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. By ({sup 3}H)retinal labeling studies, we previously identified a 25-kDa retinal-binding polypeptide that was derived from photochemically reactive sensory rhodopsin I. When H. halobium membranes containing sensory rhodopsin I were treated by a procedure that stably reduced ({sup 3}H) retinal onto the 25-kDa apoprotein, a 94-kDa protein was also found to be radiolabeled. Protease digestion confirmed that the 94-kDa retinal-labeled protein was the same as the methyl-accepting protein that was suggested above to be the siginal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. Possible models are that the 25- and 94-kDa proteins are tightly interacting components of the photosensory signaling machinery or that both are forms of sensory rhodopsin I.

  12. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  13. SIMILARITIES BETWEEN PROTEIN IIIA AND PROTEIN IIIB, TWO PROMINENT SYNAPTIC VESICLE-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHOPROTEINS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein IIIa (Mr 74,000) and protein IIIb (Mr 55,000) are two major phosphoproteins found in mammalian brain. It was previously shown in intact nerve cells that the phosphorylation state of these two proteins could be increased by electrical stimulation, by depolarizing agents in...

  14. A protein kinase associated with paired helical filaments in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, I J; Davies, P

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a protein kinase in immunoaffinity-purified preparations of paired helical filaments from brain tissue of individuals with Alzheimer disease. The kinase phosphorylates the filament proteins in vitro in a manner independent of second messenger regulation or of modulation by heparin and polyamines. Physiological concentrations of hemin, an oxidized heme porphyrin, inhibit the kinase and abolish Alz-50 immunoreactivity of the proteins. Since paired helical filaments are composed of hyperphosphorylated proteins, association of a protein kinase with the filaments provides a mechanism for abnormal processing of the proteins in disease. Images PMID:1557394

  15. Expressions of Senescence-Associated β-Galactosidase and Senescence Marker Protein-30 are Associated with Lens Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dan; Yin, Dan; Xiao, Fang; Hao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate associations of senescence marker protein-30 and senescence-associated β-galactosidase expression with lens epithelial cells apoptosis among Chinese age-related cataract patients. Material/Methods A total of 145 age-related cataract patients (69 cases with nuclear cataract in 91 eyes and 76 cases of cortical cataract with 102 eyes) were enrolled in our study. An annular tear of the central part of anterior lens capsules was performed for each patient. Immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR were used to detect the protein and mRNA expression levels, and TUNEL was used to assess lens epithelial cells apoptosis. Comparisons of protein expression levels and lens epithelial cells apoptosis were made between the 2 groups. Results The results showed a higher protein expression level of senescence marker protein-30 in surrounding parts of the anterior lens capsule compared with the central part of the anterior lens capsule; however, the positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase was remarkably higher in the central part than in the surrounding part. Compared with cortical cataract patients, nuclear cataract patients had elevated senescence marker protein-30 protein and mRNA expression levels, but had a decreased positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase. TUNEL results showed that the lens epithelial cell apoptosis rate was higher in the central part of the anterior lens capsule than in the surrounding part in both groups. Within either central or surrounding area of anterior lens capsule, cortical cataract patients exhibited a significantly higher lens epithelial cell apoptosis rate in contrast with nuclear cataract patients. Conclusions Our study results suggest that senescence marker protein-30 and senescence-associated β-galactosidase expressions in both nuclear cataract and cortical cataract patients were associated with lens epithelial cells apoptosis. PMID:26619319

  16. LUD, a new protein domain associated with lactate utilization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A novel highly conserved protein domain, DUF162 [Pfam: PF02589], can be mapped to two proteins: LutB and LutC. Both proteins are encoded by a highly conserved LutABC operon, which has been implicated in lactate utilization in bacteria. Based on our analysis of its sequence, structure, and recent experimental evidence reported by other groups, we hereby redefine DUF162 as the LUD domain family. Results JCSG solved the first crystal structure [PDB:2G40] from the LUD domain family: LutC protein, encoded by ORF DR_1909, of Deinococcus radiodurans. LutC shares features with domains in the functionally diverse ISOCOT superfamily. We have observed that the LUD domain has an increased abundance in the human gut microbiome. Conclusions We propose a model for the substrate and cofactor binding and regulation in LUD domain. The significance of LUD-containing proteins in the human gut microbiome, and the implication of lactate metabolism in the radiation-resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans are discussed. PMID:24274019

  17. Programmable protein arrays for immunoprofiling HPV-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Ewaisha, Radwa; Meshay, Ian; Resnik, Jack; Katchman, Benjamin A; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-04-01

    Over 600,000 cancers each year are attributed to the human papillomavirus (HPV), including cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (OPC). A key challenge in understanding HPV immunobiology is the diversity of oncogenic HPV types and the need for multiplexed display of HPV antigens to measure antibody responses. We have generated custom HPV protein microarrays displaying 98 proteins as C-terminal GST fusion proteins, representing eight antigens of two low-risk HPV types (HPV6 and 11) and ten oncogenic high-risk HPV types (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52 and 58). We demonstrate robust and reproducible protein expression of 96/98 of the antigens using a human cell lysate expression system. The target epitopes and specificities of four monoclonal antibodies were identified. Using sera from ten patients with newly diagnosed OPC and ten controls, we demonstrate specific IgG seroreactivity to HPV16 E1, E2, and E7 (a fold increase of 1.52, 2.19 and 1.35 in cases vs. controls, respectively, all p < 0.005), confirming our prior data on an ELISA platform. We also detect HPV52 E7 Abs in serum from a patient with cervical cancer. The HPV protein array has potential for rapid identification of serologic responses to 12 HPV types. PMID:27089055

  18. Association of Influenza Virus Proteins with Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Veit, Michael; Thaa, Bastian

    2011-01-01

    Assembly and budding of influenza virus proceeds in the viral budozone, a domain in the plasma membrane with characteristics of cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich membrane rafts. The viral transmembrane glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are intrinsically targeted to these domains, while M2 is seemingly targeted to the edge of the budozone. Virus assembly is orchestrated by the matrix protein M1, binding to all viral components and the membrane. Budding progresses by protein- and lipid-mediated membrane bending and particle scission probably mediated by M2. Here, we summarize the experimental evidence for this model with emphasis on the raft-targeting features of HA, NA, and M2 and review the functional importance of raft domains for viral protein transport, assembly and budding, environmental stability, and membrane fusion. PMID:22312341

  19. Possible association between phages, Hoc protein, and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, K; Switała-Jeleń, K; Opolski, A; Górski, A

    2006-02-01

    Mammals have become "an environment" for enterobacterial phage life cycles. Therefore it could be expected that bacteriophages adapt to them. This adaptation must comprise bacteriophage proteins. Gp Hoc seems to have significance neither for phage particle structure nor for phage antibacterial activity. It is evidently not necessary for the "typical" antibacterial actions of bacteriophages. But the rules of evolution make it improbable that gp Hoc really has no function, and non-essential genes of T4-type phages are probably important for phages' adaptation to their particular lifestyle. More interesting is the eukaryotic origin of gp Hoc: a resemblance to immunoglobulin-like proteins that reflects their evolutionary relation. Substantial differences in biological activity between T4 and a mutant that lacks gp Hoc were observed in a mammalian system. Hoc protein seems to be one of the molecules predicted to interact with mammalian organisms and/or modulate these interactions. PMID:16195787

  20. Localized mRNA translation and protein association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Recent direct observations of localization of mRNAs and proteins both in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be related to slowdown of diffusion of these species due to macromolecular crowding and their ability to aggregate and form immobile or slowly mobile complexes. Here, a generic kinetic model describing both these factors is presented and comprehensively analyzed. Although the model is non-linear, an accurate self-consistent analytical solution of the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation has been constructed, the types of localized protein distributions have been explicitly shown, and the predicted kinetic regimes of gene expression have been classified.

  1. Association of the P6 Protein of Cauliflower mosaic virus with Plasmodesmata and Plasmodesmal Proteins1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Andres; Angel, Carlos A.; Lutz, Lindy; Leisner, Scott M.; Nelson, Richard S.; Schoelz, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The P6 protein of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is responsible for the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs), which are the sites for viral gene expression, replication, and virion assembly. Moreover, recent evidence indicates that ectopically expressed P6 inclusion-like bodies (I-LBs) move in association with actin microfilaments. Because CaMV virions accumulate preferentially in P6 IBs, we hypothesized that P6 IBs have a role in delivering CaMV virions to the plasmodesmata. We have determined that the P6 protein interacts with a C2 calcium-dependent membrane-targeting protein (designated Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] Soybean Response to Cold [AtSRC2.2]) in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screen and have confirmed this interaction through coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization assays in the CaMV host Nicotiana benthamiana. An AtSRC2.2 protein fused to red fluorescent protein (RFP) was localized to the plasma membrane and specifically associated with plasmodesmata. The AtSRC2.2-RFP fusion also colocalized with two proteins previously shown to associate with plasmodesmata: the host protein Plasmodesmata-Localized Protein1 (PDLP1) and the CaMV movement protein (MP). Because P6 I-LBs colocalized with AtSRC2.2 and the P6 protein had previously been shown to interact with CaMV MP, we investigated whether P6 I-LBs might also be associated with plasmodesmata. We examined the colocalization of P6-RFP I-LBs with PDLP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and aniline blue (a stain for callose normally observed at plasmodesmata) and found that P6-RFP I-LBs were associated with each of these markers. Furthermore, P6-RFP coimmunoprecipitated with PDLP1-GFP. Our evidence that a portion of P6-GFP I-LBs associate with AtSRC2.2 and PDLP1 at plasmodesmata supports a model in which P6 IBs function to transfer CaMV virions directly to MP at the plasmodesmata. PMID:25239023

  2. Decreased activity of Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore ribosomes: correlation with developmental changes in ribosome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, A J; Wilson, J B

    1989-10-01

    Ribosomal proteins isolated from dormant zoospores were compared to the ribosomal proteins found in the active growth phase by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Zoospore ribosomes were found to contain a set of five proteins, designated Z1 to Z5, which were not present in growth phase ribosomes. The Z1-Z5 proteins were not removed by high-salt washes using either 1 M KCl or 1 M NH4 Cl. The Z1 protein is found associated with zoospore 60 S subunits while Z2-Z5 are bound to 40 S subunits. Zoospore monoribosomes and polyribosomes contain comparable levels of each of the five proteins. Approximately 60 min. after sporulation is induced, the Z1-Z5 proteins begin to accumulate on the ribosomes with the highest levels of these proteins found associated with ribosomes at the zoospore stage. During germination, the proteins gradually disappear and are not detectable on the ribosomes after 4 hr of germination. The presence of the Z1-Z5 proteins correlates with a decrease in in vitro protein synthetic activity of the fungal ribosomes. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the proteins regulate translation by completely blocking protein synthesis on a subset of ribosomes while the remainder of the ribosomes function at normal rates. PMID:2776972

  3. Studies on gonococcus infection. XV. Identification of surface proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae correlated with leukocyte association.

    PubMed Central

    King, G J; Swanson, J

    1978-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae which exhibit high levels of leukocyte association have a surface protein which is considerably diminished in isogenic gonococci which exhibit low levels of leukocyte association (LA). The LA protein exhibits strain variation in molecular weight and immunogenicity. Membranes derived from LA+ and LA- organisms show quantitative differences in their adsorption to leukocytes; these differences are analogous to those found for the intact organisms regarding their association with leukocytes. Images PMID:211086

  4. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins—MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  5. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation. PMID:25086199

  6. Effect of the microtubule-associated protein tau on dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparacino, J.; Farías, M. G.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2014-02-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with nonmotile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al., Science 319, 1086 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152993] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduces experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  7. Transmembrane Protein (Perfringolysin O) Association with Ordered Membrane Domains (Rafts) Depends Upon the Raft-Associating Properties of Protein-Bound Sterol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Because transmembrane (TM) protein localization, or nonlocalization, in ordered membrane domains (rafts) is a key to understanding membrane domain function, it is important to define the origin of protein-raft interaction. One hypothesis is that a tight noncovalent attachment of TM proteins to lipids that have a strong affinity for ordered domains can be sufficient to induce raft-protein interaction. The sterol-binding protein perfringolysin O (PFO) was used to test this hypothesis. PFO binds both to sterols that tend to localize in ordered domains (e.g., cholesterol), and to those that do not (e.g., coprostanol), but it does not bind to epicholesterol, a raft-promoting 3α-OH sterol. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay in model membrane vesicles containing coexisting ordered and disordered lipid domains, both TM and non-TM forms of PFO were found to concentrate in ordered domains in vesicles containing high and low-Tm lipids plus cholesterol or 1:1 (mol/mol) cholesterol/epicholesterol, whereas they concentrate in disordered domains in vesicles containing high-Tm and low-Tm lipids plus 1:1 (mol/mol) coprostanol/epicholesterol. Combined with previous studies this behavior indicates that TM protein association with ordered domains is dependent upon both the association of the protein-bound sterol with ordered domains and hydrophobic match between TM segments and rafts. PMID:24359745

  8. Identification of a novel protein-protein interaction motif mediating interaction of GPCR-associated sorting proteins with G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Bornert, Olivier; Møller, Thor C; Boeuf, Julien; Candusso, Marie-Pierre; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen L; Simonin, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    GPCR desensitization and down-regulation are considered key molecular events underlying the development of tolerance in vivo. Among the many regulatory proteins that are involved in these complex processes, GASP-1 have been shown to participate to the sorting of several receptors toward the degradation pathway. This protein belongs to the recently identified GPCR-associated sorting proteins (GASPs) family that comprises ten members for which structural and functional details are poorly documented. We present here a detailed structure-function relationship analysis of the molecular interaction between GASPs and a panel of GPCRs. In a first step, GST-pull down experiments revealed that all the tested GASPs display significant interactions with a wide range of GPCRs. Importantly, the different GASP members exhibiting the strongest interaction properties were also characterized by the presence of a small, highly conserved and repeated "GASP motif" of 15 amino acids. We further showed using GST-pull down, surface plasmon resonance and co-immunoprecipitation experiments that the central domain of GASP-1, which contains 22 GASP motifs, is essential for the interaction with GPCRs. We then used site directed mutagenesis and competition experiments with synthetic peptides to demonstrate that the GASP motif, and particularly its highly conserved core sequence SWFW, is critically involved in the interaction with GPCRs. Overall, our data show that several members of the GASP family interact with GPCRs and highlight the presence within GASPs of a novel protein-protein interaction motif that might represent a new target to investigate the involvement of GASPs in the modulation of the activity of GPCRs. PMID:23441177

  9. Axoplasmic transport of microtubule-associated proteins in the rat sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Takenaka, T.; Inomata, K.

    1981-09-01

    /sup 32/P-ATP was injected into the L5 dorsal root ganglion and axoplasmic transport of the phosphorylate MA proteins 2, microtubule-associated proteins 2, was observed. After the injection of /sup 32/P-ATP, the nerve was dissected out at prescribed time intervals and sliced into 5-mm pieces. Each segment was electrophoresed on an SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel and subjected to autoradiography. A protein of 310,000 dalton was transported at a velocity of 6.6-10.6 mm/day in the axon with the electrophoretic mobility identical to that of MA proteins 2, one of the key components associated with the microtubules.

  10. Protein 4.1: its association with the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Shiffer, K A; Goodman, S R

    1984-01-01

    125I-labeled protein 4.1a and 4.1b have equal ability to reassociate with inside-out erythrocyte vesicles that were depleted of protein 4.1 in addition to other peripheral membrane proteins. The reassociation of 125I-labeled protein 4.1 to protein 4.1-depleted vesicles at 4 degrees C is salt dependent, pH dependent, and saturable with a Kd of 42-50 nM and an extrapolated maximal binding capacity of 120-140 micrograms of protein 4.1 bound per mg of vesicle protein or 60-70 micrograms of protein 4.1 bound per mg of ghost protein, correlating with the protein 4.1 content in the erythrocyte membrane (6-7% of the total membrane protein). Selective proteolytic cleavage of these vesicles with papain (5 micrograms/ml at 4 degrees C) eliminates greater than 60% of the high-affinity binding sites; therefore, we conclude that the interaction of protein 4.1 with the cytoplasmic membrane surface is through a specific high-affinity protein-protein association. Images PMID:6589603

  11. Brownian dynamics study of the influences of electrostatic interaction and diffusion on protein-protein association kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H X

    1993-01-01

    A unified model is presented for protein-protein association processes that are under the influences of electrostatic interaction and diffusion (e.g., protein oligomerization, enzyme catalysis, electron and energy transfer). The proteins are modeled as spheres that bear point charges and undergo translational and rotational Brownian motion. Before association can occur the two spheres have to be aligned properly to form a reaction complex via diffusion. The reaction complex can either go on to form the product or it can dissociate into the separate reactants through diffusion. The electrostatic interaction, like diffusion, influences every step except the one that brings the reaction complex into the product. The interaction potential is obtained by extending the Kirkwood-Tanford protein model (Tanford, C., and J. G. Kirkwood. 1957. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79:5333-5339) to two charge-embedded spheres and solving the consequent equations under a particular basis set. The time-dependent association rate coefficient is then obtained through Brownian dynamics simulations according an algorithm developed earlier (Zhou, H.-X. 1990. J. Phys. Chem. 94:8794-8800). This method is applied to a model system of the cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase association process and the results confirm the experimental dependence of the association rate constant on the solution ionic strength. An important conclusion drawn from this study is that when the product is formed by very specific alignment of the reactants, as is often the case, the effect of the interaction potential is simply to scale the association rate constant by a Boltzmann factor. This explains why mutations in the interface of the reaction complex have strong influences on the association rate constant whereas those away from the interface have minimal effects. It comes about because the former mutations change the interaction potential of the reaction complex significantly and the latter ones do not. PMID:8396447

  12. Type VI secretion apparatus and phage tail-associated protein complexes share a common evolutionary origin

    SciTech Connect

    Leiman, Petr G.; Basler, Marek; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Sauder, J. Michael; Pukatzki, Stefan; Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Mekalanos, John J.

    2009-04-22

    Protein secretion is a common property of pathogenic microbes. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use at least 6 distinct extracellular protein secretion systems to export proteins through their multilayered cell envelope and in some cases into host cells. Among the most widespread is the newly recognized Type VI secretion system (T6SS) which is composed of 15--20 proteins whose biochemical functions are not well understood. Using crystallographic, biochemical, and bioinformatic analyses, we identified 3 T6SS components, which are homologous to bacteriophage tail proteins. These include the tail tube protein; the membrane-penetrating needle, situated at the distal end of the tube; and another protein associated with the needle and tube. We propose that T6SS is a multicomponent structure whose extracellular part resembles both structurally and functionally a bacteriophage tail, an efficient machine that translocates proteins and DNA across lipid membranes into cells.

  13. Detergent-associated Solution Conformations of Helical and Beta-barrel Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yiming; Lee, Byung-Kwon; Ankner, John Francis; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin; Heller, William T

    2008-01-01

    Membrane proteins present major challenges for structural biology. In particular, the production of suitable crystals for high-resolution structural determination continues to be a significant roadblock for developing an atomic-level understanding of these vital cellular systems. The use of detergents for extracting membrane proteins from the native membrane for either crystallization or reconstitution into model lipid membranes for further study is assumed to leave the protein with the proper fold with a belt of detergent encompassing the membrane-spanning segments of the structure. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to probe the detergent-associated solution conformations of three membrane proteins, namely bacteriorhodopsin (BR), the Ste2p G-protein coupled receptor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the Escherichia coli porin OmpF. The results demonstrate that, contrary to the traditional model of a detergent-associated membrane protein, the helical proteins BR and Ste2p are not in the expected, compact conformation and associated with detergent micelles, while the ?-barrel OmpF is indeed embedded in a disk-like micelle in a properly folded state. The comparison provided by the BR and Ste2p, both members of the 7TM family of helical membrane proteins, further suggests that the interhelical interactions between the transmembrane helices of the two proteins differ, such that BR, like other rhodopsins, can properly refold to crystallize, while Ste2p continues to prove resistant to crystallization from an initially detergent-associated state.

  14. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein-associated proteins using the method of digitized native protein mapping.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Chen, Jin; Wang, Ahui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shumin; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The method of digitized native protein mapping, combining nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS (in data-independent acquisition mode, or MS(E) ), was improved by using a new MS/MS mode, ion mobility separation enhanced-MS(E) (HDMS(E) ), and applied to analyze the area of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). An 18 mm × 4.8 mm rectangular area which included LDL on a nondenaturing micro 2D gel of human plasma was grid-cut into 72 square gel pieces and subjected to quantitative LC-MS/MS. Compared with MS(E) , HDMS(E) showed significantly higher performance, by assigning 50% more proteins and detecting each protein in more squares. A total of 253 proteins were assigned with LC-HDMS(E) and the quantity distribution of each was reconstructed as a native protein map. The maps showed that Apo B-100 was the most abundant protein in the grid-cut area, concentrated at pI ca. 5.4-6.1 and apparent mass ca. 1000 kDa, which corresponded to four gel pieces, squares 39-42. An Excel macro was prepared to search protein maps which showed protein quantity peaks localized within this concentrated region of Apo B-100. Twenty-two proteins out of the 252 matched this criterion, in which 19 proteins have been reported to be associated with LDL. This method only requires several microliters of a plasma sample and the principle of the protein separation is totally different from the commonly used ultracentrifugation. The results obtained by this method would provide new insights on the structure and function of LDL. PMID:27174546

  15. Deficiency of cyclase-associated protein 2 promotes arrhythmias associated with connexin43 maldistribution and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Peche, Vivek Shahaji; Linhart, Markus; Nickenig, Georg; Noegel, Angelika Anna; Schrickel, Jan Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2) plays a major role in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Since inactivation of CAP2 in a mouse model by a gene trap approach (Cap2gt/gt) results in cardiomyopathy and increased mortality, we hypothesized that CAP2 has a major impact on arrhythmias and electrophysiological parameters. Material and methods We performed long-term-ECG recordings in transgenic CAP2 deficient mice (C57BL/6) to detect spontaneous arrhythmias. In vivo electrophysiological studies by right heart catheterization and ex vivo epicardial mapping were used to analyze electrophysiological parameters, the inducibility of arrhythmias, and conduction velocities. Expression and distribution of cardiac connexins and the amount of cardiac fibrosis were evaluated. Results Spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias could be detected in Cap2gt/gt during the long-term-ECG recording. Cap2gt/gt showed marked conduction delays at atrial and ventricular levels, including a reduced heart rate (421.0 ±40.6 bpm vs. 450.8 ±27.9 bpm; p < 0.01), and prolongations of PQ (46.3 ±4.1 ms vs. 38.6 ±6.5 ms; p < 0.01), QRS (16.2 ±2.6 ms vs. 12.6 ±1.4 ms; p < 0.01), and QTc interval (55.8 ±6.0 ms vs. 45.2 ±3.3 ms; p = 0.02) in comparison to wild type mice. The PQ prolongation was due to an infra-Hisian conduction delay (HV: 9.7 ±2.1 ms vs. 6.5 ±3.1 ms; p = 0.02). The inducibility of ventricular tachycardias during the electrophysiological studies was significantly elevated in the mutant mice (inducible animals: 88% vs. 33%; p = 0.04). Cap2gt/gt showed more abnormal distribution of connexin43 compared to WT (23.0 ±4.7% vs. 2.9 ±0.8%; p < 0.01). Myocardial fibrosis was elevated in Cap2gt/gt hearts (9.1 ±6.7% vs. 5.5 ±3.3%; p < 0.01). Conclusions Loss of CAP2 results in marked electrophysiological disturbances including impaired sinus node function, conduction delays, and susceptibility to malignant arrhythmias. Structural changes in Cap2gt/gt are associated with

  16. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network. PMID:24803509

  17. Cilia and cilia-associated proteins in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seeger-Nukpezah, Tamina; Little, Joy L.; Serzhanova, Victoria; Golemis, Erica A.

    2013-01-01

    The primary cilium is a well-established target in the pathogenesis of numerous developmental and chronic disorders, and more recently is attracting interest as a structure relevant to cancer. Here we discuss mechanisms by which changes in cilia can contribute to the formation and growth of tumors. We emphasize the cancer-relevance of cilia-dependent signaling pathways and proteins including mTOR, VHL, TSC, WNT, Aurora-A, NEDD9, and Hedgehog, and highlight the emerging role of ciliary dysfunction in renal cell carcinoma, medulloblastoma, and breast cancer. PMID:24982684

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study of CSF Levels of 59 Alzheimer's Disease Candidate Proteins: Significant Associations with Proteins Involved in Amyloid Processing and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kauwe, John S. K.; Bailey, Matthew H.; Ridge, Perry G.; Perry, Rachel; Wadsworth, Mark E.; Hoyt, Kaitlyn L.; Staley, Lyndsay A.; Karch, Celeste M.; Harari, Oscar; Cruchaga, Carlos; Ainscough, Benjamin J.; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Bertelsen, Sarah; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 42 amino acid species of amyloid beta (Aβ42) and tau levels are strongly correlated with the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology including amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration and have been successfully used as endophenotypes for genetic studies of AD. Additional CSF analytes may also serve as useful endophenotypes that capture other aspects of AD pathophysiology. Here we have conducted a genome-wide association study of CSF levels of 59 AD-related analytes. All analytes were measured using the Rules Based Medicine Human DiscoveryMAP Panel, which includes analytes relevant to several disease-related processes. Data from two independently collected and measured datasets, the Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) and Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), were analyzed separately, and combined results were obtained using meta-analysis. We identified genetic associations with CSF levels of 5 proteins (Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 4 (CCL4), Interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) and Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3)) with study-wide significant p-values (p<1.46×10−10) and significant, consistent evidence for association in both the Knight ADRC and the ADNI samples. These proteins are involved in amyloid processing and pro-inflammatory signaling. SNPs associated with ACE, IL6R and MMP3 protein levels are located within the coding regions of the corresponding structural gene. The SNPs associated with CSF levels of CCL4 and CCL2 are located in known chemokine binding proteins. The genetic associations reported here are novel and suggest mechanisms for genetic control of CSF and plasma levels of these disease-related proteins. Significant SNPs in ACE and MMP3 also showed association with AD risk. Our findings suggest that these proteins/pathways may be valuable therapeutic targets for AD. Robust associations in cognitively normal

  19. Proteome-wide identification of poly(ADP-ribose) binding proteins and poly(ADP-ribose)-associated protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Isabelle, Maxim; Lo, Ken Sin; Bourassa, Sylvie; Hendzel, Michael J; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Poirier, Guy G

    2008-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) is a polymer assembled from the enzymatic polymerization of the ADP-ribosyl moiety of NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). The dynamic turnover of pADPr within the cell is essential for a number of cellular processes including progression through the cell cycle, DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic integrity, and apoptosis. In spite of the considerable advances in the knowledge of the physiological conditions modulated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions, and notwithstanding the fact that pADPr can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, few pADPr binding proteins have been identified so far. In this study, refined in silico prediction of pADPr binding proteins and large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis of pADPr binding proteins were used to establish a comprehensive repertoire of pADPr-associated proteins. Visualization and modeling of these pADPr-associated proteins in networks not only reflect the widespread involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in several pathways but also identify protein targets that could shed new light on the regulatory functions of pADPr in normal physiological conditions as well as after exposure to genotoxic stimuli. PMID:18981049

  20. Proteome-wide identification of poly(ADP-ribose) binding proteins and poly(ADP-ribose)-associated protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Isabelle, Maxim; Lo, Ken Sin; Bourassa, Sylvie; Hendzel, Michael J.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Poirier, Guy G.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) is a polymer assembled from the enzymatic polymerization of the ADP-ribosyl moiety of NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). The dynamic turnover of pADPr within the cell is essential for a number of cellular processes including progression through the cell cycle, DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic integrity, and apoptosis. In spite of the considerable advances in the knowledge of the physiological conditions modulated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions, and notwithstanding the fact that pADPr can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, few pADPr binding proteins have been identified so far. In this study, refined in silico prediction of pADPr binding proteins and large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis of pADPr binding proteins were used to establish a comprehensive repertoire of pADPr-associated proteins. Visualization and modeling of these pADPr-associated proteins in networks not only reflect the widespread involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in several pathways but also identify protein targets that could shed new light on the regulatory functions of pADPr in normal physiological conditions as well as after exposure to genotoxic stimuli. PMID:18981049

  1. Interaction of a 14-3-3 protein with the plant microtubule-associated protein EDE1

    PubMed Central

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Doonan, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The cell cycle-regulated protein ENDOSPERM DEFECTIVE 1 (EDE1) is a novel plant microtubule-associated protein essential for plant cell division and for microtubule organization in endosperm. EDE1 is only present on microtubules at mitosis and its expression is highly cell cycle regulated both at the protein and the transcript levels. Methods To search for EDE1-interacting proteins, a yeast two-hybrid screen was used in which EDE1 was fused with GAL4 DNA binding domain and expressed in a yeast strain that was then mated with a strain carrying a cDNA library fused to the GAL4 transactivation domain. Candidate interacting proteins were identified and confirmed in vitro. Key Results 14-3-3 upsilon was isolated several times from the library screen. In in vitro tests, it also interacted with EDE1: 14-3-3 upsilon most strongly associates with EDE1 in its free form, but also weakly when EDE1 is bound to microtubules. This study shows that EDE1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase substrate but that phosphorylation is not required for interaction with 14-3-3 upsilon. Conclusions The results suggest that 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in cytoskeletal organization of plant cells. The potential role of this interaction in the dynamics of EDE1 during the cell cycle is discussed. PMID:21558460

  2. Proteins Associated with SF3a60 in T. brucei

    PubMed Central

    Nyambega, Benson; Helbig, Claudia; Masiga, Daniel K.; Clayton, Christine; Levin, Mariano J.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei relies on Spliced leader trans splicing to generate functional messenger RNAs. Trans splicing joins the specialized SL exon from the SL RNA to pre-mRNAs and is mediated by the trans-spliceosome, which is made up of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and non-snRNP factors. Although the trans spliceosome is essential for trypanosomatid gene expression, not all spliceosomal protein factors are known and of these, only a few are completely characterized. In this study, we have characterized the trypanosome Splicing Factor, SF3a60, the only currently annotated SF3a component. As expected, epitope-tagged SF3a60 localizes in the trypanosome nucleus. SF3a60 is essential for cell viability but its depletion seem to have no detectable effect on trans-splicing. In addition, we used SF3a60 as bait in a Yeast-2-hybrid system screen and identified its interacting protein factors. The interactions with SF3a120, SF3a66 and SAP130 were confirmed by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. PMID:24651488

  3. Peroxymonosulfate Rapidly Inactivates the Disease-Associated Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Alexandra R; Booth, Clarissa J; Lietz, Christopher B; Li, Lingjun; Pedersen, Joel A

    2016-07-01

    Prions, the etiological agents in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, exhibit remarkable resistance to most methods of inactivation that are effective against conventional pathogens. Prions are composed of pathogenic conformers of the prion protein (PrP(TSE)). Some prion diseases are transmitted, in part, through environmental routes. The recalcitrance of prions to inactivation may lead to a persistent reservoir of infectivity that contributes to the environmental maintenance of epizootics. At present, few methods exist to remediate prion-contaminated land surfaces. Here we conducted a proof-of-principle study to examine the ability of peroxymonosulfate to degrade PrP(TSE). We find that peroxymonosulfate rapidly degrades PrP(TSE) from two species. Transition-metal-catalyzed decomposition of peroxymonosulfate to produce sulfate radicals appears to enhance degradation. We further demonstrate that exposure to peroxymonosulfate significantly reduced PrP(C) to PrP(TSE) converting ability as measured by protein misfolding cyclic amplification, used as a proxy for infectivity. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed that exposure to peroxymonosulfate results in oxidative modifications to methionine and tryptophan residues. This study indicates that peroxymonosulfate may hold promise for decontamination of prion-contaminated surfaces. PMID:27247993

  4. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen interacts with bromodomain protein Brd4 on host mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    You, Jianxin; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Denis, Gerald V; Harrington, William J; Ballestas, Mary E; Kaye, Kenneth M; Howley, Peter M

    2006-09-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is required for viral episome maintenance in host cells during latent infection. Two regions of the protein have been implicated in tethering LANA/viral episomes to the host mitotic chromosomes, and LANA chromosome-binding sites are subjects of high interest. Because previous studies had identified bromodomain protein Brd4 as the mitotic chromosome anchor for the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein, which tethers the viral episomes to host mitotic chromosomes (J. You, J. L. Croyle, A. Nishimura, K. Ozato, and P. M. Howley, Cell 117:349-360, 2004, and J. You, M. R. Schweiger, and P. M. Howley, J. Virol. 79:14956-14961, 2005), we examined whether KSHV LANA interacts with Brd4. We found that LANA binds Brd4 in vivo and in vitro and that the binding is mediated by a direct protein-protein interaction between the ET (extraterminal) domain of Brd4 and a carboxyl-terminal region of LANA previously implicated in chromosome binding. Brd4 associates with mitotic chromosomes throughout mitosis and demonstrates a strong colocalization with LANA and the KSHV episomes on host mitotic chromosomes. Although another bromodomain protein, RING3/Brd2, binds to LANA in a similar fashion in vitro, it is largely excluded from the mitotic chromosomes in KSHV-uninfected cells and is partially recruited to the chromosomes in KSHV-infected cells. These data identify Brd4 as an interacting protein for the carboxyl terminus of LANA on mitotic chromosomes and suggest distinct functional roles for the two bromodomain proteins RING3/Brd2 and Brd4 in LANA binding. Additionally, because Brd4 has recently been shown to have a role in transcription, we examined whether Brd4 can regulate the CDK2 promoter, which can be transactivated by LANA. PMID:16940503

  5. Bisphenol A accelerates capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation of rat sperm by activating protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaofeng; Ru, Yanfei; Chu, Chen; Ni, Zimei; Zhou, Yuchuan; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic estrogen-mimic chemical. It has been shown to affect many reproductive endpoints. However, the effect of BPA on the mature sperm and the mechanism of its action are not clear yet. Here, our in vitro studies indicated that BPA could accelerate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in time- and dose-dependent manners. In vivo, the adult male rats exposed to a high dose of BPA could result in a significant increase in sperm activity. Further investigation demonstrated that BPA could accelerate capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation even if sperm were incubated in medium devoid of BSA, HCO3 (-), and Ca(2+) However, this action of BPA stimulation could be blocked by H89, a highly selective blocker of protein kinase A (PKA), but not by KH7, a specific inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase. These data suggest that BPA may activate PKA to affect sperm functions and male fertility. PMID:27174873

  6. Targeting of Pseudorabies Virus Structural Proteins to Axons Requires Association of the Viral Us9 Protein with Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Mathew G.; Curanovic, Dusica; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2008-01-01

    The pseudorabies virus (PRV) Us9 protein plays a central role in targeting viral capsids and glycoproteins to axons of dissociated sympathetic neurons. As a result, Us9 null mutants are defective in anterograde transmission of infection in vivo. However, it is unclear how Us9 promotes axonal sorting of so many viral proteins. It is known that the glycoproteins gB, gC, gD and gE are associated with lipid raft microdomains on the surface of infected swine kidney cells and monocytes, and are directed into the axon in a Us9-dependent manner. In this report, we determined that Us9 is associated with lipid rafts, and that this association is critical to Us9-mediated sorting of viral structural proteins. We used infected non-polarized and polarized PC12 cells, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line that acquires many of the characteristics of sympathetic neurons in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). In these cells, Us9 is highly enriched in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Moreover, reducing the affinity of Us9 for lipid rafts inhibited anterograde transmission of infection from sympathetic neurons to epithelial cells in vitro. We conclude that association of Us9 with lipid rafts is key for efficient targeting of structural proteins to axons and, as a consequence, for directional spread of PRV from pre-synaptic to post-synaptic neurons and cells of the mammalian nervous system. PMID:18483549

  7. Quantification of protein group coherence and pathway assignment using functional association

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genomics and proteomics experiments produce a large amount of data that are awaiting functional elucidation. An important step in analyzing such data is to identify functional units, which consist of proteins that play coherent roles to carry out the function. Importantly, functional coherence is not identical with functional similarity. For example, proteins in the same pathway may not share the same Gene Ontology (GO) terms, but they work in a coordinated fashion so that the aimed function can be performed. Thus, simply applying existing functional similarity measures might not be the best solution to identify functional units in omics data. Results We have designed two scores for quantifying the functional coherence by considering association of GO terms observed in two biological contexts, co-occurrences in protein annotations and co-mentions in literature in the PubMed database. The counted co-occurrences of GO terms were normalized in a similar fashion as the statistical amino acid contact potential is computed in the protein structure prediction field. We demonstrate that the developed scores can identify functionally coherent protein sets, i.e. proteins in the same pathways, co-localized proteins, and protein complexes, with statistically significant score values showing a better accuracy than existing functional similarity scores. The scores are also capable of detecting protein pairs that interact with each other. It is further shown that the functional coherence scores can accurately assign proteins to their respective pathways. Conclusion We have developed two scores which quantify the functional coherence of sets of proteins. The scores reflect the actual associations of GO terms observed either in protein annotations or in literature. It has been shown that they have the ability to accurately distinguish biologically relevant groups of proteins from random ones as well as a good discriminative power for detecting interacting pairs of

  8. Association of lipids with integral membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyorhinis

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, T.M.; Boyer, M.J.; Keith, J.; Watson-McKown, R.; Wise, K.S.

    1988-02-01

    Triton X-114 (TX-114)-phase fractionation was used to identify and characterize integral membrane surface proteins of the wall-less procaryote Mycoplasma hyorhinis GDL. Phase fractionation of mycoplasmas followed by analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed selective partitioning of approximately 30 (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled intrinsic membrane proteins into the TX-114 phase. Similar analysis of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled cells showed that approximately 20 proteins of this organism were associated with lipid, all of which also efficiently partitioned as integral membrane components into the detergent phase. Immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from /sup 125/I-surface-labeled cells with four monoclonal antibodies to distinct surface epitopes of M. hyorhinis identified surface proteins p120, p70, p42, and p23 as intrinsic membrane components. Immunoprecipitation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled TX-114-phase proteins further established that surface proteins p120, p70, and p23 (a molecule that mediates complement-dependent mycoplasmacidal monoclonal antibody activity) were among the lipid-associated proteins of this organism. Two of these proteins, p120 and p123, were acidic (pI less than or equal to 4.5), as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing. This study established that M. hyorhinis contains an abundance of integral membrane proteins tightly associated with lipids and that many of these proteins are exposed at the external surface of the single limiting plasma membrane. Monoclonal antibodies are reported that will allow detailed analysis of the structure and processing of lipid-associated mycoplasma proteins.

  9. The Golgi-Associated Hook3 Protein Is a Member of a Novel Family of Microtubule-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walenta, Jason H.; Didier, Aaron J.; Liu, Xinran; Krämer, Helmut

    2001-01-01

    Microtubules are central to the spatial organization of diverse membrane-trafficking systems. Here, we report that Hook proteins constitute a novel family of cytosolic coiled coil proteins that bind to organelles and to microtubules. The conserved NH2-terminal domains of Hook proteins mediate attachment to microtubules, whereas the more divergent COOH-terminal domains mediate the binding to organelles. Human Hook3 bound to Golgi membranes in vitro and was enriched in the cis-Golgi in vivo. Unlike other cis-Golgi–associated proteins, however, a large fraction of Hook3 maintained its juxtanuclear localization after Brefeldin A treatment, indicating a Golgi-independent mechanism for Hook3 localization. Because overexpression of Hook3 caused fragmentation of the Golgi complex, we propose that Hook3 participates in defining the architecture and localization of the mammalian Golgi complex. PMID:11238449

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF MAIZE KERNEL ENDOSPERM PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH RESISTANCE TO AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION BY ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogens produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus during infection of susceptible crops, such as maize (Zea mays L.). Previously, embryo proteins from maize genotypes resistant or susceptible to A. flavus infection were compared using proteomics and resistance-associated proteins wer...

  11. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with a liquid protein diet for the treatment of obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Lantigua, R.A.; Amatruda, J.M.; Biddle, T.L.; Forbes, G.B.; Lockwood, D.H.

    1980-09-25

    Our data demonstrate that a liquid protein diet is frequently associated with potentially life-threatening arrhythmias that are not detected on routine electrocardiography. Several studies of metabolic balance failed to reveal a cause for these arrhythmias. We recommended that the use of liquid protein diets should be terminated pending further investigation of the causes and prevention of the cardiac toxicity.

  12. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  13. Electrostatic effects in the brownian dynamics of association and orientation of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, S.H.; Boles, J.O.; Reynolds, J.C.L.

    1987-11-05

    The Brownian dynamics (BD) method is applied to the diffusional association of electron-transfer proteins cytochrome c (CYTC) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CYP). They examine the role of protein electrostatic charge distribution and solvent mediation in the facilitation of protein-protein docking prior to the electron-transfer step. Accurate interaction potentials are computed by iterating the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation around the larger protein CYP. The lower dielectric constant inside proteins and their irregular surface topography are taken into account. Realistic criteria for determining the successful docking of the proteins are based on a combination of mutual orientation of heme planes and heme edge-to-edge distance. The proteins successfully meet the most stringent of these criteria in two distinct regions of relative separation space which coincide with two electrostatically attractive regions. The existence of a large ensemble of electrostatically stable encounter complexes seemingly with acceptable geometric requirements for electron transfer is observed rather than a single dominant complex. The reaction criteria matching the experimental association rate is the case in which the heme edge distance is inside 20 A and the heme planes are coparallel to within 60/sup 0/. Ionic strength dependence of the association rate for this case agrees with that observed in experiment in the physiological regime. Association at random heme plane orientation results in a rate constant which is almost twice as large as that from experiment.

  14. Proteomic analysis reveals the dynamic association of proteins with translated mRNAs in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Alves, Lysangela R; Avila, Andréa R; Correa, Alejandro; Holetz, Fabíola B; Mansur, Fernanda C B; Manque, Patrício A; de Menezes, Juliana P B; Buck, Gregory A; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2010-03-01

    Gene regulation is mainly post-transcriptional in trypanosomatids. The stability of mRNA and access to polysomes are thought to be tightly regulated, allowing Trypanosoma cruzi to adapt to the different environmental conditions during its life cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation requires the association between mRNAs and certain proteins to form mRNP complexes. We investigated the dynamic association between proteins and mRNAs, using poly(T) beads to isolate and characterize proteins and protein complexes bound to poly-A+ mRNAs. The protein content of these fractions was analyzed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We identified 542 protein component of the mRNP complexes associated with mRNAs. Twenty-four of the proteins obtained were present in all fractions, whereas some other proteins were exclusive to a particular fraction: epimastigote polysomal (0.37%) and post-polysomal (2.95%) fractions; stress polysomal (13.8%) and post-polysomal (40.78%) fractions. Several proteins known to be involved in mRNA metabolism were identified, and this was considered important as it made it possible to confirm the reliability of our mRNP isolation approach. This procedure allowed us to have a first insight into the composition and dynamics of mRNPs in T. cruzi. PMID:20060445

  15. Association of Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein with Nuclear Structures In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kurg, Reet; Sild, Kristiina; Ilves, Aigi; Sepp, Mari; Ustav, Mart

    2005-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses which have the capacity to establish a persistent infection in mammalian epithelial cells. The papillomavirus E2 protein is a central coordinator of viral gene expression, genome replication, and maintenance. We have investigated the distribution of bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in nuclei of proliferating cells and found that E2 is associated with cellular chromatin. This distribution does not change during the entire cell cycle. The N-terminal transactivation domain, but not the C-terminal DNA-binding domain, of the E2 protein is responsible for this association. The majority of the full-length E2 protein can only be detected in chromatin-enriched fractions but not as a free protein in the nucleus. Limited micrococcal nuclease digestion revealed that the E2 protein partitioned to different chromatin regions. A fraction of the E2 protein was located at nuclear sites that are resistant against nuclease attack, whereas the remaining E2 resided on compact chromatin accessible to micrococcal nuclease. These data suggest that there are two pools of E2 in the cell nucleus: one that localizes on transcriptionally inactive compact chromatin and the other, which compartmentalizes to transcriptionally active nuclear structures of the cell. Our data also suggest that E2 associates with chromatin through cellular protein(s), which in turn is released from chromatin at 0.4 M salt. PMID:16051845

  16. Autoimmunoreactive IgGs Against Cardiac Lipid Raft-Associated Proteins in Patients with POTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Ling, Tian-You; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Figueroa, Juan J.; Low, Phillip; Shen, Win-Kuang; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized plasma membrane microdomains that serve as platforms for integrating cellular signal transductions. We have recently reported that autoantibodies against cardiac membrane proteins are present in patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). In this study, we examined the presence of autoimmunoreactive IgGs against lipid raft proteins in these patients. IgGs were purified from the sera of 10 patients and 7 normal controls. Cardiac lipid raft preparations were isolated from normal human heart tissue. The lipid raft-associated proteins were resolved by 2DE and immunoblotted against IgGs from each subject. Protein spots that reacted specifically with patient IgGs were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Thirty-four such protein spots, and 72 unique proteins were identified. The targets of autoimmunoreactive IgGs include proteins associated with caveolae structure, adrenergic signaling, calcium signaling, cytostructures, chaperone and energy metabolism. Multiple pathways were involved including those that regulate caveolae-mediated signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, protein ubiquitination, and cardiac β-adrenergic signaling. Our results suggest that cardiac lipid raft-associated proteins are targets of autoimmunoreactive IgGs from patients with POTS. Autoimmunity may play a role in the pathogenesis of POTS. PMID:23562385

  17. Association of bovine papillomavirus E2 protein with nuclear structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kurg, Reet; Sild, Kristiina; Ilves, Aigi; Sepp, Mari; Ustav, Mart

    2005-08-01

    Papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses which have the capacity to establish a persistent infection in mammalian epithelial cells. The papillomavirus E2 protein is a central coordinator of viral gene expression, genome replication, and maintenance. We have investigated the distribution of bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in nuclei of proliferating cells and found that E2 is associated with cellular chromatin. This distribution does not change during the entire cell cycle. The N-terminal transactivation domain, but not the C-terminal DNA-binding domain, of the E2 protein is responsible for this association. The majority of the full-length E2 protein can only be detected in chromatin-enriched fractions but not as a free protein in the nucleus. Limited micrococcal nuclease digestion revealed that the E2 protein partitioned to different chromatin regions. A fraction of the E2 protein was located at nuclear sites that are resistant against nuclease attack, whereas the remaining E2 resided on compact chromatin accessible to micrococcal nuclease. These data suggest that there are two pools of E2 in the cell nucleus: one that localizes on transcriptionally inactive compact chromatin and the other, which compartmentalizes to transcriptionally active nuclear structures of the cell. Our data also suggest that E2 associates with chromatin through cellular protein(s), which in turn is released from chromatin at 0.4 M salt. PMID:16051845

  18. A Model of Protein Association Based on Their Hydrophobic and Electric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H), and electric pseudo-dipole (D) moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a) open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies); b) closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers) or closed (fixed number of monomers). Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape. PMID:25329830

  19. A model of protein association based on their hydrophobic and electric interactions.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H), and electric pseudo-dipole (D) moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a) open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies); b) closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers) or closed (fixed number of monomers). Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape. PMID:25329830

  20. Thanatos-associated protein 7 associates with template activating factor-Ibeta and inhibits histone acetylation to repress transcription.

    PubMed

    Macfarlan, Todd; Parker, J Brandon; Nagata, Kyosuke; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    The posttranslational modifications of histones on chromatin or a lack thereof is critical in transcriptional regulation. Emerging studies indicate a role for histone-binding proteins in transcriptional activation and repression. We have previously identified template-activating factor-Ibeta (TAF-Ibeta, also called PHAPII, SET, and I(2)(pp2A)) as a component of a cellular complex called inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) that masks histone acetylation in vitro and blocks histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-dependent transcription in living cells. TAF-Ibeta has also been shown to associate with transcription factors, including nuclear receptors, to regulate their activities. To identify novel interactors of TAF-Ibeta, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a previously uncharacterized human protein called thanatos-associated protein-7 (THAP7), a member of a large family of THAP domain-containing putative DNA-binding proteins. In this study we demonstrate that THAP7 associates with TAF-Ibeta in vitro and map their association domains to a C-terminal predicted coiled-coil motif on THAP7 and the central region of TAF-Ibeta. Similarly, stably transfected THAP7 associates with endogenous TAF-Ibeta in intact cells. Like TAF-Ibeta, THAP7 associates with histone H3 and histone H4 and inhibits histone acetylation. The histone-interacting domain of THAP7 is sufficient for this activity in vitro. Promoter-targeted THAP7 can also recruit TAF-Ibeta and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors/nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) proteins to promoters, and knockdown of TAF-Ibeta by small interfering RNA relieves THAP7-mediated repression, indicating that, like nuclear hormone receptors, THAP7 may represent a novel class of transcription factor that uses TAF-Ibeta as a corepressor to maintain histones in a hypoacetylated, repressed state. PMID:16195249

  1. NMR structure of the forkhead-associated domain from the Arabidopsis receptor kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gui-in; Ding, Zhaofeng; Walker, John C.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are phosphoprotein-binding modules found in diverse signaling proteins that bind partners phosphorylated on threonine or serine. Kinase-associated protein phosphatase from Arabidopsis employs its FHA domain for negative regulation of receptor-like kinase signaling pathways, which are important in plant development. The solution structure of the free state of kinase-interacting FHA domain (KI-FHA) of kinase-associated protein phosphatase has been determined with high precision and accuracy using residual dipolar couplings. KI-FHA is a sandwich of a five-stranded mixed β-sheet with a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. Despite homology only in the recognition loops, this fold is shared with FHA domains from checkpoint proteins from yeast and humans, as well as with nonhomologous MH2 domains of Smad tumor suppressors. A shared pattern of hydrophobicity throughout FHA domains and Smad MH2 domains may stabilize the core of the β-sandwich. Evolutionary trace analysis of FHA domains suggests class-specific residues in the recognition loops that could tune their phosphoprotein-binding specificity. This surface agrees with that of KI-FHA in contact with a phosphothreonine peptide ligand. Evolutionary trace analysis also predicts an unexpected swath of class-specific residues on another face of FHA domains. Protein interactions with these faces may affect assembly of transmembrane signaling complexes in plants, and in other FHA domain-containing assemblies. PMID:14500786

  2. Systematic Analysis of Endometrial Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins Based on Text Mining

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huiqiao; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to systematically characterize the expression of endometrial cancer- (EC-) associated genes and to analysis the functions, pathways, and networks of EC-associated hub proteins. Methods. Gene data for EC were extracted from the PubMed (MEDLINE) database using text mining based on NLP. PPI networks and pathways were integrated and obtained from the KEGG and other databases. Proteins that interacted with at least 10 other proteins were identified as the hub proteins of the EC-related genes network. Results. A total of 489 genes were identified as EC-related with P < 0.05, and 32 pathways were identified as significant (P < 0.05, FDR < 0.05). A network of EC-related proteins that included 271 interactions was constructed. The 17 proteins that interact with 10 or more other proteins (P < 0.05, FDR < 0.05) were identified as the hub proteins of this PPI network of EC-related genes. These 17 proteins are EGFR, MET, PDGFRB, CCND1, JUN, FGFR2, MYC, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PIK3R2, KRAS, MAPK3, CTNNB1, RELA, JAK2, AKT1, and AKT2. Conclusion. Our data may help to reveal the molecular mechanisms of EC development and provide implications for targeted therapy for EC. However, corrections between certain proteins and EC continue to require additional exploration. PMID:26366417

  3. Comparative proteomics analysis of oral cancer cell lines: identification of cancer associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A limiting factor in performing proteomics analysis on cancerous cells is the difficulty in obtaining sufficient amounts of starting material. Cell lines can be used as a simplified model system for studying changes that accompany tumorigenesis. This study used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to compare the whole cell proteome of oral cancer cell lines vs normal cells in an attempt to identify cancer associated proteins. Results Three primary cell cultures of normal cells with a limited lifespan without hTERT immortalization have been successfully established. 2DE was used to compare the whole cell proteome of these cells with that of three oral cancer cell lines. Twenty four protein spots were found to have changed in abundance. MALDI TOF/TOF was then used to determine the identity of these proteins. Identified proteins were classified into seven functional categories – structural proteins, enzymes, regulatory proteins, chaperones and others. IPA core analysis predicted that 18 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in hyperplasia, metastasis, invasion, growth and tumorigenesis. The mRNA expressions of two proteins – 14-3-3 protein sigma and Stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 – were found to correlate with the corresponding proteins’ abundance. Conclusions The outcome of this analysis demonstrated that a comparative study of whole cell proteome of cancer versus normal cell lines can be used to identify cancer associated proteins. PMID:24422745

  4. The association between phosphatidylinositol phosphodiesterase activity and a specific subunit of microtubular protein in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    1. Supernatant proteins from rat brain were separated into two fractions containing phosphatidylinositol phosphodiesterase activity by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. 2. The first fraction sediments in linear sucrose density gradients in two bands corresponding to molecular weights of 66000 and 36000. There was presumptive evidence that the lighter protein constituted the monomeric form of the enzyme. The second fraction sediments predominantly as a single protein of molecular weight 86000. 3. Treatment of rat brain supernatant with [3H]colchicine abolished the second DEAE-Sephadex peak and removed the lighter protein from the first peak. These proteins emerged in the same position as the protein binding [3H]colchicine at high salt concentration; phospholipase activity was recovered from linear sucrose density gradients in positions corresponding to molecular weights 88000 and 43000, together with an aggregate of molecular weight 140000. Electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulphate–urea–polyacrylamide gels of this fraction revealed only three proteins: the α and β-subunits of microtubular protein, of molecular weights 56000 and 52000 respectively, and a protein of molecular weight 38000. 4. A sample of microtubular protein from mouse, labelled in vivo with [3H]proline and 32Pi, was added to rat brain supernatant together with an equal amount of the same microtubular protein treated with cyclic AMP and [γ-32P]ATP and the mixture subsequently characterized by ion-exchange chromatography. Some phospholipase activity characteristic of the second peak from DEAE-Sephadex was associated with one fraction of added microtubular protein. This fraction was identified on the basis of the 3H:32P ratio as the β subunit of the protein treated with ATP and cyclic AMP. The subunit of added microtubular protein untreated with nucleotides was not associated with phospholipase activity. PMID:4353236

  5. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  6. Identification of a novel matrix protein contained in a protein aggregate associated with collagen in fish otoliths.

    PubMed

    Tohse, Hidekazu; Takagi, Yasuaki; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2008-05-01

    In the biomineralization processes, proteins are thought to control the polymorphism and morphology of the crystals by forming complexes of structural and mineral-associated proteins. To identify such proteins, we have searched for proteins that may form high-molecular-weight (HMW) aggregates in the matrix of fish otoliths that have aragonite and vaterite as their crystal polymorphs. By screening a cDNA library of the trout inner ear using an antiserum raised against whole otolith matrix, a novel protein, named otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64), was identified. The protein was found to have a molecular mass of 64 kDa, and to contain two tandem repeats and a Glu-rich region. The structure of the protein and that of its DNA are similar to those of starmaker, a protein involved in the polymorphism control in the zebrafish otoliths [Söllner C, Burghammer M, Busch-Nentwich E, Berger J, Schwarz H, Riekel C & Nicolson T (2003) Science302, 282-286]. (45)Ca overlay analysis revealed that the Glu-rich region has calcium-binding activity. Combined analysis by western blotting and deglycosylation suggested that OMM-64 is present in an HMW aggregate with heparan sulfate chains. Histological observations revealed that OMM-64 is expressed specifically in otolith matrix-producing cells and deposited onto the otolith. Moreover, the HMW aggregate binds to the inner ear-specific short-chain collagen otolin-1, and the resulting complex forms ring-like structures in the otolith matrix. Overall, OMM-64, by forming a calcium-binding aggregate that binds to otolin-1 and forming matrix protein architectures, may be involved in the control of crystal morphology during otolith biomineralization. PMID:18410381

  7. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-15

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1×, DE3×, ME3×, NEL3×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P=0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P=0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P=0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P=0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P=0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P=0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P=0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P=0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P=0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st and 2nd amide groups (P

  8. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  9. Effect of Acidic pH on Expression of Surface-Associated Proteins of Streptococcus oralis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Joanna C.; Beighton, David; Homer, Karen A.

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus oralis, a member of the mitis group of oral streptococci, is implicated in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis and is the predominant aciduric non-mutans-group streptococcus in dental plaque. We undertook to identify the most abundant surface-associated proteins of S. oralis and to investigate changes in protein expression when the organism was grown under acidic culture conditions. Surface-associated proteins were extracted from cells grown in batch culture, separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, excised, digested with trypsin, and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Putative functions were assigned by homology to a translated genomic database of Streptococcus pneumoniae. A total of 27 proteins were identified; these included a lipoprotein, a ribosome recycling factor, and the glycolytic enzymes phosphoglycerate kinase, fructose bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and enolase. The most abundant protein, phosphocarrier protein HPr, was present as three isoforms. Neither lactate dehydrogenase nor pyruvate oxidase, dominant intracellular proteins, were present among the proteins on the gels, demonstrating that proteins in the surface-associated pool did not arise as a result of cell lysis. Eleven of the proteins identified were differentially expressed when cells were grown at pH 5.2 versus pH 7.0, and these included superoxide dismutase, a homologue of dipeptidase V from Lactococcus lactis, and the protein translation elongation factors G, Tu, and Ts. This study has extended the range of streptococcal proteins known to be expressed at the cell surface. Further investigations are required to ascertain their functions at this extracellular location and determine how their expression is influenced by other environmental conditions. PMID:12957916

  10. Huntington’s Disease Protein Huntingtin Associates with its own mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; DeClercq, Josh; Dolgalev, Igor; Yu, Man Shan; Ma, Bin; Heguy, Adriana; Tanese, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Huntington’s disease (HD) protein huntingtin (Htt) plays a role in multiple cellular pathways. Deregulation of one or more of these pathways by the mutant Htt protein has been suggested to contribute to the disease pathogenesis. Our recent discovery-based proteomics studies have uncovered RNA binding proteins and translation factors associated with the endogenous Htt protein purified from mouse brains, suggesting a potential new role for Htt in RNA transport and translation. Objective: To investigate how Htt might affect RNA metabolism we set out to purify and analyze RNA associated with Htt. Methods: RNA was extracted from immunopurified Htt-containing protein complexes and analyzed by microarrays and RNA-Seq. Results: Surprisingly, the most enriched mRNA that co-purified with Htt was Htt mRNA itself. The association of Htt protein and Htt mRNA was detected independent of intact ribosomes suggesting that it is not an RNA undergoing translation. Furthermore, we identified the recently reported mis-spliced Htt mRNA encoding a truncated protein comprised of exon 1 and a portion of the downstream intron in the immunoprecipitates containing mutant Htt protein. We show that Htt protein co-localizes with Htt mRNA and that wild-type Htt reduces expression of a reporter construct harboring the Htt 3’ UTR. Conclusions: HD protein is found in a complex with its own mRNA and RNA binding proteins and translation factors. Htt may be involved in modulating its expression through post-transcriptional pathways. It is possible that Htt shares mechanistic properties similar to RNA binding proteins such as TDP-43 and FUS implicated in other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26891106

  11. G-protein from Medicago sativa: functional association to photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Muschietti, J P; Martinetto, H E; Coso, O A; Farber, M D; Torres, H N; Flawia, M M

    1993-01-01

    G-protein subunits were characterized from Medicago sativa (alfalfa) seedlings. Crude membranes and GTP-Sepharose-purified fractions were electrophoresed on SDS/polyacrylamide gels and analysed by Western blotting with 9193 (anti-alpha common) and AS/7 (anti-alpha t, anti-alpha i1 and anti-alpha i2) polyclonal antibodies. These procedures led to the identification of a specific polypeptide band of about 43 kDa. Another polypeptide reacting with the SW/1 (anti-beta) antibody, of about 37 kDa, was also detected. The 43 kDa polypeptide bound specifically [alpha-32P]GTP by a photoaffinity reaction and was ADP-ribosylated by activated cholera toxin, but not by pertussis toxin. Irradiation of etiolated Medicago sativa protoplast preparations at 660 nm for 1 min produced a maximal increase in the guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[35S])-binding rate. After this period of irradiation, the binding rate tended to decrease. The effect of a red-light (660 nm) pulse on the binding rate was reversed when it was immediately followed by a period of far-red (> 730 nm) illumination. These results may suggest that activation of GTP[S]-binding rate was a consequence of conversion of phytochrome Pr into the Ptr form. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8484719

  12. Regulation of Beclin 1 Protein Phosphorylation and Autophagy by Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Death-associated Protein Kinase 3 (DAPK3).

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nobuyuki; Usui, Tatsuya; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2016-05-13

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation system that is involved in cell survival and activated in various diseases, including cancer. Beclin 1 is a central scaffold protein that assembles components for promoting or inhibiting autophagy. Association of Beclin 1 with its interacting proteins is regulated by the phosphorylation of Beclin 1 by various Ser/Thr kinases, but the Ser/Thr phosphatases that regulate these phosphorylation events remain unknown. Here we identify Ser-90 in Beclin 1 as a regulatory site whose phosphorylation is markedly enhanced in cells treated with okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Beclin 1 Ser-90 phosphorylation is induced in skeletal muscle tissues isolated from starved mice. The Beclin 1 S90A mutant blocked starvation-induced autophagy. We found association of PP2A B55α with Beclin 1, which dissociate by starvation. We also found that death-associated protein kinase 3 directly phosphorylates Beclin 1 Ser-90. We propose that physiological regulation of Beclin 1 Ser-90 phosphorylation by PP2A and death-associated protein kinase 3 controls autophagy. PMID:26994142

  13. Heterodimeric Capping Protein from Arabidopsis Is a Membrane-Associated, Actin-Binding Protein1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Wang, Xia; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Huang, Shanjin; Szymanski, Daniel B.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a major regulator of cell morphogenesis and responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. The organization and activities of the cytoskeleton are choreographed by hundreds of accessory proteins. Many actin-binding proteins are thought to be stimulus-response regulators that bind to signaling phospholipids and change their activity upon lipid binding. Whether these proteins associate with and/or are regulated by signaling lipids in plant cells remains poorly understood. Heterodimeric capping protein (CP) is a conserved and ubiquitous regulator of actin dynamics. It binds to the barbed end of filaments with high affinity and modulates filament assembly and disassembly reactions in vitro. Direct interaction of CP with phospholipids, including phosphatidic acid, results in uncapping of filament ends in vitro. Live-cell imaging and reverse-genetic analyses of cp mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) recently provided compelling support for a model in which CP activity is negatively regulated by phosphatidic acid in vivo. Here, we used complementary biochemical, subcellular fractionation, and immunofluorescence microscopy approaches to elucidate CP-membrane association. We found that CP is moderately abundant in Arabidopsis tissues and present in a microsomal membrane fraction. Sucrose density gradient separation and immunoblotting with known compartment markers were used to demonstrate that CP is enriched on membrane-bound organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. This association could facilitate cross talk between the actin cytoskeleton and a wide spectrum of essential cellular functions such as organelle motility and signal transduction. PMID:25201878

  14. EFhd2 is a novel amyloid protein associated with pathological tau in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N; Orange, François; De Jesús-Cortés, Hector; Madera, Bismark; Vaquer-Alicea, Jaime; Ballester, Juan; Guinel, Maxime J-F; Bloom, George S; Vega, Irving E

    2013-06-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium-binding protein, abundant within the central nervous system. Previous studies identified EFhd2 associated with pathological forms of tau proteins in the tauopathy mouse model JNPL3, which expresses the human tau(P301L) mutant. This association was validated in human tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role that EFhd2 may play in tauopathies is still unknown. Here, we show that EFhd2 formed amyloid structures in vitro, a capability that is reduced by calcium ions. Electron microscopy (EM) analyses demonstrated that recombinant EFhd2 formed filamentous structures. EM analyses of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions derived from human AD brains also indicated that EFhd2 co-localizes with aggregated tau proteins and formed granular structures. Immunohistological analyses of brain slices demonstrated that EFhd2 co-localizes with pathological tau proteins in AD brains, confirming the co-aggregation of EFhd2 and pathological tau. Furthermore, EFhd2's coiled-coil domain mediated its self-oligomerization in vitro and its association with tau proteins in JNPL3 mouse brain extracts. The results demonstrate that EFhd2 is a novel amyloid protein associated with pathological tau proteins in AD brain and that calcium binding may regulate the formation of EFhd2's amyloid structures. Hence, EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathobiology of tau-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23331044

  15. Prediction of nanoparticles-cell association based on corona proteins and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Jiang, Wen; Walkey, Carl D; Chan, Warren C W; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-06-01

    Cellular association of nanoparticles (NPs) in biological fluids is affected by proteins adsorbed onto the NP surface, forming a "protein corona", thereby impacting cellular bioactivity. Here we investigate, based on an extensive gold NPs protein corona dataset, the relationships between NP-cell association and protein corona fingerprints (PCFs) as well as NP physicochemical properties. Accordingly, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed based on both linear and non-linear support vector regression (SVR) models making use of a sequential forward floating selection of descriptors. The SVR model with only 6 serum proteins and zeta potential had higher accuracy (R(2) = 0.895) relative to the linear model (R(2) = 0.850) with 11 PCFs. Considering the initial pool of 148 descriptors, the APOB, A1AT, ANT3, and PLMN serum proteins along with NP zeta potential were identified as most significant to correlating NP-cell association. The present study suggests that QSARs exploration of NP-cell association data, considering the role of both NP protein corona and physicochemical properties, can support the planning and interpretation of toxicity studies and guide the design of NPs for biomedical applications. PMID:25959034

  16. DnaJ/Hsc70 chaperone complexes control the extracellular release of neurodegenerative-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sarah N; Zheng, Dali; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Martin, Mackenzie D; Chaput, Dale; Darling, April; Trotter, Justin H; Stothert, Andrew R; Nordhues, Bryce A; Lussier, April; Baker, Jeremy; Shelton, Lindsey; Kahn, Mahnoor; Blair, Laura J; Stevens, Stanley M; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-07-15

    It is now known that proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease can spread throughout the brain in a prionlike manner. However, the mechanisms regulating the trans-synaptic spread propagation, including the neuronal release of these proteins, remain unknown. The interaction of neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins with the molecular chaperone Hsc70 is well known, and we hypothesized that much like disaggregation, refolding, degradation, and even normal function, Hsc70 may dictate the extracellular fate of these proteins. Here, we show that several proteins, including TDP-43, α-synuclein, and the microtubule-associated protein tau, can be driven out of the cell by an Hsc70 co-chaperone, DnaJC5. In fact, DnaJC5 overexpression induced tau release in cells, neurons, and brain tissue, but only when activity of the chaperone Hsc70 was intact and when tau was able to associate with this chaperone. Moreover, release of tau from neurons was reduced in mice lacking the DnaJC5 gene and when the complement of DnaJs in the cell was altered. These results demonstrate that the dynamics of DnaJ/Hsc70 complexes are critically involved in the release of neurodegenerative disease proteins. PMID:27261198

  17. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Gidda, Satinder K; Kilaru, Aruna; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D

    2013-08-01

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies, or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets occur in essentially all plant cell types, many of which may not require oleosin-mediated stabilization. The proteins associated with the surface of nonseed lipid droplets, which are likely to influence the formation, stability, and turnover of this compartment, remain to be elucidated. Here, we have combined lipidomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies of avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp to identify two new lipid droplet-associated proteins, which we named LDAP1 and LDAP2. These proteins are highly similar to each other and also to the small rubber particle proteins that accumulate in rubber-producing plants. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog to LDAP1 and LDAP2, At3g05500, was localized to the surface of lipid droplets after transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells that were induced to accumulate triacylglycerols. We propose that small rubber particle protein-like proteins are involved in the general process of binding and perhaps the stabilization of lipid-rich particles in the cytosol of plant cells and that the avocado and Arabidopsis protein members reveal a new aspect of the cellular machinery that is involved in the packaging of triacylglycerols in plant tissues. PMID:23821652

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF SUMO-2/3 MODIFIED PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH MITOTIC CHROMOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Srikumar, Tharan; Lee, Christine; Osula, Omoruyi; Subramonian, Divya; Zhang, Xiang-Dong; Cotter, Robert J.; Raught, Brian; Matunis, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation is essential for progression through mitosis, but the specific protein targets and functions remain poorly understood. In this study, we used chromosome spreads to more precisely define the localization of SUMO-2/3 to the inner-centromere and protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes. We also developed methods to immunopurify proteins modified by endogenous, untagged SUMO-2/3 from mitotic chromosomes. Using these methods we identified 149 chromosome-associated SUMO-2/3 substrates by nLC-ESI-MS/MS. Approximately one-third of the identified proteins have reported functions in mitosis. Consistent with SUMO-2/3 immunolocalization, we identified known centromere and kinetochore associated proteins, as well as chromosome scaffold associated proteins. Notably, >30 proteins involved in chromatin modification or remodeling were identified. Our results provide insights into the roles of sumoylation as a regulator of chromatin structure and other diverse processes in mitosis. Furthermore, our purification and fractionation methodologies represent an important compliment to existing approaches to identify sumoylated proteins using exogenously expressed and tagged SUMOs. PMID:25367092

  19. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  20. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  1. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  2. The La RNA-binding protein interacts with the vault RNA and is a vault-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Poderycki, Michael J; Chan, Edward K L; Rome, Leonard H

    2002-10-25

    Vaults are highly conserved ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein particles with an undefined function. Three protein species (p240/TEP1, p193/VPARP, and p100/MVP) and a small RNA comprise the 13-MDa vault particle. The expression of the unique 100-kDa major vault protein is sufficient to form the basic vault structure. Previously, we have shown that stable association of the vault RNA with the vault particle is dependent on its interaction with the p240/TEP1 protein. To identify other proteins that interact with the vault RNA, we used a UV-cross-linking assay. We find that a portion of the vault RNA is complexed with the La autoantigen in a separate smaller ribonucleoprotein particle. La interacts with the vault RNA (both in vivo and in vitro) presumably through binding to 3'-uridylates. Moreover, we also demonstrate that the La autoantigen is the 50-kDa protein that we have previously reported as a protein that co-purifies with vaults. PMID:12196535

  3. The Parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1/Park7 prevents glycation damage in human keratinocyte.

    PubMed

    Advedissian, Tamara; Deshayes, Frédérique; Poirier, Françoise; Viguier, Mireille; Richarme, Gilbert

    2016-04-22

    Reducing sugars and dicarbonyls form covalent adducts with proteins through a nonenzymatic process known as glycation, which inactivates proteins, is increased in diabetic patients and is associated with diabetic complications, including retinopathy, cataracts, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiomyopathy and skin defects. We recently characterized DJ-1/Park7 as a protein deglycase that repairs proteins from glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal, two major glycating agents which are responsible for up to 65% of glycation events. In this study, we investigated the ability of DJ-1 to prevent protein glycation in keratinocytes. Glycation of collagen and keratinocyte proteins was tested by measuring ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence emission. Protein glycation in HaCaT keratinocytes was investigated by immunodetection with anti-advanced glycation endproduct antibodies, after DJ-1 depletion or overexpression. In vitro, DJ-1 prevented glycation of collagen and keratinocyte protein extracts. In cell culture, DJ-1 depletion by small interfering RNAs resulted in a 3-fold increase in protein glycation levels. Moreover, protein glycation levels were decreased several-fold in cells overexpressing DJ-1 after addition of the Nrf2 inducer sulforaphane or after transfection with a DJ-1 plasmid. Thus, the DJ-1 deglycase plays a major role in preventing protein glycation in eukaryotic cells and might be important for preventing skin glycation. PMID:26995087

  4. Conformational modulation mediated by polyglutamine expansion in CAG repeat expansion disease-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Verani, Margherita; Bustamante, Maria; Martufi, Paola; Daldin, Manuel; Cariulo, Cristina; Azzollini, Lucia; Fodale, Valentina; Puglisi, Francesca; Weiss, Andreas; Macdonald, Douglas; Petricca, Lara; Caricasole, Andrea

    2016-09-16

    We have previously reported TR-FRET based immunoassays to detect a conformational change imparted on huntingtin protein by the polyglutamine expansion, which we confirmed using biophysical methodologies. Using these immunoassays, we now report that polyglutamine expansion influences the conformational properties of other polyglutamine disease proteins, exemplified by the androgen receptor (associated with spinal bulbar muscular atrophy) and TATA binding protein (associated with spinocerebellar ataxia 17). Using artificial constructs bearing short or long polyglutamine expansions or a multimerized, unrelated epitope (mimicking the increase in anti-polyglutamine antibody epitopes present in polyglutamine repeats of increasing length) we confirmed that the conformational TR-FRET based immunoassay detects an intrinsic conformational property of polyglutamine repeats. The TR-FRET based conformational immunoassay may represent a rapid, scalable tool to identify modulators of polyglutamine-mediated conformational change in different proteins associated with CAG triplet repeat disorders. PMID:27520369

  5. Protein profiles associated with context fear conditioning and their modulation by memantine.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Md Mahiuddin; Dhanasekaran, A Ranjitha; Block, Aaron; Tong, Suhong; Costa, Alberto C S; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of the molecular basis of learning and memory has revealed details of the roles played by many genes and the proteins they encode. Because most individual studies focus on a small number of proteins, many complexities of the relationships among proteins and their dynamic responses to stimulation are not known. We have used the technique of reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) to assess the levels of more than 80 proteins/protein modifications in subcellular fractions from hippocampus and cortex of mice trained in Context Fear Conditioning (CFC). Proteins include components of signaling pathways, several encoded by immediate early genes or involved in apoptosis and inflammation, and subunits of glutamate receptors. At one hour after training, levels of more than half the proteins had changed in one or more fractions, among them multiple components of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAPK, and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin, MTOR, pathways, subunits of glutamate receptors, and the NOTCH pathway modulator, NUMB homolog (Drosophila). Levels of 37 proteins changed in the nuclear fraction of hippocampus alone. Abnormalities in levels of thirteen proteins analyzed have been reported in brains of patients with Alzheimer's Disease. We therefore further investigated the protein profiles of mice treated with memantine, a drug approved for treatment of AD. In hippocampus, memantine alone induced many changes similar to those seen after CFC and altered the levels of seven proteins associated with Alzheimer's Disease abnormalities. Lastly, to further explore the relevance of these datasets, we superimposed responses to CFC and memantine onto components of the long term potentiation pathway, a process subserving learning and memory formation. Fourteen components of the long term potentiation pathway and 26 proteins interacting with components responded to CFC and/or memantine. Together, these datasets provide a novel view of the diversity and complexity in protein

  6. Protein Profiles Associated With Context Fear Conditioning and Their Modulation by Memantine*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Md. Mahiuddin; Dhanasekaran, A. Ranjitha; Block, Aaron; Tong, Suhong; Costa, Alberto C. S.; Gardiner, Katheleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the molecular basis of learning and memory has revealed details of the roles played by many genes and the proteins they encode. Because most individual studies focus on a small number of proteins, many complexities of the relationships among proteins and their dynamic responses to stimulation are not known. We have used the technique of reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) to assess the levels of more than 80 proteins/protein modifications in subcellular fractions from hippocampus and cortex of mice trained in Context Fear Conditioning (CFC). Proteins include components of signaling pathways, several encoded by immediate early genes or involved in apoptosis and inflammation, and subunits of glutamate receptors. At one hour after training, levels of more than half the proteins had changed in one or more fractions, among them multiple components of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAPK, and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin, MTOR, pathways, subunits of glutamate receptors, and the NOTCH pathway modulator, NUMB homolog (Drosophila). Levels of 37 proteins changed in the nuclear fraction of hippocampus alone. Abnormalities in levels of thirteen proteins analyzed have been reported in brains of patients with Alzheimer's Disease. We therefore further investigated the protein profiles of mice treated with memantine, a drug approved for treatment of AD. In hippocampus, memantine alone induced many changes similar to those seen after CFC and altered the levels of seven proteins associated with Alzheimer's Disease abnormalities. Lastly, to further explore the relevance of these datasets, we superimposed responses to CFC and memantine onto components of the long term potentiation pathway, a process subserving learning and memory formation. Fourteen components of the long term potentiation pathway and 26 proteins interacting with components responded to CFC and/or memantine. Together, these datasets provide a novel view of the diversity and complexity in protein

  7. CARDIO-PRED: an in silico tool for predicting cardiovascular-disorder associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prerna; Thukral, Nitin; Gahlot, Lokesh Kumar; Hasija, Yasha

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between proteins largely govern cellular processes and this has led to numerous efforts culminating in enormous information related to the proteins, their interactions and the function which is determined by their interactions. The main concern of the present study is to present interface analysis of cardiovascular-disorder (CVD) related proteins to shed lights on details of interactions and to emphasize the importance of using structures in network studies. This study combines the network-centred approach with three dimensional studies to comprehend the fundamentals of biology. Interface properties were used as descriptors to classify the CVD associated proteins and non-CVD associated proteins. Machine learning algorithm was used to generate a classifier based on the training set which was then used to predict potential CVD related proteins from a set of polymorphic proteins which are not known to be involved in any disease. Among several classifying algorithms applied to generate models, best performance was achieved using Random Forest with an accuracy of 69.5 %. The tool named CARDIO-PRED, based on the prediction model is present at http://www.genomeinformatics.dce.edu/CARDIO-PRED/. The predicted CVD related proteins may not be the causing factor of particular disease but can be involved in pathways and reactions yet unknown to us thus permitting a more rational analysis of disease mechanism. Study of their interactions with other proteins can significantly improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of diseases. PMID:25972989

  8. Matrix Gla Protein is Associated with Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis but not with Coronary Artery Calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Atherosclerotic coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is an inhibitor of calcification in vivo. However, little is known regarding the distribution of circulating MGP, and its associations with CHD...

  9. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype a and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins and considered to be a major venue of bioterrorist threat. BoNTs associate with neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs), forming large complexes. NAPs have been shown to shield the BoNT holotoxin from the harsh environment of ...

  10. An analysis of gene/protein associations at PubMed scale

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Event extraction following the GENIA Event corpus and BioNLP shared task models has been a considerable focus of recent work in biomedical information extraction. This work includes efforts applying event extraction methods to the entire PubMed literature database, far beyond the narrow subdomains of biomedicine for which annotated resources for extraction method development are available. Results In the present study, our aim is to estimate the coverage of all statements of gene/protein associations in PubMed that existing resources for event extraction can provide. We base our analysis on a recently released corpus automatically annotated for gene/protein entities and syntactic analyses covering the entire PubMed, and use named entity co-occurrence, shortest dependency paths and an unlexicalized classifier to identify likely statements of gene/protein associations. A set of high-frequency/high-likelihood association statements are then manually analyzed with reference to the GENIA ontology. Conclusions We present a first estimate of the overall coverage of gene/protein associations provided by existing resources for event extraction. Our results suggest that for event-type associations this coverage may be over 90%. We also identify several biologically significant associations of genes and proteins that are not addressed by these resources, suggesting directions for further extension of extraction coverage. PMID:22166173

  11. Live-cell imaging of microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) play fundamental roles in plant growth and morphogenesis. The ability to observe microtubules and MAPs in living cells using fluorescent protein fusions has propelled plant scientists forward and given them the opportunity to answer longstanding biological questions. In combination with the genetic resources available in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, our mechanistic understanding of how the microtubule cytoskeleton affects plant life has dramatically increased. It is a simple process to construct transgenic A. thaliana plants that express fluorescent protein fusions by using the disarmed plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Several screening steps are necessary to ensure that the fusion protein accurately mimics the native protein because transgenes are inserted randomly into the A. thaliana genome. To image the fluorescent proteins in planta, confocal microscopy is used to alleviate issues caused by specimen thickness and autofluorescence. PMID:23973076

  12. The 43-K protein, v1, associated with acetylcholine receptor containing membrane fragments is an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J H; Boustead, C M; Witzemann, V

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptor enriched membrane fragments were obtained from the electric organs of Torpedo marmorata. The purified membrane fragments contained several proteins in addition to the acetylcholine receptor subunits. One of these was shown to be actin by means of immune blotting with a monoclonal antibody. Brief treatment of the membranes with pH 11.0 buffer removed actin and the other non-receptor proteins including the receptor-associated 43 000 mol. wt. polypeptide. This polypeptide was shown to bind actin after transferring the proteins from one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose paper and incubating the nitrocellulose blots with actin. Specifically bound actin was demonstrated using the monoclonal antibodies to actin. No calcium or calmodulin dependency of binding was observed. The findings suggest that the 43 000 mol. wt. polypeptide is a link between the membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor and the cytoskeleton. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6389118

  13. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  14. Insights into the quaternary association of proteins through structure graphs: a case study of lectins

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The unique three-dimensional structure of both monomeric and oligomeric proteins is encoded in their sequence. The biological functions of proteins are dependent on their tertiary and quaternary structures, and hence it is important to understand the determinants of quaternary association in proteins. Although a large number of investigations have been carried out in this direction, the underlying principles of protein oligomerization are yet to be completely understood. Recently, new insights into this problem have been gained from the analysis of structure graphs of proteins belonging to the legume lectin family. The legume lectins are an interesting family of proteins with very similar tertiary structures but varied quaternary structures. Hence they have become a very good model with which to analyse the role of primary structures in determining the modes of quaternary association. The present review summarizes the results of a legume lectin study as well as those obtained from a similar analysis carried out here on the animal lectins, namely galectins, pentraxins, calnexin, calreticulin and rhesus rotavirus Vp4 sialic-acid-binding domain. The lectin structure graphs have been used to obtain clusters of non-covalently interacting amino acid residues at the intersubunit interfaces. The present study, performed along with traditional sequence alignment methods, has provided the signature sequence motifs for different kinds of quaternary association seen in lectins. Furthermore, the network representation of the lectin oligomers has enabled us to detect the residues which make extensive interactions (‘hubs’) across the oligomeric interfaces that can be targetted for interface-destabilizing mutations. The present review also provides an overview of the methodology involved in representing oligomeric protein structures as connected networks of amino acid residues. Further, it illustrates the potential of such a representation in elucidating the structural

  15. Functional genomics of intraflagellar transport-associated proteins in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Peter N; Blacque, Oliver E; Leroux, Michel R

    2009-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans presents numerous advantages for the identification and molecular analysis of intraflagellar transport (IFT)-associated proteins, which play a critical role in the formation of cilia. Many proteins were first described as participating in IFT in this organism, including IFTA-1 (IFT121), DYF-1 (fleer/IFT70), DYF-2 (IFT144), DYF-3 (Qilin), DYF-11 (MIP-T3/IFT54), DYF-13, XBX-1 (dynein light intermediate chain), XBX-2 (dynein light chain), CHE-13 (IFT57/HIPPI), orthologs of Bardet-Biedl syndrome proteins, and potential regulatory protein, IFTA-2 (RABL5/IFT22). Transgenic animals bearing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins can be generated with ease, and in vivo imaging of IFT in both wild-type and cilia mutant strains can be performed quickly. The analyses permit detailed information on the localization and dynamic properties (velocities along the ciliary axoneme) of the relevant proteins, providing insights into their potential functions in processes such as anterograde and retrograde transport and cilium formation, as well as association with distinct modules of the IFT machinery (e.g., IFT subcomplexes A or B). Behavioral studies of the corresponding IFT-associated gene mutants further enable an understanding of the ciliary role of the proteins-e.g., in chemosensation, lipid homeostasis, lifespan control, and signaling-in a multicellular animal. In this chapter, we discuss how C. elegans can be used for the identification and characterization of IFT-associated proteins, focusing on methods for the generation of GFP-tagged IFT reporter strains, time-lapse microscopy, and IFT rate measurements. PMID:20409822

  16. Characterization of proteins associating with 5' terminus of PGHS-1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Bunimov, Natalia; Laneuville, Odette

    2010-06-01

    Induction of Prostaglandin Endoperoxide H Synthase-1 (PGHS-1) gene has been previously documented in a few studies during events such as development and cellular differentiation. However, molecular mechanisms governing the regulation of PGHS-1 gene expression and contributing to changes in protein levels are poorly understood. Using the MEG-01 cell model of PGHS-1 gene induction, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the 5'UTR and the first two exons of PGHS-1 mRNA had a significant impact on decreasing the translational efficiency of a reporter gene and suggested that the presence of a secondary structure is required for conservation of this activity. This 5'end of PGHS-1 mRNA sequence has also been shown to associate with nucleolin protein. In the current study, we set to investigate the protein composition of the mRNP (messenger ribonucleoprotein) associating with the 5'end of PGHS-1 mRNA and to identify its protein members. RNA/protein binding assays coupled with LC-MS analysis identified serpin B1 and NF45 (nuclear factor 45) proteins as potential members of PGHS-1 mRNP complex. Immunoprecipitation experiments using MEG-01 protein extracts validated mass spectrometry data and confirmed binding of nucleolin, serpin B1, NF45 and NF90. The RNA fraction was extracted from immunoprecipitated mRNP complexes and association of RNA binding proteins, serpin B1, NF45 and NF90, to PGHS-1 mRNA target sequence was confirmed by RT-PCR. Together these data suggest that serpin B1, NF45 and NF90 associate with PGHS-1 mRNA and can potentially participate in the formation a single or a number of PGHS-1 ribonucleoprotein complexes, through nucleolin that possibly serves as a docking base for other protein complex members. PMID:20112001

  17. Highly efficient extraction of cellular nucleic acid associated proteins in vitro with magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Wei, Xiaoluan; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Fangjie; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-12-01

    Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) play the essential roles in gene regulation and protein expression. The global analysis of cellular NAaP would give a broad insight to understand the interaction between nucleic acids and the associated proteins, such as the important proteinous regulation factors on nucleic acids. Proteomic analysis presents a novel strategy to investigate a group of proteins. However, the large scale analysis of NAaP is yet impossible due to the lack of approaches to harvest target protein groups with a high efficiency. Herein, a simple and efficient method was developed to collect cellular NAaP using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes based on the strong interaction between carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids along with corresponding associated proteins. We found that the magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes demonstrated a nearly 100% extraction efficiency for intracellular nucleic acids from cells in vitro. Importantly, the proteins associated on nucleic acids could be highly efficiently harvested using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes due to the binding of NAaP on nucleic acids. 1594 groups of nuclear NAaP and 2595 groups of cellular NAaP were extracted and identified from about 1,000,000 cells, and 803 groups of NAaP were analyzed with only about 10,000 cells, showing a promising performance for the proteomic analysis of NAaP from minute cellular samples. This highly efficient extraction strategy for NAaP is a simple approach to identify cellular nucleic acid associated proteome, and we believed this strategy could be further applied in systems biology to understand the gene expression and regulation. PMID:23121485

  18. Predicting Cell Association of Surface-Modified Nanoparticles Using Protein Corona Structure - Activity Relationships (PCSAR).

    PubMed

    Kamath, Padmaja; Fernandez, Alberto; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are likely to interact in real-case application scenarios with mixtures of proteins and biomolecules that will absorb onto their surface forming the so-called protein corona. Information related to the composition of the protein corona and net cell association was collected from literature for a library of surface-modified gold and silver nanoparticles. For each protein in the corona, sequence information was extracted and used to calculate physicochemical properties and statistical descriptors. Data cleaning and preprocessing techniques including statistical analysis and feature selection methods were applied to remove highly correlated, redundant and non-significant features. A weighting technique was applied to construct specific signatures that represent the corona composition for each nanoparticle. Using this basic set of protein descriptors, a new Protein Corona Structure-Activity Relationship (PCSAR) that relates net cell association with the physicochemical descriptors of the proteins that form the corona was developed and validated. The features that resulted from the feature selection were in line with already published literature, and the computational model constructed on these features had a good accuracy (R(2)LOO=0.76 and R(2)LMO(25%)=0.72) and stability, with the advantage that the fingerprints based on physicochemical descriptors were independent of the specific proteins that form the corona. PMID:25961528

  19. A yeast metal resistance protein similar to human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and multidrug resistance-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Szczypka, M S; Wemmie, J A; Moye-Rowley, W S; Thiele, D J

    1994-09-01

    Members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily transport a variety of substances across biological membranes, including drugs, ions, and peptides. The yeast cadmium factor (YCF1) gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for cadmium resistance and encodes a 1,515 amino acid protein with extensive homology to both the human multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (hCFTR). S. cerevisiae cells harboring a deletion of the YCF1 gene are hypersensitive to cadmium compared with wild type cells. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that conserved amino acid residues, functionally critical in hCFTR, play a vital role in YCF1-mediated cadmium resistance. Mutagenesis of phenylalanine 713 in the YCF1 nucleotide binding fold 1, which correlates with the delta F508 mutation found in the most common form of cystic fibrosis, completely abolished YCF1 function in cadmium detoxification. Furthermore, substitution of a serine to alanine residue in a potential protein kinase A phosphorylation site in a central region of YCF1, which displays sequence similarity to the central regulatory domain of hCFTR, also rendered YCF1 nonfunctional. These results suggest that YCF1 is composed of modular domains found in human proteins which function in drug and ion transport. PMID:7521334

  20. Specific Polymorphisms in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3 Core Protein Associated with Intracellular Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Ravi; McHutchison, John; Patel, Keyur; Qiang, Guan; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2008-01-01

    Background Steatosis is a common histological finding and a poor prognostic indicator in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In HCV genotype 3–infected patients, the etiology of steatosis appears to be closely correlated with unknown viral factors that increase intracellular lipid levels. We hypothesize that specific sequence polymorphisms in HCV genotype 3 core protein may be associated with hepatic intracellular lipid accumulation. Methods Using selected serum samples from 8 HCV genotype 3–infected patients with or without steatosis, we sequenced the HCV core gene to identify candidate polymorphisms associated with increased intracellular lipid levels. Results Two polymorphisms at positions 182 and 186 of the core protein correlated with the presence (P = .03) and absence (P = .005) of intrahepatic steatosis. Transfected liver cell lines expressing core protein with steatosis-associated polymorphisms had increased intracellular lipid levels compared with non–steatosis-associated core isolates, as measured by oil red O staining (P = .02). Site-specific mutagenesis performed at positions 182 and 186 in steatosis-associated core genes yielded proteins that had decreased intracellular lipid levels in transfected cells (P = .03). Conclusions We have identified polymorphisms in HCV core protein genotype 3 that produce increased intracellular lipid levels and thus may play a significant role in lipid metabolism or trafficking, contributing to steatosis. PMID:18177246

  1. DPP6 Localization in Brain Supports Function as a Kv4 Channel Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian D.; Kwon, Elaine; Maffie, Jon; Jeong, Hyo-Young; Nadal, Marcela; Strop, Pavel; Rudy, Bernardo

    2008-01-01

    The gene encoding the dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein DPP6 (also known as DPPX) has been associated with human neural disease. However, until recently no function had been found for this protein. It has been proposed that DPP6 is an auxiliary subunit of neuronal Kv4 K+ channels, the ion channels responsible for the somato-dendritic A-type K+ current, an ionic current with crucial roles in the regulation of firing frequency, dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity. This view has been supported mainly by studies showing that DPP6 is necessary to generate channels with biophysical properties resembling the native channels in some neurons. However, independent evidence that DPP6 is a component of neuronal Kv4 channels in the brain, and whether this protein has other functions in the CNS is still lacking. We generated antibodies to DPP6 proteins to compare their distribution in brain with that of the Kv4 pore-forming subunits. DPP6 proteins were prominently expressed in neuronal populations expressing Kv4.2 proteins and both types of protein were enriched in the dendrites of these cells, strongly supporting the hypothesis that DPP6 is an associated protein of Kv4 channels in brain neurons. The observed similarity in the cellular and subcellular patterns of expression of both proteins suggests that this is the main function of DPP6 in brain. However, we also found that DPP6 antibodies intensely labeled the hippocampal mossy fiber axons, which lack Kv4 proteins, suggesting that DPP6 proteins may have additional, Kv4-unrelated functions. PMID:18978958

  2. Immunogold localization of tobravirus 2b nematode transmission helper protein associated with virus particles.

    PubMed

    Vellios, Evangelos; Duncan, George; Brown, Derek; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2002-08-15

    Transmission of the tobraviruses Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Pea early-browning virus (PEBV) by trichodorid vector nematodes requires the viral coat protein (CP) and the 2b protein, a nonstructural protein encoded by RNA2, the smaller of the two viral genomic RNAs. It is hypothesized that the 2b protein functions by interacting with a small, flexible domain located at the C-terminus of the CP, forming a bridge between the virus particle and the internal surface of the vector nematode feeding apparatus. Antibodies specific for the 2b protein of PEBV or TRV did not bind to virus particles that were adsorbed to electron microscope grids and were not able to trap virus particles from extracts of infected plants. However, electron microscopy of thin sections of plants infected with PEBV probed with 2b-specific antibodies which were further gold-labeled showed that the 2b protein localizes exclusively to virus particles. Similarly, immunogold localization studies showed that the 2b protein of TRV isolate PaY4 is associated only with TRV PaY4 virus particles. When a recombinant TRV encoding the PaY4 2b protein and the CP from TRV isolate PpK20 was examined, the 2b protein could not be detected by Western blotting and in IGL experiments was not associated with virus particles. These results suggest that in the absence of a specific interaction between compatible CP and 2b proteins, the 2b protein does not accumulate. PMID:12202212

  3. Heterochromatin-Associated Proteins HP1a and Piwi Collaborate to Maintain the Association of Achiasmate Homologs in Drosophila Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Giauque, Christopher C; Bickel, Sharon E

    2016-05-01

    Accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis depends on their ability to remain physically connected throughout prophase I. For homologs that achieve a crossover, sister chromatid cohesion distal to the chiasma keeps them attached until anaphase I. However, in Drosophila melanogaster wild-type oocytes, chromosome 4 never recombines, and the X chromosome fails to cross over in 6-10% of oocytes. Proper segregation of these achiasmate homologs relies on their pericentric heterochromatin-mediated association, but the mechanism(s) underlying this attachment remains poorly understood. Using an inducible RNA interference (RNAi) strategy combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to monitor centromere proximal association of the achiasmate FM7a/X homolog pair, we asked whether specific heterochromatin-associated proteins are required for the association and proper segregation of achiasmate homologs in Drosophila oocytes. When we knock down HP1a, H3K9 methytransferases, or the HP1a binding partner Piwi during mid-prophase, we observe significant disruption of pericentric heterochromatin-mediated association of FM7a/X homologs. Furthermore, for both HP1a and Piwi knockdown oocytes, transgenic coexpression of the corresponding wild-type protein is able to rescue RNAi-induced defects, but expression of a mutant protein with a single amino acid change that disrupts the HP1a-Piwi interaction is unable to do so. We show that Piwi is stably bound to numerous sites along the meiotic chromosomes, including centromere proximal regions. In addition, reduction of HP1a or Piwi during meiotic prophase induces a significant increase in FM7a/X segregation errors. We present a speculative model outlining how HP1a and Piwi could collaborate to keep achiasmate chromosomes associated in a homology-dependent manner. PMID:26984058

  4. Integrating gene expression and protein-protein interaction network to prioritize cancer-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To understand the roles they play in complex diseases, genes need to be investigated in the networks they are involved in. Integration of gene expression and network data is a promising approach to prioritize disease-associated genes. Some methods have been developed in this field, but the problem is still far from being solved. Results In this paper, we developed a method, Networked Gene Prioritizer (NGP), to prioritize cancer-associated genes. Applications on several breast cancer and lung cancer datasets demonstrated that NGP performs better than the existing methods. It provides stable top ranking genes between independent datasets. The top-ranked genes by NGP are enriched in the cancer-associated pathways. The top-ranked genes by NGP-PLK1, MCM2, MCM3, MCM7, MCM10 and SKP2 might coordinate to promote cell cycle related processes in cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions In this paper, we have developed a method named NGP, to prioritize cancer-associated genes. Our results demonstrated that NGP performs better than the existing methods. PMID:22838965

  5. The Peptide Network between Tetanus Toxin and Human Proteins Associated with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Guglielmo; Spinosa, Jean Pierre; Kanduc, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Sequence matching analyses show that Clostridium tetani neurotoxin shares numerous pentapeptides (68, including multiple occurrences) with 42 human proteins that, when altered, have been associated with epilepsy. Such a peptide sharing is higher than expected, nonstochastic, and involves tetanus toxin-derived epitopes that have been validated as immunopositive in the human host. Of note, an unexpected high level of peptide matching is found in mitogen-activated protein kinase 10 (MK10), a protein selectively expressed in hippocampal areas. On the whole, the data indicate a potential for cross-reactivity between the neurotoxin and specific epilepsy-associated proteins and may help evaluate the potential risk for epilepsy following immune responses induced by tetanus infection. Moreover, this study may contribute to clarifying the etiopathogenesis of the different types of epilepsy. PMID:24982805

  6. Proteins that appear to be associated with pili in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Muir, L L; Strugnell, R A; Davies, J K

    1988-01-01

    Pili of Neisseria gonorrhoeae are thought to be composed entirely of identical subunits, called pilin, that self-assemble in vitro. Previous pilus purification methods have relied on this latter point, and dissociation and reassociation of pilin subunits has yielded pilin preparations of high purity. Such a procedure could result in the loss of any pilus-associated proteins. We have developed a procedure for the isolation of intact native pili in a deoxycholate-urea buffer in which the pili are fractionated on the basis of size and hydrophobicity. Electron microscopy indicates that the pili are largely free from outer membrane vesicles and other cellular material. Electrophoretic analysis has shown that a number of proteins copurify with pilin. Antibodies to these proteins could be removed from an antiserum against whole piliated cells by absorption with piliated cells but not by absorption with nonpiliated cells. Hence, our results indicate that these proteins could be pilus associated. Images PMID:2898429

  7. Wool Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in Sheep-A Review.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Zhou, Huitong; Forrest, Rachel H J; Li, Shaobin; Wang, Jiqing; Dyer, Jolon M; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G H

    2016-01-01

    The importance of sheep's wool in making textiles has inspired extensive research into its structure and the underlying genetics since the 1960s. Wool keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are a key structural component of the wool fibre. The characterisation of the genes encoding these proteins has progressed rapidly with advances in the nucleotide and protein sequencing. This review describes our knowledge of ovine KAPs, their categorisation into families, polymorphism in the proteins and genes, the clustering and chromosomal location of the genes, some characteristics of gene expression and some potential effects of the KAPs on wool traits. The extent and nature of genetic variation in wool KAP genes and its association with fibre characteristics, provides an opportunity for the development of gene-markers for selective breeding of sheep to produce better wool with properties highly matched to specific end-uses. PMID:27240405

  8. Degradation of lipid droplet-associated proteins by chaperone-mediated autophagy facilitates lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Susmita; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) selectively degrades a subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. A potent physiological activator of CMA is nutrient deprivation, a condition in which intracellular triglyceride stores or lipid droplets (LD) also undergo hydrolysis (lipolysis) to generate free fatty acids for energetic purposes. Here we report that LD-associated proteins perilipin 2 (PLIN2) and perilipin 3 (PLIN3) are CMA substrates and their degradation via CMA precedes lipolysis. In vivo studies revealed that CMA degradation of PLIN2 and PLIN3 was enhanced during starvation, concurrent with elevated levels of cytosolic adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and macroautophagy proteins on LD. CMA blockage both in cultured cells and mouse liver or expression of CMA-resistant PLINs lead to reduced association of ATGL and macrolipophagy-related proteins with LD and the subsequent decrease in lipid oxidation and accumulation of LD. We propose a role of CMA in LD biology and in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis. PMID:25961502

  9. Wool Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in Sheep—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hua; Zhou, Huitong; Forrest, Rachel H. J.; Li, Shaobin; Wang, Jiqing; Dyer, Jolon M.; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of sheep’s wool in making textiles has inspired extensive research into its structure and the underlying genetics since the 1960s. Wool keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are a key structural component of the wool fibre. The characterisation of the genes encoding these proteins has progressed rapidly with advances in the nucleotide and protein sequencing. This review describes our knowledge of ovine KAPs, their categorisation into families, polymorphism in the proteins and genes, the clustering and chromosomal location of the genes, some characteristics of gene expression and some potential effects of the KAPs on wool traits. The extent and nature of genetic variation in wool KAP genes and its association with fibre characteristics, provides an opportunity for the development of gene-markers for selective breeding of sheep to produce better wool with properties highly matched to specific end-uses. PMID:27240405

  10. Herpes simplex virus protein UL11 but not UL51 is associated with lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nozawa, Naoki; Mori, Isamu; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2007-12-01

    The UL11 and UL51 gene products of herpes simplex virus (HSV) are membrane-associated tegument proteins that are incorporated into the HSV virion. UL11 and UL51 are conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. Both UL11 and UL51, either singly or in combination, are involved in virion envelopment and/or egress. Both proteins are fatty acylated: UL11 is both acylated by myristoic and palmitoic acids and UL51 is monoacylated by palmitoic acid. Using confocal microscopy and sucrose gradient fractionations in transfected or HSV-infected cells, we found that HSV-2 UL11 but not UL51 was associated with lipid rafts. The dual acylation of UL11 was necessary for lipid raft association, as mutations in the myristoylation or palmitoylation sites prevented lipid raft association. These differences in lipid raft association may contribute to the functional differences between UL11 and UL51. PMID:17694428

  11. Comprehensive proteome analysis of an Apc mouse model uncovers proteins associated with intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth E; Faca, Vitor; Song, Kenneth; Sarracino, David A; Richard, Larissa Georgeon; Krastins, Bryan; Forrester, Sara; Porter, Andrew; Kunin, Alexandra; Mahmood, Umar; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir M; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2009-03-01

    Tumor-derived proteins may occur in the circulation as a result of secretion, shedding from the cell surface, or cell turnover. We have applied an in-depth comprehensive proteomic strategy to plasma from intestinal tumor-bearing Apc mutant mice to identify proteins associated with tumor development. We used quantitative tandem mass spectrometry of fractionated mouse plasma to identify differentially expressed proteins in plasma from intestinal tumor-bearing Apc mutant mice relative to matched controls. Up-regulated proteins were assessed for the expression of corresponding genes in tumor tissue. A subset of proteins implicated in colorectal cancer were selected for further analysis at the tissue level using antibody microarrays, Western blotting, tumor immunohistochemistry, and novel fluorescent imaging. We identified 51 proteins that were elevated in plasma with concordant up-regulation at the RNA level in tumor tissue. The list included multiple proteins involved in colon cancer pathogenesis: cathepsin B and cathepsin D, cullin 1, Parkinson disease 7, muscle pyruvate kinase, and Ran. Of these, Parkinson disease 7, muscle pyruvate kinase, and Ran were also found to be up-regulated in human colon adenoma samples. We have identified proteins with direct relevance to colorectal carcinogenesis that are present both in plasma and in tumor tissue in intestinal tumor-bearing mice. Our results show that integrated analysis of the plasma proteome and tumor transcriptome of genetically engineered mouse models is a powerful approach for the identification of tumor-related plasma proteins. PMID:19240248

  12. The CCN Family Proteins: Modulators of Bone Development and Novel Targets in Bone-Associated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Chun; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins is composed of six extracellular matrix-associated proteins that play crucial roles in skeletal development, wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer. Members of the CCN family share four conserved cysteine-rich modular domains that trigger signal transduction in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival through direct binding to specific integrin receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In the present review, we discuss the roles of the CCN family proteins in regulating resident cells of the bone microenvironment. In vertebrate development, the CCN family plays a critical role in osteo/chondrogenesis and vasculo/angiogenesis. These effects are regulated through signaling via integrins, bone morphogenetic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, Wnt, and Notch via direct binding to CCN family proteins. Due to the important roles of CCN family proteins in skeletal development, abnormal expression of CCN proteins is related to the tumorigenesis of primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and chondrosarcoma. Additionally, emerging studies have suggested that CCN proteins may affect progression of secondary metastatic bone tumors by moderating the bone microenvironment. CCN proteins could therefore serve as potential therapeutic targets for drug development against primary and metastatic bone tumors. PMID:24551846

  13. Postranslational modifications significantly alter the binding-folding pathways of proteins associating with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Many important regulators of gene activity are natively disordered, but fully or partially order when they bind to their targets on DNA. Interestingly, the ensembles of disordered states for such free proteins are not structurally featureless, but can qualitatively differ from protein to protein. In particular, in random coil like states the chains are swollen, making relatively few contacts, while in molten globule like states a significant collapse occurs, with ensuing high density of intra-protein interactions. Furthermore, since many DNA binding proteins are positively charged polyelectrolytes, the electrostatic self-repulsion also influences the degree of collapse of the chain and its conformational preferences in the free state and upon binding to DNA. In our work, we have found that the nature of the natively disordered ensemble significantly affects the way the protein folds upon binding to DNA. In particular, we showed that posttranslational modifications of amino acid residues, such as lysine acetylation, can alter the degree of collapse and conformational preferences for a free protein, and also profoundly impact the binding affinity and pathways for the protein DNA association. These trends will be discussed in the context of DNA interacting with various histone tails and the p53 protein.

  14. Evolutionary Diversification of the Sm Family of RNA-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Sm family of proteins is closely associated with RNA metabolism throughout all life. These proteins form homomorphic and heteromorphic rings consisting of six or seven subunits with a characteristic central pore, the presence of which is critical for binding U-rich regions of single-stranded RNA. Eubacteria and Archaea typically carry one or two forms of Sm proteins and assemble one homomorphic ring per Sm protein. Eukaryotes typically carry 16 or more Sm proteins that assemble to form heteromorphic rings which lie at the center of a number of critical RNA-associated small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). High Sm protein diversity and heteromorphic Sm rings are features stretching back to the origin of eukaryotes; very deep phylogenetic divisions among existing Sm proteins indicate simultaneous evolution across essentially all existing eukaryotic life. Two basic forms of heteromorphic Sm rings are found in eukaryotes. Fixed Sm rings are highly stable and static and are assembled around an RNA cofactor. Flexible Sm rings also stabilize and chaperone RNA but assemble in the absence of an RNA substrate and, more significantly, associate with and dissociate from RNA substrates more freely than fixed rings. This suggests that the conformation of flexible Sm rings might be modified in some specific manner to facilitate association and dissociation with RNA. Diversification of eukaryotic Sm proteins may have been initiated by gene transfers and/or genome clashes that accompanied the origin of the eukaryotic cell itself, with further diversification driven by a greater need for steric specificity within increasingly complex snRNPs. PMID:18687770

  15. Global deletion of BCATm increases expression of skeletal muscle genes associated with protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Christopher J; Kimball, Scot R; Xu, Yuping; Salzberg, Anna C; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura

    2015-11-01

    Consumption of a protein-containing meal by a fasted animal promotes protein accretion in skeletal muscle, in part through leucine stimulation of protein synthesis and indirectly through repression of protein degradation mediated by its metabolite, α-ketoisocaproate. Mice lacking the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm/Bcat2), which interconverts leucine and α-ketoisocaproate, exhibit elevated protein turnover. Here, the transcriptomes of gastrocnemius muscle from BCATm knockout (KO) and wild-type mice were compared by next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify potential adaptations associated with their persistently altered nutrient signaling. Statistically significant changes in the abundance of 1,486/∼39,010 genes were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the RNA-Seq data indicated that pathways involved in protein synthesis [eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)-2, mammalian target of rapamycin, eIF4, and p70S6K pathways including 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins], protein breakdown (e.g., ubiquitin mediated), and muscle degeneration (apoptosis, atrophy, myopathy, and cell death) were upregulated. Also in agreement with our previous observations, the abundance of mRNAs associated with reduced body size, glycemia, plasma insulin, and lipid signaling pathways was altered in BCATm KO mice. Consistently, genes encoding anaerobic and/or oxidative metabolism of carbohydrate, fatty acids, and branched chain amino acids were modestly but systematically reduced. Although there was no indication that muscle fiber type was different between KO and wild-type mice, a difference in the abundance of mRNAs associated with a muscular dystrophy phenotype was observed, consistent with the published exercise intolerance of these mice. The results suggest transcriptional adaptations occur in BCATm KO mice that along with altered nutrient signaling may contribute to their previously reported protein turnover, metabolic and exercise phenotypes. PMID

  16. C-reactive protein gene variants: independent association with late-life depression and circulating protein levels.

    PubMed

    Ancelin, M-L; Farré, A; Carrière, I; Ritchie, K; Chaudieu, I; Ryan, J

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable biomarker of systemic inflammation that is commonly elevated in depressed patients. Variants in the CRP gene that influence protein levels could thus be associated with depression but this has seldom been examined, especially in the elderly. Depression was assessed in 990 people aged at least 65 years as part of the ESPRIT study. A clinical level of depression (DEP) was defined as having a score of ⩾16 on The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale or a diagnosis of current major depression based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms spanning the CRP gene were genotyped, and circulating levels of high-sensitivity CRP were determined. Multivariable analyses adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, smoking, ischemic pathologies, cognitive impairment and inflammation-related chronic pathologies. The minor alleles of rs1130864 and rs1417938 were associated with a decreased risk of depression in women at Bonferroni-corrected significance levels (P=0.002). CRP gene variants were associated with serum levels in a gender-specific manner, but only rs1205 was found to be nominally associated with both an increased risk of DEP and lower circulating CRP levels in women. Variants of the CRP gene thus influence circulating CRP levels and appear as independent susceptibility factors for late-life depression. PMID:25603415

  17. Nectin-like molecule 1 is a protein 4.1N associated protein and recruits protein 4.1N from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Du, Guangwei; Hu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Shun; Liu, Yaobo; Xu, Yaqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Liu, Jin; Yin, Bin; Fan, Ming; Peng, Xiaozhong; Qiang, Boqin; Yuan, Jiangang

    2005-05-20

    Nectins are immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecules that participate in the organization of epithelial and endothelial junctions. Sharing high homology with the poliovirus receptor (PVR/CD155), nectins were also named poliovirus receptor-related proteins (PRRs). Four nectins and five nectin-like molecules have been identified. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of human and mouse nectin-like molecular 1 (NECL1). Human and mouse NECL1 share 87.3% identity at the amino acid level. NECL1 contains an ectodomain made of three immunoglobulin-like domains, and a cytoplasmic region homologous to those of glycophorin C and contactin-associated protein. RNA blot and in situ hybridization analysis showed that NECL1 predominantly expressed in the central nervous system, mainly in neuronal cell bodies in a variety of brain regions including the cerebellum, cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro binding assay proved the association of NECL1 with protein 4.1N. NECL1 localizes to the cell-cell junctions and recruits protein 4.1N to the plasma membranes through its C-terminus, thus may regulate the function of the cell-cell junction. We propose that the NECL1 and protein 4.1N complex is involved in the morphological development, stability, and dynamic plasticity of the nervous system. PMID:15893517

  18. Protein-like fully reversible tetramerisation and super-association of an aminocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolajski, Melanie; Adams, Gary G.; Gillis, Richard B.; Besong, David Tabot; Rowe, Arthur J.; Heinze, Thomas; Harding, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Unusual protein-like, partially reversible associative behaviour has recently been observed in solutions of the water soluble carbohydrates known as 6-deoxy-6-(ω-aminoalkyl)aminocelluloses, which produce controllable self-assembling films for enzyme immobilisation and other biotechnological applications. Now, for the first time, we have found a fully reversible self-association (tetramerisation) within this family of polysaccharides. Remarkably these carbohydrate tetramers are then seen to associate further in a regular way into supra-molecular complexes. Fully reversible oligomerisation has been hitherto completely unknown for carbohydrates and instead resembles in some respects the assembly of polypeptides and proteins like haemoglobin and its sickle cell mutation. Our traditional perceptions as to what might be considered ``protein-like'' and what might be considered as ``carbohydrate-like'' behaviour may need to be rendered more flexible, at least as far as interaction phenomena are concerned.

  19. Function of nucleoid-associated proteins in chromosome structuring and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoid-associated proteins typically are abundant, low-molecular-mass polypeptides that bind DNA and alter its shape and its ability to participate in transactions such as transcription. Some can bind RNA and influence the gene expression profile of the cell at a posttranscriptional level. They also have the potential to model and remodel the structure of the nucleoid, contributing to chromosome packaging within the cell. Some nucleoid-associated proteins have been implicated in the facilitation of chromosome evolution through their ability to silence transcription, allowing new genes to be integrated into the nucleoid both physically and in a regulatory sense. The dynamic composition of the population of nucleoid-associated proteins in model bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica links nucleoid structure and the global regulation of gene expression, enhancing microbial competitive fitness and survival in complex environments. PMID:25732335

  20. Arabinogalactan protein and wall-associated kinase in a plasmalemmal reticulum with specialized vertices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gens, J. S.; Fujiki, M.; Pickard, B. G.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Arabinogalactan protein and wall-associated kinase (WAK) are suspected to be regulatory players at the interface between cytoplasm and cell wall. Both WAK(s) and arabinogalactan shown likely to represent arabinogalactan protein(s) have been visualized there with computational optical-sectioning microscopy. The arabinogalactan occurs in a polyhedral array at the external face of the cell membrane. WAK, and other proteins as yet unidentified, appear to fasten the membrane to the wall at vertices of the array. Evidence is presented that the array bears an important part of the mechanical stress experienced by the membrane, and it is speculated that the architectural organization of arabinogalactan protein, WAK, and other components of the array is critical for coordination of endomembrane activities, growth, and differentiation. The array has been named the plasmalemmal reticulum.

  1. In-depth mapping of human testicular and epididymal proteins and their functional association with spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XUEXIA; LIU, FUJUN

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian testis and epididymis are responsible for spermatozoa production and maturation, which contributes to male fertility. Predominantly expressed proteins in the testis and epididymis were suggested to be involved in the key functions or pathways in spermatogenesis and sperm maturation. To further investigate these proteins and their associations with sperm, large protein profiles of human testis and epididymis were mapped. Predominantly-expressed testicular (173) and epididymal (244) secreted proteins were further screened and functionally characterized. Differential expression levels of solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter), member 3, solute carrier family 25 (carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase), member 20, WAP-type four-disulfide core domain protein 8 and prostate and testis expressed 1 were validated using western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results may provide novel insight into the understanding of testicular and epididymal physiology and function, and facilitate sperm maturation research. PMID:25760095

  2. Protein–Protein and Protein–Membrane Associations in the Lignin Pathway[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bassard, Jean-Etienne; Richert, Ludovic; Geerinck, Jan; Renault, Hugues; Duval, Frédéric; Ullmann, Pascaline; Schmitt, Martine; Meyer, Etienne; Mutterer, Jerôme; Boerjan, Wout; De Jaeger, Geert; Mely, Yves; Goossens, Alain; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular organization of enzymes is proposed to orchestrate metabolic complexity and help channel intermediates in different pathways. Phenylpropanoid metabolism has to direct up to 30% of the carbon fixed by plants to the biosynthesis of lignin precursors. Effective coupling of the enzymes in the pathway thus seems to be required. Subcellular localization, mobility, protein–protein, and protein–membrane interactions of four consecutive enzymes around the main branch point leading to lignin precursors was investigated in leaf tissues of Nicotiana benthamiana and cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. CYP73A5 and CYP98A3, the two Arabidopsis cytochrome P450s (P450s) catalyzing para- and meta-hydroxylations of the phenolic ring of monolignols were found to colocalize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to form homo- and heteromers. They moved along with the fast remodeling plant ER, but their lateral diffusion on the ER surface was restricted, likely due to association with other ER proteins. The connecting soluble enzyme hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT), was found partially associated with the ER. Both HCT and the 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase relocalized closer to the membrane upon P450 expression. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy supports P450 colocalization and interaction with the soluble proteins, enhanced by the expression of the partner proteins. Protein relocalization was further enhanced in tissues undergoing wound repair. CYP98A3 was the most effective in driving protein association. PMID:23175744

  3. Isolation and Analysis of Keratins and Keratin-Associated Proteins from Hair and Wool.

    PubMed

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Plowman, Jeffrey E; Harland, Duane P

    2016-01-01

    The presence of highly cross-linked protein networks in hair and wool makes them very difficult substrates for protein extraction, a prerequisite for further protein analysis and characterization. It is therefore imperative that these cross-links formed by disulfide bridges are first disrupted for the efficient extraction of proteins. Chaotropes such as urea are commonly used as efficient extractants. However, a combination of urea and thiourea not only improves recovery of proteins but also results in improved resolution of the keratins in 2DE gels. Reductants also play an important role in protein dissolution. Dithiothreitol effectively removes keratinous material from the cortex, whereas phosphines, like Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, remove material from the exocuticle. The relative extractability of the keratins and keratin-associated proteins is also dependent on the concentration of chaotropes, reductants, and pH, thus providing a means to preferentially extract these proteins. Ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM(+)[Cl](-)) are known to solubilize wool by disrupting noncovalent interactions, specifically intermolecular hydrogen bonds. BMIM(+)[Cl](-) proved to be an effective extractant of wool proteins and complementary in nature to chaotropes such as urea and thiourea for identifying unique peptides of wool proteins using mass spectrometry (MS). Successful identification of proteins resolved by one- or two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS is highly dependent on the optimal recovery of its protease-digested peptides with an efficient removal of interfering substances. The detergent sodium deoxycholate used in conjunction with Empore™ disks improved identification of proteins by mass spectrometry leading to higher percentage sequence coverage, identification of unique peptides and higher score. PMID:26795475

  4. Laser capture microdissection to identify septum-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fischer, Reinhard; Teichert, Ines; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To spatially resolve genetic differences at the cellular level, the laser-capture microdissection technique was developed. With this method cells can be cut from tissues with a laser beam and analyzed for DNA, RNA or protein composition. Here we adapted the technique to isolate septal microtubule-organizing center (MTOC)-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans About 3000 septa were collected and subjected to peptide fingerprinting by mass-spectrometric analysis. We identified the microtubule polymerase AlpA and found it interacts with ApsB specifically at sMTOCs, suggesting that AlpA might be involved in the assembly or the functioning of this protein complex. PMID:26951366

  5. Interaction with the Yes-associated protein (YAP) allows TEAD1 to positively regulate NAIP expression.

    PubMed

    Landin Malt, André; Georges, Adrien; Silber, Joël; Zider, Alain; Flagiello, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Although the expression of the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered involved in apoptosis suppression as well as in inflammatory response, the molecular basis of the NAIP gene expression is poorly understood. Here we show that the TEA domain protein 1 (TEAD1) is able to positively activate the transcription of NAIP. We further demonstrate that this regulation is mediated by the presence of the endogenous Yes associated protein (YAP) cofactor, and requires the interaction with YAP. We finally identified an intronic region of the NAIP gene responding to TEAD1/YAP activity, suggesting that regulation of NAIP by TEAD1/YAP is at the transcriptional level. PMID:23994529

  6. Identification of a cellulose synthase-associated protein required for cellulose biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Kaplinsky, Nick; Bringmann, Martin; Cobb, Alex; Carroll, Andrew; Sampathkumar, Arun; Baskin, Tobias I.; Persson, Staffan; Somerville, Chris R.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose synthase-interactive protein 1 (CSI1) was identified in a two-hybrid screen for proteins that interact with cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms involved in primary plant cell wall synthesis. CSI1 encodes a 2,150-amino acid protein that contains 10 predicted Armadillo repeats and a C2 domain. Mutations in CSI1 cause defective cell elongation in hypocotyls and roots and reduce cellulose content. CSI1 is associated with CESA complexes, and csi1 mutants affect the distribution and movement of CESA complexes in the plasma membrane. PMID:20616083

  7. Association of polyalanine and polyglutamine coiled coils mediates expansion disease-related protein aggregation and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Corà, Davide; Cesano, Federico; Monje, Francisco J.; Montarolo, Pier Giorgio; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of homopolymeric glutamine (polyQ) or alanine (polyA) repeats in certain proteins owing to genetic mutations induces protein aggregation and toxicity, causing at least 18 human diseases. PolyQ and polyA repeats can also associate in the same proteins, but the general extent of their association in proteomes is unknown. Furthermore, the structural mechanisms by which their expansion causes disease are not well understood, and these repeats are generally thought to misfold upon expansion into aggregation-prone β-sheet structures like amyloids. However, recent evidence indicates a critical role for coiled-coil (CC) structures in triggering aggregation and toxicity of polyQ-expanded proteins, raising the possibility that polyA repeats may as well form these structures, by themselves or in association with polyQ. We found through bioinformatics screenings that polyA, polyQ and polyQA repeats have a phylogenetically graded association in human and non-human proteomes and associate/overlap with CC domains. Circular dichroism and cross-linking experiments revealed that polyA repeats can form—alone or with polyQ and polyQA—CC structures that increase in stability with polyA length, forming higher-order multimers and polymers in vitro. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we studied the relevance of polyA CCs to the in vivo aggregation and toxicity of RUNX2—a polyQ/polyA protein associated with cleidocranial dysplasia upon polyA expansion—and found that the stability of its polyQ/polyA CC controls its aggregation, localization and toxicity. These findings indicate that, like polyQ, polyA repeats form CC structures that can trigger protein aggregation and toxicity upon expansion in human genetic diseases. PMID:24497578

  8. Association of polyalanine and polyglutamine coiled coils mediates expansion disease-related protein aggregation and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Corà, Davide; Cesano, Federico; Monje, Francisco J; Montarolo, Pier Giorgio; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2014-07-01

    The expansion of homopolymeric glutamine (polyQ) or alanine (polyA) repeats in certain proteins owing to genetic mutations induces protein aggregation and toxicity, causing at least 18 human diseases. PolyQ and polyA repeats can also associate in the same proteins, but the general extent of their association in proteomes is unknown. Furthermore, the structural mechanisms by which their expansion causes disease are not well understood, and these repeats are generally thought to misfold upon expansion into aggregation-prone β-sheet structures like amyloids. However, recent evidence indicates a critical role for coiled-coil (CC) structures in triggering aggregation and toxicity of polyQ-expanded proteins, raising the possibility that polyA repeats may as well form these structures, by themselves or in association with polyQ. We found through bioinformatics screenings that polyA, polyQ and polyQA repeats have a phylogenetically graded association in human and non-human proteomes and associate/overlap with CC domains. Circular dichroism and cross-linking experiments revealed that polyA repeats can form--alone or with polyQ and polyQA--CC structures that increase in stability with polyA length, forming higher-order multimers and polymers in vitro. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we studied the relevance of polyA CCs to the in vivo aggregation and toxicity of RUNX2--a polyQ/polyA protein associated with cleidocranial dysplasia upon polyA expansion--and found that the stability of its polyQ/polyA CC controls its aggregation, localization and toxicity. These findings indicate that, like polyQ, polyA repeats form CC structures that can trigger protein aggregation and toxicity upon expansion in human genetic diseases. PMID:24497578

  9. PTMcode: a database of known and predicted functional associations between post-translational modifications in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Minguez, Pablo; Letunic, Ivica; Parca, Luca; Bork, Peer

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in the regulation and structural stabilization of eukaryotic proteins. The combination of individual PTM states is a key to modulate cellular functions as became evident in a few well-studied proteins. This combinatorial setting, dubbed the PTM code, has been proposed to be extended to whole proteomes in eukaryotes. Although we are still far from deciphering such a complex language, thousands of protein PTM sites are being mapped by high-throughput technologies, thus providing sufficient data for comparative analysis. PTMcode (http://ptmcode.embl.de) aims to compile known and predicted PTM associations to provide a framework that would enable hypothesis-driven experimental or computational analysis of various scales. In its first release, PTMcode provides PTM functional associations of 13 different PTM types within proteins in 8 eukaryotes. They are based on five evidence channels: a literature survey, residue co-evolution, structural proximity, PTMs at the same residue and location within PTM highly enriched protein regions (hotspots). PTMcode is presented as a protein-based searchable database with an interactive web interface providing the context of the co-regulation of nearly 75 000 residues in >10 000 proteins. PMID:23193284

  10. Topography of Lipid Droplet-Associated Proteins: Insights from Freeze-Fracture Replica Immunogold Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Robenek, Horst; Buers, Insa; Robenek, Mirko J.; Hofnagel, Oliver; Ruebel, Anneke; Troyer, David; Severs, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets are not merely storage depots for superfluous intracellular lipids in times of hyperlipidemic stress, but metabolically active organelles involved in cellular homeostasis. Our concepts on the metabolic functions of lipid droplets have come from studies on lipid droplet-associated proteins. This realization has made the study of proteins, such as PAT family proteins, caveolins, and several others that are targeted to lipid droplets, an intriguing and rapidly developing area of intensive inquiry. Our existing understanding of the structure, protein organization, and biogenesis of the lipid droplet has relied heavily on microscopical techniques that lack resolution and the ability to preserve native cellular and protein composition. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling overcomes these disadvantages and can be used to define at high resolution the precise location of lipid droplet-associated proteins. In this paper illustrative examples of how freeze-fracture immunocytochemistry has contributed to our understanding of the spatial organization in the membrane plane and function of PAT family proteins and caveolin-1 are presented. By revisiting the lipid droplet with freeze-fracture immunocytochemistry, new perspectives have emerged which challenge prevailing concepts of lipid droplet biology and may hopefully provide a timely impulse for many ongoing studies. PMID:21490801

  11. Several Novel Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identified in Skeletal Muscle Have Cytoskeletal Associations*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K.; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  12. Several novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins identified in skeletal muscle have cytoskeletal associations.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Gavin S; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R W; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  13. Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yongqin; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Dill, Brian D.; Shah, Manesh; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Hettich, Robert L.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by ∼2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as β-N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development. PMID:21685158

  14. Hsp56: A novel heat shock protein associated with untransformed steroid receptor complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, E.R. )

    1990-12-25

    The recently-described p59 protein has been shown to be associated with untransformed steroid receptors present in rabbit uterus and rat liver cytosols while a smaller version of this protein (p56) interacts with glucocorticoid receptors in human IM-9 cell cytosols. In addition to interacting with glucocorticoid receptors, the p56 protein of IM-9 cell cytosol is also found as part of a large heteromeric complex that contains both the 70-kDa and 90-kDa heat shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp90, respectively). Given this association of p56 with the two major stress proteins, I have speculated that p56 may itself be a heat shock protein. In this paper, the effect of heat stress on the rate of synthesis of p56 is determined. Intact IM-9 cells were exposed to 37 or 43 degrees C for 4 h, followed by pulse-labeling with (35S)methionine. Analysis of whole cytosolic extracts by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography reveal an increased rate of radiolabeling for hsp70, hsp90, hsp100, ad hsp110, but no heat-inducible protein of smaller relative molecular mass is detected. However, immune-purification of p56 from normal and heat-stressed cytosols with the EC1 monoclonal antibody results in the presence of a 56-kDa protein that exhibits an increased rate of synthesis in response to heat stress. The results of two-dimensional gel Western blots employing the EC1 antibody demonstrate that this heat-inducible protein is indeed the EC1-reactive p56 protein and that the induction effect is not due to unequal yields of p56 during immune-purification.

  15. Serum Proteins Alteration in Association with Body Mass Index in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Madhuvanthi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Serum proteins are an important indicator of the nutritional status in an individual. There is a worldwide prevalence of both undernourishment and obesity. It has been suggested that low Body Mass Index (BMI) is associated with a decrease in serum protein levels predisposing them to other illnesses. Overweight and obese individuals carry risk for various other non-communicable diseases. Aim To compare the serum protein levels in underweight, overweight and obese individuals with that of normal body mass index individuals. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted in subjects who attended the master health checkup clinic of PSG hospitals. Subjects in the age group of 20-50 years were selected. Their serum proteins and BMI was measured. Twenty subjects each of underweight, normal, overweight and obese individuals were selected, categorized and compared. Results The serum protein level of normal individuals (Group I) was compared with underweight (Group II), overweight (Group III) and obese subjects (Group IV) by one-way ANOVA analysis. The mean serum total proteins in gm/dl in group I controls was 7.555±0.37 compared to Group II (underweight) which was 7.295±0.419. Low BMI was found to be associated with a decrease in serum protein level which was not statistically significant. Elevated BMI as in overweight and obese subjects showed no significant alterations in serum protein levels with p >0.05 and the changes were found to be independent of the body mass index. Conclusion Underweight individuals showed a decrease in serum protein levels whereas there were no significant changes in the serum protein levels in overweight and obese individuals. PMID:27504281

  16. Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yongqin; D'Haeseleer, Patrik M; Dill, Brian; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by 2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as -N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development.

  17. Endobrevin, a novel synaptobrevin/VAMP-like protein preferentially associated with the early endosome.

    PubMed

    Wong, S H; Zhang, T; Xu, Y; Subramaniam, V N; Griffiths, G; Hong, W

    1998-06-01

    Synaptobrevins/vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) together with syntaxins and a synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are the main components of a protein complex involved in the docking and/or fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. We report here the molecular, biochemical, and cell biological characterization of a novel member of the synaptobrevin/VAMP family. The amino acid sequence of endobrevin has 32, 33, and 31% identity to those of synaptobrevin/VAMP-1, synaptobrevin/VAMP-2, and cellubrevin, respectively. Membrane fractionation studies demonstrate that endobrevin is enriched in membrane fractions that are also enriched in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy establishes that endobrevin is primarily associated with the perinuclear vesicular structures of the early endocytic compartment. The preferential association of endobrevin with the early endosome was further established by electron microscopy (EM) immunogold labeling. In vitro binding assays show that endobrevin interacts with immobilized recombinant alpha-SNAP fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Our results highlight the general importance of members of the synaptobrevin/VAMP protein family in membrane traffic and provide new avenues for future functional and mechanistic studies of this protein as well as the endocytotic pathway. PMID:9614193

  18. Different Transmembrane Domains Associate with Distinct Endoplasmic Reticulum Components during Membrane Integration of a Polytopic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meacock, Suzanna L.; Lecomte, Fabienne J.L.; Crawshaw, Samuel G.; High, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We have been studying the insertion of the seven transmembrane domain (TM) protein opsin to gain insights into how the multiple TMs of polytopic proteins are integrated at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We find that the ER components associated with the first and second TMs of the nascent opsin polypeptide chain are clearly distinct. The first TM (TM1) is adjacent to the α and β subunits of the Sec61 complex, and a novel component, a protein associated with the ER translocon of 10 kDa (PAT-10). The most striking characteristic of PAT-10 is that it remains adjacent to TM1 throughout the biogenesis and membrane integration of the full-length opsin polypeptide. TM2 is also found to be adjacent to Sec61α and Sec61β during its membrane integration. However, TM2 does not form any adducts with PAT-10; rather, a transient association with the TRAM protein is observed. We show that the association of PAT-10 with opsin TM1 does not require the N-glycosylation of the nascent chain and occurs irrespective of the amino acid sequence and transmembrane topology of TM1. We conclude that the precise makeup of the ER membrane insertion site can be distinct for the different transmembrane domains of a polytopic protein. We find that the environment of a particular TM can be influenced by both the “stage” of nascent chain biosynthesis reached, and the TM's relative location within the polypeptide. PMID:12475939

  19. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins. PMID:25084333

  20. Isolation and solubilization of gram-positive bacterial cell wall-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jason N; Djordjevic, Steven P; Walker, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes a simple, rapid and reproducible method to prepare bacterial cell wall extracts for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). The extraction process uses mutanolysin, an N-acetylmuramidase, to gently solubilize cell wall-associated proteins from Gram-positive prokaryotes. The cells are first washed with buffer and resuspended in a solution containing mutanolysin. Following incubation at 37 degrees C, the sample is centrifuged and the supernatant containing the soluble cell wall-associated proteins is harvested. Following a brief precipitation step, the pellet is solubilized in sample buffer ready for isoelectric focusing and 2DE analysis. PMID:18369905

  1. Detection of gene annotations and protein-protein interaction associated disorders through transitive relationships between integrated annotations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasingly high amounts of heterogeneous and valuable controlled biomolecular annotations are available, but far from exhaustive and scattered in many databases. Several annotation integration and prediction approaches have been proposed, but these issues are still unsolved. We previously created a Genomic and Proteomic Knowledge Base (GPKB) that efficiently integrates many distributed biomolecular annotation and interaction data of several organisms, including 32,956,102 gene annotations, 273,522,470 protein annotations and 277,095 protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Results By comprehensively leveraging transitive relationships defined by the numerous association data integrated in GPKB, we developed a software procedure that effectively detects and supplement consistent biomolecular annotations not present in the integrated sources. According to some defined logic rules, it does so only when the semantic type of data and of their relationships, as well as the cardinality of the relationships, allow identifying molecular biology compliant annotations. Thanks to controlled consistency and quality enforced on data integrated in GPKB, and to the procedures used to avoid error propagation during their automatic processing, we could reliably identify many annotations, which we integrated in GPKB. They comprise 3,144 gene to pathway and 21,942 gene to biological function annotations of many organisms, and 1,027 candidate associations between 317 genetic disorders and 782 human PPIs. Overall estimated recall and precision of our approach were 90.56 % and 96.61 %, respectively. Co-functional evaluation of genes with known function showed high functional similarity between genes with new detected and known annotation to the same pathway; considering also the new detected gene functional annotations enhanced such functional similarity, which resembled the one existing between genes known to be annotated to the same pathway. Strong evidence was also found in

  2. Protein association of the neurotoxin and non-protein amino acid BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in the liver and brain following neonatal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Andersson, Marie; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2014-04-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not an amino acid that is normally found in proteins. Our previous autoradiographic study of (3)H-labeled BMAA in adult mice unexpectedly revealed a tissue distribution similar to that of protein amino acids. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of free and protein-bound BMAA in neonatal rat tissues following a short exposure using autoradiographic imaging and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The autoradiographic imaging of (14)C-L-BMAA demonstrated a distinct uptake of radioactivity that was retained following acid extraction in tissues with a high rate of cell turnover and/or protein synthesis. The UHPLC-MS/MS analysis conclusively demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat tissues. The level of protein-associated BMAA in the liver was more than 10 times higher than that in brain regions not fully protected by the blood-brain barrier which may be due to the higher rate of protein synthesis in the liver. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BMAA was associated with rat proteins suggesting that BMAA may be misincorporated into proteins. However, protein-associated BMAA seemed to be cleared over time, as none of the samples from adult rats had any detectable free or protein-associated BMAA. PMID:24472610

  3. Anomalous self-diffusion and sticky Rouse dynamics in associative protein hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shengchang; Wang, Muzhou; Olsen, Bradley D

    2015-03-25

    Natural and synthetic materials based on associating polymers possess diverse mechanical behavior, transport properties and responsiveness to external stimuli. Although much is known about their dynamics on the molecular and macroscopic level, knowledge of self-diffusive dynamics of the network-forming constituents remains limited. Using forced Rayleigh scattering, anomalous self-diffusion is observed in model associating protein hydrogels originating from the interconversion between species that diffuse in both the molecular and associated state. The diffusion can be quantitatively modeled using a two-state model for polymers in the gel, where diffusivity in the associated state is critical to the super diffusive behavior. The dissociation time from bulk rheology measurements was 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the one measured by diffusion, because the former characterizes submolecular dissociation dynamics, whereas the latter depicts single protein molecules completely disengaging from the network. Rheological data also show a sticky Rouse-like relaxation at long times due to collective relaxation of large groups of proteins, suggesting mobility of associated molecules. This study experimentally demonstrates a hierarchy of relaxation processes in associating polymer networks, and it is anticipated that the results can be generalized to other associative systems to better understand the relationship of dynamics among sticky bonds, single molecules, and the entire network. PMID:25764061

  4. Uncovering RNA binding proteins associated with age and gender during liver maturation

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Praneet; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Arif, Waqar; Kalsotra, Auinash; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we perform an association analysis focusing on the expression changes of 1344 RNA Binding proteins (RBPs) as a function of age and gender in human liver. We identify 88 and 45 RBPs to be significantly associated with age and gender respectively. Experimental verification of several of the predicted associations in mice confirmed our findings. Our results suggest that a small fraction of the gender-associated RBPs (~40%) are expressed higher in males than females. Altogether, these observations show that several of these RBPs are important and conserved regulators in maintaining liver function. Further analysis of the protein interaction network of RBPs associated with age and gender based on the centrality measures like degree, betweenness and closeness revealed that several of these RBPs might be prominent players in aging liver and impart gender specific alterations in gene expression via the formation of protein complexes. Indeed, both age and gender-associated RBPs in liver were found to show significantly higher clustering coefficients and network centrality measures compared to non-associated RBPs. The compendium of RBPs and this study will help us gain insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulatory molecules in aging and gender specific expression of genes. PMID:25824884

  5. Identification of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor with multiple domains implicated in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Nativ, M; Lustig, M; Grumet, M; Schilling, J; Martinez, R; Plowman, G D; Schlessinger, J

    1997-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) expressed on the surface of glial cells binds to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored recognition molecule contactin on neuronal cells leading to neurite outgrowth. We describe the cloning of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor (p190/Caspr) containing a mosaic of domains implicated in protein-protein interactions. The extracellular domain of Caspr contains a neurophilin/coagulation factor homology domain, a region related to fibrinogen beta/gamma, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, neurexin motifs as well as unique PGY repeats found in a molluscan adhesive protein. The cytoplasmic domain of Caspr contains a proline-rich sequence capable of binding to a subclass of SH3 domains of signaling molecules. Caspr and contactin exist as a complex in rat brain and are bound to each other by means of lateral (cis) interactions in the plasma membrane. We propose that Caspr may function as a signaling component of contactin, enabling recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways in neurons. The binding of RPTPbeta to the contactin-Caspr complex could provide a mechanism for cell-cell communication between glial cells and neurons during development. PMID:9118959

  6. Conformational Transitions in Protein-Protein Association: Binding of Fasciculin-2 to Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Radic, Zoran; Taylor, Palmer; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The neurotoxin fasciculin-2 (FAS2) is a picomolar inhibitor of synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The dynamics of binding between FAS2 and AChE is influenced by conformational fluctuations both before and after protein encounter. Submicrosecond molecular dynamics trajectories of apo forms of fasciculin, corresponding to different conformational substates, are reported here with reference to the conformational changes of loop I of this three-fingered toxin. This highly flexible loop exhibits an ensemble of conformations within each substate corresponding to its functions. The high energy barrier found between the two major substates leads to transitions that are slow on the timescale of the diffusional encounter of noninteracting FAS2 and AChE. The more stable of the two apo substates may not be the one observed in the complex with AChE. It seems likely that the more stable apo form binds rapidly to AChE and conformational readjustments then occur in the resulting encounter complex. PMID:16473897

  7. Cytoskeletal proteins in cortical development and disease: actin associated proteins in periventricular heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Gewei; Sheen, Volney L.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton regulates many important cellular processes in the brain, including cell division and proliferation, migration, and cytokinesis and differentiation. These developmental processes can be regulated through actin dependent vesicle and organelle movement, cell signaling, and the establishment and maintenance of cell junctions and cell shape. Many of these processes are mediated by extensive and intimate interactions of actin with cellular membranes and proteins. Disruption in the actin cytoskeleton in the brain gives rise to periventricular heterotopia (PH), a malformation of cortical development, characterized by abnormal neurons clustered deep in the brain along the lateral ventricles. This disorder can give rise to seizures, dyslexia and psychiatric disturbances. Anatomically, PH is characterized by a smaller brain (impaired proliferation), heterotopia (impaired initial migration) and disruption along the neuroependymal lining (impaired cell-cell adhesion). Genes causal for PH have also been implicated in actin-dependent processes. The current review provides mechanistic insight into actin cytoskeletal regulation of cortical development in the context of this malformation of cortical development. PMID:25883548

  8. Bactericidal Permeability Increasing Protein Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in the Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Can, Güray; Akın, Hakan; Özdemir, Filiz T.; Can, Hatice; Yılmaz, Bülent; Eren, Fatih; Atuğ, Özlen; Ünsal, Belkıs; Hamzaoğlu, Hülya O.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology, affects the small and large bowel at different levels. It is increasingly considered that innate immune system may have a central position in the pathogenesis of the disease. As a part of the innate immune system, bactericidal permeability increasing protein has an important role in the recognition and neutralization of gram-negative bacteria. The aim of our study was to investigate the involvement of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism (bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu) in inflammatory bowel disease in a large group of Turkish patients. Patients and Methods: The present study included 528 inflammatory bowel disease patients, 224 with Crohn's disease and 304 with ulcerative colitis, and 339 healthy controls. Results: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism was found to be associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (P = 0.0001). The frequency of the Glu/Glu genotype was significantly lower in patients using steroids and in those with steroid dependence (P = 0.012, OR, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.94; P = 0.0286, OR, 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66-0.86, respectively). There was no other association between bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism and phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusions: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism is associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This is the first study reporting the association of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism with steroid use and dependence in Crohn's disease. PMID:26228368

  9. Analysis of proteins associated with growth of Bacteroides ovatus on the branched galactomannan guar gum.

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, P J; Salyers, A A

    1992-01-01

    Bacteroides ovatus, a gram-negative obligate anaerobe from the human colon, can ferment the branched galactomannan guar gum. Previously, three enzymes involved in guar gum breakdown were characterized. The expression of these enzymes appeared to be regulated; i.e., specific activities were higher in extracts from bacteria grown on guar gum than in extracts from bacteria grown on the monosaccharide constituents of guar gum, mannose and galactose. In the present study, we used two-dimensional gel analysis to determine the total number of B. ovatus proteins enhanced during growth on guar gum. Twelve soluble proteins and 20 membrane proteins were expressed at higher levels in guar gum-grown cells than in galactose-grown cells. An unexpected finding was that the expression of the two galactomannanases was induced by glucose as well as guar gum. Three other proteins, one membrane protein and two soluble proteins, had this same expression pattern. The remainder of the guar gum-associated proteins seen on two-dimensional gels and the guar gum-associated alpha-galactosidase were induced in cells grown on guar gum but not in cells grown on glucose. Two transposon-generated mutants (M-5 and M-7) that could not grow on guar gum were isolated. Both mutants still expressed the galactomannanases and the alpha-galactosidase. They also still expressed all of the guar gum-associated proteins that could be detected in two-dimensional gels of glucose-grown or galactose-grown cells. A second transposon insertion that suppressed the guar gum-negative phenotype of M-5 was isolated and characterized. The characteristics of this suppressor mutant indicated that the original transposon insertion was probably in a regulatory locus. Images PMID:1622222

  10. Identification of a nonhistone chromosomal protein associated with heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster and its gene.

    PubMed Central

    James, T C; Elgin, S C

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a fraction of nuclear proteins of Drosophila melanogaster identified as tightly binding to DNA. Four of these antibodies were directed against a 19-kilodalton nuclear protein; immunofluorescence staining of the polytene chromosomes localized the antigen to the alpha, beta, and intercalary heterochromatic regions. Screening of a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library with one of the monoclonal antibodies identified a recombinant DNA phage clone that produced a fusion protein immunologically similar to the heterochromatin-associated protein. Polyclonal sera directed against the bacterial lacZ fusion protein recognized the same nuclear protein on Western blots. A full-length cDNA clone was isolated from a lambda gt10 library, and its DNA sequence was obtained. Analysis of the open reading frame revealed an 18,101-dalton protein encoded by this cDNA. Two overlapping genomic DNA clones were isolated from a Charon 4 library of D. melanogaster with the cDNA clone, and a restriction map was obtained. In situ hybridization with these probes indicated that the gene maps to a single chromosome location at 29A on the 2L chromosome. This general strategy should be effective for cloning the genes and identifying the genetic loci of chromosomal proteins which cannot be readily assayed by other means. Images PMID:3099166