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Sample records for 130-nm commercial cmos

  1. Development of a low power Delay-Locked Loop in two 130 nm CMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.

    2016-02-01

    The design and measurement results of two low power DLL prototypes for applications in particle physics readout systems are presented. The DLLs were fabricated in two different 130 nm CMOS technologies, called process A and process B, giving the opportunity to compare these two CMOS processes. Both circuits generate 64 uniform clock phases and operate at similar frequency range, from 20 MHz up to 60 MHz (10 MHz - 90 MHz in process B). The period jitter of both DLLs is in the range 2.5 ps - 12.1 ps (RMS) and depends on the selected output phase. The complete DLL functionality was experimentally verified, confirming a very low and frequency scalable power consumption of around 0.7 mW at typical 40 MHz input. The DLL prototype, designed in process A, occupies 680 μm × 210 μm, while the same circuit designed in process B occupies 430 μm × 190 μm.

  2. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA. PMID:26205275

  3. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology.

    PubMed

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode's current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm(2) of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA. PMID:26205275

  4. Cryogenic Lifetime Studies of 130 nm and 65 nm CMOS Technologies for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, James R.; Deptuch, G. W.; Wu, Guoying; Gui, Ping

    2015-06-04

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility intends to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. Research is under way to place the electronics inside the cryostat. For reasons of efficiency and economics, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This, then, requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130 nm and 65 nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. Our results show that both technologies achieve the lifetimes required by the experiment. Minimal design changes are necessary in the case of the 130 nm process and no changes whatsoever are necessary for the 65 nm process.

  5. A 1 V 186-μW 50-MS/s 10-bit subrange SAR ADC in 130-nm CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingyuan, Yu; Ting, Li; Jiaqi, Yang; Shuangshuang, Zhang; Fujiang, Lin; Lin, He

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a 10-bit 50-MS/s subrange successive-approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) composed of a 4-bit SAR coarse ADC and a 6-bit SAR fine ADC. In the coarse ADC, multi-comparator SAR architecture is used to reduce the digital logic propagation delay, and a traditional asynchronous SAR ADC with monotonic switching method is used as the fine ADC. With that combination, power dissipation also can be much reduced. Meanwhile, a modified SAR control logic is adopted in the fine ADC to speed up the conversion and other techniques, such as splitting capacitors array, are borrowed to reduce the power consumption. Fabricated with 1P8M 130-nm CMOS technology, the proposed SAR ADC achieves 51.6-dB signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) and consumes 186 μW at 50 MS/s with a 1-V supply, resulting in a figure of merit (FOM) of 12 fJ/conversion-step. The core area is only 0.045 mm2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61204033, 61331015), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. WK2100230015), and the Funds of Science and Technology on Analog Integrated Circuit Laboratory (No. 9140C090111150C09041).

  6. A saw-less direct conversion long term evolution receiver with 25% duty-cycle LO in 130 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siyuan, He; Changhong, Zhang; Liang, Tao; Weifeng, Zhang; Longyue, Zeng; Wei, Lü; Haijun, Wu

    2013-03-01

    A CMOS long-term evolution (LTE) direct convert receiver that eliminates the interstage SAW filter is presented. The receiver consists of a low noise variable gain transconductance amplifier (TCA), a quadrature passive current commutating mixer with a 25% duty-cycle LO, a trans-impedance amplifier (TIA), a 7th-order Chebyshev filter and programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs). A wide dynamic gain range is allocated in the RF and analog parts. A current commutating passive mixer with a 25% duty-cycle LO improves gain, noise, and linearity. An LPF based on a Tow-Thomas biquad suppresses out-of-band interference. Fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process, the receiver chain achieves a 107 dB maximum voltage gain, 2.7 dB DSB NF (from PAD port), -11 dBm IIP3, and > +65 dBm IIP2 after calibration, 96 dB dynamic control range with 1 dB steps, less than 2% error vector magnitude (EVM) from 2.3 to 2.7 GHz. The total receiver (total I Q path) draws 89 mA from a 1.2-V LDO on chip supply.

  7. A 12-bit 60-MS/s 36-mW SHA-less opamp-sharing pipeline ADC in 130 nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X.; Chen, J.; You, Y.; Feng, Y.; Tang, Y.; Zuo, Z.; Vosooghi, B.; Fan, Q.; Xiao, L.; Gong, D.; Liu, T.; Ye, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 12-bit 60-MS/s SHA-less opamp-sharing pipeline analog-to-digital converter (ADC) implemented in a 0.13-μ m CMOS technology. A switch-embedded dual-input current-reused operational transconductance amplifier (OTA) with an overlapping two-phase clocking scheme is proposed to achieve low power consumption and eliminate the non-resetting and memory effects observed in conventional opamp-sharing techniques. To further reduce the power consumption, the ADC also incorporates a SHA-less multi-bit structure. The ADC achieves a signal-to-noise and distortion ratio of 64.9 dB and a spurious-free dynamic range of 77.1 dB at 60 MS/s. It occupies 2.3 mm 2 of area and consumes 36 mW of power under a 1.2-V supply.

  8. Tests of commercial colour CMOS cameras for astronomical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhvala, S. M.; Reshetnyk, V. M.; Zhilyaev, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present some results of testing commercial colour CMOS cameras for astronomical applications. Colour CMOS sensors allow to perform photometry in three filters simultaneously that gives a great advantage compared with monochrome CCD detectors. The Bayer BGR colour system realized in colour CMOS sensors is close to the astronomical Johnson BVR system. The basic camera characteristics: read noise (e^{-}/pix), thermal noise (e^{-}/pix/sec) and electronic gain (e^{-}/ADU) for the commercial digital camera Canon 5D MarkIII are presented. We give the same characteristics for the scientific high performance cooled CCD camera system ALTA E47. Comparing results for tests of Canon 5D MarkIII and CCD ALTA E47 show that present-day commercial colour CMOS cameras can seriously compete with the scientific CCD cameras in deep astronomical imaging.

  9. Hardening of commercial CMOS PROMs with polysilicon fusible links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, W. H.; Rauchfuss, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The method by which a commercial 4K CMOS PROM with polysilicon fuses was hardened and the feasibility of applying this method to a 16K PROM are presented. A description of the process and the necessary minor modifications to the original layout are given. The PROM circuit and discrete device characteristics over radiation to 1000K rad-Si are summarized. The dose rate sensitivity of the 4K PROMs is also presented.

  10. Packaging commercial CMOS chips for lab on a chip integration.

    PubMed

    Datta-Chaudhuri, Timir; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2014-05-21

    Combining integrated circuitry with microfluidics enables lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices to perform sensing, freeing them from benchtop equipment. However, this integration is challenging with small chips, as is briefly reviewed with reference to key metrics for package comparison. In this paper we present a simple packaging method for including mm-sized, foundry-fabricated dies containing complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits within LOCs. The chip is embedded in an epoxy handle wafer to yield a level, large-area surface, allowing subsequent photolithographic post-processing and microfluidic integration. Electrical connection off-chip is provided by thin film metal traces passivated with parylene-C. The parylene is patterned to selectively expose the active sensing area of the chip, allowing direct interaction with a fluidic environment. The method accommodates any die size and automatically levels the die and handle wafer surfaces. Functionality was demonstrated by packaging two different types of CMOS sensor ICs, a bioamplifier chip with an array of surface electrodes connected to internal amplifiers for recording extracellular electrical signals and a capacitance sensor chip for monitoring cell adhesion and viability. Cells were cultured on the surface of both types of chips, and data were acquired using a PC. Long term culture (weeks) showed the packaging materials to be biocompatible. Package lifetime was demonstrated by exposure to fluids over a longer duration (months), and the package was robust enough to allow repeated sterilization and re-use. The ease of fabrication and good performance of this packaging method should allow wide adoption, thereby spurring advances in miniaturized sensing systems. PMID:24682025

  11. Characterization of optical proximity matching for 130-nm node gate line width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sandra; Zhang, Gary; Wang, ChangAn; Detweiler, Shangting F.

    2003-06-01

    As IC density shrinks based on Moore"s law, optical lithography continually is scaled to print ever-smaller features by using resolution enhancement techniques such as phase shift mask, optical proximity correction (OPC), off-axis illumination and sub-resolution assistant features. OPC has been playing a key role to maximize the overlapping process window through pitch in the sub-wavelength optical lithography. As an important cost control measure, one general OPC model is applied to the full exposure field across multiple scanners. To implement this technique, optical proximity matching of line width across the field and across multiple tools turns out to be very crucial particularly at gate pattern. In addition, it is very important to obtain reliable critical dimension (CD) data sets with low noise level and high accuracy from the metrology tool. Otherwise, extracting the real scanner fingerprint in term of CD can not be achieved with precision in the order of 1nm~2nm. Scatterometry CD measurements have demonstrated excellent results to overcome this problem. The methodology of Scatterometry is emerging as one of the best metrology tool candidates in terms of gate line width control for technology nodes beyond 130nm. This paper investigates the sources of error that consume the CD budget of optical proximity matching for line through pitch (LTP). The study focuses on the 130nm technology node and uses experimental data and Prolith resist vector model based simulations. Scatterometer CD measurements of LTP are used for the first time and effectively correlated to lens aberrations and effective partial coherence (EPC) measurements which were extracted by Litel In-situ Interferometer (ISI) and Source Metrology Instrument (SMI). Implications of optical proximity matching are also discussed for future technology nodes. From the results, the paper also demonstrates the efficacy of scatterometer line through pitch measurements for OPC characterization.

  12. Lifetime studies of 130nm nMOS transistors intended for long-duration, cryogenic high-energy physics experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, J.R.; Arora, R.; Cressler, J.D.; Deptuch, G.W.; Gui, P.; Lourenco, N.E.; Wu, G.; Yarema, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    Future neutrino physics experiments intend to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. To increase performance, integrated readout electronics should work inside the cryostat. Due to the scale and cost associated with evacuating and filling the cryostat, the electronics will be unserviceable for the duration of the experiment. Therefore, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is via hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. The results show that the difference in lifetime for room temperature operation and cryogenic operation for this process are not great and the lifetimes at both 300K and at 77K can be projected to more than 20 years at the nominal voltage (1.5V) for this technology.

  13. 130-nm reticle inspection using multibeam UV-wavelength database inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Christopher M.; Schlaffer, Robert

    2002-07-01

    The TeraStar family of reticle inspection systems were introduced in 2000 with die-to-die and STARlightT capability. These tools set the standard for high-resolution reticle inspection for the 130 nm design rule and below. The latest addition to the TeraStar family is the TeraStar SLF77, which extends the tool platform to include die-to-database inspection capability. Sensitivity for Chrome on Glass is 100 nm with much greater tolerance for inspecting aggressive OPC features such as serifs and assist lines. Many advanced reticles that are not inspectable on previous generation inspection tools are all inspectable on the TeraStar SLF77. Data prep times and file structure have been significantly improved with the average prep time being less than 10 percent of the 365UV-HR and average output file size less than 25 percent of the GigaPrep. The TeraStar SLF77 incorporates all the features of the TeraStar family such as triple-beam optics and TeraPro HP High Productivity Modes with the ability to run STARlight inspections concurrently with either die-to-die or die-to-database pattern inspections. Advanced registration algorithms accommodate subtle plate and machine errors to provide high sensitivity with low false detections. Advanced image overlay inspects small lines and OPC features and is very independent of defect shape and location. The TeraStar SLF77 has removed the barriers that existed with previous generation database inspection tools and made advanced reticle die-to-database inspection cost effective. Last October, KLA-Tencor introduced the TeraStar SLF77 and the three beta sites have recently completed beta evaluation. Here we present the first results from the use of the TeraStar in a production environment triple beam die-to-database inspection system. We have also shipped more than ten systems to customers worldwide. This paper describes the implementation of productivity improvements at the beta sites, performance on 130nm node customer product reticles

  14. Particle detection and classification using commercial off the shelf CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Martín; Lipovetzky, Jose; Sofo Haro, Miguel; Sidelnik, Iván; Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Alcalde Bessia, Fabricio; Berisso, Mariano Gómez

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we analyse the response of two different Commercial Off The shelf CMOS image sensors as particle detectors. Sensors were irradiated using X-ray photons, gamma photons, beta particles and alpha particles from diverse sources. The amount of charge produced by different particles, and the size of the spot registered on the sensor are compared, and analysed by an algorithm to classify them. For a known incident energy spectrum, the employed sensors provide a dose resolution lower than microGray, showing their potentials in radioprotection, area monitoring, or medical applications.

  15. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E.; Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Zhou, Z.; Ackland, B.; Dickinson, A.; Eid, E.; Inglis, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research and development of CMOS active pixel image sensors for low cost commercial applications. A number of sensor designs have been fabricated and tested in both p-well and n-well technologies. Major elements in the development of the sensor include on-chip analog signal processing circuits for the reduction of fixed pattern noise, on-chip timing and control circuits and on-chip analog-to-digital conversion (ADC). Recent results and continuing efforts in these areas will be presented.

  16. Commercial CMOS image sensors as X-ray imagers and particle beam monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Maffessanti, S.; Montemurro, G. V.; Carraresi, L.

    2015-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are widely used in several applications such as mobile handsets webcams and digital cameras among others. Furthermore they are available across a wide range of resolutions with excellent spectral and chromatic responses. In order to fulfill the need of cheap systems as beam monitors and high resolution image sensors for scientific applications we exploited the possibility of using commercial CMOS image sensors as X-rays and proton detectors. Two different sensors have been mounted and tested. An Aptina MT9v034, featuring 752 × 480 pixels, 6μm × 6μm pixel size has been mounted and successfully tested as bi-dimensional beam profile monitor, able to take pictures of the incoming proton bunches at the DeFEL beamline (1-6 MeV pulsed proton beam) of the LaBeC of INFN in Florence. The naked sensor is able to successfully detect the interactions of the single protons. The sensor point-spread-function (PSF) has been qualified with 1MeV protons and is equal to one pixel (6 mm) r.m.s. in both directions. A second sensor MT9M032, featuring 1472 × 1096 pixels, 2.2 × 2.2 μm pixel size has been mounted on a dedicated board as high-resolution imager to be used in X-ray imaging experiments with table-top generators. In order to ease and simplify the data transfer and the image acquisition the system is controlled by a dedicated micro-processor board (DM3730 1GHz SoC ARM Cortex-A8) on which a modified LINUX kernel has been implemented. The paper presents the architecture of the sensor systems and the results of the experimental measurements.

  17. Shallow-trench-isolation bounded single-photon avalanche diodes in commercial deep submicron CMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Hod

    This dissertation describes the first single-photon detection device to be manufactured in a commercial deep-submicron CMOS technology. It also describes novel self-timed peripheral circuits which optimize the performance of the new device. An extension of the new device for dual-color single-photon detection is investigated. Finally, an area- and power-efficient method for single-photon frequency upconversion is presented, analyzed, and experimentally examined. Single-photon avalanche diodes have been used in diverse applications, including three-dimensional laser radar, three-dimensional facial mapping, fluorescence-correlation techniques and time-domain tomography. Due to the high electric fields which these devices must sustain, they have traditionally been manufactured in custom processes, severely limiting their speed and the ability to integrate them in high-resolution imagers. By utilizing a process module originally designed to enhance the performance of CMOS transistors, we achieve highly planar junctions in an area-efficient manner. This results in SPADs exhibiting high fill factors, small pitch and ultrafast operation. Device miniaturization is accompanied by excessive noise, which was shown to emanate from trapped avalanche charges. Due to the fast recharging of the device, these charges are released in a subsequent charged phase of the device, causing correlated after-pulses. We present electrostatic and electrical simulation results, as well as a comprehensive characterization of the new device. We also show for the first time that by utilizing the two junctions included in the device, we can selectively detect photons of different wavelengths in the same pixel, as is desirable in cross-correlation experiments. This dissertation also describes an efficient new method for single-photon frequency upconversion. This is desirable for applications including quantum-key distribution and high-resolution near-infrared imaging. The new technique is based on

  18. Radiation-enhanced gate-induced-drain-leakage current in the 130 nm partially-depleted SOI pMOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Hu, Zhiyuan; Ning, Bingxu; Dai, Lihua; Bi, Dawei; Zhang, Zhengxuan

    2015-04-01

    The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of the pMOSFET from 130 nm partially-depleted silicon-on-insulator (PDSOI) is investigated. The data obtained from 60Co γ-ray irradiation experiments indicate that input/output (I/O) device is more susceptible to TID effect than the core device. An anomalous off-state leakage increase is observed for I/O pMOSFET when drain is biased at a high voltage after irradiation. It is proved that this radiation-induced leakage relates to the enhanced gate-induce-drain-leakage (GIDL). Both the radiation-induced interface traps at the gate-oxide/body interface and the oxide trapped charges in the buried oxide (BOX) are responsible for the growth of the leakage current. These conclusions are also verified by the TCAD simulations. The isothermal annealing can recover the leakage current to the pre-irradiation level.

  19. Investigating the degradation mechanisms caused by the TID effects in 130 nm PDSOI I/O NMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Hu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhengxuan; Huang, Huixiang; Ning, Bingxu; Bi, Dawei

    2014-06-01

    This paper evaluates the radiation responses of 3.3 V I/O NMOSFETs from 130 nm partially-depleted silicon-on-insulator (PDSOI) technology. The data obtained from 60Co ionizing radiation experiments indicate that charge trapped in the shallow trench isolation, particularly at the bottom region of the trench oxide, should be the dominant contributor to the off-state drain-to-source leakage current under ON bias. The body doping profile and device dimension are two key factors affecting the performance degradation of the PDSOI transistors after radiation. Significant front gate threshold voltage shift is observed in the T-shape gate device, which is well known as the Radiation Induced Narrow Channel Effect (RINCE). The charge trapped in the buried oxide can induce large threshold voltage shift in the front gate transistor through coupling effect in the low body doping device. The coupling effect is evaluated through three-dimensional simulation. A degradation of the carrier mobility which relates to shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide trapped charge in the narrow channel device is also discussed.

  20. Bit Distribution and Reliability of High Density 1.5 V Ferroelectric Random Access Memory Embedded with 130 nm, 5 lm Copper Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayakumar, K. R.; Boku, K.; Remack, K. A.; Rodriguez, J.; Summerfelt, S. R.; Celii, F. G.; Aggarwal, S.; Martin, J. S.; Hall, L.; Matz, L.; Rathsack, B.; McAdams, H.; Moise, T. S.

    2006-04-01

    High density embedded ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM), operable at 1.5 V, has been fabricated within a 130 nm, 5 lm Cu/fluorosilicate glass (FSG) logic process. To evaluate FRAM extendability to future process nodes, we have measured the bit distribution and reliability properties of arrays with varying individual capacitor areas ranging from 0.40 μm2 (130 nm node) to 0.15 μm2 (˜65 nm node). Wide signal margins, stable retention (≫10 years at 85 °C), and high endurance read/write cycling (≫1012 cycles) have been demonstrated, suggesting that reliable, high density FRAM can be realized.

  1. High-voltage pixel detectors in commercial CMOS technologies for ATLAS, CLIC and Mu3e experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perić, Ivan; Fischer, Peter; Kreidl, Christian; Hanh Nguyen, Hong; Augustin, Heiko; Berger, Niklaus; Kiehn, Moritz; Perrevoort, Ann-Kathrin; Schöning, André; Wiedner, Dirk; Feigl, Simon; Heim, Timon; Meng, Lingxin; Münstermann, Daniel; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Bompard, Frederic; Breugnon, Patrick; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Fougeron, Denis; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Rozanov, Alexandre; Barbero, Marlon; Backhaus, Malte; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Lütticke, Florian; Mariñas, Carlos; Obermann, Theresa; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Schwenker, Benjamin; Dierlamm, Alexander; La Rosa, Alessandro; Miucci, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    High-voltage particle detectors in commercial CMOS technologies are a detector family that allows implementation of low-cost, thin and radiation-tolerant detectors with a high time resolution. In the R/D phase of the development, a radiation tolerance of 1015 neq/cm2, nearly 100% detection efficiency and a spatial resolution of about 3 μm were demonstrated. Since 2011 the HV detectors have first applications: the technology is presently the main option for the pixel detector of the planned Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). Several prototype sensors have been designed in a standard 180 nm HV CMOS process and successfully tested. Thanks to its high radiation tolerance, the HV detectors are also seen at CERN as a promising alternative to the standard options for ATLAS upgrade and CLIC. In order to test the concept, within ATLAS upgrade R/D, we are currently exploring an active pixel detector demonstrator HV2FEI4; also implemented in the 180 nm HV process.

  2. Micro ethanol sensors with a heater fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Zhen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Yang, Ming-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an ethanol microsensor equipped with a heater. The ethanol sensor is manufactured using the commercial 0.18 µm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The sensor consists of a sensitive film, a heater and interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by the sol-gel method, and it is coated on the interdigitated electrodes. The heater is located under the interdigitated electrodes, and it is used to supply a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensor needs a post-processing step to remove the sacrificial oxide layer, and to coat zinc oxide on the interdigitated electrodes. When the sensitive film senses ethanol gas, the resistance of the sensor generates a change. An inverting amplifier circuit is utilized to convert the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. Experiments show that the sensitivity of the ethanol sensor is 0.35 mV/ppm. PMID:24072022

  3. An Acetone Microsensor with a Ring Oscillator Circuit Fabricated Using the Commercial 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Shih, Po-Jen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an acetone microsensor with a ring oscillator circuit using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The acetone microsensor contains a sensitive material, interdigitated electrodes and a polysilicon heater. The sensitive material is α-Fe2O3 synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The sensor requires a post-process to remove the sacrificial oxide layer between the interdigitated electrodes and to coat the α-Fe2O3 on the electrodes. When the sensitive material adsorbs acetone vapor, the sensor produces a change in capacitance. The ring oscillator circuit converts the capacitance of the sensor into the oscillation frequency output. The experimental results show that the output frequency of the acetone sensor changes from 128 to 100 MHz as the acetone concentration increases 1 to 70 ppm. PMID:25036331

  4. A Comparative Study of Heavy Ion and Proton Induced Bit Error Sensitivity and Complex Burst Error Modes in Commercially Available High Speed SiGe BiCMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Paul; Carts, Marty; Campbell, Art; Reed, Robert; Ladbury, Ray; Seidleck, Christina; Currie, Steve; Riggs, Pam; Fritz, Karl; Randall, Barb

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation that reviews recent SiGe bit error test data for different commercially available high speed SiGe BiCMOS chips that were subjected to various levels of heavy ion and proton radiation. Results for the tested chips at different operating speeds are displayed in line graphs.

  5. Radiation Characteristics of a 0.11 Micrometer Modified Commercial CMOS Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poivey, Christian; Kim, Hak; Berg, Melanie D.; Forney, Jim; Seidleck, Christina; Vilchis, Miguel A.; Phan, Anthony; Irwin, Tim; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Saigusa, Rajan K.; Mirabedini, Mohammad R.; Finlinson, Rick; Suvkhanov, Agajan; Hornback, Verne; Sung, Jun; Tung, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    We present radiation data, Total Ionizing Dose and Single Event Effects, on the LSI Logic 0.11 micron commercial process and two modified versions of this process. Modified versions include a buried layer to guarantee Single Event Latchup immunity.

  6. Micro Ethanol Sensors with a Heater Fabricated Using the Commercial 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Zhen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Yang, Ming-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an ethanol microsensor equipped with a heater. The ethanol sensor is manufactured using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The sensor consists of a sensitive film, a heater and interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by the sol-gel method, and it is coated on the interdigitated electrodes. The heater is located under the interdigitated electrodes, and it is used to supply a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensor needs a post-processing step to remove the sacrificial oxide layer, and to coat zinc oxide on the interdigitated electrodes. When the sensitive film senses ethanol gas, the resistance of the sensor generates a change. An inverting amplifier circuit is utilized to convert the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. Experiments show that the sensitivity of the ethanol sensor is 0.35 mV/ppm. PMID:24072022

  7. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Staller, C.; Zhou, Z; Fossum, E.

    1994-01-01

    JPL, under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has been developing a second-generation solid-state image sensor technology. Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are a well-established first generation image sensor technology. For both commercial and NASA applications, CCDs have numerous shortcomings. In response, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been under research. The major advantages of APS technology are the ability to integrate on-chip timing, control, signal-processing and analog-to-digital converter functions, reduced sensitivity to radiation effects, low power operation, and random access readout.

  8. Observation of Peierls transition in nanowires (diameter approximately 130 nm) of the charge transfer molecule TTF-TCNQ synthesized by electric-field-directed growth.

    PubMed

    Sai, T Phanindra; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2010-01-29

    We report the growth of nanowires of the charge transfer complex tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) with diameters as low as 130 nm and show that such nanowires can show Peierls transitions at low temperatures. The wires of sub-micron length were grown between two prefabricated electrodes (with sub-micron gap) by vapor phase growth from a single source by applying an electric field between the electrodes during the growth process. The nanowires so grown show a charge transfer ratio approximately 0.57, which is close to that seen in bulk crystals. Below the transition the transport is strongly nonlinear and can be interpreted as originating from de-pinning of CDW that forms at the Peierls transition. PMID:20009165

  9. Observation of Peierls transition in nanowires (diameter~130 nm) of the charge transfer molecule TTF-TCNQ synthesized by electric-field-directed growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanindra Sai, T.; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the growth of nanowires of the charge transfer complex tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) with diameters as low as 130 nm and show that such nanowires can show Peierls transitions at low temperatures. The wires of sub-micron length were grown between two prefabricated electrodes (with sub-micron gap) by vapor phase growth from a single source by applying an electric field between the electrodes during the growth process. The nanowires so grown show a charge transfer ratio ~0.57, which is close to that seen in bulk crystals. Below the transition the transport is strongly nonlinear and can be interpreted as originating from de-pinning of CDW that forms at the Peierls transition.

  10. Cross/bar polymer electro-optic routing switch with broadband flatting spectral response over 130 nm: Principle, design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Zheng, Li-Hua; Luo, Qian-Qian; Liang, Lei; Ma, Chun-Sheng; Zhang, Da-Ming

    2013-05-01

    A novel non-resonance 2×2 polymer electro-optic (EO) switch with flatting spectral response is proposed by employing two-section reversed active Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs), a passive middle directional coupler (M-DC) and two passive phase generating couplers (PGCs). Two crosstalk compensations are performed by optimizing the PGCs to broaden the spectrum under bar-state and optimizing the two active MZIs to broaden the spectrum under cross-state. The bar-state and cross-state voltages are 0 and ±4 V, respectively, with the two optimized MZI EO region lengths of 4068 and 5941 μm. Sufficiently considering wavelength dispersion of material and waveguide, a wide spectrum over 130 nm (1473-1603 nm) is achieved for dropping the crosstalk below -30 dB, and within this range, an insertion loss of 1.8-12.3 dB is observed. Under the same crosstalk level, this spectrum is over 2 times of that of the traditional 2×2 MZI switch (60 nm) based on the same materials. This broadband 2×2 switch is more attractive than our previously reported broadband 1×1 switch due to cross/bar routing operations other than simple ON/OFF functions.

  11. Visible and ultraviolet /800-130 nm/ extinction of vapor-condensed silicate, carbon, and silicon carbide smokes and the interstellar extinction curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The extinction curves from 800 to 130 nm (1.25-7.7/micron) of amorphous silicate smokes nominally of olivine and pyroxene composition, carbon smokes, and crystalline SiC smokes are presented. The SiC smoke occurred in the low-temperature (beta) cubic structural form. The SiC smoke showed an absorption edge which occurred at significantly longer wavelengths than the calculated extinction profile of the hexagonal SiC form previously used to calculate the interstellar extinction profile. Neither SiC nor amorphous silicates show an extinction band similar to the observed 6.6/micron astronomical extinction band. The infrared absorption peaks for the silicate and SiC samples near 10 microns and 11-13 microns, respectively, were also measured. The ultraviolet to infrared extinction ratio for the amorphous silicate samples is similar to the observed astronomical extinction ratio. The measured extinction ratios for SiC smokes are significantly below the interstellar extinction ratio. The extinction peak of the carbon smokes occurred at 4.0 and 4.25/micron, for samples of mean radii 13 and 6 nm, respectively. The extinction profile is distinctly different from that predicted for graphite grains of the same size, and is similar to that predicted for glassy carbon grains.

  12. Commercially developed mixed-signal CMOS process features for application in advanced ROICs in 0.18μm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar-Roy, Arjun; Hurwitz, Paul; Mann, Richard; Qamar, Yasir; Chaudhry, Samir; Zwingman, Robert; Howard, David; Racanelli, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Increasingly complex specifications for next-generation focal plane arrays (FPAs) require smaller pixels, larger array sizes, reduced power consumption and lower cost. We have previously reported on the favorable features available in the commercially available TowerJazz CA18 0.18μm mixed-signal CMOS technology platform for advanced read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) applications. In his paper, new devices in development for commercial purposes and which may have applications in advanced ROICs are reported. First, results of buried-channel 3.3V field effect transistors (FETs) are detailed. The buried-channel pFETs show flicker (1/f) noise reductions of ~5X in comparison to surface-channel pFETs along with a significant reduction of the body constant parameter. The buried-channel nFETs show ~2X reduction of 1/f noise versus surface-channel nFETs. Additional reduced threshold voltage nFETs and pFETs are also described. Second, a high-density capacitor solution with a four-stacked linear (metal-insulator-metal) MIM capacitor having capacitance density of 8fF/μm2 is reported. Additional stacking with MOS capacitor in a 5V tolerant process results in >50fC/μm2 charge density. Finally, one-time programmable (OTP) and multi-time programmable (MTP) non-volatile memory options in the CA18 technology platform are outlined.

  13. Preliminary Radiation Testing of a State-of-the-Art Commercial 14nm CMOS Processor/System-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Carl M., Jr.; Duncan, Adam; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Kay, Matt; Bruner, Pat; Krzesniak, Mike; Dong, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hardness assurance test results of Intel state-of-the-art 14nm “Broadwell” U-series processor / System-on-a-Chip (SoC) for total ionizing dose (TID) are presented, along with exploratory results from trials at a medical proton facility. Test method builds upon previous efforts [1] by utilizing commercial laptop motherboards and software stress applications as opposed to more traditional automated test equipment (ATE).

  14. Preliminary Radiation Testing of a State-of-the-Art Commercial 14nm CMOS Processor - System-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Carl M., Jr.; Duncan, Adam; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Kay, Matt; Bruner, Pat; Krzesniak, Mike; Dong, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hardness assurance test results of Intel state-of-the-art 14nm Broadwell U-series processor System-on-a-Chip (SoC) for total dose are presented, along with first-look exploratory results from trials at a medical proton facility. Test method builds upon previous efforts by utilizing commercial laptop motherboards and software stress applications as opposed to more traditional automated test equipment (ATE).

  15. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  16. High-temperature Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbrayer, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the possibility of using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology for high temperature electronics are presented. A CMOS test chip was specifically developed as the test bed. This test chip incorporates CMOS transistors that have no gate protection diodes; these diodes are the major cause of leakage in commercial devices.

  17. A CMOS readout circuit for microstrip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasri, B.; Fiorini, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we present the design and the results of a CMOS analog channel for silicon microstrips detectors. The readout circuit was initially conceived for the outer layers of the SuperB silicon vertex tracker (SVT), but can serve more generally other microstrip-based detection systems. The strip detectors considered show a very high stray capacitance and high series resistance. Therefore, the noise optimization was the first priority design concern. A necessary compromise on the best peaking time to achieve an acceptable noise level together with efficiency and timing accuracy has been investigated. The ASIC is composed by a preamplifier, shaping amplifier and a Time over Threshold (T.o.T) block for the digitalization of the signals. The chosen shaping function is the third-order semi-Gaussian function implemented with complex poles. An inverter stage is employed in the analog channel in order to operate with signals delivered from both p and n strips. The circuit includes the possibility to select the peaking time of the shaper output from four values: 250 ns, 375 ns, 500 ns and 750 ns. In this way, the noise performances and the signal occupancy can be optimized according to the real background during the experiment. The ASIC prototype has been fabricated in the 130 nm IBM technology which is considered intrinsically radiation hard. The results of the experimental characterization of a produced prototype are satisfactorily matched with simulation.

  18. High-voltage CMOS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrler, F.; Blanco, R.; Leys, R.; Perić, I.

    2016-07-01

    High-voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) pixel sensors are depleted active pixel sensors implemented in standard commercial CMOS processes. The sensor element is the n-well/p-substrate diode. The sensor electronics are entirely placed inside the n-well which is at the same time used as the charge collection electrode. High voltage is used to deplete the part of the substrate around the n-well. HVCMOS sensors allow implementation of complex in-pixel electronics. This, together with fast signal collection, allows a good time resolution, which is required for particle tracking in high energy physics. HVCMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI and are considered as an option for both ATLAS and CLIC (CERN). Radiation tolerance and time walk compensation have been tested and results are presented.

  19. Graphene/Si CMOS Hybrid Hall Integrated Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Le; Xu, Huilong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Chengying; Jiang, Jianhua; Ma, Xiaomeng; Chen, Bingyan; Li, Zishen; Zhong, Hua; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-01-01

    Graphene/silicon CMOS hybrid integrated circuits (ICs) should provide powerful functions which combines the ultra-high carrier mobility of graphene and the sophisticated functions of silicon CMOS ICs. But it is difficult to integrate these two kinds of heterogeneous devices on a single chip. In this work a low temperature process is developed for integrating graphene devices onto silicon CMOS ICs for the first time, and a high performance graphene/CMOS hybrid Hall IC is demonstrated. Signal amplifying/process ICs are manufactured via commercial 0.18 um silicon CMOS technology, and graphene Hall elements (GHEs) are fabricated on top of the passivation layer of the CMOS chip via a low-temperature micro-fabrication process. The sensitivity of the GHE on CMOS chip is further improved by integrating the GHE with the CMOS amplifier on the Si chip. This work not only paves the way to fabricate graphene/Si CMOS Hall ICs with much higher performance than that of conventional Hall ICs, but also provides a general method for scalable integration of graphene devices with silicon CMOS ICs via a low-temperature process. PMID:24998222

  20. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  1. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  2. Adaptive Threshold Neural Spike Detector Using Stationary Wavelet Transform in CMOS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuning; Boling, C Sam; Kamboh, Awais M; Mason, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    Spike detection is an essential first step in the analysis of neural recordings. Detection at the frontend eases the bandwidth requirement for wireless data transfer of multichannel recordings to extra-cranial processing units. In this work, a low power digital integrated spike detector based on the lifting stationary wavelet transform is presented and developed. By monitoring the standard deviation of wavelet coefficients, the proposed detector can adaptively set a threshold value online for each channel independently without requiring user intervention. A prototype 16-channel spike detector was designed and tested in an FPGA. The method enables spike detection with nearly 90% accuracy even when the signal-to-noise ratio is as low as 2. The design was mapped to 130 nm CMOS technology and shown to occupy 0.014 mm(2) of area and dissipate 1.7 μW of power per channel, making it suitable for implantable multichannel neural recording systems. PMID:25955990

  3. 25Gb/s 1V-driving CMOS ring modulator with integrated thermal tuning.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoliang; Zheng, Xuezhe; Yao, Jin; Thacker, Hiren; Shubin, Ivan; Luo, Ying; Raj, Kannan; Cunningham, John E; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2011-10-10

    We report a high-speed ring modulator that fits many of the ideal qualities for optical interconnect in future exascale supercomputers. The device was fabricated in a 130 nm SOI CMOS process, with 7.5 μm ring radius. Its high-speed section, employing PN junction that works at carrier-depletion mode, enables 25 Gb/s modulation and an extinction ratio >5 dB with only 1V peak-to-peak driving. Its thermal tuning section allows the device to work in broad wavelength range, with a tuning efficiency of 0.19 nm/mW. Based on microwave characterization and circuit modeling, the modulation energy is estimated ~7 fJ/bit. The whole device fits in a compact 400 μm2 footprint. PMID:21997052

  4. All-CMOS night vision viewer with integrated microdisplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosen, Marius E.; Venter, Petrus J.; du Plessis, Monuko; Faure, Nicolaas M.; Janse van Rensburg, Christo; Rademeyer, Pieter

    2014-02-01

    The unrivalled integration potential of CMOS has made it the dominant technology for digital integrated circuits. With the advent of visible light emission from silicon through hot carrier electroluminescence, several applications arose, all of which rely upon the advantages of mature CMOS technologies for a competitive edge in a very active and attractive market. In this paper we present a low-cost night vision viewer which employs only standard CMOS technologies. A commercial CMOS imager is utilized for near infrared image capturing with a 128x96 pixel all-CMOS microdisplay implemented to convey the image to the user. The display is implemented in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, with no process alterations or post processing. The display features a 25 μm pixel pitch and a 3.2 mm x 2.4 mm active area, which through magnification presents the virtual image to the user equivalent of a 19-inch display viewed from a distance of 3 meters. This work represents the first application of a CMOS microdisplay in a low-cost consumer product.

  5. High-speed multicolour photometry with CMOS cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhvala, S. M.; Zhilyaev, B. E.; Reshetnyk, V. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of testing the commercial digital camera Nikon D90 with a CMOS sensor for high-speed photometry with a small telescope Celestron 11'' at the Peak Terskol Observatory. CMOS sensor allows to perform photometry in 3 filters simultaneously that gives a great advantage compared with monochrome CCD detectors. The Bayer BGR colour system of CMOS sensors is close to the Johnson BVR system. The results of testing show that one can carry out photometric measurements with CMOS cameras for stars with the V-magnitude up to ≃14^{m} with the precision of 0.01^{m}. Stars with the V-magnitude up to ˜10 can be shot at 24 frames per second in the video mode.

  6. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  7. CCD and CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Nick

    The charge-coupled device (CCD) has been developed primarily as a compact image sensor for consumer and industrial markets, but is now also the preeminent visible and ultraviolet wavelength image sensor in many fields of scientific research including space-science and both Earth and planetary remote sensing. Today"s scientific or science-grade CCD will strive to maximise pixel count, focal plane coverage, photon detection efficiency over the broadest spectral range and signal dynamic range whilst maintaining the lowest possible readout noise. The relatively recent emergence of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor technology is arguably the most important development in solid-state imaging since the invention of the CCD. CMOS technology enables the integration on a single silicon chip of a large array of photodiode pixels alongside all of the ancillary electronics needed to address the array and digitise the resulting analogue video signal. Compared to the CCD, CMOS promises a more compact, lower mass, lower power and potentially more radiation tolerant camera.

  8. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, J.D.

    1998-06-02

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

  9. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

  10. On noise in time-delay integration CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levski, Deyan; Choubey, Bhaskar

    2016-05-01

    Time delay integration sensors are of increasing interest in CMOS processes owing to their low cost, power and ability to integrate with other circuit readout blocks. This paper presents an analysis of the noise contributors in current day CMOS Time-Delay-Integration image sensors with various readout architectures. An analysis of charge versus voltage domain readout modes is presented, followed by a noise classification of the existing Analog Accumulator Readout (AAR) and Digital Accumulator Readout (DAR) schemes for TDI imaging. The analysis and classification of existing readout schemes include, pipelined charge transfer, buffered direct injection, voltage as well as current-mode analog accumulators and all-digital accumulator techniques. Time-Delay-Integration imaging modes in CMOS processes typically use an N-number of readout steps, equivalent to the number of TDI pixel stages. In CMOS TDI sensors, where voltage domain readout is used, the requirements over speed and noise of the ADC readout chain are increased due to accumulation of the dominant voltage readout and ADC noise with every stage N. Until this day, the latter is the primary reason for a leap-back of CMOS TDI sensors as compared to their CCD counterparts. Moreover, most commercial CMOS TDI implementations are still based on a charge-domain readout, mimicking a CCD-like operation mode. Thus, having a good understanding of each noise contributor in the signal chain, as well as its magnitude in different readout architectures, is vital for the design of future generation low-noise CMOS TDI image sensors based on a voltage domain readout. This paper gives a quantitative classification of all major noise sources for all popular implementations in the literature.

  11. Design and Fabrication of Vertically-Integrated CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2011-01-01

    Technologies to fabricate integrated circuits (IC) with 3D structures are an emerging trend in IC design. They are based on vertical stacking of active components to form heterogeneous microsystems. Electronic image sensors will benefit from these technologies because they allow increased pixel-level data processing and device optimization. This paper covers general principles in the design of vertically-integrated (VI) CMOS image sensors that are fabricated by flip-chip bonding. These sensors are composed of a CMOS die and a photodetector die. As a specific example, the paper presents a VI-CMOS image sensor that was designed at the University of Alberta, and fabricated with the help of CMC Microsystems and Micralyne Inc. To realize prototypes, CMOS dies with logarithmic active pixels were prepared in a commercial process, and photodetector dies with metal-semiconductor-metal devices were prepared in a custom process using hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The paper also describes a digital camera that was developed to test the prototype. In this camera, scenes captured by the image sensor are read using an FPGA board, and sent in real time to a PC over USB for data processing and display. Experimental results show that the VI-CMOS prototype has a higher dynamic range and a lower dark limit than conventional electronic image sensors. PMID:22163860

  12. Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-05-01

    Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

  13. Fully CMOS analog and digital SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Villa, Federica; Bronzi, Danilo; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2015-03-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging single photon detectors used in many applications requiring large active area, photon-number resolving capability and immunity to magnetic fields. We present three families of analog SiPM fabricated in a reliable and cost-effective fully standard planar CMOS technology with a total photosensitive area of 1×1 mm2. These three families have different active areas with fill-factors (21%, 58.3%, 73.7%) comparable to those of commercial SiPM, which are developed in vertical (current flow) custom technologies. The peak photon detection efficiency in the near-UV tops at 38% (fill-factor included) comparable to commercial custom-process ones and dark count rate density is just a little higher than the best-in-class commercial analog SiPMs. Thanks to the CMOS processing, these new SiPMs can be integrated together with active components and electronics both within the microcell and on-chip, in order to act at the microcell level or to perform global pre-processing. We also report CMOS digital SiPMs in the same standard CMOS technology, based on microcells with digitalized processing, all integrated on-chip. This CMOS digital SiPMs has four 32×1 cells (128 microcells), each consisting of SPAD, active quenching circuit with adjustable dead time, digital control (to switch off noisy SPADs and readout position of detected photons), and fast trigger output signal. The achieved 20% fill-factor is still very good.

  14. Development of radiation hard CMOS active pixel sensors for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernegger, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    New pixel detectors, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full CMOS processes, hold promise as next-generation active pixel sensors for inner and intermediate layers of the upgraded ATLAS tracker. The use of commercial CMOS processes allow cost-effective detector construction and simpler hybridisation techniques. The paper gives an overview of the results obtained on AMS-produced CMOS sensors coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chips. The SOI (silicon-on-insulator) produced sensors by XFAB hold great promise as radiation hard SOI-CMOS sensors due to their combination of partially depleted SOI transistors reducing back-gate effects. The test results include pre-/post-irradiation comparison, measurements of charge collection regions as well as test beam results.

  15. Characterization of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel detectors implemented with a high-resistive CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Rymaszewski, P.; Hirono, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present the recent development of DMAPS (Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor), implemented with a Toshiba 130 nm CMOS process. Unlike in the case of standard MAPS technologies which are based on an epi-layer, this process provides a high-resistive substrate that enables larger signal and faster charge collection by drift in a 50 - 300 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n-wells to isolate the collection electrodes from the thin active device layer, NMOS and PMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to characterize the technology, we implemented a simple three transistor readout with a variety of pixel pitches and input FET sizes. This layout variety gives us a clue on sensor characteristics for future optimization, such as the input detector capacitance or leakage current. In the initial measurement, the radiation spectra were obtained from 55Fe with an energy resolution of 770 eV (FWHM) and 90Sr with the MVP of 4165 e-.

  16. A Single-Chip 8-Band CMOS Transceiver for 3G Cellular Systems with Digital Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Takehiko; Tsurumi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    In this paper, a single-chip dual-mode 8-band 130nm CMOS transceiver including A/D/A converters and digital filters with 312MHz LVDS interface is presented. For a transmitter chain, linear direct quadrature modulation architecture is introduced for both W-CDMA/HSDPA (High Speed Uplink Packet Access) and for GSM/EDGE. Analog baseband LPFs and quadrature modulators are commonly used both for GSM and for EDGE. For a direct conversion receiver chain, ABB (Analog Base-Band) blocks, i.e., LPFs and VGAs, delta-sigma A/D converters, and FIR filters are commonly used for W-CDMA/HSDPA (High Speed Downlink Packet Access) and GSM/EDGE to reduce chip area. Their characteristics can be reconfigured by register-based control sequence. The receiver chain also includes high-speed DC offset cancellers both in analog and in digital stage, and the self-contained AGC controller, whose parameters such as time constant are programmable to be free from DBB (Digital Base-Band) control. The transceiver also includes wide-range VCOs and fractional PLLs, an LVDS driver and receiver for high-speed digital interface of 312MHz. Measured results reveal that the transceiver satisfies 3GPP specifications for W-CDMA/HSPA (High Speed Packet Access) and GSM/EDGE.

  17. Effect of coupling parasitics and CMOS driver width on transition time for dynamic inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Devendra Kumar; Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar; Sharma, R. K.

    2014-05-01

    This article analyses the effect of coupling parasitics and CMOS gate driver width on transition time delay of coupled interconnects driven by dynamically switching inputs. Propagation delay through an interconnect is dependent not only on the technology/topology but also on many other factors such as input transition time, load characteristic, driving gate dimensions and so on. The delay is affected by rise/fall time of the signal, which in turn is dependent on the driving gate and the load presented to it. The signal transition time is also a strong function of wire parasitics. This article addresses the different issues of signal transition time. The impact of inter-wire parasitics and driver width on signal transition time are presented in this article. Furthermore, the effect of unequal transition time of the inputs to interconnect lines on crosstalk noise and delay is analysed. To demonstrate these effects, two distributed RLC lines coupled capacitively and inductively are taken into consideration. The simulations are run at three different technology nodes, viz. 65 nm, 90 nm and 130 nm.

  18. Large area CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Guerrini, N.; Sedgwick, I.

    2011-01-01

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of CMOS-MEMS thermoelectric micro generators.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pin-Hsu; Shih, Po-Jen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Liu, Mao-Chen

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a thermoelectric micro generator fabricated by the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and the post-CMOS process. The micro generator is composed of 24 thermocouples in series. Each thermocouple is constructed by p-type and n-type polysilicon strips. The output power of the generator depends on the temperature difference between the hot and cold parts in the thermocouples. In order to prevent heat-receiving in the cold part in the thermocouples, the cold part is covered with a silicon dioxide layer with low thermal conductivity to insulate the heat source. The hot part of the thermocouples is suspended and connected to an aluminum plate, to increases the heat-receiving area in the hot part. The generator requires a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures. The post-CMOS process uses an anisotropic dry etching to remove the oxide sacrificial layer and an isotropic dry etching to etch the silicon substrate. Experimental results show that the micro generator has an output voltage of 67 μV at the temperature difference of 1 K. PMID:22205869

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of CMOS-MEMS Thermoelectric Micro Generators

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Pin-Hsu; Shih, Po-Jen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Liu, Mao-Chen

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a thermoelectric micro generator fabricated by the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and the post-CMOS process. The micro generator is composed of 24 thermocouples in series. Each thermocouple is constructed by p-type and n-type polysilicon strips. The output power of the generator depends on the temperature difference between the hot and cold parts in the thermocouples. In order to prevent heat-receiving in the cold part in the thermocouples, the cold part is covered with a silicon dioxide layer with low thermal conductivity to insulate the heat source. The hot part of the thermocouples is suspended and connected to an aluminum plate, to increases the heat-receiving area in the hot part. The generator requires a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures. The post-CMOS process uses an anisotropic dry etching to remove the oxide sacrificial layer and an isotropic dry etching to etch the silicon substrate. Experimental results show that the micro generator has an output voltage of 67 μV at the temperature difference of 1 K. PMID:22205869

  1. Planar CMOS analog SiPMs: design, modeling, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Villa, Federica; Bronzi, Danilo; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are large area detectors consisting of an array of single-photon-sensitive microcells, which make SiPMs extremely attractive to substitute the photomultiplier tubes in many applications. We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of analog SiPMs in standard planar 0.35 μm CMOS technology, with about 1 mm × 1 mm total area and different kinds of microcells, based on single-photon avalanche diodes with 30 μm diameter reaching 21.0% fill-factor (FF), 50 μm diameter (FF = 58.3%) or 50 μm square active area with rounded corner of 5 μm radius (FF = 73.7%). We also developed the electrical SPICE model for CMOS SiPMs. Our CMOS SiPMs have 25 V breakdown voltage, in line with most commercial SiPMs and higher gain (8.8 × 106, 13.2 × 106, and 15.0 × 106, respectively). Although dark count rate density is slightly higher than state-of-the-art analog SiPMs, the proposed standard CMOS processing opens the feasibility of integration with active electronics, for switching hot pixels off, drastically reducing the overall dark count rate, or for further on-chip processing.

  2. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  3. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Methods: A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Results: Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Conclusion: Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the

  4. Hybrid CMOS SiPIN detectors as astronomical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Lance Michael

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have dominated optical and x-ray astronomy since their inception in 1969. Only recently, through improvements in design and fabrication methods, have imagers that use Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology gained ground on CCDs in scientific imaging. We are now in the midst of an era where astronomers might begin to design optical telescope cameras that employ CMOS imagers. The first three chapters of this dissertation are primarily composed of introductory material. In them, we discuss the potential advantages that CMOS imagers offer over CCDs in astronomical applications. We compare the two technologies in terms of the standard metrics used to evaluate and compare scientific imagers: dark current, read noise, linearity, etc. We also discuss novel features of CMOS devices and the benefits they offer to astronomy. In particular, we focus on a specific kind of hybrid CMOS sensor that uses Silicon PIN photodiodes to detect optical light in order to overcome deficiencies of commercial CMOS sensors. The remaining four chapters focus on a specific type of hybrid CMOS Silicon PIN sensor: the Teledyne Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN Imager (HyViSI). In chapters four and five, results from testing HyViSI detectors in the laboratory and at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope are presented. We present our laboratory measurements of the standard detector metrics for a number of HyViSI devices, ranging from 1k×1k to 4k×4k format. We also include a description of the SIDECAR readout circuit that was used to control the detectors. We then show how they performed at the telescope in terms of photometry, astrometry, variability measurement, and telescope focusing and guiding. Lastly, in the final two chapters we present results on detector artifacts such as pixel crosstalk, electronic crosstalk, and image persistence. One form of pixel crosstalk that has not been discussed elsewhere in the literature, which we refer to as Interpixel Charge

  5. A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jones, Todd; Wrigley, Chris; Hancock, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the test and characterization results for a back-illuminated megapixel CMOS imager. The imager pixel consists of a standard junction photodiode coupled to a three transistor-per-pixel switched source-follower readout [1]. The imager also consists of integrated timing and control and bias generation circuits, and provides analog output. The analog column-scan circuits were implemented in such a way that the imager could be configured to run in off-chip correlated double-sampling (CDS) mode. The imager was originally designed for normal front-illuminated operation, and was fabricated in a commercially available 0.5 pn triple-metal CMOS-imager compatible process. For backside illumination, the imager was thinned by etching away the substrate was etched away in a post-fabrication processing step.

  6. A Brief Discussion of Radiation Hardening of CMOS Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1998-12-18

    Commercial microchips work well in their intended environments. However, generic microchips will not fimction correctly if exposed to sufficient amounts of ionizing radiation, the kind that satellites encounter in outer space. Modern CMOS circuits must overcome three specific concerns from ionizing radiation: total-dose, single-event, and dose-rate effects. Minority-carrier devices such as bipolar transistors, optical receivers, and solar cells must also deal with recombination-generation centers caused by displacement damage, which are not major concerns for majority-carrier CMOS devices. There are ways to make the chips themselves more resistant to radiation. This extra protection, called radiation hardening, has been called both a science and an art. Radiation hardening requires both changing the designs of the chips and altering the ways that the chips are manufactured.

  7. CMOS output buffer wave shaper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, L.; Whitaker, S.; Merrell, R.

    1990-01-01

    As the switching speeds and densities of Digital CMOS integrated circuits continue to increase, output switching noise becomes more of a problem. A design technique which aids in the reduction of switching noise is reported. The output driver stage is analyzed through the use of an equivalent RLC circuit. The results of the analysis are used in the design of an output driver stage. A test circuit based on these techniques is being submitted to MOSIS for fabrication.

  8. Fabrication of CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovich, Yacov; Koltin, Ephie; Choen, David; Shkuri, Moshe; Ben-Simon, Meir

    1999-04-01

    In order to provide its customers with sub-micron CMOS fabrication solutions for imaging applications, Tower Semiconductor initiated a project to characterize the optical parameters of Tower's 0.5-micron process. A special characterization test chip was processed using the TS50 process. The results confirmed a high quality process for optical applications. Perhaps the most important result is the process' very low dark current, of 30-50 pA/cm2, using the entire window of process. This very low dark current characteristic was confirmed for a variety of pixel architectures. Additionally, we have succeeded to reduce and virtually eliminate the white spots on large sensor arrays. As a foundry Tower needs to support fabrication of many different imaging products. Therefore we have developed a fabrication methodology that is adjusted to the special needs of optical applications. In order to establish in-line process monitoring of the optical parameters, Tower places a scribe line optical test chip that enables wafer level measurements of the most important parameters, ensuring the optical quality and repeatability of the process. We have developed complementary capabilities like in house deposition of color filter and fabrication of very large are dice using sub-micron CMOS technologies. Shellcase and Tower are currently developing a new CMOS image sensor optical package.

  9. A Low-Cost CMOS-MEMS Piezoresistive Accelerometer with Large Proof Mass

    PubMed Central

    Khir, Mohd Haris Md; Qu, Peng; Qu, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a low-cost, high-sensitivity CMOS-MEMS piezoresistive accelerometer with large proof mass. In the device fabricated using ON Semiconductor 0.5 μm CMOS technology, an inherent CMOS polysilicon thin film is utilized as the piezoresistive sensing material. A full Wheatstone bridge was constructed through easy wiring allowed by the three metal layers in the 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The device fabrication process consisted of a standard CMOS process for sensor configuration, and a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) based post-CMOS microfabrication for MEMS structure release. A bulk single-crystal silicon (SCS) substrate is included in the proof mass to increase sensor sensitivity. In device design and analysis, the self heating of the polysilicon piezoresistors and its effect to the sensor performance is also discussed. With a low operating power of 1.5 mW, the accelerometer demonstrates a sensitivity of 0.077 mV/g prior to any amplification. Dynamic tests have been conducted with a high-end commercial calibrating accelerometer as reference. PMID:22164052

  10. Critical issues for the application of integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies to inertial measurement units

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Ellis, J.R.; Montague, S.; Allen, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    One of the principal applications of monolithically integrated micromechanical/microelectronic systems has been accelerometers for automotive applications. As integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies such as those developed by U.C. Berkeley, Analog Devices, and Sandia National Laboratories mature, additional systems for more sensitive inertial measurements will enter the commercial marketplace. In this paper, the authors will examine key technology design rules which impact the performance and cost of inertial measurement devices manufactured in integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies. These design parameters include: (1) minimum MEMS feature size, (2) minimum CMOS feature size, (3) maximum MEMS linear dimension, (4) number of mechanical MEMS layers, (5) MEMS/CMOS spacing. In particular, the embedded approach to integration developed at Sandia will be examined in the context of these technology features. Presently, this technology offers MEMS feature sizes as small as 1 {micro}m, CMOS critical dimensions of 1.25 {micro}m, MEMS linear dimensions of 1,000 {micro}m, a single mechanical level of polysilicon, and a 100 {micro}m space between MEMS and CMOS. This is applicable to modern precision guided munitions.

  11. CMOS downsizing toward sub-10 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Recently, CMOS downsizing has been accelerated very aggressively in both production and research level, and even transistor operation of a 6 nm gate length p-channel MOSFET was reported in a conference. However, many serious problems are expected for implementing such small-geometry MOSFETs into large scale integrated circuits, and it is still questionable whether we can successfully introduce sub-10 nm CMOS LSIs into the market or not. In this paper, limitation and its possible causes for the downscaling of CMOS towards sub-10 nm are discussed with consideration of past CMOS predictions for the limitation.

  12. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  13. Nanosecond monolithic CMOS readout cell

    DOEpatents

    Souchkov, Vitali V.

    2004-08-24

    A pulse shaper is implemented in monolithic CMOS with a delay unit formed of a unity gain buffer. The shaper is formed of a difference amplifier having one input connected directly to an input signal and a second input connected to a delayed input signal through the buffer. An elementary cell is based on the pulse shaper and a timing circuit which gates the output of an integrator connected to the pulse shaper output. A detector readout system is formed of a plurality of elementary cells, each connected to a pixel of a pixel array, or to a microstrip of a plurality of microstrips, or to a detector segment.

  14. Verilog-A Device Models for Cryogenic Temperature Operation of Bulk Silicon CMOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akturk, Akin; Potbhare, Siddharth; Goldsman, Neil; Holloway, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Verilog-A based cryogenic bulk CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) compact models are built for state-of-the-art silicon CMOS processes. These models accurately predict device operation at cryogenic temperatures down to 4 K. The models are compatible with commercial circuit simulators. The models extend the standard BSIM4 [Berkeley Short-channel IGFET (insulated-gate field-effect transistor ) Model] type compact models by re-parameterizing existing equations, as well as adding new equations that capture the physics of device operation at cryogenic temperatures. These models will allow circuit designers to create optimized, reliable, and robust circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  15. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerated life tests were performed on CMOS microcircuits to predict their long term reliability. The consistency of the CMOS microcircuit activation energy between the range of 125 C to 200 C and the range 200 C to 250 C was determined. Results indicate CMOS complexity and the amount of moisture detected inside the devices after testing influences time to failure of tested CMOS devices.

  16. Characterization of the CCD and CMOS cameras for grating-based phase-contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytaev, Pavel; Hipp, Alexander; Lottermoser, Lars; Herzen, Julia; Greving, Imke; Khokhriakov, Igor; Meyer-Loges, Stephan; Plewka, Jörn; Burmester, Jörg; Caselle, Michele; Vogelgesang, Matthias; Chilingaryan, Suren; Kopmann, Andreas; Balzer, Matthias; Schreyer, Andreas; Beckmann, Felix

    2014-09-01

    In this article we present the quantitative characterization of CCD and CMOS sensors which are used at the experiments for microtomography operated by HZG at PETRA III at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. A standard commercial CCD camera is compared to a camera based on a CMOS sensor. This CMOS camera is modified for grating-based differential phase-contrast tomography. The main goal of the project is to quantify and to optimize the statistical parameters of this camera system. These key performance parameters such as readout noise, conversion gain and full-well capacity are used to define an optimized measurement for grating-based phase-contrast. First results will be shown.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Maximiliano S.; Lerner, Betiana; Resasco, Daniel E.; Pareja Obregon, Pablo D.; Julian, Pedro M.; Mandolesi, Pablo S.; Buffa, Fabian A.; Boselli, Alfredo; Lamagna, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS) was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture. PMID:22319330

  18. Biosensing with integrated CMOS nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ashfaque; Yemenicioglu, Sukru; Chen, Chin-Hsuan; Corgliano, Ellie; Milaninia, Kaveh; Xia, Fan; Plaxco, Kevin; Theogarajan, Luke

    2012-10-01

    This paper outlines our recent efforts in using solid-state nanopores as a biosensing platform. Traditionally biosensors concentrate mainly on the detection platform and not on signal processing. This decoupling can lead to inferior sensors and is exacerbated in nanoscale devices, where device noise is large and large dynamic range is required. This paper outlines a novel platform that integrates the nano, micro and macroscales in a closely coupled manner that mitigates many of these problems. We discuss our initial results of DNA translocation through the nanopore. We also briefly discuss the use of molecular recognition properties of aptamers with the versatility of the nanopore detector to design a new class of biosensors in a CMOS compatible platform.

  19. CMOS Imaging Detectors as X-ray Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Inoue, Katsuaki

    2004-05-12

    CMOS imagers are matrix-addressed photodiode arrays, which have been utilized in devices such as commercially available digital cameras. The pixel size of CMOS imagers is usually larger than that of CCD and smaller than that of TFT, giving them a unique position. Although CMOS x-ray imaging devices have already become commercially available, they have not been used as an x-ray area detector in synchrotron radiation experiments. We tested performance of a CMOS detector from Rad-icon (Shad-o-Box1024) in medical imaging, small-angle scattering, and protein crystallography experiments. It has pixels of 0.048 mm square, read-out time of 0.45 sec, 12-bit ADC, and requires a frame grabber for image acquisition. The detection area is 5-cm square. It uses a Kodak Min-R scintillator screen as a phosphor. The sensitivity to x-rays with an energy less than 15 keV was low because of the thick window materials. Since the readout noise is high, the dynamic range is limited to 2000. The biggest advantages of this detector are cost-effectiveness (about 10,000 US dollars) and compactness (thickness < 3 cm, weight < 2 kg)

  20. Flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC with elastomeric microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC chips with PDMS microfluidics. Microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the CMOS die. The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the CMOS chip. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor die and matched PDMS microfluidic channels in a flexible package. The packaged system is fully functional under 3cm bending radius. The flexible integration of CMOS ICs with microfluidics enables previously unavailable flexible CMOS electronic systems with fluidic manipulation capabilities, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing.

  1. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm CMOS foundry process.

    PubMed

    Uddin, A; Yemenicioglu, S; Chen, C-H; Corigliano, E; Milaninia, K; Theogarajan, L

    2013-04-19

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA-base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor's 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the n+ polysilicon/SiO2/n+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3, which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3. PMID:23519330

  2. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm cmos foundry process

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, A; Yemenicioglu, S; Chen, C-H; Corigliano, E; Milaninia, K; Theogarajan, L

    2013-01-01

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor’s 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the N+ polysilicon/SiO2/N+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3 which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3. PMID:23519330

  3. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm CMOS foundry process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, A.; Yemenicioglu, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Corigliano, E.; Milaninia, K.; Theogarajan, L.

    2013-04-01

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA-base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor’s 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the n+ polysilicon/SiO2/n+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3, which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3.

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of CMOS-MEMS Magnetic Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsuan; Dai, Ching-Liang; Yang, Ming-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the design and fabrication of magnetic microsensors using the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The magnetic sensor is composed of springs and interdigitated electrodes, and it is actuated by the Lorentz force. The finite element method (FEM) software CoventorWare is adopted to simulate the displacement and capacitance of the magnetic sensor. A post-CMOS process is utilized to release the suspended structure. The post-process uses an anisotropic dry etching to etch the silicon dioxide layer and an isotropic dry etching to remove the silicon substrate. When a magnetic field is applied to the magnetic sensor, it generates a change in capacitance. A sensing circuit is employed to convert the capacitance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the magnetic microsensor varies from 0.05 to 1.94 V in the magnetic field range of 5–200 mT. PMID:24172287

  5. A CMOS Smart Temperature and Humidity Sensor with Combined Readout

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 μA. PMID:25230305

  6. A CMOS smart temperature and humidity sensor with combined readout.

    PubMed

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 µA. PMID:25230305

  7. Optical readout of a triple-GEM detector by means of a CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafini, M.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.

    2016-07-01

    In last years, the development of optical sensors has produced objects able to provide very interesting performance. Large granularity is offered along with a very high sensitivity. CMOS sensors with millions of pixels able to detect as few as two or three photons per pixel are commercially available and can be used to read-out the optical signals provided by tracking particle detectors. In this work the results obtained by optically reading-out a triple-GEM detector by a commercial CMOS sensor will be presented. A standard detector was assembled with a transparent window below the third GEM allowing the light to get out. The detector is supplied with an Ar/CF4 based gas mixture producing 650 nm wavelength photons matching the maximum quantum efficiency of the sensor.

  8. A simple and low-cost biofilm quantification method using LED and CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Junhee; Lee, Junghoon; Kwak, Soo Hwan; Oh, Sangwoo; Paek, Se-Hwan; Ha, Un-Hwan; Seo, Sungkyu

    2014-12-01

    A novel biofilm detection platform, which consists of a cost-effective red, green, and blue light-emitting diode (RGB LED) as a light source and a lens-free CMOS image sensor as a detector, is designed. This system can measure the diffraction patterns of cells from their shadow images, and gather light absorbance information according to the concentration of biofilms through a simple image processing procedure. Compared to a bulky and expensive commercial spectrophotometer, this platform can provide accurate and reproducible biofilm concentration detection and is simple, compact, and inexpensive. Biofilms originating from various bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), were tested to demonstrate the efficacy of this new biofilm detection approach. The results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. To utilize a cost-effective light source (i.e., an LED) for biofilm detection, the illumination conditions were optimized. For accurate and reproducible biofilm detection, a simple, custom-coded image processing algorithm was developed and applied to a five-megapixel CMOS image sensor, which is a cost-effective detector. The concentration of biofilms formed by P. aeruginosa was detected and quantified by varying the indole concentration, and the results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. The correlation value of the results from those two systems was 0.981 (N = 9, P < 0.01) and the coefficients of variation (CVs) were approximately threefold lower at the CMOS image-sensor platform. PMID:25455019

  9. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces. PMID:27509529

  10. Characterization and reliability of CMOS microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedder, Gary K.; Blanton, Ronald D. S.

    1999-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of high-aspect-ratio CMOS micromachining, focusing on materials characterization, reliability, and fault analysis. Composite microstrutural beam widths and gaps down to 1.2 micrometers are etched out of conventional CMOS dielectric, aluminum, and gate-polysilicon thin films using post-CMOS dry etching for both structural sidewall definition and for release from the substrate. Differences in stress between the multiple metal and dielectric layers cause vertical stress gradients and curl, while misalignment between layers causes lateral stress gradients and curl. Cracking is induced in a resonant fatigue structures at 620 MPa of repetitive stress after over 50 million cycles. Beams have withstood over 1.3 billion cycles at 124 MPa stress levels induced by electrostatic actuation. Failures due to process defects are classified according to the geometrical features of the defective structures. Relative probability of occurrence of each defect type is extracted from the process simulation results.

  11. Low power, CMOS digital autocorrelator spectrometer for spaceborne applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Kumar; Wilson, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A 128-channel digital autocorrelator spectrometer using four 32 channel low power CMOS correlator chips was built and tested. The CMOS correlator chip uses a 2-bit multiplication algorithm and a full-custom CMOS VLSI design to achieve low DC power consumption. The digital autocorrelator spectrometer has a 20 MHz band width, and the total DC power requirement is 6 Watts.

  12. Resistor Extends Life Of Battery In Clocked CMOS Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, George H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Addition of fixed resistor between battery and clocked complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) circuit reduces current drawn from battery. Basic idea to minimize current drawn from battery by operating CMOS circuit at lowest possible current consistent with use of simple, fixed off-the-shelf components. Prolongs lives of batteries in such low-power CMOS circuits as watches and calculators.

  13. Low-loss and low-crosstalk 8 × 8 silicon nanowire AWG routers fabricated with CMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sheng, Zhen; Li, Le; Pang, Albert; Wu, Aimin; Li, Wei; Wang, Xi; Zou, Shichang; Qi, Minghao; Gan, Fuwan

    2014-04-21

    Low-loss and low-crosstalk 8 × 8 arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) routers based on silicon nanowire waveguides are reported. A comparative study of the measurement results of the 3.2 nm-channel-spacing AWGs with three different designs is performed to evaluate the effect of each optimal technique, showing that a comprehensive optimization technique is more effective to improve the device performance than a single optimization. Based on the comprehensive optimal design, we further design and experimentally demonstrate a new 8-channel 0.8 nm-channel-spacing silicon AWG router for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) application with 130 nm CMOS technology. The AWG router with a channel spacing of 3.2 nm (resp. 0.8 nm) exhibits low insertion loss of 2.32 dB (resp. 2.92 dB) and low crosstalk of -20.5~-24.5 dB (resp. -16.9~-17.8 dB). In addition, sophisticated measurements are presented including all-input transmission testing and high-speed WDM system demonstrations for these routers. The functionality of the Si nanowire AWG as a router is characterized and a good cyclic rotation property is demonstrated. Moreover, we test the optical eye diagrams and bit-error-rates (BER) of the de-multiplexed signal when the multi-wavelength high-speed signals are launched into the AWG routers in a system experiment. Clear optical eye diagrams and low power penalty from the system point of view are achieved thanks to the low crosstalk of the AWG devices. PMID:24787827

  14. Performance of radiation-hard HV/HR CMOS sensors for the ATLAS inner detector upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Barbero, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Breugnon, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A major upgrade (Phase II Upgrade) to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled for 2022, will be brought to the machine so as to extend its discovery potential. The upgraded LHC, called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will run with a nominal leveled instantaneous luminosity of 5×1034 cm-2s-1, more than twice the expected luminosity. This unprecedented luminosity will result in higher occupancy and background radiations, which will request the design of a new Inner Tracker (ITk) which should have higher granularity, reduced material budget and improved radiation tolerance. A new pixel sensor concept based on High Voltage and High Resistivity CMOS (HV/HR CMOS) technology targeting the ATLAS inner detector upgrade is under exploration. With respect to the traditional hybrid pixel detector, the HV/HR CMOS sensor can potentially offer lower material budget, reduced pixel pitch and lower cost. Several prototypes have been designed and characterized within the ATLAS upgrade R&D effort, to investigate the detection and radiation hardness performance of various commercial technologies. An overview of the HV/HR CMOS sensor operation principle is described in this paper. The characterizations of three prototypes with X-ray, proton and neutron irradiation are also given.

  15. CMOS VCSEL driver circuit for 25+Gbps/channel short-reach parallel optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masumi

    This thesis proposes a new CMOS driver for Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting LASER (VCSEL) diode arrays. A VCSEL is a promising light source for optical communication. However, its threshold voltage (1.5V for a 850-nm VCSEL) exceeds the rated supply voltage of nanoscale CMOS technologies. This makes difficult designing a driver sourcing a modulated current to a VCSELs anode directly, an arrangement suitable for low-cost parallel optical links. To overcome this problem, a combination of analog circuit techniques is proposed including a novel pad shield driving technique. A prototype fabricated in a 65-nm CMOS technology achieved 26-Gb/s bit-rate and 1.80-pJ/b power efficiency with an optical modulation amplitude (OMA) of +1.8dBm and 3.1ps-rms jitter when driving a 850-nm 14Gb/s commercial VCSEL. This is the highest-speed anode-driving CMOS VCSEL driver reported to date. Also it has the best power efficiency and the smallest area (0:024 mm2) amongst anode-driving drivers in any process technology.

  16. Development of a lens-coupled CMOS detector for an X-ray inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Ahn, Jung Keun; Cho, Gyuseong

    2005-06-01

    A digital X-ray imaging detector based on a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor has been developed for X-ray non-destructive inspection applications. This is a cost-effective solution because of the availability of cheap commercial standard CMOS image sensors. The detector configuration adopts an indirect X-ray detection method by using scintillation material and lens assembly. As a feasibility test of the developed lens-coupled CMOS detector as an X-ray inspection system, we have acquired X-ray projection images under a variety of imaging conditions. The results show that the projected image is reasonably acceptable in typical non-destructive testing (NDT). However, the developed detector may not be appropriate for laminography due to a low light-collection efficiency of lens assembly. In this paper, construction of the lens-coupled CMOS detector and its specifications are described, and the experimental results are presented. Using the analysis of quantum accounting diagram, inefficiency of the lens-coupling method is discussed.

  17. End-of-fabrication CMOS process monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Allen, R. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Hannaman, D. J.; Lieneweg, U.; Lin, Y.-S.; Sayah, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    A set of test 'modules' for verifying the quality of a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process at the end of the wafer fabrication is documented. By electrical testing of specific structures, over thirty parameters are collected characterizing interconnects, dielectrics, contacts, transistors, and inverters. Each test module contains a specification of its purpose, the layout of the test structure, the test procedures, the data reduction algorithms, and exemplary results obtained from 3-, 2-, or 1.6-micrometer CMOS/bulk processes. The document is intended to establish standard process qualification procedures for Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC's).

  18. Evaluation of a CMOS image detector for low-cost and power medical x-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott T.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Wobschall, Darold C.; Jeong, Myoungki; Kim, Hyunkeun; Rudin, Stephen

    1999-05-01

    Recent developments in CMOS image detectors are changing the way digital imaging is performed for many applications. The replacement of charge coupled devices (CCDs), with CMOS detectors is a desirable paradigm shift that will depend on the ability to match the high performance characteristics of CCDs. Digital X-ray imaging applications (chest X-ray, mammography) would benefit greatly from this shift because CMOS detectors have the following inherent characteristics: (1) Low operating power (5 - 10 times lower than CCD/processing electronics). (2) Standard CMOS manufacturing process (CCD requires special manufacturing). (3) On-chip integration of analog/digital processing functions (difficult with CCD). (4) Low Cost (5 - 10 times lower cost than CCD). The achievement of both low cost and low power is highly desirable for portable applications as well as situations where large, expensive X-ray imaging machines are not feasible (small hospitals and clinics, emergency medical vehicles, remote sites). Achieving this goal using commercially available components would allow rapid development of such digital X-ray systems as compared with the development difficulties incurred through specialized direct detectors and systems. The focus of this paper is to evaluate a CMOS image detector for medical X-ray applications and to demonstrate the results obtained from a prototype CMOS digital X-ray camera. Results from the images collected from this optically-coupled camera are presented for a particular lens, X-ray conversion screen, and demagnification factor. Further, an overview of the overall power consumption and cost of a multi-sensor CMOS mosaic compared to its CCD counterpart are also reported.

  19. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymaszewski, P.; Barbero, M.; Breugnon, P.; Godiot, S.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hirono, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Liu, J.; Pangaud, P.; Peric, I.; Rozanov, A.; Wang, A.; Wermes, N.

    2016-02-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  20. SPICE analysis of the SEU sensitivity of a fully depleted SOI CMOS SRAM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Alles, M.L. )

    1994-12-01

    Fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technologies are of interest for commercial applications as well as for use in harsh (radiation-intensive) environments. In both types of application, effects of charged particles (single-event effects) are of concern. Here, SPICE analysis of SEU sensitivity of a 6-T SRAM cell using commercially-representative fully depleted SOI CMOS technology parameters indicates that reduction of the minority carrier lifetime (parasitic bipolar gain) and use of thinner silicon can significantly reduce SEU sensitivity.

  1. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; Cumalat, J. P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.; Shenai, A.; Wagner, S. R.

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  2. SEU hardening of CMOS memory circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Canaris, J.; Liu, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to harden CMOS memory circuits against Single Event Upset (SEU) in the space environment. A RAM cell and Flip Flop design are presented to demonstrate the method. The Flip Flop was used in the control circuitry for a Reed Solomon encoder designed for the Space Station.

  3. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    1992-01-01

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  4. Low power SEU immune CMOS memory circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, M. N.; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    The authors report a design improvement for CMOS static memory circuits hardened against single event upset (SEU) using a recently proposed logic/circuit design technique. This improvement drastically reduces static power consumption, reduces the number of transistors required in a D flip-flop design, and eliminates the possibility of capturing an upset state in the slave section during a clock transition.

  5. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Petach, Trevor A.; Baum, Brian K.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  6. A fail-safe CMOS logic gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobin, V.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to make Complex CMOS Gates fail-safe for a class of faults. Two classes of faults are defined. The fail-safe design presented has limited fault-tolerance capability. Multiple faults are also covered.

  7. CMOS preamplifiers for detectors large and small

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1997-12-31

    We describe four CMOS preamplifiers developed for multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) and silicon drift detectors (SDD) covering a capacitance range from 150 pF to 0.15 pF. Circuit techniques to optimize noise performance, particularly in the low-capacitance regime, are discussed.

  8. Low energy CMOS for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Alkalaj, Leon

    The current focus of NASA's space flight programs reflects a new thrust towards smaller, less costly, and more frequent space missions, when compared to missions such as Galileo, Magellan, or Cassini. Recently, the concept of a microspacecraft was proposed. In this concept, a small, compact spacecraft that weighs tens of kilograms performs focused scientific objectives such as imaging. Similarly, a Mars Lander micro-rover project is under study that will allow miniature robots weighing less than seven kilograms to explore the Martian surface. To bring the microspacecraft and microrover ideas to fruition, one will have to leverage compact 3D multi-chip module-based multiprocessors (MCM) technologies. Low energy CMOS will become increasingly important because of the thermodynamic considerations in cooling compact 3D MCM implementations and also from considerations of the power budget for space applications. In this paper, we show how the operating voltage is related to the threshold voltage of the CMOS transistors for accomplishing a task in VLSI with minimal energy. We also derive expressions for the noise margins at the optimal operating point. We then look at a low voltage CMOS (LVCMOS) technology developed at Stanford University which improves the power consumption over conventional CMOS by a couple of orders of magnitude and consider the suitability of the technology for space applications by characterizing its SEU immunity.

  9. Low-Power SOI CMOS Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene (Technical Monitor); Cheruiyot, K.; Cothern, J.; Huang, D.; Singh, S.; Zencir, E.; Dogan, N.

    2003-01-01

    The work aims at developing a low-power Silicon on Insulator Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (SOI CMOS) Transceiver for deep-space communications. RF Receiver must accomplish the following tasks: (a) Select the desired radio channel and reject other radio signals, (b) Amplify the desired radio signal and translate them back to baseband, and (c) Detect and decode the information with Low BER. In order to minimize cost and achieve high level of integration, receiver architecture should use least number of external filters and passive components. It should also consume least amount of power to minimize battery cost, size, and weight. One of the most stringent requirements for deep-space communication is the low-power operation. Our study identified that two candidate architectures listed in the following meet these requirements: (1) Low-IF receiver, (2) Sub-sampling receiver. The low-IF receiver uses minimum number of external components. Compared to Zero-IF (Direct conversion) architecture, it has less severe offset and flicker noise problems. The Sub-sampling receiver amplifies the RF signal and samples it using track-and-hold Subsampling mixer. These architectures provide low-power solution for the short- range communications missions on Mars. Accomplishments to date include: (1) System-level design and simulation of a Double-Differential PSK receiver, (2) Implementation of Honeywell SOI CMOS process design kit (PDK) in Cadence design tools, (3) Design of test circuits to investigate relationships between layout techniques, geometry, and low-frequency noise in SOI CMOS, (4) Model development and verification of on-chip spiral inductors in SOI CMOS process, (5) Design/implementation of low-power low-noise amplifier (LNA) and mixer for low-IF receiver, and (6) Design/implementation of high-gain LNA for sub-sampling receiver. Our initial results show that substantial improvement in power consumption is achieved using SOI CMOS as compared to standard CMOS

  10. Detection of pointing errors with CMOS-based camera in intersatellite optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Si-yuan; Ma, Jing; Tan, Li-ying

    2005-01-01

    For very high data rates, intersatellite optical communications hold a potential performance edge over microwave communications. Acquisition and Tracking problem is critical because of the narrow transmit beam. A single array detector in some systems performs both spatial acquisition and tracking functions to detect pointing errors, so both wide field of view and high update rate is required. The past systems tend to employ CCD-based camera with complex readout arrangements, but the additional complexity reduces the applicability of the array based tracking concept. With the development of CMOS array, CMOS-based cameras can employ the single array detector concept. The area of interest feature of the CMOS-based camera allows a PAT system to specify portion of the array. The maximum allowed frame rate increases as the size of the area of interest decreases under certain conditions. A commercially available CMOS camera with 105 fps @ 640×480 is employed in our PAT simulation system, in which only part pixels are used in fact. Beams angle varying in the field of view can be detected after getting across a Cassegrain telescope and an optical focus system. Spot pixel values (8 bits per pixel) reading out from CMOS are transmitted to a DSP subsystem via IEEE 1394 bus, and pointing errors can be computed by the centroid equation. It was shown in test that: (1) 500 fps @ 100×100 is available in acquisition when the field of view is 1mrad; (2)3k fps @ 10×10 is available in tracking when the field of view is 0.1mrad.

  11. CMOS cassette for digital upgrade of film-based mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Mehmet A.; Toker, Emre

    2006-03-01

    While full-field digital mammography (FFDM) technology is gaining clinical acceptance, the overwhelming majority (96%) of the installed base of mammography systems are conventional film-screen (FSM) systems. A high performance, and economical digital cassette based product to conveniently upgrade FSM systems to FFDM would accelerate the adoption of FFDM, and make the clinical and technical advantages of FFDM available to a larger population of women. The planned FFDM cassette is based on our commercial Digital Radiography (DR) cassette for 10 cm x 10 cm field-of-view spot imaging and specimen radiography, utilizing a 150 micron columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator and 48 micron active-pixel CMOS sensor modules. Unlike a Computer Radiography (CR) cassette, which requires an external digitizer, our DR cassette transfers acquired images to a display workstation within approximately 5 seconds of exposure, greatly enhancing patient flow. We will present the physical performance of our prototype system against other FFDM systems in clinical use today, using established objective criteria such as the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), and subjective criteria, such as a contrast-detail (CD-MAM) observer performance study. Driven by the strong demand from the computer industry, CMOS technology is one of the lowest cost, and the most readily accessible technologies available for FFDM today. Recent popular use of CMOS imagers in high-end consumer cameras have also resulted in significant advances in the imaging performance of CMOS sensors against rivaling CCD sensors. This study promises to take advantage of these unique features to develop the first CMOS based FFDM upgrade cassette.

  12. Region-of-interest cone beam computed tomography (ROI CBCT) with a high resolution CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Takemoto, H.; Silver, M. D.; Nagesh, S. V. S.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems with rotational gantries that have standard flat panel detectors (FPD) are widely used for the 3D rendering of vascular structures using Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithms. One of the inherent limitations of these systems is limited resolution (<3 lp/mm). There are systems available with higher resolution but their small FOV limits them to small animal imaging only. In this work, we report on region-of-interest (ROI) CBCT with a high resolution CMOS detector (75 μm pixels, 600 μm HR-CsI) mounted with motorized detector changer on a commercial FPD-based C-arm angiography gantry (194 μm pixels, 600 μm HL-CsI). A cylindrical CT phantom and neuro stents were imaged with both detectors. For each detector a total of 209 images were acquired in a rotational protocol. The technique parameters chosen for the FPD by the imaging system were used for the CMOS detector. The anti-scatter grid was removed and the incident scatter was kept the same for both detectors with identical collimator settings. The FPD images were reconstructed for the 10 cm x10 cm FOV and the CMOS images were reconstructed for a 3.84 cm x 3.84 cm FOV. Although the reconstructed images from the CMOS detector demonstrated comparable contrast to the FPD images, the reconstructed 3D images of the neuro stent clearly showed that the CMOS detector improved delineation of smaller objects such as the stent struts (~70 μm) compared to the FPD. Further development and the potential for substantial clinical impact are suggested.

  13. Commercialisation of CMOS Integrated Circuit Technology in Multi-Electrode Arrays for Neuroscience and Cell-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Anthony H. D.; Robbins, Jon; Bowen, Chris R.; Taylor, John

    2011-01-01

    The adaptation of standard integrated circuit (IC) technology as a transducer in cell-based biosensors in drug discovery pharmacology, neural interface systems and electrophysiology requires electrodes that are electrochemically stable, biocompatible and affordable. Unfortunately, the ubiquitous Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) IC technology does not meet the first of these requirements. For devices intended only for research, modification of CMOS by post-processing using cleanroom facilities has been achieved. However, to enable adoption of CMOS as a basis for commercial biosensors, the economies of scale of CMOS fabrication must be maintained by using only low-cost post-processing techniques. This review highlights the methodologies employed in cell-based biosensor design where CMOS-based integrated circuits (ICs) form an integral part of the transducer system. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application of multi-electrode arrays for in vitro neuroscience applications. Identifying suitable IC packaging methods presents further significant challenges when considering specific applications. The various challenges and difficulties are reviewed and some potential solutions are presented. PMID:22163884

  14. Faint-meteor survey with a large-format CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, J.; Enomoto, T.; Terai, T.; Kasuga, T.; Miyazaki, S.; Oota, K.; Muraoka, F.; Onishi, T.; Yamasaki, T.; Mito, H.; Aoki, T.; Soyano, T.; Tarusawa, K.; Matsunaga, N.; Sako, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Doi, M.

    2014-07-01

    For observing faint meteors, we need a large telescope or similar optics, which always give a restriction of the field of view. It is a kind of trade-off between the high sensitivity by using larger telescope and narrower field of view. Reconciling this contradiction, we need a large-format imaging detector together with fast readout for meteor observations. A high-sensitivity CMOS sensor of the large format was developed by Canon Inc. in 2010[1]. Its size is 202 mm×205 mm which makes it the largest one-chip CMOS sensor in the world, and approximately 40 times the size of Canon's largest commercial CMOS sensor as shown in the figure. The number of pixel is 1280×1248. Because the increased size of the new CMOS sensor allows more light to be gathered, it enables shooting in low-light environments. The sensor makes image capture possible in one-hundredth the amount of light required by a 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor, facilitating the shooting of 60 frame-per-second video with a mere 0.3 lux of illumination. We tried to use this large-format CMOS sensor attached to the prime focus of the 1.05-m (F3.1) Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory, University of Tokyo, for surveying faint meteors. The field of view is 3.3 by 3.3 degrees. Test observations including operation check of the system were carried out in January 2011, September 2011,and December 2012. Images were obtained at a time resolution of 60 frames per second. In this system, the limiting magnitude is estimated to be about 11-12. Because of the limitation of the data storage, full-power observations (14-bit data per 1/60 second) were performed for about one or two hours each night. During the first period, we can count a sporadic meteor every 5 seconds. This is about one order higher detection rate of the faint meteors compared with the previous work[2]. Assuming the height of faint meteors at 100 km, the derived flux of the sporadic meteors is about 5 × 10^{-4} km^{-2} sec^{-1}. The last run was

  15. A CMOS Neural Interface for a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Hageman, Kristin N; Kalayjian, Zaven K; Tejada, Francisco; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A; Fridman, Gene Y; Dai, Chenkai; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Georgiou, Julio; Della Santina, Charles C; Andreou, Andreas G

    2016-04-01

    We present a high-voltage CMOS neural-interface chip for a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that measures head motion and modulates vestibular nerve activity to restore vision- and posture-stabilizing reflexes. This application specific integrated circuit neural interface (ASIC-NI) chip was designed to work with a commercially available microcontroller, which controls the ASIC-NI via a fast parallel interface to deliver biphasic stimulation pulses with 9-bit programmable current amplitude via 16 stimulation channels. The chip was fabricated in the ONSemi C5 0.5 micron, high-voltage CMOS process and can accommodate compliance voltages up to 12 V, stimulating vestibular nerve branches using biphasic current pulses up to 1.45±0.06 mA with durations as short as 10 μs/phase. The ASIC-NI includes a dedicated digital-to-analog converter for each channel, enabling it to perform complex multipolar stimulation. The ASIC-NI replaces discrete components that cover nearly half of the 2nd generation MVP (MVP2) printed circuit board, reducing the MVP system size by 48% and power consumption by 17%. Physiological tests of the ASIC-based MVP system (MVP2A) in a rhesus monkey produced reflexive eye movement responses to prosthetic stimulation similar to those observed when using the MVP2. Sinusoidal modulation of stimulus pulse rate from 68-130 pulses per second at frequencies from 0.1 to 5 Hz elicited appropriately-directed slow phase eye velocities ranging in amplitude from 1.9-16.7 °/s for the MVP2 and 2.0-14.2 °/s for the MVP2A. The eye velocities evoked by MVP2 and MVP2A showed no significant difference ( t-test, p=0.34), suggesting that the MVP2A achieves performance at least as good as the larger MVP2. PMID:25974945

  16. A CMOS Neural Interface for a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Kristin N.; Kalayjian, Zaven K.; Tejada, Francisco; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A.; Fridman, Gene Y.; Dai, Chenkai; Pouliquen, Philippe O.; Georgiou, Julio; Della Santina, Charles C.; Andreou, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-voltage CMOS neural-interface chip for a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that measures head motion and modulates vestibular nerve activity to restore vision- and posture-stabilizing reflexes. This application specific integrated circuit neural interface (ASIC-NI) chip was designed to work with a commercially available microcontroller, which controls the ASIC-NI via a fast parallel interface to deliver biphasic stimulation pulses with 9-bit programmable current amplitude via 16 stimulation channels. The chip was fabricated in the ONSemi C5 0.5 micron, high-voltage CMOS process and can accommodate compliance voltages up to 12 V, stimulating vestibular nerve branches using biphasic current pulses up to 1.45 ± 0.06 mA with durations as short as 10 µs/phase. The ASIC-NI includes a dedicated digital-to-analog converter for each channel, enabling it to perform complex multipolar stimulation. The ASIC-NI replaces discrete components that cover nearly half of the 2nd generation MVP (MVP2) printed circuit board, reducing the MVP system size by 48% and power consumption by 17%. Physiological tests of the ASIC-based MVP system (MVP2A) in a rhesus monkey produced reflexive eye movement responses to prosthetic stimulation similar to those observed when using the MVP2. Sinusoidal modulation of stimulus pulse rate from 68–130 pulses per second at frequencies from 0.1 to 5 Hz elicited appropriately-directed slow phase eye velocities ranging in amplitude from 1.9–16.7°/s for the MVP2 and 2.0–14.2°/s for the MVP2A. The eye velocities evoked by MVP2 and MVP2A showed no significant difference (t-test, p = 0.034), suggesting that the MVP2A achieves performance at least as good as the larger MVP2. PMID:25974945

  17. Ultralow-Loss CMOS Copper Plasmonic Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I; Kirtaev, Roman V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2016-01-13

    Surface plasmon polaritons can give a unique opportunity to manipulate light at a scale well below the diffraction limit reducing the size of optical components down to that of nanoelectronic circuits. At the same time, plasmonics is mostly based on noble metals, which are not compatible with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which can outperform gold plasmonic waveguides simultaneously providing long (>40 μm) propagation length and deep subwavelength (∼λ(2)/50, where λ is the free-space wavelength) mode confinement in the telecommunication spectral range. These results create the backbone for the development of a CMOS plasmonic platform and its integration in future electronic chips. PMID:26654281

  18. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhang; Suying, Yao; Jiangtao, Xu

    2011-11-01

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS), a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle. Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors, the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel. Then, the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived. It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region. In this model, photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance, but dark current shot noise does. According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator, the total noise can be reduced. These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS.

  19. Spectrum acquisition of detonation based on CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Bai, Yonglin; Wang, Bo; Liu, Baiyu; Xue, Yingdong; Zhang, Wei; Gou, Yongsheng; Bai, Xiaohong; Qin, Junjun; Xian, Ouyang

    2010-10-01

    The detection of high-speed dynamic spectrum is the main method to acquire transient information. In order to obtain the large amount spectral data in real-time during the process of detonation, a CMOS-based system with high-speed spectrum data acquisition is designed. The hardware platform of the system is based on FPGA, and the unique characteristic of CMOS image sensors in the rolling shutter model is used simultaneously. Using FPGA as the master control chip of the system, not only provides the time sequence for CIS, but also controls the storage and transmission of the spectral data. In the experiment of spectral data acquisition, the acquired information is transmitted to the host computer through the CameraLink bus. The dynamic spectral curve is obtained after the subsequent processing. The experimental results demonstrate that this system is feasible in the acquisition and storage of high-speed dynamic spectrum information during the process of detonation.

  20. IR CMOS: infrared enhanced silicon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, M. U.; Carey, J. E.; Haddad, Homayoon; Vineis, C.; Sickler, J.; Li, X.; Jiang, J.; Sahebi, F.; Palsule, C.; McKee, J.

    2013-06-01

    SiOnyx has developed visible and infrared CMOS image sensors leveraging a proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor process technology. This technology demonstrates 10 fold improvements in infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Furthermore, these sensitivity enhancements are achieved on a focal plane with state of the art noise performance of 2 electrons/pixel. By capturing light in the visible regime as well as infrared light from the night glow, this sensor technology provides imaging in daytime through twilight and into nighttime conditions. The measured 10x quantum efficiency at the critical 1064 nm laser node enables see spot imaging capabilities in a variety of ambient conditions. The spectral sensitivity is from 400 to 1200 nm.

  1. Cmos spdt switch for wlan applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. A. S.; Reaz, M. B. I.; Rahman, L. F.; Minhad, K. N.

    2015-04-01

    WLAN has become an essential part of our today's life. The advancement of CMOS technology let the researchers contribute low power, size and cost effective WLAN devices. This paper proposes a single pole double through transmit/receive (T/R) switch for WLAN applications in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The proposed switch exhibit 1.36 dB insertion loss, 25.3 dB isolation and 24.3 dBm power handling capacity. Moreover, it only dissipates 786.7 nW power per cycle. The switch utilizes only transistor aspect ratio optimization and resistive body floating technique to achieve such desired performance. In this design the use of bulky inductor and capacitor is avoided to evade imposition of unwanted nonlinearities to the communication signal.

  2. CMOS Camera Array With Onboard Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Nahum

    2009-01-01

    A compact CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) camera system has been developed with high resolution (1.3 Megapixels), a USB (universal serial bus) 2.0 interface, and an onboard memory. Exposure times, and other operating parameters, are sent from a control PC via the USB port. Data from the camera can be received via the USB port and the interface allows for simple control and data capture through a laptop computer.

  3. CMOS-array design-automation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, A.; Lombardt, T.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty four page report discusses design of 4,096-bit complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) read-only memory (ROM). CMOSROM is either mask or laser programable. Report is divided into six sections; section one describes background of ROM chips; section two presents design goals for chip; section three discusses chip implementation and chip statistics; conclusions and recommendations are given in sections four thru six.

  4. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan Allen; Marshall, Paul W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Gordon, Michael S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Schwank, James R.; Dodds, Nathaniel A.; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Berg, Melanie D.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; Seidleck, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  5. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Seidleck, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  6. Radiation effects on scientific CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanfu, Zhao; Liyan, Liu; Xiaohui, Liu; Xiaofeng, Jin; Xiang, Li

    2015-11-01

    A systemic solution for radiation hardened design is presented. Besides, a series of experiments have been carried out on the samples, and then the photoelectric response characteristic and spectral characteristic before and after the experiments have been comprehensively analyzed. The performance of the CMOS image sensor with the radiation hardened design technique realized total-dose resilience up to 300 krad(Si) and resilience to single-event latch up for LET up to 110 MeV·cm2/mg.

  7. Radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS for radiography conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Soongpyung; Kang, Dong-Won; Kim, Dong-Kie

    2006-11-01

    Under industrial radiography conditions, we analyzed short-term radiation characteristics of scintillator coupled CMOS APS (hereinafter SC CMOS APS). By means of experimentation, the contribution of the transmitted X-ray through the scintillator to the properties of the CMOS APS and the afterimage, generated in the acquired image even at low dose condition, were investigated. To see the transmitted X-ray effects on the CMOS APS, Fein focus™ X-ray machine, two scintillators of Lanex™ Fine and Regular, and two CMOS APS array of RadEye™ were used under the conditions of 50 kV p/1 mAs and 100 kV p/1 mAs. By measuring the transmitted X-ray on signal and Noise Power Spectrum, we analytically examined the generation mechanism of the afterimage, based on dark signal or dark current increase in the sensor, and explained the afterimage in the SC CMOS APS.

  8. CMOS-controlled rapidly tunable photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ray

    With rapidly increasing data bandwidth demands, wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical access networks seem unavoidable in the near future. To operate WDM optical networks in an efficient scheme, wavelength reconfigurability and scalability of the network are crucial. Unfortunately, most of the existing wavelength tunable technologies are neither rapidly tunable nor spectrally programmable. This dissertation presents a tunable photodetector that is designed for dynamic-wavelength allocation WDM network environments. The wavelength tuning mechanism is completely different from existing technologies. The spectrum of this detector is programmable through low-voltage digital patterns. Since the wavelength selection is achieved by electronic means, the device wavelength reconfiguration time is as fast as the electronic switching time. In this dissertation work, we have demonstrated a tunable detector that is hybridly integrated with its customized CMOS driver and receiver with nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time. In addition to its nanosecond wavelength reconfiguration time, the spectrum of this detector is digitally programmable, which means that it can adapt to system changes without re-fabrication. We have theoretically developed and experimentally demonstrated two device operating algorithms based on the same orthogonal device-optics basis. Both the rapid wavelength tuning time and the scalability make this novel device very viable for new reconfigurable WDM networks. By taking advantage of CMOS circuit design, this detector concept can be further extended for simultaneous multiple wavelength detection. We have developed one possible chip architecture and have designed a CMOS tunable optical demux for simultaneous controllable two-wavelength detection.

  9. Efficient design of CMOS TSC checkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddappa, Anita; Shamanna, Manjunath K.; Maki, Gary; Whitaker, Sterling

    1990-01-01

    This paper considers the design of an efficient, robustly testable, CMOS Totally Self-Checking (TSC) Checker for k-out-of-2k codes. Most existing implementations use primitive gates and assume the single stuck-at fault model. The self-testing property has been found to fail for CMOS TSC checkers under the stuck-open fault model due to timing skews and arbitrary delays in the circuit. A new four level design using CMOS primitive gates (NAND, NOR, INVERTERS) is presented. This design retains its properties under the stuck-open fault model. Additionally, this method offers an impressive reduction (greater than 70 percent) in gate count, gate inputs, and test set size when compared to the existing method. This implementation is easily realizable and is based on Anderson's technique. A thorough comparative study has been made on the proposed implementation and Kundu's implementation and the results indicate that the proposed one is better than Kundu's in all respects for k-out-of-2k codes.

  10. Quantitative optical metrology with CMOS cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, Cosme; Kolenovic, Ervin; Ferguson, Curtis F.

    2004-08-01

    Recent advances in laser technology, optical sensing, and computer processing of data, have lead to the development of advanced quantitative optical metrology techniques for high accuracy measurements of absolute shapes and deformations of objects. These techniques provide noninvasive, remote, and full field of view information about the objects of interest. The information obtained relates to changes in shape and/or size of the objects, characterizes anomalies, and provides tools to enhance fabrication processes. Factors that influence selection and applicability of an optical technique include the required sensitivity, accuracy, and precision that are necessary for a particular application. In this paper, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision characteristics in quantitative optical metrology techniques, and specifically in optoelectronic holography (OEH) based on CMOS cameras, are discussed. Sensitivity, accuracy, and precision are investigated with the aid of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable gauges, demonstrating the applicability of CMOS cameras in quantitative optical metrology techniques. It is shown that the advanced nature of CMOS technology can be applied to challenging engineering applications, including the study of rapidly evolving phenomena occurring in MEMS and micromechatronics.

  11. Correct CMOS IC defect models for quality testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soden, Jerry M.; Hawkins, Charles F.

    1993-01-01

    Leading edge, high reliability, and low escape CMOS IC test practices have now virtually removed the stuck-at fault model and replaced it with more defect-orientated models. Quiescent power supply current testing (I(sub DDQ)) combined with strategic use of high speed test patterns is the recommended approach to zero defect and high reliability testing goals. This paper reviews the reasons for the change in CMOS IC test practices and outlines an improved CMOS IC test methodology.

  12. A Standard CMOS Humidity Sensor without Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnik, Oleg; Higuchi, Kohei; Maenaka, Kazusuke

    2011-01-01

    A 2 μW power dissipation, voltage-output, humidity sensor accurate to 5% relative humidity was developed using the LFoundry 0.15 μm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a Intervia Photodielectric 8023–10 humidity-sensitive layer, and a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter. PMID:22163949

  13. Behavior of faulty double BJT BiCMOS logic gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Sankaran M.; Malaiya, Yashwant K.; Jayasumana, Anura P.

    1992-01-01

    Logic Behavior of a Double BJT BiCMOS device under transistor level shorts and opens is examined. In addition to delay faults, faults that cause the gate to exhibit sequential behavior were observed. Several faults can be detected only by monitoring the current. The faulty behavior of Bipolar (TTL) and CMOS logic families is compared with BiCMOS, to bring out the testability differences.

  14. Interferometric comparison of the performance of a CMOS and sCMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Moreno, J. M.; De la Torre I., Manuel H.; Hernández-Montes, M. S.; Pérez-López, Carlos; Mendoza S., Fernando

    2015-08-01

    We present an analysis of the imaging performance of two state-of-the-art sensors widely used in the nondestructive- testing area (NDT). The analysis is based on the quantification of the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio from an optical phase image. The calculation of the SNR is based on the relation of the median (average) and standard deviation measurements over specific areas of interest in the phase images of both sensors. This retrieved phase is coming from the vibrational behavior of a large object by means of an out-of-plane holographic interferometer. The SNR is used as a figure-of-merit to evaluate and compare the performance of the CMOS and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera as part of the experimental set-up. One of the cameras has a high speed CMOS sensor while the other has a high resolution sCMOS sensor. The object under study is a metallically framed table with a Formica cover with an observable area of 1.1 m2. The vibration induced to the sample is performed by a linear step motor with an attached tip in the motion stage. Each camera is used once at the time to record the deformation keeping the same experimental conditions for each case. These measurements may complement the conventional procedures or technical information commonly used to evaluate a camerás performance such as: quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and others. Results present post processed images from both cameras, but showing a smoother and easy to unwrap optical phase coming from those recorded with the sCMOS camera.

  15. Current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyhesan, Mohammad Kassim

    Digital imaging is growing rapidly making Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semi conductor (CMOS) image sensor-based cameras indispensable in many modern life devices like cell phones, surveillance devices, personal computers, and tablets. For various purposes wireless portable image systems are widely deployed in many indoor and outdoor places such as hospitals, urban areas, streets, highways, forests, mountains, and towers. However, the increased demand on high-resolution image sensors and improved processing features is expected to increase the power consumption of the CMOS sensor-based camera systems. Increased power consumption translates into a reduced battery life-time. The increased power consumption might not be a problem if there is access to a nearby charging station. On the other hand, the problem arises if the image sensor is located in widely spread areas, unfavorable to human intervention, and difficult to reach. Given the limitation of energy sources available for wireless CMOS image sensor, an energy harvesting technique presents a viable solution to extend the sensor life-time. Energy can be harvested from the sun light or the artificial light surrounding the sensor itself. In this thesis, we propose a current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor capable of energy harvesting and image capture. The proposed sensor is based on a hybrid pixel that can be programmed to perform the task of an image sensor and the task of a solar cell to harvest energy. The basic idea is to design a pixel that can be configured to exploit its internal photodiode to perform two functions: image sensing and energy harvesting. As a proof of concept a 40 x 40 array of hybrid pixels has been designed and fabricated in a standard 0.5 microm CMOS process. Measurement results show that up to 39 microW of power can be harvested from the array under 130 Klux condition with an energy efficiency of 220 nJ /pixel /frame. The proposed image sensor is a current-mode image sensor which has several

  16. Envelope tracking CMOS power amplifier with high-speed CMOS envelope amplifier for mobile handsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Sakai, Yasufumi; Oishi, Kazuaki; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Mori, Toshihiko; Yamaura, Shinji; Suto, Kazuo; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2014-01-01

    A high-efficiency CMOS power amplifier (PA) based on envelope tracking (ET) has been reported for a wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) and long term evolution (LTE) application. By adopting a high-speed CMOS envelope amplifier with current direction sensing, a 5% improvement in total power-added efficiency (PAE) and a 11 dB decrease in adjacent channel leakage ratio (ACLR) are achieved with a W-CDMA signal. Moreover, the proposed PA achieves a PAE of 25.4% for a 10 MHz LTE signal at an output power (Pout) of 25.6 dBm and a gain of 24 dB.

  17. Planar Microfluidic System Based on Electrophoresis for Detection of 130-nm Magnetic Labels for Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Tsukasa; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2011-04-01

    Superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) used as magnetic labels offer potential for the realization of high sensitivity and low cost biosensors for point of care treatment (POCT). For better biomolecular affinity and higher sensitivity, it is desirable to use sub-200-nm-diameter SPBs comparable in size to actual biomolecules. However, the detection of small concentrations of such SPBs by magnetoresistive devices is extremely challenging due to small magnetic response of SPBs. As a solution to these limitations, we describe a simple detecting procedure where the capture of micro-SPBs by immobilized nano-target SPBs due to self-assembly induced by an external magnetic field, which was monitored under an optical microscope. Here we describe biosensing system based on self-assembly of micro-SPBs by nanoSPBs targets using a system without external pumps, thereby enabling greater miniaturization and portability.

  18. Impact of Spacecraft Shielding on Direct Ionization Soft Error Rates for sub-130 nm Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Michael M.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Oldham, Timothy R.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    We use ray tracing software to model various levels of spacecraft shielding complexity and energy deposition pulse height analysis to study how it affects the direct ionization soft error rate of microelectronic components in space. The analysis incorporates the galactic cosmic ray background, trapped proton, and solar heavy ion environments as well as the October 1989 and July 2000 solar particle events.

  19. CMOS-Technology-Enabled Flexible and Stretchable Electronics for Internet of Everything Applications.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Aftab M; Hussain, Muhammad M

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable electronics can dramatically enhance the application of electronics for the emerging Internet of Everything applications where people, processes, data and devices will be integrated and connected, to augment quality of life. Using naturally flexible and stretchable polymeric substrates in combination with emerging organic and molecular materials, nanowires, nanoribbons, nanotubes, and 2D atomic crystal structured materials, significant progress has been made in the general area of such electronics. However, high volume manufacturing, reliability and performance per cost remain elusive goals for wide commercialization of these electronics. On the other hand, highly sophisticated but extremely reliable, batch-fabrication-capable and mature complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based technology has facilitated tremendous growth of today's digital world using thin-film-based electronics; in particular, bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) which is used in most of the electronics existing today. However, one fundamental challenge is that state-of-the-art CMOS electronics are physically rigid and brittle. Therefore, in this work, how CMOS-technology-enabled flexible and stretchable electronics can be developed is discussed, with particular focus on bulk monocrystalline silicon (100). A comprehensive information base to realistically devise an integration strategy by rational design of materials, devices and processes for Internet of Everything electronics is offered. PMID:26607553

  20. High-performance CMOS image sensors at BAE SYSTEMS Imaging Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Paul; Fowler, Boyd; Liu, Chiao; Mims, Steve; Balicki, Janusz; Bartkovjak, Peter; Do, Hung; Li, Wang

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of high-performance CMOS image sensor products developed at BAE SYSTEMS Imaging Solutions designed to satisfy the increasingly challenging technical requirements for image sensors used in advanced scientific, industrial, and low light imaging applications. We discuss the design and present the test results of a family of image sensors tailored for high imaging performance and capable of delivering sub-electron readout noise, high dynamic range, low power, high frame rates, and high sensitivity. We briefly review the performance of the CIS2051, a 5.5-Mpixel image sensor, which represents our first commercial CMOS image sensor product that demonstrates the potential of our technology, then we present the performance characteristics of the CIS1021, a full HD format CMOS image sensor capable of delivering sub-electron read noise performance at 50 fps frame rate at full HD resolution. We also review the performance of the CIS1042, a 4-Mpixel image sensor which offers better than 70% QE @ 600nm combined with better than 91dB intra scene dynamic range and about 1 e- read noise at 100 fps frame rate at full resolution.

  1. Ultra-fast high-resolution hybrid and monolithic CMOS imagers in multi-frame radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Kris; Douence, Vincent; Bai, Yibin; Nedrow, Paul; Mariam, Fesseha; Merrill, Frank; Morris, Christopher L.; Saunders, Andy

    2014-09-01

    A new burst-mode, 10-frame, hybrid Si-sensor/CMOS-ROIC FPA chip has been recently fabricated at Teledyne Imaging Sensors. The intended primary use of the sensor is in the multi-frame 800 MeV proton radiography at LANL. The basic part of the hybrid is a large (48×49 mm2) stitched CMOS chip of 1100×1100 pixel count, with a minimum shutter speed of 50 ns. The performance parameters of this chip are compared to the first generation 3-frame 0.5-Mpixel custom hybrid imager. The 3-frame cameras have been in continuous use for many years, in a variety of static and dynamic experiments at LANSCE. The cameras can operate with a per-frame adjustable integration time of ~ 120ns-to- 1s, and inter-frame time of 250ns to 2s. Given the 80 ms total readout time, the original and the new imagers can be externally synchronized to 0.1-to-5 Hz, 50-ns wide proton beam pulses, and record up to ~1000-frame radiographic movies typ. of 3-to-30 minute duration. The performance of the global electronic shutter is discussed and compared to that of a high-resolution commercial front-illuminated monolithic CMOS imager.

  2. CMOS compatible on-chip decoupling capacitor based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, A. M.; Göransson, G.; Desmaris, V.; Enoksson, P.

    2015-05-01

    On-chip decoupling capacitor of specific capacitance 55 pF/μm2 (footprint area) which is 10 times higher than the commercially available discrete and on-chip (65 nm technology node) decoupling capacitors is presented. The electrodes of the capacitor are based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) capable of being integrated directly on CMOS chips. The carbon nanofibers employed in this study were grown on CMOS chips using direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) technique at CMOS compatible temperature. The carbon nanofibers were grown at temperature from 390 °C to 550 °C. The capacitance of the carbon nanofibers was measured by cyclic voltammetry and thus compared. Futhermore the capacitance of decoupling capacitor was measured using different voltage scan rate to show their high charge storage capability and finally the cyclic voltammetry is run for 1000 cycles to assess their suitability as electrode material for decoupling capacitor. Our results show the high specific capacitance and long-term reliability of performance of the on-chip decoupling capacitors. Moreover, the specific capacitance shown is larger for carbon nanofibers grown at higher temperature.

  3. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial points of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)

  4. Lab-on-CMOS Integration of Microfluidics and Electrochemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yue; Mason, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a CMOS-microfluidics integration scheme for electrochemical microsystems. A CMOS chip was embedded into a micro-machined silicon carrier. By leveling the CMOS chip and carrier surface to within 100 nm, an expanded obstacle-free surface suitable for photolithography was achieved. Thin film metal planar interconnects were microfabricated to bridge CMOS pads to the perimeter of the carrier, leaving a flat and smooth surface for integrating microfluidic structures. A model device containing SU-8 microfluidic mixers and detection channels crossing over microelectrodes on a CMOS integrated circuit was constructed using the chip-carrier assembly scheme. Functional integrity of microfluidic structures and on-CMOS electrodes was verified by a simultaneous sample dilution and electrochemical detection experiment within multi-channel microfluidics. This lab-on-CMOS integration process is capable of high packing density, is suitable for wafer-level batch production, and opens new opportunities to combine the performance benefits of on-CMOS sensors with lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:23939616

  5. High responsivity CMOS imager pixel implemented in SOI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, X.; Wrigley, C.; Yang, G.; Pain, B.

    2000-01-01

    Availability of mature sub-micron CMOS technology and the advent of the new low noise active pixel sensor (APS) concept have enabled the development of low power, miniature, single-chip, CMOS digital imagers in the decade of the 1990's.

  6. CMOS-compatible RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakamraju, Narendra V.; Kim, Bruce; Phillips, Stephen M.

    2004-08-01

    Mobile technologies have relied on RF switches for a long time. Though the basic function of the switch has remained the same, the way they have been made has changed in the recent past. In the past few years work has been done to use MEMS technologies in designing and fabricating an RF switch that would in many ways replace the electronic and mechanical switches that have been used for so long. The work that is described here is an attempt to design and fabricate an RF MEMS switch that can handle higher RF power and have CMOS compatible operating voltages.

  7. Vertical Isolation for Photodiodes in CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement in complementary metal oxide/semi conduct - or (CMOS) image detectors, two additional implants in each pixel would effect vertical isolation between the metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and the photodiode of the pixel. This improvement is expected to enable separate optimization of the designs of the photodiode and the MOSFETs so as to optimize their performances independently of each other. The purpose to be served by enabling this separate optimization is to eliminate or vastly reduce diffusion cross-talk, thereby increasing sensitivity, effective spatial resolution, and color fidelity while reducing noise.

  8. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  9. Radiation-hard Active Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades based on HV-CMOS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miucci, A.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Backhaus, M.; Capeans, M.; Feigl, S.; Nessi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; La Rosa, A.; Muenstermann, D.; George, M.; Große-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Breugnon, P.; Pangaud, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Fougeron, D.; Bompard, F.; Clemens, J. C.; Liu, J.; Barbero, M.; Rozanov, A.; HV-CMOS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. A proposal for the next generation of inner detectors is based on HV-CMOS: a new family of silicon sensors based on commercial high-voltage CMOS technology, which enables the fabrication of part of the pixel electronics inside the silicon substrate itself. The main advantages of this technology with respect to the standard silicon sensor technology are: low material budget, fast charge collection time, high radiation tolerance, low cost and operation at room temperature. A traditional readout chip is still needed to receive and organize the data from the active sensor and to handle high-level functionality such as trigger management. HV-CMOS has been designed to be compatible with both pixel and strip readout. In this paper an overview of HV2FEI4, a HV-CMOS prototype in 180 nm AMS technology, will be given. Preliminary results after neutron and X-ray irradiation are shown.

  10. A Radiation Hardened by Design CMOS ASIC for Thermopile Readouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, G.; Aslam, S.; DuMonthier, J.

    2012-01-01

    A radiation hardened by design (RHBD) mixed-signal application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has been designed for a thermopile readout for operation in the harsh Jovian orbital environment. The multi-channel digitizer (MCD) ASIC includes 18 low noise amplifier channels which have tunable gain/filtering coefficients, a 16-bit sigma-delta analog-digital converter (SDADC) and an on-chip controller. The 18 channels, SDADC and controller were designed to operate with immunity to single event latchup (SEL) and to at least 10 Mrad total ionizing dose (TID). The ASIC also contains a radiation tolerant 16-bit 20 MHz Nyquist ADC for general purpose instrumentation digitizer needs. The ASIC is currently undergoing fabrication in a commercial 180 nm CMOS process. Although this ASIC was designed specifically for the harsh radiation environment of the NASA led JEO mission it is suitable for integration into instrumentation payloads 011 the ESA JUICE mission where the radiation hardness requirements are slightly less stringent.

  11. CMOS solid state photomultipliers for ultra-low light levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik B.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Chen, Xaio Jie; Whitney, Chad; Chapman, Eric C.; Alberghini, Guy; Rines, Rich; Augustine, Frank; Christian, James

    2011-05-01

    Detection of single photons is crucial for a number of applications. Geiger photodiodes (GPD) provide large gains with an insignificant amount of multiplication noise exclusively from the diode. When the GPD is operated above the reverse bias breakdown voltage, the diode can avalanche due to charged pairs generated from random noise (typically thermal) or incident photons. The GPD is a binary device, as only one photon is needed to trigger an avalanche, regardless of the number of incident photons. A solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) is an array of GPDs, and the output of the SSPM is proportional to the incident light intensity, providing a replacement for photomultiplier tubes. We have developed CMOS SSPMs using a commercial fabrication process for a myriad of applications. We present results on the operation of these devices for low intensity light pulses. The data analysis provides a measured of the junction capacitance (~150 fF), which affects the rise time (~2 ns), the fall time (~32 ns), and gain (>106). Multipliers for the cross talk and after pulsing are given, and a consistent picture within the theory of operation of the expected dark current and photodetection efficiency is demonstrate. Enhancement of the detection efficiency with respect to the quantum efficiency at unity gain for shallow UV photons is measured, indicating an effect due to fringe fields within the diode structure. The signal and noise terms have been deconvolved from each other, providing the fundamental model for characterizing the behavior at low-light intensities.

  12. A CMOS Amperometric System for Multi-Neurotransmitter Detection.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Genevieve; Carrara, Sandro; Di Micheli, Giovanni; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-06-01

    In vivo multi-target and selective concentration monitoring of neurotransmitters can help to unravel the brain chemical complex signaling interplay. This paper presents a dedicated integrated potentiostat transducer circuit and its selective electrode interface. A custom 2-electrode time-based potentiostat circuit was fabricated with 0.13 μm CMOS technology and provides a wide dynamic input current range of 20 pA to 600 nA with 56 μ W, for a minimum sampling frequency of 1.25 kHz. A multi-working electrode chip is functionalized with carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based chemical coatings that offer high sensitivity and selectivity towards electroactive dopamine and non-electroactive glutamate. The prototype was experimentally tested with different concentrations levels of both neurotransmitter types, and results were similar to measurements with a commercially available potentiostat. This paper validates the functionality of the proposed biosensor, and demonstrates its potential for the selective detection of a large number of neurochemicals. PMID:26761882

  13. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive. PMID:24353390

  14. A CMOS high speed imaging system design based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Wang, Huawei; Cao, Jianzhong; Qiao, Mingrui

    2015-10-01

    CMOS sensors have more advantages than traditional CCD sensors. The imaging system based on CMOS has become a hot spot in research and development. In order to achieve the real-time data acquisition and high-speed transmission, we design a high-speed CMOS imaging system on account of FPGA. The core control chip of this system is XC6SL75T and we take advantages of CameraLink interface and AM41V4 CMOS image sensors to transmit and acquire image data. AM41V4 is a 4 Megapixel High speed 500 frames per second CMOS image sensor with global shutter and 4/3" optical format. The sensor uses column parallel A/D converters to digitize the images. The CameraLink interface adopts DS90CR287 and it can convert 28 bits of LVCMOS/LVTTL data into four LVDS data stream. The reflected light of objects is photographed by the CMOS detectors. CMOS sensors convert the light to electronic signals and then send them to FPGA. FPGA processes data it received and transmits them to upper computer which has acquisition cards through CameraLink interface configured as full models. Then PC will store, visualize and process images later. The structure and principle of the system are both explained in this paper and this paper introduces the hardware and software design of the system. FPGA introduces the driven clock of CMOS. The data in CMOS is converted to LVDS signals and then transmitted to the data acquisition cards. After simulation, the paper presents a row transfer timing sequence of CMOS. The system realized real-time image acquisition and external controls.

  15. A novel colour-sensitive CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-10-01

    A novel colour-sensitive semiconductor detector is proposed. The device (named Transverse Field Detector (TFD)) can be used to measure the colour of the incident light without any colour filter. The device is completely compatible with standard CMOS processes and is suitable to be integrated in a pixel array for imaging purposes. The working principle is based on the capability of this device to collect at different superficial junctions the carriers, generated at different depths, by means of suitable transverse electric fields. The transverse components of the electric field are generated inside the depleted region by a suitable bias of the superficial junctions. Thanks to the differences in the light absorption coefficients at different wavelengths, the device performs colour separation. Among the advantages of this approach are the capability of an active tuning of the pixel colour response, which can be obtained just by changing the biasing values of collecting junctions, and foreseen higher colour fidelity, thanks to the easy extension to four colour pixels. First test structures of three colours TFD pixels were designed and built in a standard CMOS 90 nm technology. Operative principles of the device and first experimental results are presented.

  16. Challenges of nickel silicidation in CMOS technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Breil, Nicolas; Lavoie, Christian; Ozcan, Ahmet; Baumann, Frieder; Klymko, Nancy; Nummy, Karen; Sun, Bing; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Yu, Jian; Zhu, Frank; Narasimha, Shreesh; Chudzik, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In our paper, we review some of the key challenges associated with the Ni silicidation process in the most recent CMOS technologies. The introduction of new materials (e.g.SiGe), and of non-planar architectures bring some important changes that require fundamental investigation from a material engineering perspective. Following a discussion of the device architecture and silicide evolution through the last CMOS generations, we focus our study on a very peculiar defect, termed NiSi-Fangs. We describe a mechanism for the defect formation, and present a detailed material analysis that supports this mechanism. We highlight some of the possible metal enrichment processes of the nickel monosilicide such as oxidation or various RIE (Reactive Ion Etching) plasma process, leading to a metal source available for defect formation. Furthermore, we investigate the NiSi formation and re-formation silicidation differences between Si and SiGe materials, and between (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) orientations. Finally, we show that the thermal budgets post silicidation can lead to the formation of NiSi-Fangs if the structure and the processes are not optimized. Beyond the understanding of the defect and the discussion on the engineering solutions used to prevent its formation, the interest of this investigation also lies in the fundamental learning within the Ni–Pt–Si–Ge system and some additional perspective on Ni-based contacts to advanced microelectronic devices.

  17. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. PMID:26500051

  18. CMOS image sensor integrated with micro-LED and multielectrode arrays for the patterned photostimulation and multichannel recording of neuronal tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Arata; Kimura, Hiroshi; Sawadsaringkarn, Yosmongkol; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Kobayashi, Takuma; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ohta, Jun

    2012-03-12

    We developed a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated device for optogenetic applications. This device can interface via neuronal tissue with three functional modalities: imaging, optical stimulation and electrical recording. The CMOS image sensor was fabricated on 0.35 μm standard CMOS process with built-in control circuits for an on-chip blue light-emitting diode (LED) array. The effective imaging area was 2.0 × 1.8 mm². The pixel array was composed of 7.5 × 7.5 μm² 3-transistor active pixel sensors (APSs). The LED array had 10 × 8 micro-LEDs measuring 192 × 225 μm². We integrated the device with a commercial multichannel recording system to make electrical recordings. PMID:22418489

  19. Advances in CMOS Solid-state Photomultipliers for Scintillation Detector Applications

    PubMed Central

    Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Johnson, Erik B.; McClish, Mickel; Dokhale, Purushotthom; Shah, Kanai S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha; Chapman, Eric; Augustine, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPMs) are a compact, lightweight, potentially low-cost alternative to a photomultiplier tube for a variety of scintillation detector applications, including digital-dosimeter and medical-imaging applications. Manufacturing SSPMs with a commercial CMOS process provides the ability for rapid prototyping, and facilitates production to reduce the cost. RMD designs CMOS SSPM devices that are fabricated by commercial foundries. This work describes the characterization and performance of these devices for scintillation detector applications. This work also describes the terms contributing to device noise in terms of the excess noise of the SSPM, the binomial statistics governing the number of pixels triggered by a scintillation event, and the background, or thermal, count rate. The fluctuations associated with these terms limit the resolution of the signal pulse amplitude. We explore the use of pixel-level signal conditioning, and characterize the performance of a prototype SSPM device that preserves the digital nature of the signal. In addition, we explore designs of position-sensitive SSPM detectors for medical imaging applications, and characterize their performance. PMID:25540471

  20. Ink-Jet Printed CMOS Electronics from Oxide Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Garlapati, Suresh Kumar; Baby, Tessy Theres; Dehm, Simone; Hammad, Mohammed; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2015-08-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology with high transconductance and signal gain is mandatory for practicable digital/analog logic electronics. However, high performance all-oxide CMOS logics are scarcely reported in the literature; specifically, not at all for solution-processed/printed transistors. As a major step toward solution-processed all-oxide electronics, here it is shown that using a highly efficient electrolyte-gating approach one can obtain printed and low-voltage operated oxide CMOS logics with high signal gain (≈21 at a supply voltage of only 1.5 V) and low static power dissipation. PMID:25867029

  1. Lower-Dark-Current, Higher-Blue-Response CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Hancock, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Several improved designs for complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit image detectors have been developed, primarily to reduce dark currents (leakage currents) and secondarily to increase responses to blue light and increase signal-handling capacities, relative to those of prior CMOS imagers. The main conclusion that can be drawn from a study of the causes of dark currents in prior CMOS imagers is that dark currents could be reduced by relocating p/n junctions away from Si/SiO2 interfaces. In addition to reflecting this conclusion, the improved designs include several other features to counteract dark-current mechanisms and enhance performance.

  2. An electrostatic CMOS/BiCMOS Lithium ion vibration-based harvester-charger IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Erick Omar

    Self-powered microsystems, such as wireless transceiver microsensors, appeal to an expanding application space in monitoring, control, and diagnosis for commercial, industrial, military, space, and biomedical products. As these devices continue to shrink, their microscale dimensions allow them to be unobtrusive and economical, with the potential to operate from typically unreachable environments and, in wireless network applications, deploy numerous distributed sensing nodes simultaneously. Extended operational life, however, is difficult to achieve since their limited volume space constrains the stored energy available, even with state-of-the-art technologies, such as thin-film lithium-ion batteries (Li Ion) and micro-fuel cells. Harvesting ambient energy overcomes this deficit by continually replenishing the energy reservoir and, as a result, indefinitely extending system lifetime. In this work, an electrostatic harvester that harnesses ambient kinetic energy from vibrations to charge an energy-storage device (e.g., a battery) is investigated, developed, and evaluated. The proposed harvester charges and holds the voltage across a vibration-sensitive variable capacitor so that vibrations can induce it to generate current into the battery when capacitance decreases (as its plates separate). The challenge is that energy is harnessed at relatively slow rates, producing low output power, and the electronics required to transfer it to charge a battery can easily demand more than the power produced. To this end, the system reduces losses by time-managing and biasing its circuits to operate only when needed and with just enough energy while charging the capacitor through an efficient quasi-lossless inductor-based precharger. As result, the proposed energy harvester stores a net energy gain in the battery during every vibration cycle. Two energy-harvesting integrated circuits (IC) were analyzed, designed, developed, and validated using a 0.7-im BiCMOS process and a 30-Hz

  3. CMOS digital pixel sensors: technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2014-04-01

    CMOS active pixel sensor technology, which is widely used these days for digital imaging, is based on analog pixels. Transition to digital pixel sensors can boost signal-to-noise ratios and enhance image quality, but can increase pixel area to dimensions that are impractical for the high-volume market of consumer electronic devices. There are two main approaches to digital pixel design. The first uses digitization methods that largely rely on photodetector properties and so are unique to imaging. The second is based on adaptation of a classical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for in-pixel data conversion. Imaging systems for medical, industrial, and security applications are emerging lower-volume markets that can benefit from these in-pixel ADCs. With these applications, larger pixels are typically acceptable, and imaging may be done in invisible spectral bands.

  4. CMOS imager for pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Sun, Chao (Inventor); Yang, Guang (Inventor); Heynssens, Julie B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Systems and techniques to realize pointing and tracking applications with CMOS imaging devices. In general, in one implementation, the technique includes: sampling multiple rows and multiple columns of an active pixel sensor array into a memory array (e.g., an on-chip memory array), and reading out the multiple rows and multiple columns sampled in the memory array to provide image data with reduced motion artifact. Various operation modes may be provided, including TDS, CDS, CQS, a tracking mode to read out multiple windows, and/or a mode employing a sample-first-read-later readout scheme. The tracking mode can take advantage of a diagonal switch array. The diagonal switch array, the active pixel sensor array and the memory array can be integrated onto a single imager chip with a controller. This imager device can be part of a larger imaging system for both space-based applications and terrestrial applications.

  5. Latchup in CMOS devices from heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, K.; Nichols, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    It is noted that complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microcircuits are inherently latchup prone. The four-layer n-p-n-p structures formed from the parasitic pnp and npn transistors make up a silicon controlled rectifier. If properly biased, this rectifier may be triggered 'ON' by electrical transients, ionizing radiation, or a single heavy ion. This latchup phenomenon might lead to a loss of functionality or device burnout. Results are presented from tests on 19 different device types from six manufacturers which investigate their latchup sensitivity with argon and krypton beams. The parasitic npnp paths are identified in general, and a qualitative rationale is given for latchup susceptibility, along with a latchup cross section for each type of device. Also presented is the correlation between bit-flip sensitivity and latchup susceptibility.

  6. CMOS image sensor with contour enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liya; Lai, Xiaofeng; Chen, Kun; Yuan, Xianghui

    2010-10-01

    Imitating the signal acquisition and processing of vertebrate retina, a CMOS image sensor with bionic pre-processing circuit is designed. Integration of signal-process circuit on-chip can reduce the requirement of bandwidth and precision of the subsequent interface circuit, and simplify the design of the computer-vision system. This signal pre-processing circuit consists of adaptive photoreceptor, spatial filtering resistive network and Op-Amp calculation circuit. The adaptive photoreceptor unit with a dynamic range of approximately 100 dB has a good self-adaptability for the transient changes in light intensity instead of intensity level itself. Spatial low-pass filtering resistive network used to mimic the function of horizontal cell, is composed of the horizontal resistor (HRES) circuit and OTA (Operational Transconductance Amplifier) circuit. HRES circuit, imitating dendrite of the neuron cell, comprises of two series MOS transistors operated in weak inversion region. Appending two diode-connected n-channel transistors to a simple transconductance amplifier forms the OTA Op-Amp circuit, which provides stable bias voltage for the gate of MOS transistors in HRES circuit, while serves as an OTA voltage follower to provide input voltage for the network nodes. The Op-Amp calculation circuit with a simple two-stage Op-Amp achieves the image contour enhancing. By adjusting the bias voltage of the resistive network, the smoothing effect can be tuned to change the effect of image's contour enhancement. Simulations of cell circuit and 16×16 2D circuit array are implemented using CSMC 0.5μm DPTM CMOS process.

  7. A safety monitoring system for taxi based on CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    CMOS image sensors now become increasingly competitive with respect to their CCD counterparts, while adding advantages such as no blooming, simpler driving requirements and the potential of on-chip integration of sensor, analogue circuitry, and digital processing functions. A safety monitoring system for taxi based on cmos imager that can record field situation when unusual circumstance happened is described in this paper. The monitoring system is based on a CMOS imager (OV7120), which can output digital image data through parallel pixel data port. The system consists of a CMOS image sensor, a large capacity NAND FLASH ROM, a USB interface chip and a micro controller (AT90S8515). The structure of whole system and the test data is discussed and analyzed in detail.

  8. Depleted CMOS pixels for LHC proton-proton experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    While so far monolithic pixel detectors have remained in the realm of comparatively low rate and radiation applications outside LHC, new developments exploiting high resistivity substrates with three or four well CMOS process options allow reasonably large depletion depths and full CMOS circuitry in a monolithic structure. This opens up the possibility to target CMOS pixel detectors also for high radiation pp-experiments at the LHC upgrade, either in a hybrid-type fashion or even fully monolithic. Several pixel matrices have been prototyped with high ohmic substrates, high voltage options, and full CMOS electronics. They were characterized in the lab and in test beams. An overview of the necessary development steps and different approaches as well as prototype results are presented in this paper.

  9. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  10. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, D.; Bussat, J.-M.; Denes, P.; Greiner, L.; Kim, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Wieman, H.; Battaglia, M.; Hooberman, B.; Tompkins, L.

    2007-12-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS pixel sensors are also reported, and future plans and activities are discussed.

  11. OLED-on-CMOS integration for optoelectronic sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Uwe; Kreye, Daniel; Reckziegel, Sven; Törker, Michael; Grillberger, Christiane; Amelung, Jörg

    2007-02-01

    Highly-efficient, low-voltage organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are well suitable for post-processing integration onto the top metal layer of CMOS devices. This has been proven for OLED microdisplays so far. Moreover, OLEDon- CMOS technology may also be excellently suitable for various optoelectronic sensor applications by combining highly efficient emitters, use of low-cost materials and cost-effective manufacturing together with silicon-inherent photodetectors and CMOS circuitry. The use of OLEDs on CMOS substrates requires a top-emitting, low-voltage and highly efficient OLED structure. By reducing the operating voltage for the OLED below 5V, the costs for the CMOS process can be reduced, because a process without high-voltage option can be used. Red, orange, white, green and blue OLED-stacks with doped charge transport layers were prepared on different dualmetal layer CMOS test substrates without active transistor area. Afterwards, the different devices were measured and compared with respect to their performance (current, luminance, voltage, luminance dependence on viewing angle, optical outcoupling etc.). Low operating voltages of 2.4V at 100cd/m2 for the red p-i-n type phosphorescent emitting OLED stack, 2.5V at 100cd/m2 for the orange phosphorescent emitting OLED stack and 3.2V at 100cd/m2 for the white fluorescent emitting OLED have been achieved here. Therefore, those OLED stacks are suitable for use in a CMOS process even within a regular 5V process option. Moreover, the operating voltage achieved so far is expected to be reduced further when using different top electrode materials. Integrating such OLEDs on a CMOS-substrate provide a preferable choice for silicon-based optical microsystems targeted towards optoelectronic sensor applications, as there are integrated light barriers, optocouplers, or lab-onchip devices.

  12. Delta Doping High Purity CCDs and CMOS for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Elliott, S. Tom; Bebek, Chris; Holland, Steve; Kolbe, Bill

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing delta doping high purity CCD's and CMOS for LSST is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of JPL s versatile back-surface process for CCDs and CMOS; 2) Application to SNAP and ORION missions; 3) Delta doping as a back-surface electrode for fully depleted LBNL CCDs; 4) Delta doping high purity CCDs for SNAP and ORION; 5) JPL CMP thinning process development; and 6) Antireflection coating process development.

  13. CMOS front end electronics for the ATLAS muon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huth, J.; Oliver, J.; Hazen, E.; Shank, J.

    1997-12-31

    An all-CMOS design for an integrated ASD (Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator) chip for readout of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) is presented. Eight channels of charge-sensitive preamp, two-stage pole/zero shaper, Wilkinson ADC and discriminator with programmable hysteresis are integrated on a single IC. Key elements have been prototyped in 1.2 and 0.5 micron CMOS operating at 5V and 3.3V respectively.

  14. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  15. Advancement of CMOS Doping Technology in an External Development Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amitabh; Chambers, James J.; Shaw, Judy B.

    2011-01-01

    The consumer appetite for a rich multimedia experience drives technology development for mobile hand-held devices and the infrastructure to support them. Enhancements in functionality, speed, and user experience are derived from advancements in CMOS technology. The technical challenges in developing each successive CMOS technology node to support these enhancements have become increasingly difficult. These trends have motivated the CMOS business towards a collaborative approach based on strategic partnerships. This paper describes our model and experience of CMOS development, based on multi-dimensional industrial and academic partnerships. We provide to our process equipment, materials, and simulation partners, as well as to our silicon foundry partners, the detailed requirements for future integrated circuit products. This is done very early in the development cycle to ensure that these requirements can be met. In order to determine these fundamental requirements, we rely on a strategy that requires strong interaction between process and device simulation, physical and chemical analytical methods, and research at academic institutions. This learning is shared with each project partner to address integration and manufacturing issues encountered during CMOS technology development from its inception through product ramp. We utilize TI's core strengths in physical analysis, unit processes and integration, yield ramp, reliability, and product engineering to support this technological development. Finally, this paper presents examples of the advancement of CMOS doping technology for the 28 nm node and beyond through this development model.

  16. Commercial Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Phil McAlister delivers a presentation by the Commercial Crew (CC) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to...

  17. Integration of complex optical functionality in a production CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Lawrence C., III

    Optical functionality has been developed within the confines of an existing CMOS process. As of this writing, 10Gigabit modulators, electrically tunable optical filters, waveguides, and grating coupler technology have been successfully implemented alongside the existing transistors in the Freescale Hip7SOI process. This technology will be used to manufacture high bandwidth optical interconnections directly on silicon chips, allowing a new type of network and computing infrastructure to be developed. This work is covered in two distinct phases. First, the exploratory work done to gain experience with high index contrast silicon waveguides primarily served to uncover challenges related with simulation of these devices, and with the practical limitations of efficiently coupling the resulting waveguide devices with the outside world. The second phase began as the grating coupler emerged to address the coupling challenge. It became feasible to conceive of a commercially viable technology based on silicon photonics. The coupler has been evolved to a high level, currently achieving coupling loss of less than 1dB. Once the light is on chip, filtering and modulation technology are implemented. The reverse-biased plasma dispersion modulator has a 3dB roll-off of 10GHz, and an insertion loss less than 5dB. Optical filters based on ring resonators, arrayed waveguide gratings, and interleavers have all been implemented, often with world record performance, and many of the devices have been made electronically tunable to compensate for manufacturing variations and environmental excursions. Finally, circuitry has been designed and constructed on the same die with the optical functionality, fully demonstrating the ability to achieve monolithic integration of these devices.

  18. Space Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  19. A CMOS wireless biomolecular sensing system-on-chip based on polysilicon nanowire technology.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-W; Huang, Y-J; Yen, P-W; Tsai, H-H; Liao, H-H; Juang, Y-Z; Lu, S-S; Lin, C-T

    2013-11-21

    As developments of modern societies, an on-field and personalized diagnosis has become important for disease prevention and proper treatment. To address this need, in this work, a polysilicon nanowire (poly-Si NW) based biosensor system-on-chip (bio-SSoC) is designed and fabricated by a 0.35 μm 2-Poly-4-Metal (2P4M) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process provided by a commercialized semiconductor foundry. Because of the advantages of CMOS system-on-chip (SoC) technologies, the poly-Si NW biosensor is integrated with a chopper differential-difference amplifier (DDA) based analog-front-end (AFE), a successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC), and a microcontroller to have better sensing capabilities than a traditional Si NW discrete measuring system. In addition, an on-off key (OOK) wireless transceiver is also integrated to form a wireless bio-SSoC technology. This is pioneering work to harness the momentum of CMOS integrated technology into emerging bio-diagnosis technologies. This integrated technology is experimentally examined to have a label-free and low-concentration biomolecular detection for both Hepatitis B Virus DNA (10 fM) and cardiac troponin I protein (3.2 pM). Based on this work, the implemented wireless bio-SSoC has demonstrated a good biomolecular sensing characteristic and a potential for low-cost and mobile applications. As a consequence, this developed technology can be a promising candidate for on-field and personalized applications in biomedical diagnosis. PMID:24080725

  20. Multichannel lens-free CMOS sensors for real-time monitoring of cell growth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ko-Tung; Chang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wang, Yao-Nan

    2015-02-01

    A low-cost platform is proposed for the growth and real-time monitoring of biological cells. The main components of the platform include a PMMA cell culture microchip and a multichannel lens-free CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) / LED imaging system. The PMMA microchip comprises a three-layer structure and is fabricated using a low-cost CO2 laser ablation technique. The CMOS / LED monitoring system is controlled using a self-written LabVIEW program. The platform has overall dimensions of just 130 × 104 × 115 mm(3) and can therefore be placed within a commercial incubator. The feasibility of the proposed system is demonstrated using HepG2 cancer cell samples with concentrations of 5000, 10 000, 20 000, and 40 000 cells/mL. In addition, cell cytotoxicity tests are performed using 8, 16, and 32 mM cyclophosphamide. For all of the experiments, the cell growth is observed over a period of 48 h. The cell growth rate is found to vary in the range of 44∼52% under normal conditions and from 17.4∼34.5% under cyclophosphamide-treated conditions. In general, the results confirm the long-term cell growth and real-time monitoring ability of the proposed system. Moreover, the magnification provided by the lens-free CMOS / LED observation system is around 40× that provided by a traditional microscope. Consequently, the proposed system has significant potential for long-term cell proliferation and cytotoxicity evaluation investigations. PMID:25224658

  1. Multiband CMOS sensor simplify FPA design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weng Lyang B.; Ling, Jer

    2015-10-01

    Push broom multi-band Focal Plane Array (FPA) design needs to consider optics, image sensor, electronic, mechanic as well as thermal. Conventional FPA use two or several CCD device as an image sensor. The CCD image sensor requires several high speed, high voltage and high current clock drivers as well as analog video processors to support their operation. Signal needs to digitize using external sample / hold and digitized circuit. These support circuits are bulky, consume a lot of power, must be shielded and placed in close to the CCD to minimize the introduction of unwanted noise. The CCD also needs to consider how to dissipate power. The end result is a very complicated FPA and hard to make due to more weighs and draws more power requiring complex heat transfer mechanisms. In this paper, we integrate microelectronic technology and multi-layer soft / hard Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology to design electronic portion. Since its simplicity and integration, the optics, mechanic, structure and thermal design will become very simple. The whole FPA assembly and dis-assembly reduced to a few days. A multi-band CMOS Sensor (dedicated as C468) was used for this design. The CMOS Sensor, allow for the incorporation of clock drivers, timing generators, signal processing and digitization onto the same Integrated Circuit (IC) as the image sensor arrays. This keeps noise to a minimum while providing high functionality at reasonable power levels. The C468 is a first Multiple System-On-Chip (MSOC) IC. This device used our proprietary wafer butting technology and MSOC technology to combine five long sensor arrays into a size of 120 mm x 23.2 mm and 155 mm x 60 mm for chip and package, respectively. The device composed of one Panchromatic (PAN) and four different Multi- Spectral (MS) sensors. Due to its integration on the electronic design, a lot of room is clear for the thermal design. The optical and mechanical design is become very straight forward. The flight model FPA

  2. NSC 800, 8-bit CMOS microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszko, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The NSC 800 is an 8-bit CMOS microprocessor manufactured by National Semiconductor Corp., Santa Clara, California. The 8-bit microprocessor chip with 40-pad pin-terminals has eight address buffers (A8-A15), eight data address -- I/O buffers (AD(sub 0)-AD(sub 7)), six interrupt controls and sixteen timing controls with a chip clock generator and an 8-bit dynamic RAM refresh circuit. The 22 internal registers have the capability of addressing 64K bytes of memory and 256 I/O devices. The chip is fabricated on N-type (100) silicon using self-aligned polysilicon gates and local oxidation process technology. The chip interconnect consists of four levels: Aluminum, Polysi 2, Polysi 1, and P(+) and N(+) diffusions. The four levels, except for contact interface, are isolated by interlevel oxide. The chip is packaged in a 40-pin dual-in-line (DIP), side brazed, hermetically sealed, ceramic package with a metal lid. The operating voltage for the device is 5 V. It is available in three operating temperature ranges: 0 to +70 C, -40 to +85 C, and -55 to +125 C. Two devices were submitted for product evaluation by F. Stott, MTS, JPL Microprocessor Specialist. The devices were pencil-marked and photographed for identification.

  3. Simulation of SEU transients in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, N.; Bhuva, B.L.; Kerns, S.E. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that available analytical models of the number of single-event-induced errors (SEU) in combinational logic systems are not easily applicable to real integrated circuits (ICs). An efficient computer simulation algorithm set, SITA, predicts the vulnerability of data stored in and processed by complex combinational logic circuits to SEU. SITA is described in detail to allow researchers to incorporate it into their error analysis packages. Required simulation algorithms are based on approximate closed-form equations modeling individual device behavior in CMOS logic units. Device-level simulation is used to estimate the probability that ion-device interactions produce erroneous signals capable of propagating to a latch (or n output node), and logic-level simulation to predict the spread of such erroneous, latched information through the IC. Simulation results are compared to those from SPICE for several circuit and logic configurations. SITA results are comparable to this established circuit-level code, and SITA can analyze circuits with state-of-the-art device densities (which SPICE cannot). At all IC complexity levels, SITAS offers several factors of 10 savings in simulation time over SPICE.

  4. Development of a CMOS MEMS pressure sensor with a mechanical force-displacement transduction structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Lin; Chang, Heng-Chung; Chang, Chun-I.; Fang, Weileun

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a capacitive pressure sensor with a mechanical force-displacement transduction structure based on the commercially available standard CMOS process (the TSMC 0.18 μm 1P6M CMOS process). The pressure sensor has a deformable diaphragm to support a movable plate with an embedded sensing electrode. As the diaphragm is deformed by the ambient pressure, the movable plate and its embedded sensing electrode are displaced. Thus, the pressure is detected from the capacitance change between the movable and fixed electrodes. The undeformed movable electrode will increase the effective sensing area between the sensing electrodes, thereby improving the sensitivity. Experimental results show that the proposed pressure sensor with a force-displacement transducer will increase the sensitivity by 126% within the 20 kPa-300 kPa absolute pressure range. Moreover, this study extends the design to add pillars inside the pressure sensor to further increase its sensing area as well as sensitivity. A sensitivity improvement of 117% is also demonstrated for a pressure sensor with an enlarged sensing electrode (the overlap area is increased two fold).

  5. Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) implemented in LF-150 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    We present the recent development of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS), implemented with an LFoundry (LF) 150 nm CMOS process. MAPS detectors based on an epi-layer have been matured in recent years and have attractive features in terms of reducing material budget and handling cost compared to conventional hybrid pixel detectors. However, the obtained signal is relatively small (~1000 e-) due to the thin epi-layer, and charge collection time is relatively slow, e.g., in the order of 100 ns, because charges are mainly collected by diffusion. Modern commercial CMOS technology, however, offers advanced process options to overcome such difficulties and enable truly monolithic devices as an alternative to hybrid pixel sensors and charge coupled devices. Unlike in the case of the standard MAPS technologies with epi-layers, the LF process provides a high-resistivity substrate that enables large signal and fast charge collection by drift in a ~50 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n- and p-wells to isolate the collection electrode from the thin active device layer, PMOS and NMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to evaluate the sensor and transistor characteristics, several collection electrodes variants and readout architectures have been implemented. In this report, we focus on its design aspect of the LF-DMAPS prototype chip.

  6. Optical modulation techniques for analog signal processing and CMOS compatible electro-optic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Douglas M.; Rasras, Mahmoud; Tu, Kun-Yii; Chen, Young-Kai; White, Alice E.; Patel, Sanjay S.; Carothers, Daniel; Pomerene, Andrew; Kamocsai, Robert; Beattie, James; Kopa, Anthony; Apsel, Alyssa; Beals, Mark; Mitchel, Jurgen; Liu, Jifeng; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2008-02-01

    Integrating electronic and photonic functions onto a single silicon-based chip using techniques compatible with mass-production CMOS electronics will enable new design paradigms for existing system architectures and open new opportunities for electro-optic applications with the potential to dramatically change the management, cost, footprint, weight, and power consumption of today's communication systems. While broadband analog system applications represent a smaller volume market than that for digital data transmission, there are significant deployments of analog electro-optic systems for commercial and military applications. Broadband linear modulation is a critical building block in optical analog signal processing and also could have significant applications in digital communication systems. Recently, broadband electro-optic modulators on a silicon platform have been demonstrated based on the plasma dispersion effect. The use of the plasma dispersion effect within a CMOS compatible waveguide creates new challenges and opportunities for analog signal processing since the index and propagation loss change within the waveguide during modulation. We will review the current status of silicon-based electrooptic modulators and also linearization techniques for optical modulation.

  7. Commercial Fishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is a curriculum framework for a program in commercial fishing to be taught in Florida secondary and postsecondary institutions. This outline covers the major concepts/content of the program, which is designed to prepare students for employment in occupations with titles such as net fishers, pot fishers, line fishers, shrimp boat…

  8. Commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Togai, Masaki

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on commercial applications of fuzzy logic in Japan are presented. Topics covered include: suitable application area of fuzzy theory; characteristics of fuzzy control; fuzzy closed-loop controller; Mitsubishi heavy air conditioner; predictive fuzzy control; the Sendai subway system; automatic transmission; fuzzy logic-based command system for antilock braking system; fuzzy feed-forward controller; and fuzzy auto-tuning system.

  9. Improved Space Object Observation Techniques Using CMOS Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Schlatter, P.; Silha, J.; Peltonen, J.; Santti, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2013-08-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contain their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. Presently applied and proposed optical observation strategies for space debris surveys and space surveillance applications had to be analyzed. The major design drivers were identified and potential benefits from using available and future CMOS sensors were assessed. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, the characteristics of a particular CMOS sensor available at the Zimmerwald observatory were analyzed by performing laboratory test measurements.

  10. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  11. High-performance monolithic CMOS detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Vignon, Bruno; Magnan, Pierre; Farre, Jean A.; Corbiere, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe

    2001-12-01

    During the last 10 years, research about CMOS image sensors (also called APS - Active Pixel Sensors) has been intensively carried out, in order to offer an alternative to CCDs as image sensors. This is particularly the case for space applications as CMOS image sensors feature characteristics which are obviously of interest for flight hardware: parallel or semi-parallel architecture, on chip control and processing electronics, low power dissipation, high level of radiation tolerance... Many image sensor companies, institutes and laboratories have demonstrated the compatibility of CMOS image sensors with consumer applications: micro-cameras, video-conferencing, digital- still cameras. And recent designs have shown that APS is getting closer to the CCD in terms of performance level. However, he large majority of the existing products do not offer the specific features which are required for many space applications. ASTRIUM and SUPAERO/CIMI have decided to work together in view of developing CMOS image sensors dedicated to space business. After a brief presentation of the team organization for space image sensor design and production, the latest results of a high performances 512 X 512 pixels CMOS device characterization are presented with emphasis on the achieved electro-optical performance. Finally, the on going and short-term coming activities of the team are discussed.

  12. CMOS Cell Sensors for Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Adiguzel, Yekbun; Kulah, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies. PMID:23112587

  13. Total dose and proton testing of a commercial HgCdTe array

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkinson, G.R. ); Baddiley, C.J.; Guy, D.R.P. ); Parsons, J.E. )

    1994-12-01

    The radiation tolerance of a commercially available 256 x 4 HgCdTe array has been measured. The main effects were ionization-induced and produced changes in diode slope resistance and CMOS multiplexer characteristics particularly the onset of parasitic leakage currents after [approximately]15krad(Si). However these effects annealed with storage above 20 C.

  14. ESD protection design for advanced CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin B.; Wang, Gewen

    2001-10-01

    ESD effects in integrated circuits have become a major concern as today's technologies shrink to sub-micron/deep- sub-micron dimensions. The thinner gate oxide and shallower junction depth used in the advanced technologies make them very vulnerable to ESD damages. The advanced techniques like silicidation and STI (shallow trench insulation) used for improving other device performances make ESD design even more challenging. For non-silicided technologies, a certain DCGS (drain contact to gate edge spacing) is needed to achieve ESD hardness for nMOS output drivers and nMOS protection transistors. The typical DCGS values are 4-5um and 2-3um for 0.5um and 0.25um CMOS, respectively. The silicidation reduces the ballast resistance provided by DCGS with at least a factor of 10. As a result, scaling of the ESD performance with device width is lost and even zero ESD performance is reported for standard silicided devices. The device level ESD design is focused in this paper, which includes GGNMOS (gate grounded NMOS) and GCNMOS (gate coupled NMOS). The device level ESD testing including TLP (transmission line pulse) is given. Several ESD issues caused by advanced technologies have been pointed out. The possible solutions have been developed and summarized including silicide blocking, process optimization, back-end ballasting, and new protection scheme, dummy gate/n-well resistor ballsting, etc. Some of them require process cost increase, and others provide novel, compact, and simple design but involving royalty/IP (intellectual property) issue. Circuit level ESD design and layout design considerations are covered. The top-level ESD protection strategies are also given.

  15. Adiabatic circuits: converter for static CMOS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Amirante, E.; Bargagli-Stoffi, A.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2003-05-01

    Ultra low power applications can take great advantages from adiabatic circuitry. In this technique a multiphase system is used which consists ideally of trapezoidal voltage signals. The input signals to be processed will often come from a function block realized in static CMOS. The static rectangular signals must be converted for the oscillating multiphase system of the adiabatic circuitry. This work shows how to convert the input signals to the proposed pulse form which is synchronized to the appropriate supply voltage. By means of adder structures designed for a 0.13µm technology in a 4-phase system there will be demonstrated, which additional circuits are necessary for the conversion. It must be taken into account whether the data arrive in parallel or serial form. Parallel data are all in one phase and therefore it is advantageous to use an adder structure with a proper input stage, e.g. a Carry Lookahead Adder (CLA). With a serial input stage it is possible to read and to process four signals during one cycle due to the adiabatic 4-phase system. Therefore input signals with a frequency four times higher than the adiabatic clock frequency can be used. This reduces the disadvantage of the slow clock period typical for adiabatic circuits. By means of an 8 bit Ripple Carry Adder (8 bit RCA) the serial reading will be introduced. If the word width is larger than 4 bits the word can be divided in 4 bit words which are processed in parallel. This is the most efficient way to minimize the number of input lines and pads. At the same time a high throughput is achieved.

  16. Radiation tolerant back biased CMOS VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K. (Inventor); Gambles, Jody W. (Inventor); Hass, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A CMOS circuit formed in a semiconductor substrate having improved immunity to total ionizing dose radiation, improved immunity to radiation induced latch up, and improved immunity to a single event upset. The architecture of the present invention can be utilized with the n-well, p-well, or dual-well processes. For example, a preferred embodiment of the present invention is described relative to a p-well process wherein the p-well is formed in an n-type substrate. A network of NMOS transistors is formed in the p-well, and a network of PMOS transistors is formed in the n-type substrate. A contact is electrically coupled to the p-well region and is coupled to first means for independently controlling the voltage in the p-well region. Another contact is electrically coupled to the n-type substrate and is coupled to second means for independently controlling the voltage in the n-type substrate. By controlling the p-well voltage, the effective threshold voltages of the n-channel transistors both drawn and parasitic can be dynamically tuned. Likewise, by controlling the n-type substrate, the effective threshold voltages of the p-channel transistors both drawn and parasitic can also be dynamically tuned. Preferably, by optimizing the threshold voltages of the n-channel and p-channel transistors, the total ionizing dose radiation effect will be neutralized and lower supply voltages can be utilized for the circuit which would result in the circuit requiring less power.

  17. Modeling and Manufacturing of a Micromachined Magnetic Sensor Using the CMOS Process without Any Post-Process

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Jian-Zhi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Dai, Ching-Liang

    2014-01-01

    The modeling and fabrication of a magnetic microsensor based on a magneto-transistor were presented. The magnetic sensor is fabricated by the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process without any post-process. The finite element method (FEM) software Sentaurus TCAD is utilized to analyze the electrical properties and carriers motion path of the magneto-transistor. A readout circuit is used to amplify the voltage difference of the bases into the output voltage. Experiments show that the sensitivity of the magnetic sensor is 354 mV/T at the supply current of 4 mA. PMID:24732100

  18. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 μW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs. PMID:24841250

  19. A CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 µW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs. PMID:24841250

  20. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J. A.; Metaxas, M. G.; Royle, G. J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J. M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS).

  1. Design of CMOS logic gates for TID radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, John Okyere; Sasabo, Maria L.

    1993-01-01

    The rise time, fall time and propagation delay of the logic gates were derived. The effects of total ionizing dose (TID) radiation on the fall and rise times of CMOS logic gates were obtained using C program calculations and PSPICE simulations. The variations of mobility and threshold voltage on MOSFET transistors when subjected to TID radiation were used to determine the dependence of switching times on TID. The results of this work indicate that by increasing the size of P-channel transistor with respect to the N-channel transistors of the CMOS gates, the propagation delay of CMOS logic gate can be made to decrease with, or be independent of an increase in TID radiation.

  2. VHF NEMS-CMOS piezoresistive resonators for advanced sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcamone, Julien; Dupré, Cécilia; Arndt, Grégory; Colinet, Eric; Hentz, Sébastien; Ollier, Eric; Duraffourg, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    This work reports on top-down nanoelectromechanical resonators, which are among the smallest resonators listed in the literature. To overcome the fact that their electromechanical transduction is intrinsically very challenging due to their very high frequency (100 MHz) and ultimate size (each resonator is a 1.2 μm long, 100 nm wide, 20 nm thick silicon beam with 100 nm long and 30 nm wide piezoresistive lateral nanowire gauges), they have been monolithically integrated with an advanced fully depleted SOI CMOS technology. By advantageously combining the unique benefits of nanomechanics and nanoelectronics, this hybrid NEMS-CMOS device paves the way for novel breakthrough applications, such as NEMS-based mass spectrometry or hybrid NEMS/CMOS logic, which cannot be fully implemented without this association.

  3. Operation and biasing for single device equivalent to CMOS

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are semiconductor devices including at least one junction which is rectifying whether the semiconductor is caused to be N or P-type, by the presence of field induced carriers. In particular, inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to conventional multiple device CMOS systems, which can be operated as modulators, are disclosed as are a non-latching SCR and an approach to blocking parasitic currents. Operation of the gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems under typical bias schemes is described, and simple demonstrative five mask fabrication procedures for the inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems are also presented.

  4. Fabrication of the planar angular rotator using the CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ching-Liang; Chang, Chien-Liu; Chen, Hung-Lin; Chang, Pei-Zen

    2002-05-01

    In this investigation we propose a novel planar angular rotator fabricated by the conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. Following the 0.6 μm single poly triple metal (SPTM) CMOS process, the device is completed by a simple maskless, post-process etching step. The rotor of the planar angular rotator rotates around its geometric center with electrostatic actuation. The proposed design adopts an intelligent mechanism including the slider-crank system to permit simultaneous motion. The CMOS planar angular rotator could be driven with driving voltages of around 40 V. The design proposed here has a shorter response time and longer life, without problems of friction and wear, compared to the more common planar angular micromotor.

  5. IGBT scaling principle toward CMOS compatible wafer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Omura, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    A scaling principle for trench gate IGBT is proposed. CMOS technology on large diameter wafer enables to produce various digital circuits with higher performance and lower cost. The transistor cell structure becomes laterally smaller and smaller and vertically shallower and shallower. In contrast, latest IGBTs have rather deeper trench structure to obtain lower on-state voltage drop and turn-off loss. In the aspect of the process uniformity and wafer warpage, manufacturing such structure in the CMOS factory is difficult. In this paper, we show the scaling principle toward shallower structure and better performance. The principle is theoretically explained by our previously proposed "Structure Oriented" analytical model. The principle represents a possibility of technology direction and roadmap for future IGBT for improving the device performance consistent with lower cost and high volume productivity with CMOS compatible large diameter wafer technologies.

  6. Design Considerations for CMOS-Integrated Hall-Effect Magnetic Bead Detectors for Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Skucha, K.; Gambini, S.; Liu, P.; Megens, M.; Kim, J.; Boser, BE

    2014-01-01

    We describe a design methodology for on-chip magnetic bead label detectors based on Hall-effect sensors. Signal errors caused by the label-binding process and other factors that limit the minimum detection area are quantified and adjusted to meet typical assay accuracy standards. The methodology is demonstrated by designing an 8192 element Hall sensor array, implemented in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process with single-mask postprocessing. The array can quantify a 1% surface coverage of 2.8 μm beads in 30 seconds with a coefficient of variation of 7.4%. This combination of accuracy and speed makes this technology a suitable detection platform for biological assays based on magnetic bead labels. PMID:25031503

  7. 77 FR 26787 - Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same, DN 2895; the Commission is... importation of certain CMOS image sensors and products containing same. The complaint names as...

  8. Spectrometer with CMOS demodulation of fiber optic Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Martin Brokner

    A CMOS imager based spectrometer is developed to interrogate a network containing a large number of Bragg grating sensors. The spectrometer uses a Prism-Grating- Prism (PGP) to spectrally separate serially multiplexed Bragg reflections on a single fiber. As a result, each Bragg grating produces a discrete spot on the CMOS imager that shifts horizontally as the Bragg grating experiences changes in strain or temperature. The reflected wavelength of the spot can be determined by finding the center of the spot produced. The use of a randomly addressable CMOS imager enables a flexible sampling rate. Some fibers can be interrogated at a high sampling rate while others can be interrogated at a low sampling rate. However, the use of a CMOS imager leads to several unique problems in terms of signal processing. These include a logarithmic pixel response, a low signal-to-noise ratio, a long pixel time constant, and software issues. The expected capabilities of the CMOS imager based spectrometer are determined with a theoretical model. The theoretical model tests three algorithms for determining the center of the spot: single row centroid, single row parabolic fit, and entire spot centroid. The theoretical results are compared to laboratory test data and field test data. The CMOS based spectrometer is capable of interrogating many optical fibers, and in the configuration tested, the fiber bundle consisted of 23 fibers. Using this system, a single fiber can be interrogated from 778 nm to 852 nm at 2100 Hz or multiple fibers can be interrogated over the same wavelength so that the total number of fiber interrogations is up to 2100 per second. The reflected Bragg wavelength can be determined within +/-3pm, corresponding to a +/-3μɛ uncertainty.

  9. Commercial Sensory Survey Radiation Testing Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Dolphic, Michael D.; Thorbourn, Dennis O.; Alexander, James W.; Salomon, Phil M.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Sensor Technology Commercial Sensor Survey task is geared toward benefiting future NASA space missions with low-cost, short-duty-cycle, visible imaging needs. Such applications could include imaging for educational outreach purposes or short surveys of spacecraft, planetary, or lunar surfaces. Under the task, inexpensive commercial grade CMOS sensors were surveyed in fiscal year 2007 (FY07) and three sensors were selected for total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (DDD) tolerance testing. The selected sensors had to meet selection criteria chosen to support small, low-mass cameras that produce good resolution color images. These criteria are discussed in detail in [1]. This document discusses the progress of radiation testing on the Micron and OmniVision sensors selected in FY07 for radiation tolerance testing.

  10. A 65 nm CMOS LNA for Bolometer Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tom Nan; Boon, Chirn Chye; Zhu, Forest Xi; Yi, Xiang; He, Xiaofeng; Feng, Guangyin; Lim, Wei Meng; Liu, Bei

    2016-04-01

    Modern bolometers generally consist of large-scale arrays of detectors. Implemented in conventional technologies, such bolometer arrays suffer from integrability and productivity issues. Recently, the development of CMOS technologies has presented an opportunity for the massive production of high-performance and highly integrated bolometers. This paper presents a 65-nm CMOS LNA designed for a millimeter-wave bolometer's pre-amplification stage. By properly applying some positive feedback, the noise figure of the proposed LNA is minimized at under 6 dB and the bandwidth is extended to 30 GHz.

  11. Impact of technology trends on SEU in CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, P.E.; Sexton, F.W.; Hash, G.L.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Draper, B.L.; Farino, A.J.; Flores, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    The impact of technology trends on the SEU hardness of epitaxial CMOS SRAMs is investigated using three-dimensional simulation. The authors study trends in SEU susceptibility with parameter variations across and within technology generations. Upset mechanisms for various strike locations and their dependence on gate-length scaling are explored. Such studies are useful for technology development and providing input for process and design decisions. An application of SEU simulation to the development of a 0.5-{micro}m radiation-hardened CMOS SRAM is presented.

  12. High-speed CMOS image sensor for high-throughput lensless microfluidic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mei; Huang, Xiwei; Jia, Qixiang; Nadipalli, Revanth; Wang, Tongxi; Shang, Yang; Yu, Hao; Je, Minkyu; Yeo, Kiatseng

    2012-03-01

    The integration of CMOS image sensor and microfluidics becomes a promising technology for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis. However, commercial image sensors usually have limited speed and low-light sensitivity. One high-speed and high-sensitivity CMOS image sensor chip is introduced in this paper, targeted for high-throughput microfluidic imaging system. Firstly, high speed image sensor architecture is introduced with design of column-parallel single-slope analog-todigital converter (ADC) with digital correlated double sampling (CDS). The frame rate can be achieved to 2400 frames/second (fps) with resolution of 128×96 for high-throughput microfluidic imaging. Secondly, the designed system has superior low-light sensitivity, which is achieved by large pixel size (10μm×10μm, 56% fill factor). Pixel peak signalnoise- ratio (SNR) reaches to 50dB with 10dB improvement compared to the commercial pixel (2.2μm×2.2μm). The degradation of pixel resolution is compensated by super-resolution image processing algorithm. By reconstructing single image with multiple low-resolution frames, we can equivalently achieve 2μm resolution with physical 10μm pixel. Thirdly, the system-on-chip (SoC) integration results in a real-time controlled intelligent imaging system without expensive data storage and time-consuming computer analysis. This initial sensor prototype with timing-control makes it possible to develop high-throughput lensless microfluidic imaging system for POC diagnosis.

  13. Evaluation of MOBILE-based gate-level pipelining augmenting CMOS with RTDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, Juan; Avedillo, María J.; Quintana, José M.

    2011-05-01

    The incorporation of Resonant Tunnel Diodes (RTDs) into III/V transistor technologies has shown an improved circuit performance: higher circuit speed, reduced component count, and/or lowered power consumption. Currently, the incorporation of these devices into CMOS technologies (RTD-CMOS) is an area of active research. Although some works have focused the evaluation of the advantages of this incorporation, additional work in this direction is required. We compare RTD-CMOS and pure CMOS realizations of a network of logic gates which can be operated in a gate-level pipeline. Significant lower average power is obtained for RTD-CMOS implementations.

  14. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  15. Commercial Capaciflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A capacitive proximity/tactile sensor with unique performance capabilities ('capaciflector' or capacitive reflector) is being developed by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for use on robots and payloads in space in the interests of safety, efficiency, and ease of operation. Specifically, this sensor will permit robots and their attached payloads to avoid collisions in space with humans and other objects and to dock these payloads in a cluttered environment. The sensor is simple, robust, and inexpensive to manufacture with obvious and recognized commercial possibilities. Accordingly, NASA/GSFC, in conjunction with industry, is embarking on an effort to 'spin' this technology off into the private sector. This effort includes prototypes aimed at commercial applications. The principles of operation of these prototypes are described along with hardware, software, modelling, and test results. The hardware description includes both the physical sensor in terms of a flexible printed circuit board and the electronic circuitry. The software description will include filtering and detection techniques. The modelling will involve finite element electric field analysis and will underline techniques used for design optimization.

  16. Low light level CMOS sensor for night vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Elad; Ginat, Ran; Nesher, Ofer

    2015-05-01

    For many years image intensifier tubes were used for night vision systems. In 2014, Elbit systems developed a digital low-light level CMOS sensor, with similar sensitivity to a Gen II image-intensifiers, down to starlight conditions. In this work we describe: the basic principle behind this sensor, physical model for low-light performance estimation and results of field testing.

  17. Mechanically Flexible and High-Performance CMOS Logic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2015-01-01

    Low-power flexible logic circuits are key components required by the next generation of flexible electronic devices. For stable device operation, such components require a high degree of mechanical flexibility and reliability. Here, the mechanical properties of low-power flexible complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) logic circuits including inverter, NAND, and NOR are investigated. To fabricate CMOS circuits on flexible polyimide substrates, carbon nanotube (CNT) network films are used for p-type transistors, whereas amorphous InGaZnO films are used for the n-type transistors. The power consumption and voltage gain of CMOS inverters are <500 pW/mm at Vin = 0 V (<7.5 nW/mm at Vin = 5 V) and >45, respectively. Importantly, bending of the substrate is not found to cause significant changes in the device characteristics. This is also observed to be the case for more complex flexible NAND and NOR logic circuits for bending states with a curvature radius of 2.6 mm. The mechanical stability of these CMOS logic circuits makes them ideal candidates for use in flexible integrated devices. PMID:26459882

  18. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Corbiere, Franck; Belliot, Pierre; Estribeau, Magali

    2004-11-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding space applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this paper will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments and performances of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process will be presented in the corresponding section.

  19. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for demanding space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pé, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Belliot, Pierre

    2004-06-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for more and more consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA, and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this talk will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process and of devices based on improved designs will be presented.

  20. CMOS image sensors as an efficient platform for glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2013-10-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have been used previously in the analysis of biological samples. In the present study, a CMOS image sensor was used to monitor the concentration of oxidized mouse plasma glucose (86-322 mg dL(-1)) based on photon count variation. Measurement of the concentration of oxidized glucose was dependent on changes in color intensity; color intensity increased with increasing glucose concentration. The high color density of glucose highly prevented photons from passing through the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip, which suggests that the photon count was altered by color intensity. Photons were detected by a photodiode in the CMOS image sensor and converted to digital numbers by an analog to digital converter (ADC). Additionally, UV-spectral analysis and time-dependent photon analysis proved the efficiency of the detection system. This simple, effective, and consistent method for glucose measurement shows that CMOS image sensors are efficient devices for monitoring glucose in point-of-care applications. PMID:23900281

  1. Effects Of Dose Rates On Radiation Damage In CMOS Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goben, Charles A.; Coss, James R.; Price, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes measurements of effects of ionizing-radiation dose rate on consequent damage to complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic devices. Depending on irradiation time and degree of annealing, survivability of devices in outer space, or after explosion of nuclear weapons, enhanced. Annealing involving recovery beyond pre-irradiation conditions (rebound) detrimental. Damage more severe at lower dose rates.

  2. Upper-Bound Estimates Of SEU in CMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1990-01-01

    Theory of single-event upsets (SEU) (changes in logic state caused by energetic charged subatomic particles) in complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) logic devices extended to provide upper-bound estimates of rates of SEU when limited experimental information available and configuration and dimensions of SEU-sensitive regions of devices unknown. Based partly on chord-length-distribution method.

  3. An SEU-hardened CMOS data latch design

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, L.R. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    A Single Event Upset (SEU)-hardened Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) data latch design is described. The hardness is achieved by virtue of the latch design, thus no fabrication process or design groundrule development is required. Hardness is gained with comparatively little adverse impact on performance. Cyclotron tests provided hardness verification.

  4. CMOS VLSI Layout and Verification of a SIMD Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Jianqing

    1996-01-01

    A CMOS VLSI layout and verification of a 3 x 3 processor parallel computer has been completed. The layout was done using the MAGIC tool and the verification using HSPICE. Suggestions for expanding the computer into a million processor network are presented. Many problems that might be encountered when implementing a massively parallel computer are discussed.

  5. Attributes and drawbacks of submicron CMOS for IR FPA readouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, L. J.

    1998-09-01

    The availability of submicron CMOS has enabled the development of shingle-chip IR cameras having performance capabilities and on-chip functions which were previously impossible. Sensor designers are, however, encoutering and overcoming several challanges including steadily decreasing operating voltage.

  6. Relationship between IBICC imaging and SEU in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.; Laird, J.S.; Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Legge, G.J.F.

    1993-03-01

    Ion-beam-induced charge-collection (IBICC) images of the TA670 16K-bit CMOS SRAM are analyzed and compared to previous SEU images. Enhanced charge collection was observed in the n-source/drains regions consistent with bipolar amplification or shunting.

  7. Relationship between IBICC imaging and SEU in CMOS ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L. ); Laird, J.S.; Cholewa, M.; Saint, A.; Legge, G.J.F. )

    1993-01-01

    Ion-beam-induced charge-collection (IBICC) images of the TA670 16K-bit CMOS SRAM are analyzed and compared to previous SEU images. Enhanced charge collection was observed in the n-source/drains regions consistent with bipolar amplification or shunting.

  8. Overcoming scaling concerns in a radiation-hardening CMOS technology

    SciTech Connect

    Maimon, J.; Haddad, N.

    1999-12-01

    Scaling efforts to develop an advanced radiation-hardened CMOS process to support a 4M SRAM are described. Issues encountered during scaling of transistor, isolation, and resistor elements are discussed, as well as the solutions used to overcome these issues. Transistor data, total dose radiation results, and the performance of novel resistors for prevention of single event upsets (SEU) are presented.

  9. Reliability design of CMOS image sensor for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ning; Chen, Shijun; Chen, Yongping

    2013-08-01

    In space applications, sensors work in very harsh space environment. Thus the reliability design must be carefully considered. This paper addresses the techniques which effectively increase the reliability of CMOS image sensors. A radiation tolerant pixel design which is implemented in a sun tracker sensor is presented. Measurement results of total dose radiation, SEL, SEU, etc prove the radiation immunity of the sensor.

  10. Thin Film on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Space Applications

    PubMed Central

    Schulze Spuentrup, Jan Dirk; Burghartz, Joachim N.; Graf, Heinz-Gerd; Harendt, Christine; Hutter, Franz; Nicke, Markus; Schmidt, Uwe; Schubert, Markus; Sterzel, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    A 664 × 664 element Active Pixel image Sensor (APS) with integrated analog signal processing, full frame synchronous shutter and random access for applications in star sensors is presented and discussed. A thick vertical diode array in Thin Film on CMOS (TFC) technology is explored to achieve radiation hardness and maximum fill factor.

  11. CMOS Ultra Low Power Radiation Tolerant (CULPRiT) Microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Penshu; Maki, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Space Electronics needs Radiation Tolerance or hardness to withstand the harsh space environment: high-energy particles can change the state of the electronics or puncture transistors making them disfunctional. This viewgraph document reviews the use of CMOS Ultra Low Power Radiation Tolerant circuits for NASA's electronic requirements.

  12. CCD AND PIN-CMOS DEVELOPMENTS FOR LARGE OPTICAL TELESCOPE.

    SciTech Connect

    RADEKA, V.

    2006-04-03

    Higher quantum efficiency in near-IR, narrower point spread function and higher readout speed than with conventional sensors have been receiving increased emphasis in the development of CCDs and silicon PIN-CMOS sensors for use in large optical telescopes. Some key aspects in the development of such devices are reviewed.

  13. Mechanically Flexible and High-Performance CMOS Logic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2015-01-01

    Low-power flexible logic circuits are key components required by the next generation of flexible electronic devices. For stable device operation, such components require a high degree of mechanical flexibility and reliability. Here, the mechanical properties of low-power flexible complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) logic circuits including inverter, NAND, and NOR are investigated. To fabricate CMOS circuits on flexible polyimide substrates, carbon nanotube (CNT) network films are used for p-type transistors, whereas amorphous InGaZnO films are used for the n-type transistors. The power consumption and voltage gain of CMOS inverters are <500 pW/mm at Vin = 0 V (<7.5 nW/mm at Vin = 5 V) and >45, respectively. Importantly, bending of the substrate is not found to cause significant changes in the device characteristics. This is also observed to be the case for more complex flexible NAND and NOR logic circuits for bending states with a curvature radius of 2.6 mm. The mechanical stability of these CMOS logic circuits makes them ideal candidates for use in flexible integrated devices. PMID:26459882

  14. Integrated imaging sensor systems with CMOS active pixel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, G.; Cunningham, T.; Ortiz, M.; Heynssens, J.; Sun, C.; Hancock, B.; Seshadri, S.; Wrigley, C.; McCarty, K.; Pain, B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses common approaches to CMOS APS technology, as well as specific results on the five-wire programmable digital camera-on-a-chip developed at JPL. The paper also reports recent research in the design, operation, and performance of APS imagers for several imager applications.

  15. Neutron induced soft errors in CMOS memories under reduced bias

    SciTech Connect

    Hazucha, P.; Svensson, C.; Johansson, K.

    1998-12-01

    A custom designed 16 kbit CMOS memory was irradiated by 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV neutrons. SEU cross sections were evaluated under different supply voltages. The cross section values are compared to those predicted by the BGR model.

  16. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  17. INDEP approach for leakage reduction in nanoscale CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Pattanaik, Manisha; Raj, Balwinder

    2015-02-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology scaling for improving speed and functionality turns leakage power one of the major concerns for nanoscale circuits design. The minimization of leakage power is a rising challenge for the design of the existing and future nanoscale CMOS circuits. This paper presents a novel, input-dependent, transistor-level, low leakage and reliable INput DEPendent (INDEP) approach for nanoscale CMOS circuits. INDEP approach is based on Boolean logic calculations for the input signals of the extra inserted transistors within the logic circuit. The gate terminals of extra inserted transistors depend on the primary input combinations of the logic circuits. The appropriate selection of input gate voltages of INDEP transistors are reducing the leakage current efficiently along with rail to rail output voltage swing. The important characteristic of INDEP approach is that it works well in both active as well as standby modes of the circuits. This approach overcomes the limitations created by the prevalent current leakage reduction techniques. The simulation results indicate that INDEP approach mitigates 41.6% and 35% leakage power for 1-bit full adder and ISCAS-85 c17 benchmark circuit, respectively, at 32 nm bulk CMOS technology node.

  18. Direct readout of gaseous detectors with tiled CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visschers, J. L.; Blanco Carballo, V.; Chefdeville, M.; Colas, P.; van der Graaf, H.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Timmermans, J.

    2007-03-01

    A coordinated design effort is underway, exploring the three-dimensional direct readout of gaseous detectors by an anode plate equipped with a tiled array of many CMOS pixel readout ASICs, having amplification grids integrated on their topsides and being contacted on their backside.

  19. Analysis of pixel circuits in CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zou; Chen, Nan; Yao, Li-bin

    2015-04-01

    CMOS image sensors (CIS) have lower power consumption, lower cost and smaller size than CCD image sensors. However, generally CCDs have higher performance than CIS mainly due to lower noise. The pixel circuit used in CIS is the first part of the signal processing circuit and connected to photodiode directly, so its performance will greatly affect the CIS or even the whole imaging system. To achieve high performance, CMOS image sensors need advanced pixel circuits. There are many pixel circuits used in CIS, such as passive pixel sensor (PPS), 3T and 4T active pixel sensor (APS), capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA), and passive pixel sensor (PPS). At first, the main performance parameters of each pixel structure including the noise, injection efficiency, sensitivity, power consumption, and stability of bias voltage are analyzed. Through the theoretical analysis of those pixel circuits, it is concluded that CTIA pixel circuit has good noise performance, high injection efficiency, stable photodiode bias, and high sensitivity with small integrator capacitor. Furthermore, the APS and CTIA pixel circuits are simulated in a standard 0.18-μm CMOS process and using a n-well/p-sub photodiode by SPICE and the simulation result confirms the theoretical analysis result. It shows the possibility that CMOS image sensors can be extended to a wide range of applications requiring high performance.

  20. Commercial LANDSAT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Private industry should assume responsibility either for the United States' land satellite (LANDSAT) system or for both the land and the weather satellite systems, recommends the Land Remote Sensing Satellite Advisory Committee. The committee (Eos, June 29, 1982, p. 553), composed of representatives from academia, industry, and government, has a working group that is evaluating the potential for commercialization of remote sensing satellites.The recommendations call for industry ownership or operation of either or both of the remote sensing systems, but only up to and including the holding of raw, unprocessed data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) currently operates LANDSAT but will be relinquishing its responsibility to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on January 31. NOAA already operates the U.S. civilian weather satellite service, which includes the NOAA-5, NOAA-6, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellites (Eos, June 2, 1981, p. 522).

  1. A novel multi-actuation CMOS RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chiung-I.; Ko, Chih-Hsiang; Huang, Tsun-Che

    2008-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a capacitive shunt type RF MEMS switch, which is actuated by electro-thermal actuator and electrostatic actuator at the same time, and than latching the switching status by electrostatic force only. Since thermal actuators need relative low voltage compare to electrostatic actuators, and electrostatic force needs almost no power to maintain the switching status, the benefits of the mechanism are very low actuation voltage and low power consumption. Moreover, the RF MEMS switch has considered issues for integrated circuit compatible in design phase. So the switch is fabricated by a standard 0.35um 2P4M CMOS process and uses wet etching and dry etching technologies for postprocess. This compatible ability is important because the RF characteristics are not only related to the device itself. If a packaged RF switch and a packaged IC wired together, the parasitic capacitance will cause the problem for optimization. The structure of the switch consists of a set of CPW transmission lines and a suspended membrane. The CPW lines and the membrane are in metal layers of CMOS process. Besides, the electro-thermal actuators are designed by polysilicon layer of the CMOS process. So the RF switch is only CMOS process layers needed for both electro-thermal and electrostatic actuations in switch. The thermal actuator is composed of a three-dimensional membrane and two heaters. The membrane is a stacked step structure including two metal layers in CMOS process, and heat is generated by poly silicon resistors near the anchors of membrane. Measured results show that the actuation voltage of the switch is under 7V for electro-thermal added electrostatic actuation.

  2. Contact CMOS imaging of gaseous oxygen sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Daivasagaya, Daisy S.; Yao, Lei; Yi Yung, Ka; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Cheung, Maurice C.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Bright, Frank V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a compact luminescent gaseous oxygen (O2) sensor microsystem based on the direct integration of sensor elements with a polymeric optical filter and placed on a low power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC). The sensor operates on the measurement of excited-state emission intensity of O2-sensitive luminophore molecules tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp)3]2+) encapsulated within sol–gel derived xerogel thin films. The polymeric optical filter is made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that is mixed with a dye (Sudan-II). The PDMS membrane surface is molded to incorporate arrays of trapezoidal microstructures that serve to focus the optical sensor signals on to the imager pixels. The molded PDMS membrane is then attached with the PDMS color filter. The xerogel sensor arrays are contact printed on top of the PDMS trapezoidal lens-like microstructures. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. Correlated double sampling circuit, pixel address, digital control and signal integration circuits are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data is read out as a serial coded signal. The CMOS imager consumes a static power of 320 µW and an average dynamic power of 625 µW when operating at 100 Hz sampling frequency and 1.8 V DC. This CMOS sensor system provides a useful platform for the development of miniaturized optical chemical gas sensors. PMID:24493909

  3. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; French, M.; Manolopoulos, S.; Tyndel, M.; Allport, P.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Hall, G.; Raymond, M.

    2003-03-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to tape. Because of the large number of pixels, data reduction is needed on the sensor itself or just outside. This brings in stringent requirements on the temporal noise as well as to the sensor uniformity, expressed as a Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN). A pixel architecture with an additional transistor is proposed. This architecture, coupled to correlated double sampling of the signal will allow cancellation of the two dominant noise sources, namely the reset or kTC noise and the FPN. A prototype has been designed in a standard 0.25 μm CMOS technology. It has also a structure for electrical calibration of the sensor. The prototype is functional and detailed tests are under way.

  4. An RF Energy Harvester System Using UHF Micropower CMOS Rectifier Based on a Diode Connected CMOS Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Shokrani, Mohammad Reza; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar B.; Rokhani, Fakhrul Zaman; Shafie, Suhaidi Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type diode connected MOS transistor to improve CMOS conventional rectifier's performance in RF energy harvester systems for wireless sensor networks in which the circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology. The proposed diode connected MOS transistor uses a new bulk connection which leads to reduction in the threshold voltage and leakage current; therefore, it contributes to increment of the rectifier's output voltage, output current, and efficiency when it is well important in the conventional CMOS rectifiers. The design technique for the rectifiers is explained and a matching network has been proposed to increase the sensitivity of the proposed rectifier. Five-stage rectifier with a matching network is proposed based on the optimization. The simulation results shows 18.2% improvement in the efficiency of the rectifier circuit and increase in sensitivity of RF energy harvester circuit. All circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology. PMID:24782680

  5. An RF energy harvester system using UHF micropower CMOS rectifier based on a diode connected CMOS transistor.

    PubMed

    Shokrani, Mohammad Reza; Khoddam, Mojtaba; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar B; Kamsani, Noor Ain; Rokhani, Fakhrul Zaman; Shafie, Suhaidi Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type diode connected MOS transistor to improve CMOS conventional rectifier's performance in RF energy harvester systems for wireless sensor networks in which the circuits are designed in 0.18  μm TSMC CMOS technology. The proposed diode connected MOS transistor uses a new bulk connection which leads to reduction in the threshold voltage and leakage current; therefore, it contributes to increment of the rectifier's output voltage, output current, and efficiency when it is well important in the conventional CMOS rectifiers. The design technique for the rectifiers is explained and a matching network has been proposed to increase the sensitivity of the proposed rectifier. Five-stage rectifier with a matching network is proposed based on the optimization. The simulation results shows 18.2% improvement in the efficiency of the rectifier circuit and increase in sensitivity of RF energy harvester circuit. All circuits are designed in 0.18 μm TSMC CMOS technology. PMID:24782680

  6. Practicality of Evaluating Soft Errors in Commercial sub-90 nm CMOS for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to: Highlight space memory evaluation evolution, Review recent developments regarding low-energy proton direct ionization soft errors, Assess current space memory evaluation challenges, including increase of non-volatile technology choices, and Discuss related testing and evaluation complexities.

  7. Feasibility study of a latchup-based particle detector exploiting commercial CMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Civera, P.; Demarchi, D.; Villani, G.; Weber, M.

    2009-12-01

    The stimulated ignition of latchup effects caused by external radiation has so far proved to be a hidden hazard. Here this effect is described as a novel approach to detect particles by means of a solid-state device susceptible to latchup effects. In addition, the device can also be used as a circuit for reading sensors devices, leaving the capability of sensing to external sensors. The paper first describes the state-of-the-art of the project and its development over the latest years, then the present and future studies are proposed. An elementary cell composed of two transistors connected in a thyristor structure is shown. The study begins using traditional bipolar transistors since the latchup effect is originated as a parasitic circuit composed of such devices. Then, an equivalent circuit built up of MOS transistors is exploited, resulting an even more promising and challenging configuration than that obtained via bipolar transistors. As the MOS transistors are widely used at present in microelectronics devices and sensors, a latchup-based cell is proposed as a novel structure for future applications in particle detection, amplification of signal sensors and radiation monitoring.

  8. Development of a CMOS SOI Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Y.; Hazumi, M.; Ikegami, Y.; Kohriki, T.; Tajima, O.; Terada, S.; Tsuboyama, T.; Unno, Y.; Ushiroda, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Hara, K.; Ishino, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Miyake, H.; Martin, E.; Varner, G.; Tajima, H.; Ohno, M.; Fukuda, K.; Komatsubara, H.; Ida, J.; /NONE - OKI ELECTR INDUST TOKYO

    2008-08-19

    We have developed a monolithic radiation pixel detector using silicon on insulator (SOI) with a commercial 0.15 {micro}m fully-depleted-SOI technology and a Czochralski high resistivity silicon substrate in place of a handle wafer. The SOI TEG (Test Element Group) chips with a size of 2.5 x 2.5 mm{sup 2} consisting of 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels have been designed and manufactured. Performance tests with a laser light illumination and a {beta} ray radioactive source indicate successful operation of the detector. We also briefly discuss the back gate effect as well as the simulation study.

  9. Low-cost uncooled infrared detector arrays in standard CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Tanrikulu, M. Y.; Akin, Tayfun

    2003-09-01

    This paper reports the development of a low-cost 128 x 128 uncooled infrared focal plane array (FPA) based on suspended and thermally isolated CMOS p+-active/n-well diodes. The FPA is fabricated using a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process followed by simple post-CMOS bulk micromachining that does not require any critical lithography or complicated deposition steps; and therefore, the cost of the uncooled FPA is almost equal to the cost of the CMOS chip. The post-CMOS fabrication steps include an RIE etching to reach the bulk silicon and an anisotropic silicon etching to obtain thermally isolated pixels. During the RIE etching, CMOS metal layers are used as masking layers, and therefore, narrow openings such as 2 μm can be defined between the support arms. This approach allows achieving small pixel size of 40 μm x 40 μm with a fill factor of 44%. The FPA is scanned at 30 fps by monolithically integrated multi-channel parallel readout circuitry which is composed of low-noise differential transconductance amplifiers, switched capacitor (SC) integrators, sample-and-hold circuits, and various other circuit blocks for reducing the effects of variations in detector voltage and operating temperature. The fabricated detector has a temperature coefficient of -2 mV/K, a thermal conductance value of 1.8 x 10-7 W/K, and a thermal time constant value of 36 msec, providing a measured DC responsivity (R) of 4970 V/W under continuous bias. Measured detector noise is 0.69 μV in 8 kHz bandwidth at 30 fps scanning rate, resulting a measured detectivity (D*) of 9.7 x 108 cm√HzW. Contribution of the 1/f noise component is found to be negligible due to the single crystal nature of the silicon n-well and its low value at low bias levels. The noise of the readout circuit is measured as 0.76 μV, resulting in an expected NETD value of 1 K when scanned at 30 fps using f=1 optics. This NETD value can be decreased below 350 mK by decreasing the electrical bandwidth with the help of increased

  10. Experimental evaluation of CCD and CMOS cameras in low-light-level conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laitinen, Jyrki; Ailisto, Heikki J.

    1999-09-01

    In this research characteristics of standard commercial CCD and CMOS cameras are evaluated experimentally and compared. Special attention is paid to the operation of these devices in low light level condition, which is typical to many surveillance and consumer electronics applications. One emerging application utilizing inexpensive image sensors at variable illumination condition is the UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System), which will deliver wirelessly, for example, pictures, graphics and video from the year 2002. The determination of the system performance is based in this study on the imaging of a calibrated gray scale test chart at varying illumination condition. At each level of illumination the system response is characterized by a signal to random noise figure. The signal is calculated as the difference of the system response to the lightest and darkest areas of the gray scale. The random noise is measured as the standard deviation of the gray values in a difference of two successive images of the test pattern. The standard deviation is calculated from 10-bit digitized images for small group of pixels (36 X 36) corresponding to the different areas of the gray scale in the test pattern images. If the random noise is plot as a function of signal (encoded in digital numbers, DN) for small group of pixels, a Photon Transfer curve is obtained. This is one of the basic performance standards of CCD sensors. However, if camera systems with nonlinear response or AGC are evaluated, the variations of the system response at different signal levels should be included to the performance measure. In these cases the signal to noise curve is useful. The signal to random noise curves were determined for a CCD and a CMOS camera characterized by similar specifications. The comparison between two camera systems shows that considerable differences between the operation of these devices especially at low light level condition can exist. It was found that approximately

  11. Commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The near term (one to five year) needs of domestic and foreign commercial suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals for electromagnetically separated stable isotopes are assessed. Only isotopes purchased to make products for sale and profit are considered. Radiopharmaceuticals produced from enriched stable isotopes supplied by the Calutron facility at ORNL are used in about 600,000 medical procedures each year in the United States. A temporary or permanent disruption of the supply of stable isotopes to the domestic radiopharmaceutical industry could curtail, if not eliminate, the use of such diagnostic procedures as the thallium heart scan, the gallium cancer scan, the gallium abscess scan, and the low radiation dose thyroid scan. An alternative source of enriched stable isotopes exist in the USSR. Alternative starting materials could, in theory, eventually be developed for both the thallium and gallium scans. The development of a new technology for these purposes, however, would take at least five years and would be expensive. Hence, any disruption of the supply of enriched isotopes from ORNL and the resulting unavailability of critical nuclear medicine procedures would have a dramatic negative effect on the level of health care in the United States.

  12. Improved Space Object Orbit Determination Using CMOS Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Peltonen, J.; Sännti, T.; Silha, J.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-09-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contains their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, we simulated several observation scenarios for ground- and space-based sensor by assuming different observation and sensor properties. We will introduce the analyzed end-to-end simulations of the ground- and space-based strategies in order to investigate the orbit determination accuracy and its sensitivity which may result from different values for the frame-rate, pixel scale, astrometric and epoch registration accuracies. Two cases were simulated, a survey using a ground-based sensor to observe objects in LEO for surveillance applications, and a statistical survey with a space-based sensor orbiting in LEO observing small-size debris in LEO. The ground-based LEO survey uses a dynamical fence close to the Earth shadow a few hours after sunset. For the space-based scenario

  13. High-Voltage-Input Level Translator Using Standard CMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Blalock, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    proposed integrated circuit would translate (1) a pair of input signals having a low differential potential and a possibly high common-mode potential into (2) a pair of output signals having the same low differential potential and a low common-mode potential. As used here, "low" and "high" refer to potentials that are, respectively, below or above the nominal supply potential (3.3 V) at which standard complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits are designed to operate. The input common-mode potential could lie between 0 and 10 V; the output common-mode potential would be 2 V. This translation would make it possible to process the pair of signals by use of standard 3.3-V CMOS analog and/or mixed-signal (analog and digital) circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. A schematic of the circuit is shown in the figure. Standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry cannot withstand input potentials greater than about 4 V. However, there are many applications that involve low-differential-potential, high-common-mode-potential input signal pairs and in which standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry, which is relatively inexpensive, would be the most appropriate circuitry for performing other functions on the integrated-circuit chip that handles the high-potential input signals. Thus, there is a need to combine high-voltage input circuitry with standard low-voltage CMOS circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. The proposed circuit would satisfy this need. In the proposed circuit, the input signals would be coupled into both a level-shifting pair and a common-mode-sensing pair of CMOS transistors. The output of the level-shifting pair would be fed as input to a differential pair of transistors. The resulting differential current output would pass through six standoff transistors to be mirrored into an output branch by four heterojunction bipolar transistors. The mirrored differential current would be converted back to potential by a pair of diode-connected transistors

  14. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  15. Performance of PHOTONIS' low light level CMOS imaging sensor for long range observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourree, Loig E.

    2014-05-01

    Identification of potential threats in low-light conditions through imaging is commonly achieved through closed-circuit television (CCTV) and surveillance cameras by combining the extended near infrared (NIR) response (800-10000nm wavelengths) of the imaging sensor with NIR LED or laser illuminators. Consequently, camera systems typically used for purposes of long-range observation often require high-power lasers in order to generate sufficient photons on targets to acquire detailed images at night. While these systems may adequately identify targets at long-range, the NIR illumination needed to achieve such functionality can easily be detected and therefore may not be suitable for covert applications. In order to reduce dependency on supplemental illumination in low-light conditions, the frame rate of the imaging sensors may be reduced to increase the photon integration time and thus improve the signal to noise ratio of the image. However, this may hinder the camera's ability to image moving objects with high fidelity. In order to address these particular drawbacks, PHOTONIS has developed a CMOS imaging sensor (CIS) with a pixel architecture and geometry designed specifically to overcome these issues in low-light level imaging. By combining this CIS with field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based image processing electronics, PHOTONIS has achieved low-read noise imaging with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio at quarter moon illumination, all at standard video frame rates. The performance of this CIS is discussed herein and compared to other commercially available CMOS and CCD for long-range observation applications.

  16. A theoretical investigation of spectra utilization for a CMOS based indirect detector for dual energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyvas, N.; Martini, N.; Koukou, V.; Michail, C.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Valais, I.; Kandarakis, I.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Dual Energy imaging is a promising method for visualizing masses and microcalcifications in digital mammography. Currently commercially available detectors may be suitable for dual energy mammographic applications. The scope of this work was to theoretically examine the performance of the Radeye CMOS digital indirect detector under three low- and high-energy spectral pairs. The detector was modeled through the linear system theory. The pixel size was equal to 22.5μm and the phosphor material of the detector was a 33.9 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor screen. The examined spectral pairs were (i) a 40kV W/Ag (0.01cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations, (ii) a 40kV W/Cd (0.013cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations and (iii) a 40kV W/Pd (0.008cm) and a 70kV W/Cu (0.1cm) target/filter combinations. For each combination the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), showing the signal to noise ratio transfer, the detector optical gain (DOG), showing the sensitivity of the detector and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the detector output signal were calculated. The second combination exhibited slightly higher DOG (326 photons per X-ray) and lower CV (0.755%) values. In terms of electron output from the RadEye CMOS, the first two combinations demonstrated comparable DQE values; however the second combination provided an increase of 6.5% in the electron output.

  17. Wideband Fully-Programmable Dual-Mode CMOS Analogue Front-End for Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Valente, Virgilio; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-channel dual-mode CMOS analogue front-end (AFE) for electrochemical and bioimpedance analysis. Current-mode and voltage-mode readouts, integrated on the same chip, can provide an adaptable platform to correlate single-cell biosensor studies with large-scale tissue or organ analysis for real-time cancer detection, imaging and characterization. The chip, implemented in a 180-nm CMOS technology, combines two current-readout (CR) channels and four voltage-readout (VR) channels suitable for both bipolar and tetrapolar electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. Each VR channel occupies an area of 0.48 mm 2 , is capable of an operational bandwidth of 8 MHz and a linear gain in the range between -6 dB and 42 dB. The gain of the CR channel can be set to 10 kΩ, 50 kΩ or 100 kΩ and is capable of 80-dB dynamic range, with a very linear response for input currents between 10 nA and 100 μ A. Each CR channel occupies an area of 0.21 mm 2 . The chip consumes between 530 μ A and 690 μ A per channel and operates from a 1.8-V supply. The chip was used to measure the impedance of capacitive interdigitated electrodes in saline solution. Measurements show close matching with results obtained using a commercial impedance analyser. The chip will be part of a fully flexible and configurable fully-integrated dual-mode EIS system for impedance sensors and bioimpedance analysis. PMID:27463721

  18. Low back-reflection CMOS-compatible grating coupler for perfectly vertical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabos, G.; Pleros, N.; Tsiokos, D.

    2015-02-01

    In view of high volume manufacturing of silicon based photonic-integrated-circuits (Si-PICs), CMOS compatible low-cost fabrication processes as well as simplified packaging methods are imperatively needed. Silicon-onInsulator (SOI) based grating couplers (GCs) have attracted attention as the key components for providing optical interfaces to Si-PICs due their fabrication simplicity compared to the edge coupling alternatives. GCs based on perfectly vertical coupling scheme become essential by introducing substantial savings in the packaging cost as no angular configurations are required but at the expense of high coupling efficiency values due to the second order diffraction. In this context, research efforts concentrated on designing GCs with minimized back reflection into the waveguide yet employing more than one etching steps or rather complex fabrication processes. Herein, we propose a fully etched CMOS compatible non-uniform one-dimensional (1D) GC for perfectly vertical coupling with low back reflected optical power by means of numerical simulations. A particle-swarm-optimization (PSO) algorithm was deployed in conjunction with a commercially available 2D finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method to maximize the coupling efficiency to a SMF fiber for TM polarization. The design parameters were restricted to the period length and the filling factor while the minimum feature size was 80 nm. A peak coupling loss of 4.4 dB at 1553 nm was achieved with a 1-dB bandwidth of 47 nm and a back reflection of -20 dB. The coupling tolerance to fabrication errors was also investigated.

  19. X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using low cost COTS CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, David W.

    2012-08-01

    Whilst commercial X-ray sensor arrays are capable of both imaging and spectroscopy they are currently expensive and this can limit their widespread use. This study examines the use of very low cost CMOS sensors for X-ray imaging and spectroscopy based on the commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology used in cellular telephones, PC multimedia and children's toys. Some examples of imaging using a 'webcam' and a modified OmniVision OV7411 sensor are presented, as well as a simple energy dispersive X-ray detector based on an OmniVision OV7221 sensor. In each case X-ray sensitivity was enabled by replacing the sensor's front glass window with a 5 μm thick aluminium foil, with X-rays detected as an increase in a pixel's dark current due to the generation of additional electron-hole pairs within its active region. The exposure control and data processing requirements for imaging and spectroscopy are discussed. The modified OV7221 sensor was found to have a linear X-ray energy calibration and a resolution of approximately 510 eV.

  20. Radiation-hard active CMOS pixel sensors for HL-LHC detector upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Malte

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be increased during the Long Shutdown of 2022 and 2023 (LS3) in order to increase the sensitivity of its experiments. A completely new inner detector for the ATLAS experiment needs to be developed to withstand the extremely harsh environment of the upgraded, so-called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). High radiation hardness as well as granularity is mandatory to cope with the requirements in terms of radiation damage as well as particle occupancy. A new silicon detector concept that uses commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes as active sensor for pixel and/or strip layers has risen high attention, because it potentially provides high radiation hardness and granularity and at the same time reduced price due to the commercial processing and possibly relaxed requirements for the hybridization technique. Results on the first prototypes characterized in a variety of laboratory as well as test beam environments are presented.

  1. Fundamental performance differences between CMOS and CCD imagers: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Grygon, Mark; Elliott, Tom; Cheng, John; Lesser, Michael; Pinter, Jeff

    2007-09-01

    A new class of CMOS imagers that compete with scientific CCDs is presented. The sensors are based on deep depletion backside illuminated technology to achieve high near infrared quantum efficiency and low pixel cross-talk. The imagers deliver very low read noise suitable for single photon counting - Fano-noise limited soft x-ray applications. Digital correlated double sampling signal processing necessary to achieve low read noise performance is analyzed and demonstrated for CMOS use. Detailed experimental data products generated by different pixel architectures (notably 3TPPD, 5TPPD and 6TPG designs) are presented including read noise, charge capacity, dynamic range, quantum efficiency, charge collection and transfer efficiency and dark current generation. Radiation damage data taken for the imagers is also reported.

  2. A fully integrated CMOS inverse sine circuit for computational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Jong-Kug

    2010-08-01

    An inverse trigonometric function generator using CMOS technology is presented and implemented. The development and synthesis of inverse trigonometric functional circuits based on the simple approximation equations are also introduced. The proposed inverse sine function generator has the infinite input range and can be used in many measurement and instrumentation systems. The nonlinearity of less than 2.8% for the entire input range of 0.5 Vp-p with a small-signal bandwidth of 3.2 MHz is achieved. The chip implemented in 0.25 μm CMOS process operates from a single 1.8 V supply. The measured power consumption and the active chip area of the inverse sine function circuit are 350 μW and 0.15 mm2, respectively.

  3. Monolithic CMOS-MEMS integration for high-g accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Vinayak; Li, Holden; Tan, Chuan Seng

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights work-in-progress towards the conceptualization, simulation, fabrication and initial testing of a silicon-germanium (SiGe) integrated CMOS-MEMS high-g accelerometer for military, munition, fuze and shock measurement applications. Developed on IMEC's SiGe MEMS platform, the MEMS offers a dynamic range of 5,000 g and a bandwidth of 12 kHz. The low noise readout circuit adopts a chopper-stabilization technique implementing the CMOS through the TSMC 0.18 µm process. The device structure employs a fully differential split comb-drive set up with two sets of stators and a rotor all driven separately. Dummy structures acting as protective over-range stops were designed to protect the active components when under impacts well above the designed dynamic range.

  4. Radiation Hard 0.13 Micron CMOS Library at IHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdhold, U.

    2013-08-01

    To support space applications we have developed an 0.13 micron CMOS library which should be radiation hard up to 200 krad. The article describes the concept to come to a radiation hard digital circuit and was introduces in 2010 [1]. By introducing new radiation hard design rules we will minimize IC-level leakage and single event latch-up (SEL). To reduce single event upset (SEU) we add two p-MOS transistors to all flip flops. For reliability reasons we use double contacts in all library elements. The additional rules and the library elements are integrated in our Cadence mixed signal design kit, “Virtuoso” IC6.1 [2]. A test chip is produced with our in house 0.13 micron BiCMOS technology, see Ref. [3]. As next step we will doing radiation tests according the european space agency (ESA) specifications, see Ref. [4], [5].

  5. Radiation Hard 0.25 Micron CMOS Library at IHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdhold, U.

    2008-08-01

    To support space applications we have produced a test chip with our in house 0.25 micron BiCMOS- Technology. Then the chips were radiated and measured. During measurements no threshold voltage shift and no single event latchup (SEL) were obtained up to a level of 200 krad. As conclusion of the measurement we developed new radiation hard design rules and according to these rules we created a new radiation hard CMOS library. With this new library we produced a Leon3 chip with triple module redundancy. Single event upsets did occur. Therefore we upgrade the library to make the flip flops more resistant against single event upset (SEU) by adding two p-MOS transistors.

  6. A CMOS image sensor dedicated to medical gamma camera application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, Nur S.; Paindavoine, Michel; Ginhac, Dominique; Parmentier, Michel; Tamda, Najia

    2005-03-01

    Generally, medical Gamma Camera are based on the Anger principle. These cameras use a scintillator block coupled to a bulky array of photomultiplier tube (PMT). To simplify this, we designed a new integrated CMOS image sensor in order to replace bulky PMT photodetetors. We studied several photodiodes sensors including current mirror amplifiers. These photodiodes have been fabricated using a CMOS 0.6 micrometers process from Austria Mikro Systeme (AMS). Each sensor pixel in the array occupies respectively, 1mm x 1mm area, 0.5mm x 0.5mm area and 0.2mm 0.2mm area with fill factor 98 % and total chip area is 2 square millimeters. The sensor pixels show a logarithmic response in illumination and are capable of detecting very low green light emitting diode (less than 0.5 lux) . These results allow to use our sensor in new Gamma Camera solid-state concept.

  7. Diffuse reflectance measurements using lensless CMOS imaging chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkanova, I.; Pandya, A.; Shah, D.; Lilge, L.; Douplik, A.

    2014-10-01

    To assess superficial epithelial microcirculation, a diagnostic tool should be able to detect the heterogeneity of microvasculature, and to monitor qualitative derangement of perfusion in a diseased condition. Employing a lensless CMOS imaging chip with an RGB Bayer filter, experiments were conducted with a microfluidic platform to obtain diffuse reflectance maps. Haemoglobin (Hb) solution (160 g/l) was injected in the periodic channels (grooves) of the microfluidic phantom which were covered with ~250 μm thick layer of intralipid to obtain a diffusive environment. Image processing was performed on data acquired on the surface of the phantom to evaluate the diffuse reflectance from the subsurface periodic pattern. Thickness of the microfluidic grooves, the wavelength dependent contrast between Hb and the background, and effective periodicity of the grooves were evaluated. Results demonstrate that a lens-less CMOS camera is capable of capturing images of subsurface structures with large field of view.

  8. A CMOS integrated timing discriminator circuit for fast scintillation counters

    SciTech Connect

    Jochmann, M.W.

    1998-06-01

    Based on a zero-crossing discriminator using a CR differentiation network for pulse shaping, a new CMOS integrated timing discriminator circuit is proposed for fast (t{sub r} {ge} 2 ns) scintillation counters at the cooler synchrotron COSY-Juelich. By eliminating the input signal`s amplitude information by means of an analog continuous-time divider, a normalized pulse shape at the zero-crossing point is gained over a wide dynamic input amplitude range. In combination with an arming comparator and a monostable multivibrator this yields in a highly precise timing discriminator circuit, that is expected to be useful in different time measurement applications. First measurement results of a CMOS integrated logarithmic amplifier, which is part of the analog continuous-time divider, agree well with the corresponding simulations. Moreover, SPICE simulations of the integrated discriminator circuit promise a time walk well below 200 ps (FWHM) over a 40 dB input amplitude dynamic range.

  9. CMOS floating-point vector-arithmetic unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, D.; Rix, B.; Hahn, H.; Hosticka, B. J.

    1994-05-01

    This work describes a floating-point arithmetic unit based on the CORDIC algorithm. The unit computes a full set of high level arithmetic and elementary functions: multiplication, division, (co)sine, hyperbolic (co)sine, square root, natural logarithm, inverse (hyperbolic) tangent, vector norm, and phase. The chip has been integrated in 1.6 micron double-metal n-well CMOS technology and achieves a normalized peak performance of 220 MFLOPS.

  10. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximow, B.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerated life test of sufficient duration to generate a minimum of 50% cumulative failures in lots of CMOS devices was conducted to provide a basis for determining the consistency of activation energy at 250 C. An investigation was made to determine whether any thresholds were exceeded during the high temperature testing, which could trigger failure mechanisms unique to that temperature. The usefulness of the 250 C temperature test as a predictor of long term reliability was evaluated.

  11. Characterization of a CMOS detector for limited-view mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbakri, Idris A.

    2007-03-01

    Sensors based on complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) technology have recently been considered for mammography applications. CMOS offers the advantages of lower cost and relative ease of fabrications. We report on the evaluation of a CMOS imager (C9730DK, Hamamatsu Corporation) with 14-bit digitization and 50-micron detector element (del) resolution. The imager has an active area of 5 x 5 cm and uses 160-micron layer of needle-crystal CsI (55 mg/cc) to convert x-rays to light. The detector is suitable for spot and specimen imaging and image-guided biopsy. To evaluate resolution performance, we measured the modulation transfer function (MTF) using the slanted edge method. We also measured the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) using Fourier analysis of uniform images. The MTF and NNPS were used to determine the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector. The detector was characterized using a molybdenum target/molybdenum filter mammography x-ray source operated at 28 kVp with 44mm of PMMA added to mimic clinical beam quality (HVL = 0.62 mm Al). Our analysis showed that the imager had a linear response. The MTF was 28% at 5 lp/mm and 8% at 10 lp/mm. The product of the NNPS and exposure showed that the detector was quantum limited. The DQE near 0 lp/mm was in the 55-60% range. The DQE and MTF performance of the CMOS detector are comparable to published values for other digital mammography detectors.

  12. A BiCMOS integrated charge to amplitude converter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallin-Martel, L.; Pouxe, J.; Rossetto, O.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a fast two channel gated charge to amplitude converter (QAC) which has been designed with the 1.2 {mu}m BiCMOS technology from AMS (Austria Mikro Systeme). It can integrate fast negative impulse currents up to 100 mA. Associated with an audio 18 bit low cost ADC, it can easily be used to make a 12 to 13 bit QDC. The problems of current to current conversion, pedestal and offset stability are discussed.

  13. Linear dynamic range enhancement in a CMOS imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A CMOS imager with increased linear dynamic range but without degradation in noise, responsivity, linearity, fixed-pattern noise, or photometric calibration comprises a linear calibrated dual gain pixel in which the gain is reduced after a pre-defined threshold level by switching in an additional capacitance. The pixel may include a novel on-pixel latch circuit that is used to switch in the additional capacitance.

  14. Attenuation of single event induced pulses in CMOS combinational logic

    SciTech Connect

    Baze, M.P.; Buchner, S.P.

    1997-12-01

    Results are presented of a study of SEU generated transient pulse attenuation in combinational logic structures built using common digital CMOS design practices. SPICE circuit analysis, heavy ion tests, and pulsed, focused laser simulations were used to examine the response characteristics of transient pulse behavior in long logic strings. Results show that while there is an observable effect, it cannot be generally assumed that attenuation will significantly reduce observed circuit bit error rates.

  15. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, S.; Hu, G.; Howe, R. C. T.; de Luca, A.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; Ray, S. K.; Guha, P. K.; Hasan, T.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graphene flakes form a percolating network to render the resultant graphene-PVP thin film conductive, which varies in presence of humidity due to swelling of the hygroscopic PVP host. When the sensors are exposed to relative humidity ranging from 10-80%, we observe significant changes in resistance with increasing sensitivity from the amount of graphene in the inks. Our sensors show excellent repeatability and stability, over a period of several weeks. The location specific deposition of functional graphene ink onto a low cost CMOS platform has the potential for high volume, economic manufacturing and application as a new generation of miniature, low power humidity sensors for the internet of things.

  16. Aluminum nitride on titanium for CMOS compatible piezoelectric transducers

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C; Petzold, Bryan C; Ninan, Biju; Mullapudi, Ravi; Pruitt, Beth L

    2010-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used for microscale sensors and actuators but can pose material compatibility challenges. This paper reports a post-CMOS compatible fabrication process for piezoelectric sensors and actuators on silicon using only standard CMOS metals. The piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited on titanium (Ti) by reactive sputtering are characterized and microcantilever actuators are demonstrated. The film texture of the polycrystalline Ti and AlN films is improved by removing the native oxide from the silicon substrate in situ and sequentially depositing the films under vacuum to provide a uniform growth surface. The piezoelectric properties for several AlN film thicknesses are measured using laser doppler vibrometry on unpatterned wafers and released cantilever beams. The film structure and properties are shown to vary with thickness, with values of d33f, d31 and d33 of up to 2.9, −1.9 and 6.5 pm V−1, respectively. These values are comparable with AlN deposited on a Pt metal electrode, but with the benefit of a fabrication process that uses only standard CMOS metals. PMID:20333316

  17. Fully depleted, thick, monolithic CMOS pixels with high quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A.; Stefanov, K.; Johnston, N.; Holland, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Centre for Electronic Imaging (CEI) has an active programme of evaluating and designing Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors with high quantum efficiency, for applications in near-infrared and X-ray photon detection. This paper describes the performance characterisation of CMOS devices made on a high resistivity 50 μ m thick p-type substrate with a particular focus on determining the depletion depth and the quantum efficiency. The test devices contain 8 × 8 pixel arrays using CCD-style charge collection, which are manufactured in a low voltage CMOS process by ESPROS Photonics Corporation (EPC). Measurements include determining under which operating conditions the devices become fully depleted. By projecting a spot using a microscope optic and a LED and biasing the devices over a range of voltages, the depletion depth will change, causing the amount of charge collected in the projected spot to change. We determine if the device is fully depleted by measuring the signal collected from the projected spot. The analysis of spot size and shape is still under development.

  18. Development of CMOS Imager Block for Capsule Endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafie, S.; Fodzi, F. A. M.; Tung, L. Q.; Lioe, D. X.; Halin, I. A.; Hasan, W. Z. W.; Jaafar, H.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the development of imager block to be associated in a capsule endoscopy system. Since the capsule endoscope is used to diagnose gastrointestinal diseases, the imager block must be in small size which is comfortable for the patients to swallow. In this project, a small size 1.5V button battery is used as the power supply while the voltage supply requirements for other components such as microcontroller and CMOS image sensor are higher. Therefore, a voltage booster circuit is proposed to boost up the voltage supply from 1.5V to 3.3V. A low power microcontroller is used to generate control pulses for the CMOS image sensor and to convert the 8-bits parallel data output to serial data to be transmitted to the display panel. The results show that the voltage booster circuit was able to boost the voltage supply from 1.5V to 3.3V. The microcontroller precisely controls the CMOS image sensor to produce parallel data which is then serialized again by the microcontroller. The serial data is then successfully translated to 2fps image and displayed on computer.

  19. Neuronal cell biocompatibility and adhesion to modified CMOS electrodes.

    PubMed

    Graham, Anthony H D; Bowen, Chris R; Taylor, John; Robbins, Jon

    2009-10-01

    The use of CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) integrated circuits to create electrodes for biosensors, implants and drug-discovery has several potential advantages over passive multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). However, unmodified aluminium CMOS electrodes may corrode in a physiological environment. We have investigated a low-cost electrode design based on the modification of CMOS metallisation to produce a nanoporous alumina electrode as an interface to mammalian neuronal cells and corrosion inhibitor. Using NG108-15 mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid cells, results show that porous alumina is biocompatible and that the inter-pore distance (pore pitch) of the alumina has no effect on cell vitality. To establish whether porous alumina and a cell membrane can produce a tight junction required for good electrical coupling between electrode and cell, we devised a novel cell detachment centrifugation assay to assess the long-term adhesion of cells. Results show that porous alumina substrates produced with a large pore pitch of 206 nm present a significantly improved surface compared to the unmodified aluminium control and that small pore-pitches of 17 nm and 69 nm present a less favourable surface for cell adhesion. PMID:19459049

  20. CMOS-compatible graphene photodetector covering all optical communication bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Humer, Markus; Furchi, Marco M.; Bachmann, Dominic; Guider, Romain; Fromherz, Thomas; Mueller, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Optical interconnects are becoming attractive alternatives to electrical wiring in intra- and interchip communication links. Particularly, the integration with silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has received considerable interest because of the ability of cost-effective integration of electronics and optics on a single chip. Although silicon enables the realization of optical waveguides and passive components, the integration of another, optically absorbing, material is required for photodetection. Traditionally, germanium or compound semiconductors are used for this purpose; however, their integration with silicon technology faces major challenges. Recently, graphene emerged as a viable alternative for optoelectronic applications, including photodetection. Here, we demonstrate an ultra-wideband CMOS-compatible photodetector based on graphene. We achieved a multigigahertz operation over all fibre-optic telecommunication bands beyond the wavelength range of strained germanium photodetectors, the responsivity of which is limited by their bandgap. Our work complements the recent demonstration of a CMOS-integrated graphene electro-optical modulator, and paves the way for carbon-based optical interconnects.

  1. A CMOS TDI image sensor for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, Joseph E.; Stefanov, Konstantin D.; Holland, Andrew D.; Endicott, James; Mayer, Frederic; Barbier, Frederic

    2015-09-01

    Time Delay and Integration (TDI) is used to increase the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) in image sensors when imaging fast moving objects. One important TDI application is in Earth observation from space. In order to operate in the space radiation environment, the effect that radiation damage has on the performance of the image sensors must be understood. This work looks at prototype TDI sensor pixel designs, produced by e2v technologies. The sensor is a CCD-like charge transfer device, allowing in-pixel charge summation, produced on a CMOS process. The use of a CMOS process allows potential advantages such as lower power consumption, smaller pixels, higher line rate and extra on-chip functionality which can simplify system design. CMOS also allows a dedicated output amplifier per column allowing fewer charge transfers and helping to facilitate higher line rates than CCDs. In this work the effect on the pixels of radiation damage from high energy protons, at doses relevant to a low Earth orbit mission, is presented. This includes the resulting changes in Charge Transfer inefficiency (CTI) and dark signal.

  2. Polycrystalline Mercuric Iodide Films on CMOS Readout Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hartsough, Neal E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygard, Einar; Malakhov, Nail; Barber, William C.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan

    2009-01-01

    We have created high-resolution x-ray imaging devices using polycrystalline mercuric iodide (HgI2) films grown directly onto CMOS readout chips using a thermal vapor transport process. Images from prototype 400×400 pixel HgI2-coated CMOS readout chips are presented, where the pixel grid is 30 μm × 30 μm. The devices exhibited sensitivity of 6.2 μC/Rcm2 with corresponding dark current of ∼2.7 nA/cm2, and a 80 μm FWHM planar image response to a 50 μm slit aperture. X-ray CT images demonstrate a point spread function sufficient to obtain a 50 μm spatial resolution in reconstructed CT images at a substantially reduced dose compared to phosphor-coated readouts. The use of CMOS technology allows for small pixels (30 μm), fast readout speeds (8 fps for a 3200×3200 pixel array), and future design flexibility due to the use of well-developed fabrication processes. PMID:20161098

  3. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing.

    PubMed

    Santra, S; Hu, G; Howe, R C T; De Luca, A; Ali, S Z; Udrea, F; Gardner, J W; Ray, S K; Guha, P K; Hasan, T

    2015-01-01

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graphene flakes form a percolating network to render the resultant graphene-PVP thin film conductive, which varies in presence of humidity due to swelling of the hygroscopic PVP host. When the sensors are exposed to relative humidity ranging from 10-80%, we observe significant changes in resistance with increasing sensitivity from the amount of graphene in the inks. Our sensors show excellent repeatability and stability, over a period of several weeks. The location specific deposition of functional graphene ink onto a low cost CMOS platform has the potential for high volume, economic manufacturing and application as a new generation of miniature, low power humidity sensors for the internet of things. PMID:26616216

  4. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing

    PubMed Central

    Santra, S.; Hu, G.; Howe, R. C. T.; De Luca, A.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; Ray, S. K.; Guha, P. K.; Hasan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graphene flakes form a percolating network to render the resultant graphene-PVP thin film conductive, which varies in presence of humidity due to swelling of the hygroscopic PVP host. When the sensors are exposed to relative humidity ranging from 10–80%, we observe significant changes in resistance with increasing sensitivity from the amount of graphene in the inks. Our sensors show excellent repeatability and stability, over a period of several weeks. The location specific deposition of functional graphene ink onto a low cost CMOS platform has the potential for high volume, economic manufacturing and application as a new generation of miniature, low power humidity sensors for the internet of things. PMID:26616216

  5. Cryogenic CMOS circuits for single charge digital readout.

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrieri, Thomas M.; Longoria, Erin Michelle; Eng, Kevin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Young, Ralph Watson

    2010-03-01

    The readout of a solid state qubit often relies on single charge sensitive electrometry. However the combination of fast and accurate measurements is non trivial due to large RC time constants due to the electrometers resistance and shunt capacitance from wires between the cold stage and room temperature. Currently fast sensitive measurements are accomplished through rf reflectrometry. I will present an alternative single charge readout technique based on cryogenic CMOS circuits in hopes to improve speed, signal-to-noise, power consumption and simplicity in implementation. The readout circuit is based on a current comparator where changes in current from an electrometer will trigger a digital output. These circuits were fabricated using Sandia's 0.35 {micro}m CMOS foundry process. Initial measurements of comparators with an addition a current amplifier have displayed current sensitivities of < 1nA at 4.2K, switching speeds up to {approx}120ns, while consuming {approx}10 {micro}W. I will also discuss an investigation of noise characterization of our CMOS process in hopes to obtain a better understanding of the ultimate limit in signal to noise performance.

  6. Cryogenic CMOS circuits for single charge digital readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Kevin; Gurrieri, T. M.; Hamlet, J.; Carroll, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    The readout of a solid state qubit often relies on single charge sensitive electrometry. However the combination of fast and accurate measurements is non trivial due to large RC time constants due to the electrometers resistance and shunt capacitance from wires between the cold stage and room temperature. Currently fast sensitive measurements are accomplished through rf reflectrometry. I will present an alternative single charge readout technique based on cryogenic CMOS circuits in hopes to improve speed, signal-to-noise, power consumption and simplicity in implementation. The readout circuit is based on a current comparator where changes in current from an electrometer will trigger a digital output. These circuits were fabricated using Sandia's 0.35μm CMOS foundry process. Initial measurements of comparators with an addition a current amplifier have displayed current sensitivities of < 1nA at 4.2K, switching speeds up to ˜120ns, while consuming ˜10μW. I will also discuss an investigation of noise characterization of our CMOS process in hopes to obtain a better understanding of the ultimate limit in signal to noise performance.

  7. First result on biased CMOS MAPs-on-diamond devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanxheri, K.; Citroni, M.; Fanetti, S.; Lagomarsino, S.; Morozzi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Sciortino, S.; Servoli, L.

    2015-10-01

    Recently a new type of device, the MAPS-on-diamond, obtained bonding a thinned to 25 μm CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor to a standard 500 μm pCVD diamond substrate, has been proposed and fabricated, allowing a highly segmented readout (10×10 μm pixel size) of the signal produced in the diamond substrate. The bonding between the two materials has been obtained using a new laser technique to deliver the needed energy at the interface. A biasing scheme has been adopted to polarize the diamond substrate to allow the charge transport inside the diamond without disrupting the functionalities of the CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor. The main concept of this class of devices is the capability of the charges generated in the diamond by ionizing radiation to cross the silicon-diamond interface and to be collected by the MAPS photodiodes. In this work we demonstrate that such passage occurs and measure its overall efficiency. This study has been carried out first calibrating the CMOS MAPS with monochromatic X-rays, and then testing the device with charged particles (electrons) either with and without biasing the diamond substrate, to compare the amount of signal collected.

  8. CMOS-liquid-crystal-based image transceiver device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efron, Uzi; Davidov, Isak; Sinelnikov, Vladimir; Levin, Ilya

    2001-05-01

    A CMOS-Liquid Crystal-Based Image Transceiver Device (ITD) is under development at the Holon Institute of Technology. The device combines both functions of imaginary and display in a single array structure. This unique structure allows the combination of see-through, aiming, imaging and the displaying of a superposed image to be combined in a single, compact, head mounted display. The CMOS-based pixel elements are designed to provide image sensor part of the pixel is based on an n-well photodiode and a three-transistors readout circuit. The imaging function is based on a back- illuminated sensor configuration. In order to provide a high imager fill-factor, two pixel configuration are proposed: 1) A p++/p-/p-well silicon structure using twin- well CMOS process; 2) an n-well processed silicon structure with a micro-lens array. The display portion of the IT device is to be fabricate don a silicon-based reflective, active matrix driver, using nematic liquid crystal material. The reflective display pixel electrode is driven by an n-MOS transistor, formed in the corresponding pixel region on the silicon substrate. The timing, sequencing and control of the IT device array are designed in a pipeline array processing scheme. A preliminary prototype system and device design have been performed and the first test device is currently being tested. Details of the device design as well as its smart goggle applications are presented.

  9. CMOS/LCOS-based image transceiver device: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efron, Uzi; Davidov, Isak; Sinelnikov, Vladimir; Friesem, Asher A.

    2001-11-01

    A CMOS-liquid crystal-based image transceiver device (ITD) is under development at the Holon Institute of Technology. The device combines both functions of imaging and display in a single array configuration. This unique structure allows the combination of see-through, aiming, imaging and the displaying of a superposed image to be combined in a single, compact, head mounted display. The CMOS-based pixel elements are designed to provide efficient imaging in the visible range as well as driver capabilities for the overlying liquid crystal modulator. The image sensor part of the pixel is based on an n-well photodiode and a three-transistor readout circuit. The imaging function is based on a back- illuminated sensor configuration. In order to provide a high imager fill-factor, two pixel configurations are proposed: 1) A p++/p-/p-well silicon structure using twin- well CMOS process; 2) An n-well processed silicon structure with a micro-lens array. The display portion of the IT device is to be fabricated on a silicon-based reflective, active matrix driver, using nematic liquid crystal material, in LCOS technology. The timing, sequencing and control of the IT device array are designed in a pipeline array processing scheme. A preliminary prototype system and device design have been performed and the first test device is currently undergoing testing. Details of the device design as well as its Smart Goggle applications are presented.

  10. Aluminum nitride on titanium for CMOS compatible piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Joseph C.; Petzold, Bryan C.; Ninan, Biju; Mullapudi, Ravi; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2010-02-01

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used for microscale sensors and actuators but can pose material compatibility challenges. This paper reports a post-CMOS compatible fabrication process for piezoelectric sensors and actuators on silicon using only standard CMOS metals. The piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited on titanium (Ti) by reactive sputtering are characterized and microcantilever actuators are demonstrated. The film texture of the polycrystalline Ti and AlN films is improved by removing the native oxide from the silicon substrate in situ and sequentially depositing the films under vacuum to provide a uniform growth surface. The piezoelectric properties for several AlN film thicknesses are measured using laser doppler vibrometry on unpatterned wafers and released cantilever beams. The film structure and properties are shown to vary with thickness, with values of d33f, d31 and d33 of up to 2.9, -1.9 and 6.5 pm V-1, respectively. These values are comparable with AlN deposited on a Pt metal electrode, but with the benefit of a fabrication process that uses only standard CMOS metals.

  11. Self-Calibrated Humidity Sensor in CMOS without Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnik, Oleg; Higuchi, Kohei; Maenaka, Kazusuke

    2012-01-01

    A 1.1 μW power dissipation, voltage-output humidity sensor with 10% relative humidity accuracy was developed in the LFoundry 0.15 μm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a humidity-sensitive layer of Intervia Photodielectric 8023D-10, a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter, and the self-calibration circuitry. PMID:22368466

  12. Single photon detection and localization accuracy with an ebCMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajgfinger, T.; Dominjon, A.; Barbier, R.

    2015-07-01

    The CMOS sensor technologies evolve very fast and offer today very promising solutions to existing issues facing by imaging camera systems. CMOS sensors are very attractive for fast and sensitive imaging thanks to their low pixel noise (1e-) and their possibility of backside illumination. The ebCMOS group of IPNL has produced a camera system dedicated to Low Light Level detection and based on a 640 kPixels ebCMOS with its acquisition system. After reminding the principle of detection of an ebCMOS and the characteristics of our prototype, we confront our camera to other imaging systems. We compare the identification efficiency and the localization accuracy of a point source by four different photo-detection devices: the scientific CMOS (sCMOS), the Charge Coupled Device (CDD), the Electron Multiplying CCD (emCCD) and the Electron Bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). Our ebCMOS camera is able to identify a single photon source in less than 10 ms with a localization accuracy better than 1 μm. We report as well efficiency measurement and the false positive identification of the ebCMOS camera by identifying more than hundreds of single photon sources in parallel. About 700 spots are identified with a detection efficiency higher than 90% and a false positive percentage lower than 5. With these measurements, we show that our target tracking algorithm can be implemented in real time at 500 frames per second under a photon flux of the order of 8000 photons per frame. These results demonstrate that the ebCMOS camera concept with its single photon detection and target tracking algorithm is one of the best devices for low light and fast applications such as bioluminescence imaging, quantum dots tracking or adaptive optics.

  13. CMOS Integrated Single Electron Transistor Electrometry (CMOS-SET) circuit design for nanosecond quantum-bit read-out.

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrieri, Thomas M.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Levy, James E.

    2008-08-01

    Novel single electron transistor (SET) read-out circuit designs are described. The circuits use a silicon SET interfaced to a CMOS voltage mode or current mode comparator to obtain a digital read-out of the state of the qubit. The design assumes standard submicron (0.35 um) CMOS SOI technology using room temperature SPICE models. Implications and uncertainties related to the temperature scaling of these models to 100mK operation are discussed. Using this technology, the simulations predict a read-out operation speed of approximately Ins and a power dissipation per cell as low as 2nW for single-shot read-out, which is a significant advantage over currently used radio frequency SET (RF-SET) approaches.

  14. Top-down fabrication of fully CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire arrays and their integration into CMOS Inverters on plastic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeongwon; Jeon, Youngin; Moon, Taeho; Kim, Sangsig

    2011-04-26

    A route to the top-down fabrication of highly ordered and aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with degenerately doped source/drain regions from a bulk Si wafer is presented. In this approach, freestanding n- and p-SiNWs with an inverted triangular cross section are obtained using conventional photolithography, crystal orientation dependent wet etching, size reduction oxidation, and ion implantation doping. Based on these n- and p-SiNWs transferred onto a plastic substrate, simple SiNW-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverters are constructed for the possible applications of these SiNW arrays in integrated circuits on plastic. The static voltage transfer characteristic of the SiNW-based CMOS inverter exhibits a voltage gain of ∼9 V/V and a transition of 0.32 V at an operating voltage of 1.5 V with a full output voltage swing between 0 V and V(DD), and its mechnical bendability indicates good fatigue properties for potential applications of flexible electronics. This novel top-down approach is fully compatible with the current state-of-the-art Si-based CMOS technologies and, therefore, offers greater flexibility in device design for both high-performance and low-power functionality. PMID:21355599

  15. Scaled CMOS Technology Reliability Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The desire to assess the reliability of emerging scaled microelectronics technologies through faster reliability trials and more accurate acceleration models is the precursor for further research and experimentation in this relevant field. The effect of semiconductor scaling on microelectronics product reliability is an important aspect to the high reliability application user. From the perspective of a customer or user, who in many cases must deal with very limited, if any, manufacturer's reliability data to assess the product for a highly-reliable application, product-level testing is critical in the characterization and reliability assessment of advanced nanometer semiconductor scaling effects on microelectronics reliability. A methodology on how to accomplish this and techniques for deriving the expected product-level reliability on commercial memory products are provided.Competing mechanism theory and the multiple failure mechanism model are applied to the experimental results of scaled SDRAM products. Accelerated stress testing at multiple conditions is applied at the product level of several scaled memory products to assess the performance degradation and product reliability. Acceleration models are derived for each case. For several scaled SDRAM products, retention time degradation is studied and two distinct soft error populations are observed with each technology generation: early breakdown, characterized by randomly distributed weak bits with Weibull slope (beta)=1, and a main population breakdown with an increasing failure rate. Retention time soft error rates are calculated and a multiple failure mechanism acceleration model with parameters is derived for each technology. Defect densities are calculated and reflect a decreasing trend in the percentage of random defective bits for each successive product generation. A normalized soft error failure rate of the memory data retention time in FIT/Gb and FIT/cm2 for several scaled SDRAM generations is

  16. Radiation hardness by design for mixed signal infrared readout circuit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaalema, Stephen; Gates, James; Dobyns, David; Pauls, Greg; Wall, Bruce

    2013-09-01

    Readout integrated circuits (ROICs) to support space-based infrared detection applications often have severe radiation tolerance requirements. Radiation hardness-by-design (RHBD) significantly enhances the radiation tolerance of commercially available CMOS and custom radiation hardened fabrication techniques are not required. The combination of application specific design techniques, enclosed gate architecture nFETs and intrinsic thin oxide radiation hardness of 180 nm process node commercial CMOS allows realization of high performance mixed signal circuits. Black Forest Engineering has used RHBD techniques to develop ROICs with integrated A/D conversion that operate over a wide range of temperatures (40K-300K) to support infrared detection. ROIC radiation tolerance capability for 256x256 LWIR area arrays and 1x128 thermopile linear arrays is presented. The use of 130 nm CMOS for future ROIC RHBD applications is discussed.

  17. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A.; Kesler, Benjamin A.; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A.; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M.; Dallesasse, John M.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-07-01

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid’s absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics.

  18. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A.; Kesler, Benjamin A.; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A.; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M.; Dallesasse, John M.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid’s absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:27389070

  19. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A; Kesler, Benjamin A; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M; Dallesasse, John M; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid's absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:27389070

  20. Digital pixel CMOS focal plane array with on-chip multiply accumulate units for low-latency image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Jeffrey W.; Tyrrell, Brian M.; D'Onofrio, Richard; Berger, Paul J.; Fernandez-Cull, Christy

    2014-06-01

    A digital pixel CMOS focal plane array has been developed to enable low latency implementations of image processing systems such as centroid trackers, Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors, and Fitts correlation trackers through the use of in-pixel digital signal processing (DSP) and generic parallel pipelined multiply accumulate (MAC) units. Light intensity digitization occurs at the pixel level, enabling in-pixel DSP and noiseless data transfer from the pixel array to the peripheral processing units. The pipelined processing of row and column image data prior to off chip readout reduces the required output bandwidth of the image sensor, thus reducing the latency of computations necessary to implement various image processing systems. Data volume reductions of over 80% lead to sub 10μs latency for completing various tracking and sensor algorithms. This paper details the architecture of the pixel-processing imager (PPI) and presents some initial results from a prototype device fabricated in a standard 65nm CMOS process hybridized to a commercial off-the-shelf short-wave infrared (SWIR) detector array.

  1. NV-CMOS HD camera for day/night imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsong, T.; Tower, J.; Sudol, Thomas; Senko, T.; Chodelka, D.

    2014-06-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed a new multi-purpose day/night video camera with low-light imaging performance comparable to an image intensifier, while offering the size, weight, ruggedness, and cost advantages enabled by the use of SRI's NV-CMOS HD digital image sensor chip. The digital video output is ideal for image enhancement, sharing with others through networking, video capture for data analysis, or fusion with thermal cameras. The camera provides Camera Link output with HD/WUXGA resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels operating at 60 Hz. Windowing to smaller sizes enables operation at higher frame rates. High sensitivity is achieved through use of backside illumination, providing high Quantum Efficiency (QE) across the visible and near infrared (NIR) bands (peak QE <90%), as well as projected low noise (<2h+) readout. Power consumption is minimized in the camera, which operates from a single 5V supply. The NVCMOS HD camera provides a substantial reduction in size, weight, and power (SWaP) , ideal for SWaP-constrained day/night imaging platforms such as UAVs, ground vehicles, fixed mount surveillance, and may be reconfigured for mobile soldier operations such as night vision goggles and weapon sights. In addition the camera with the NV-CMOS HD imager is suitable for high performance digital cinematography/broadcast systems, biofluorescence/microscopy imaging, day/night security and surveillance, and other high-end applications which require HD video imaging with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The camera comes with an array of lens mounts including C-mount and F-mount. The latest test data from the NV-CMOS HD camera will be presented.

  2. Swap intensified WDR CMOS module for I2/LWIR fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yang; Noguier, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The combination of high resolution visible-near-infrared low light sensor and moderate resolution uncooled thermal sensor provides an efficient way for multi-task night vision. Tremendous progress has been made on uncooled thermal sensors (a-Si, VOx, etc.). It's possible to make a miniature uncooled thermal camera module in a tiny 1cm3 cube with <1W power consumption. For silicon based solid-state low light CCD/CMOS sensors have observed also a constant progress in terms of readout noise, dark current, resolution and frame rate. In contrast to thermal sensing which is intrinsic day&night operational, the silicon based solid-state sensors are not yet capable to do the night vision performance required by defense and critical surveillance applications. Readout noise, dark current are 2 major obstacles. The low dynamic range at high sensitivity mode of silicon sensors is also an important limiting factor, which leads to recognition failure due to local or global saturations & blooming. In this context, the image intensifier based solution is still attractive for the following reasons: 1) high gain and ultra-low dark current; 2) wide dynamic range and 3) ultra-low power consumption. With high electron gain and ultra low dark current of image intensifier, the only requirement on the silicon image pickup device are resolution, dynamic range and power consumption. In this paper, we present a SWAP intensified Wide Dynamic Range CMOS module for night vision applications, especially for I2/LWIR fusion. This module is based on a dedicated CMOS image sensor using solar-cell mode photodiode logarithmic pixel design which covers a huge dynamic range (> 140dB) without saturation and blooming. The ultra-wide dynamic range image from this new generation logarithmic sensor can be used directly without any image processing and provide an instant light accommodation. The complete module is slightly bigger than a simple ANVIS format I2 tube with <500mW power consumption.

  3. SOI CMOS Imager with Suppression of Cross-Talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Zheng, Xingyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sun, Chao

    2009-01-01

    A monolithic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type, now undergoing development, is designed to operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and to offer a combination of high quantum efficiency and low diffusion and capacitive cross-talk among pixels. The imager is designed to be especially suitable for astronomical and astrophysical applications. The imager design could also readily be adapted to general scientific, biological, medical, and spectroscopic applications. One of the conditions needed to ensure both high quantum efficiency and low diffusion cross-talk is a relatively high reverse bias potential (between about 20 and about 50 V) on the photodiode in each pixel. Heretofore, a major obstacle to realization of this condition in a monolithic integrated circuit has been posed by the fact that the required high reverse bias on the photodiode is incompatible with metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) in the CMOS pixel readout circuitry. In the imager now being developed, the SOI structure is utilized to overcome this obstacle: The handle wafer is retained and the photodiode is formed in the handle wafer. The MOSFETs are formed on the SOI layer, which is separated from the handle wafer by a buried oxide layer. The electrical isolation provided by the buried oxide layer makes it possible to bias the MOSFETs at CMOS-compatible potentials (between 0 and 3 V), while biasing the photodiode at the required higher potential, and enables independent optimization of the sensory and readout portions of the imager.

  4. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm2 at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm2. Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm2 while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt. PMID:23136624

  5. 77 FR 74513 - Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Investigations: Terminations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... (``CalTech''). 77 FR 33488 (June 6, 2012). The complaint alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff... COMMISSION Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Investigations: Terminations... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain CMOS image sensors...

  6. 77 FR 33488 - Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to... States after importation of certain CMOS image sensors and products containing same by reason of... image sensors and products containing same that infringe one or more of claims 1 and 2 of the...

  7. CMOS IC fault models, physical defect coverage, and I sub DDQ testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, R.R.; Soden, J.M. ); Hawkins, C.F. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The development of the stuck-at fault (SAF) model is reviewed with emphasis on its relationship to CMOS integrated circuit (IC) technologies. The ability of the SAF model to represent common physical defects in CMOS ICs is evaluated. A test strategy for defect detection, which includes I{sub DDQ} testing is presented. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Comparison of Total Dose Effects on Micropower Op-Amps: Bipolar and CMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Johnston, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper compares low-paper op-amps, OPA241 (bipolar) and OPA336 (CMOS), from Burr-Brown, MAX473 (bipolar) and MAX409 (CMOS), characterizing their total dose response with a single 2.7V power supply voltage.

  9. Integration of GMR-based spin torque oscillators and CMOS circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingsu; Eklund, Anders; Sani, Sohrab; Rodriguez, Saul; Malm, B. Gunnar; Åkerman, Johan; Rusu, Ana

    2015-09-01

    This paper demonstrates the integration of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin torque oscillators (STO) with dedicated high frequency CMOS circuits. The wire-bonding-based integration approach is employed in this work, since it allows easy implementation, measurement and replacement. A GMR STO is wire-bonded to the dedicated CMOS integrated circuit (IC) mounted on a PCB, forming a (GMR STO + CMOS IC) pair. The GMR STO has a lateral size of 70 nm and more than an octave of tunability in the microwave frequency range. The proposed CMOS IC provides the necessary bias-tee for the GMR STO, as well as electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and wideband amplification targeting high frequency GMR STO-based applications. It is implemented in a 65 nm CMOS process, offers a measured gain of 12 dB, while consuming only 14.3 mW and taking a total silicon area of 0.329 mm2. The measurement results show that the (GMR STO + CMOS IC) pair has a wide tunability range from 8 GHz to 16.5 GHz and improves the output power of the GMR STO by about 10 dB. This GMR STO-CMOS integration eliminates wave reflections during the signal transmission and therefore exhibits good potential for developing high frequency GMR STO-based applications, which combine the features of CMOS and STO technologies.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of a CMOS-MEMS Humidity Sensor.

    PubMed

    Dennis, John-Ojur; Ahmed, Abdelaziz-Yousif; Khir, Mohd-Haris

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Microelectromechanical System (CMOS-MEMS) device with embedded microheater operated at relatively elevated temperatures (40 °C to 80 °C) for the purpose of relative humidity measurement. The sensing principle is based on the change in amplitude of the device due to adsorption or desorption of humidity on the active material layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles deposited on the moving plate, which results in changes in the mass of the device. The sensor has been designed and fabricated through a standard 0.35 µm CMOS process technology and post-CMOS micromachining technique has been successfully implemented to release the MEMS structures. The sensor is operated in the dynamic mode using electrothermal actuation and the output signal measured using a piezoresistive (PZR) sensor connected in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The output voltage of the humidity sensor increases from 0.585 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity increases from 35% RH to 95% RH. The output voltage is found to be linear from 0.585 mV to 3.250 mV as the humidity increased from 35% RH to 60% RH, with sensitivity of 0.107 mV/% RH; and again linear from 3.250 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity level increases from 60% RH to 95% RH, with higher sensitivity of 0.781 mV/% RH. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the humidity sensor increases linearly from 0.102 mV/% RH to 0.501 mV/% RH with increase in the temperature from 40 °C to 80 °C and a maximum hysteresis of 0.87% RH is found at a relative humidity of 80%. The sensitivity is also frequency dependent, increasing from 0.500 mV/% RH at 2 Hz to reach a maximum value of 1.634 mV/% RH at a frequency of 12 Hz, then decreasing to 1.110 mV/% RH at a frequency of 20 Hz. Finally, the CMOS-MEMS humidity sensor showed comparable response, recovery, and repeatability of measurements in three cycles as compared to a standard sensor that directly

  11. Performance Analysis of Visible Light Communication Using CMOS Sensors.

    PubMed

    Do, Trong-Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the fundamentals of visible light communication systems that use the rolling shutter mechanism of CMOS sensors. All related information involving different subjects, such as photometry, camera operation, photography and image processing, are studied in tandem to explain the system. Then, the system performance is analyzed with respect to signal quality and data rate. To this end, a measure of signal quality, the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR), is formulated. Finally, a simulation is conducted to verify the analysis. PMID:26938535

  12. Performance Analysis of Visible Light Communication Using CMOS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Do, Trong-Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the fundamentals of visible light communication systems that use the rolling shutter mechanism of CMOS sensors. All related information involving different subjects, such as photometry, camera operation, photography and image processing, are studied in tandem to explain the system. Then, the system performance is analyzed with respect to signal quality and data rate. To this end, a measure of signal quality, the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR), is formulated. Finally, a simulation is conducted to verify the analysis. PMID:26938535

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of a CMOS-MEMS Humidity Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, John-Ojur; Ahmed, Abdelaziz-Yousif; Khir, Mohd-Haris

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Microelectromechanical System (CMOS-MEMS) device with embedded microheater operated at relatively elevated temperatures (40 °C to 80 °C) for the purpose of relative humidity measurement. The sensing principle is based on the change in amplitude of the device due to adsorption or desorption of humidity on the active material layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles deposited on the moving plate, which results in changes in the mass of the device. The sensor has been designed and fabricated through a standard 0.35 µm CMOS process technology and post-CMOS micromachining technique has been successfully implemented to release the MEMS structures. The sensor is operated in the dynamic mode using electrothermal actuation and the output signal measured using a piezoresistive (PZR) sensor connected in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The output voltage of the humidity sensor increases from 0.585 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity increases from 35% RH to 95% RH. The output voltage is found to be linear from 0.585 mV to 3.250 mV as the humidity increased from 35% RH to 60% RH, with sensitivity of 0.107 mV/% RH; and again linear from 3.250 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity level increases from 60% RH to 95% RH, with higher sensitivity of 0.781 mV/% RH. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the humidity sensor increases linearly from 0.102 mV/% RH to 0.501 mV/% RH with increase in the temperature from 40 °C to 80 °C and a maximum hysteresis of 0.87% RH is found at a relative humidity of 80%. The sensitivity is also frequency dependent, increasing from 0.500 mV/% RH at 2 Hz to reach a maximum value of 1.634 mV/% RH at a frequency of 12 Hz, then decreasing to 1.110 mV/% RH at a frequency of 20 Hz. Finally, the CMOS-MEMS humidity sensor showed comparable response, recovery, and repeatability of measurements in three cycles as compared to a standard sensor that directly

  14. Defect classes - an overdue paradigm for CMOS IC testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, C.F.; Soden, J.M.; Righter, A.W.; Ferguson, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    The IC test industry has struggled for more than 30 years to establish a test approach that would guarantee a low defect level to the customer. We propose a comprehensive strategy for testing CMOS ICs that uses defect classes based on measured defect electrical properties. Defect classes differ from traditional fault models. Our defect class approach requires that the test strategy match the defect electrical properties, while fault models require that IC defects match the fault definition. We use data from Sandia Labs failure analysis and test facilities and from public literature. We describe test pattern requirements for each defect class and propose a test paradigm.

  15. High total dose effects on CMOS/SOI technology

    SciTech Connect

    Flament, O.; Dupont-Nivet, E.; Leray, J.L.; Pere, J.F.; Delagnes, E. ); Auberton-Herve, A.J.; Giffard, B. ); Borel, G.; Ouisse, T. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that, CMOS silicon on insulator technology has shown its ability to process hardened components which remain functional after irradiation with a total dose of several tens of Megarads. New tests on elementary transistors and 29101 microprocessor have been made at doses up to 100 Mrad (SiO{sub 2}) and above. Results of irradiation at these total doses are presented for different biases, together with the post-irradiation behavior of the components. All the observations show that new parameters must be taken into account for hardness insurance at a high level of total dose.

  16. A CMOS readout system for very large detector capacitances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeneberg, U.; Hosticka, B. J.; Fent, J.; Oberlack, H.; Zimmer, G.

    1990-03-01

    In this contribution we present readout electronics for a liquid-argon calorimeter. It has been designed and optimized for operation at cryogenic temperatures and it is integrated in an n-well 2 μm CMOS technology. The chip contains 16 analog channels with switched-capacitor circuits for charge collection, storage, and amplification, and averaging and correlated double sampling circuits for noise reduction. Further components include a trigger generator, an analog multiplexer, digital control circuits for analog switching, and 50 ω cable drivers.

  17. Laser SEU sensitivity mapping of deep submicron CMOS SRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongtao, Yu; Guoqiang, Feng; Rui, Chen; Jianwei, Han

    2014-06-01

    The pulsed laser facility for SEU sensitivity mapping is utilized to study the SEU sensitive regions of a 0.18 μm CMOS SRAM cell. Combined with the device layout micrograph, SEU sensitivity maps of the SRAM cell are obtained. TCAD simulation work is performed to examine the SEU sensitivity characteristics of the SRAM cell. The laser mapping experiment results are discussed and compared with the electron micrograph information of the SRAM cell and the TCAD simulation results. The results present that the test technique is reliable and of high mapping precision for the deep submicron technology device.

  18. Silicon nanowires integrated with CMOS circuits for biosensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, G.; Asadollahi, A.; Hellström, P.-E.; Garidis, K.; Östling, M.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a silicon nanowire (SiNW) biosensor fabricated in a fully depleted SOI CMOS process. The sensor array consists of N by N pixel matrix (N2 pixels or test sites) and 8 input-output (I/O) pins. In each pixel a single crystalline SiNW with 75 by 20 nm cross-section area is defined using sidewall transfer lithography in the SOI layer. The key advantage of the design is that each individual SiNWs can be read-out sequentially and used for real-time charge based detection of molecules in liquids or gases.

  19. Radiation-hard silicon gate bulk CMOS cell family

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, C. F.; Habing, D. H.; Flores, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    A radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate CMOS technology and a topologically simple, high-performance dual-port cell family utilizing this process have been demonstrated. Additional circuits, including a random logic circuit containing 4800 transistors on a 236 x 236 mil die, are presently being designed and processed. Finally, a joint design-process effort is underway to redesign the cell family in reduced design rules; this results in a factor of 2.5 cell size reduction and a factor of 3 decrease in chip interconnect area. Cell performance is correspondingly improved.

  20. A quasi-passive CMOS pipeline D/A converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Fong-Jim; Temes, Gabor C.; Law, Simon

    1989-01-01

    A novel pipeline digital-to-analog converter configuration, based on switched-capacitor techniques, is described. An n-bit D/A conversion can be implemented by cascading n + 1 unit cells. The device count of the circuit increases linearly, not exponentially, with the conversion accuracy. The new configuration can be pipelined. Hence, the conversion rate can be increased without requiring a higher clock rate. An experimental 10-bit DAC prototype has been fabricated using a 3-micron CMOS process. The results show that high-speed, high-accuracy, and low-power operation can be achieved without special process or postprocess trimming.

  1. Test of radiation hardness of CMOS transistors under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Rowe, W.A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Hoffman, C.M.; Holtkamp, D.; Kinnison, W.W.; Sommer, W.F. Jr.; Ziock, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We have tested 2 micron CMOS test structures from various foundries in the LAMPF Beam stop for radiation damage under prolongued neutron irradiation. The fluxes employed covered the region expected to be encountered at the SSC and led to fluences of up to 10/sup 14/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in about 500 hrs of running. We show that test structures which have been measured to survive ionizing radiation of the order MRad also survive these high neutron fluences. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Predicting Lifetimes Of CMOS ASIC's From Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Zamani, Nasser; Zoutendyk, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Concise report discusses recent developments in use of semiempirical mathematical models to predict rates of failure and operating lifetimes of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC's). Each model represents specific mechanism of failure. Once failure mechanisms and models relevant to given ASIC chosen, adjustable parameters in models fitted to life-test data acquired from representative integrated-circuit structures on test coupons fabricated along with ASIC's. Then design parameters of ASIC's incorporated into models, and models yield lifetimes.

  3. A high speed CMOS A/D converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Don R.; Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a high speed analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. The converter is a 7 bit flash converter with one half LSB accuracy. Typical parts will function at approximately 200 MHz. The converter uses a novel comparator circuit that is shown to out perform more traditional comparators, and thus increases the speed of the converter. The comparator is a clocked, precharged circuit that offers very fast operation with a minimal offset voltage (2 mv). The converter was designed using a standard 1 micron digital CMOS process and is 2,244 microns by 3,972 microns.

  4. Optimum Design of CMOS DC-DC Converter for Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Yasushi; Edo, Masaharu; Denta, Toshio; Kawashima, Tetsuya; Ninomiya, Tamotsu

    In recent years, low output power CMOS DC-DC converters which integrate power stage MOSFETs and a PWM controller using CMOS process have been used in many mobile applications. In this paper, we propose the calculation method of CMOS DC-DC converter efficiency and report optimum design of CMOS DC-DC converter based on this method. By this method, converter efficiencies are directly calculated from converter specifications, dimensions of power stage MOSFET and device parameters. Therefore, this method can be used for optimization of CMOS DC-DC converter design, such as dimensions of power stage MOSFET and switching frequency. The efficiency calculated by the proposed method agrees well with the experimental results.

  5. Closed-loop adaptive optics using a CMOS image quality metric sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Chueh; Rayankula, Aditya; Giles, Michael K.; Furth, Paul M.

    2006-08-01

    When compared to a Shack-Hartmann sensor, a CMOS image sharpness sensor has the advantage of reduced complexity in a closed-loop adaptive optics system. It also has the potential to be implemented as a smart sensor using VLSI technology. In this paper, we present a novel adaptive optics testbed that uses a CMOS sharpness imager built in the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Electro-Optics Research Laboratory (EORL). The adaptive optics testbed, which includes a CMOS image quality metric sensor and a 37-channel deformable mirror, has the capability to rapidly compensate higher-order phase aberrations. An experimental performance comparison of the pinhole image sharpness feedback method and the CMOS imager is presented. The experimental data shows that the CMOS sharpness imager works well in a closed-loop adaptive optics system. Its overall performance is better than that of the pinhole method, and it has a fast response time.

  6. Fabrication and device characteristics of strained-Si-on-insulator (strained-SOI) CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, Tomohisa; Tezuka, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Numata, Toshinori; Usuda, Koji; Moriyama, Yoshihiko; Nakaharai, Shu; Koga, Junji; Tanabe, Akihito; Maeda, Tatsuro

    2004-03-01

    Strained-Si-on-insulator (strained-SOI) CMOS is a promising device structure for satisfying requirements of both high current drive and low supply voltage under sub-100 nm nodes, because of the combination of advantages of SOI MOSFETs and high mobility strained-Si channels. In this paper, we present the concept, the device structures and the fabrication techniques of strained-SOI CMOS. We introduce our original fabrication method of strained-SOI substrates, called the Ge condensation technique. It is experimentally shown that strained-SOI CMOS has higher electron and hole mobility and that strained-SOI CMOS ring oscillators successfully operate with the performance enhancement of 30-70% against conventional SOI CMOS ones.

  7. The total dose effects on the 1/f noise of deep submicron CMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongbin, Hu; Yuxin, Wang; Wu, Lu

    2014-02-01

    Using 0.18 μm CMOS transistors, the total dose effects on the 1/f noise of deep-submicron CMOS transistors are studied for the first time in mainland China. From the experimental results and the theoretic analysis, we realize that total dose radiation causes a lot of trapped positive charges in STI (shallow trench isolation) SiO2 layers, which induces a current leakage passage, increasing the 1/f noise power of CMOS transistors. In addition, we design some radiation-hardness structures on the CMOS transistors and the experimental results show that, until the total dose achieves 750 krad, the 1/f noise power of the radiation-hardness CMOS transistors remains unchanged, which proves our conclusion.

  8. CMOS digital intra-oral sensor for x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinqiao; Byczko, Andrew; Choi, Marcus; Chung, Lap; Do, Hung; Fowler, Boyd; Ispasoiu, Radu; Joshi, Kumar; Miller, Todd; Nagy, Alex; Reaves, David; Rodricks, Brian; Teeter, Doug; Wang, George; Xiao, Feng

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present a CMOS digital intra-oral sensor for x-ray radiography. The sensor system consists of a custom CMOS imager, custom scintillator/fiber optics plate, camera timing and digital control electronics, and direct USB communication. The CMOS imager contains 1700 x 1346 pixels. The pixel size is 19.5um x 19.5um. The imager was fabricated with a 0.18um CMOS imaging process. The sensor and CMOS imager design features chamfered corners for patient comfort. All camera functions were integrated within the sensor housing and a standard USB cable was used to directly connect the intra-oral sensor to the host computer. The sensor demonstrated wide dynamic range from 5uGy to 1300uGy and high image quality with a SNR of greater than 160 at 400uGy dose. The sensor has a spatial resolution more than 20 lp/mm.

  9. Development of on-CMOS chip micro-photonic and MOEMS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyman, Lukas W.; Okhai, Timothy; Bourouina, Tarik; Noell, Wilfried

    2011-03-01

    Advanced 3D CAD and optical simulation software were used to design first iteration on-CMOS chip MOEMS micro-systems. A Si Avalanche-based LED and an array of detectors interface laterally with a single arm canti-lever system, all to be fabricated with CMOS technology. Silicon nitride wave-guides are used as optical propagation channels offering losses of lower than 1dB.cm-1. Micro-bending and multi-planing of the wave guiding is possible. Far-field manipulation of the emitted channel radiation is possible. Mechanically designed and sensor systems can be added by means of CMOS post processing techniques. The emission level of the Si CMOS Av LEDs is 10+3 higher than the detectivity of silicon p-i-n detectors, offering good dynamic range in detection and data analyses. The mature processing characteristics of CMOS technology offers high integration possibilities and low cost manufacturing of the designed systems.

  10. Beyond CMOS: heterogeneous integration of III-V devices, RF MEMS and other dissimilar materials/devices with Si CMOS to create intelligent microsystems.

    PubMed

    Kazior, Thomas E

    2014-03-28

    Advances in silicon technology continue to revolutionize micro-/nano-electronics. However, Si cannot do everything, and devices/components based on other materials systems are required. What is the best way to integrate these dissimilar materials and to enhance the capabilities of Si, thereby continuing the micro-/nano-electronics revolution? In this paper, I review different approaches to heterogeneously integrate dissimilar materials with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In particular, I summarize results on the successful integration of III-V electronic devices (InP heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) and GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs)) with Si CMOS on a common silicon-based wafer using an integration/fabrication process similar to a SiGe BiCMOS process (BiCMOS integrates bipolar junction and CMOS transistors). Our III-V BiCMOS process has been scaled to 200 mm diameter wafers for integration with scaled CMOS and used to fabricate radio-frequency (RF) and mixed signals circuits with on-chip digital control/calibration. I also show that RF microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can be integrated onto this platform to create tunable or reconfigurable circuits. Thus, heterogeneous integration of III-V devices, MEMS and other dissimilar materials with Si CMOS enables a new class of high-performance integrated circuits that enhance the capabilities of existing systems, enable new circuit architectures and facilitate the continued proliferation of low-cost micro-/nano-electronics for a wide range of applications. PMID:24567473

  11. Beyond CMOS: heterogeneous integration of III–V devices, RF MEMS and other dissimilar materials/devices with Si CMOS to create intelligent microsystems

    PubMed Central

    Kazior, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in silicon technology continue to revolutionize micro-/nano-electronics. However, Si cannot do everything, and devices/components based on other materials systems are required. What is the best way to integrate these dissimilar materials and to enhance the capabilities of Si, thereby continuing the micro-/nano-electronics revolution? In this paper, I review different approaches to heterogeneously integrate dissimilar materials with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In particular, I summarize results on the successful integration of III–V electronic devices (InP heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) and GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs)) with Si CMOS on a common silicon-based wafer using an integration/fabrication process similar to a SiGe BiCMOS process (BiCMOS integrates bipolar junction and CMOS transistors). Our III–V BiCMOS process has been scaled to 200 mm diameter wafers for integration with scaled CMOS and used to fabricate radio-frequency (RF) and mixed signals circuits with on-chip digital control/calibration. I also show that RF microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can be integrated onto this platform to create tunable or reconfigurable circuits. Thus, heterogeneous integration of III–V devices, MEMS and other dissimilar materials with Si CMOS enables a new class of high-performance integrated circuits that enhance the capabilities of existing systems, enable new circuit architectures and facilitate the continued proliferation of low-cost micro-/nano-electronics for a wide range of applications. PMID:24567473

  12. A Single-Chip CMOS Pulse Oximeter with On-Chip Lock-In Detection

    PubMed Central

    He, Diwei; Morgan, Stephen P.; Trachanis, Dimitrios; van Hese, Jan; Drogoudis, Dimitris; Fummi, Franco; Stefanni, Francesco; Guarnieri, Valerio; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive and continuous method for monitoring the blood oxygen saturation level. This paper presents the design and testing of a single-chip pulse oximeter fabricated in a 0.35 µm CMOS process. The chip includes photodiode, transimpedance amplifier, analogue band-pass filters, analogue-to-digital converters, digital signal processor and LED timing control. The experimentally measured AC and DC characteristics of individual circuits including the DC output voltage of the transimpedance amplifier, transimpedance gain of the transimpedance amplifier, and the central frequency and bandwidth of the analogue band-pass filters, show a good match (within 1%) with the circuit simulations. With modulated light source and integrated lock-in detection the sensor effectively suppresses the interference from ambient light and 1/f noise. In a breath hold and release experiment the single chip sensor demonstrates consistent and comparable performance to commercial pulse oximetry devices with a mean of 1.2% difference. The single-chip sensor enables a compact and robust design solution that offers a route towards wearable devices for health monitoring. PMID:26184225

  13. A Single-Chip CMOS Pulse Oximeter with On-Chip Lock-In Detection.

    PubMed

    He, Diwei; Morgan, Stephen P; Trachanis, Dimitrios; van Hese, Jan; Drogoudis, Dimitris; Fummi, Franco; Stefanni, Francesco; Guarnieri, Valerio; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is a noninvasive and continuous method for monitoring the blood oxygen saturation level. This paper presents the design and testing of a single-chip pulse oximeter fabricated in a 0.35 µm CMOS process. The chip includes photodiode, transimpedance amplifier, analogue band-pass filters, analogue-to-digital converters, digital signal processor and LED timing control. The experimentally measured AC and DC characteristics of individual circuits including the DC output voltage of the transimpedance amplifier, transimpedance gain of the transimpedance amplifier, and the central frequency and bandwidth of the analogue band-pass filters, show a good match (within 1%) with the circuit simulations. With modulated light source and integrated lock-in detection the sensor effectively suppresses the interference from ambient light and 1/f noise. In a breath hold and release experiment the single chip sensor demonstrates consistent and comparable performance to commercial pulse oximetry devices with a mean of 1.2% difference. The single-chip sensor enables a compact and robust design solution that offers a route towards wearable devices for health monitoring. PMID:26184225

  14. A CMOS oscillator for radiation-hardened, low-power space electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouiklis, Georgios; Kottaras, George; Psomoulis, Athanasios; Sarris, Emmanuel

    2013-07-01

    This article presents the design, manufacturing and test results of an on-chip CMOS oscillator, using a ring-oscillator, VCO based architecture. The oscillator generates a configurable square waveform clock signal to be used internally or externally to the IC that integrates it, with very low area (320 transistors, 112 × 148 µm) and power overhead (975 µW). The oscillator is integrated in a mixed signal IC which has been qualified for space applications, at a commercial 250 nm process. It enables the standalone operation of the IC without external oscillator and gives the possibility to clock other components and systems. In addition, it reduces the noise interference at PCB and chip level, optimising the performance of sensitive analogue parts. It was validated by radiation tests according to ESA standards' procedures that the oscillator's functionality and characteristics do not deteriorate with TID levels up to 1Mrad. This approach can be easily adjusted to a wide range of frequencies, while significantly reducing the cost and power budget of space qualified systems with small design effort trade-off.

  15. High Speed, Radiation Hard CMOS Pixel Sensors for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Joseph, John; Krieger, Brad

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors are currently being established as the technology of choice for new generation digital imaging systems in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). A careful sensor design that couples μm-level pixel pitches with high frame rate readout and radiation hardness to very high electron doses enables the fabrication of direct electron detectors that are quickly revolutionizing high-resolution TEM imaging in material science and molecular biology. This paper will review the principal characteristics of this novel technology and its advantages over conventional, optically-coupled cameras, and retrace the sensor development driven by the Transmission Electron Aberration corrected Microscope (TEAM) project at the LBNL National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), illustrating in particular the imaging capabilities enabled by single electron detection at high frame rate. Further, the presentation will report on the translation of the TEAM technology to a finer feature size process, resulting in a sensor with higher spatial resolution and superior radiation tolerance currently serving as the baseline for a commercial camera system.

  16. Multiplexed Oversampling Digitizer in 65 nm CMOS for Column-Parallel CCD Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Carl; Walder, Jean-Pierre; von der Lippe, Henrik

    2012-04-10

    A digitizer designed to read out column-parallel charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used for high-speed X-ray imaging is presented. The digitizer is included as part of the High-Speed Image Preprocessor with Oversampling (HIPPO) integrated circuit. The digitizer module comprises a multiplexed, oversampling, 12-bit, 80 MS/s pipelined Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) and a bank of four fast-settling sample-and-hold amplifiers to instrument four analog channels. The ADC multiplexes and oversamples to reduce its area to allow integration that is pitch-matched to the columns of the CCD. Novel design techniques are used to enable oversampling and multiplexing with a reduced power penalty. The ADC exhibits 188 ?V-rms noise which is less than 1 LSB at a 12-bit level. The prototype is implemented in a commercially available 65 nm CMOS process. The digitizer will lead to a proof-of-principle 2D 10 Gigapixel/s X-ray detector.

  17. Laser Doppler blood flow imaging with a 64×64 pixel full custom CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D.; Nguyen, H. C.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; Zhu, Y.; Crowe, J. A.; Morgan, S. P.; Clough, G. F.; Gill, C. A.

    2011-03-01

    Full field laser Doppler perfusion imaging offers advantages over scanning laser Doppler imaging as the effects of movement artifacts are reduced. The increased frame rate allows rapid changes in blood flow to be imaged. A custom made CMOS sensor offers several advantages over commercial cameras as the design can be optimized to the detected signals. For example, laser Doppler signals are known to have a bandwidth from DC up to ~20KHz and be of a low modulation depth. Therefore a design that can amplify the AC component and have a sampling rate and an antialiasing filter appropriate to the signal bandwidth would be beneficial. An additional advantage of custom made sensors is that on-chip processing of blood flow allows the data bottleneck that exists between the photo-detector array and processing electronics to be overcome, as the processed data can be read out from the image sensor to a PC or display at a low data rate. A fully integrated 64x64 pixel array for imaging blood flow is presented. On-chip analog signal processing is used to amplify the AC component, normalize the AC signal by the DC light intensity and provide anti-aliasing. On-chip digital signal processing is used to implement the filters required to calculate blood flow. The imaging array has been incorporated into a device that has been used in a clinical setting. Results are presented demonstrating changes in blood flow in occlusion and release tests.

  18. Design considerations for a new, high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS)

    PubMed Central

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Titus, Albert; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50–1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems. PMID:24353389

  19. Design considerations for a new, high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS).

    PubMed

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Titus, Albert; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems. PMID:24353389

  20. Design considerations for a new high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Titus, Albert H.; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems.

  1. Further developments on a novel color sensitive CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-05-01

    The Transverse Field Detector (TFD) is a recently proposed Silicon pixel device designed to perform color imaging without the use of color filters. The color detection principle is based on the dependence of the Silicon absorption coefficient from the wavelength and relies on the generation of a suitable transverse electric field configuration, within the semiconductor active layer, to drive photocarriers generated at different depths towards different collecting electrodes. Each electrode has in this way a different spectral response with respect to the incoming wavelength. Pixels with three or four different spectral responses can be implemented within ~ 6 μm of pixel dimension. Thanks to the compatibility with standard triple well CMOS processes, the TFD can be used in an Active Pixel Sensor exploiting a dedicated readout topology, based on a single transistor charge amplifier. The overall APS electronics includes five transistors (5T) and a feedback capacitance, with a resulting overall fill factor around 50%. In this work the three colors and four colors TFD pixel simulations and implementations in a 90 nm standard CMOS triple well technology are described. Details on the design of a TFD APS mini matrix are provided and preliminary experimental results on four colors pixels are presented.

  2. Electronic-photonic integrated circuits on the CMOS platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimerling, L. C.; Ahn, D.; Apsel, A. B.; Beals, M.; Carothers, D.; Chen, Y.-K.; Conway, T.; Gill, D. M.; Grove, M.; Hong, C.-Y.; Lipson, M.; Liu, J.; Michel, J.; Pan, D.; Patel, S. S.; Pomerene, A. T.; Rasras, M.; Sparacin, D. K.; Tu, K.-Y.; White, A. E.; Wong, C. W.

    2006-02-01

    The optical components industry stands at the threshold of a major expansion that will restructure its business processes and sustain its profitability for the next three decades. This growth will establish a cost effective platform for the partitioning of electronic and photonic functionality to extend the processing power of integrated circuits. BAE Systems, Lucent Technologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Applied Wave Research are participating in a high payoff research and development program for the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) of DARPA. The goal of the program is the development of technologies and design tools necessary to fabricate an application-specific, electronicphotonic integrated circuit (AS-EPIC). As part of the development of this demonstration platform we are exploring selected functions normally associated with the front end of mixed signal receivers such as modulation, detection, and filtering. The chip will be fabricated in the BAE Systems CMOS foundry and at MIT's Microphotonics Center. We will present the latest results on the performance of multi-layer deposited High Index Contrast Waveguides, CMOS compatible modulators and detectors, and optical filter slices. These advances will be discussed in the context of the Communications Technology Roadmap that was recently released by the MIT Microphotonics Center Industry Consortium.

  3. Custom CMOS Reed Solomon coder for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Cameron, K.; Owsley, P.; Maki, G.

    1990-01-01

    A VLSI coder is presented that can function either as an encoder or decoder for Reed-Solomon codes. VLSI is one approach to implementing high-performance Reed-Solomon decoders. There are three VLSI technologies that could be used: gate arrays, standard cells, and full custom. The first two approaches are relatively easy to implement, but are limited in both performance and density. Full-custom VLSI is used to achieve both circuit density and speed, and allows control of the amount of interconnect. Speed, which is a function of capacitance, which is a function of interconnect, is an important parameter in high-performance VLSI. A single 8.2 mm x 8.4 mm, 200,000 transistor CMOS chip implementation of the Reed-Solomon code required by the Hubble Space Telescope is reported. The chip features a 10-MHz sustained byte rate independent of error pattern. The 1.6-micron CMOS integrated circuit has complete decoder and encoder functions and uses a single data/system clock. Block lengths up to 255 bytes and shortened codes are supported with no external buffering. Erasure corrections and random error corrections are supported with programmable correction of up to 10 symbol errors. Correction time is independent of error pattern and the number of errors in the incoming message.

  4. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-16

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature. PMID:26871255

  5. Single phase dynamic CMOS PLA using charge sharing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhong, Y. B.; Tsang, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    A single phase dynamic CMOS NOR-NOR programmable logic array (PLA) using triggered decoders and charge sharing techniques for high speed and low power is presented. By using the triggered decoder technique, the ground switches are eliminated, thereby, making this new design much faster and lower power dissipation than conventional PLA's. By using the charge-sharing technique in a dynamic CMOS NOR structure, a cascading AND gate can be implemented. The proposed PLA's are presented with a delay-time of 15.95 and 18.05 nsec, respectively, which compare with a conventional single phase PLA with 35.5 nsec delay-time. For a typical example of PLA like the Signetics 82S100 with 16 inputs, 48 input minterms (m) and 8 output minterms (n), the 2-SOP PLA using the triggered 2-bit decoder is 2.23 times faster and has 2.1 times less power dissipation than the conventional PLA. These results are simulated using maximum drain current of 600 micro-A, gate length of 2.0 micron, V sub DD of 5 V, the capacitance of an input miniterm of 1600 fF, and the capacitance of an output minterm of 1500 fF.

  6. CMOS-TDI detector technology for reconnaissance application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Reulke, Ralf; Jung, Melanie; Sengebusch, Karsten

    2014-10-01

    The Institute of Optical Sensor Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the institute's scientific results of the leading-edge detector design CMOS in a TDI (Time Delay and Integration) architecture. This project includes the technological design of future high or multi-spectral resolution spaceborne instruments and the possibility of higher integration. DLR OS and the Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems (IMS) in Duisburg were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for future projects, new manufacturing accuracy and on-chip processing capability in order to keep pace with the ambitious scientific and user requirements. In combination with the engineering research, the current generation of space borne sensor systems is focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large-swath and high-spectral resolution with intelligent synchronization control, fast-readout ADC (analog digital converter) chains and new focal-plane concepts opens the door to new remote-sensing and smart deep-space instruments. The paper gives an overview of the detector development status and verification program at DLR, as well as of new control possibilities for CMOS-TDI detectors in synchronization control mode.

  7. Illumination robust change detection with CMOS imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, Vijay; Gupta, Sheetal B.; Rajagopalan, A. N.; Seetharaman, Guna

    2015-05-01

    Change detection between two images in the presence of degradations is an important problem in the computer vision community, more so for the aerial scenario which is particularly challenging. Cameras mounted on moving platforms such as aircrafts or drones are subject to general six-dimensional motion as the motion is not restricted to a single plane. With CMOS cameras increasingly in vogue due to their low power consumption, the inevitability of rolling-shutter (RS) effect adds to the challenge. This is caused by sequential exposure of rows in CMOS cameras unlike conventional global shutter cameras where all pixels are exposed simultaneously. The RS effect is particularly pronounced in aerial imaging since each row of the imaging sensor is likely to experience a different motion. For fast-moving platforms, the problem is further compounded since the rows are also affected by motion blur. Moreover, since the two images are shot at different times, illumination differences are common. In this paper, we propose a unified computational framework that elegantly exploits the scarcity constraint to deal with the problem of change detection in images degraded by RS effect, motion blur as well as non-global illumination differences. We formulate an optimization problem where each row of the distorted image is approximated as a weighted sum of the corresponding rows in warped versions of the reference image due to camera motion within the exposure period to account for geometric as well as photometric differences. The method has been validated on both synthetic and real data.

  8. 3-D perpendicular assembly of SWNTs for CMOS interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yilmaz, Cihan; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Due to their superior electrical properties such as high current density and ballistic transport, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are considered as a potential candidate for future very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects. However, direct incorporation of CNTs into a complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) architecture by the conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth method is problematic because it requires high temperatures that might damage insulators and doped semiconductors in the underlying CMOS circuits. In this paper, we present a directed assembly method to assemble aligned CNTs into pre-patterned vias perpendicular to the substrate. A dynamic electric field with a static offset is applied to provide the force needed for directing the SWNT assembly. It is also shown that by adjusting assembly parameters the density of the assembled CNTs can be significantly enhanced. This highly scalable directed assembly method is conducted at room temperature and pressure and is accomplished in a few minutes. I-V characterization of the assembled CNTs was conducted using a Zyvex nanomanipulator in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the measured value of the resistance was 270 kΩs.

  9. CMOS: efficient clustered data monitoring in sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Tiny and smart sensors enable applications that access a network of hundreds or thousands of sensors. Thus, recently, many researchers have paid attention to wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The limitation of energy is critical since most sensors are battery-powered and it is very difficult to replace batteries in cases that sensor networks are utilized outdoors. Data transmission between sensor nodes needs more energy than computation in a sensor node. In order to reduce the energy consumption of sensors, we present an approximate data gathering technique, called CMOS, based on the Kalman filter. The goal of CMOS is to efficiently obtain the sensor readings within a certain error bound. In our approach, spatially close sensors are grouped as a cluster. Since a cluster header generates approximate readings of member nodes, a user query can be answered efficiently using the cluster headers. In addition, we suggest an energy efficient clustering method to distribute the energy consumption of cluster headers. Our simulation results with synthetic data demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of our proposed technique. PMID:24459444

  10. Reliability issue on pipeline defects in CMOS memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, So; Terrell, Kyle; Wu, Chau-Chin; Shy, Paul; Lien, Chuen-Der

    1996-09-01

    Pipeline defects have recently been reported in a leakage source of CMOS devices when die shrink. We report the observed physical defects which shorted source and drain under .6 u short channel CMOS devices by the Wright-etching of the defective devices. We also found pipeline defects filled with phosphorous doped n-type material by the cross- sectioning of the pipeline in the channel of NMOS transistor. We also observed that devices are failing during high temperature reliability test, which causes single bit failure. This indicates that there are many potential defective die to reach assembly process even though most of detectives are discarded at wafer sort. SEM analysis identifies that location of defective parts is decorated with a pair of protruding holes at the 90 degree corner of field island of faulty pass-gate of SRAM. These pipeline defects are caused mainly by the compressed stress from field oxide. Reliability and yield have been improved since the pipeline were minimized after relieving stress on pass- gate.

  11. 3D integration of sub-surface photonics with CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Bahram; Indukuri, Tejaswi; Koonath, Prakash

    2006-02-01

    The integration of photonics and electronics on a single silicon substrate requires technologies that can add optical functionalities without significantly sacrificing valuable wafer area. To this end, we have developed an innovative fabrication process, called SIMOX 3-D Sculpting, that enables monolithic optoelectronic integration in a manner that does not compromise the economics of CMOS manufacturing. In this technique, photonic devices are realized in subsurface silicon layers that are separated from the surface silicon layer by an intervening SiO II layer. The surface silicon layer may then be utilized for electronic circuitry. SIMOX 3-D sculpting involves (1) the implantation of oxygen ions into a patterned silicon substrate followed by (2) high temperature anneal to create buried waveguide-based photonic devices. This process has produced subterranean microresonators with unloaded quality factors of 8000 and extinction ratios >20dB. On the surface silicon layers, MOS transistor structures have been fabricated. The small cross-sectional area of the waveguides lends itself to the realization of nonlinear optical devices. We have previously demonstrated spectral broadening and continuum generation in silicon waveguides utilizing Kerr optical nonlinearity. This may be combined with microresonator filters for on-chip supercontiuum generation and spectral carving. The monolithic integration of CMOS circuits and optical modulators with such multi-wavelength sources represent an exciting avenue for silicon photonics.

  12. Smart CMOS image sensor for lightning detection and imaging.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Sébastien; Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Molina, Romain; Tulet, Michel; Bréart-de-Boisanger, Michel; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Guiry, Saïprasad; Larnaudie, Franck; Leone, Bruno; Perez-Cuevas, Leticia; Zayer, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We present a CMOS image sensor dedicated to lightning detection and imaging. The detector has been designed to evaluate the potentiality of an on-chip lightning detection solution based on a smart sensor. This evaluation is performed in the frame of the predevelopment phase of the lightning detector that will be implemented in the Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite for the European Space Agency. The lightning detection process is performed by a smart detector combining an in-pixel frame-to-frame difference comparison with an adjustable threshold and on-chip digital processing allowing an efficient localization of a faint lightning pulse on the entire large format array at a frequency of 1 kHz. A CMOS prototype sensor with a 256×256 pixel array and a 60 μm pixel pitch has been fabricated using a 0.35 μm 2P 5M technology and tested to validate the selected detection approach. PMID:23458812

  13. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  14. CMOS low data rate imaging method based on compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Long-long; Liu, Kun; Han, Da-peng

    2012-07-01

    Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology enables the integration of image sensing and image compression processing, making improvements on overall system performance possible. We present a CMOS low data rate imaging approach by implementing compressed sensing (CS). On the basis of the CS framework, the image sensor projects the image onto a separable two-dimensional (2D) basis set and measures the corresponding coefficients obtained. First, the electrical current output from the pixels in a column are combined, with weights specified by voltage, in accordance with Kirchhoff's law. The second computation is performed in an analog vector-matrix multiplier (VMM). Each element of the VMM considers the total value of each column as the input and multiplies it by a unique coefficient. Both weights and coefficients are reprogrammable through analog floating-gate (FG) transistors. The image can be recovered from a percentage of these measurements using an optimization algorithm. The percentage, which can be altered flexibly by programming on the hardware circuit, determines the image compression ratio. These novel designs facilitate image compression during the image-capture phase before storage, and have the potential to reduce power consumption. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves a large image compression ratio and ensures imaging quality.

  15. Scanning probe lithography approach for beyond CMOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Zahid; Jones, Mervyn; Kaestner, Marcus; Hofer, Manuel; Guliyev, Elshad; Ahmad, Ahmad; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Zoellner, Jens-Peter; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2013-03-01

    As present CMOS devices approach technological and physical limits at the sub-10 nm scale, a `beyond CMOS' information-processing technology is necessary for timescales beyond the semiconductor technology roadmap. This requires new approaches to logic and memory devices, and to associated lithographic processes. At the sub-5 nm scale, a technology platform based on a combination of high-resolution scanning probe lithography (SPL) and nano-imprint lithography (NIL) is regarded as a promising candidate for both resolution and high throughput production. The practical application of quantum-effect devices, such as room temperature single-electron and quantum-dot devices, then becomes feasible. This paper considers lithographic and device approaches to such a `single nanometer manufacturing' technology. We consider the application of scanning probes, capable of imaging, probing of material properties and lithography at the single nanometer scale. Modified scanning probes are used to pattern molecular glass based resist materials, where the small particle size (<1 nm) and mono-disperse nature leads to more uniform and smaller lithographic pixel size. We also review the current status of single-electron and quantum dot devices capable of room-temperature operation, and discuss the requirements for these devices with regards to practical application.

  16. CMOS prototype for retinal prosthesis applications with analog processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Cabrera, G.; García-Lamont, J.; Reyes-Barranca, M. A.; Matsumoto-Kuwabara, Y.; Moreno-Cadenas, J. A.; Flores-Nava, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    A core architecture for analog processing, which emulates a retina's receptive field, is presented in this work. A model was partially implemented and built on CMOS standard technology through MOSIS. It considers that the receptive field is the basic unit for image processing in the visual system. That is why the design is concerned on a partial solution of receptive field properties in order to be adapted in the future as an aid to people with retinal diseases. A receptive field is represented by an array of 3×3 pixels. Each pixel carries out a process based on four main operations. This means that image processing is developed at pixel level. Operations involved are: (1) photo-transduction by photocurrent integration, (2) signal averaging from eight neighbouring pixels executed by a neu-NMOS (ν-NMOS) neuron, (3) signal average gradient between central pixel and the average value from the eight neighbouring pixels (this gradient is performed by a comparator) and finally (4) a pulse generator. Each one of these operations gives place to circuital blocks which were built on 0.5 μm CMOS technology.

  17. A CMOS active pixel sensor for retinal stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prydderch, Mark L.; French, Marcus J.; Mathieson, Keith; Adams, Christopher; Gunning, Deborah; Laudanski, Jonathan; Morrison, James D.; Moodie, Alan R.; Sinclair, James

    2006-02-01

    Degenerative photoreceptor diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the most common causes of blindness in the western world. A potential cure is to use a microelectronic retinal prosthesis to provide electrical stimulation to the remaining healthy retinal cells. We describe a prototype CMOS Active Pixel Sensor capable of detecting a visual scene and translating it into a train of electrical pulses for stimulation of the retina. The sensor consists of a 10 x 10 array of 100 micron square pixels fabricated on a 0.35 micron CMOS process. Light incident upon each pixel is converted into output current pulse trains with a frequency related to the light intensity. These outputs are connected to a biocompatible microelectrode array for contact to the retinal cells. The flexible design allows experimentation with signal amplitudes and frequencies in order to determine the most appropriate stimulus for the retina. Neural processing in the retina can be studied by using the sensor in conjunction with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programmed to behave as a neural network. The sensor has been integrated into a test system designed for studying retinal response. We present the most recent results obtained from this sensor.

  18. IR CMOS: near infrared enhanced digital imaging (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Carey, James E.; Joy, Thomas; Vineis, Chris J.; Palsule, Chintamani

    2015-08-01

    SiOnyx has demonstrated imaging at light levels below 1 mLux (moonless starlight) at video frame rates with a 720P CMOS image sensor in a compact, low latency camera. Low light imaging is enabled by the combination of enhanced quantum efficiency in the near infrared together with state of the art low noise image sensor design. The quantum efficiency enhancements are achieved by applying Black Silicon, SiOnyx's proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor processing technology. In the near infrared, silicon's native indirect bandgap results in low absorption coefficients and long absorption lengths. The Black Silicon nanostructured layer fundamentally disrupts this paradigm by enhancing the absorption of light within a thin pixel layer making 5 microns of silicon equivalent to over 300 microns of standard silicon. This results in a demonstrate 10 fold improvements in near infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Applications include surveillance, nightvision, and 1064nm laser see spot. Imaging performance metrics will be discussed. Demonstrated performance characteristics: Pixel size : 5.6 and 10 um Array size: 720P/1.3Mpix Frame rate: 60 Hz Read noise: 2 ele/pixel Spectral sensitivity: 400 to 1200 nm (with 10x QE at 1064nm) Daytime imaging: color (Bayer pattern) Nighttime imaging: moonless starlight conditions 1064nm laser imaging: daytime imaging out to 2Km

  19. CMOS: Efficient Clustered Data Monitoring in Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tiny and smart sensors enable applications that access a network of hundreds or thousands of sensors. Thus, recently, many researchers have paid attention to wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The limitation of energy is critical since most sensors are battery-powered and it is very difficult to replace batteries in cases that sensor networks are utilized outdoors. Data transmission between sensor nodes needs more energy than computation in a sensor node. In order to reduce the energy consumption of sensors, we present an approximate data gathering technique, called CMOS, based on the Kalman filter. The goal of CMOS is to efficiently obtain the sensor readings within a certain error bound. In our approach, spatially close sensors are grouped as a cluster. Since a cluster header generates approximate readings of member nodes, a user query can be answered efficiently using the cluster headers. In addition, we suggest an energy efficient clustering method to distribute the energy consumption of cluster headers. Our simulation results with synthetic data demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of our proposed technique. PMID:24459444

  20. High-stage analog accumulator for TDI CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianxin, Li; Fujun, Huang; Yong, Zong; Jing, Gao

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the parasitic phenomenon on the performance of the analog accumulator in TDI CMOS image sensor is analyzed and resolved. A 128-stage optimized accumulator based on 0.18-μm one-poly four-metal 3.3 V CMOS technology is designed and simulated. A charge injection effect from the top plate sampling is employed to compensate the un-eliminated parasitics based on the accumulator with a decoupling switch, and then a calibration circuit is designed to restrain the mismatch and Process, Voltage and Temperature (PVT) variations. The post layout simulation indicates that the improved SNR of the accumulator upgrades from 17.835 to 21.067 dB, while an ideal value is 21.072 dB. In addition, the linearity of the accumulator is 99.62%. The simulation results of two extreme cases and Monte Carlo show that the mismatch and PVT variations are restrained by the calibration circuit. Furthermore, it is promising to design a higher stage accumulator based on the proposed structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61404090, 61434004).

  1. CMOS mm-wave transceivers for Gbps wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoyong, Chi; Zheng, Song; Lixue, Kuang; Haikun, Jia; Xiangyu, Meng; Zhihua, Wang

    2016-07-01

    The challenges in the design of CMOS millimeter-wave (mm-wave) transceiver for Gbps wireless communication are discussed. To support the Gbps data rate, the link bandwidth of the receiver/transmitter must be wide enough, which puts a lot of pressure on the mm-wave front-end as well as on the baseband circuit. This paper discusses the effects of the limited link bandwidth on the transceiver system performance and overviews the bandwidth expansion techniques for mm-wave amplifiers and IF programmable gain amplifier. Furthermore, dual-mode power amplifier (PA) and self-healing technique are introduced to improve the PA's average efficiency and to deal with the process, voltage, and temperature variation issue, respectively. Several fully-integrated CMOS mm-wave transceivers are also presented to give a short overview on the state-of-the-art mm-wave transceivers. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61331003).

  2. A Low-Cost CMOS Programmable Temperature Switch

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunlong; Wu, Nanjian

    2008-01-01

    A novel uncalibrated CMOS programmable temperature switch with high temperature accuracy is presented. Its threshold temperature Tth can be programmed by adjusting the ratios of width and length of the transistors. The operating principles of the temperature switch circuit is theoretically explained. A floating gate neural MOS circuit is designed to compensate automatically the threshold temperature Tth variation that results form the process tolerance. The switch circuit is implemented in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process. The temperature switch can be programmed to perform the switch operation at 16 different threshold temperature Tths from 45—120°C with a 5°C increment. The measurement shows a good consistency in the threshold temperatures. The chip core area is 0.04 mm2 and power consumption is 3.1 μA at 3.3V power supply. The advantages of the temperature switch are low power consumption, the programmable threshold temperature and the controllable hysteresis.

  3. Large CMOS imager using hadamard transform based multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Wadsworth, Mark V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a concept design for a large (10k x 10k) CMOS imaging array whose elements are grouped in small subarrays with N pixels in each. The subarrays are code-division multiplexed using the Hadamard Transform (HT) based encoding. The Hadamard code improves the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio to the reference of the read-out amplifier by a factor of N^1/2. This way of grouping pixels reduces the number of hybridization bumps by N. A single chip layout has been designed and the architecture of the imager has been developed to accommodate the HT base multiplexing into the existing CMOS technology. The imager architecture allows for a trade-off between the speed and the sensitivity. The envisioned imager would operate at a speed >100 fps with the pixel noise < 20 e-. The power dissipation would be 100 pW/pixe1. The combination of the large format, high speed, high sensitivity and low power dissipation can be very attractive for space reconnaissance applications.

  4. A CMOS Imager with Focal Plane Compression using Predictive Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon-Salas, Walter D.; Balkir, Sina; Sayood, Khalid; Schemm, Nathan; Hoffman, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a CMOS image sensor with focal-plane compression. The design has a column-level architecture and it is based on predictive coding techniques for image decorrelation. The prediction operations are performed in the analog domain to avoid quantization noise and to decrease the area complexity of the circuit, The prediction residuals are quantized and encoded by a joint quantizer/coder circuit. To save area resources, the joint quantizerlcoder circuit exploits common circuitry between a single-slope analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and a Golomb-Rice entropy coder. This combination of ADC and encoder allows the integration of the entropy coder at the column level. A prototype chip was fabricated in a 0.35 pm CMOS process. The output of the chip is a compressed bit stream. The test chip occupies a silicon area of 2.60 mm x 5.96 mm which includes an 80 X 44 APS array. Tests of the fabricated chip demonstrate the validity of the design.

  5. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging. PMID:20728336

  6. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  7. Monolithic integration of high bandwidth waveguide coupled Ge photodiode in a photonic BiCMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischke, S.; Knoll, D.; Zimmermann, L.

    2015-03-01

    Monolithic integration of photonic functionality in the frontend-of-line (FEOL) of an advanced microelectronics technology is a key step towards future communication applications. This combines photonic components such as waveguides, couplers, modulators, and photo detectors with high-speed electronics plus shortest possible interconnects crucial for high-speed performance. Integration of photonics into CMOS FEOL is therefore in development for quite some time reaching 90nm node recently [1]. However, an alternative to CMOS is high-performance BiCMOS, offering significant advantages for integrated photonics-electronics applications with regard to cost and RF performance. We already presented results of FEOL integration of photonic components in a high-performance SiGe:C BiCMOS baseline to establish a novel, photonic BiCMOS process. Process cornerstone is a local-SOI approach which allows us to fabricate SOI-based, thus low-loss photonic components in a bulk BiCMOS environment [2]. A monolithically integrated 10Gbit/sec Silicon modulator with driver was shown here [3]. A monolithically integrated 25Gbps receiver was presented in [4], consisting of 200GHz bipolar transistors and CMOS devices, low-loss waveguides, couplers, and highspeed Ge photo diodes showing 3-dB bandwidth of 35GHz, internal responsivity of more than 0.6A/W at λ= 1.55μm, and ~ 50nA dark current at 1V. However, the BiCMOS-given thermal steps cause a significant smearing of the Germanium photo diodes doping profile, limiting the photo diode performance. Therefore, we introduced implantation of non-doping elements to overcome such limiting factors, resulting in photo diode bandwidths of more than 50GHz even under the effect of thermal steps necessary when the diodes are integrated in a high performance BiCMOS process.

  8. Delta-Doped Back-Illuminated CMOS Imaging Arrays: Progress and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Jones, Todd J.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Greer, Frank; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the latest results on our development of delta-doped, thinned, back-illuminated CMOS imaging arrays. As with charge-coupled devices, thinning and back-illumination are essential to the development of high performance CMOS imaging arrays. Problems with back surface passivation have emerged as critical to the prospects for incorporating CMOS imaging arrays into high performance scientific instruments, just as they did for CCDs over twenty years ago. In the early 1990's, JPL developed delta-doped CCDs, in which low temperature molecular beam epitaxy was used to form an ideal passivation layer on the silicon back surface. Comprising only a few nanometers of highly-doped epitaxial silicon, delta-doping achieves the stability and uniformity that are essential for high performance imaging and spectroscopy. Delta-doped CCDs were shown to have high, stable, and uniform quantum efficiency across the entire spectral range from the extreme ultraviolet through the near infrared. JPL has recently bump-bonded thinned, delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays to a CMOS readout, and demonstrated imaging. Delta-doped CMOS devices exhibit the high quantum efficiency that has become the standard for scientific-grade CCDs. Together with new circuit designs for low-noise readout currently under development, delta-doping expands the potential scientific applications of CMOS imaging arrays, and brings within reach important new capabilities, such as fast, high-sensitivity imaging with parallel readout and real-time signal processing. It remains to demonstrate manufacturability of delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays. To that end, JPL has acquired a new silicon MBE and ancillary equipment for delta-doping wafers up to 200mm in diameter, and is now developing processes for high-throughput, high yield delta-doping of fully-processed wafers with CCD and CMOS imaging devices.

  9. High-performance VGA-resolution digital color CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agwani, Suhail; Domer, Steve; Rubacha, Ray; Stanley, Scott

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses the performance of a new VGA resolution color CMOS imager developed by Motorola on a 0.5micrometers /3.3V CMOS process. This fully integrated, high performance imager has on chip timing, control, and analog signal processing chain for digital imaging applications. The picture elements are based on 7.8micrometers active CMOS pixels that use pinned photodiodes for higher quantum efficiency and low noise performance. The image processing engine includes a bank of programmable gain amplifiers, line rate clamping for dark offset removal, real time auto white balancing, per column gain and offset calibration, and a 10 bit pipelined RSD analog to digital converter with a programmable input range. Post ADC signal processing includes features such as bad pixel replacement based on user defined thresholds levels, 10 to 8 bit companding and 5 tap FIR filtering. The sensor can be programmed via a standard I2C interface that runs on 3.3V clocks. Programmable features include variable frame rates using a constant frequency master clock, electronic exposure control, continuous or single frame capture, progressive or interlace scanning modes. Each pixel is individually addressable allowing region of interest imaging and image subsampling. The sensor operates with master clock frequencies of up to 13.5MHz resulting in 30FPS. A total programmable gain of 27dB is available. The sensor power dissipation is 400mW at full speed of operation. The low noise design yields a measured 'system on a chip' dynamic range of 50dB thus giving over 8 true bits of resolution. Extremely high conversion gain result in an excellent peak sensitivity of 22V/(mu) J/cm2 or 3.3V/lux-sec. This monolithic image capture and processing engine represent a compete imaging solution making it a true 'camera on a chip'. Yet in its operation it remains extremely easy to use requiring only one clock and a 3.3V power supply. Given the available features and performance levels, this sensor will be

  10. Steps toward fabricating cryogenic CMOS compatible single electron devices for future qubits.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Childs, Kenton David; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Tracy, Lisa A.; Eng, Kevin; Stevens, Jeffrey; Nordberg, Eric; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Lilly, Michael Patrick

    2008-08-01

    We describe the development of a novel silicon quantum bit (qubit) device architecture that involves using materials that are compatible with a Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) 0.35 mum complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process intended to operate at 100 mK. We describe how the qubit structure can be integrated with CMOS electronics, which is believed to have advantages for critical functions like fast single electron electrometry for readout compared to current approaches using radio frequency techniques. Critical materials properties are reviewed and preliminary characterization of the SNL CMOS devices at 4.2 K is presented.

  11. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Nan; Cheung, Ka Wai; Wong, Hiu Tung; Ho, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art. PMID:25365460

  12. Future directions for CMOS device technology development from a system application perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Tak H.

    2007-03-01

    The development of CMOS technology has been, and will remain, driven by system needs. Traditionally, these needs have been met quite satisfactorily by simply reducing the physical size of the transistors as guided by the MOSFET scaling theory and increasing the chip-level integration density as anticipated from "Moore's Law." Now that CMOS has reached its scaling limits, continued progress has to come from innovations beyond the traditional development paths, guided by anticipating and addressing system designers' concerns and needs. In this talk, we examine several opportunities for extending current CMOS technology to continue satisfying the needs of system designers.

  13. Top-Down CMOS-NEMS Polysilicon Nanowire with Piezoresistive Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Marigó, Eloi; Sansa, Marc; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Barniol, Núria

    2015-01-01

    A top-down clamped-clamped beam integrated in a CMOS technology with a cross section of 500 nm × 280 nm has been electrostatic actuated and sensed using two different transduction methods: capacitive and piezoresistive. The resonator made from a single polysilicon layer has a fundamental in-plane resonance at 27 MHz. Piezoresistive transduction avoids the effect of the parasitic capacitance assessing the capability to use it and enhance the CMOS-NEMS resonators towards more efficient oscillator. The displacement derived from the capacitive transduction allows to compute the gauge factor for the polysilicon material available in the CMOS technology. PMID:26184222

  14. The GBT-SerDes ASIC prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, P.; Baron, S.; Bonacini, S.; Cobanoglu, O.; Faccio, F.; Feger, S.; Francisco, R.; Gui, P.; Li, J.; Marchioro, A.; Paillard, C.; Porret, D.; Wyllie, K.

    2010-11-01

    In the framework of the GigaBit Transceiver project (GBT), a prototype, the GBT-SerDes ASIC, was developed, fabricated and tested. To sustain high radiation doses while operating at 4.8Gb/s, the ASIC was fabricated in a commercial 130 nm CMOS technology employing radiation tolerant techniques and circuits. The transceiver serializes-deserializes the data, Reed-Solomon encodes and decodes the data and scrambles and descrambles the data for transmission over optical fibre links. This paper describes the GBT-SerDes architecture, and presents the test results.

  15. Triple inverter pierce oscillator circuit suitable for CMOS

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf; Kurt O.

    2007-02-27

    An oscillator circuit is disclosed which can be formed using discrete field-effect transistors (FETs), or as a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit. The oscillator circuit utilizes a Pierce oscillator design with three inverter stages connected in series. A feedback resistor provided in a feedback loop about a second inverter stage provides an almost ideal inverting transconductance thereby allowing high-Q operation at the resonator-controlled frequency while suppressing a parasitic oscillation frequency that is inherent in a Pierce configuration using a "standard" triple inverter for the sustaining amplifier. The oscillator circuit, which operates in a range of 10 50 MHz, has applications for use as a clock in a microprocessor and can also be used for sensor applications.

  16. An Approach for Self-Timed Synchronous CMOS Circuit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Alvernon; Lala, Parag K.

    2001-01-01

    In this letter we present a timing and control strategy that can be used to realize synchronous systems with a level of performance that approaches that of asynchronous circuits or systems. This approach is based upon a single-phase synchronous circuit/system architecture with a variable period clock. The handshaking signals required for asynchronous self-timed circuits are not needed. Dynamic power supply current monitoring is used to generate the timing information, that is comparable to the completion signal found in self-timed circuits; this timing information is used to modi@ the circuit clock period. This letter is concluded with an example of the proposed approach applied to a static CMOS ripple-carry adder.

  17. A 20 MHz CMOS reorder buffer for a superscalar microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenell, John; Wallace, Steve; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    1992-01-01

    Superscalar processors can achieve increased performance by issuing instructions out-of-order from the original sequential instruction stream. Implementing an out-of-order instruction issue policy requires a hardware mechanism to prevent incorrectly executed instructions from updating register values. A reorder buffer can be used to allow a superscalar processor to issue instructions out-of-order and maintain program correctness. This paper describes the design and implementation of a 20MHz CMOS reorder buffer for superscalar processors. The reorder buffer is designed to accept and retire two instructions per cycle. A full-custom layout in 1.2 micron has been implemented, measuring 1.1058 mm by 1.3542 mm.

  18. Characteristic of e2v CMOS sensors for astronomical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiang-Yu; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Geary, John C.; Amato, Stephen M.; Pratlong, Jerome; Pike, Andrew; Jordan, Paul; Lehner, Matthew J.

    2014-07-01

    We report the testing result of e2v CIS 107 CMOS sensor for temperature from 300K to 170K. The CIS 107 sensor is a prototype device with 10 different variations of pixel designs. The sensor has 1500 × 2000, 7 μm pixels with 4 outputs. Each variation covers 1500 × 200 pixels. These are 4T pixels with high resistivity epitaxial silicon and back thinned to 11μm. At room temperature, the several variants of pixels show peak QE higher than 90%, readout noise around 5e- and dark current around 50e-/s/pix. The full well is about 15000 e- due to the limitation of the transfer gate capacitor. The CIS 107 device was further characterized at different device temperatures from 170K to 300K. The readout noise decreases and the full well increases as the device is operated at lower temperature.

  19. Rapid Bacterial Detection via an All-Electronic CMOS Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Nikkhoo, Nasim; Cumby, Nichole; Gulak, P Glenn; Maxwell, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The timely and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases is one of the greatest challenges currently facing modern medicine. The development of innovative techniques for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens in point-of-care facilities using low-cost, portable instruments is essential. We have developed a novel all-electronic biosensor that is able to identify bacteria in less than ten minutes. This technology exploits bacteriocins, protein toxins naturally produced by bacteria, as the selective biological detection element. The bacteriocins are integrated with an array of potassium-selective sensors in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor technology to provide an inexpensive bacterial biosensor. An electronic platform connects the CMOS sensor to a computer for processing and real-time visualization. We have used this technology to successfully identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in human infections. PMID:27618185

  20. Variation in SEU sensitivity of dose-imprinted CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Stassinopoulos, E.G. ); Brucker, G.S. ); Van Gunten, O. ); Kim, H.S. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study of dose-induced changes in SEU sensitivity of CMOS static RAMs. Two time-regimes were investigated following exposure of memories to Cobalt-60 gamma rays: the near term within a few hours after exposure, and the long term, after many days. Samples were irradiated both at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The latter procedure was used in order to freeze-in the damage state until SEU measurements could be made before annealing would take place. Results show that memories damaged by dose are more sensitive to upsets by heavy ions. The induced changes are substantial: threshold linear energy transfer (LET) values decreased by as much as 46% and asymptotic cross sections increased by factors of 2 to 4 (unannealed samples).

  1. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The 250 C, 200C and 125C accelerated tests are described. The wear-out distributions from the 250 and 200 C tests were used to estimate the activation energy between the two test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear-out region. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three devices types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment is assessed. Guidlines for the development of accelerated life-test conditions are proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life-test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits is described.

  2. Variation in SEU sensitivity of dose-imprinted CMOS SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Brucker, G. J.; Van Gunten, O.; Kim, H. S.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report on an experimental study of dose-induced changes in SEU (single-event-upset) sensitivity of CMOS static RAMs. Two time regimes were investigated following exposure of memories to cobalt-60 gamma rays: the near term, within a few hours after exposure, and the long term, after many days. Samples were irradiated both at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures. The latter procedure was used in order to freeze in the damage state until SEU measurements could be made prior to annealing. Results show that memories damaged by dose are more sensitive to upsets by heavy ions. The induced changes are substantial: threshold linear energy transfer (LET) values decreased by as much as 46 percent and asymptotic cross sections increased by factors of two to four (unannealed samples).

  3. Single event upset in irradiated 16k CMOS SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Axness, C.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Winokur, P.S.; Browning, J.S.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Koga, R.

    1988-12-01

    The Single Event Upset (SEU) characteristics of a CMOS SRAM cell irradiated under conditions that simulate the total-dose degradation anticipated in space applications are experimentally and theoretically investigated. Simulations of SEU sensitivity utilizing a 2D circuit/device simulator, with measured transistor threshold-voltage shifts and mobility degradations as inputs, are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data at high total dose. Both simulation and experiment show a strong SRAM cell SEU imbalance, resulting in a more SEU tolerant preferred state and a less tolerant non-preferred state. The resulting cell imbalance causes an overall degradation in SEU immunity which increases with increasing total dose and which should be taken into account in SEU testing and part characterization.

  4. CMOS APS detector characterization for quantitative X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Oliva, Piernicola; Golosio, Bruno; Delogu, Pasquale

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Imaging detector based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor and structured scintillator is characterized for quantitative X-ray imaging in the energy range 11-30 keV. Linearity, dark noise, spatial resolution and flat-field correction are the characteristics of the detector subject of investigation. The detector response, in terms of mean Analog-to-Digital Unit and noise, is modeled as a function of the energy and intensity of the X-rays. The model is directly tested using monochromatic X-ray beams and it is also indirectly validated by means of polychromatic X-ray-tube spectra. Such a characterization is suitable for quantitative X-ray imaging and the model can be used in simulation studies that take into account the actual performance of the detector.

  5. Novel CMOS readout techniques for uncooled pyroelectric IR FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tai-Ping; Chin, Yuan-Lung; Chung, Wen-Yaw; Hsiung, Shen-Kan; Chou, Jung-Chuan

    1998-09-01

    Based on the application of the source follower per detector (SFD) input biasing technique, a new redout structure for the IR focal-plane-array (FPA), called the variable gain source follower per detector (VGSFD) is proposed and analyzed. The readout circuit of VGSFD of a unit cell of pyroelectric sensor under investigation, is composed of a source follower per detector circuit, high gain amplifier, and the reset switch. The VGSFD readout chip has been designed in 0.5 micrometers double-poly-double-metal n-well CMOS technology in various formats from 8 by 8 to 128 by 128. The experimental 8 by 8 VGSFD measurement results of the fabricated readout chip at room temperature have successfully verified both the readout function and performance. The high gain, low power, high sensitivity readout performances are achieved in a 50 by 50 micrometers (superscript 2) pixel size.

  6. A portable swappable method scientific CMOS image data storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-long; Pi, Hai-feng; Hu, Bing-liang; Gao, Jia-rui

    2015-11-01

    In the field of deep space exploration, the detector needs high-speed data real-time transmission and large capacity storage. SATA(Serial advanced technology attachment) as a new generation of interface protocols, SATA interface hard disk has the advantages of with large storage capacity, high transmission rate, the cheap price, data is not lost when power supply drop, so it is suitable for used in high speed large capacity data storage system. This paper by using Kintex-7 XCE7K325T XILINK series FPGA, the data of scientific CMOS CIS2521F through the SATA controller is stored in the hard disk. If the hard disk storage is full, it will automatically switch to the next hard disk.

  7. Reliability Considerations of ULP Scaled CMOS in Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark; MacNeal, Kristen; Cooper, Mark

    2012-01-01

    NASA, the aerospace community, and other high reliability (hi-rel) users of advanced microelectronic products face many challenges as technology continues to scale into the deep sub-micron region. Decreasing the feature size of CMOS devices not only allows more components to be placed on a single chip, but it increases performance by allowing faster switching (or clock) speeds with reduced power compared to larger scaled devices. Higher performance, and lower operating and stand-by power characteristics of Ultra-Low Power (ULP) microelectronics are not only desirable, but also necessary to meet low power consumption design goals of critical spacecraft systems. The integration of these components in such systems, however, must be balanced with the overall risk tolerance of the project.

  8. Development of a radiation-hard CMOS process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    It is recommended that various techniques be investigated which appear to have the potential for improving the radiation hardness of CMOS devices for prolonged space flight mission. The three key recommended processing techniques are: (1) making the gate oxide thin. It has been shown that radiation degradation is proportional to the cube of oxide thickness so that a relatively small reduction in thickness can greatly improve radiation resistance; (2) cleanliness and contamination control; and (3) to investigate different oxide growth (low temperature dry, TCE and HCL). All three produce high quality clean oxides, which are more radiation tolerant. Technique 2 addresses the reduction of metallic contamination. Technique 3 will produce a higher quality oxide by using slow growth rate conditions, and will minimize the effects of any residual sodium contamination through the introduction of hydrogen and chlorine into the oxide during growth.

  9. A new visible watermarking technique applied to CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pingping; Shang, Yan; Li, Chunming

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a new visible watermarking solution for CMOS image sensor which can enhance secure features of captured images. Visible watermarks are embedded in the Bayer format image data and can be transferred by the subsequent interpolation process. A piecewise function is setup based on the gray scale resolution characteristics of human eyes. Watermark stretch factor can be adaptively chosen according to the gray value of the current pixel. The advantage of this algorithm is that the watermark has the same visibility in different image brightness region. A number of color images have been used to test the method. In order to check the robustness of watermarked images, we conducted adding noise and filtering experiments, results show that the visibility of watermark is also good after the experiments. The approach allows a digital watermark to be embedded in an image immediately upon its capture, before leaving the imaging chip.

  10. Failure analysis of a half-micron CMOS IC technology

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, A.Y.; Tangyunyong, P.; Bennett, R.S.; Flores, R.S.

    1996-08-01

    We present the results of recent failure analysis of an advanced, 0.5 {mu}m, fully planarized, triple metallization CMOS technology. A variety of failure analysis (FA) tools and techniques were used to localize and identify defects generated by wafer processing. These include light (photon) emission microscopy (LE), fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI), focused ion beam cross sectioning, SEM/voltage contrast imaging, resistive contrast imaging (RCI), and e-beam testing using an IDS-5000 with an HP 82000. The defects identified included inter- and intra-metal shorts, gate oxide shorts due to plasma processing damage, and high contact resistance due to the contact etch and deposition process. Root causes of these defects were determined and corrective action was taken to improve yield and reliability.

  11. A radiation hardened SONOS/CMOS EEPROM family

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, V.F.; Wood, G.M.; Buller, J.F. . Semiconductor Sector); Murray, J.R.; Rodriquez, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    There has long been a need for fast read nonvolatile, rad hard memories for military and space applications. Recent advances in EEPROM technology now allow this need to be met for many applications. Harris/Sandia have developed a 16k and a 256k rad hard EEPROM. The EEPROMs utilize a Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) memory transistor integrated into a 2 {mu}m, rad hard two level metal CMOS process. Both the 16k and the 256k parts have been designed to interface with the Intel 8085 or 80C51 and National 32000 series microprocessors and feature page and block clear modes. Both parts are functionally identical, and are produced by the same fabrication process. They are also pin for pin compatible with each other, except for the extra address and ground pins on the 256k. This paper describes the characteristics of this EEPROM family. 1 ref.

  12. A radiation hardened SONOS/CMOS EEPROM family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, V. F.; Wood, G. M.; Buller, J. F.; Murray, J. R.; Rodriquez, J. L.

    1990-07-01

    There has long been a need for fast read nonvolatile, rad hard memories for military and space applications. Recent advances in Electrically Erasably Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM) technology now allow this need to be met for many applications. Harris/Sandia have developed a 16k and a 256k rad hard EEPROM. The EEPROMs utilize a Silicon Oxide Nitride Oxide Silicon (SONOS) memory transistor integrated into a 2 microns rad hard two level metal CMOS process. Both the 16k and the 256k parts were designed to interface with the Intel 8085 or 80C51 and National 32000 series microprocessors and feature page and block clear modes. Both parts are functionally identical, and are produced by the same fabrication process. They are also pin for pin compatible with each other, except for the extra address and ground pins on the 256k. The characteristics of this EEPROM family are described.

  13. Rule-based circuit optimization for CMOS VLSI

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, F.

    1987-01-01

    A closed-loop design system iJADE was developed in Franz LISP. iJADE is a hierarchical CMOS VLSI circuit optimizer. Using a switch-level timing simulator and a timing analyzer, the program pinpoints the critical paths. The path-delay reduction algorithms and a rule-based expert system are then applied to adjust transistor sizes such that the speed of the circuit can be improved while keeping constraints satisfied. iJADE is also capable of detecting and correcting the timing errors of synchronous circuits. The circuit is described in SPICE-like input format, and then partitioned into blocks. Delays are computed on a block-by-block basis hierarchically, using a simple model based on input rise time, block type, and output load.

  14. Interferometric metrology of wafer nanotopography for advanced CMOS process integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John F.; Koliopoulos, Chris L.; Tang, Shouhong

    2001-12-01

    According to industry standards (SEMI M43, Guide for Reporting Wafer Nanotopography), Nanotopography is the non- planar deviation of the whole front wafer surface within a spatial wavelength range of approximately 0.2 to 20 mm and within the fixed quality area (FQA). The need for precision metrology of wafer nanotopography is being actively addressed by interferometric technology. In this paper we present an approach to mapping the whole wafer front surface nanotopography using an engineered coherence interferometer. The interferometer acquires a whole wafer raw topography map. The raw map is then filtered to remove the long spatial wavelength, high amplitude shape contributions and reveal the nanotopography in the filtered map. Filtered maps can be quantitatively analyzed in a variety of ways to enable statistical process control (SPC) of nanotopography parameters. The importance of tracking these parameters for CMOS gate level processes at 180-nm critical dimension, and below, is examined.

  15. Hybrid backside illuminated CMOS image sensors possessing low crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra Rao, Padmakumar; De Munck, Koen; Minoglou, Kyriaki; De Vos, Joeri; Sabuncuoglu, Deniz; De Moor, Piet

    2011-11-01

    Backside illuminated (BSI) hybrid CMOS image sensors possessing excellent spectral response (> 80% between 400nm-800nm) have been previously reported by us. Particularly challenging with BSI imagers is to combine such sensitivity, with low electrical inter-pixel crosstalk (or charge-dispersion). Employing thick bulk silicon (in BSI) to maximize red response results in large crosstalk especially for blue light. In the second generation of these imagers, we undertook the exercise of solving the crosstalk problem by a two-pronged approach: a) an optimized epitaxial substrate that was engineered to maximize the internal electric field b) high aspect ratio trenches (30 μm deep) with carefully tailored sidewall passivation. The results show that the proposed optimizations are effective in curtailing crosstalk without having a major impact on other sensor parameters.

  16. High-Q CMOS-integrated photonic crystal microcavity devices

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Karan K.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Bafrali, Reha; Meade, Roy; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical resonators are necessary or beneficial in realizations of various functions in scaled photonic platforms, including filtering, modulation, and detection in classical communication systems, optical sensing, as well as addressing and control of solid state emitters for quantum technologies. Although photonic crystal (PhC) microresonators can be advantageous to the more commonly used microring devices due to the former's low mode volumes, fabrication of PhC cavities has typically relied on electron-beam lithography, which precludes integration with large-scale and reproducible CMOS fabrication. Here, we demonstrate wavelength-scale polycrystalline silicon (pSi) PhC microresonators with Qs up to 60,000 fabricated within a bulk CMOS process. Quasi-1D resonators in lateral p-i-n structures allow for resonant defect-state photodetection in all-silicon devices, exhibiting voltage-dependent quantum efficiencies in the range of a few 10 s of %, few-GHz bandwidths, and low dark currents, in devices with loaded Qs in the range of 4,300–9,300; one device, for example, exhibited a loaded Q of 4,300, 25% quantum efficiency (corresponding to a responsivity of 0.31 A/W), 3 GHz bandwidth, and 30 nA dark current at a reverse bias of 30 V. This work demonstrates the possibility for practical integration of PhC microresonators with active electro-optic capability into large-scale silicon photonic systems. PMID:24518161

  17. Thermochromism in Commercial Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Mary Anne; Leblanc, Monique

    1999-09-01

    Many commercial products change color with a change of temperature. How do they do it? The processes responsible for the two major categories of commercial thermochromic coloring agents are presented, along with a description of applications of thermochromic materials.

  18. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An expanded role for the U.S. private sector in America's space future has emerged as a key national objective, and NASA's Office of Commercial Programs is providing a focus for action. The Office supports new high technology commercial space ventures, the commercial application of existing aeronautics and space technology, and expanded commercial access to available NASA capabilities and services. The progress NASA has made in carrying out its new assignment is highlighted.

  19. A 0.18 micrometer CMOS Thermopile Readout ASIC Immune to 50 MRAD Total Ionizing Dose (SI) and Single Event Latchup to 174MeV-cm(exp 2)/mg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, Gerard T.; Aslam, Shahid; Lakew, Brook; DuMonthier, Jeffery J.; Katz, Richard B.; Kleyner, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Radiation hardened by design (RHBD) techniques allow commercial CMOS circuits to operate in high total ionizing dose and particle fluence environments. Our radiation hard multi-channel digitizer (MCD) ASIC (Figure 1) is a versatile analog system on a chip (SoC) fabricated in 180nm CMOS. It provides 18 chopper stabilized amplifier channels, a 16- bit sigma-delta analog-digital converter (SDADC) and an on-chip controller. The MCD was evaluated at Goddard Space Flight Center and Texas A&M University's radiation effects facilities and found to be immune to single event latchup (SEL) and total ionizing dose (TID) at 174 MeV-cm(exp 2)/mg and 50 Mrad (Si) respectively.

  20. Commercial Radio as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenbuhler, Eric W.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the day-to-day work routines of commercial radio with the principles of a theoretical communication model. Illuminates peculiarities of the conduct of communication by commercial radio. Discusses the application of theoretical models to the evaluation of practicing institutions. Offers assessments of commercial radio deriving from…

  1. Commercial Banking Industry Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright Horizons Children's Centers, Cambridge, MA.

    Work and family programs are becoming increasingly important in the commercial banking industry. The objective of this survey was to collect information and prepare a commercial banking industry profile on work and family programs. Fifty-nine top American commercial banks from the Fortune 500 list were invited to participate. Twenty-two…

  2. Commercialism in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kirstin

    2001-01-01

    This document gives voice to concerns raised by critics and supporters of commercialism in schools and provides brief descriptions of several important resources on this topic. "Commercial Activities in School" (U.S. General Accounting Office) reports on the nature and frequency of commercial activities in public schools, as well as the laws and…

  3. COMMERCIAL FOODS, MATHEMATICS - I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DORNFIELD, BLANCHE E.

    THE UNDERSTANDING AND MASTERY OF FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS IS A NECESSARY PART OF COMMERCIAL FOODS WORK. THIS STUDENT HANDBOOK WAS DESIGNED TO ACCOMPANY A COMMERCIAL FOODS COURSE AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FOR STUDENTS WITH APPROPRIATE APTITUDES AND COMMERCIAL FOOD SERVICE GOALS. THE MATERIAL, TESTED IN VARIOUS INTERESTED CLASSROOMS, WAS PREPARED BY…

  4. CMOS color image sensor with overlaid organic photoconductive layers having narrow absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Shunji; Ihama, Mikio; Inuiya, Masafumi; Komatsu, Takashi; Saito, Takahiro

    2007-02-01

    At EI2006, we proposed the CMOS image sensor, which was overlaid with organic photoconductive layers in order to incorporate in it large light-capturing ability of a color film owing to its multiple-layer structure, and demonstrated the pictures taken by the trial product of the proposed CMOS image sensor overlaid with an organic layer having green sensitivity. In this study, we have tried to get the optimized spectral sensitivity for the proposed CMOS image sensor by means of the simulation to minimize the color difference between the original Macbeth chart and its reproduction with the spectral sensitivity of the sensor as a parameter. As a result, it has been confirmed that the proposed CMOS image sensor with multiple-layer structure possesses high potential capability in terms of imagecapturing efficiency when it is provided with the optimized spectral sensitivity.

  5. ''Normal'' tissues from humans exposed to radium contain an alteration in the c-mos locus

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Schlenker, R.A.; Hardwick, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of a number of human proto-oncogenes from persons with internal systemic exposure to radium were analyzed by restriction enzyme digestion and southern blotting of their DNA. Two extra c-mos Eco R1 restriction-fragment-length bands of 5.0 kb and 5.5 kb were found in tissue DNA from six of seven individuals. The extra c-mos bands were detected in DNA from many, but not all, of the tissues of the individuals exposed to radium. Our results suggest that the c-mos restriction-fragment-length alterations (RFLA) found in individuals exposed to radium were induced rather than inherited, are epigenetic in origin, and most likely result from changes in the methylation of bases surrounding the single exon of the c-mos proto-oncogene. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Prediction and measurement of radiation damage to CMOS devices on board spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.; Danchenko, V.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Sing, M.; Brucker, G. J.; Ohanian, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The CMOS Radiation Effects Measurement (CREM) experiment is presently being flown on the Explorer-55. The purpose of the experiment is to evaluate device performance in the actual space radiation environment and to correlate the respective measurements to on-the-ground laboratory irradiation results. The experiment contains an assembly of C-MOS and P-MOS devices shielded in front by flat slabs of aluminum and by a practically infinite shield in the back. Predictions of radiation damage to C-MOS devices are based on standard environment models and computational techniques. A comparison of the shifts in CMOS threshold potentials, that is, those measured in space to those obtained from the on-the-ground simulation experiment with Co-60, indicates that the measured space damage is smaller than predicted by about a factor of 2-3 for thin shields, but agrees well with predictions for thicker shields.

  7. Heterogeneous integration of GaAs pHEMT and Si CMOS on the same chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Shu, Wu; Yan, Zhao; Hong-Chang, Shen; You-Tao, Zhang; Tang-Sheng, Chen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the technology of wafer-scale transistor-level heterogeneous integration of GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (pHEMTs) and Si complementary metal–oxide semiconductor (CMOS) on the same Silicon substrate. GaAs pHEMTs are vertical stacked at the top of the Si CMOS wafer using a wafer bonding technique, and the best alignment accuracy of 5 μm is obtained. As a circuit example, a wide band GaAs digital controlled switch is fabricated, which features the technologies of a digital control circuit in Si CMOS and a switch circuit in GaAs pHEMT, 15% smaller than the area of normal GaAs and Si CMOS circuits.

  8. Long term ionization response of several BiCMOS VLSIC technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, R.L. ); Combs, W.; Clark, S. )

    1992-06-01

    BiCMOS is emerging as a strong competitor to CMOS for gate arrays and memories because of its performance advantages for the same feature size. In this paper, the authors examine the long term ionization response of five BiCMOS technologies by characterizing test structures which emphasize the various failure modes of CMOS and bipolar. The primary failure modes are found to be associated with the recessed field oxide isolation; edge leakage in the n channel MOSFETs and buried layer to buried layer leakage in the bipolar. The ionization failure thresholds for worst case bias were in the range of 5-20 Krad(Si) for both failure modes in all five technologies.

  9. Functional Model of Carbon Nanotube Programmable Resistors for Hybrid Nano/CMOS Circuit Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weisheng; Agnus, Guillaume; Derycke, Vincent; Filoramo, Ariana; Gamrat, Christian; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe

    Hybrid Nano (e.g. Nanotube and Nanowire) /CMOS circuits combine both the advantages of Nano-devices and CMOS technologies; they have thus become the most promising candidates to relax the intrinsic drawbacks of CMOS circuits beyond Moore’s law. A functional simulation model for an hybrid Nano/CMOS design is presented in this paper. It is based on Optically Gated Carbon NanoTube Field Effect Transistors (OG-CNTFET), which can be used as 2-terminal programmable resistors. Their resistance can be adjusted precisely, reproducibly and in a non-volatile way, over three orders of magnitude. These interesting behaviors of OG-CNTFET promise great potential for developing the non-volatile memory and neuromorphic adaptive computing circuits. The model is developed in Verilog-A language and implemented on Cadence Virtuoso platform with Spectre 5.1.41 simulator. Many experimental parameters are included in this model to improve the simulation accuracy.

  10. Speckle-based modulation transfer function measurements for comparative evaluation of CCD and CMOS detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Pozo, Antonio M.; Rubiño, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Charge-coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) matrices offer excellent features in imaging systems. For assessing the suitability of each technology according to the application, the complete characterization of the detector arrays becomes necessary. A system is optically characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF). We have comparatively studied the results provided by the speckle method for detectors of two types: CCD and CMOS. To do so, we first analysed the precision in determining the MTF of the CCD using two apertures at the exit port of an integrating sphere: a single and a double-slit. For the single-slit, we propose a new procedure of fitting the experimental data which overcomes the drawbacks of the conventional procedure. Since it offered lower uncertainty and better reproducibility, the single-slit was used for the study with the CMOS detector. Significant differences were found between the MTF of the CCD and the CMOS detectors.

  11. Compressive Sensing Based Bio-Inspired Shape Feature Detection CMOS Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A CMOS imager integrated circuit using compressive sensing and bio-inspired detection is presented which integrates novel functions and algorithms within a novel hardware architecture enabling efficient on-chip implementation.

  12. Radiation Performance of 1 Gbit DDR SDRAMs Fabricated in the 90 nm CMOS Technology Node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.; Gorelick, Jerry L.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H.; LaBel, K.; Friendlich, M.; Koga, R.; George, J.; Crain, S.; Yu, P.; Reed, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present Single Event Effect (SEE) and Total Ionizing Dose (TID) data for 1 Gbit DDR SDRAMs (90 nm CMOS technology) as well as comparing this data with earlier technology nodes from the same manufacturer.

  13. CMOS open-fault detection in the presence of glitches and timing skews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajsuman, Rochit; Jayasumana, Anura P.; Malaiya, Yashwant K.

    1989-08-01

    A testable CMOS design technique in which some extra transistors are used in such a way that the CMOS gate is converted to a pseudo-nMOS/pMOS gate during testing is discussed. With the proposed design technique, CMOS open faults can be detected regardless of timing skews/delays, glitches, or charge sharing among the internal nodes. The major advantage of the proposed testable design technique is that it allows the use of a single test vector to detect a stuck-open fault. This significantly reduces the complexity of test generation and the time consumed for testing. The design procedure is simple and all the classical algorithms and automatic test-pattern-generating programs can be used to generate tests for circuits designed according to this technique. Even random testing techniques can be used efficiently to detect the open faults in these CMOS circuits.

  14. Off-Line Testing for Bridge Faults in CMOS Domino Logic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K.; Lala, P. K.; Busaba, F.

    1997-01-01

    Bridge faults, especially in CMOS circuits, have unique characteristics which make them difficult to detect during testing. This paper presents a technique for detecting bridge faults which have an effect on the output of CMOS Domino logic circuits. The faults are modeled at the transistor level and this technique is based on analyzing the off-set of the function during off-line testing.

  15. Results of the 2015 testbeam of a 180 nm AMS High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Casse, G.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Di Bello, F. A.; Ferrere, D.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Lanni, F.; Liu, H.; Meloni, F.; Meng, L.; Miucci, A.; Muenstermann, D.; Nessi, M.; Perić, I.; Rimoldi, M.; Ristic, B.; Barrero Pinto, M. Vicente; Vossebeld, J.; Weber, M.; Wu, W.; Xu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Active pixel sensors based on the High-Voltage CMOS technology are being investigated as a viable option for the future pixel tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC. This paper reports on the testbeam measurements performed at the H8 beamline of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron on a High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype produced in 180 nm AMS technology. Results in terms of tracking efficiency and timing performance, for different threshold and bias conditions, are shown.

  16. A new CMOS-based digital imaging detector for applications in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Mehmet A.; Toker, Emre

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a CMOS-based x-ray imaging detector in the same form factor of a standard film cassette (18 cm × 24 cm) for Small Field-of-view Digital Mammography (SFDM) applications. This SFDM cassette is based on our three-side buttable, 25 mm × 50 mm, 48μm active-pixel CMOS sensor modules and utilizes a 150μm columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator. For imaging up to 100 mm × 100 mm field-of-view, a number of CMOS sensor modules need to be tiled and electronically synchronized together. By using fiber-optic communication, acquired images from the SFDM cassette can be transferred, processed and displayed on a review station within approximately 5 seconds of exposure, greatly enhancing patient flow. We present the physical performance of this CMOS-based SFDM cassette, using established objective criteria such as the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), and more subjective criteria, by evaluating images from a phantom study and the clinical studies of our collaborators. Driven by the strong demand from the computer industry, CMOS technology is one of the lowest cost, and the most readily accessible technologies available for digital mammography today. Recent popular use of CMOS imagers in high-end consumer cameras have also resulted in significant advances in the imaging performance of CMOS sensors against rivaling CCD sensors. The SFDM cassette can be employed in various mammography applications, including spot imaging, stereotactic biopsy imaging, core biopsy and surgical biopsy specimen radiography. This study demonstrates that all the image quality requirements for demanding mammography applications can be addressed with CMOS technology.

  17. A CCD/CMOS process for integrated image acquisition and early vision signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keast, Craig L.; Sodini, Charles G.

    The development of technology which integrates a four phase, buried-channel CCD in an existing 1.75 micron CMOS process is described. The four phase clock is employed in the integrated early vision system to minimize process complexity. Signal corruption is minimized and lateral fringing fields are enhanced by burying the channel. The CMOS process for CCD enhancement is described, which highlights a new double-poly process and the buried channel, and the integration is outlined. The functionality and transfer efficiency of the process enhancement were appraised by measuring CCD shift registers at 100 kHz. CMOS measurement results are presented, which include threshold voltages, poly-to-poly capacitor voltage and temperature coefficients, and dark current. A CCD/CMOS processor is described which combines smoothing and segmentation operations. The integration of the CCD and the CMOS processes is found to function due to the enhancement-compatible design of the CMOS process and the thorough employment of CCD module baseline process steps.

  18. CMOS-sensors for energy-resolved X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, D.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Baudot, J.; Deveaux, M.; Dulinski, W.; Kachel, M.; Linnik, B.; Müntz, C.; Stroth, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Due to their low noise, CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors are suited to sense X-rays with a few keV quantum energy, which is of interest for high resolution X-ray imaging. Moreover, the good energy resolution of the silicon sensors might be used to measure this quantum energy. Combining both features with the good spatial resolution of CMOS sensors opens the potential to build ``color sensitive" X-ray cameras. Taking such colored images is hampered by the need to operate the CMOS sensors in a single photon counting mode, which restricts the photon flux capability of the sensors. More importantly, the charge sharing between the pixels smears the potentially good energy resolution of the sensors. Based on our experience with CMOS sensors for charged particle tracking, we studied techniques to overcome the latter by means of an offline processing of the data obtained from a CMOS sensor prototype. We found that the energy resolution of the pixels can be recovered at the expense of reduced quantum efficiency. We will introduce the results of our study and discuss the feasibility of taking colored X-ray pictures with CMOS sensors.

  19. World commercial aircraft accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of all accidents world-wide involving aircraft in commercial service which resulted in the loss of the airframe or one or more fatality, or both. This information has been gathered in order to present a complete inventory of commercial aircraft accidents. Events involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, hijackings, suicides, and industrial ground accidents are included within this list. Included are: accidents involving world commercial jet aircraft, world commercial turboprop aircraft, world commercial pistonprop aircraft with four or more engines and world commercial pistonprop aircraft with two or three engines from 1946 to 1992. Each accident is presented with information in the following categories: date of the accident, airline and its flight numbers, type of flight, type of aircraft, aircraft registration number, construction number/manufacturers serial number, aircraft damage, accident flight phase, accident location, number of fatalities, number of occupants, cause, remarks, or description (brief) of the accident, and finally references used. The sixth chapter presents a summary of the world commercial aircraft accidents by major aircraft class (e.g. jet, turboprop, and pistonprop) and by flight phase. The seventh chapter presents several special studies including a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types with 100 or more fatalities in order of decreasing number of fatalities, a list of collision accidents involving commercial aircrafts, and a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, and hijackings.

  20. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

  1. Users Guide on Scaled CMOS Reliability: NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Office of Safety and Mission Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark; Cooper, Mark; Johnston, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Reliability of advanced CMOS technology is a complex problem that is usually addressed from the standpoint of specific failure mechanisms rather than overall reliability of a finished microcircuit. A detailed treatment of CMOS reliability in scaled devices can be found in Ref. 1; it should be consulted for a more thorough discussion. The present document provides a more concise treatment of the scaled CMOS reliability problem, emphasizing differences in the recommended approach for these advanced devices compared to that of less aggressively scaled devices. It includes specific recommendations that can be used by flight projects that use advanced CMOS. The primary emphasis is on conventional memories, microprocessors, and related devices.

  2. A CMOS Pressure Sensor Tag Chip for Passive Wireless Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zuo, Lei; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of −20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation. PMID:25806868

  3. High resolution, high bandwidth global shutter CMOS area scan sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzpour, Naser; Sonder, Matthias; Li, Binqiao

    2013-10-01

    Global shuttering, sometimes also known as electronic shuttering, enables the use of CMOS sensors in a vast range of applications. Teledyne DALSA Global shutter sensors are able to integrate light synchronously across millions of pixels with microsecond accuracy. Teledyne DALSA offers 5 transistor global shutter pixels in variety of resolutions, pitches and noise and full-well combinations. One of the recent generations of these pixels is implemented in 12 mega pixel area scan device at 6 um pitch and that images up to 70 frames per second with 58 dB dynamic range. These square pixels include microlens and optional color filters. These sensors also offer exposure control, anti-blooming and high dynamic range operation by introduction of a drain and a PPD reset gate to the pixel. The state of the art sense node design of Teledyne DALSA's 5T pixel offers exceptional shutter rejection ratio. The architecture is consistent with the requirements to use stitching to achieve very large area scan devices. Parallel or serial digital output is provided on these sensors using on-chip, column-wise analog to digital converters. Flexible ADC bit depth combined with windowing (adjustable region of interest, ROI) allows these sensors to run with variety of resolution/bandwidth combinations. The low power, state of the art LVDS I/O technology allows for overall power consumptions of less than 2W at full performance conditions.

  4. Smart CMOS sensor for wideband laser threat detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, Craig R.; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2015-09-01

    The proliferation of lasers has led to their widespread use in applications ranging from short range standoff chemical detection to long range Lidar sensing and target designation operating across the UV to LWIR spectrum. Recent advances in high energy lasers have renewed the development of laser weapons systems. The ability to measure and assess laser source information is important to both identify a potential threat as well as determine safety and nominal hazard zone (NHZ). Laser detection sensors are required that provide high dynamic range, wide spectral coverage, pulsed and continuous wave detection, and large field of view. OPTRA, Inc. and Tufts have developed a custom ROIC smart pixel imaging sensor architecture and wavelength encoding optics for measurement of source wavelength, pulse length, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), irradiance, and angle of arrival. The smart architecture provides dual linear and logarithmic operating modes to provide 8+ orders of signal dynamic range and nanosecond pulse measurement capability that can be hybridized with the appropriate detector array to provide UV through LWIR laser sensing. Recent advances in sputtering techniques provide the capability for post-processing CMOS dies from the foundry and patterning PbS and PbSe photoconductors directly on the chip to create a single monolithic sensor array architecture for measuring sources operating from 0.26 - 5.0 microns, 1 mW/cm2 - 2 kW/cm2.

  5. A 16-channel CMOS preamplifier for laser ranging radar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ru-qing; Zhu, Jing-guo; Jiang, Yan; Li, Meng-lin; Li, Feng

    2015-10-01

    A 16-channal front-end preamplifier array has been design in a 0.18um CMOS process for pulse Laser ranging radar receiver. This front-end preamplifier array incorporates transimpedance amplifiers(TIAs) and differential voltage post-amplifier(PAMP),band gap reference and other interface circuits. In the circuit design, the regulated cascade (RGC) input stage, Cherry-Hooper and active inductor peaking were employed to enhance the bandwidth. And in the layout design, by applying the layout isolation structure combined with P+ guard-ring(PGR), N+ guard-ring(NGR),and deep-n-well(DNW) for amplifier array, the crosstalk and the substrate noise coupling was reduced effectively. The simulations show that a single channel receiver front-end preamplifier achieves 95 dBΩ transimpedance gain and 600MHz bandwidth for 3 PF photodiode capacitance. The total power of 16-channel front-end amplifier array is about 800mW for 1.8V supply.

  6. Sub-band structure engineering for advanced CMOS channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, T.; Tezuka, T.; Sugiyama, N.; Nakaharai, S.; Numata, T.; Koga, J.; Uchida, K.

    2005-05-01

    This paper reviews our recent studies of novel CMOS channels based on the concept of sub-band structure engineering. This device design concept can be realized as strained-Si channel MOSFETs, ultra-thin SOI MOSFETs and Ge-on-Insulator (GOI) MOSFETs. An important factor for the electron mobility enhancement is the introduction of larger sub-band energy splitting between the 2- and 4-fold valleys on a (1 0 0) surface, which can be obtained in strained-Si and ultra-thin body channels. The electrical properties of strained-Si MOSFETs are summarized with an emphasis on strained-SOI structures. Also, the importance of the precise control of ultra-thin SOI thickness is pointed out from the experimental results of the SOI thickness dependence of mobility. Furthermore, it is shown that the increase in the sub-band energy splitting can also be effective in obtaining higher current drive of n-channel MOSFETs under ballistic transport regime. This suggests that the current drive enhancement based on MOS channel engineering utilizing strain and ultra-thin body structures can be extended to ultra-short channel MOSFETs dominated by ballistic transport.

  7. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  8. A CMOS pressure sensor tag chip for passive wireless applications.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zuo, Lei; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of -20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation. PMID:25806868

  9. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the time period from May 1976 to December 1979 and encompasses the three phases of accelerated testing: Phase 1, the 250 C testing; Phase 2, the 200 C testing; and Phase 3, the 125 C testing. The duration of the test in Phase 1 and Phase 2 was sufficient to take the devices into the wear out region. The wear out distributions were used to estimate the activation energy between the 250 C and the 200 C test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test, 20,000 hours, was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear out region; consequently the third data point at 125 C for determining the consistency of activation energy could not be obtained. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three device types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment was assessed. Guidelines for the development of accelerated life test conditions were proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits was explored in Phase 4 of this study and is attached as an appendix to this report.

  10. Charge collection studies in irradiated HV-CMOS particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolder, A.; Andelković, M.; Arndt, K.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Buttar, C.; Caragiulo, P.; Cindro, V.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Dragone, A.; Ehrler, F.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Gorišek, A.; Grabas, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grillo, A.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; Kanisauskas, K.; Kenney, C.; Kramberger, G.; Liang, Z.; Mandić, I.; Maneuski, D.; McMahon, S.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Nickerson, R.; Perić, I.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Seiden, A.; Shipsey, I.; Song, W.; Stanitzki, M.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Turchetta, R.; Vigani, L.; Volk, J.; Wang, R.; Warren, M.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Xiu, Q.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, H.

    2016-04-01

    Charge collection properties of particle detectors made in HV-CMOS technology were investigated before and after irradiation with reactor neutrons. Two different sensor types were designed and processed in 180 and 350 nm technology by AMS. Edge-TCT and charge collection measurements with electrons from 90Sr source were employed. Diffusion of generated carriers from undepleted substrate contributes significantly to the charge collection before irradiation, while after irradiation the drift contribution prevails as shown by charge measurements at different shaping times. The depleted region at a given bias voltage was found to grow with irradiation in the fluence range of interest for strip detectors at the HL-LHC. This leads to large gains in the measured charge with respect to the one before irradiation. The increase of the depleted region was attributed to removal of effective acceptors. The evolution of depleted region with fluence was investigated and modeled. Initial studies show a small effect of short term annealing on charge collection.

  11. CMOS Image Sensor with a Built-in Lane Detector.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pei-Yung; Cheng, Hsien-Chein; Huang, Shih-Shinh; Fu, Li-Chen

    2009-01-01

    This work develops a new current-mode mixed signal Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) imager, which can capture images and simultaneously produce vehicle lane maps. The adopted lane detection algorithm, which was modified to be compatible with hardware requirements, can achieve a high recognition rate of up to approximately 96% under various weather conditions. Instead of a Personal Computer (PC) based system or embedded platform system equipped with expensive high performance chip of Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) or Digital Signal Processor (DSP), the proposed imager, without extra Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) circuits to transform signals, is a compact, lower cost key-component chip. It is also an innovative component device that can be integrated into intelligent automotive lane departure systems. The chip size is 2,191.4 × 2,389.8 μm, and the package uses 40 pin Dual-In-Package (DIP). The pixel cell size is 18.45 × 21.8 μm and the core size of photodiode is 12.45 × 9.6 μm; the resulting fill factor is 29.7%. PMID:22573983

  12. Circuit design for nuclear radiation test of CMOS multiplier chips

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T.S.; Martin, R.L.; Hughes, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes the design of a microprocessor-based electronic circuit to be used in testing the effects of nuclear radiation on a CMOS 8 x 8 multiplier chip. Knowledge of such effects is important for military and space applications of integrated circuits. The multiplier chip undergoing testing is attached to a DUT (device under test) board which is enclosed in a metal container. The container is then lowered to the cobalt 60 radiation source located at the bottom of a 15-ft-deep pool. The gamma-ray radiation test setup is schematically shown. The in-source test board containing the multiplier chip is attached to an 8085-based, single-board microcomputer (SDK-85) by a 30-ft multiconductor cable. Doses of gamma-ray radiation from cobalt 60 are applied in steps at increasing quantities until the multiplier chip, which is tested between doses, begins to malfunction. An 8085 assembly language program is used for functional test of the multiplier. The leakage current and the propagation delay time are also measured between doses.

  13. Capacitively Coupled CMOS VCSEL Driver Circuits for Optical Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Victor

    This thesis presents the analysis, design and implementation of a common-cathode capacitively-coupled VCSEL driver in 65nm CMOS intended for short-reach optical interconnects. The driver consists of an AC-coupled high-frequency path and a low-frequency path that provides DC signal components. By increasing the low-frequency path bandwidth by 10 times compared to previous AC-coupled drivers allowed the on-chip coupling capacitor to be reduced to 2.1pF, occupying 3 times less area than prior art. The driver introduces capacitively-coupled two-tap emphasis to equalize the VCSEL's optical response. The VCSEL was modulated with an OMA of up to 5.1dBm and an ER of 9dB, measuring an RMS jitter of 5ps at a data rate of 15Gb/s, which represents the highest OMA and ER achieved in high-speed anode-driving LDDs. The driver could be programmed for a low-power mode, outputting 2.3dBm OMA at power consumption of only 30mW, corresponding to an energy efficiency of 2pJ/bit.

  14. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  15. A new architecture of current-mode CMOS TDI Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cheng; Chen, Yongping

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, CMOS sensors still suffer from the problem of low SNR, especially in the stage of low illumination and high relative scanning velocity. Lots of methods have been develop to overcome this problem. Among these researches, TDI (Time Delay Integration) architecture is a more natural choice, which is natively supported by CCD sensors. In this paper a new kind of proposed current-mode sensor is used to achieve TDI operation in analog domain. The circuit is composed of three main parts. At first, a current-type pixel is proposed, in which the active MOSFET is operated in the triode region to ensure the output current is linearly dependent on the gate voltage and avoid the reduction of threshold voltage in the traditional voltage mode pixels, such as 3T, 4T which use the source followers as its active part. Then a discrete double sampling (DDS) unit, which is operated in the form of currents is used to efficiently reduce the fixed pattern noise (FPN) and make the output is independent of reset voltage of pixels. For accumulation, an improved current mirror adder under controlled of timing circuits is proposed to overcome the problem of saturation suffered in voltage domain. Some main noise sources, especially come from analog sample and holds capacitors and switches is analyzed. Finally, simulation results with CSMC 0.5um technology and Cadence IC show that the proposed method is reasonable and efficient to improve the SNR.

  16. Improved Signal Chains for Readout of CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Hancock, Bruce; Cunningham, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    An improved generic design has been devised for implementing signal chains involved in readout from complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and for other readout integrated circuits (ICs) that perform equivalent functions. The design applies to any such IC in which output signal charges from the pixels in a given row are transferred simultaneously into sampling capacitors at the bottoms of the columns, then voltages representing individual pixel charges are read out in sequence by sequentially turning on column-selecting field-effect transistors (FETs) in synchronism with source-follower- or operational-amplifier-based amplifier circuits. The improved design affords the best features of prior source-follower-and operational- amplifier-based designs while overcoming the major limitations of those designs. The limitations can be summarized as follows: a) For a source-follower-based signal chain, the ohmic voltage drop associated with DC bias current flowing through the column-selection FET causes unacceptable voltage offset, nonlinearity, and reduced small-signal gain. b) For an operational-amplifier-based signal chain, the required bias current and the output noise increase superlinearly with size of the pixel array because of a corresponding increase in the effective capacitance of the row bus used to couple the sampled column charges to the operational amplifier. The effect of the bus capacitance is to simultaneously slow down the readout circuit and increase noise through the Miller effect.

  17. A hierarchical approach to test generation for CMOS VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weening, Edward Christiaan

    A hierarchical approach to the automatic test pattern generation for large digital VLSI circuits, fabricated in CMOS technology, is developed and implemented. The use of information on the circuit's hierarchy, which is readily available from most modern CAD (Computer Aided Design) systems, speeds up the test generation process considerably and enhances the quality of the tests generated. The hierarchical test generation tool can also be integrated in future CAD systems making test generation and testability enhancement during circuit design feasible. The hierarchical approach is described at the switch, functional, and behavioral level. A test pattern generation algorithm at the switch level is presented. Test generation and fault simulation algorithms both using OBDD (Ordered Binary Decision Diagram) functional descriptions of the circuit modules are presented. A test plan generation method at the behavioral level is presented. Practical results show that the hierarchical approach to test generation is more efficient than a conventional, non-hierarchical approach, especially for switch level faults. The results also show that the use of Design For Testability (DFT) circuitry is supported at the behavioral level.

  18. Multi-Aperture CMOS Sun Sensor for Microsatellite Attitude Determination.

    PubMed

    Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the high precision digital sun sensor under development at the University of Naples. The sensor determines the sun line orientation in the sensor frame from the measurement of the sun position on the focal plane. It exploits CMOS technology and an original optical head design with multiple apertures. This allows simultaneous multiple acquisitions of the sun as spots on the focal plane. The sensor can be operated either with a fixed or a variable number of sun spots, depending on the required field of view and sun-line measurement precision. Multiple acquisitions are averaged by using techniques which minimize the computational load to extract the sun line orientation with high precision. Accuracy and computational efficiency are also improved thanks to an original design of the calibration function relying on neural networks. Extensive test campaigns are carried out using a laboratory test facility reproducing sun spectrum, apparent size and distance, and variable illumination directions. Test results validate the sensor concept, confirming the precision improvement achievable with multiple apertures, and sensor operation with a variable number of sun spots. Specifically, the sensor provides accuracy and precision in the order of 1 arcmin and 1 arcsec, respectively. PMID:22408538

  19. Characteristics of CMOS Light Detectors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, James; Johnson, Erik; Stapels, Christopher; Linsay, Paul; Miskimen, Rory; Crabb, Donald; Augustine, Frank

    2008-10-01

    Advancing nuclear and high-energy physics often requires experiments conducted in harsh environments, such as a liquid helium bath and a superconducting magnet at several Tesla. These experiments need improved sensors that operate in these conditions. Improvements in detector technology used in extreme environments can improve the data quality and allow new designs for experiments that operate under these conditions. Solid-State Photomultipliers (SSPM), a device built from a monolithic array of photodiodes, can be used in these environments where traditional PMTs may not operate. Measurements of the diode properties at low temperatures down to 5 K are used to determine the potential of CMOS SSPMs in these environments. At temperatures below 60 K, extensive after pulsing is observed, which renders the Geiger photodiodes in the SSPM nonfunctional for biases above breakdown. In proportional mode operation, below the reverse bias breakdown, the photodiodes show a linear response to incident light with a relatively large gain and can be used at temperatures near 5 K.

  20. Standard format two-color CMOS ROIC for SLS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simolon, Brian; Aziz, Naseem; Hansen, Randy; Kurth, Eric; Lam, Simon; Petronio, Susan; Woolaway, James

    2011-05-01

    The ISC0903 is a 320 × 256, standard format, two-color CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) designed for strained-layer superlattice (SLS) detectors. The detector interface is supported through one input pad in each 30 micron pixel. One bit in the serial control word programs the chip to automatically adjust all biases and timing to allow for the integration of either electrons or holes. This feature allows users to easily operate this ROIC with a wide variety of p-on-n or n-on-p detectors. The ROIC has been specifically designed to allow for both polarities of detectors to be placed back-to-back and to connect to the ROIC through the one input pad to obtain a two-color image. The two-color image is achieved by switching the ROIC mode between the two colors on a per-frame basis. This paper will describe the interface, design, and features of the ISC0903 ROIC.

  1. Large format two-color CMOS ROIC for SLS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simolon, Brian; Aziz, Naseem; Barskey, Steve; Hansen, Randy; Kurth, Eric; Long, John; Petronio, Susan

    2013-07-01

    The ISC0905 is a 640 × 512, large format, two-color CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) designed for strained-layer superlattice (SLS) detectors. The detector interface is supported through one input pad in each 30 μm pixel. One bit in the serial control word programs the chip to automatically adjust all biases and timing to allow for the integration of either electrons or holes. This feature allows users to easily operate this ROIC with a wide variety of p-on-n or n-on-p detectors. The ROIC has been specifically designed to allow for both polarities of detectors to be placed back-to-back and to connect to the ROIC through a single input pad to obtain a two-color image. The two-color image is achieved by switching the ROIC mode between the two colors on a per frame basis. This paper will describe the interface, design and features of the ISC0905 ROIC as well as a summary of the characterization test results.

  2. A CMOS ASIC Design for SiPM Arrays.

    PubMed

    Dey, Samrat; Banks, Lushon; Chen, Shaw-Pin; Xu, Wenbin; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert S; Rudell, Jacques C

    2011-12-01

    Our lab has previously reported on novel board-level readout electronics for an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array featuring row/column summation technique to reduce the hardware requirements for signal processing. We are taking the next step by implementing a monolithic CMOS chip which is based on the row-column architecture. In addition, this paper explores the option of using diagonal summation as well as calibration to compensate for temperature and process variations. Further description of a timing pickoff signal which aligns all of the positioning (spatial channels) pulses in the array is described. The ASIC design is targeted to be scalable with the detector size and flexible to accommodate detectors from different vendors. This paper focuses on circuit implementation issues associated with the design of the ASIC to interface our Phase II MiCES FPGA board with a SiPM array. Moreover, a discussion is provided for strategies to eventually integrate all the analog and mixed-signal electronics with the SiPM, on either a single-silicon substrate or multi-chip module (MCM). PMID:24825923

  3. Multi-Aperture CMOS Sun Sensor for Microsatellite Attitude Determination

    PubMed Central

    Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the high precision digital sun sensor under development at the University of Naples. The sensor determines the sun line orientation in the sensor frame from the measurement of the sun position on the focal plane. It exploits CMOS technology and an original optical head design with multiple apertures. This allows simultaneous multiple acquisitions of the sun as spots on the focal plane. The sensor can be operated either with a fixed or a variable number of sun spots, depending on the required field of view and sun-line measurement precision. Multiple acquisitions are averaged by using techniques which minimize the computational load to extract the sun line orientation with high precision. Accuracy and computational efficiency are also improved thanks to an original design of the calibration function relying on neural networks. Extensive test campaigns are carried out using a laboratory test facility reproducing sun spectrum, apparent size and distance, and variable illumination directions. Test results validate the sensor concept, confirming the precision improvement achievable with multiple apertures, and sensor operation with a variable number of sun spots. Specifically, the sensor provides accuracy and precision in the order of 1 arcmin and 1 arcsec, respectively. PMID:22408538

  4. Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires.

    PubMed

    Stern, Eric; Klemic, James F; Routenberg, David A; Wyrembak, Pauline N; Turner-Evans, Daniel B; Hamilton, Andrew D; LaVan, David A; Fahmy, Tarek M; Reed, Mark A

    2007-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires have the potential to function as highly sensitive and selective sensors for the label-free detection of low concentrations of pathogenic microorganisms. Successful solution-phase nanowire sensing has been demonstrated for ions, small molecules, proteins, DNA and viruses; however, 'bottom-up' nanowires (or similarly configured carbon nanotubes) used for these demonstrations require hybrid fabrication schemes, which result in severe integration issues that have hindered widespread application. Alternative 'top-down' fabrication methods of nanowire-like devices produce disappointing performance because of process-induced material and device degradation. Here we report an approach that uses complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistor compatible technology and hence demonstrate the specific label-free detection of below 100 femtomolar concentrations of antibodies as well as real-time monitoring of the cellular immune response. This approach eliminates the need for hybrid methods and enables system-scale integration of these sensors with signal processing and information systems. Additionally, the ability to monitor antibody binding and sense the cellular immune response in real time with readily available technology should facilitate widespread diagnostic applications. PMID:17268465

  5. Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.; Cook, Robert

    2010-07-01

    The recent development of active pixel sensors as X-Ray focal plane arrays will place them in contention with CCDs on future satellite missions. Penn State University (PSU) is working with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) to develop X-Ray Hybrid CMOS devices (HCDs), a type of active pixel sensor with fast frame rates, adaptable readout timing and geometry, low power consumption, and inherent radiation hardness. CCDs have been used with great success on the current generation of X-Ray telescopes (e.g. Chandra, XMM, Suzaku, and Swift). However, their bucket-brigade readout architecture, which transfers charge across the chip with discrete component readout electronics, results in clockrate limited readout speeds that cause pileup (saturation) of bright sources and an inherent susceptibility to radiation induced displacement damage that limits mission lifetime. In contrast, HCDs read pixels through the detector substrate with low power, on-chip readout integrated circuits. Faster frame rates, achieved with adaptable readout timing and geometry, will allow the next generation's larger effective area telescopes to observe brighter sources free of pileup. In HCDs, radiation damaged lattice sites affect a single pixel instead of an entire row. The PSU X-ray group is currently testing 4 Teledyne HCDs, with low cross-talk CTIA devices in development. We will report laboratory measurements of HCD readnoise, interpixel-capacitance and its impact on event selection, linearity, and energy resolution as a function of energy.

  6. Dielectrophoretic lab-on-CMOS platform for trapping and manipulation of cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungchul; Kabiri, Shideh; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of cells are essential operations in numerous studies in biology and life sciences. We discuss the realization of a Lab-on-a-Chip platform for dielectrophoretic trapping and repositioning of cells and microorganisms on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, which we define here as Lab-on-CMOS (LoC). The LoC platform is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) which is the force experienced by any dielectric particle including biological entities in non-uniform AC electrical field. DEP force depends on the permittivity of the cells, its size and shape and also on the permittivity of the medium and therefore it enables selective targeting of cells based on their phenotype. In this paper, we address an important matter that of electrode design for DEP for which we propose a three-dimensional (3D) octapole geometry to create highly confined electric fields for trapping and manipulation of cells. Conventional DEP-based platforms are implemented stand-alone on glass, silicon or polymers connected to external infrastructure for electronics and optics, making it bulky and expensive. In this paper, the use of CMOS as a platform provides a pathway to truly miniaturized lab-on-CMOS or LoC platform, where DEP electrodes are designed using built-in multiple metal layers of the CMOS process for effective trapping of cells, with built-in electronics for in-situ impedance monitoring of the cell position. We present electromagnetic simulation results of DEP force for this unique 3D octapole geometry on CMOS. Experimental results with yeast cells validate the design. These preliminary results indicate the promise of using CMOS technology for truly compact miniaturized lab-on-chip platform for cell biotechnology applications. PMID:26780441

  7. Design and simulation of multi-color infrared CMOS metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengxi; Chen, Yongping; Ma, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers, which usually can be fabricated in a low weight thin film structure, have a near unity absorptivity in a special waveband, and therefore have been widely applied from microwave to optical waveband. To increase absorptance of CMOS MEMS devices in 2-5 μmm waveband, multi-color infrared metamaterial absorbers are designed with CSMC 0.5 μmm 2P3M and 0.18 μmm 1P6M CMOS technology in this work. Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) three-layer MMAs and Insulator-metal-insulator-metal (MIMI) four-layer MMAs are formed by CMOS metal interconnect layers and inter metal dielectrics layer. To broaden absorption waveband in 2-5μmm range, MMAs with a combination of different sizes cross bars are designed. The top metal layer is a periodic aluminum square array or cross bar array with width ranging from submicron to several microns. The absorption peak position and intensity of MMAs can be tuned by adjusting the top aluminum micro structure array. Post-CMOS process is adopted to fabricate MMAs. The infrared absorption spectra of MMAs are verified with finite element method simulation, and the effects of top metal structure sizes, patterns, and films thickness are also simulated and intensively discussed. The simulation results show that CMOS MEMS MMAs enhance infrared absorption in 2-20 μmm. The MIM broad MMA has an average absorptance of 0.22 in 2-5 μmm waveband, and 0.76 in 8-14 μm waveband. The CMOS metamaterial absorbers can be inherently integrated in many kinds of MEMS devices fabricated with CMOS technology, such as uncooled bolometers, infrared thermal emitters.

  8. Commercial fertilizers 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, N.L.; Berry, J.T.; Montgomery, M.H.

    1991-12-01

    This document contains consumption data for commercial fertilizers in the USA for 1991. Graphical information on the consumption by class is given for the nation. State by state data for consumption of several types of commercial fertilizers are presented. Only numerical data is included.

  9. Commercialism in Intercollegiate Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delany, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the history of intercollegiate athletics and the evolution of commercialization in college sports, particularly through television. Argues that few Division I programs could be self-sufficient; the issue is the degree to which sports are commercialized for revenue, and the challenge to balance schools' needs, private sector interests, and…

  10. Commercialism@Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Alex; Morales, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    The Center for the Analysis of Commercialism in Schools found that the number of press citations from 1990 to 2000 discussing seven types of commercializing activities (program sponsorship, exclusive agreements, incentive programs, appropriation of space, sponsored educational materials, electronic marketing, privatization, and fund raising)…

  11. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  12. A high frame rate, 16 million pixels, radiation hard CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, N.; Turchetta, R.; Van Hoften, G.; Henderson, R.; McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A. R.

    2011-03-01

    CMOS sensors provide the possibility of designing detectors for a large variety of applications with all the benefits and flexibility of the widely used CMOS process. In this paper we describe a novel CMOS sensor designed for transmission electron microscopy. The overall design consists of a large 61 × 63 mm2 silicon area containing 16 million pixels arranged in a 4K × 4K array, with radiation hard geometry. All this is combined with a very fast readout, the possibility of region of interest (ROI) readout, pixel binning with consequent frame rate increase and a dynamic range close to 12 bits. The high frame rate has been achieved using 32 parallel analogue outputs each one operating at up to 20 MHz. Binning of pixels can be controlled externally and the flexibility of the design allows several possibilities, such as 2 × 2 or 4 × 4 binning. Other binning configurations where the number of rows and the number of columns are not equal, such as 2 × 1 or 2 × 4, are also possible. Having control of the CMOS design allowed us to optimise the pixel design, in particular with regard to its radiation hardness, and to make optimum choices in the design of other regions of the final sensor. An early prototype was also designed with a variety of geometries in order to optimise the readout structure and these are presented. The sensor was manufactured in a 0.35 μm standard CMOS process.

  13. Deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the membrane of a CMOS-MEMS resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. Y.; Dennis, J. O.; Khir, M. H. Md; Saad, M. N. Mohamad

    2014-10-01

    A CMOS-MEMS resonator is optimized as a highly sensitive gas sensor. The principle of detection is based on change in resonant frequency of the resonator due to adsorption/absorption of trace gases onto the active material on the resonator membrane. The resonator was successfully fabricated using 0.35 μm CMOS technology and post-CMOS micromachining process. The post-CMOS process is used to etch the silicon substrate and silicon oxide to release the suspended structures of the devices. Preliminary trials of nanocrystalline Titania paste (TiO2) was screen-printed on three aluminum plates of sizes 2mm × 2 mm. One of the samples was analysed as prepared while the other two samples were sintered at 300°C and 550°C, respectively. Physical observation indicated a change of the color for heated samples as compared to the unheated one. EDX results indicates a carbon (C) peak with average weight % of 18.816 in the as prepared sample and absence of the peaks for the samples sintered at 300°C and 550°C. EDX results also show that the TiO2 used consists of a uniform distribution of spherical shaped nanoparticles with a diameter of about 13.49 to 48.42 nm. Finally, the Titania paste was successfully deposit on the membrane of the CMOS-MEMS resonator for use as the gas sensitive membrane of the sensor.

  14. Testability of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) leakage faults in CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaiya, Y. K.; Su, S. Y. H.

    1983-09-01

    With the advent of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration), the importance of CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) technology has increased. CMOS offers some very significant advantages over NMOS, and has emerged very competitive. Therefore, testability of CMOS devices is of considerable importance. CMOS devices exhibit some failure modes which are not adequately represented by the classical stuck-at fault model. A new fault model is introduced here to represent such faults. Leakage faults are specifically examined in this report, such faults increase the static supply current (which is ordinarily quite low) substantially. A leakage testing experiment consists of applying different vectors to the circuit, and in each case measuring the static supply current. This experimentally obtained data is then analyzed to obtain fault-related information. Leakage testing offers extra testability without any additional pins. It can detect some faults which cannot be detected by the conventional testing. Test generation for several basic CMOS structures is considered. Correspondence between leakage testing and conventional testing is studied. Two methods for analyzing experimental data are presented. Available experimental data was analyzed to obtain statistical information.

  15. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-07-15

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10{sup 11}, 5 × 10{sup 11}, and 1 × 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V{sub N}), saturation output signal voltage (V{sub S}), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike.

  16. Photocurrent estimation from multiple nondestructive samples in CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinqiao; El Gamal, Abbas

    2001-05-01

    CMOS image sensors generally suffer form lower dynamic range than CCDs due to their higher readout noise. Their high speed readout capability and the potential of integrating memory and signal processing with the sensor on the same chip, open up many possibilities for enhancing their dynamic range. Earlier work have demonstrated the use of multiple non-destructive samples to enhance dynamic range, while achieving higher SNR than using other dynamic range enhancement schemes. The high dynamic range image is constructed by appropriately scaling each pixel's last sample before saturation. Conventional CDS is used to reduce offset FPN and reset noise. This simple high dynamic range image construction scheme, however, does not take full advantage of the multiple samples. Readout noise power, which doubles as a result of performing CDS, remain as high as in conventional sensor operation. As a result dynamic range is only extended at the high illumination end. The paper explores the use of linear mean-square-error estimation to more fully exploit the multiple pixel samples to reduce readout noise and thus extend dynamic range at the low illumination end. We present three estimation algorithms: (1) a recursive estimator when reset noise and offset FPN are ignored, (2) a non-recursive algorithm when reset noise and FPN are considered, and (3) a recursive estimation algorithm for case (2), which achieves mean square error close to the non-recursive algorithm without the need to store all the samples. The later recursive algorithm is attractive since it requires the storage of only a few pixel values per pixel, which makes its implementation in a single chip digital imaging system feasible.

  17. sCMOS detector for imaging VNIR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Reulke, Ralf; Schwarzer, Horst; Venus, Holger; Neumann, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The facility Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the scientific results of the institute of leading edge instruments and focal plane designs for EnMAP VIS/NIR spectrograph. EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) is one of the selected proposals for the national German Space Program. The EnMAP project includes the technological design of the hyper spectral space borne instrument and the algorithms development of the classification. The EnMAP project is a joint response of German Earth observation research institutions, value-added resellers and the German space industry like Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) and others to the increasing demand on information about the status of our environment. The Geo Forschungs Zentrum (GFZ) Potsdam is the Principal Investigator of EnMAP. DLR OS and KT were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for this project, new manufacturing accuracy and on-chip processing capability in order to keep pace with the ambitious scientific and user requirements. In combination with the engineering research, the current generations of space borne sensor systems are focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large swath and high spectral resolution with intelligent synchronization control, fast-readout ADC chains and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing and smart deep space instruments. The paper gives an overview over the detector verification program at DLR on FPA level, new control possibilities for sCMOS detectors in global shutter mode and key parameters like PRNU, DSNU, MTF, SNR, Linearity, Spectral Response, Quantum Efficiency, Flatness and Radiation Tolerance will be discussed in detail.

  18. Etch challenges for DSA implementation in CMOS via patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta Barros, P.; Barnola, S.; Gharbi, A.; Argoud, M.; Servin, I.; Tiron, R.; Chevalier, X.; Navarro, C.; Nicolet, C.; Lapeyre, C.; Monget, C.; Martinez, E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the etch challenges to overcome for the implementation of PS-b-PMMA block copolymer's Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) in CMOS via patterning level. Our process is based on a graphoepitaxy approach, employing an industrial PS-b-PMMA block copolymer (BCP) from Arkema with a cylindrical morphology. The process consists in the following steps: a) DSA of block copolymers inside guiding patterns, b) PMMA removal, c) brush layer opening and finally d) PS pattern transfer into typical MEOL or BEOL stacks. All results presented here have been performed on the DSA Leti's 300mm pilot line. The first etch challenge to overcome for BCP transfer involves in removing all PMMA selectively to PS block. In our process baseline, an acetic acid treatment is carried out to develop PMMA domains. However, this wet development has shown some limitations in terms of resists compatibility and will not be appropriated for lamellar BCPs. That is why we also investigate the possibility to remove PMMA by only dry etching. In this work the potential of a dry PMMA removal by using CO based chemistries is shown and compared to wet development. The advantages and limitations of each approach are reported. The second crucial step is the etching of brush layer (PS-r-PMMA) through a PS mask. We have optimized this step in order to preserve the PS patterns in terms of CD, holes features and film thickness. Several integrations flow with complex stacks are explored for contact shrinking by DSA. A study of CD uniformity has been addressed to evaluate the capabilities of DSA approach after graphoepitaxy and after etching.

  19. Compact CMOS Camera Demonstrator (C3D) for Ukube-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriss, R. D.; Holland, A. D.; Barber, S. J.; Karout, S.; Burgon, R.; Dryer, B. J.; Murray, N. J.; Hall, D. J.; Smith, P. H.; Grieg, T.; Tutt, J. H.; Endicott, J.; Jerram, P.; Morris, D.; Robbins, M.; Prevost, V.; Holland, K.

    2011-09-01

    The Open University, in collaboration with e2v technologies and XCAM Ltd, have been selected to fly an EO (Earth Observation) technology demonstrator and in-orbit radiation damage characterisation instrument on board the UK Space Agency's UKube-1 pilot Cubesat programme. Cubesat payloads offer a unique opportunity to rapidly build and fly space hardware for minimal cost, providing easy access to the space environment. Based around the e2v 1.3 MPixel 0.18 micron process eye-on-Si CMOS devices, the instrument consists of a radiation characterisation imager as well as a narrow field imager (NFI) and a wide field imager (WFI). The narrow and wide field imagers are expected to achieve resolutions of 25 m and 350 m respectively from a 650 km orbit, providing sufficient swathe width to view the southern UK with the WFI and London with the NFI. The radiation characterisation experiment has been designed to verify and reinforce ground based testing that has been conducted on the e2v eye-on-Si family of devices and includes TEC temperature control circuitry as well as RADFET in-orbit dosimetry. Of particular interest are SEU and SEL effects. The novel instrument design allows for a wide range of capabilities within highly constrained mass, power and space budgets providing a model for future use on similarly constrained missions, such as planetary rovers. Scheduled for launch in December 2011, this 1 year low cost programme should not only provide valuable data and outreach opportunities but also help to prove flight heritage for future missions.

  20. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  1. Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny C. Servo, Ph.D.

    2004-07-12

    In order to fulfill the objective of Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR), the Department of Energy funds an initiative referred to as the Commercialization Assistance Program (CAP). The over-arching purpose of the CAP is to facilitate transition of the SBIR-funded technology to Phase III defined as private sector investment or receipt of non-sbir dollars to further the commercialization of the technology. Phase III also includes increased sales. This report summarizes the stages involved in the implementation of the Commercialization Assistance Program, a program which has been most successful in fulfilling its objectives.

  2. Commercial Biomedical Experiments Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. The biomedical experiments CIBX-2 payload is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the stars program. Here, Astronaut Story Musgrave activates the CMIX-5 (Commercial MDA ITA experiment) payload in the Space Shuttle mid deck during the STS-80 mission in 1996 which is similar to CIBX-2. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  3. A scalable neural chip with synaptic electronics using CMOS integrated memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Albrecht, Jose M.; Derosier, Timothy; Srinivasa, Narayan

    2013-09-01

    The design and simulation of a scalable neural chip with synaptic electronics using nanoscale memristors fully integrated with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) is presented. The circuit consists of integrate-and-fire neurons and synapses with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). The synaptic conductance values can be stored in memristors with eight levels, and the topology of connections between neurons is reconfigurable. The circuit has been designed using a 90 nm CMOS process with via connections to on-chip post-processed memristor arrays. The design has about 16 million CMOS transistors and 73 728 integrated memristors. We provide circuit level simulations of the entire chip performing neuronal and synaptic computations that result in biologically realistic functional behavior.

  4. Recent Design Development in Molecular Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection Using Nanometer CMOS Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dung C.; Ma, Dongsheng (Brian); Roveda, Janet M. W.

    2012-01-01

    As one of the key clinical imaging methods, the computed X-ray tomography can be further improved using new nanometer CMOS sensors. This will enhance the current technique's ability in terms of cancer detection size, position, and detection accuracy on the anatomical structures. The current paper reviewed designs of SOI-based CMOS sensors and their architectural design in mammography systems. Based on the existing experimental results, using the SOI technology can provide a low-noise (SNR around 87.8 db) and high-gain (30 v/v) CMOS imager. It is also expected that, together with the fast data acquisition designs, the new type of imagers may play important roles in the near-future high-dimensional images in additional to today's 2D imagers. PMID:23319947

  5. Radiation-tolerant 50MHz bulk CMOS VLSI circuits utilizing radiation-hard structure NMOS transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, H.; Takatsuka

    1986-10-01

    A radiation-tolerant, high speed, bulk CMOS VLSI circuit design, utilizing a new NMOS structure, has been investigated, based on ..gamma..-ray irradiation experimental results for 2 ..mu..m shift registers. By utilizing 60-bit clocked gate and transfer gate static shift register circuits, the usefulness of radiation-hard NMOS structure and circuit design parameter optimization has been confirmed experimentally, showing 50 MHZ operation CMOS circuits at 5 V supply voltage after 1 x 10/sup 5/ rads (Si) irradiation. The limitations of dynamic circuits in radiation-tolerant circuit designs have also been shown, using 120-bit dynamic shift register circuits. Based on the above results, radiation-tolerant, high-performance, bulk CMOS VLSI circuit designs are discussed.

  6. A CMOS Time-Resolved Fluorescence Lifetime Analysis Micro-System.

    PubMed

    Rae, Bruce R; Muir, Keith R; Gong, Zheng; McKendry, Jonathan; Girkin, John M; Gu, Erdan; Renshaw, David; Dawson, Martin D; Henderson, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    We describe a CMOS-based micro-system for time-resolved fluorescence lifetime analysis. It comprises a 16 × 4 array of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) fabricated in 0.35 μm high-voltage CMOS technology with in-pixel time-gated photon counting circuitry and a second device incorporating an 8 × 8 AlInGaN blue micro-pixellated light-emitting diode (micro-LED) array bump-bonded to an equivalent array of LED drivers realized in a standard low-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology, capable of producing excitation pulses with a width of 777 ps (FWHM). This system replaces instrumentation based on lasers, photomultiplier tubes, bulk optics and discrete electronics with a PC-based micro-system. Demonstrator lifetime measurements of colloidal quantum dot and Rhodamine samples are presented. PMID:22291564

  7. A Glucose Biosensor Using CMOS Potentiostat and Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Khandaker A; Islam, Syed K; Hensley, Dale K; McFarlane, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a linear, low power, and compact CMOS based potentiostat for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNF) based amperometric glucose sensors. The CMOS based potentiostat consists of a single-ended potential control unit, a low noise common gate difference-differential pair transimpedance amplifier and a low power VCO. The potentiostat current measuring unit can detect electrochemical current ranging from 500 nA to 7 [Formula: see text] from the VACNF working electrodes with high degree of linearity. This current corresponds to a range of glucose, which depends on the fiber forest density. The potentiostat consumes 71.7 [Formula: see text] of power from a 1.8 V supply and occupies 0.017 [Formula: see text] of chip area realized in a 0.18 [Formula: see text] standard CMOS process. PMID:27337723

  8. A CMOS Time-Resolved Fluorescence Lifetime Analysis Micro-System

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Bruce R.; Muir, Keith R.; Gong, Zheng; McKendry, Jonathan; Girkin, John M.; Gu, Erdan; Renshaw, David; Dawson, Martin D.; Henderson, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a CMOS-based micro-system for time-resolved fluorescence lifetime analysis. It comprises a 16 × 4 array of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) fabricated in 0.35 μm high-voltage CMOS technology with in-pixel time-gated photon counting circuitry and a second device incorporating an 8 × 8 AlInGaN blue micro-pixellated light-emitting diode (micro-LED) array bump-bonded to an equivalent array of LED drivers realized in a standard low-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology, capable of producing excitation pulses with a width of 777 ps (FWHM). This system replaces instrumentation based on lasers, photomultiplier tubes, bulk optics and discrete electronics with a PC-based micro-system. Demonstrator lifetime measurements of colloidal quantum dot and Rhodamine samples are presented. PMID:22291564

  9. A Demonstration of TIA Using FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Koichi; Wada, Takehiko; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Arai, Yasuo; Ohno, Morifumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kanada, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki; Hattori, Yasuki; Ukai, Sota; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Baba, Shunsuke; Kochi, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Keita

    2016-02-01

    We are developing a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) operated at temperatures below ˜ 4 K. Its application is planned for the readout circuit of high-impedance far-infrared detectors for astronomical observations. We designed a trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) using a CMOS operational amplifier (OPAMP) with FD-SOI technique. The TIA is optimized to readout signals from a germanium blocked impurity band (Ge BIB) detector which is highly sensitive to wavelengths of up to ˜ 200 \\upmu m. For the first time, we demonstrated the FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP combined with the Ge BIB detector at 4.5 K. The result promises to solve issues faced by conventional cryogenic ROICs.

  10. A Demonstration of TIA Using FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Koichi; Wada, Takehiko; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Arai, Yasuo; Ohno, Morifumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kanada, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki; Hattori, Yasuki; Ukai, Sota; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Baba, Shunsuke; Kochi, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Keita

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) operated at temperatures below ˜ 4 K. Its application is planned for the readout circuit of high-impedance far-infrared detectors for astronomical observations. We designed a trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) using a CMOS operational amplifier (OPAMP) with FD-SOI technique. The TIA is optimized to readout signals from a germanium blocked impurity band (Ge BIB) detector which is highly sensitive to wavelengths of up to ˜ 200 μm. For the first time, we demonstrated the FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP combined with the Ge BIB detector at 4.5 K. The result promises to solve issues faced by conventional cryogenic ROICs.

  11. The effect of interconnection resistance on the performance enhancement of liquid-nitrogen-cooled CMOS circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, J.T. ); Plummer, J.D. . Center for Integrated Systems)

    1989-08-01

    The effect of interconnection resistance on CMOS circuit performance is examined at room temperature and liquid-nitrogen temperature. The interconnection is modeled as a distributed RLC line driven by an optimal configuration of cascaded inverters. The thin-film resistivity of pure aluminum has been measured to allow accurate prediction of the effect of interconnection resistance on performance. A critical interconnect length is defined as the point at which interconnect resistance begins to dominate propagation delay time. The critical interconnect length is computed at room temperature and liquid-nitrogen temperature for present-day and scaled CMOS technologies and compared to the maximum interconnect length expected in state-of-the-art VLSI circuits. Conclusions are drawn concerning the importance of interconnection resistance in determining the enhancement in performance achieved through reduced-temperature operation of CMOS integrated circuits.

  12. The evaluation system of the 2-D scanning mirror based on CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gui-ying; Xie, Yuan; Chen, Jin-xing

    2010-10-01

    The high precision two-dimension scanning control technique is being developed for the next geosynchronous satellites FY-4 satellites which is using the three-axis stabilization stages. How to evaluate the point and scanning precision of the scanning mirror is one of the most important technologies. This paper describes the optoelectronic measure method based on CMOS sensors to evaluate the point and scanning precision of the scanning mirror in the laboratory, which is a 2-D dynamic angle measurement system. Some technologies, such as the sup-pixel orientation technology and the CMOS ROI technology, are used in the measurement system. The research shows that the angle measurement system based on IBIS-6600CMOS sensors can attain the 20°× 20° field of view, 2" accuracy, and 1Kframes/s speed. But the system is sensitive to the environment and it can only be worked in the laboratory.

  13. A CMOS-compatible, surface-micromachined pressure sensor for aqueous ultrasonic application

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.P.; Smith, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    A surface micromachined pressure sensor array is under development at the Integrated Micromechanics, Microsensors, and CMOS Technologies organization at Sandia National Laboratories. This array is designed to sense absolute pressures from ambient pressure to 650 psia with frequency responses from DC to 2 MHz. The sensor is based upon a sealed, deformable, circular LPCVD silicon nitride diaphragm. Absolute pressure is determined from diaphragm deflection, which is sensed with low-stress, micromechanical, LPCVD polysilicon piezoresistors. All materials and processes used for sensor fabrication are CMOS compatible, and are part of Sandia`s ongoing effort of CMOS integration with Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Test results of individual sensors are presented along with process issues involving the release etch and metal step coverage.

  14. A Demonstration of TIA Using FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Koichi; Wada, Takehiko; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Arai, Yasuo; Ohno, Morifumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kanada, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki; Hattori, Yasuki; Ukai, Sota; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Baba, Shunsuke; Kochi, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Keita

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) operated at temperatures below ˜ 4 K. Its application is planned for the readout circuit of high-impedance far-infrared detectors for astronomical observations. We designed a trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) using a CMOS operational amplifier (OPAMP) with FD-SOI technique. The TIA is optimized to readout signals from a germanium blocked impurity band (Ge BIB) detector which is highly sensitive to wavelengths of up to ˜ 200 \\upmu m. For the first time, we demonstrated the FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP combined with the Ge BIB detector at 4.5 K. The result promises to solve issues faced by conventional cryogenic ROICs.

  15. Prototyping of an HV-CMOS demonstrator for the High Luminosity-LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella, E.; Benoit, M.; Casanova, R.; Casse, G.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Peric, I.; Vossebeld, J.

    2016-01-01

    HV-CMOS sensors can offer important advantages in terms of material budget, granularity and cost for large area tracking systems in high energy physics experiments. This article presents the design and simulated results of an HV-CMOS pixel demonstrator for the High Luminosity-LHC. The pixel demonstrator has been designed in the 0.35 μm HV-CMOS process from ams AG and submitted for fabrication through an engineering run. To improve the response of the sensor, different wafers with moderate to high substrate resistivities are used to fabricate the design. The prototype consists of four large analog and standalone matrices with several pixel flavours, which are all compatible for readout with the FE-I4 ASIC. Details about the matrices and the pixel flavours are provided in this article.

  16. Design of a CMOS-based multichannel integrated biosensor chip for bioelectronic interface with neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wong, Wai Man; Zhang, Yulong; Zhang, Yandong; Gao, Fei; Nelson, Richard D; Larue, John C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and prototyping of a 24-channel mixed signal full-customized CMOS integrated biosensor chip for in vitro extracellular recording of neural signals. Design and implementation of hierarchical modules including microelectrode electrophysiological sensors, analog signal buffers, high gain amplifier and control/interface units are presented in detail. The prototype chip was fabricated by MOSIS with AMI C5 0.5 microm, double poly, triple metal layer CMOS technology. The electroless gold plating process is used to replace the aluminum material obtained from the standard CMOS process with biocompatible metal gold in the planner microelectrode array sensors to prevent cell poisoning and undesirable electrochemical corrosion. The biosensor chip provides a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio for neural signals with amplitudes and frequencies within the range of 600microV - 2mV and 100 Hz to 10KHz, respectively. PMID:19965239

  17. Development of low read noise high conversion gain CMOS image sensor for photon counting level imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kawahito, Shoji; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita

    2016-05-01

    A CMOS image sensor with deep sub-electron read noise and high pixel conversion gain has been developed. Its performance is recognized through image outputs from an area image sensor, confirming the capability of photoelectroncounting- level imaging. To achieve high conversion gain, the proposed pixel has special structures to reduce the parasitic capacitances around FD node. As a result, the pixel conversion gain is increased due to the optimized FD node capacitance, and the noise performance is also improved by removing two noise sources from power supply. For the first time, high contrast images from the reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor, with less than 0.3e- rms noise level, have been generated at an extremely low light level of a few electrons per pixel. In addition, the photon-counting capability of the developed CMOS imager is demonstrated by a measurement, photoelectron-counting histogram (PCH).

  18. 5A Zirconium Dioxide Ammonia Microsensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit Manufactured Using the 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guan-Ming; Dai, Ching-Liang; Yang, Ming-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The study presents an ammonia microsensor integrated with a readout circuit on-a-chip fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The integrated sensor chip consists of a heater, an ammonia sensor and a readout circuit. The ammonia sensor is constructed by a sensitive film and the interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zirconium dioxide that is coated on the interdigitated electrodes. The heater is used to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. A post-process is employed to remove the sacrificial layer and to coat zirconium dioxide on the sensor. When the sensitive film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas, the sensor produces a change in resistance. The readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experiments show that the integrated ammonia sensor has a sensitivity of 4.1 mV/ppm. PMID:23503294

  19. NASA commercial programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA-sponsored and assisted commercial space activities of 1989 are presented. Industrial R and D in space, centers for the commercial development of space, and new cooperative agreements are addressed in the U.S. private sector in space section. In the building U.S. competitiveness through technology section, the following topics are presented: (1) technology utilization as a national priority; (2) an exploration of benefits; and (3) honoring Apollo-Era spinoffs. International and domestic R and D trends, and the space sector are discussed in the section on selected economic indicators. Other subjects included in this report are: (1) small business innovation; (2) budget highlights and trends; (3) commercial programs management; and (4) the commercial programs advisory committee.

  20. Commercial space launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    While the space shuttle is expected to be the principle Space Transportation System (STS) of the United States, the Reagan Administration is moving ahead with the President's declared space policy of encouraging private sector operation of expendable launch vehicles (ELV's). With the signing of the “Commercial Space Launch Law” on October 30, the administration hopes that it has opened up the door for commercial ventures into space by streamlining regulations and coordinating applications for launches. The administration considers the development and operation of private sector ELV's as an important part of an overall U.S. space policy, complementing the space shuttle and government ELV's. The law follows by nearly a year the creation of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), which will coordinate applications for commercial space launches.

  1. Amorphous selenium direct detection CMOS digital x-ray imager with 25 micron pixel pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Christopher C.; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Ghanbarzadeh, Sina; Allan, Gary; Farrier, Michael; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a high resolution amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detection imager using a large-area compatible back-end fabrication process on top of a CMOS active pixel sensor having 25 micron pixel pitch. Integration of a-Se with CMOS technology requires overcoming CMOS/a-Se interfacial strain, which initiates nucleation of crystalline selenium and results in high detector dark currents. A CMOS-compatible polyimide buffer layer was used to planarize the backplane and provide a low stress and thermally stable surface for a-Se. The buffer layer inhibits crystallization and provides detector stability that is not only a performance factor but also critical for favorable long term cost-benefit considerations in the application of CMOS digital x-ray imagers in medical practice. The detector structure is comprised of a polyimide (PI) buffer layer, the a-Se layer, and a gold (Au) top electrode. The PI layer is applied by spin-coating and is patterned using dry etching to open the backplane bond pads for wire bonding. Thermal evaporation is used to deposit the a-Se and Au layers, and the detector is operated in hole collection mode (i.e. a positive bias on the Au top electrode). High resolution a-Se diagnostic systems typically use 70 to 100 μm pixel pitch and have a pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF) that is significantly limited by the pixel aperture. Our results confirm that, for a densely integrated 25 μm pixel pitch CMOS array, the MTF approaches the fundamental material limit, i.e. where the MTF begins to be limited by the a-Se material properties and not the pixel aperture. Preliminary images demonstrating high spatial resolution have been obtained from a frst prototype imager.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of a charge-biased CMOS-MEMS resonant gate field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, C. H.; Li, C. S.; Li, M. H.; Wang, Y. L.; Li, S. S.

    2014-09-01

    A high-frequency charge-biased CMOS-MEMS resonant gate field effect transistor (RGFET) composed of a metal-oxide composite resonant-gate structure and an FET transducer has been demonstrated utilizing the TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS technology with Q > 1700 and a signal-to-feedthrough ratio greater than 35 dB under a direct two-port measurement configuration. As compared to the conventional capacitive-type MEMS resonators, the proposed CMOS-MEMS RGFET features an inherent transconductance gain (gm) offered by the FET transduction capable of enhancing the motional signal of the resonator and relaxing the impedance mismatch issue to its succeeding electronics or 50 Ω-based test facilities. In this work, we design a clamped-clamped beam resonant-gate structure right above a floating gate FET transducer as a high-Q building block through a maskless post-CMOS process to combine merits from the large capacitive transduction areas of the large-width beam resonator and the high gain of the underneath FET. An analytical model is also provided to simulate the behavior of the charge-biased RGFET; the theoretical prediction is in good agreement with the experimental results. Thanks to the deep-submicrometer gap spacing enabled by the post-CMOS polysilicon release process, the proposed resonator under a purely capacitive transduction already attains motional impedance less than 10 kΩ, a record-low value among CMOS-MEMS capacitive resonators. To go one step further, the motional signal of the proposed RGFET is greatly enhanced through the FET transduction. Such a strong transmission and a sharp phase transition across 0° pave a way for future RGFET-type oscillators in RF and sensor applications. A time-elapsed characterization of the charge leakage rate for the floating gate is also carried out.

  3. Label free sensing of creatinine using a 6 GHz CMOS near-field dielectric immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Guha, S; Warsinke, A; Tientcheu, Ch M; Schmalz, K; Meliani, C; Wenger, Ch

    2015-05-01

    In this work we present a CMOS high frequency direct immunosensor operating at 6 GHz (C-band) for label free determination of creatinine. The sensor is fabricated in standard 0.13 μm SiGe:C BiCMOS process. The report also demonstrates the ability to immobilize creatinine molecules on a Si3N4 passivation layer of the standard BiCMOS/CMOS process, therefore, evading any further need of cumbersome post processing of the fabricated sensor chip. The sensor is based on capacitive detection of the amount of non-creatinine bound antibodies binding to an immobilized creatinine layer on the passivated sensor. The chip bound antibody amount in turn corresponds indirectly to the creatinine concentration used in the incubation phase. The determination of creatinine in the concentration range of 0.88-880 μM is successfully demonstrated in this work. A sensitivity of 35 MHz/10 fold increase in creatinine concentration (during incubation) at the centre frequency of 6 GHz is gained by the immunosensor. The results are compared with a standard optical measurement technique and the dynamic range and sensitivity is of the order of the established optical indication technique. The C-band immunosensor chip comprising an area of 0.3 mm(2) reduces the sensing area considerably, therefore, requiring a sample volume as low as 2 μl. The small analyte sample volume and label free approach also reduce the experimental costs in addition to the low fabrication costs offered by the batch fabrication technique of CMOS/BiCMOS process. PMID:25782697

  4. Research on spaceborne low light detection based on EMCCD and CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingxing; Liu, Jinguo; Zhou, Huaide; Zhang, Boyan

    2015-10-01

    Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device(EMCCD) can realize read out noise of less than 1e- by promoting gain of charges with the charge multiplication principle and is suitable for low light imaging. With the development of back Illuminated CMOS technology CMOS with high quantum efficiency and less than 1.5e- read noise has been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics(CIOMP). Spaceborne low light detection cameras based on EMCCD CCD201 and based on CMOS were respectively established and system noise models were founded. Low light detection performance as well as principle of spaceborne camera based on EMCCD and spaceborne camera based on CMOS were compared and analyzed. Results of analysis indicated that signal to noise(SNR) of spaceborne low light detection camera based on EMCCD would be 23.78 as radiance at entrance pupil of the camera was as low as 10-9 W/cm2/sr/μm at the focal plane temperature of 20°C. Spaceborne low light detection camera worked in starring mode and the integration time was 2 second. SNR of low light detection camera based on CMOS would be 27.42 under the same conditions. If cooling systems were used and the temperature was lowered from 20°C to -20°C, SNR of low light detection camera based on EMCCD would be improved to 27.533 while SNR of low light detection camera based on CMOS would be improved to 27.79.

  5. Design and experimental demonstration of low-power CMOS magnetic cell manipulation platform using charge recycling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Yoshida, Kohei; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We present the world’s first charge-recycling-based low-power technique of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) magnetic cell manipulation. CMOS magnetic cell manipulation associated with magnetic beads is a promissing tool for on-chip biomedical-analysis applications such as drug screening because CMOS can integrate control electronics and electro-chemical sensors. However, the conventional CMOS cell manipulation requires considerable power consumption. In this work, by concatenating multiple unit circuits and recycling electric charge among them, power consumption is reduced by a factor of the number of the concatenated unit circuits (1/N). For verifying the effectiveness, test chip was fabricated in a 0.6-µm CMOS. The chip successfully manipulates magnetic microbeads with achieving 49% power reduction (from 51 to 26.2 mW). Even considering the additional serial resistance of the concatenated inductors, nearly theoretical power reduction effect can be confirmed.

  6. Commodification and commercial surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Arneson, Richard J

    1992-01-01

    ... In this article I shall argue tentatively for the claim that commercial surrogacy should be legally permissible. I am more strongly convinced that a commitment to feminism should not predispose anyone against surrogacy. At least, no arguments offered so far should persuade anyone who is committed to equal rights for women and men and the dismantling of gender-based hierarchies to favor either legal prohibition or moral condemnation of commercial surrogacy. PMID:11651242

  7. Technology Commercialization Program 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

  8. ERC commercialization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MW power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full-sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MW Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

  9. ERC commercialization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MR power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full- sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, and (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MR Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

  10. Prediction and measurement of radiation damage to CMOS devices on board spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.; Danchenko, V.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Sing, M.; Brucker, G. J.; Ohanian, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The initial results obtained from the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors Radiation Effects Measurement experiment are presented. Predictions of radiation damage to C-MOS devices are based on standard environment models and computational techniques. A comparison of the shifts in CMOS threshold potentials, that is, those measured in space to those obtained from the on the ground simulation experiment with Co 60, indicated that the measured space damage is greater than predicted by a factor of two for shields thicker than 100 mils (2.54 mm), but agrees well with predictions for the thinner shields.

  11. Wireless power transmission for biomedical implants: The role of near-zero threshold CMOS rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Ali; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet R

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical implants require an electronic power conditioning circuitry to provide a stable electrical power supply. The efficiency of wireless power transmission is strongly dependent on the power conditioning circuitry specifically the rectifier. A cross-connected CMOS bridge rectifier is implemented to demonstrate the impact of thresholds of rectifiers on wireless power transfer. The performance of the proposed rectifier is experimentally compared with a conventional Schottky diode full wave rectifier over 9 cm distance of air and tissue medium between the transmitter and receiver. The output voltage generated by the CMOS rectifier across a 1 KΩ resistive load is around twice as much as the Schottky rectifier. PMID:26737525

  12. An in vitro demonstration of CMOS-based optoelectronic neural interface device for optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, T; Nakajima, S; Maezawa, Y; Noda, T; Sasagawa, K; Ishikawa, Y; Shiosaka, S; Ohta, J

    2013-01-01

    A CMOS-based neural interface device equipped with an integrated micro light source array for optogenetics was fabricated and demonstrated. A GaInN LED array formed on sapphire substrate was successfully assembled with a multifunctional CMOS image sensor that is capable of on-chip current injection. We demonstrated a functionality of light stimulation onto ChR2-expressed cells in an in vitro experiment. A ChR2-expressed cell were successfully stimulated with the light emitted from the fabricated device. PMID:24109808

  13. Total-dose and charge-trapping effects in gate oxides for CMOS LSI devices

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.S.; Kaputa, D.J.; Korman, C.S.; Surowiec, E.P.

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on CMOS devices fabricated using 3 Micron CMOS BULK process has been studied as a function of gate oxide processing and subsequent annealing. Threshold shifts, speed degradation, and power supply currents were measured as a function of total dose up to 10/sup 6/ Rad (Si). Using hot electron injection techniques, trapping densities and capture cross-sections of the traps in each oxide type have been determined at pre- and post-irradiation levels. Power supply leakage and speed performance of the devices were recovered within three to five hours by annealing them at 125/sup 0/C, +10 V bias.

  14. CMOS/SOI hardening at 100 MRAD (SiO sub 2 )

    SciTech Connect

    Leray, J.L.; Dupont-Nivet, E.; Pere, J.F.; Coic, Y.M.; Raffaelli, M. ); Auberton-Herve, A.J.; Bruel, M.; Giffard, B., Margail, J. )

    1990-12-01

    Hardened CMOS/SOI 29101 microprocessor, elementary cells and transistor shave been irradiated at levels between 10 Mrad(SiO{sub 2}) and 1 Grad(SiO{sub 2}) ({sup 60}Co and 10 keV x-rays). SIMOX buried oxide behavior in the range of 100 Mrad(SiO{sub 2}) and a channel-stopped MOS/SOI structure avoiding lateral leakage current are presented. These two items indicate the feasibility of a CMOS/SOI technology operating in the hundred Mrad(SiO{sub 2}) range.

  15. Measurements on HV-CMOS active sensors after irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, B.

    2015-04-01

    During the long shutdown (LS) 3 beginning 2022 the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosities pushing the limits especially for the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiments. In order to cope with the increased particle rate and radiation levels the ATLAS Inner Detector will be completely replaced by a purely silicon based one. Novel sensors based on HV-CMOS processes prove to be good candidates in terms of spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper measurements conducted on prototypes built in the AMS H18 HV-CMOS process and irradiated to fluences of up to 2·1016 neq cm-2 are presented.

  16. A novel CMOS sensor with in-pixel auto-zeroed discrimination for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degerli, Y.; Guilloux, F.; Orsini, F.

    2014-05-01

    With the aim of developing fast and granular Monolithic Active Pixels Sensors (MAPS) as new charged particle tracking detectors for high energy physics experiments, a new rolling shutter binary pixel architecture concept (RSBPix) with in-pixel correlated double sampling, amplification and discrimination is presented. The discriminator features auto-zeroing in order to compensate process-related transistor mismatches. In order to validate the pixel, a first monolithic CMOS sensor prototype, including a pixel array of 96 × 64 pixels, has been designed and fabricated in the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process. Results of laboratory tests are presented.

  17. 180 Degree Hybrid (Rat-Race) Junction on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Polyimide Interface Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Papapolymerou, John

    2003-01-01

    180-degree hybrid junctions can be used to equally divide power between two output ports with either a 0 or 180-degree phase difference. Alternatively, they can be used to combine signals from two sources and output a sum and difference signal. The main limitation of implementing; these on CMOS grade silicon is the high loss associated with the substrate. In this paper, we present a low loss 180-degree hybrid junction on CMOS grade (15 omega-cm) silicon with a polyimide interface layer for the first time. The divider utilizes Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) line technology, and operates at a center frequency of 15 GIIz.

  18. Fast-moving target tracking system based on CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhun; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2008-10-01

    This paper introduces a fast-moving target tracking system based on CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxygen Semiconductor) image sensor. A pipeline parallel architecture of region segmentation and first order moment algorithms on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) platform enables driving the high frame rate CMOS image sensor and processing real-time images at the same time, extracting coordinates of the bright target spots in the high-rate consecutive image frames. In the end of this paper, an experiment proved that this system performs well in tracking fast-moving target in satisfying demand of speed and accuracy.

  19. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  20. Design and performance of a custom ASIC digitizer for wire chamber readout in 65 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. J.; Brown, D. N.; Chang, J. K.; Ding, D.; Gnani, D.; Grace, C. R.; Jones, J. A.; Kolomensky, Y. G.; von der Lippe, H.; Mcvittie, P. J.; Stettler, M. W.; Walder, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the design and performance of a prototype ASIC digitizer for integrated wire chamber readout, implemented in 65 nm commercial CMOS technology. Each channel of the 4-channel prototype is composed of two 16-bit Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs), one 8-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), a front-end preamplifier and shaper, plus digital and analog buffers that support a variety of digitization chains. The prototype has a multiplexed digital backend that executes a state machine, distributes control and timing signals, and buffers data for serial output. Laboratory bench tests measure the absolute TDC resolution between 74 ps and 480 ps, growing with the absolute delay, and a relative time resolution of 19 ps. Resolution outliers due to cross-talk between clock signals and supply or reference voltages are seen. After calibration, the ADC displays good linearity and noise performance, with an effective number of bits of 6.9. Under normal operating conditions the circuit consumes 32 mW per channel. Potential design improvements to address the resolution drift and tails are discussed.