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Sample records for 131i-anti-cd20 rituximab radioimmunotherapy

  1. Standard Operating Procedure for In-house Preparation of (131)I-rituximab for Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pickford, Matthew D; Turner, J Harvey

    2012-09-01

    A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) has been formulated for in-house preparation, quality control, dispensing and administration of (131)I-rituximab appropriate for the safe, effective, radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A decade of experience of semi-automated radioiodination of rituximab in our hospital radiopharmaceutical laboratory was analysed. The methodology was then refined for safe, practical, affordable application to radioimmunotherapy of lymphoma in departments of nuclear medicine in developing countries. This SOP has the potential to be incorporated into good laboratory practice conditions appropriate for local regulatory agency requirements. PMID:23372447

  2. Standard Operating Procedure for In-house Preparation of 131I-rituximab for Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pickford, Matthew D.; Turner, J. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) has been formulated for in-house preparation, quality control, dispensing and administration of 131I-rituximab appropriate for the safe, effective, radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A decade of experience of semi-automated radioiodination of rituximab in our hospital radiopharmaceutical laboratory was analysed. The methodology was then refined for safe, practical, affordable application to radioimmunotherapy of lymphoma in departments of nuclear medicine in developing countries. This SOP has the potential to be incorporated into good laboratory practice conditions appropriate for local regulatory agency requirements. PMID:23372447

  3. Radioimmunotherapy of relapsed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma with 131I-rituximab in routine clinical practice: 10-year single-institution experience of 142 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Michael F; Turner, J Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has achieved objective response rates in clinical trials comparable with standard rituximab with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy, but is relatively underused in routine practice. In this article, we report our clinical experience in 142 consecutive patients who received iodine-131 rituximab radioimmunotherapy for low-grade, predominantly follicular, relapsed NHL. Objective response rates of 67%, with complete response (CR) in 50% and median overall survival of 32 months, matched the response rates in a phase 2 clinical trial of (131)I-rituximab radioimmunotherapy and compares favorably with those reported for (131)I-tositumomab or (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Progression-free survival was 18 months overall and 32 months in CR or CR-unconfirmed patients. Our patients comprised 107 (75%) follicular lymphoma, 21 (15%) small lymphocytic lymphoma, 6 (4%) mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue/marginal zone lymphoma, and 8 (6%) mantle-cell lymphoma, with median follow-up of 32 months and 8-year overall survival of 48%. Toxicity was limited to hematologic grade 4 neutropenia, occurring in 10% and thrombocytopenia in 6%. There were no episodes of bleeding or infection requiring hospital admission. Radioimmunotherapy with (131)I-rituximab in routine clinical outpatient practice provides cost-effective, safe treatment of relapsed/refractory indolent NHL, with half of patients achieving durable, complete remission with potential for repeat radioimmunotherapy on relapse. PMID:20864582

  4. Standard Operating Procedure for Prospective Individualised Dosimetry for ([131])I-rituximab Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Calais, Phillipe J; Turner, J Harvey

    2012-09-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an attractive therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) as it allows targeted tumor irradiation which provides a cytotoxic effect significantly greater than that of the immune-mediated effects of a non-radioactive, or 'cold', antibody alone. Anti-CD20 antibodies such as rituximab are ideal for RIT, as not only is it easily iodinated, but the CD20 antigen is found on more than 95% of B-cell NHL. A standard operating procedure (SOP) has been formulated for personalized prospective dosimetry for safe, effective outpatient (131)I-rituximab RIT of NHL. Over five years, experience of treatment of outpatients with (131)I-rituximab was analyzed with respect to critical organ radiation dose in patients and radiation exposure of their carers. This radiation safety methodology has been refined; and offers the potential for safe, practical application to outpatient (131)I-rituximab RIT of lymphoma in general and in developing countries in particular. Given endorsement and sanction of this SOP by local regulatory authorities the personalized dosimetry paradigm will facilitate incorporation of RIT into the routine clinical practice of therapeutic nuclear oncology worldwide. PMID:23372448

  5. A phase 2 study of inotuzumab ozogamicin in patients with indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma refractory to rituximab alone, rituximab and chemotherapy, or radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goy, Andre; Forero, Andres; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Christopher Ehmann, W; Tsai, Michaela; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Volkert, Angela; Vandendries, Erik; Ogura, Michinori

    2016-08-01

    This phase 2 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of inotuzumab ozogamicin (InO) in patients with indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) refractory to rituximab alone, rituximab plus chemotherapy or anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy. Patients received InO 1·8 mg/m(2) intravenously on a 28-d cycle for a planned 4-8 cycles. The initial InO dose and schedule could be adjusted for tolerability and patients were allowed to receive 2 additional cycles (up to 8 total) after achieving a complete response (CR). The primary endpoint was overall response. Eighty-one patients were enrolled, among whom 48 (59%) received ≥3 InO cycles and 13 (16%) completed the treatment phase. The overall response rate was 67% (CR, 31%). Median (95% confidence interval) progression-free survival was 12·7 (8·9-26·9) months; median overall survival was not reached. Haematological adverse events (AEs) were common, particularly thrombocytopenia (74%) and neutropenia (56%). These were also the most common AEs leading to treatment discontinuation (37% and 11%, respectively); 58% of patients reported AEs leading to treatment discontinuation. InO demonstrated robust activity in these heavily pretreated patients, although treatment duration was limited by haematological toxicities. Additional studies may determine dosing regimens that allow for reduced toxicity. PMID:27101934

  6. An approach for conjugation of 177Lu- DOTA-SCN- Rituximab (BioSim) & its evaluation for radioimmunotherapy of relapsed & refractory B-cell non Hodgkins lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Parul; Singla, Suhas; Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Vasisht, Atul; Sharma, Atul; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Bal, C.S.; Snehlata; Malhotra, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: The prerequisite of radioimmunotherapy is stable binding of a radionuclide to monoclonal antibodies, which are specific to the tumour-associated antigen. Most B-cell lymphomas express CD20 antigen on the surface of the tumour cells, making it a suitable target for therapeutic radioactive monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, the immunoconjugate of biosimilar Rituximab (Reditux™) and macrocyclic chelator, p-SCN-Bz-DOTA, was prepared and radiolabelled with Lutetium-177 followed by quality control procedures. Methods: Rituximab(BioSim) was desalted with sodium bicarbonate (0.1M, pH 9.0) and incubated with DOTA-SCN (1:50). The effectiveness of the conjugation was evaluated by determining the number of chelators per antibody molecule. This conjugate was radiolabelled with Lutetium-177 and purified using PD10 column. The quality control parameters like pH, clarity, radiochemical purity, in vitro stability and sterility were studied. Immunoreactivity of 177Lu-DOTA-Rituximab (BioSim) was assessed using RAMOS cells. The radioimmunoconjugate (RIC) after stringent quality assurance was injected in three patients and the biodistribution profile was analysed. Results: An average of 4.25 ± 1.04 p-SCN-Bz-DOTA molecules could be randomly conjugated to a single molecule of Rituximab (BioSim). The radiochemical purity of the labelled antibody was > 95 per cent with preserved affinity for CD20 antigen. The final preparation was stable up to about 120 h when tested under different conditions. A favourable biodistribution profile was observed with liver showing the maximum uptake of the RIC. Interpretation & conclusions: A favourable radiochemical purity, stability and biodistribution of the radiolabelled immunoconjugate indicate that clinical trials for evaluation of toxicity and efficacy of 177Lu-DOTA-antiCD20 antibody-Rituximab (BioSim) in patients of relapsed and refractory non Hodgkin's lymphoma can be considered. PMID:24927340

  7. Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Because drug development is not a static process, a drug’s market authorisation may change over time. In many cases, the number of indications for which a drug is approved increases. Because this facet of drug development also comes at significant costs, a corresponding patent filing strategy is required to protect these investments. The strategy as applied to rituximab, which is approved for a variety of indications, is discussed in this review. PMID:24866199

  8. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Low-Dose-Rate Radioimmunotherapy by the Alpha-Emitting Radioimmunoconjugate Thorium-227-DOTA-Rituximab

    SciTech Connect

    Dahle, Jostein; Krogh, Cecilie; Melhus, Katrine B.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Larsen, Roy H.; Kvinnsland, Yngve

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the low-dose-rate alpha-particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate {sup 227}Th-1,4,7,10-p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7, 10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-rituximab can be used to inactivate lymphoma cells growing as single cells and small colonies. Methods and Materials: CD20-positive lymphoma cell lines were treated with {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab for 1-5 weeks. To simulate the in vivo situation with continuous but decreasing supply of radioimmunoconjugates from the blood pool, the cells were not washed after incubation with {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab, but half of the medium was replaced with fresh medium, and cell concentration and cell-bound activity were determined every other day after start of incubation. A microdosimetric model was established to estimate the average number of hits in the nucleus for different localizations of activity. Results: There was a specific targeted effect on cell growth of the {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab treatment. Although the cells were not washed after incubation with {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab, the average contribution of activity in the medium to the mean dose was only 6%, whereas the average contribution from activity on the cells' own surface was 78%. The mean dose rates after incubation with 800 Bq/mL {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab varied from 0.01 to 0.03 cGy/min. The average delay in growing from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} cells/mL was 15 days when the cells were treated with a mean absorbed radiation dose of 2 Gy alpha-particle radiation from {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab, whereas it was 11 days when the cells were irradiated with 6 Gy of X-radiation. The relative biologic effect of the treatment was estimated to be 2.9-3.4. Conclusions: The low-dose-rate radioimmunoconjugate {sup 227}Th-DOTA-rituximab is suitable for inactivation of single lymphoma cells and small colonies of lymphoma cells.

  9. Cancer radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-01-01

    Targeting of radionuclides with antibodies, or radioimmunotherapy, has been an active field of research spanning nearly 50 years, evolving with advancing technologies in molecular biology and chemistry, and with many important preclinical and clinical studies illustrating the benefits, but also the challenges, which all forms of targeted therapies face. There are currently two radiolabeled antibodies approved for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors remains a challenge. Novel antibody constructs, focusing on treatment of localized and minimal disease, and pretargeting are all promising new approaches that are currently under investigation. PMID:21395378

  10. Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith, Ruby F.; Buchsbaum, Donald J. . E-mail: djb@uab.edu

    2006-10-01

    This brief review covers the concept of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and summarize the results obtained in preclinical animal models and initial phase I clinical trials. Reagents studied have been a bifunctional antibody prepared by crosslinking Fab' fragments from two antibodies with different specificity, one binding the target antigen expressed on tumors and the other binding a radiolabeled peptide. The alternative system is a conjugate of streptavidin linked to the pretargeting agent and radiolabeled biotin. After reaching optimal tumor targeting of the pretargeting agent, a synthetic mono-biotin poly N-acetyl-galactosamine compound was used to clear unbound targeting agent from the circulation before the injection of radiolabeled biotin. Promising therapeutic responses were obtained in various tumor xenograft models in athymic nude mice. A phase I study of an anti-CD20/streptavidin pretargeting agent and 15 mCi/m{sup 2} {sup 9}Y-biotin produced objective responses with minimal toxicity among lymphoma patients, with an average tumor-to-whole-body radiation dose ratio of 49. Pretargeting radioimmunotherapy approaches have shown higher tumor-to-whole-body ratios than that usually obtained with one-step radioimmunotherapy.

  11. Radioimmunotherapy of malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, R.M. )

    1991-05-01

    The critical issues in radioimmunotherapy are highlighted, and novel ways of improving the therapeutic indexes of radioimmunotherapeutic agents are outlined. The use of radioactively labeled monoclonal antibodies to treat malignant tumors has been investigated in animals and humans. Radionuclides suitable for labeling antibodies for such use include iodine 125, iodine 131, yttrium 90, rhenium 188, and copper 67. Radiobiological factors to be considered in radioimmunotherapy include the size and density of the tumor and the ability of a radiolabeled antibody to penetrate the tumor nodule. The dose of radiation required to destroy a tumor varies; however, the whole-body dose must not exceed 200 rads to avoid irreversible toxicity to the bone marrow. Despite the theoretical inadequacy of radiation doses to tumors indicated by conventional dosimetry, responses have been observed in animals and humans. More reliable and accurate dosimetric methods are under development. The induction of human antimouse antibodies can alter the pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies. Improving the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapeutic agents may be achieved through regional therapy, administering a secondary antibody to improve clearance, combining radioimmunotherapy with external-beam irradiation, using an avidin-biotin conjugate system to deliver the radiolabeled antibodies, and addressing the problem of tumor antigen heterogeneity. Researchers are working to reduce or eliminate the clinical problems associated with radioimmunotherapy. Hematologic malignancies, such as lymphomas, are more likely than solid tumors to respond satisfactorily. 110 refs.

  12. Preparation & in vitro evaluation of 90Y-DOTA-rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Kameswaran, Mythili; Pandey, Usha; Dash, Ashutosh; Samuel, Grace; Venkatesh, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Radioimmunotherapy is extensively being used for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Use of rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody directed against the CD20 antigen in combination with suitable beta emitters is expected to result in good treatment response by its cross-fire and bystander effects. The present work involves the conjugation of p-isothiocyanatobenzyl DOTA (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA) to rituximab, its radiolabelling with 90Y and in vitro and in vivo evaluation to determine its potential as a radioimmunotherapeutic agent. Methods: Rituximab was conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-DOTA at 1:1 antibody: DOTA molar ratio. The number of DOTA molecules linked to one molecule of rituximab was determined by radioassay and spectroscopic assay. Radiolabelling of rituximab with 90Y was carried out and its in vitro stability was evaluated. In vitro cell binding studies were carried out in Raji cells expressing CD20 antigen. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal Swiss mice. Results: Using both radioassay and spectroscopic method, it was determined that about five molecules of DOTA were linked to rituximab. Radiolabelling of the rituximab conjugate with 90Y and subsequent purification on PD-10 column gave a product with radiochemical purity (RCP) > 98 per cent which was retained at > 90 per cent up to 72 h when stored at 37°C. In vitro cell binding experiments of 90Y-DOTA-rituximab with Raji cells exhibited specific binding of 20.7 ± 0.1 per cent with 90Y-DOTA-rituximab which reduced to 15.5 ± 0.2 per cent when incubated with cold rituximab. The equilibrium constant Kd for 90Y-DOTA-Rituximab was determined to be 3.38 nM. Radiolabelled antibody showed clearance via hepatobiliary and renal routes and activity in tibia was found to be quite low indicating in vivo stability of 90Y-DOTA-rituximab. Interpretation & conclusions: p-SCN-Bn-DOTA was conjugated with rituximab and radiolabelling with 90Y was carried out. In vitro studies carried

  13. Radioimmunotherapy of human tumours.

    PubMed

    Larson, Steven M; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Cheung, Nai-Kong V; Press, Oliver W

    2015-06-01

    The eradication of cancer remains a vexing problem despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of neoplasia. One therapeutic approach that has demonstrated potential involves the selective targeting of radionuclides to cancer-associated cell surface antigens using monoclonal antibodies. Such radioimmunotherapy (RIT) permits the delivery of a high dose of therapeutic radiation to cancer cells, while minimizing the exposure of normal cells. Although this approach has been investigated for several decades, the cumulative advances in cancer biology, antibody engineering and radiochemistry in the past decade have markedly enhanced the ability of RIT to produce durable remissions of multiple cancer types. PMID:25998714

  14. Radioimmunotherapy of lymphoma: Bexxar and Zevalin.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Stanley J

    2010-03-01

    Radioimmunotherapy is a form of targeted radionuclide therapy that uses a monoclonal antibody to deliver localized radiation. It is most appropriate for treatment of multiple tumor sites that cannot be readily excised surgically or irradiated using external beam radiation or brachytherapy. At present, 2 products, Bexxar ((131)I-tositumomab and unlabeled tositumomab, GlaxoSmithKline, Triangle Park, NC) and Zevalin ((90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and unlabeled rituximab, Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Irvine, CA and Cell Therapeutics, Seattle, WA) are approved for treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in certain clinical situations in the United States and Canada. Zevalin is available also in Europe, and there are plans to make both agents more widely available. The therapeutic dose to be used depends upon a number of patient-specific variables. Both regimen achieve a complete response or partial response in approximately 3 of 4 patients, with a duration of remission lasting many years in some cases. This article reviews the basis for dose selection, the nuclear medicine procedures involved, the results obtained to date, and issues related to patient and staff safety. PMID:20113680

  15. Rituximab: Uses in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, K; Wilson, J; Wilkerson, M

    2016-09-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with considerable potential in dermatology due to an increase in off-label indications. Chronic graft-versus-host disease and pemphigus vulgaris are two of the most promising indications for off-label use of rituximab. It is a generally safe alternative that should be considered when traditional therapy with corticosteroids or immunosuppressants has failed or caused significant intolerance. Currently, rituximab is only FDA-approved for treatment of follicular and diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Herein, off-label uses of rituximab and its efficacy in the treatment of cutaneous diseases are reviewed. PMID:27603326

  16. Radioimmunotherapy for Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Emmanouilides, Christos

    2003-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy targeting CD20 is a promising novel treatment for lymphoma. Prior trials have established the safe dose of Zevalin ((90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan; IDEC Pharmaceuticals) for patients with no more than 25% bone marrow (BM) involvement. Zevalin is expected to be an effective treatment for WM; however, the safe dose has not been defined. A phase I clinical trial has been designed to define the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of Zevalin in patients with WM and BM involvement up to 50%. Eligible patients need to have adequate hematologic indices (absolute neutrophil count [ANC] > 1,500/microL, platelets > 100,000/microL). The starting dose of (90)Y-Zevalin is 0.08 mCi/kg. Dose escalation by 0.04 mCi/kg in cohorts of three to six patients will be performed. Patients will be re-treated at 12 weeks if there is no complete response, no progression, and no dose-limiting toxicity. If the degree of BM involvement remains in the 20% to 50% range, re-treatment will involve a similar dose of Zevalin; if it is <20%, patients will receive Zevalin to the maximum allowed cumulative dose of 0.4 mCi/kg (or 0.3 mCi/kg for mild thrombocytopenia). Despite the phase I design, the re-treatment provision is expected to result in significant clinical benefit. PMID:12720148

  17. Discovery – Development of Rituximab

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded the development of rituximab, one of the first monoclonal antibody cancer treatments. With the discovery of rituximab, more than 70 percent of patients diagnosed with non-hodgkin lymphoma now live five years past their initial diagnosis.

  18. Radiometals as payloads for radioimmunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, Gerald L; Kennel, Stephen J; Siegel, Jeffry A; Denardo, Sally J

    2004-10-01

    Because of their remarkable effectiveness in radioimmunotherapy (RIT), 2 anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (MAb) drugs, one labeled with indium 111 for imaging or yttrium 90 for therapy, and another labeled with iodine I 131 for imaging and therapy, have been approved for use in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Successful RIT for lymphomas is due in large part to the rapid and efficient binding of the targeted MAb to lymphoma cells. Carcinomas are more difficult to access, necessitating novel strategies matched with radionuclides with specific physical properties. Because there are many radionuclides from which to choose, a systematic approach is required to select those preferred for a specific application. Thus far, radionuclides with g emissions for imaging and particulate emissions for therapy have been investigated. Radionuclides of iodine were the first to be used for RIT. Many conventionally radioiodinated MAbs are degraded after endocytosis by target cells, releasing radioiodinated peptides and amino acids. In contrast, radiometals have been shown to have residualizing properties, advantageous when the MAb is localized in malignant tissue. b-emitting lanthanides like those of 90Y, lutetium 177, etc. have attractive combinations of biologic, physical, radiochemical, production, economic, and radiation safety characteristics. Other radiometals, such as copper-67 and copper-64, are also of interest. a-emitters, including actinium-225 and bismuth-213, have been used for therapy in selected applications. Evidence for the impact of the radionuclide is provided by data from the randomized pivotal phase III trial of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) in patients with NHL; responses were about 2 times greater in the 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan arm than in the rituximab arm. It is clear that RIT has emerged as a safe and efficient method for treatment of NHL, especially in specific settings. PMID:15498149

  19. Radioimmunotherapy of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The need for novel approaches to treat infectious diseases is obvious and urgent. This situation has renewed interest in using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in therapy of infectious diseases. During the last 5 years radioimmunotherapy (RIT), a modality developed for cancer treatment, has been successfully adapted for the treatment of experimental fungal (C. neoformans and H. capsulatum), bacterial (S. pneumoniae and B. anthracis) and viral (HIV-1) infections. RIT produced none or only transient hematological toxicity in experimental animals. Investigation of radiobiological mechanisms of RIT of infections showed that microbial cells are killed by both "direct hit" and "cross-fire" radiation. MAbs radiolabeled with either alpha- or beta-emitters stimulated apoptosis-like cell death, while only mAbs radiolabeled with alpha-emitter 213Bi also decreased the metabolic activity of microbial cells. The success of this approach in laboratory studies combined with earlier nuclear medicine experience on pre-clinical and clinical studies utilizing radiolabeled organism-specific antibodies for imaging of infections provides encouragement for feasibility of therapeutically targeting microbes with labeled antibodies. We envision that first the organism-specific mAbs will be radiolabeled with imaging radionuclides such as 99mTc or 111In to localize the sites of infection with SPECT followed by RIT with 188Re- or 90Y-labeled mAb, respectively. Also, immunoPET might be utilized for imaging of infection before treatment if such positron-emitting radionuclides as 86Y (matching pair for 90Y) or 124I (matching pair for 131I) are available. It might be possible to create a so-called “pan-antibody” which would recognize an antigen shared by a particular class of human pathogens such as fungi, for example. The availability of such antibodies would eliminate the necessity of having antibodies specific for each particular microorganism and would enormously enhance the development of RIT

  20. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.

    1992-03-24

    This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.

  1. Macrodosimetry and microdosimetry in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K.

    1990-02-01

    This progress report summarizes the research accomplished and its clinical implementation since July 15, 1989. To improve beta-particle dosimetry, a point-source function was developed that is valid for a wide range of beta-particle emitters. An analytical solution for beta-particle dose rates within and outside of slabs of finite thickness was validated in an experimental tumor system and is now being used in clinical radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Quantitative SPECT was validated in phantom studies, beagle dogs, and patients with Kaposi's sarcoma. It is currently being used in clinical RIT for patients with Hodgkin's disease or hepatoma. Additionally, methodologies and computer software are being developed for quantitative autoradiography to achieve absorbed-dose calculation on the cellular level. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents an attractive strategy to deliver radiation selectively to tumor and other target organs while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. RIT with β-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in leukemia. Similarly, RIT directed against CD20 has shown promise in the setting of autologous and allogeneic HCT for B-cell lymphomas. α-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213, actinium-225 and astatinine-211 offers the possibility of more selective and efficient killing of target cells while sparing the surrounding normal cells. Pretargeting strategies may further improve target:normal organ dose ratios. While RIT has demonstrated significant antitumor activity, ultimately, randomized studies will be required to determine if conditioning regimens that include this therapeutic modality can improve patient outcomes after HCT. PMID:23557421

  3. Radioimmunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... will be involved in this procedure? A radiologist, nuclear medicine physician or radiation oncologist and other healthcare ... equipment? A radiologist who has specialized training in nuclear medicine or a nuclear medicine physician will supervise ...

  4. Efficacy and safety of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E

    2003-12-01

    Radioimmunotherapy, an emerging treatment option for certain patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), enables the targeting of cytotoxic radiation to tumor cells with minimal irradiation of normal cells. Yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin; Biogen Idec Inc, Cambridge, MA) was approved in February 2002 for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or transformed B-cell NHL, including patients with rituximab-refractory NHL. Yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan is an effective treatment with a consistent overall response rate of 73% to 83%. It has a good safety profile and is generally well tolerated in the indicated population. The results of clinical trials show that (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan can be used effectively and safely in many patients with NHL, including those with mild thrombocytopenia and those with disease that is refractory to rituximab, without the adverse events associated with conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy. The use of (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan does not preclude subsequent therapy with other conventional treatment options. PMID:14710398

  5. Improvement of Radioimmunotherapy Using Pretargeting

    PubMed Central

    Frampas, Eric; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    During the past two decades, considerable research has been devoted to radionuclide therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and receptor binding agents. Conventional radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is now an established and important tool in the treatment of hematologic malignancies such as Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For solid malignancies, the efficacy of RIT has not been as successful due to lower radiosensitivity, difficult penetration of the antibody into the tumor, and potential excessive radiation to normal tissues. Innovative approaches have been developed in order to enhance tumor absorbed dose while limiting toxicity to overcome the different limitations due to the tumor and host characteristics. Pretargeting techniques (pRIT) are a promising approach that consists of decoupling the delivery of a tumor monoclonal antibody (mAb) from the delivery of the radionuclide. This results in a much higher tumor-to-normal tissue ratio and is favorable for therapy as well and imaging. This includes various strategies based on avidin/streptavidin-biotin, DNA-complementary DNA, and bispecific antibody-hapten bindings. pRIT continuously evolves with the investigation of new molecular constructs and the development of radiochemistry. Pharmacokinetics improve dosimetry depending on the radionuclides used (alpha, beta, and Auger emitters) with prediction of tumor response and host toxicities. New constructs such as the Dock and Lock technology allow production of a variety of mABs directed against tumor-associated antigens. Survival benefit has already been shown in medullary thyroid carcinoma. Improvement in delivery of radioactivity to tumors with these pretargeting procedures associated with reduced hematologic toxicity will become the next generation of RIT. The following review addresses actual technical and clinical considerations and future development of pRIT. PMID:23802097

  6. Radioimmunotherapy Combined with Maintenance Anti-CD20 Antibody May Trigger Long-Term Protective T Cell Immunity in Follicular Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Buchegger, Franz; Larson, Steven M.; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Cairoli, Anne; Prior, John O.; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the patient's immune response may play a major role in the long-term efficacy of antibody therapies of follicular lymphoma (FL). Particular long-lasting recurrence free survivals have been observed after first line, single agent rituximab or after radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Rituximab maintenance, furthermore, has a major efficacy in prolonging recurrence free survival after chemotherapy. On the other hand, RIT as a single step treatment showed a remarkable capacity to induce complete and partial remissions when applied in recurrence and as initial treatment of FL or given for consolidation. These clinical results strongly suggest that RIT combined with rituximab maintenance could stabilize the high percentages of patients with CR and PR induced by RIT. While the precise mechanisms of the long-term efficacy of these 2 treatments are not elucidated, different observations suggest that the patient's T cell immune response could be decisive. With this review, we discuss the potential role of the patient's immune system under rituximab and RIT and argue that the T cell immunity might be particularly promoted when combining the 2 antibody treatments in the early therapy of FL. PMID:24371449

  7. Practical simplifications for radioimmunotherapy dosimetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.; DeNardo, G.L.; O`Donnell, R.T.; Yuan, A.; DeNardo, D.A.; Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is potentially useful for assessment and prediction of efficacy and toxicity for radionuclide therapy. The usefulness of these dose estimates relies on the establishment of a dose-response model using accurate pharmacokinetic data and a radiation dosimetric model. Due to the complexity in radiation dose estimation, many practical simplifications have been introduced in the dosimetric modeling for clinical trials of radioimmunotherapy. Although research efforts are generally needed to improve the simplifications used at each stage of model development, practical simplifications are often possible for specific applications without significant consequences to the dose-response model. In the development of dosimetric methods for radioimmunotherapy, practical simplifications in the dosimetric models were introduced. This study evaluated the magnitude of uncertainty associated with practical simplifications for: (1) organ mass of the MIRD phantom; (2) radiation contribution from target alone; (3) interpolation of S value; (4) macroscopic tumor uniformity; and (5) fit of tumor pharmacokinetic data.

  8. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

  9. Vulvovaginal pyoderma gangrenosum secondary to rituximab therapy.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shreya; Selva-Nayagam, Priya; Hamann, Ian; Fischer, Gayle

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is being used increasingly for the treatment of B-cell malignancies and nonmalignant conditions. Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare neutrophilic dermatosis, which can be either idiopathic or associated with underlying systemic inflammatory conditions. We present a series of 4 patients who presented with ulcerative pyoderma gangrenosum in the vulvovaginal area after treatment with rituximab. PMID:24769650

  10. Rituximab in immunologic glomerular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, A Ahsan; Asmar, Abdo; Alsabbagh, Mourad M

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data suggest that the B-cell antigen CD20 may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of many diseases including glomerular diseases. These and other findings underpin the central concept of B-cell-depleting therapies that target CD20 antigen as treatments for lupus nephritis, idiopathic membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, cryglobulinemic glomerulonephritis, antibody mediated renal allograft rejection and recurrent glomerulonephritis in renal allograft. Use of rituximab as a B-cell depleting therapy has been associated with clinical improvement and has emerged as a possible adjunct or alternative treatment option in this field of nephrology. PMID:22377738

  11. Yttrium-90-ibritumomab tiuxetan radioimmunotherapy: a new treatment approach for B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E

    2004-02-01

    either rituximab or ibritumomab tiuxetan. The aim was to demonstrate that the addition of the yttrium-90 radioisotope to the antibody provided additional efficacy over the unconjugated ("cold") rituximab alone. The results of this study showed an overall response rate of 80% with (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan versus 56% for rituximab (p = 0.002). An additional trial enrolled 54 patients who were nonresponsive or refractory to rituximab and treated the patients with a single dose of 0.4 mCi/kg (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. An overall response rate of 74% was found in these rituximab-refractory patients. These data provide further evidence of the added value of the yttrium-90. Finally, a fifth trial treated 30 patients with mild thrombocytopenia using 0.3 mCi/kg (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and found an overall response rate of 83%. (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan radioimmunotherapy is a new treatment modality for patients with relapsed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The advantages of this therapy are that it utilizes targeted radiation in a single-dose, outpatient schedule that is well tolerated and accepted by the patient. Future trials will build on these results and determine at what point in the disease course this modality can best be utilized to maximize the benefits to the patient. PMID:15045033

  12. Use of second antibody in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Begent, R.H.; Bagshawe, K.D.; Pedley, R.B.; Searle, F.; Ledermann, J.A.; Green, A.J.; Keep, P.A.; Chester, K.A.; Glaser, M.G.; Dale, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, a second antibody was directed against the first antitumor antibody to accelerate clearance of the /sup 131/I-labeled first antibody and improve tumor to normal tissue ratios of radioactivity. The value of this method in improving the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapy with /sup 131/I-antibody to CEA has been investigated in nude mice bearing xenografts of human colon carcinoma and in 5 patients with colorectal cancer. The xenografts did not become saturated with anti-CEA as the administered dose was increased to therapeutic levels. At these high dose levels, the second antibody increased tumor to blood ratios to a maximum of 155:1, 48 times the level in controls that did not receive the second antibody. In 5 patients given 50 mCi of anti-CEA, there was no significant toxicity with the second antibody; clearance of radioactivity was accelerated; and tumor imaging was enhanced. The second antibody appears to have the potential to improve the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapy.

  13. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.

    1992-03-24

    This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.

  14. [Radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan. Clinical considerations, radiopharmacy, radiation protection, perspectives].

    PubMed

    Schomäcker, K; Dietlein, M; Schnell, R; Pinkert, J; Eschner, W; Zimmermanns, B; Fischer, T; Engert, A; Schicha, H

    2005-01-01

    90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) is currently approved for radioimmunotherapy of patients with relapsed or refractory follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma pretreated with rituximab. Future directions are the combined use of 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan as part of the initial treatment and as first-line multi-agent therapy of relapsed disease. Current studies investigate patients with other than follicular indolent histologies, e. g. diffuse large cell lymphoma. Labelling of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan is a safe procedure, the radiochemical purity is not disturbed by a higher room temperature or by metallic impurity. Quality control is recommended by thin layer chromatography (TLC), strips >15 cm are favourable. TLC cannot distinguish between the correctly radiolabelled antibodies and radiocolloid impurity. If necessary, additional HPLC should be performed. Radiocolloid impurities are absorbed to the solid phase and do not reach the eluate. If the radiochemical purity test is insufficient (<95%), the additional cleaning using EconoPac 10 DG columns (Biorad, Hercules, CA, USA) is a reliable procedure to reduce the percentage of free radionuclide. However, this procedure is not part of the approval. PMID:16163413

  15. Yttrium 90-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan radioimmunotherapy produces high response rates and durable remissions in patients with previously treated B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Leo I; Witzig, Thomas; Molina, Arturo; Czuczman, Myron; Emmanouilides, Christos; Joyce, Robin; Vo, Katie; Theuer, Charles; Pohlman, Brad; Bartlett, Nancy; Wiseman, Greg; Darif, Mohamed; White, Christine

    2004-09-01

    We report updated time-to-event variables of a phase III randomized study comparing yttrium 90-labeled ibritumomab with rituximab standard therapy in 143 rituximab-naive patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or transformed CD20+ non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Most patients (79%) had follicular lymphoma. Patients were randomized to receive a single intravenous (I.V.) dose of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan 0.4 mCi/kg (n = 73) or rituximab 375 mg/m2 I.V. weekly for 4 doses (n = 70). The radioimmunotherapy group was pretreated with 2 rituximab doses (250 mg/m2) to improve biodistribution and one dose of Indium 111-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan for imaging. The overall response rate was 80% versus 56% (P = 0.002) and complete response (CR)/CR unconfirmed (CRu) rates were 34% for 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan versus 20% for rituximab. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the data are mature as all ongoing patients in both groups exceeded the median Kaplan-Meier estimated time to progression (TTP), duration of response (DR), and time to next therapy. Although this study was not powered to detect differences in time-to-event variables, the results from this randomized trial demonstrate trends toward longer median TTP (15 vs. 10.2 months; P = 0.07), DR (16.7 vs. 11.2 months; P = 0.44) and time to next therapy (21.1 vs. 13.8 months; P = 0.27) in follicular NHL patients treated with 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan compared with the rituximab control arm. In patients achieving a CR/CRu, the median TTP was 24.7 months for patients treated with 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan compared with 13.2 months for rituximab-treated patients (P = 0.41), and ongoing responses of > 5 years have been observed. These results confirm that 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan produces high response rates and durable remissions in patients with previously treated low-grade, follicular, and transformed NHL. PMID:15453924

  16. Four cases of rituximab-associated melanoma.

    PubMed

    Velter, Charles; Pagès, Cécile; Schneider, Pierre; Osio, Amélie; Brice, Pauline; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-08-01

    Biological agents have transformed the management of inflammatory and proliferative disorders. Safety issues have been raised, particularly the increased risk of opportunistic infections and secondary cancers. We report four cases of melanoma worsening or occurring after rituximab treatment for associated B-cell lymphoma, and discuss the accountability of the molecule in this process. In three cases, melanoma was diagnosed before or at the same time as a B-cell lymphoma treated with rituximab associated with chemotherapy and we observed rapid metastatic progression. In the last case, melanoma appeared after 5 years treatment with rituximab for a follicular lymphoma. Although it is premature to conclude on the role of rituximab in melanoma, careful follow-up and registration of such cases are important to gain further insight on this topic. PMID:24743053

  17. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  18. Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy for Hematologic and Other Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Summation Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has emerged as one of the most promising treatment options, particularly for hematologic malignancies. However, this approach has generally been limited by a suboptimal therapeutic index (target-to-nontarget ratio) and an inability to deliver sufficient radiation doses to tumors selectively. Pretargeted RIT (PRIT) circumvents these limitations by separating the targeting vehicle from the subsequently administered therapeutic radioisotope, which binds to the tumor-localized antibody or is quickly excreted if unbound. A growing number of preclinical proof-of-principle studies demonstrate that PRIT is feasible and safe and provides improved directed radionuclide delivery to malignant cells compared with conventional RIT while sparing normal cells from nonspecific radiotoxicity. Early phase clinical studies corroborate these preclinical findings and suggest better efficacy and lesser toxicities in patients with hematologic and other malignancies. With continued research, PRIT-based treatment strategies promise to become cornerstones to improved outcomes for cancer patients despite their complexities. PMID:20423225

  19. Rituximab Retreatment for Low-Tumor Burden Follicular Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a randomized clinical trial of patients with low–tumor burden follicular lymphoma that compared maintenance therapy with rituximab versus retreatment with rituximab only when there was evidence of disease progression.

  20. Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Avichai; Zwas, Shifra Tzila

    2016-03-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard therapy for patients with chemosensitive-relapsed or chemosensitive-refractory aggressive lymphoma. The use of rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has dramatically changed the outcome of patients with aggressive lymphoma, increasing both response and survival rates. However, despite this progress a significant proportion of patients are still refractory or relapse after frontline rituximab-containing therapy. Moreover, it is increasingly more difficult to rescue these patients with current salvage chemotherapy and ASCT approaches. Novel approaches are needed for these high-risk patients, especially in the rituximab era. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a form of targeted therapy using the parent monoclonal antibody to deliver radiation emitted by a conjugated radioisotope, to the vicinity of antigen-positive tissues. Two radioimmunoconjugates--yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) and iodine-131 tositumomab (Bexxar) have been in clinical use. There are multiple studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of both agents in both indolent and aggressive lymphoma. Radiolabeled antibodies are ideal candidates to combine with high-dose chemotherapy and ASCT. RIT targets radiation to disease sites while limiting exposure of uninvolved critical organs, thus it can safely replace total-body irradiation during conditioning for ASCT. The major toxicity and limiting factor in RIT is myelotoxicity that is easily reversed by stem-cell rescue. RIT can be combined at standard doses with high-dose chemotherapy or can be given in escalated doses either alone or with high-dose chemotherapy before ASCT. Several phase II studies have shown the safety and potential efficacy of both agents using these approaches. A small randomized study comparing standard-dose Zevalin with combination of carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan (BEAM) high-dose chemotherapy and BEAM alone suggested a

  1. Acquired Hemophilia A Successfully Treated with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder due to the development of specific autoantibodies against factor VIII. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been proven to be effective in obtaining a long-term suppression of inhibitors of AHA, besides other immunosuppressive standard treatments. Here we describe a case of idiopathic AHA in a 60-year old man successfully treated with rituximab. He showed a complete clinical response with a normalization of clotting parameters after 5 weekly courses of rituximab given at a dose of 375 mg/sqm., but after stopping rituximab, an initial worsening of coagulation parameters induced the addition of 3 further courses. At present, the patient is in complete clinical and hematological remission after 200 days. This case confirms that Rituximab may be a safe and useful tool to treat AHA and, a prolonged administration can overcome the initial resistance. However, the precise position of this drug in the therapeutic strategy (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be established and warrants further investigation. PMID:25745551

  2. Idiopathic Nonviral Cryoglobulinemia Treated Successfully With Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Mahmoud; Thajudeen, Bijin; Bracamonte, Erika; Madhrira, Machaiah

    2016-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemia is a systemic inflammatory syndrome that generally involves small-to-medium vessel vasculitis due to cryoglobulin-containing immune complexes. The therapeutic management of idiopathic cryoglobulinemic vasculitis has yet to be defined because no study has evaluated the best strategies. However, treatment of severe vasculitis is traditionally based on a combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants or plasmapheresis, and more recently rituximab. We report a case of 77-year-old female patient diagnosed with idiopathic cryoglobulinemia, treated successfully with 6 months prednisone tapering and 2 doses of rituximab (1 g each dose). After receiving the above-mentioned treatment, her creatinine went back to normal with resolution of proteinuria and hematuria, normalization of serum complements, and significant improvement in her clinical picture. We conclude that rituximab could be an effective treatment for idiopathic cryoglobulnemia. PMID:24914502

  3. Herpetic tracheitis in association with rituximab therapy.

    PubMed

    Thong, Lorraine; Plant, Barry J; McCarthy, Julie; Murphy, Desmond M

    2016-07-01

    A 58-year old lady under active follow-up with the respiratory services at our institution for bronchiectasis secondary to hypogammaglobulinaemia presented with hoarseness and haemoptysis. She was also receiving rituximab maintenance therapy for follicular lymphoma. Bronchoscopy demonstrated vesicular lesions on her vocal cords and trachea, confirmed as herpes simplex virus (HSV) on cytological analysis of brushings. She responded well to intravenous valacyclovir. Rituximab is increasingly utilised in the treatment of haematological and auto-immune disorders. This case highlights the potential of this drug to potentiate susceptibility to infection in an already immunocompromised individual. PMID:27512561

  4. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  5. Emerging Trends for Radioimmunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Suprit; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Due to its ability to target both known and occult lesions, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an attractive therapeutic modality for solid tumors. Poor tumor uptake and undesirable pharmacokinetics, however, have precluded the administration of radioimmunoconjugates at therapeutically relevant doses thereby limiting the clinical utility of RIT. In solid tumors, efficacy of RIT is further compromised by heterogeneities in blood flow, tumor stroma, expression of target antigens and radioresistance. As a result significant efforts have been invested toward developing strategies to overcome these impediments. Further, there is an emerging interest in exploiting short-range, high energy α-particle emitting radionuclides for the eradication of minimal residual and micrometastatic disease. As a result several modalities for localized therapy and models of minimal disease have been developed for preclinical evaluation. This review provides a brief update on the recent efforts toward improving the efficacy of RIT for solid tumors, and development of RIT strategies for minimal disease associated with solid tumors. Further, some of promising approaches to improve tumor targeting, which showed promise in the past, but have now been ignored are also discussed. PMID:23844555

  6. Radionuclides for radioimmunotherapy: criteria for selection.

    PubMed

    Geerlings, M W

    1993-01-01

    In developing and designing radioimmunotherapy, the selection of the isotope is a major factor. This selection depends on a number of criteria and parameters, affecting usefulness and feasibility. Usefulness is directly related to the radiological performance of the ionising radiation in relation to tissue and its morphology, with a major distinction between the effects of alpha and beta-particles (or rays). Usefulness is also directly related to the pharmacodynamic performance of the isotope-carrier (e.g. antibody) complex, where the proper choice of isotope radiodecay halflife is of major importance. Feasibility depends on availability of the components in the isotope-ligand-carrier complex, and also on convenience and safety aspects in the preparation and the handling of the materials as well as in their application in patients. A comparison is made between the various properties of alpha-emitting isotopes that have been proposed over a number of years, concluding that the combination 225Ac- 213Bi deserves serious further attention. PMID:8277210

  7. Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O.W.

    1996-08-15

    Experiments were performed to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells. An attempt was made to examine in vivo the effects of lysosomotropic amines and thioamides on the retention of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies by tumor cells. Experiments also examined the impact of newer radioiodination techniques on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies, and on the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy of neoplasms. The endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with I-131, In-111, and Y-90 were compared. The utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer was investigated.

  8. Role of Rituximab and Rituximab Biosimilars in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Morton; Lammers, Philip E; Ciceri, Fabio; Jacobs, Ira A

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), is the most-common subtype of NHL. DLBCL can be classified into at least 3 major immunologically distinct types, which contributes to considerable variation in disease prognosis and response to treatment. DLBCL potentially is curable, even when diagnosed at advanced stages. The current standard of care for most patients with untreated or relapsed/refractory DLBCL is chemoimmunotherapy containing rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. With advanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DLBCL and specific signaling pathways that are activated in different subtypes, potential new therapeutic targets have been identified, some of which are at the late stages of clinical development. This review summarizes the critical role of rituximab in the current standard of care treatment for DLBCL and discusses why rituximab is likely to remain an important component of treatment options for DLBCL in the foreseeable future. In addition, current and emerging therapeutic agents, including potential benefits of rituximab biosimilars, for patients with DLBCL are discussed. The advent of rituximab biosimilars may facilitate accessibility of rituximab-based chemotherapies to patients with DLBCL and has potential cost-saving benefits for healthcare systems globally. PMID:26906106

  9. Rituximab in combination with platinum-containing chemotherapy in patients with relapsed or primary refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bieker, Ralf; Kessler, Torsten; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Mesters, Rolf M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a regimen consisting of rituximab and a platinum-containing chemotherapy with either Ifosfamide, Carboplatin and Etoposide (ICE) or Cisplatin, high-dose Ara-C and Dexamethasone (DHAP) in patients with relapsed or primary refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Ten patients with relapsed or primary refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were treated from June 2000 until May 2001 with a platinum-containing chemotherapy regimen according to the ICE- or DHAP-protocol in combination with rituximab at the University of Muenster. Two cycles of ICE or DHAP and rituximab were given. In case of at least a minor response after 2 cycles, 2 additional cycles of the same combination were applied. Response rate, remission duration and duration of survival were evaluated. All 10 patients could be analysed with respect to these endpoints. No treatment related mortality was observed. The response rate (CR/PR) was 60% (10/50%). Twenty percent of the patients had progressive disease. The median duration of remission and survival was 3 and 3.5 months, respectively (range: 1-6 and 1-7 months, respectively), the survival rate was 10%. Eight of 10 patients died because of their underlying disease with short remission duration, 1 patient died of complications of allogeneic transplantation in CR. In conclusion, the combination of platinum-containing chemotherapy (ICE or DHAP) with rituximab demonstrates significant activity in intensively pretreated patients with relapsed or primary refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Considering the short duration of remission and survival, respectively, other experimental therapeutic approaches (e.g. allogeneic stem cell transplantation, radioimmunotherapy) should be pursued following this treatment in order to induce long-term remission. PMID:14534718

  10. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    We plan to extend our success in treating B cell malignancies with {sup 131}I labeled Lym-1 by a major effort in therapy with {sup 67}Cu Lym-1. Yttrium-90 labeled by a macrocycle, DOTA will be studied in patients as a continuation of the {sup 111}In-BAD (DOTA) Lym-1 studies. Excellent images and pharmacokinetics of the {sup 111}In-BAD(DOTA)-Lym-1 studies. Lymphomas and related diseases represent a special case for radioimmunotherapy because of their documented radiosensitivity and immunodeficiency, and thus offer a unique opportunity to conduct therapeutic feasibility studies in a responsive human model. Using marine and chimeric L6 and other MoAb to breast cancer, we have applied the strategies that were developed in taking Lym-1 antibody from the bench to the patient. We have examined a number of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of breast cancer and chose chimeric L6 for prototype studies because of certain characteristics. The chemistry of attachment of conjugates to antibodies and their impact on immunological targeting biological activities (cytotoxicity), metabolic fate, and therapeutic index will continue to be a major strength and function of this program. This grant has supported the conception, synthesis, and development of the first macrocylic, bifunctional chelating agent TETA (6-p-nitrobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazatetradecane-N,N{prime},N{double prime}, N{prime}{double prime}-tetraacetic acid and its derivatives, including Lym-1-2IT-BAT), for use in Cu-67-based radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy. This work has led to the further development of several new macrocylic bifunctional chelating agents for copper, indium, yttrium and other metals. In addition, successful Cu-67 labelings of Lym-1-2IT-BAT for human radiopharmaceutical have shown patient pharmacokinetics of {sup 67}Cu-BAT(TETA)-Lym-1 with promising therapeutic dosimetry.

  11. Treatment planning for radio-immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdi, Alev K.; Erdi, Yusuf E.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Wessels, Barry W.

    1996-10-01

    To foster the success of clinical trials in radio-immunotherapy (RIT), one needs to determine (i) the quantity and spatial distribution of the administered radionuclide carrier in the patient over time, (ii) the absorbed dose in the tumour sites and critical organs based on this distribution and (iii) the volume of tumour mass(es) and normal organs from computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and appropriately correlated with nuclear medicine imaging techniques (such as planar, single-photon emission computerized tomography or positron-emission tomography). Treatment planning for RIT has become an important tool in predicting the relative benefit of therapy based on individualized dosimetry as derived from diagnostic, pre-therapy administration of the radiolabelled antibody. This allows the investigator to pre-select those patients who have `favourable' dosimetry characteristics (high time-averaged target: non-target ratios) so that the chances for treatment success may be more accurately quantified before placing the patient at risk for treatment-related organ toxicities. The future prospects for RIT treatment planning may yield a more accurate correlation of response and critical organ toxicity with computed absorbed dose, and the compilation of dose - volume histogram information for tumour(s) and normal organ(s) such that computing tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities becomes possible for heterogeneous distributions of the radiolabelled antibody. Additionally, radiobiological consequences of depositing absorbed doses from exponentially decaying sources must be factored into the interpretation when trying to compute the effects of standard external beam isodose display patterns combined with those associated with RIT.

  12. Cancer radioimmunotherapy with alpha-emitting nuclides.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Olivier; Supiot, Stéphane; Degraef-Mougin, Marie; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Carlier, Thomas; Chatal, Jean-François; Davodeau, François; Cherel, Michel

    2005-05-01

    In lymphoid malignancies and in certain solid cancers such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, somewhat mixed success has been achieved when applying radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with beta-emitters for the treatment of refractory cases. The development of novel RIT with alpha-emitters has created new opportunities and theoretical advantages due to the high linear energy transfer (LET) and the short path length in biological tissue of alpha-particles. These physical properties offer the prospect of achieving selective tumoural cell killing. Thus, RIT with alpha-emitters appears particularly suited for the elimination of circulating single cells or cell clusters or for the treatment of micrometastases at an early stage. However, to avoid non-specific irradiation of healthy tissues, it is necessary to identify accessible tumoural targets easily and rapidly. For this purpose, a small number of alpha-emitters have been investigated, among which only a few have been used for in vivo preclinical studies. Another problem is the availability and cost of these radionuclides; for instance, the low cost and the development of a reliable actinium-225/bismuth-213 generator were probably determining elements in the choice of bismuth-213 in the only human trial of RIT with an alpha-emitter. This article reviews the literature concerning monoclonal antibodies radiolabelled with alpha-emitters that have been developed for possible RIT in cancer patients. The principal radio-immunoconjugates are considered, starting with physical and chemical properties of alpha-emitters, their mode of production, the possibilities and difficulties of labelling, in vitro studies and finally, when available, in vivo preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:15841373

  13. Radioimmunotherapy of micrometastases: Theoretical evaluation of adjuvant treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, G.; Yorke, E.D.; Willins, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    Failure of current cancer treatment modalities is generally associated with the inability to control distant metastatic disease. This work examines the adjuvant use of radiolabeled antibodies for targeting micrometastases. A Monte Carlo program is used to estimate the number and size distribution of metastases that are present in a given (node-negative) prostate cancer patient population at the time of diagnosis. These results are used in a second program that solves the equations associated with antibody (Ab) diffusion, binding, and dissociation to yield the kinetics of Ab penetration within pre-vascularized micrometastases. These simulated kinetic data are then micrometastasis. Using a two-compartment macroscopic model of Ab distribution, the red marrow dose is also calculated. Calculations are performed for I-123 and for I-131-labeled antibody. With these results, the fraction of the patient population that would benefit from radioimmunotherapy is estimated. The analysis suggests that a single administration of radioimmunotherapy following surgery or external beam radiotherapy will yield a potentially lethal dose ({ge} 20 Gy for I-123 and {ge} 38 Gy for I-131) to 23% of micrometastases present at the time of initial diagnosis without inducing prohibitive red marrow morbidity (absorbed dose {le}2.5 Gy). Multiple courses of radioimmunotherapy, designed to target micrometastases that are initially too small but that eventually reach a targetable size (i.e., 20 {mu}m {le} micromet. radius {le}200{mu}m), will yield a potentially lethal results suggest that approximately 25% of high risk prostate cancer patients (i.e., patients with occult metastases at the time of diagnosis) could benefit from single course of radioimmunotherapy; multiple courses of radioimmunotherapy could benefit 75% of high risk prostate cancer patients.

  14. Rapid exacerbation of neuromyelitis optica after rituximab treatment.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yongqiang; Lu, Tingting; Wang, Yuge; Fang, Ling; Li, Rui; Kermode, Allan G; Qiu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Studies have shown the efficacy of immunosuppressants against neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Rituximab is recommended as an off-label prescription to treat refractory NMO. However, we describe two such patients who were suboptimally responsive to rituximab and whose symptoms worsened after treatment. Our cautionary cases highlight that in a small proportion of patients with refractory NMO, rituximab may either fail or induce rapid relapse of NMO. This suggests we need to consider new treatment strategies for refractory NMO. PMID:26704780

  15. Rituximab use in adult primary glomerulopathy: where is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Samir G; Itani, Houssam S; Abou-Mrad, Rana M; Abou Arkoub, Rima; Tanios, Bassem Y

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody that results in depletion of B-cell lymphocytes. It is currently used in the treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases, in addition to CD20-positive lymphomas. The use of rituximab in the treatment of the adult primary glomerular diseases has emerged recently, although not yet established as first-line therapy in international guidelines. In patients with steroid-dependent minimal change disease or frequently relapsing disease, and in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN), several retrospective and prospective studies support the use of rituximab to induce remission, whereas in idiopathic focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), the use of rituximab has resulted in variable results. Evidence is still lacking for the use of rituximab in patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) and idiopathic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), as only few reports used rituximab in these two entities. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are warranted and clearly needed to establish the definitive role of rituximab in the management of steroid-dependent and frequently relapsing minimal change disease, IMN, both as first-line and second-line treatment, and in MPGN. We await the results of an ongoing RCT of rituximab use in IgAN. Although current evidence for the use of rituximab in patients with idiopathic FSGS is poor, more RCTs are needed to clarify its role, if any, in the management of steroid-resistant or steroid-dependent FSGS. PMID:27621641

  16. Stiff-person syndrome treated with rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Marcelo Evangelista; Araújo, Marx Lincoln Barros; Tomaz, Carlos Alberto Bezerra; Allam, Nasser

    2010-01-01

    Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare neurological condition consisting of progressive and fluctuating rigidity of the axial muscles combined with painful spasms. The pathophysiology of SPS is not fully understood, but there seems to be an autoimmune component. The use of rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting CD20 protein in the surface of mature B cells, for the treatment of SPS is a recent therapeutical approach showing promising results. The authors present a case report of a 41-year-old female patient diagnosed with SPS who was treated with rituximab in a public hospital in Brasília, Brazil, showing a good and safe response to the treatment so far. Our data go along with some recent articles published in the literature. PMID:22802263

  17. Rituximab Desensitization in Pediatric Patients: Results of a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joyce P.; Platt, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody (mAb) primarily used to treat oncologic and autoinflammatory conditions. Although hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) and desensitization protocols to mAbs have been well described in adults, the experience in the pediatric population is very limited. We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of desensitization to rituximab in the pediatric population at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the experience with HSRs and desensitization to rituximab during a 5-year period in our tertiary care pediatric center, including reaction evaluation, premedication regimens, and desensitization procedures and protocols. A total of 17 desensitizations to rituximab were performed in three patients. A 14-year-old patient underwent successful desensitization to rituximab using a published adult protocol without incident. Two younger patients (ages 7 years and 23 months) experienced significant reactions during initial desensitization attempts. Therefore, we designed a modified desensitization protocol to rituximab, with particular attention to the rate of infusion as mg/kg/h. This new patient weight-based protocol was successfully used in a total of 13 desensitizations in these two patients. Desensitization to rituximab was a safe and effective procedure in our pediatric population. We present a new patient weight-based desensitization protocol for pediatric patients who develop HSRs to rituximab, with particular usefulness for younger pediatric patients and potential utility in pediatric patients with HSRs to other mAbs.

  18. Rituximab and chemotherapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sonet, Anne; Bosly, André

    2009-06-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 chimeric monoclonal antibody with activity in nearly all subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Association of rituximab with chemotherapy (mostly the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone [CHOP] regimen) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents an extraordinary revolution in the prognosis of DLBCL, and is the new standard of therapy in elderly and young, low-risk patients. Despite the lack of randomized, clinical trials in younger patients with high risk, rituximab is also a standard of care in these patients in clinical practice, at least in North America. The practice is based on observational trials (e.g., the British Columbia Registry) and the missing logic in classifying patients as 'younger' or 'older': 60 years old or 65 years old. In Europe, trials are ongoing to establish the best treatment for young, high-risk patients. Association of rituximab and chemotherapy deeply modifies prognostic factors defined before the rituximab era. PMID:19496708

  19. [Recurrent infections in an ITP patient treated with rituximab].

    PubMed

    Rosenberg-Bezalel, Shira; Asher, Ilan; Sthoeger, Zev

    2012-11-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent infections. Various mechanisms have been implied in the disease pathophysiology. Patients with CVID are at increased risk of developing ITP (Immune Thrombocytopenia Purpura) and/ or AIHA (Autoimmune Haemolytic Anemia). Rituximab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is increasingly being used for autoimmune cytopenias including ITP and AIHA. This is a case history of a patient treated with Rituximab due to refractory ITP. A year after completion of therapy the patient started suffering from an increased frequency of infections. Six years after treatment with Rituximab the patient was diagnosed with CVID and IVIG replacement treatment was started. The main possibilities that this patient presents include aggravation of CVID, first presented as ITP, after Rituximab treatment versus CVID secondary to Rituximab treatment. PMID:23367730

  20. Rituximab in B-Lineage Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maury, Sébastien; Chevret, Sylvie; Thomas, Xavier; Heim, Dominik; Leguay, Thibaut; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Hunault, Mathilde; Boissel, Nicolas; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Hess, Urs; Vey, Norbert; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Braun, Thorsten; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chalandon, Yves; Lhéritier, Véronique; Beldjord, Kheira; Béné, Marie C; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2016-09-15

    Background Treatment with rituximab has improved the outcome for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may also have the CD20 antigen, which is targeted by rituximab. Although single-group studies suggest that adding rituximab to chemotherapy could improve the outcome in such patients, this hypothesis has not been tested in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned adults (18 to 59 years of age) with CD20-positive, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative ALL to receive chemotherapy with or without rituximab, with event-free survival as the primary end point. Rituximab was given during all treatment phases, for a total of 16 to 18 infusions. Results From May 2006 through April 2014, a total of 209 patients were enrolled: 105 in the rituximab group and 104 in the control group. After a median follow-up of 30 months, event-free survival was longer in the rituximab group than in the control group (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45 to 0.98; P=0.04); the estimated 2-year event-free survival rates were 65% (95% CI, 56 to 75) and 52% (95% CI, 43 to 63), respectively. Treatment with rituximab remained associated with longer event-free survival in a multivariate analysis. The overall incidence rate of severe adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups, but fewer allergic reactions to asparaginase were observed in the rituximab group. Conclusions Adding rituximab to the ALL chemotherapy protocol improved the outcome for younger adults with CD20-positive, Ph-negative ALL. (Funded by the Regional Clinical Research Office, Paris, and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00327678 .). PMID:27626518

  1. Rituximab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Chi Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 molecule expressed on the surface of B cells. It was first used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and later approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that does not respond adequately to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, including the anti-tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF) biologics. Sustained efficacy in RA can be achieved by repeated courses of rituximab. However, the optimal dose and retreatment schedule of rituximab in RA remains to be established. Seropositivity, complete B cell depletion shortly after treatment, and previous failure to no more than one anti-TNF agent are three factors associated with greater clinical benefits to rituximab. Infusion reaction to the first dose of rituximab occurs in approximately 25% of RA patients, and the incidence reduces with subsequent exposure. Immunogenicity to the chimeric compound occurs in 11% of RA patients, but this does not correlate with its efficacy in B cell depletion. Extended observation of randomized controlled trials in RA does not reveal a significant increase in the incidence of serious infections related to rituximab compared to placebo groups, and the infection rate remains static over time. Repeated treatment with rituximab is associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, which may increase the risk of serious, but rarely opportunistic, infections. Reactivation of occult hepatitis B infection has been reported in RA patients receiving rituximab, but no increase in the incidence of tuberculosis was observed. Screening for baseline serum immunoglobulin G level and hepatitis B status (including occult infection) is important, especially in Asian countries where hepatitis B infection is prevalent. The rare but fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy linked to the use of rituximab has to be noted. Postmarketing surveillance and registry data, particularly in Asia, are necessary to establish the long-term efficacy and

  2. Radioimmunotherapy: potential as a therapeutic strategy in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wun, T; Kwon, D S; Tuscano, J M

    2001-01-01

    Lymphomas are the fifth most common malignancy in the United States and are increasing in incidence. Despite being among the most responsive malignancies to radiation and chemotherapy, the majority of patients relapse or have progressive disease. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed at cell-specific surface antigens have been useful in the diagnosis of lymphomas and, more recently, the therapeutic mouse-human chimeric MAb rituximab has demonstrated effectiveness in B cell lymphomas. Conjugating MAbs to radionuclides is a strategy for improving the efficacy of MAb lymphoma therapy by delivering radiation in close proximity to the tumour (radioimmunotherapy or RIT). In addition, the low dose rate of the delivered radiation may exert a greater antitumour activity than an equivalent dose of conventional external beam radiation. The antigenic targets for MAb therapy have included CD20, CD22, HLA-DR, and B cell idiotype. Radionuclides that have been used include iodine-131, yttrium-90, and copper-67; there are relative merits and disadvantages to each source of radiation. Clinical studies to date have focused on relapsed and refractory patients with both indolent and aggressive lymphomas, although more recent studies have included previously untreated patients with indolent lymphoma. Radioimmunoconjugate has been delivered as either single or multiple doses. Response rates have varied widely, dependent on the patient population and the response criteria. Of note, complete responses can be achieved in this typically refractory patient group. Toxicities have generally consisted of mild infusion-related nausea, fever, chills, and asthenia. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are the dose-limiting toxicities and have prompted the incorporation of autologous stem cell support as a means of achieving dose escalation. To date, RIT has been delivered to highly selected patients in relatively few centres with requisite equipment and specialised personnel. In addition to these

  3. The spectrum of use of rituximab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, Alessandra; Vismara, Eleonora; Ricci, Francesca; Morra, Enrica; Montillo, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The monoclonal chimeric anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, has considerably improved therapeutic outcome in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has limited clinical activity when used as a single agent. The combination of the monoclonal antibody with fludarabine-based regimens clearly demonstrated, in Phase II and randomized trials, an increase in clinical efficacy in previously untreated and pretreated patients. Furthermore the addition of rituximab enabled the eradication of minimal residual disease, which is correlated with the prognosis in a high proportion of patients. Although the combination of rituximab with fludarabine-based regimens increased myelosuppression and immunosuppression, incidence of infections did not increase. The benefit of adding rituximab to other purine analogs or other chemotherapeutic combination regimens has also been explored. Moreover there could be a role for achieving better quality of responses with the combination of different monoclonal antibodies, considering that they target different antigens and exert different mechanism of action. Although the role of rituximab as maintenance therapy in low grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas has been determined, the benefit and optimal schedule in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are still under investigation. This review brings together knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action and clinical use of rituximab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:21289858

  4. Rituximab targets podocytes in recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fornoni, Alessia; Sageshima, Junichiro; Wei, Changli; Merscher-Gomez, Sandra; Robier, Aguillon-Prada; Jauregui, Alexandra N.; Li, Jing; Mattiazzi, Adela; Ciancio, Gaetano; Chen, Linda; Zilleruelo, Gaston; Abitbol, Carolyn; Chandar, Jayanthi; Seeherunvong, Wacheree; Ricordi, Camillo; Ikehata, Masami; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Reiser, Jochen; Burke, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a prevalent glomerular disease characterized by proteinuria, progression to end stage renal disease and recurrence of proteinuria after kidney transplantation in approximately one third of patients. It has been suggested that rituximab might treat recurrent FSGS through an unknown mechanism. Rituximab recognizes CD20 on B-lymphocytes but might also bind sphingomyelin-phosphodiesterase-acid-like-3b (SMPDL-3b) and regulates acid-sphyngomyelinase (ASMase) activity. We hypothesized that rituximab prevents recurrent FSGS and preserves podocyte SMPDL-3b expression. We studied 41 patients at high risk for recurrent FSGS, 27 of whom were treated with rituximab at time of kidney transplant. Incidence of nephrotic-range proteinuria and change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) were analyzed. SMPDL-3b immunostaining was performed in post-reperfusion kidney biopsies. SMPDL-3b protein, ASMase activity, and cytoskeleton remodeling were studied in cultured normal human podocytes that had been exposed to patient sera with or without rituximab. Rituximab treatment was associated with lower incidence of post-transplant proteinuria and decreased ΔeGFR. The number of SMPDL-3b+ podocytes in post-reperfusion biopsies was reduced in patients who developed recurrent FSGS. Rituximab partially prevented SMPDL-3b and ASMase downregulation that was observed in podocytes treated with the sera of patients with recurrent FSGS. Either SMPDL-3b overexpression or treatment with rituximab prevented disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and podocyte apoptosis induced by patient sera. This effect was diminished in cultured podocytes where the gene encoding SMPDL-3b was silenced. Our study suggests that treatment of high-risk patients with rituximab at time of kidney transplant might prevent recurrent FSGS by modulating podocyte function in an SMPDL-3b–dependent manner. PMID:21632984

  5. Rituximab targets podocytes in recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fornoni, Alessia; Sageshima, Junichiro; Wei, Changli; Merscher-Gomez, Sandra; Aguillon-Prada, Robier; Jauregui, Alexandra N; Li, Jing; Mattiazzi, Adela; Ciancio, Gaetano; Chen, Linda; Zilleruelo, Gaston; Abitbol, Carolyn; Chandar, Jayanthi; Seeherunvong, Wacheree; Ricordi, Camillo; Ikehata, Masami; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Reiser, Jochen; Burke, George W

    2011-06-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a glomerular disease characterized by proteinuria, progression to end-stage renal disease, and recurrence of proteinuria after kidney transplantation in about one-third of patients. It has been suggested that rituximab might treat recurrent FSGS through an unknown mechanism. Rituximab not only recognizes CD20 on B lymphocytes, but might also bind sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3b (SMPDL-3b) protein and regulate acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) activity. We hypothesized that rituximab prevents recurrent FSGS and preserves podocyte SMPDL-3b expression. We studied 41 patients at high risk for recurrent FSGS, 27 of whom were treated with rituximab at time of kidney transplant. SMPDL-3b protein, ASMase activity, and cytoskeleton remodeling were studied in cultured normal human podocytes that had been exposed to patient sera with or without rituximab. Rituximab treatment was associated with lower incidence of posttransplant proteinuria and stabilization of glomerular filtration rate. The number of SMPDL-3b(+) podocytes in postreperfusion biopsies was reduced in patients who developed recurrent FSGS. Rituximab partially prevented SMPDL-3b and ASMase down-regulation that was observed in podocytes treated with the sera of patients with recurrent FSGS. Overexpression of SMPDL-3b or treatment with rituximab was able to prevent disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and podocyte apoptosis induced by patient sera. This effect was diminished in cultured podocytes where SMPDL-3b was silenced. Our study suggests that treatment of high-risk patients with rituximab at time of kidney transplant might prevent recurrent FSGS by modulating podocyte function in an SMPDL-3b-dependent manner. PMID:21632984

  6. Cost-effectiveness of rituximab in refractory cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, U; Mathews, C; Cullis, J O

    2008-08-01

    Cold haemagglutinin disease (CHAD) is an uncommon condition frequently associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and is refractory to conventional treatments used in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Rituximab has been used in this condition with favourable and lasting responses. Cost has been a major limitation to its use in such indication. We present cost-effectiveness analysis of the use of rituximab in two patients with CHAD. Rituximab successfully controlled haemolysis in both cases of CHAD and was found to be cost-effective through reducing transfusion needs. PMID:18665831

  7. Rituximab monitoring and redosing in pediatric neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nosadini, Margherita; Alper, Gulay; Riney, Catherine J.; Benson, Leslie A.; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Nolan, Melinda; Appleton, Richard; Leventer, Richard J.; Deiva, Kumaran; Brilot, Fabienne; Gorman, Mark P.; Waldman, Amy T.; Banwell, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study rituximab in pediatric neuromyelitis optica (NMO)/NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and the relationship between rituximab, B cell repopulation, and relapses in order to improve rituximab monitoring and redosing. Methods: Multicenter retrospective study of 16 children with NMO/NMOSD receiving ≥2 rituximab courses. According to CD19 counts, events during rituximab were categorized as “repopulation,” “depletion,” or “depletion failure” relapses (repopulation threshold CD19 ≥10 × 106 cells/L). Results: The 16 patients (14 girls; mean age 9.6 years, range 1.8–15.3) had a mean of 6.1 events (range 1–11) during a mean follow-up of 6.1 years (range 1.6–13.6) and received a total of 76 rituximab courses (mean 4.7, range 2–9) in 42.6-year cohort treatment. Before rituximab, 62.5% had received azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, or cyclophosphamide. Mean time from rituximab to last documented B cell depletion and first repopulation was 4.5 and 6.8 months, respectively, with large interpatient variability. Earliest repopulations occurred with the lowest doses. Significant reduction between pre- and post-rituximab annualized relapse rate (ARR) was observed (p = 0.003). During rituximab, 6 patients were relapse-free, although 21 relapses occurred in 10 patients, including 13 “repopulation,” 3 “depletion,” and 4 “depletion failure” relapses. Of the 13 “repopulation” relapses, 4 had CD19 10–50 × 106 cells/L, 10 had inadequate monitoring (≤1 CD19 in the 4 months before relapses), and 5 had delayed redosing after repopulation detection. Conclusion: Rituximab is effective in relapse prevention, but B cell repopulation creates a risk of relapse. Redosing before B cell repopulation could reduce the relapse risk further. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that rituximab significantly reduces ARR in pediatric NMO/NMOSD. This study also demonstrates a relationship between B cell repopulation

  8. Ibritumomab tiuxetan radioimmunotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mild thrombocytopenia: a phase II multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Gregory A; Gordon, Leo I; Multani, Pratik S; Witzig, Thomas E; Spies, Stewart; Bartlett, Nancy L; Schilder, Russell J; Murray, James L; Saleh, Mansoor; Allen, Roberta S; Grillo-López, Antonio J; White, Christine A

    2002-06-15

    Mildly thrombocytopenic patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have an increased risk of chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression following treatment. The safety and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy with a reduced dose of (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (0.3 mCi/kg [11 MBq/kg]; maximum 32 mCi [1.2 GBq]) was evaluated in 30 patients with mild thrombocytopenia (100-149 x 10(9) platelets/L) who had advanced, relapsed or refractory, low-grade, follicular, or transformed B-cell NHL. The ibritumomab tiuxetan regimen included an infusion of rituximab (250 mg/m(2)) and injection of (111)In ibritumomab tiuxetan (5 mCi [185 MBq]) for dosimetry evaluation, followed 1 week later with rituximab (250 mg/m(2)) and (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (0.3 mCi/kg [11 MBq/kg]). Patients (median age, 61 years; 90% stage III/IV at study entry; 83% follicular lymphoma; and 67% with bone marrow involvement) had a median of 2 prior therapy regimens (range, 1-9). Estimated radiation-absorbed doses were well below the study-defined maximum allowable for all 30 patients. With the use of the International Workshop criteria for NHL response assessment, the overall response rate was 83% (37% complete response, 6.7% complete response unconfirmed, and 40% partial response). Kaplan-Meier estimated median time to progression (TTP) was 9.4 months (range, 1.7-24.6). In responders, Kaplan-Meier estimated median TTP was 12.6 months (range, 4.9-24.6), with 35% of data censored. Toxicity was primarily hematologic, transient, and reversible. The incidence of grade 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was 33%, 13%, and 3%, respectively. Reduced-dose ibritumomab tiuxetan is safe and well tolerated and has significant clinical activity in this patient population. PMID:12036859

  9. Collection of hematopoietic stem cells after previous radioimmunotherapy is feasible and does not impair engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Derenzini, Enrico; Stefoni, Vittorio; Maglie, Roberto; Casadei, Beatrice; Pellegrini, Cinzia; Broccoli, Alessandro; Stefani, Giulia; Fanti, Stefano; Motta, Maria Rosa; Narducci, Riccardo; Argnani, Lisa; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2013-12-01

    Major concerns about radioimmunotherapy (RIT) administration early in the course of follicular lymphoma (FL) are long-term toxicity and the theoretical impairment of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) harvest, but few data are available about mobilization rates after RIT. This study evaluates the impact of prior therapy with RIT (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan) and different chemotherapy regimens in all FL patients (N = 103) attempting HSC mobilization at our institution over the last 7 years. Sixty-nine patients received R-CHOP (rituximab-cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-vincristine-prednisone) or CHOP-like regimens, 21 patients received R-FM (rituximab-fludarabine-mitoxantrone), and 13 patients received RIT before HSC mobilization. Median CD34+ cell yield at first mobilization was 7.2 × 10(6)/kg in the R-CHOP group versus 4.3 in the R-FM group versus 1.7 in the RIT group (P = .02 R-CHOP versus R-FM; P < .0001 R-CHOP versus RIT; P < .02 R-FM versus RIT). Although 8 of 13 patients initially failed to collect enough HSC after RIT, a second and/or salvage harvest was successfully performed in 7 patients, with 10 of 13 patients (77%) finally undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). No differences in engraftment kinetics were observed between the three groups (R-CHOP versus R-FM versus RIT). Although mobilization was significantly impaired in patients previously treated with RIT, a salvage HSC harvest and ASCT after RIT were safe and feasible in most patients. PMID:24055654

  10. Prolonged Remission in Neuromyelitis Optica Following Cessation of Rituximab Treatment.

    PubMed

    Weinfurtner, Kelley; Graves, Jennifer; Ness, Jayne; Krupp, Lauren; Milazzo, Maria; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an autoimmune disease characterized by acute episodes of transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Several small, open-label studies suggest rituximab, a monoclonal antibody against CD20, prevents relapses in neuromyelitis optica; however, there is little consensus on timing or duration of treatment. Here we report four patients with severe relapsing neuromyelitis optica who were stabilized on rituximab and, after discontinuing treatment, continued to experience prolonged remission of their disease. Remission ranged from 4.5 to 10.5 years total, including 3 to 9 years off all therapies. The patients had sustained clinical responses despite normal B-lymphocyte levels and, in at least 2 patients, continued seropositivity for aquaporin-4 antibodies. These cases suggest that rituximab may induce prolonged remission in certain neuromyelitis optica patients, and they highlight the need for further elucidation of rituximab's mechanism in neuromyelitis optica. PMID:25387545

  11. Screening for viral hepatitis prior to rituximab chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leonard, A N; Love, B L; Norris, L B; Siddiqui, S K; Wallam, M N; Bennett, C L

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the CDC published guidelines recommending screening of all persons undergoing treatment with rituximab to identify persons at risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. We evaluated implementation of this recommendation in veterans, who are at increased risk of HBV, and determined characteristics of those screened. We also evaluated a control setting, rates of hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening among the same rituximab-treated patients. There are no guidelines that recommend HCV screening prior to initiation of rituximab. Medical records of patients receiving rituximab between January 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed according to two time periods: 2006-2008 (period 1, pre-guidelines) and 2009-2012 (period 2, post-guidelines). Patient demographics, concomitant chemotherapy regimen (protocol, dose, duration), treatment indication, risk factors for hepatitis infection (substance abuse, homelessness, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)), and HBV/HCV screening status were documented. During the study period, 102 patients were treated with rituximab (49 in period 1 and 53 in period 2). During periods 1 and 2, 22 and 32 % of rituximab-treated patients were screened for HBV, respectively (p = 0.375). Treatment during 2009 was the only significant predictor of HBV screening in the adjusted model (p = 0.01). For HCV during periods 1 and 2, 22 and 21 % of patients were screened, respectively (p = 1.00). There were no significant predictors of HCV screening. Rates of screening for HBV among rituximab-treated patients were low, both before and after dissemination of guidelines recommending universal HBV screening of rituximab-treated patients. PMID:26382277

  12. Rituximab therapy in nephrotic syndrome due to AH amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Nagaaki; Matsuda, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Daigo; Gono, Takahisa; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with AH amyloidosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic leukemia that has remained in a stable state with a nephrotic syndrome for 17 months since the commencement of cyclic rituximab therapy aimed at suppression of pathogenetic gamma heavy chains. Free light chains in serum and CD20-positive cells in peripheral blood were useful as hematological markers in the patient. Rituximab might be a potent therapeutic option for AH amyloidosis associated with a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:19590993

  13. Improved production, and evaluation of Cu-67 for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolsky, K.L.; Joshi, V.; Meinken, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    Copper-67 is a radionuclide of great interest for radioimmunotherapy. We report labeling and biodistribution results with the anti-CEA F(ab`){sub 2} monoclonal antibody (MAb). The anti-CEA F(ab`){sub 2} MAb was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodo-decane-and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N`,N``,N```-tetraacetic acid (DOTA and TETA) using their mono NHS esters. The ligands were synthesized using a simple large scale method and the MAb conjugates were labeled with Cu-67 (90{plus_minus}5% yield, 98% in-vitro serum stability at 4d, and immunoreactivity 80{plus_minus}10%). Data in tumor (LS-174 T cells) xenografted nude mice showed similar tumor uptake (% ID/g) for both DOTA and TETA at 24h (32.4 vs 35.7) and 96h (14.6 vs 17.1). The DOTA conjugate showed slightly higher liver uptake (24h: 14.7 vs 10.4; 96h: 7.05 vs 5.3) and blood uptake (24h: 6.16 vs 4.73; 96h: 0.72 vs 0.46) while the TETA conjugate showed higher kidney uptake (24h: 12.8 vs 4.8; 96h: 8.6 vs 4.1). These results are quite favorable and warrant further study of these Cu-67-MAb conjugates for radioimmunotherapy.

  14. PET/CT AND RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY OF PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek; Oehr, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Traditional morphologically based imaging modalities are now being complemented by positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) in prostate cancer. Metastatic prostate cancer is an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) since no effective therapies are available. This review highlights the most important achievements within the last year in PET/CT and RIT of prostate cancer. Recent findings Conflicting results exist on the use of choline for detection of malignant disease in the prostate gland. The role of PET/CT in N-staging remains to be elucidated further. However, 18F-choline and 11C-choline PET/CT have been demonstrated to be useful for detection of recurrence. 18F-choline and 18F-fluoride PET/CT are useful for detection of bone metastases. Prostate tumor antigens may be used as targets for RIT. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is currently under focus of a number of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. J591, a monoclonal antibody, that targets the extracellular domain of PSMA, shows promising results. HER2 receptors may also have a potential as target for PET/CT imaging and RIT of advanced prostate cancer. Summary PET/CT in prostate cancer has proven to play a significant role, in particular for detection of prostate cancer recurrence and bone metastases. Radioimmunotherapy of metastatic prostate cancer warrant further investigations. PMID:19535981

  15. Idelalisib and Rituximab in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheson, Bruce D.; Pagel, John M.; Hillmen, Peter; Barrientos, Jacqueline C.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Flinn, Ian; Ghia, Paolo; Eradat, Herbert; Ervin, Thomas; Lamanna, Nicole; Coiffier, Bertrand; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Ma, Shuo; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Cramer, Paula; Aiello, Maria; Johnson, Dave M.; Miller, Langdon L.; Li, Daniel; Jahn, Thomas M.; Dansey, Roger D.; Hallek, Michael; O’Brien, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who have clinically significant coexisting medical conditions are less able to undergo standard chemo-therapy. Effective therapies with acceptable side-effect profiles are needed for this patient population. METHODS In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study, we assessed the efficacy and safety of idelalisib, an oral inhibitor of the delta iso-form of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, in combination with rituximab versus rituximab plus placebo. We randomly assigned 220 patients with decreased renal function, previous therapy-induced myelosuppression, or major coexisting illnesses to receive rituximab and either idelalisib (at a dose of 150 mg) or placebo twice daily. The primary end point was progression-free survival. At the first prespecified interim analysis, the study was stopped early on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board owing to overwhelming efficacy. RESULTS The median progression-free survival was 5.5 months in the placebo group and was not reached in the idelalisib group (hazard ratio for progression or death in the idelalisib group, 0.15; P<0.001). Patients receiving idelalisib versus those receiving placebo had improved rates of overall response (81% vs. 13%; odds ratio, 29.92; P<0.001) and overall survival at 12 months (92% vs. 80%; hazard ratio for death, 0.28; P = 0.02). Serious adverse events occurred in 40% of the patients receiving idelalisib and rituximab and in 35% of those receiving placebo and rituximab. CONCLUSIONS The combination of idelalisib and rituximab, as compared with placebo and rituximab, significantly improved progression-free survival, response rate, and overall survival among patients with relapsed CLL who were less able to undergo chemo-therapy. (Funded by Gilead; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01539512.) PMID:24450857

  16. Rituximab versus Cyclophosphamide for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John H.; Merkel, Peter A.; Spiera, Robert; Seo, Philip; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St. Clair, E. William; Turkiewicz, Anthony; Tchao, Nadia K.; Webber, Lisa; Ding, Linna; Sejismundo, Lourdes P.; Mieras, Kathleen; Weitzenkamp, David; Ikle, David; Seyfert-Margolis, Vicki; Mueller, Mark; Brunetta, Paul; Allen, Nancy B.; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Geetha, Duvuru; Keogh, Karina A.; Kissin, Eugene Y.; Monach, Paul A.; Peikert, Tobias; Stegeman, Coen; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Specks, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids have been the cornerstone of remission-induction therapy for severe antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis for 40 years. Uncontrolled studies suggest that rituximab is effective and may be safer than a cyclophosphamide-based regimen. METHODS We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, noninferiority trial of rituximab (375 mg per square meter of body-surface area per week for 4 weeks) as compared with cyclophosphamide (2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) for remission induction. Glucocorticoids were tapered off; the primary end point was remission of disease without the use of prednisone at 6 months. RESULTS Nine centers enrolled 197 ANCA-positive patients with either Wegener’s granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis. Baseline disease activity, organ involvement, and the proportion of patients with relapsing disease were similar in the two treatment groups. Sixty-three patients in the rituximab group (64%) reached the primary end point, as compared with 52 patients in the control group (53%), a result that met the criterion for noninferiority (P<0.001). The rituximab-based regimen was more efficacious than the cyclophosphamide-based regimen for inducing remission of relapsing disease; 34 of 51 patients in the rituximab group (67%) as compared with 21 of 50 patients in the control group (42%) reached the primary end point (P = 0.01). Rituximab was also as effective as cyclophosphamide in the treatment of patients with major renal disease or alveolar hemorrhage. There were no significant differences between the treatment groups with respect to rates of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Rituximab therapy was not inferior to daily cyclophosphamide treatment for induction of remission in severe ANCA-associated vasculitis and may be superior in relapsing disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Genentech, and Biogen; Clinical

  17. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Progress report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-31

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  18. Effect of taxol on the therapeutic efficacy of radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.T.; Spicer, K.M.; Means, J.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to evaluate the potential of using taxol to maximize the therapeutic effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy. Published studies have shown taxol to be an effective radiosensitizer of tumors to external irradiation by blocking tumor cells in the G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle. In vitro and in vivo studies were carried out to study the effect of low-dose taxol on the therapeutic effectiveness of I-131 anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (OEM-094-20856 MoAb) of human colonic carcinoma (LS-174T cell line). The in vitro clonogenic assay studies indicated taxol effectively enhanced the cell killing effect of I-131 MoAb.

  19. Radioimmunotherapy of Solid Tumors: Searching for the Right Target

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Sgouros, George

    2015-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors remains a challenge despite the tremendous success of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) and 131I Tositumomab (Bexxar) in treating non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. For a variety of reasons, clinical trials of radiolabeled antibodies against solid tumors have not led to responses equivalent to those seen against lymphoma. In contrast, promising responses have been observed with unlabeled antibodies that target solid tumor receptors associated with cellular signaling pathways. These observations suggest that anti-tumor efficacy of the carrier antibody might be critical to achieving clinical responses. Here, we review and compare tumor antigens targeted by radiolabeled antibodies and unlabeled antibodies used in immunotherapy. The review shows that the trend for radiolabeled antibodies under pre-clinical development is to also target antigens associated with signaling pathways that are essential for the growth and survival of the tumor. PMID:21034423

  20. Criteria for the selection of nuclides for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes many factors that need to be considered if radioimmunotherapy is to become a commonplace reality. For beta-emitting radionuclides, two physical features of importance are half-life and energy, with the latter determining the range. These features must be matched to the pharmacokinetics of the carrier and the distribution of the radionuclide, both macroscopically and microscopically. Alpha-particle emitters could be considered for cells that are readily accessible to the labeled antibody and for populations that uniformly and constantly display the targeted antigen or idiotype, e.g., trafficking cells such as T or B lymphocytes. For cells that concentrate the radioactive label, the use of low-energy electrons should be examined. If the radionuclide is translocated to the nucleus, the Auger effect can be particularly lethal because of the high LET-like biological response. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Criteria for the selection of radionuclides for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Mease, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    The potential of utilizing monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors (radioimmunotherapy, RIT) has stimulated much research activity. From dosimetric and other considerations, the choice of radiolabel is an important factor that needs to be optimized for maximum effectiveness of RIT. This paper reviews and assesses a number of present and future radionuclides that are particularly suitable for RIT based on the various physical, chemical, and biological considerations. Intermediate to high-energy beta emitters' (with and without gamma photons in their emission) are emphasized since they possess a number of advantages over alpha and Auger emitters. Factors relating to the production and availability of candidate radiometals as well as their stable chemical attachment to monoclonal antibodies are discussed. 34 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Is rituximab sub-optimally dosed in indolent B cell lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Yazeed; Rouphail, Basel; Jia, Xuefei; Dean, Robert M; Hill, Brian T; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Pohlman, Brad L; Smith, Mitchell R

    2016-09-01

    Rituximab pharmacokinetics are affected by gender, age and weight and can affect outcomes in aggressive B cell lymphoma. Less is known about the pharmacokinetics of rituximab in indolent B cell lymphoma (iNHL). We analysed the effects of gender, age, weight and body surface area on the outcomes of 303 patients treated with first line rituximab-based regimens for iNHL. The patients were divided into 3 treatment cohorts: rituximab only, rituximab + chemotherapy (R-CTX) and R-CTX followed by rituximab maintenance; furthermore, each cohort was subdivided as follicular (FL) or non-FL, based on histology. Older males and patients with higher weight had worse outcomes when treated with R-CTX, probably due to faster rituximab clearance. Our results concur with studies of R-CTX for DLBCL. As this effect was not observed in patients treated with rituximab alone or R-CTX followed by rituximab maintenance, we hypothesize that higher rituximab levels reached with weekly rituximab and/or prolonged exposure achieved with maintenance therapy exceed the therapeutic threshold, even with faster clearance, which nullifies the negative effect of higher weight and male gender. In conclusion, under current practices, a subset of patients with iNHL, i.e., FL treated with R-CTX, may be sub-optimally dosed with rituximab. PMID:27136331

  3. Rituximab and biosimilars – equivalence and reciprocity

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Zaina P; Magwood, Jametta S; Singh, Sarveshwari; Bennett, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a debilitating disease affecting millions of people daily. Over the years, cancer treatment has advanced in leaps and bounds. Antibodies are important breakthrough therapeutic agents for cancer. These agents, proteins produced by B lymphocytes of the immune system in response to antigens, bind to receptors on cell surfaces so that the antigen–antibody complexes can be recognized and destroyed by phagocytes. While each B cell synthesizes only one kind of antibody, an entire population of different types of B cells and their respective antibodies are produced in response to various antigens to which the organism had been exposed. However, to be useful clinically, substantial amounts of a single antibody must be generated from a single ancestral B cell. These antibodies produced by a specific population of B cells are the monoclonal antibodies that have become the cornerstone of treatment for cancer and many immunologic illnesses. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the clinical development of biosimilars in clinical oncology, focusing on rituximab and like biosimilars. PMID:24829884

  4. 90-yttrium-ibritumomab tiuxetan consolidation of fludarabine, mitoxantrone, rituximab in intermediate/high-risk follicular lymphoma: updated long-term results after a median follow-up of 7 years.

    PubMed

    Casadei, Beatrice; Pellegrini, Cinzia; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Annechini, Giorgia; De Renzo, Amalia; Stefoni, Vittorio; Broccoli, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Letizia; Quirini, Federica; Tonialini, Lorenzo; Morigi, Alice; Argnani, Lisa; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) after an induction phase with conventional chemoimmunotherapy became an attractive strategy of consolidation for patients with advanced follicular lymphoma: in particular, in many studies RIT was represented by yttrium-90-ibritumomab tiuxetan ((90) Y-IT). Independently by the different front-line treatment, updates on the long-term follow-up of these studies are needed because the disease course of follicular lymphoma is characterised by multiple relapses and progressively shorter durations of response. We report updated long-term efficacy and toxicity results of a multicenter phase II study on sequential treatment with four cycles of fludarabine, mitoxantrone, and rituximab followed by (90) Y-IT as front-line therapy for untreated patients with intermediate/high-risk follicular lymphoma. With a median follow-up of 84 months, only 19/49 (38.8%) complete response patients relapsed, yielding an estimated long-term disease-free survival of 62.6%. The 7-year overall survival was 72.7%. Four (7.3%) second acute myeloid leukemia occurred, with a median time following RIT of 42 months. A relevant patients' responsiveness to subsequent therapies occurred: approximately 65% of relapsed patients obtained a good clinical response after the second-line treatment. These data represented the first evidence of a real role even in the long period of 90Y-IT after a fludarabine-containing regimen plus rituximab in the treatment of high-risk follicular lymphoma. PMID:26990782

  5. Developmental immunotoxicology assessment of rituximab in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Anu; McKeever, Kathleen; Anand, Banmeet; Eppler, Steve; Weinbauer, Gerhard F; Beyer, Joseph C

    2011-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric murine/human-engineered immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, selectively depleting CD20-expressing cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. As part of the rituximab registration-enabling program for rheumatoid arthritis, cynomolgus monkey embryo-fetal development and pre- and postnatal developmental toxicity studies were performed. In both studies, female cynomolgus monkeys were administered rituximab iv at doses of 0/0, 15/20, 37.5/50, and 75/100 mg/kg (loading dose/study dose) from gestation day (GD) 20 to 50 for the embryo-fetal development study and GD 20 to postpartum (pp) day 28 for the pre- and postnatal study. In the embryo-fetal development study, although maternal dosing ended during the first trimester at GD 50, placental transfer of rituximab to fetuses was demonstrated at GD 100. Consequently, fetuses demonstrated B-cell depletion in lymphoid tissues at GD 100. Repletion of B cells was demonstrated in infants in a follow-up pre- and postnatal study following fetal and neonatal exposure. In the pre- and postnatal study, despite B-cell depletion, there was no significant functional consequence on the infant's ability to mount T-cell-dependent antibody responses following vaccination or antigenic challenge. Overall, rituximab was well tolerated at maximum feasible doses up to 100 mg/kg in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys and their infants after exposure from the period of organogenesis throughout pregnancy, parturition, and postnatal development. Importantly, the preclinical data have been concordant with the clinical data in children for cases where rituximab was administered during pregnancy. PMID:20937725

  6. Improving testing for hepatitis B before treatment with rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Jopson, Laura; Ng, Sarah; Lowery, Matthew; Harwood, Jayne; Waugh, Sheila; Valappil, Manoj; McPherson, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Objectives/Background Individuals with current or previous infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) can experience viral reactivation when treated with immunosuppression. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody used to treat many diseases, has potent immunosuppressant effects with a high risk of causing HBV reactivation. Reactivation can range from elevated liver enzymes to acute severe hepatitis with liver failure and a significant mortality risk. HBV screening and appropriate use of prophylactic antiviral therapy can prevent reactivation. This work describes the introduction of a local policy for HBV testing in patients before rituximab treatment and assesses its impact. Methods and Results A baseline review (before policy introduction) of 90 patients showed that only 21 (23%) had hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 17 (19%) had hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBcAb) tested before receiving rituximab. Following introduction of the policy (on the basis of international guidelines), improved laboratory reporting protocols and targeted education sessions, two further reviews of HBV testing rates among patients being initiated onto rituximab were performed. There was a marked increase in pre-rituximab testing for HBsAg from 23 to 79% and for anti-HBcAb from 19 to 78%. Throughout the study period, a total of one (0.8%) HBsAg-positive and six (4.7%) anti-HBcAb-positive patients were identified. Conclusions This work clearly indicates that simple strategies can markedly improve appropriate HBV screening. In our cohort, 6% (of whom only 43% had recognized HBV risk factors) required antiviral prophylaxis, which emphasizes the importance of universal screening before rituximab. Reinforcement of the guidelines and ongoing education is needed to further increase testing rates. PMID:27388147

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Katrina E; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction. PMID:27275457

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wardrope, Katrina E.; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D. O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction.

  9. Two cases of refractory Wegener's granulomatosis successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Naoto; Matsudaira, Ran; Hirashima, Mika; Ikeda, Makoto; Tajima, Michiko; Nawata, Masuyuki; Morimoto, Shinji; Kaneda, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    2007-01-01

    Conventional therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis, steroid and cyclophosphamide, fails to control disease activity in some refractory patients and has treatment-related toxicity. B cell depletion therapy using rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been shown to be effective for certain autoimmune diseases including antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -associated systemic vasculitis. We report two refractory cases of Wegener's granulomatosis: one with bronchial and pulmonary involvement and retroorbital granuloma, the other with retroorbital granuloma and hypertrophic pachymeningitis causing severe headache. Rituximab was effective in both cases, with diminished granuloma and reduced ANCA titers, allowing steroids to be tapered. No adverse effects were detected. PMID:17409608

  10. Rituximab in combination with multiagent chemotherapy for pediatric follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Riten; Galardy, Paul J; Dogan, Ahmet; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Khan, Shakila P

    2011-08-01

    Given the rarity of follicular lymphoma (FL) in children, there is limited data on which to base treatment recommendations. Herein, we report our institutional experience of using rituximab with multiagent chemotherapy for pediatric FL. Six pediatric patients were diagnosed with FL from 2000 to 2009. All patients received rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) for varying durations. Five of the six patients remain in remission with a median follow-up of 31 months. Larger randomized trials are indicated to establish the efficacy of this regimen for pediatric FL patients. PMID:21462303

  11. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  12. Evaluation of chelating agents for radioimmunotherapy with scandium-47

    SciTech Connect

    Mausner, L.F.; Joshi, V.; Kolsky, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Sc-47 has attractive properties [t{1/2} 3.35d, {beta}{sub max}:441 keV (68%), 601 keV (32%); {gamma} 159.4 keV (68%)] for radioimmunotherapy. Sc also displays favorable coordination chemistry for chelation attachment to antibodies. Due to chemical similarities to In and Y we have tested ligands with Sc-47 originally developed for use with In-111 or Y-90. The Scl-47 was produced with a fast neutron reaction Ti-47 (n,p). The radiochemical separation used cation exchange (AG-MP50) loaded with a 2% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} - 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, followed by elution of Sc-47 with a 1 M NH{sub 4}{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/0.25 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution. Further separation and conversion of Sc to chloride form is achieved with a Chelex 100 column. No traces of Ti or Fe could be detected by spectrophotometric assay. Anti-CEA F(ab{prime});{sub 2} antibody conjugates of the following chelates were used for labeling studies: 4-isothiocyanato-cyclohexyl EDTA (4-ICE), N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of DOTA {l_angle}DOTA NHS{r_angle}, 2-{l_angle}p-SCN-Bz{r_angle}-6 methyl DTPA {l_angle}1B4MDTPA{r_angle} and conventional DTPA dianhydride. Labeling yields with Sc-47 were, 4-ICE 80%, DOTAQ-NHS 64%, 1B4MDTPA 98% and DTPA 62%. Serum stability of these preparations was essentially 100% out to 48 h except for DTPA (61%). The biodistribution {l_angle}% ID/g{r_angle} of these conjugates in human tumor xenografted nude mice {l_angle}LS-174% cells{r_angle} was compared. 4-ICE, DOTA-NHS and 1B4M-DTPA(15.4, 7.0, 7.0) but liver uptake was somewhat higher for DOTA-NHS than 4-ICE or 1B4M-DTPA (9.4, 5.8, 5.6). Generally faster whole body clearance for 1B4M-DTPA led to somewhat better tumor to organ ratios by 48 h. The poor stability of DTPA conjugate was evident with poor tumor uptake (12.4), high kidney (14.8), liver (17.1) and bone (3.6). We conclude that ligands which perform better with In-111 and Y-90 also give stable Sc-47 conjugates and their biodistributions are favorable for radioimmunotherapy.

  13. Is rituximab an effective treatment of refractory calcinosis?

    PubMed

    Dubos, Maria; Ly, Kim; Martel, Clothilde; Fauchais, Anne Laure

    2016-01-01

    Calcinosis, the deposition of calcified material in soft tissues, is frequently seen in systemic sclerosis and dermatomyositis. Treatment options are limited, with disappointing results. Some recent case reports suggest that rituximab may be an attractive therapeutic option. In case 1, a 54-year-old woman who presented with rheumatoid arthritis in association with scleromyositis was treated with rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis. Despite this, she developed multiple progressive calcinosis, necessitating extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to limit calcinosis extension and pain. In case 2, a 38-year-old man, previously treated for an anti-Pm/Scl-positive polymyositis/scleroderma overlap syndrome, presented with multiple tumoural periarticular calcinosis, which progressed despite bisphosphonates, sodium thiosulfate and thalidomide. We decided to start rituximab. Progression of calcinosis was still evident 6 and 12 months after anti-CD20 treatment. Many treatments have been tried to treat calcinosis without demonstrated effectiveness. Presently, rituximab cannot be recommended for this indication in the absence of successful controlled trials. PMID:27247203

  14. Rituximab therapy for primary glomerulonephritis: Report on two cases

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Cresseri, Donata; Fogazzi, Giovanni B; Moroni, Gabriella; Passerini, Patrizia; Martin, Paul; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2015-01-01

    The evidence in the medical literature on the efficacy and safety of rituximab therapy for primary glomerulonephritis is limited and controversial. We describe two male Caucasian patients with rapidly progressive kidney failure due to primary proliferative glomerulonephritis. Both of them received high-dose intravenous corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide with limited benefit. The first patient (hepatitis C virus-negative mixed cryoglobulinemia) underwent plasma-exchange with intravenous immunoglobulins; he showed significant benefit on kidney function (he became dialysis independent with serum creatinine going back to 1.6 mg/dL) after one rituximab pulse even if urinary abnormalities were still present. No improvement in renal function or urinary changes occurred in the second patient. Both these individuals developed sepsis over the follow-up, the first patient died two months after rituximab therapy. This report is in keeping with the occurrence of severe infections after rituximab therapy in patients with renal impairment at baseline and concomitant high-dose steroids. PMID:26301235

  15. Rituximab-associated acute thrombocytopenia: an under-diagnosed phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ron; Bonstein, Lilach; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Ben-Bassat, Isaac; Shpilberg, Ofer; Raanani, Pia

    2009-04-01

    Acute infusion reactions are the most common documented adverse reactions reported with rituximab, with overt cytokine release syndrome, and hematological adverse events being much rarer. The clinical course of a patient with mantle cell lymphoma, who developed acute thrombocytopenia and leukopenia following rituximab administration, is described and the literature reviewed. Serum complement and the levels of three cytokines--TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1, were measured 2 days after the infusion of rituximab by using ELISA assay. Drug-dependent antibodies against platelets were evaluated by two procedures as follows: an immunofluorescence test applying flow cytometry and Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization of Platelet Antigen (MAIPA). Serum levels of TNF-a were significantly increased compared with normal, whereas those of IL-6 and IL-1 were not increased significantly. Flow cytometry assay and the MAIPA assay failed to detect rituximab-dependent antibodies against platelets. Complement levels were decreased compared with normal. Literature search yielded 10 publications reporting on another 15 patients. The most common type of lymphoma was mantle cell lymphoma, six patients had bone marrow involvement, and 10 patients had splenomegaly. In 10 patients, acute cytopenia was preceded by cytokine release syndrome or infusion-related symptoms. Usually, thrombocytopenia was not associated with bleeding manifestations. Thrombocytopenia was the most commonly acute cytopenia reported. The postulated pathogenesis is associated with cytokine release syndrome and complement activation. Patients with potential risk factors like splenomegaly and bone marrow involvement, who develop clinical manifestations compatible with cytokine release syndrome, should be closely monitored for rituximab-associated cytopenia. PMID:19260124

  16. Tumor dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy: Methods of calculation for beta particles

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K. ); Kwok, C.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Calculational methods of beta-particle dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are reviewed for clinical and experimental studies and computer modeling of tumors. In clinical studies, absorbed-dose estimates are usually based on the [ital in]-[ital vivo] quantitation of the activity in tumors from gamma camera images. Because of the limited spatial resolution of gamma cameras, clinical dosimetry is necessarily limited to the macroscopic level (macrodosimetry) and the MIRD formalism for absorbed-dose calculations is appropriate. In experimental RIT, tumor dimensions are often comparable to or smaller than the beta-particle range of commonly used radionuclides (for example, [sup 131]I, [sup 67]Cu, [sup 186]Re, [sup 188]Re, [sup 90]Y) and deviations from the equilibrium dose must be taken into account in absorbed-dose calculations. Additionally, if small tumors are growing rapidly at the time of RIT, the effects of tumor growth will need to be included in absorbed-dose estimates. In computer modeling of absorbed-dose distributions, analytical, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods have been used to investigate the consequences of uniform and nonuniform activity distributions and the effects of inhomogeneous media. Measurements and calculations of the local absorbed dose at the multicellular level have shown that variations in this dose are large. Knowledge of the absorbed dose is essential for any form of radiotherapy. Therefore, it is important that clinical, experimental, and theoretical investigations continue to provide information on tumor dosimetry that is necessary for a better understanding of the radiobiological effects of RIT.

  17. Microdosimetric model of astatine-211 labeled antibodies for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Humm, J.L.

    1987-11-01

    Astatine-211 is an alpha-emitter with a short half-life (7.2 hr). This paper discusses the potential of /sup 211/At targeted by antibodies for tumor therapy and the possible advantage of /sup 211/At over beta- and gamma-emitting radionuclides such as /sup 131/I currently employed in the field of radioimmunotherapy. Since the longest range alpha-particle from /sup 211/At is only 67 microns and the rate of energy loss is high (track averaged linear energy transfer LT approximately 120 keV/micron), a disintegration of /sup 211/At produces a large and extremely localized deposition of energy. A Monte-Carlo model has been developed for studying the stochastic fluctuation of alpha-particle hits and energy deposition in cell nuclei in an attempt to determine the efficacy of /sup 211/At-labeled antibodies for tumor cell inactivation. Calculations have been performed for 2 extreme conditions: (a) the case of /sup 211/At retained in the capillary, and (b) for a homogeneous distribution of /sup 211/At-labeled antibody in the tumor. The results of these two calculations represent the boundary conditions between which any real solution must lie. Finally, developments to the model to include antibody transport across the capillary membrane and through the tumor tissue are discussed.

  18. Radioimmunotherapy of Cryptococcus neoformans spares bystander mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Ruth A; Jiang, Zewei; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Aim Previously, we showed that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for cryptococcal infections using radioactively labeled antibodies recognizing the cryptococcal capsule reduced fungal burden and prolonged survival of mice infected with Cryptococcus neoformans. Here, we investigate the effects of RIT on bystander mammalian cells. Materials & methods Heat-killed C. neoformans bound to anticapsular antibodies, unlabeled or labeled with the β-emitter rhenium-188 (16.9-h half-life) or the α-emitter bismuth-213 (46-min half-life), was incubated with macrophage-like J774.16 cells or epithelial-like Chinese hamster ovary cells. Lactate dehydrogenase activity, crystal violet uptake, reduction of tetrazolium dye (2,3)-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfenyl)-(2H)-terazolium-5-carboxanilide and nitric oxide production were measured. Results The J774.16 and Chinese hamster ovary cells maintained membrane integrity, viability and metabolic activity following exposure to radiolabeled C. neoformans. Conclusion RIT of C. neoformans is a selective therapy with minimal effects on host cells and these results are consistent with observations that RIT-treated mice with cryptococcal infection lacked RIT-related pathological changes in lungs and brain tissues. PMID:24020737

  19. Time Savings with Rituximab Subcutaneous Injection versus Rituximab Intravenous Infusion: A Time and Motion Study in Eight Countries

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Erwin; Kritikou, Persefoni; Sandoval, Mariana; Tao, Sunning; Wiesner, Christof; Carella, Angelo Michele; Ngoh, Charles; Waterboer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Rituximab is a standard treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The SABRINA trial (NCT01200758) showed that a subcutaneous (SC) rituximab formulation did not compromise efficacy or safety compared with intravenous (IV) infusion. We aimed to quantify active healthcare professional (HCP) time and patient chair time for rituximab SC and IV, including potential time savings. Methods This non-interventional time and motion study was run in eight countries and 30 day oncology units. Rituximab SC data were collected alongside the MabCute trial (NCT01461928); IV data were collected per routine real-world practice. Trained observers recorded active HCP time for pre-specified tasks (stopwatch) and chair time (time of day). A random intercept model was used to analyze active HCP time (by task and for all tasks combined) in the treatment room and drug preparation area, drug administration duration, chair time and patient treatment room time by country and/or across countries. Active HCP and chair time were extrapolated to a patient’s first year of treatment (11 rituximab sessions). Results Mean active HCP time was 35.0 and 23.7 minutes for IV and SC process, respectively (-32%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction in time was 27–58%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated active HCP time (first year of treatment) was 1.1–5.2 hours. Mean chair time was 262.1 minutes for IV, including 180.9 minutes infusion duration, vs. 67.3 minutes for SC, including 8.3 minutes SC injection administration (-74%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction was 53–91%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated chair time for the first year of treatment was 3.1–5.5 eight-hour days. Conclusions Compared with rituximab IV, rituximab SC was associated with reduced chair time and active HCP time. The latter could be invested in other activities, whereas the former may lead to more available appointments, reducing waiting lists and increasing the efficiency of day oncology units. Trial

  20. A phase II trial of RCHOP followed by radioimmunotherapy for early stage (stages I/II) diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: ECOG3402.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E; Hong, Fangxin; Micallef, Ivana N; Gascoyne, Randy D; Dogan, Ahmet; Wagner, Henry; Kahl, Brad S; Advani, Ranjana H; Horning, Sandra J

    2015-09-01

    Patients with early stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receive RCHOP (rituximab cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) alone or with involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). Anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) delivers radiation to microscopic sites outside of known disease. This phase II study aimed to achieve a functional complete response (CR) rate of ≥75% to RCHOP and (90) Yttrium-ibritumomab tiuxetan RIT. Patients with stages I/II DLBCL received 4-6 cycles of RCHOP followed by RIT [14·8 MBq/kg (0·4 mCi/kg)]; patients with positron emission tomographypositive sites of disease after RCHOP/RIT received 30 Gy IFRT. Of the 62 patients enrolled; 53 were eligible. 42% (22/53) had stage I/IE; 58% (31/53) stage II/IIE. After RCHOP, 79% (42/53) were in CR/unconfirmed CR. Forty-eight patients proceeded to RIT. One partial responder after RIT received IFRT and achieved a CR. The best response after RCHOP + RIT in all 53 patients was a functional CR rate of 89% (47/53; 95% confidence interval: 77-96%). With a median follow-up of 5·9 years, 7 (13%) patients have progressed and 4 (8%) have died (2 with DLBCL). At 5 years, 78% of patients remain in remission and 94% are alive. Chemoimmunotherapy and RIT is an active regimen for early stage DLBCL patients. Eighty-nine percent of patients achieved functional CR without the requirement of IFRT. This regimen is worthy of further study for early stage DLBCL in a phase III trial. PMID:25974212

  1. Administered activity and metastatic cure probability during radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in nude mice with {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Elgqvist, Joergen . E-mail: jorgen.elgqvist@radfys.gu.se; Andersson, Hakan; Bernhardt, Peter; Baeck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jensen, Holger; Johansson, Bengt R.; Lindegren, Sture; Olsson, Marita; Palm, Stig; Warnhammar, Elisabet; Jacobsson, Lars

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the therapeutic efficacy of {alpha}-radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer in mice. This study: (i) estimated the minimum required activity (MRA), giving a reasonable high therapeutic efficacy; and (ii) calculated the specific energy to tumor cell nuclei and the metastatic cure probability (MCP) using various assumptions regarding monoclonal-antibody (mAb) distribution in measured tumors. The study was performed using the {alpha}-particle emitter Astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) labeled to the mAb MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}. Methods and Materials: Animals were inoculated intraperitoneally with {approx}1 x 10{sup 7} cells of the cell line NIH:OVCAR-3. Four weeks later animals were treated with 25, 50, 100, or 200 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2} (n = 74). Another group of animals was treated with a nonspecific mAb: 100 kBq {sup 211}At-Rituximab F(ab'){sub 2} (n = 18). Eight weeks after treatment the animals were sacrificed and presence of macro- and microscopic tumors and ascites was determined. An MCP model was developed and compared with the experimentally determined tumor-free fraction (TFF). Results: When treatment was given 4 weeks after cell inoculation, the TFFs were 25%, 22%, 50%, and 61% after treatment with 25, 50, 100, or 200 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}, respectively, the specific energy to irradiated cell nuclei varying between {approx}2 and {approx}400 Gy. Conclusion: As a significant increase in the therapeutic efficacy was observed between the activity levels of 50 and 100 kBq (TFF increase from 22% to 50%), the conclusion was that the MRA is {approx}100 kBq {sup 211}At-MX35 F(ab'){sub 2}. MCP was most consistent with the TFF when assuming a diffusion depth of 30 {mu}m of the mAbs in the tumors.

  2. Rituximab add-on therapy for breakthrough relapsing multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Naismith, R.T.; Piccio, L.; Lyons, J.A.; Lauber, J.; Tutlam, N.T.; Parks, B.J.; Trinkaus, K.; Song, S.K.; Cross, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: B cells and the humoral immune system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). This study sought to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of add-on therapy with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that depletes circulating B cells, in subjects with relapsing MS with breakthrough disease defined by clinical and MRI activity (Class III evidence). Methods: Thirty subjects with a relapse within the past 18 months despite use of an injectable disease-modifying agent, and with at least 1 gadolinium-enhancing (GdE) lesion on any of 3 pretreatment MRIs, received rituximab administered at 375 mg/m2 weekly × 4 doses. Three monthly posttreatment brain MRI scans were obtained beginning 12 weeks after the first infusion. Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were obtained at baseline and throughout the posttreatment follow-up. Results: GdE lesions were reduced after treatment with rituximab, with 74% of posttreatment MRI scans being free of GdE activity compared with 26% free of GdE activity at baseline (p < 0.0001). Median GdE lesions were reduced from 1.0 to 0, and mean number was reduced from 2.81 per month to 0.33 after treatment (88% reduction). MSFC improved as well (p = 0.02). EDSS remained stable. Conclusion: Rituximab add-on therapy was effective based upon blinded radiologic endpoints in this phase II study. In combination with standard injectable therapies, rituximab was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. B-cell–modulating therapy remains a potential option for treatment of patients with relapsing MS with an inadequate response to standard injectable therapies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that add-on rituximab reduces gadolinium-enhancing brain lesions in multiple sclerosis. GLOSSARY DMT = disease-modifying therapy; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; FOV = field of view; GdE = gadolinium-enhancing; HACA = human

  3. Objective cerebrospinal fluid response to intraventricular rituximab in indolent CNS lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Strowd, Roy E; Abuali, Inas A; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Indolent CNS lymphomas (CNSLs) are rare and no guidelines exist for management. Recent literature highlights the potential for safe and tolerable intrathecal (IT) delivery of rituximab, a large anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, for aggressive CNSL. We report a patient with relapsed indolent CNSL who failed systemic rituximab and could not tolerate IT chemotherapies, but had an objective response of 6 months duration to IT rituximab. PMID:25905905

  4. The feasibility of radioimmunotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Gerretsen, M; Quak, J J; Brakenhoff, R H; Snow, G B; van Dongen, G A

    1994-01-01

    Since the introduction of the hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein (Nature 1975, 256, 495-497), tremendous effort has been put in the realisation of Ehrlich's concept of the magic bullet, which was proposed as early as the beginning of the century. The first clinical studies for radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with radiolabelled antibodies were undertaken in the early 1980s. Since then, RIS has been performed on thousands of patients with various types of malignancies, like colon carcinoma, lung carcinoma, breast carcinoma, neuroblastoma, T-cell lymphoma and ovarian carcinoma. In addition, a substantial number of therapy trials with radiolabelled antibodies have been performed. The developments for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have only recently been able to catch up with these events to some extent. One of the main reasons for this slow progress has been the lack of monoclonal antibodies (Mab) with specificity for HNSCC. Although there are as yet no real tumour specific antigens known for HNSCC, which also holds true for the majority of malignancies arising from other tissues, we now have the availability of a number of Mab with high specificity for HNSCC and with a very restricted reaction pattern with normal tissues. Labelled with 131I, these Mab have been shown to be highly capable to localise in HNSCC xenografts in nude mice. Based on these promising data, patient studies with one of these Mab, designated Mab E48, labelled with 99mTc, were started to evaluate the feasibility of RIS in patients with head and neck cancer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032305

  5. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Annual report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1991-12-31

    We plan to extend our success in treating B cell malignancies with {sup 131}I labeled Lym-1 by a major effort in therapy with {sup 67}Cu Lym-1. Yttrium-90 labeled by a macrocycle, DOTA will be studied in patients as a continuation of the {sup 111}In-BAD (DOTA) Lym-1 studies. Excellent images and pharmacokinetics of the {sup 111}In-BAD(DOTA)-Lym-1 studies. Lymphomas and related diseases represent a special case for radioimmunotherapy because of their documented radiosensitivity and immunodeficiency, and thus offer a unique opportunity to conduct therapeutic feasibility studies in a responsive human model. Using marine and chimeric L6 and other MoAb to breast cancer, we have applied the strategies that were developed in taking Lym-1 antibody from the bench to the patient. We have examined a number of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of breast cancer and chose chimeric L6 for prototype studies because of certain characteristics. The chemistry of attachment of conjugates to antibodies and their impact on immunological targeting biological activities (cytotoxicity), metabolic fate, and therapeutic index will continue to be a major strength and function of this program. This grant has supported the conception, synthesis, and development of the first macrocylic, bifunctional chelating agent TETA (6-p-nitrobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazatetradecane-N,N{prime},N{double_prime}, N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and its derivatives, including Lym-1-2IT-BAT), for use in Cu-67-based radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy. This work has led to the further development of several new macrocylic bifunctional chelating agents for copper, indium, yttrium and other metals. In addition, successful Cu-67 labelings of Lym-1-2IT-BAT for human radiopharmaceutical have shown patient pharmacokinetics of {sup 67}Cu-BAT(TETA)-Lym-1 with promising therapeutic dosimetry.

  6. Compartmental Intrathecal Radioimmunotherapy: Results for Treatment for Metastatic CNS Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Kim; Kushner, Brian H.; Modak, Shakeel; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Smith-Jones, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John L.; Xu, Hong; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Souweidane, Mark M.; Larson, Steven M.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the management of brain metastases is needed. We evaluated the addition of compartmental intrathecal antibody-based radioimmunotherapy (cRIT) in patients with recurrent metastatic central nervous system (CNS) neuroblastoma following surgery, craniospinal irradiation, and chemotherapy. 21 patients treated for recurrent neuroblastoma metastatic to the CNS received a cRIT-containing salvage regimen incorporating intrathecal 131I-monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) targeting GD2 or B7H3 following surgery and radiation. Most patients also received outpatient craniospinal irradiation, 3F8/GMCSF immunotherapy, 13-cis-retinoic acid and oral temozolomide for systemic control. Seventeen of 21 cRIT-salvage patients are alive 7-74 months (median 33) since CNS relapse, with all 17 remaining free of CNS neuroblastoma. One patient died of infection at 22 months with no evidence of disease at autopsy, and one of lung and bone marrow metastases at 15 months, and one of progressive bone marrow disease at 30 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen was well tolerated, notable for myelosuppression minimized by stem cell support (n=5), and biochemical hypothyroidism (n=5). One patient with a 7-year history of metastatic neuroblastoma is in remission from MLL-associated secondary leukemia. This is significantly improved to published results with non-cRIT based where relapsed CNS NB has a median time to death of approximately 6 months. The cRIT-salvage regimen for CNS metastases was well tolerated by young patients, despite their prior history of intensive cytotoxic therapies. It has the potential to increase survival with better than expected quality of life. PMID:19890606

  7. A pretargeting system for tumor PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Frampas, Eric; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Rauscher, Aurore; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M; Chatal, Jean-François; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Labeled antibodies, as well as their fragments and antibody-derived recombinant constructs, have long been proposed as general vectors to target radionuclides to tumor lesions for imaging and therapy. They have indeed shown promise in both imaging and therapeutic applications, but they have not fulfilled the original expectations of achieving sufficient image contrast for tumor detection or sufficient radiation dose delivered to tumors for therapy. Pretargeting was originally developed for tumor immunoscintigraphy. It was assumed that directly-radiolabled antibodies could be replaced by an unlabeled immunoconjugate capable of binding both a tumor-specific antigen and a small molecular weight molecule. The small molecular weight molecule would carry the radioactive payload and would be injected after the bispecific immunoconjugate. It has been demonstrated that this approach does allow for both antibody-specific recognition and fast clearance of the radioactive molecule, thus resulting in improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios. It was subsequently shown that pretargeting also held promise for tumor therapy, translating improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios into more specific delivery of absorbed radiation doses. Many technical approaches have been proposed to implement pretargeting, and two have been extensively documented. One is based on the avidin-biotin system, and the other on bispecific antibodies binding a tumor-specific antigen and a hapten. Both have been studied in preclinical models, as well as in several clinical studies, and have shown improved targeting efficiency. This article reviews the historical and recent preclinical and clinical advances in the use of bispecific-antibody-based pretargeting for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The results of recent evaluation of pretargeting in PET imaging also are discussed. PMID:25873896

  8. Combination Radioimmunotherapy Approaches and Quantification of Immuno-PET.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Su

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which play a prominent role in cancer therapy, can interact with specific antigens on cancer cells, thereby enhancing the patient's immune response via various mechanisms, or mAbs can act against cell growth factors and, thereby, arrest the proliferation of tumor cells. Radionuclide-labeled mAbs, which are used in radioimmunotherapy (RIT), are effective for cancer treatment because tumor associated-mAbs linked to cytotoxic radionuclides can selectively bind to tumor antigens and release targeted cytotoxic radiation. Immunological positron emission tomography (immuno-PET), which is the combination of PET with mAb, is an attractive option for improving tumor detection and mAb quantification. However, RIT remains a challenge because of the limited delivery of mAb into tumors. The transport and uptake of mAb into tumors is slow and heterogeneous. The tumor microenvironment contributed to the limited delivery of the mAb. During the delivery process of mAb to tumor, mechanical drug resistance such as collagen distribution or physiological drug resistance such as high intestinal pressure or absence of lymphatic vessel would be the limited factor of mAb delivery to the tumor at a potentially lethal mAb concentration. When α-emitter-labeled mAbs were used, deeper penetration of α-emitter-labeled mAb inside tumors was more important because of the short range of the α emitter. Therefore, combination therapy strategies aimed at improving mAb tumor penetration and accumulation would be beneficial for maximizing their therapeutic efficacy against solid tumors. PMID:27275358

  9. A pretargeting system for tumor PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Frampas, Eric; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Rauscher, Aurore; Sharkey, Robert M.; Goldenberg, David M.; Chatal, Jean-François; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Labeled antibodies, as well as their fragments and antibody-derived recombinant constructs, have long been proposed as general vectors to target radionuclides to tumor lesions for imaging and therapy. They have indeed shown promise in both imaging and therapeutic applications, but they have not fulfilled the original expectations of achieving sufficient image contrast for tumor detection or sufficient radiation dose delivered to tumors for therapy. Pretargeting was originally developed for tumor immunoscintigraphy. It was assumed that directly-radiolabled antibodies could be replaced by an unlabeled immunoconjugate capable of binding both a tumor-specific antigen and a small molecular weight molecule. The small molecular weight molecule would carry the radioactive payload and would be injected after the bispecific immunoconjugate. It has been demonstrated that this approach does allow for both antibody-specific recognition and fast clearance of the radioactive molecule, thus resulting in improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios. It was subsequently shown that pretargeting also held promise for tumor therapy, translating improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios into more specific delivery of absorbed radiation doses. Many technical approaches have been proposed to implement pretargeting, and two have been extensively documented. One is based on the avidin-biotin system, and the other on bispecific antibodies binding a tumor-specific antigen and a hapten. Both have been studied in preclinical models, as well as in several clinical studies, and have shown improved targeting efficiency. This article reviews the historical and recent preclinical and clinical advances in the use of bispecific-antibody-based pretargeting for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The results of recent evaluation of pretargeting in PET imaging also are discussed. PMID:25873896

  10. Dosimetry and quantitative radionuclide imaging in radioimmunotherapy: Final report, July 15, 1992-July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Brief summaries of the principal accomplishments of this project on the development of quantitative SPECT for high energy photons (87Y, 19F) and stability testing of 87Y-labeled antibodies in the nude mouse model, development of an unified approach to photon and beta particle dosimetry, quantitative SPECT for nonuniform attenuation, and development of patient-specific dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy.

  11. Rituximab efficiently depletes B cells in lung tumors and normal lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    Joly-Battaglini, Albane; Hammarström, Clara; Stankovic, Branislava; Aamodt, Henrik; Stjärne, Johan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Øynebråten, Inger; Corthay, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 B-cell-specific antigen and is widely used as therapy for B-cell lymphoma. Since rituximab depletes both malignant and normal B cells, it is increasingly being used to treat various conditions in which normal B cells have a pathogenic role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. It is well-established that rituximab efficiently eliminates B cells in blood, lymph nodes, and spleen. In contrast, the effect of rituximab in non-lymphoid tissues remains poorly documented and is debated. Here, we report a rheumatoid arthritis patient who was treated with rituximab before receiving thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. Using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we show that rituximab efficiently depleted CD20-positive B cells in a primary lung tumor, in lung-associated lymph nodes, and in normal lung tissue. We conclude that rituximab may be very efficient at depleting normal B cells in the lungs. This property of rituximab may potentially be exploited for the treatment of conditions in which pathogenic B cells reside in the lungs. On the other hand, the clearance of lung B cells may provide an explanation for the rare cases of severe non-infectious pulmonary toxicity of rituximab. PMID:27081474

  12. Protein biochip array technology to monitor rituximab in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, S; Guisset, C; Tatem, L; Dossat, N; Dupuy, A M; Cohen, J D; Cristol, J P; Daures, J P; Jorgensen, C

    2009-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) there are currently no good indicators to predict a clinical response to rituximab. The purpose of this study was to monitor and determine the role of peripheral blood cytokine profiling in differentiating between a good versus poor response to rituximab in RA. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 3 months from 46 RA patients who were treated with rituximab. Responders are defined by the presence of three of four American College of Rheumatology criteria: ≥ 20% decrease in C-reactive protein, visual analogical score of disease activity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and improvement of the disease activity score (28) (four values) by ≥ 1·2 obtained at 3 months. Twelve cytokines were measured from serum collected on days 0 and 90 by proteomic array, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1a, IL-1b, IL-2, IL-8, interferon-γ, IL-4, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, epidermal growth factor and vascular growth factor. We showed that C-reactive protein and IL-6 levels decrease significantly at 3 months in the responder group compared with baseline. At day 90 we identified a cytokine profile which differentiates responders and non-responders. High serum levels of two proinflammatory cytokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and epidermal growth factor, were significantly higher in the responder group at day 90 compared with non-responders. However, we were not able to identify a baseline cytokine profile predictive of a good response at 3 months. These findings suggest that cytokine profiling by proteomic analysis may be a promising tool for monitoring rituximab and may help in the future to identify responder RA patients. PMID:19220830

  13. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C.; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve β cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti–B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti–B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti–B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti–B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  14. Rituximab-Induced Splenic Rupture and Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ranjit; Gheith, Shereen; Lamparella, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 55 Final Diagnosis: Mantle cell lymphoma Symptoms: Cytokine release syndrome • hypoglycemia • hypotension • splenic rupture • splenomegaly • vision loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Case Report Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Rituximab is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody that is used for many different lymphomas. Post-marketing surveillance has revealed that the risk of fatal reaction with rituximab use is extremely low. Splenic rupture and cytokine release syndrome are rare fatal adverse events related to the use of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, especially in aggressive malignancies with high tumor burden. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and type B symptoms and was diagnosed with mantle cell lymphoma. Initial peripheral blood flow cytometry showed findings that mimicked features of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Further treatment with rituximab led to catastrophic treatment complications that proved to be fatal for the patient. Conclusions: Severe cytokine release syndrome associated with biologics carries a very high morbidity and case fatality rate. With this case report we aim to present the diagnostic challenge with small B-cell neoplasms, especially mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic lymphomas, and underscore the importance of thorough risk assessment for reactions prior to treatment initiation. PMID:26972227

  15. Sarcoidosis following successful treatment of pemphigus vulgaris with rituximab: a rituximab-induced reaction further supporting B-cell contribution to sarcoidosis pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Galimberti, F; Fernandez, A P

    2016-06-01

    The anti-CD20 peripheral B-cell depleting monoclonal antibody, rituximab, has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for refractory pemphigus vulgaris (PV), a potentially fatal autoimmune blistering disease. We report a patient who developed skin nodules and arthralgias following successful treatment of refractory PV with rituximab. Clinical, serological and histological findings were consistent with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The nodules promptly responded to treatment with corticosteroids, and resolved without recurrence when the medication was tapered several months later. The temporal onset of sarcoidosis following treatment with rituximab and the eventual resolution, coupled with the remarkable similarities between the B-cell immunological environment expected in our patient during the post-rituximab period and the immunological environment described in patients with idiopathic sarcoidosis, strongly implicates exposure to rituximab as the trigger for sarcoidosis development in our patient. We propose that rituximab-induced sarcoidal granulomas may be a rare adverse effect of treatment with this medication, providing further support for an important role of B cells in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. With better understanding of the circumstances surrounding sarcoidosis development following rituximab administration, this medication could potentially be used to induce sarcoidosis in animal research models to study the immunopathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26800651

  16. The risk of infections in hematologic patients treated with rituximab is not influenced by cumulative rituximab dosage - a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20, is approved for the treatment of CD20-positive B-cell Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and rheumatologic disorders. Due to its potent activity in depleting CD20-positive lymphocytes, the influence on opportunistic infections is still under discussion. Thus, we analyzed the impact of rituximab either as monotherapy or in combination with other chemotherapeutic regimens to elucidate its role in contributing to infectious complications. Methods The records of consecutive patients (n = 125, 141 treatment episodes) treated with rituximab alone or in combination with chemotherapy and corticosteroids were analyzed retrospectively for the incidence, spectrum and outcome of infections during treatment and 6 months after the last course of rituximab. Univariate analysis of cofactors such as steroid medication, antiinfective prophylaxis, underlying disease and remission status were performed. Results Altogether 80 therapy episodes were associated with infections, the median number of infections per patient being 1 (range 1–7). The number of infectious complications was significantly higher in patients receiving a combination of rituximab and chemotherapy compared to rituximab monotherapy (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference regarding number of rituximab courses or cumulative rituximab dosage between episodes with and without infections, respectively.Mean cumulative prednisone dosage between the cohort with infections and the one without infections showed a trend towards higher dosage of prednisone in the patients with infections (mean difference 441 mg, p > 0.14). Conclusions Rituximab in induction treatment, either as monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy by itself does not increase the incidence or change the spectrum of infections in hematologic patients. However the possible influence of higher dosages of concomitant steroid medication on frequency of infections

  17. Dose esclation in radioimmunotherapy based on projected whole body dose

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Kaminski, M.S.; Regan, D.

    1994-05-01

    A variety of approaches have been utilized in conducting phase I radioimmunotherapy dose-escalation trials. Escalation of dose has been based on graded increases in administered mCi; mCi/kg; or mCi/m2. It is also possible to escalate dose based on tracer-projected marrow, blood or whole body radiation dose. We describe our results in performing a dose-escalation trial in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma based on escalating administered whole-body radiation dose. The mCi dose administered was based on a patient-individualized tracer projected whole-body dose. 25 patients were entered on the study. RIT with 131 I anti-B-1 was administered to 19 patients. The administered dose was prescribed based on the projected whole body dose, determined from patient-individualized tracer studies performed prior to RIT. Whole body dose estimates were based on the assumption that the patient was an ellipsoid, with 131 antibody kinetics determined using a whole-body probe device acquiring daily conjugate views of 1 minute duration/view. Dose escalation levels proceeded with 10 cGy increments from 25 cGy whole-body and continues, now at 75 cGy. The correlation among potential methods of dose escalation and toxicity was assessed. Whole body radiation dose by probe was strongly correlated with the blood radiation dose determined from sequential blood sampling during tracer studies (r=.87). Blood radiation dose was very weakly correlated with mCi dose (r=.4) and mCi/kg (r=.45). Whole body radiation dose appeared less well-correlated with injected dose in mCi (r=.6), or mCi/kg (r=.64). Toxicity has been infrequent in these patients, but appears related to increasing whole body dose. Non-invasive determination of whole-body radiation dose by gamma probe represents a non-invasive method of estimating blood radiation dose, and thus of estimating bone marrow radiation dose.

  18. Effectiveness of Rituximab in Severe Wegener’s Granulomatosis: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Oristrell, Joaquim; Bejarano, Guillermina; Jordana, Rosa; Monteagudo, Manuel; Marí, Begoña; Casanovas, Arnau; Tolosa, Carles

    2009-01-01

    We hereby describe the satisfactory evolution of rituximab treatment in two patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG). Rituximab was indicated for refractoriness to standard treatment in one case and life-threatening myelotoxicity due to alkylating agents in the other. A brief review of previous experience with the use of rituximab in the treatment of WG is presented. PMID:19590594

  19. The Effect of Rituximab on Vaccine Responses in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Nazi, Ishac; Kelton, John G.; Larché, Mark; Snider, Denis P.; Heddle, Nancy M.; Crowther, Mark A.; Cook, Richard J.; Tinmouth, Alan T.; Mangel, Joy; Arnold, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    B-cell depletion therapy may impair vaccine responses and increase infection risk in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Capitalizing on a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial, we investigated the effects of rituximab on the antibody and cellular responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine in ITP patients. Of 60 patients in the main trial, 24 patients received both vaccines 6 months after rituximab (n=17) or placebo (n=7). Among 20 evaluable patients, 3/14 (21%) in the rituximab group and 4/6 (67%) in the placebo group achieved a 4-fold increase in anti-pneumococcal antibodies (p=0.12). For anti-Hib antibodies, 4/14 (29%) and 5/6 (83%), respectively, achieved a 4-fold increase (p<0.05). Fewer patients in the rituximab group demonstrated functional Hib killing (2/14 [14%] versus 5/6 [83%], p<0.05). Three of 14 rituximab-treated patients failed to respond to vaccines by any criteria. After vaccinations, pre-plasma cell blasts and interferon-γ secreting T-cells were reduced in rituximab-treated patients. We found that antibody responses were impaired for at least 6 months after rituximab. Cellular immunity was reduced in parallel with the depleted B-cell pool. These findings have implications for the timing of vaccinations and the mechanism of infection after rituximab in patients with ITP. PMID:23851398

  20. Rituximab in the treatment of shrinking lung syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Peñacoba Toribio, Patricia; Córica Albani, María Emilia; Mayos Pérez, Mercedes; Rodríguez de la Serna, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Shrinking lung syndrome (SLS) is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We report the case of a patient with non-responding SLS (neither to glucocorticoids nor immunosupresors), who showed remarkable improvement after the onset of treatment with rituximab. Although there is a little evidence, treatment with rituximab could be proposed in SLS when classical treatment fails. PMID:24315464

  1. Efficiency of treatment with rituximab in platelet transfusion refractoriness: a study of 7 cases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenbin; Wu, Dijiong; Hu, Tonglin; Ye, Baodong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rituximab in treatment of immune PR. Methods: We retrospective analysis 7 paitents (5 aplastic anemia, 2 myelodysplastic syndrome) with immune PR who received at least 3 weekly infusions of rituximab (375 mg/m2). Results: All enrolled patients acquired improvement of platelets transfusion more than 2 months (CCI ≥ 4.5 × 109/L). We first found that there were 2 patterns of response to rituximab treatment in patients with immune PR, which the early but transient after the first rituximab administration and the late but continuous beginning to appear at 3 weeks from the start of treatment. Conclusion: Rituximab is a promising treatment in patients with immune PR and giving the opportunity and time for cure the disease. PMID:26550372

  2. Rituximab for troublesome cases of childhood nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Osama Y; Aboualhameael, Adila; Kari, Jameela A

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is the most common glomerular disease of childhood. Steroid-dependent and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome present challenges in their pharmaceutical management; patients may need several immunosuppressive medication for optimum control, each of which medication has its own safety profile. Rituximab (RTX) is a monoclonal antibody that targets B cells and has been used successfully for management of lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. Recent clinical studies showed that rituximab may be an efficacious and safe alternative for the treatment of complicated nephrotic syndrome. In this review article, we aim to review the efficacy and safety of RTX therapy in nephrotic syndrome. We reviewed the literature pertaining to this topic by searching for relevant studies on PubMed and Medline using specific keywords. The initial search yielded 452 articles. These articles were then examined to ensure their relevance to the topic of research. We focused on multicenter randomized controlled trials with relatively large numbers of patients. A total of 29 articles were finally identified and will be summarized in this review. The majority of clinical studies of RTX in complicated pediatric NS showed that rituximab is effective in approximately 80% of patients with steroid-dependent NS, as it decreases the number of relapses and steroid dosage. However, RTX is less effective at achieving remission in steroid-resistant NS. RTX use was generally safe, and most side effects were transient and infusion-related. More randomized, double-blinded clinical studies are needed to assess the role of RTX in children with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:25512892

  3. An overview of imaging techniques and physical aspects of treatment planning in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K. ); Koral, K.F. ); Jaszczak, R.J. ); Green, A.J. ); Chen, G.T.Y.; Roeske, J.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Planar and tomographic imaging techniques and methods of treatment planning in clinical radioimmunotherapy are reviewed. In clinical trials, the data needed for dosimetry and treatment planning are, in most cases, obtained from noninvasive imaging procedures. The required data include tumor and normal organ volumes, the activity of radiolabeled antibodies taken up in these volumes, and the pharmacokinetics of the administered activity of radiolabeled antibodies. Therefore, the topics addressed in this review include: (1) Volume determinations of tumors and normal organs from x-ray-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, (2) quantitation of the activity of radiolabeled antibodies in tumors and normal organs from planar gamma camera views, (3) quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography, (4) correlative image analysis, and (5) treatment planning in clinical radioimmunotherapy.

  4. An Efficient Bifunctional Decadentate Ligand 3p-C-DEPA for Targeted Alpha Radioimmunotherapy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun A; Kang, Chi Soo; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Milenic, Diane E.; Chen, Yunwei; Dai, Anzhi; Brechbiel, M. W.; Chong, Hyun-Soon

    2011-01-01

    A new bifunctional ligand 3p-C-DEPA was synthesized and evaluated for use in targeted alpha radioimmunotherapy. 3p-C-DEPA was efficiently prepared via regiospecific ring opening of an aziridinium ion and conjugated with trastuzumab. The 3p-C-DEPA-trastuzumab conjugate was extremely rapid in binding 205/6Bi, and the corresponding 205/6Bi-3p-C-DEPA-trastuzumab complex was stable in human serum. Biodistribution studies were performed to evaluate in vivo stability and tumor targeting of 205/6Bi-3p-C-DEPA-trastuzumab conjugate in tumor bearing athymic mice. 205/6Bi-3p-C-DEPA-trastuzumab conjugate displayed excellent in vivo stability and targeting as evidenced by low organ uptake and high tumor uptake. The results of the in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that 3p-C-DEPA is a promising chelator for radioimmunotherapy of 212Bi and 213Bi. PMID:21604692

  5. Rituximab's new therapeutic target: the podocyte actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew C

    2011-06-01

    Therapeutic off-target activities are well recognized for small-molecule drugs. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) traditionally are believed to act specifically and lack off-target therapeutic effects. In this issue of Science Translational Medicine, Fornoni et al. show therapeutic benefit, through an off-target-mediated mechanism, of the mAb drug rituximab in recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) after kidney transplantation. These data shed new light on FSGS pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutic interventions for proteinuric diseases. PMID:21632983

  6. Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Biologic DMARDS (Rituximab and Etanercept)

    PubMed Central

    Gashi, Afrim A.; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Berisha, Idriz; Kryeziu, Avni; Ismaili, Jehona; Krasniqi, Gezim

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Goal: To determine efficacy and safety of treatment with Rituximab and Etanercept plus Methotrexate in patients with active Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), who had an inadequate response to nonbiologic DMARDS therapies and to explore the pharmacogenetics and pharmacodynamics of Rituximab and Etanercept in our populations. Study was done at Rheumatology Clinic of University Clinical Centre in Prishtina during 2009-2011 years. Methods: We evaluated primary efficacy and safety at 24 weeks in patients enrolled in the study of long term efficacy of Rituximab and Etanercept. Patients with active Rheumatoid Arthritis and an inadequate response to 1 or more non biologic DMARDS were randomized to receive intravenous Rituximab (1 course consisting of 2 infusions of 1.000 mg each –one group, and Etanercept 25 mg twice weekly –second group, but both groups with background MTX. The primary efficacy end point was a response on the ACR 20%, improvement criteria at 24 weeks, Secondary end points were responses on the ACR 50 and ACR 70, improvement criteria, the DAS 28, and EULAR response criteria at 24 weeks. Results: During our investigations we treated 20 patients, 15 females and 5 males, in the treated group with RTX and 13 patients 8 females and 5 males in the treated group with ETN. Patients of group 1 and group 2 were of ages 37-69 years old and 19-69 years old (average 47-44) Most of the patients belong in 2nd and 3 rd functional stage according to Steinbrocker. All ACR response parameters were significantly improved in RTX treated patients who also had clinically meaningful improvement in fatigue, disability and quality of life. Patients showed a trend less progression in radiographic end points. Most adverse events occurred with the first RTX infusion and were mild to moderate severity. Conclusion: At 24 weeks, a single course of RTX and ETN provided significant and clinically meaningful improvements in disease activity in patients with active, longstanding RA who

  7. Development and evaluation of copper-67 and samarium-153 labeled conjugates for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Joshi, V.; Kolsky, K.; Sweet, M.; Steplewski, Z.

    1995-02-01

    The potential of utilizing receptor-specific agents such as monoclonal antibodies (MAb), and MAb-derived smaller molecules, as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors has stimulated much research activity. The success of such applications depends on many factors, especially the tumor binding properties of the antibody reagent, the efficiency of labeling and in-vivo stability of the radioconjugate and, on the careful choice of the radionuclide best suited to treat the tumor under consideration. The radiolabeled antibody technique for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), however, has experienced many limitations, and its success has not matched the expectations that were raised more than a decade ago. The problems that have been identified include: (i) degradation of antibody immunoreactivity resulting from chemical manipulations required for labeling; (ii) lack of suitable radioisotopes and methods for stable attachment of the radiolabel; (iii) in-vivo instability of the radioimmunoconjugates; (iv) excessive accumulation of activity in non-target locations; and (v) lack of radioimmunoconjugate accessibility to cells internal to a tumor mass. A careful choice of the radionuclide(s) best suited to treat the tumor under consideration is one of the most important requirements for successful radioimmunotherapy. This study evaluates copper 67 and samarium 153 for tumor radioimmunotherapy.

  8. Rituximab for treatment of inhibitors in haemophilia A. A Phase II study.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, C; Josephson, C D; Granger, S; Konkle, B A; Kruse-Jarres, R; Ragni, M V; Journeycake, J M; Valentino, L; Key, N S; Gill, J C; McCrae, K R; Neufeld, E J; Manno, C; Raffini, L; Saxena, K; Torres, M; Marder, V; Bennett, C M; Assmann, S F

    2014-09-01

    The development of antibodies against infused factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with haemophilia A is a serious complication leading to poorly controlled bleeding and increased morbidity. No treatment has been proven to reduce high titre antibodies in patients who fail immune tolerance induction or are not candidates for it. The Rituximab for the Treatment of Inhibitors in Congenital Hemophilia A (RICH) study was a phase II trial to assess whether rituximab can reduce anamnestic FVIII antibody (inhibitor) titres. Male subjects with severe congenital haemophilia A and an inhibitor titre ≥5 Bethesda Units/ml (BU) following a FVIII challenge infusion received rituximab 375 mg/m² weekly for weeks 1 through 4. Post-rituximab inhibitor titres were measured monthly from week 6 through week 22 to assess treatment response. Of 16 subjects who received at least one dose of rituximab, three (18.8%) met the criteria for a major response, defined as a fall in inhibitor titre to <5 BU, persisting after FVIII re-challenge. One subject had a minor response, defined as a fall in inhibitor titre to <5 BU, increasing to 5-10 BU after FVIII re-challenge, but <50% of the original peak inhibitor titre. Rituximab is useful in lowering inhibitor levels in patients, but its effect as a solo treatment strategy is modest. Future studies are indicated to determine the role of rituximab as an adjunctive therapy in immune tolerisation strategies. PMID:24919980

  9. A systematic review of the use of rituximab as induction therapy in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Macklin, Philip S; Morris, Peter J; Knight, Simon R

    2015-04-01

    Rituximab is a B-lymphocyte depleting agent used to treat lymphoma and autoimmune diseases. There has been recent interest in its use both for management of highly-sensitised and ABO-incompatible recipients but also for induction therapy before transplantation. This systematic review evaluates the evidence for its use as part of induction protocols in ABO-compatible, non-sensitised recipients. 4 databases and 3 trial registries were searched for studies of the use of rituximab as part of induction protocols. The small number of identified studies precluded meta-analysis and thus a narrative review was conducted. 12 manuscripts met the inclusion criteria, relating to 5 individual studies. No significant improvements in patient and graft survival or acute rejection rates were identified with rituximab induction. A single small study reported a trend towards improved graft function with the addition of rituximab induction to a standard immunosuppressive regimen. Rituximab was not found to be associated with increased infectious complications in any study but concerns were raised over possible associations with leukopaenia and cardiovascular mortality. Overall, no convincing benefit of rituximab induction was found and some safety concerns were identified. The results of on-going trials are awaited but further studies may be required before we can draw firm conclusions regarding the efficacy and safety of rituximab in this setting. PMID:25555541

  10. In vivo B-cell depletion with rituximab for alternative donor hemopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Dominietto, A; Tedone, E; Soracco, M; Bruno, B; Raiola, A M; Van Lint, M T; Geroldi, S; Lamparelli, T; Galano, B; Gualandi, F; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 55 patients given a fixed dose of rituximab (200 mg) on day+5 after an alternative donor transplant, to prevent EBV DNA-emia; 68 alternative transplants who did not receive prophylactic rituximab served as controls. The two groups were comparable for donor type, and all patients received anti-thymocyte globulin in the conditioning regimen. Rituximab patients had a significantly lower rate of EBV DNA-emia 56 vs 85% (P=0.0004), a lower number of maximum median EBV copies (91 vs 1321/10(5) cells, P=0.003) and a significantly lower risk of exceeding 1000 EBV copies per 10(5)cells (14 vs 49%, P=0.0001). Leukocyte and lymphocyte counts were lower on day +50 and+100 in rituximab patients, whereas Ig levels were comparable. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute GvHD was significantly reduced in rituximab patients (20 vs 38%, P=0.02). Chronic GvHD was comparable. There was a trend for a survival advantage for patients receiving rituximab (46 vs 40%, P=0.1), mainly because of lower transplant mortality (25 vs 37%, P=0.1). Despite the drawback of a retrospective study, these data suggest that a fixed dose of rituximab on day +5 reduces the risk of a high EBV load, and also reduces acute GvHD. PMID:21460867

  11. Rituximab in the treatment of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Senaka; Gooneratne, Lallindra

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab is a B-cell depleting monoclonal antibody that is gaining popularity as an effective therapy for many autoimmune cytopenias. This article systematically evaluates its therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of different types of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. We conclude that there is sufficient evidence to recommend it as a second line therapy for warm autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (wAIHA) either as monotherapy or combined therapy. Evidence from a single randomized controlled trial suggests that it may also be more efficacious as first line therapy in combination with steroids than steroids alone. A fewer number of studies have assessed its role in cold autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (cAIHA) and cold agglutinin disease (CAD) with success rates varying from 45-66%. In the absence of alternative definitive therapy, rituximab should be considered for patients with symptomatic CAD and significant haemolysis. Case reports of its efficacy in mixed autoimmune haemolytic anaemias are available but evidence from case series or larger cohorts are nonexistent. PMID:25139610

  12. Common variable immunodeficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, rituximab and splenectomy: important considerations.

    PubMed

    Arays, Ruta; Goyal, Sahil; Jordan, Kim M

    2016-08-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is readily considered in patients presenting with recurrent sino-pulmonary infections, however this disease has a broad range of clinical manifestations and diagnosis can be delayed by several years. We present the case of a 44-year-old postpartum female who presented with nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Four years prior, she was hospitalized for treatment of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) with splenectomy and rituximab followed by two episodes of bacterial meningitis despite immunizations. The recurrent meningitis had been attributed to splenectomy and immunotherapy. During this hospitalization, extensive workup for gastrointestinal pathology was negative and she was diagnosed with intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Her hospital course was complicated by development of severe pseudomonas pneumonia, and subsequent immunoglobulin testing and impaired antibody response to vaccines were consistent with CVID. We review the clinical presentation of CVID, its association with autoimmune disease, and treatment implications, specifically the impact of rituximab therapy and splenectomy on immunoglobulin function and risk of serious infection. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction has been reported in children with CVID, but literature search failed to reveal similar presentation in adults. Physicians must consider the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of CVID to avoid delay in diagnosis and treatment. Institution of appropriate therapy with immunoglobulin replacement is important to decrease risk of serious infection. PMID:27276370

  13. Salvage Regimens With Autologous Transplantation for Relapsed Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Rituximab Era

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Christian; Glass, Bertram; Mounier, Nicolas; Singh Gill, Devinder; Linch, David C.; Trneny, Marek; Bosly, Andre; Ketterer, Nicolas; Shpilberg, Ofer; Hagberg, Hans; Ma, David; Brière, Josette; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Schmitz, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Salvage chemotherapy followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard treatment for relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Salvage regimens have never been compared; their efficacy in the rituximab era is unknown. Patients and Methods Patients with CD20+ DLBCL in first relapse or who were refractory after first-line therapy were randomly assigned to either rituximab, ifosfamide, etoposide, and carboplatin (R-ICE) or rituximab, dexamethasone, high-dose cytarabine, and cisplatin (R-DHAP). Responding patients received high-dose chemotherapy and ASCT. Results The median age of the 396 patients enrolled (R-ICE, n = 202; R-DHAP, n = 194) was 55 years. Similar response rates were observed after three cycles of R-ICE (63.5%; 95% CI, 56% to 70%) and R-DHAP (62.8%; 95 CI, 55% to 69%). Factors affecting response rates (P < .001) were refractory disease/relapse less than versus more than 12 months after diagnosis (46% v 88%, respectively), International Prognostic Index (IPI) of more than 1 versus 0 to 1 (52% v 71%, respectively), and prior rituximab treatment versus no prior rituximab (51% v 83%, respectively). There was no significant difference between R-ICE and R-DHAP for 3-year event-free survival (EFS) or overall survival. Three-year EFS was affected by prior rituximab treatment versus no rituximab (21% v 47%, respectively), relapse less than versus more than 12 months after diagnosis (20% v 45%, respectively), and IPI of 2 to 3 versus 0 to 1 (18% v 40%, respectively). In the Cox model, these parameters were significant (P < .001). Conclusion In patients who experience relapse more than 12 months after diagnosis, prior rituximab treatment does not affect EFS. Patients with early relapses after rituximab-containing first-line therapy have a poor prognosis, with no difference between the effects of R-ICE and R-DHAP. PMID:20660832

  14. Rituximab for the treatment of IgG4-related orbital disease: experience from five cases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, A; Andrew, N H; Tsirbas, A; Tan, P; Gajdatsy, A; Selva, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the clinical efficacy and safety of rituximab for treatment of IgG4-related orbital disease (IgG4-ROD). Design Retrospective multicentre interventional case series. Methods Chart review for five cases of biopsy-confirmed IgG4-ROD (IgG4+>10/HPF, ratio of IgG4+/IgG+>40%) treated with rituximab. Information retrieved included the dosing schedule, adverse events and the magnitude, temporality, and duration of the clinical response. Results All cases of IgG4-ROD were either steroid dependent or steroid resistant. Rituximab doses for induction therapy included two doses of 1000 mg at 2-weekly intervals, and four doses at 375 mg/m2 at weekly intervals. Two months after starting rituximab, three cases achieved complete clinical resolution and two cases achieved partial clinical resolution. Complete radiological resolution occurred in one case, and partial radiological resolution in three cases. Three cases received rituximab maintenance therapy and one case was commenced on mycophenolate. No relapse occurred during a mean follow-up of 33 months (range: 7–65 months). One disease relapse occurred when the dosing interval of rituximab maintenance therapy was extended to 6–monthly intervals; remission was swiftly achieved with rituximab reinduction therapy. The only adverse effects reported were one episode of fatigue lasting 1 week and two episodes of orbital discomfort. Conclusion Rituximab may be an effective treatment option for IgG4-ROD that is steroid dependent or steroid intolerant. Rituximab therapy resulted in swift clinical and radiological improvement, many months free of relapse, and few side effects. PMID:25341435

  15. Rituximab maintenance after autologous stem cell transplantation prolongs response duration in non-naive rituximab follicular lymphoma patients: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, J; Gastinne, T; Leux, C; Moreau, A; Bossard, C; Mahé, B; Blin, N; Dubruille, V; Touzeau, C; Voldoire, M; Guillaume, T; Peterlin, P; Gallas, P; Garnier, A; Maisonneuve, H; Moreau, P; Juge-Morineau, N; Jardel, H; Chevallier, P; Moreau, P; Le Gouill, S

    2016-08-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the role of rituximab (R) in maintenance treatment after autologous stem cell transplantation performed in patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma. We compared the outcome of 67 follicular lymphoma (FL) patients according to the use of rituximab maintenance (RM) or not. All patients received rituximab plus chemotherapy before autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). Patients received median of two lines of prior therapy. The RM schedule was one injection of rituximab every 3 months for 2 years. Median follow-up is 4.6 years. The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) after ASCT was 86 % with RM vs. 46 % without (p = 0.0045). Median is not reached in the RM arm vs. 31 months in non-RM arm. The 3-year OS was 96 % with RM vs. 78 % without (p = 0.059). The present monocentric study shows that 2 years of RM after ASCT significantly increases response duration for non-naive rituximab relapsed FL patients compared with observation. PMID:27297970

  16. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  17. Clinical responses to rituximab in a case of neuroblastoma with refractory opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Samin; Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Moradveisi, Borhan; Aminasnafi, Ali; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-01-01

    Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurologic syndrome. In a high proportion of children, it is associated with neuroblastoma. The etiology of this condition is thought to be immune mediated. In children, immunotherapy with conventional treatments such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and even antiepileptic drugs has been tried. Recently rituximab has been used safely for refractory OMS in children with neuroblastoma. Our patient was a 3.5-year-old girl referred for ataxia and dancing eye movements starting since 1.5 years ago. She was diagnosed with neuroblastoma on imaging studies on admission. The OMS was refractory to surgical resection, chemotherapy, corticosteroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Patient received rituximab simultaneously with chemotherapy. The total severity score decreased by 61.1% after rituximab. Patient's ataxia markedly improved that she was able to walk independently after 6 months. Our case confirmed the clinical efficacy and safety of rituximab in a refractory case of OMS. PMID:23198199

  18. Future therapies for pemphigus vulgaris: Rituximab and beyond.

    PubMed

    Huang, Amy; Madan, Raman K; Levitt, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    The conventional treatment for patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) centers on global immunosuppression, such as the use of steroids and other immunosuppressive drugs, to decrease titers of antidesmoglein autoantibodies responsible for the acantholytic blisters. Global immunosuppressants, however, cause serious side effects. The emergence of anti-CD20 biologic medications, such as rituximab, as an adjunct to conventional therapy has shifted the focus to targeted destruction of autoimmune B cells. Next-generation biologic medications with improved modes of delivery, pharmacology, and side effect profiles are constantly being developed, adding to the diversity of options for PV treatment. We review promising monoclonal antibodies, including veltuzumab, obinutuzumab (GA-101), ofatumumab, ocaratuzumab (AME-133v), PRO131921, and belimumab. PMID:26792592

  19. Rituximab-induced interstitial lung disease: five case reports.

    PubMed

    Naqibullah, Matiuallah; Shaker, Saher B; Bach, Karen S; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a mouse/human chimeric anti-CD20 IgG1 monoclonal antibody has been effectively used as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy regimen to treat lymphoma since 1997. In addition, it has been used to treat idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, systemic lupus erythematous, rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Recently, RTX has also been suggested for the treatment of certain connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Rare but serious pulmonary adverse reactions are reported. To raise awareness about this serious side effect of RTX treatment, as the indication for its use increases with time, we report five cases of probable RTX-ILD and discuss the current literature on this potentially lethal association. PMID:26557260

  20. Persistence of babesiosis for >2 years in a patient on rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Raffalli, John; Wormser, Gary P

    2016-06-01

    We report a patient who was being treated with rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis who developed Babesia microti infection that persisted for 26 months despite prolonged anti-babesia drug therapy. The explanation for the persistence was likely to have been the long-term immunocompromising effects of rituximab, as evidenced by seronegativity for B. microti antibodies that lasted for more than 1 year after onset of infection. PMID:27036977

  1. Retrospective analysis of rituximab therapy and splenectomy in childhood chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Ay, Yilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba H; Oymak, Yesim; Toret, Ersin; Demirag, Bengu; Ince, Dilek; Ozcan, Esin; Moueminoglou, Nergial; Koker, Sultan A; Vergin, Canan

    2016-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) results from accelerated platelet destruction mediated by autoantibodies to platelet glycoproteins. Some patients with chronic ITP are refractory to all therapies [steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), anti-D and immunosuppresive drugs] and have chronic low platelet counts and episodic bleeding. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of rituximab treatment and splenectomy in paediatric patients diagnosed with chronic and refractory ITP who were unresponsive to steroids, IVIG, cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Records of patients with chronic and refractory ITP in 459 patients with primary ITP who were followed up in our hospital from January 2005 to December 2014 were reviewed. Fifteen of patients received rituximab and/or applied splenectomy. Fifteen chronic ITP patients (10 boys, five girls) with a mean age of 10 years were enrolled in the study. Two of these patients were suffering from Evans syndrome. The median time since diagnosis of ITP was 10 years. The median follow-up duration after starting Rituximab and splenectomy were 13 and 9.5 months, respectively.None of the seven patients who were treated with rituximab achieved a response. A splenectomy was performed in six of the seven patients who had been treated with rituximab. Complete and partial responses were achieved in 67 and 33% of the patients, respectively. We evaluated the clinical characteristics and responses of chronic ITP patients who did not receive rituximab therapy and underwent a splenectomy. The success rate was 100% in the eight patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Rituximab therapy might not be beneficial for some children with severe chronic ITP who are refractory to standard agents. A splenectomy might be useful and preferable to rituximab. PMID:26656905

  2. Combination of cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and intratumoral CpG oligodeoxynucleotide successfully eradicates established B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Betting, David J; Hurvitz, Sara A; Steward, Kristopher K; Yamada, Reiko E; Kafi, Kamran; van Rooijen, Nico; Timmerman, John M

    2012-09-01

    Rituximab plus chemotherapy is standard therapy for patients with non-Hodgkin B cell lymphoma, but often complete response or cure is not achieved. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) can improve antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and adaptive antitumor immune responses. Using a syngeneic murine B cell lymphoma expressing human CD20 (38C13-huCD20), we previously demonstrated that rituximab plus intratumoral CpG, but not systemic CpG, could eradicate up to half of 7-day established 38C13-huCD20 tumors. However, larger 10-day established tumors could not be cured with this regimen. We thus hypothesized that cytoreduction with cyclophosphamide (Cy) before immunotherapy might permit eradication of these more advanced tumor burdens. Pretreatment with Cy resulted in tumor eradication from 83% of animals treated with rituximab/CpG, whereas Cy/CpG or Cy/rituximab treatments only cured 30% or 17%, respectively (P<0.005). Tumor eradication depended on natural killer cells, but not T cells, macrophages, or complement. Only mice treated with Cy/rituximab/CpG partially resisted rechallenge with tumor cells. Foxp3 Treg and CD11bGr1 myeloid suppressor cells persisted within lymphoid organs after therapy, possibly influencing the ability to establish adaptive tumor immunity. In conclusion, cytoreduction with Cy permitted the cure of large, established lymphomas not otherwise responsive to rituximab plus intratumoral CpG immunotherapy. PMID:22892450

  3. Use of Rituximab in Children with Steroid- and Calcineurin-Inhibitor-Dependent Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravani, Pietro; Ponticelli, Alessandro; Siciliano, Chiara; Fornoni, Alessia; Magnasco, Alberto; Sica, Felice; Bodria, Monica; Caridi, Gianluca; Wei, Changli; Belingheri, Mirco; Ghio, Luciana; Merscher-Gomez, Sandra; Edefonti, Alberto; Pasini, Andrea; Montini, Giovanni; Murtas, Corrado; Wang, Xiangyu; Muruve, Daniel; Vaglio, Augusto; Martorana, Davide; Pani, Antonello; Scolari, Francesco; Reiser, Jochen; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2013-01-01

    In children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome rituximab can maintain short-term remission with withdrawal of prednisone and calcineurin-inhibitors. Long-term effects including number of repeated infusions to maintain remission are unknown. We treated with rituximab 46 consecutive children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome lasting for at least one year (6.3±4.1 years), who were maintained in remission with oral prednisone and calcineurin inhibitors. They received 1–5 rituximab courses during a median follow-up of three years (range 1–5). Oral agents were tapered after each infusion, and completely withdrawn within 45 days. Rituximab was well tolerated. Six-month probabilities of remission were 48% after the first infusion and 37% after subsequent infusions. One- and two-year-remission probabilities were respectively 20% and 10%. Median time intervals between complete oral-agent withdrawal and relapse were 5.6 and 8.5 months respectively following the first and subsequent courses. Time to reconstitution of CD20 cells correlated with the duration of remission, but was not associated with variation in FcyR, CD20 or SMPDL-3B polymorphisms. Podocyte Src phosphorylation was normal. Rituximab can be safely and repeatedly used as prednisone and calcineurin-inhibitor-sparing therapy in a considerable proportion of children with dependent forms of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Further research is needed to identify patients who will benefit most from rituximab therapy. PMID:23739238

  4. Early-onset neutropenia induced by rituximab in a patient with lupus nephritis and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M; Vilá, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been used to treat several complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) including nephritis, cerebritis, and hematological disorders. Neutropenia is among the adverse events associated with rituximab; this usually occurs several weeks after therapy. However, early-onset neutropenia has been reported only in a few cases. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old Hispanic SLE woman who developed severe early-onset neutropenia (0.3 × 10(9)/L) after the second weekly rituximab infusion (375 mg/m(2) weekly × 4) given for nephritis and hemolytic anemia. She also had early-onset thrombocytopenia after rituximab therapy. Both hematological disorders resolved 12 days after the fourth and final dose. This case, together with few others, suggests that early-onset neutropenia may occur during rituximab therapy. Even though rituximab-induced neutropenia seems to be transient, it may predispose SLE patients to severe complications such as infections. PMID:25767732

  5. Early-Onset Neutropenia Induced by Rituximab in a Patient with Lupus Nephritis and Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been used to treat several complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) including nephritis, cerebritis, and hematological disorders. Neutropenia is among the adverse events associated with rituximab; this usually occurs several weeks after therapy. However, early-onset neutropenia has been reported only in a few cases. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old Hispanic SLE woman who developed severe early-onset neutropenia (0.3 × 109/L) after the second weekly rituximab infusion (375 mg/m2 weekly × 4) given for nephritis and hemolytic anemia. She also had early-onset thrombocytopenia after rituximab therapy. Both hematological disorders resolved 12 days after the fourth and final dose. This case, together with few others, suggests that early-onset neutropenia may occur during rituximab therapy. Even though rituximab-induced neutropenia seems to be transient, it may predispose SLE patients to severe complications such as infections. PMID:25767732

  6. Use of Rituximab for Refractory Cytopenias Associated with Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti; Price, Susan; Perkins, Katie; Aldridge, Patricia; Tretler, Jean; Davis, Joie; Dale, Janet K.; Gill, Fred; Hartman, Kip R.; Stork, Linda C.; Gnarra, David J.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Newburger, Peter E.; Puck, Jennifer; Fleisher, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background ALPS is a disorder of apoptosis resulting in accumulation of autoreactive lymphocytes, leading to marked lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and multilineage cytopenias due to splenic sequestration and/or autoimmune destruction often presenting in childhood. We summarize our experience of rituximab use during the last 8 years in twelve patients, 9 children and 3 adults, out of 259 individuals with ALPS, belonging to 166 families currently enrolled in studies at the National Institutes of Health. Methods Refractory immune thrombocytopenia (platelet count <20,000) in 9 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in 3 patients led to treatment with rituximab. Among them, 7 patients had undergone prior surgical splenectomy; 3 had significant splenomegaly; and 2 had no palpable spleen. Results In 7 out of 9 patients with ALPS and thrombocytopenia, rituximab therapy led to median response duration of 21months (range 14–36 months). In contrast, none of the 3 children treated with rituximab for AIHA responded. Noted toxicities included profound and prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia in 3 patients requiring replacement IVIG, total absence of antibody response to polysaccharide vaccines lasting up to 4 years after rituximab infusions in 1 patient and prolonged neutropenia in 1 patient. Conclusion Toxicities including hypogammaglobulinemia and neutropenia constitute an additional infection risk burden, especially in asplenic individuals, and may warrant avoidance of rituximab until other immunosuppressive medication options are exhausted. Long term follow up of ALPS patients with cytopenias after any treatment is necessary to determine relative risks and benefits. PMID:19214977

  7. Anti-JC virus antibodies in rituximab-treated patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Hyun; Hyun, Jae-Won; Jeong, In Hye; Joung, AeRan; Yeon, Joung-Lim; Dehmel, Thomas; Adams, Ortwin; Kieseier, Bernd C; Kim, Ho Jin

    2015-03-01

    Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, has been proposed to be effective for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). A concern for developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), which is caused by John Cunningham virus (JCV), has been suggested particularly in patients treated long term with rituximab. In this study, using a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with glutathione S-transferase-tagged VP1 as the antigen, we investigated the seroprevalence of anti-JCV antibodies among 78 Korean patients with NMOSD and the change in anti-JCV antibody serostatus following long-term rituximab treatment. The overall seroprevalence of anti-JCV antibodies was 69 % prior to rituximab administration. Over a mean of 4 years of repeated treatment with rituximab, no patient developed PML. Of 24 initially seronegative patients, none converted into seropositive, whereas six (11 %) of 54 initially seropositive patients converted into seronegative. Our results might support the safety of long-term rituximab treatment in patients with NMOSD with regard to the risk of developing PML. PMID:25559683

  8. Subcutaneous versus intravenous administration of rituximab: pharmacokinetics, CD20 target coverage and B-cell depletion in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mao, Cheng-Ping; Brovarney, Martin R; Dabbagh, Karim; Birnböck, Herbert F; Richter, Wolfgang F; Del Nagro, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The CD20-specific monoclonal antibody rituximab (MabThera(®), Rituxan(®)) is widely used as the backbone of treatment for patients with hematologic disorders. Intravenous administration of rituximab is associated with infusion times of 4-6 hours, and can be associated with infusion-related reactions. Subcutaneous administration of rituximab may reduce this and facilitate administration without infusion-related reactions. We sought to determine the feasibility of achieving equivalent efficacy (measured by endogenous B-cell depletion) and long-term durability of CD20 target coverage for subcutaneously administered rituximab compared with intravenous dosing. In these preclinical studies, male cynomolgus monkeys were treated with either intravenous rituximab or novel subcutaneous formulation of rituximab containing human recombinant DNA-derived hyaluronidase enzyme. Peripheral blood samples were analyzed for serum rituximab concentrations, peripheral B-cell depletion, and CD20 target coverage, including subset analysis according to CD21+ status. Distal lymph node B-cell depletion and CD20 target coverage were also measured. Initial peak serum concentrations of rituximab were significantly higher following intravenous administration than subcutaneous. However, the mean serum rituximab trough concentrations were comparable at 2 and 7 days post-first dose and 9 and 14 days post-second dose. Efficacy of B-cell depletion in both peripheral blood and distal lymph nodes was comparable for both methods. In lymph nodes, 9 days after the second dose with subcutaneous and intravenous rituximab, B-cell levels were decreased by 57% and 42% respectively. Similarly, levels of peripheral blood B cells were depleted by >94% for both subcutaneous and intravenous dosing at all time points. Long-term recovery of free unbound surface CD20 levels was similar, and the duration of B-cell depletion was equally sustained over 2 months for both methods. These results demonstrate that, despite

  9. Subcutaneous versus Intravenous Administration of Rituximab: Pharmacokinetics, CD20 Target Coverage and B-Cell Depletion in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cheng-Ping; Brovarney, Martin R.; Dabbagh, Karim; Birnböck, Herbert F.; Richter, Wolfgang F.; Del Nagro, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The CD20-specific monoclonal antibody rituximab (MabThera®, Rituxan®) is widely used as the backbone of treatment for patients with hematologic disorders. Intravenous administration of rituximab is associated with infusion times of 4–6 hours, and can be associated with infusion-related reactions. Subcutaneous administration of rituximab may reduce this and facilitate administration without infusion-related reactions. We sought to determine the feasibility of achieving equivalent efficacy (measured by endogenous B-cell depletion) and long-term durability of CD20 target coverage for subcutaneously administered rituximab compared with intravenous dosing. In these preclinical studies, male cynomolgus monkeys were treated with either intravenous rituximab or novel subcutaneous formulation of rituximab containing human recombinant DNA-derived hyaluronidase enzyme. Peripheral blood samples were analyzed for serum rituximab concentrations, peripheral B-cell depletion, and CD20 target coverage, including subset analysis according to CD21+ status. Distal lymph node B-cell depletion and CD20 target coverage were also measured. Initial peak serum concentrations of rituximab were significantly higher following intravenous administration than subcutaneous. However, the mean serum rituximab trough concentrations were comparable at 2 and 7 days post-first dose and 9 and 14 days post-second dose. Efficacy of B-cell depletion in both peripheral blood and distal lymph nodes was comparable for both methods. In lymph nodes, 9 days after the second dose with subcutaneous and intravenous rituximab, B-cell levels were decreased by 57% and 42% respectively. Similarly, levels of peripheral blood B cells were depleted by >94% for both subcutaneous and intravenous dosing at all time points. Long-term recovery of free unbound surface CD20 levels was similar, and the duration of B-cell depletion was equally sustained over 2 months for both methods. These results demonstrate that, despite

  10. Real Time Analysis of Binding between Rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody) and B Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Liang; Lin, Peiling; Chisti, Mohammad M.; Rehman, Abdul; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2013-01-01

    CD20, expressed on greater than 90% of B-lymphocytic lymphomas, is an attractive target for antibody therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric murine/human-engineered monoclonal antibody and can selectively deplete CD20-expressing cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. The immobilization of B-lymphoblast-like Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells on the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gold electrode surface using RGD tripeptide was electrochemically confirmed. The real-time processes of attachment of Raji cells on the gold electrode and the subsequent binding of Rituximab to the cells were studied using QCM biosensor. The interaction between Rituximab and Raji cells led to the increased resonant frequency shifts (Δf0) in the studied antibody concentration range from 5 to 250 µg mL−1 following the Langmuir adsorption model. From these observations, the apparent binding constant between a single-layer of Rituximab and Raji cells was calculated to be 1.6×106 M−1. Control experiments using other therapeutic antibodies (i.e., Trastuzumab and Bevacizumab) and different cells (i.e., T cells and endothelial cells) proved the specific interaction between Rituximab and B cells. The effects of Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions on the Rituximab-Raji cell interaction were also studied providing the enhanced QCM signals, in particular, further indicating that CD20 is a calcium ion channel that can transport these metal ions into the cells and accelerate the cell lysis induced by Rituximab. Thus the real time capability of QCM and its simplicity of operation are highly suitable for multipurpose studies on living cells including cell-immobilization, cytotoxicity of drugs, and the cell action mechanisms. PMID:23926879

  11. Changes in B and T lymphocytes and chemokines with rituximab treatment in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Piccio, Laura; Naismith, Robert T.; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Klein, Robyn S.; Parks, Becky J.; Lyons, Jeri A.; Cross, Anne H.

    2010-01-01

    Background B cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). A beneficial effect of B cell depletion using rituximab has been shown, but the complete mechanism of action for this drug is unclear. Objective To determine the relationship between T cells, B cells, and changes in CSF chemokines with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that targets CD20. Design Phase II trial of rituximab as an add-on therapy. Setting The John L. Multiple Sclerosis Center, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. Patients Thirty relapsing-remitting MS subjects with clinical and MRI activity despite treatment with an immunomodulatory drug received four weekly doses of 375mg/m2 rituximab. Main Outcome Measures Lumbar puncture was performed before and after rituximab infusions in 26 subjects. CSF B and T lymphocytes were enumerated by flow cytometry, and chemoattractants were measured by ELISA. Results After rituximab administration, CSF B cells were decreased or undetectable in all subjects and CSF T cells were reduced in 81% of subjects. The mean reduction in CSF cellularity was 95% for B cells and 50% for T cells. After rituximab infusion, CSF CXCL13 and CCL19 decreased (P= 0.002, P=0.03, respectively). The proportional decline in CSF T cells correlated with the proportional decrease in CXCL13 (r=0.45;P=0.03), suggesting a possible relationship. CSF IgG index, IgG concentration, and oligoclonal band number were unchanged following treatment. Conclusions B cells are critical for T cell trafficking into the CNS in MS patients, and may alter T cell trafficking by influencing chemokine production within the CNS. PMID:20558389

  12. Estimation of radiation absorbed doses to the red marrow in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, D.A.; Sui Shen

    1995-02-01

    Myelotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor in radioimmunotherapy. Traditional methods most commonly used to estimate the radiation adsorbed dose to the bone marrow of patients consider contribution from radionuclide in the blood and/or total body. Targeted therapies, such as radioimmunotherapy, add a third potential source for radiation to the bone marrow because the radiolabeled targeting molecules can accumulate specifically on malignant target cells infiltrating the bone marrow. A non-invasive method for estimating the radiation absorbed dose to the red marrow of patients who have received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) has been developed and explored. The method depends on determining the cumulated activity in three contributing sources: (1) marrow; (2) blood; and (3) total body. The novel aspect of this method for estimating marrow radiation dose is derivation of the radiation dose for the entire red marrow from radiation dose estimates obtained by detection of cumulated activity in three lumbar vertebrae using a gamma camera. Contributions to the marrow radiation dose form marrow, blood, and total body cumulated activity were determined for patients who received an I-131 labeled MoAb, Lym-1, that reacts with malignant B-lymphocytes of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and nonHodgkin`s lymphoma. Six patients were selected for illustrative purposes because their vertebrae were readily visualized on lumbar images. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A review for radiation oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, Roger M. . E-mail: macklir@ccf.org; Pohlman, Brad

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to review advances in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and to discuss the role of Radiation oncologist in administering this important new form of biologically targeted radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A review of articles and abstracts on the clinical efficacy, safety, and radiation safety of yttrium Y 90 ({sup 9}Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) and iodine I 131 tositumomab (Bexxar) was performed. Results: The clinical efficacy of RIT in NHL has been shown in numerous clinical trials of {sup 9}Y ibritumomab tiuxetan and {sup 131}I tositumomab. Both agents have produced significant responses in patients with low-grade, follicular, or transformed NHL, including patients with disease that had not responded or had responded poorly to previous chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Reversible toxicities such as neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia are the most common adverse events with both agents. Conclusions: Radioimmunotherapy is safe and effective in many patients with B-cell NHL. {sup 9}Y ibritumomab tiuxetan and {sup 131}I tositumomab can produce clinically meaningful and durable responses even in patients in whom chemotherapy has failed. Treatment with RIT requires a multispecialty approach and close communication between Radiation oncologist and other members of the treatment team. Radiation oncologist plays an important role in treating patients with RIT and monitoring them for responses and adverse events after treatment.

  14. Gemcitabine enhances rituximab-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity to B cell lymphoma by CD20 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazumi; Nagasaki, Eijiro; Kan, Shin; Ito, Masaki; Kamata, Yuko; Homma, Sadamu; Aiba, Keisuke

    2016-05-01

    Although rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to CD20, has significantly improved the prognosis for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), one-third of DLBCL patients demonstrate resistance to rituximab or relapse after rituximab treatment. Thus, a novel approach to rituximab-based treatment is likely to be required to improve the efficacy of DLBCL treatment. As complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) is a key mechanism mediating rituximab's tumoricidal activity, rituximab binding to CD20 on tumor cells is a critical factor for effective rituximab-based treatments against DLBCL. We found that gemcitabine (GEM), but not lenalidomide (LEN) or azacitidine (AZA), can upregulate CD20 expression in TK and KML-1 cells, two human DLBCL cell lines. Treatment of TK and KML-1 cells with GEM enhanced CD20 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. CD20 upregulation by GEM treatment was accompanied by increased rituximab binding to CD20. In TK cells, GEM treatment synergistically increased rituximab-mediated CDC activity in a dose-dependent manner. In KML cells, GEM treatment also induced upregulation of complement regulatory proteins, possibly leading to resistance to CDC. Treatment with LEN, a drug that did not upregulate CD20, did not enhance rituximab-mediated CDC activity. GEM treatment activated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) signaling in these cells. Furthermore, a specific inhibitor to NF-kB suppressed GEM-induced CD20 upregulation, indicating that GEM-induced NF-kB activation is closely associated with CD20 upregulation. These results suggest that when used in combination, GEM might enhance the antitumor efficacy of rituximab against DLBCL due to its unique ability to upregulate CD20. PMID:26920337

  15. Place in therapy of rituximab in the treatment of granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shivani; Geetha, Duvuru

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis are small vessel vasculitides characterized by circulating antineutrophil circulating antibodies. Standard treatment for active severe disease has consisted of cyclophosphamide with glucocorticoids with or without plasmapheresis, which achieves approximately 75% sustained remission, but carries significant adverse effects such as malignancy, infertility, leukopenia, and infections. The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil circulating antibodies-associated vasculitis has been established, and as such, rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, has been studied in treatment of active granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis (induction) and in maintaining remission. Rituximab has been shown to be effective in inducing remission in several retrospective studies in patients with refractory disease or cyclophosphamide intolerance. The RAVE and RITUXVAS trials demonstrated rituximab is a noninferior alternative to standard cyclophosphamide-based therapy; however, its role in elderly patients and patients with severe renal disease warrants further investigation. Rituximab has been compared with azathioprine for maintaining remission in the MAINRITSAN trial and may be more efficacious in maintaining remission in patients treated with cyclophosphamide induction. Rituximab is not without risks and carries a similar adverse event risk rate as cyclophosphamide in randomized control trials. However, its use can be considered over cyclophosphamide in patients who have relapsing or refractory disease or in young patients seeking to preserve fertility.

  16. Practical considerations on the use of rituximab in autoimmune neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Mixalis L.; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2010-01-01

    Rituximab (Mabthera, Rituxan) is a chimeric human/murine monoclonal antibody against CD-20 surface antigen expressed on B-cells. Rituximab, by causing B-cell depletion, appears to be effective in several autoimmune disorders; it has been approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is a promising new agent in the treatment of several autoimmune neurological disorders. A controlled study in patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis has shown that rituximab significantly reduces the number of new MRI lesions and improves clinical outcome; it also showed some promise in a subset of patients with primary progressive MS. The drug is also effective in a number of patients with Devic’s disease, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune neuropathies, and inflammatory myopathies. The apparent effectiveness of rituximab has moved B-cells into the center stage of clinical and laboratory investigation of autoimmune neurological disorders. We review the evidence-based effectiveness of rituximab in neurological disorders based on controlled trials and anecdotal reports, including our own experience, and address the immunobiology of B-cells in autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders. In addition, we provide practical guidelines on how best to use this drug in clinical practice and highlight its potential toxicity. PMID:21179602

  17. Rituximab as Single Agent in Primary MALT Lymphoma of the Ocular Adnexa

    PubMed Central

    Annibali, Ombretta; Chiodi, Francesca; Sarlo, Chiara; Cortes, Magdalena; Quaranta-Leoni, Francesco M.; Quattrocchi, Carlo; Bianchi, Antonella; Bonini, Stefano; Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas are the first cause of primary ocular malignancies, and among them the most common are MALT Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas. Recently systemic immunotherapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody has been investigated as first-line treatment; however, the optimal management for MALT Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas is still unknown. The present study evaluated retrospectively the outcome of seven consecutive patients with primary MALT Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas, of whom six were treated with single agent Rituximab. All patients received 6 cycles of Rituximab 375 mg/mq every 3 weeks intravenously. The overall response rate was 100%; four patients (67%) achieved a Complete Remission, and two (33%) achieved a partial response. In four patients an additional Rituximab maintenance every 2-3 months was given for two years. After a median follow-up of 29 months (range 8–34), no recurrences were observed, without of therapy- or disease-related severe adverse events. None of the patients needed additional radiotherapy or other treatments. Rituximab as a single agent is highly effective and tolerable in first-line treatment of primary MALT Ocular adnexal Lymphomas. Furthermore, durable responses are achievable with the same-agent maintenance. Rituximab can be considered the agent of choice in the management of an indolent disease in whom the “quality of life” matter is of primary importance. PMID:26425558

  18. Rituximab for subcutaneous delivery: Clinical management principles from a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Julia; Cox, Keith; Bedwell, Kylie; Ku, Mathew

    2015-12-01

    Nurses play an integral role in administering treatments to patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Intravenous (IV) rituximab was approved by the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration in 1998, and a novel subcutaneous (SC) formulation was approved in 2014. Fixed-dose SC rituximab is highly concentrated; co-formulation with a fully human recombinant vorhyaluronidase alfa enzyme helps overcome the physiological barriers of the SC space, facilitating drug dispersion. Despite a different pharmacokinetic profile to the IV preparation, SC rituximab demonstrates a comparable efficacy/safety profile. Most frequently occurring rituximab-related adverse events include neutropenia, nausea and constipation, and administration-related reactions are more frequent with the SC preparation. Compared with IV, SC delivery reduces treatment times and nurse workload, and patients report greater comfort and convenience. This article sets out nursing considerations for optimal administration of SC rituximab, including premedication, drug handling/preparation, injection technique, after-care and management of adverse events, particularly administration-related reactions. PMID:26681664

  19. Successful rituximab treatment in an elderly patient with recurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Etsuko; Yamanouchi, Jun; Hato, Takaaki; Takeuchi, Kazuto; Niiya, Toshiyuki; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-07-01

    An 81-year-old man presenting with fever, neurological symptoms, thrombocytopenia, and hemolytic anemia was diagnosed with acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). His disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) activity was <1% and the ADAMTS13 inhibitor titer was 3.2 BU/ml. He received plasma exchange and steroid administration until remission was achieved. Seven months later, he suffered from paralysis of the right hand, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. We confirmed TTP recurrence based on ADAMTS13 activity <1% and an ADAMTS13 inhibitor titer of 19.4 BU/ml. Four infusions of rituximab were administered in addition to plasma exchange and steroid pulse therapy. Platelet count recovery was observed within 5 days. No severe side effects related to rituximab occurred. Although rituximab has not been approved for TTP in Japan, we report the efficacy and safety of rituximab in an elderly patient with recurrent TTP. We suggest that rituximab therapy should be started as soon as possible for recurrent TTP in patients with high titers of ADAMTS13 inhibitor. PMID:27498731

  20. Rituximab for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: A Story of Rapid Success in Translation

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Andrew M.; Thalji, Nassir M.; Greenberg, Alexandra J.; Tapia, Carmen J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Translational stories range from straightforward to complex. In this commentary, the story of the rapid and successful translation of rituximab therapy for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) is examined. Development of this monoclonal antibody therapy began in the late 1980s. In 1994, rituximab received its first approval for the treatment of NHL by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Rituximab has since been approved for additional indications and has transformed medical practice. However, the social and political implications of these rapid successes are only beginning to become clear. In this commentary, key events in the rapid translation of rituximab from the bench to bedside are highlighted and placed into this historical framework. To accomplish this, the story of rituximab is divided into the following six topics, which we believe to be widely applicable to case studies of translation: (1) underlying disease, (2) key basic science, (3) key clinical studies in translation, (4) FDA approval process, (5) changes to medical practice, and (6) the social and political influences on translation. PMID:24528902

  1. Timing determines dexamethasone and rituximab induced synergistic cell death.

    PubMed

    Adem, Jemal; Eray, Mine; Eeva, Jonna; Nuutinen, Ulla; Pelkonen, Jukka

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of cell death signaling pathways in many cell types such as B lymphocytes (B-cells) can lead to cancer, for example to B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab (RTX) and glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone (Dex) are widely used to treat hematological malignancies including B-cell lymphomas. Although the combination of Dex and RTX improves the treatment outcome of lymphoma patients, most lymphomas remain incurable diseases. Therefore, a detailed investigation of Dex- and RTX-induced signaling might provide new insights into the therapeutic benefits of these drugs. In this paper, we describe Dex- and RTX-induced signaling pathways and their downstream target proteins/cells. In addition, we also overview how the signaling initiated by Dex and RTX modulate the outcome of Dex- and RTX-mediated cell death in lymphoma cells. The combination of Dex and RTX results in massive cell death in lymphoma cells. However, pretreatment of lymphoma cells or mononuclear cytotoxic cells with Dex followed by RTX leads to a decrease in apoptosis or it impairs antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). RTX-mediated ADCC is impaired by Dex-induced depletion of cytotoxic cells, whereas RTX-mediated short-term ERK1/2 activation decreases Dex-induced apoptosis. Therefore, the timing of the combination of Dex and RTX is a determining factor for the synergistic effect of these cell death inducing agents. PMID:27290654

  2. Rituximab as maintenance therapy for ANCA associated vasculitis: how, when and why?

    PubMed

    Alba, Marco A; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe

    2016-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) are chronic autoimmune diseases characterized by inflammation and destruction of small vessels. Rituximab is now licensed for use as a remission-induction agent in the treatment of these disorders. During recent years, several non-controlled studies have suggested that rituximab may be of value in maintaining disease remission in AAV. In these series, 3 techniques have been tried: "watch-and-wait", repeated cycles in fixed intervals, or administration based on proposed biomarkers. More importantly, the results of the MAINRITSAN trial showed that this anti-CD20 agent is superior to azathioprine for preventing major relapses in AAV. This review summarizes current information regarding the effectiveness, timing, dosing, duration and safety of rituximab as a valid option for remission maintenance. PMID:26255570

  3. Selective response to rituximab in a young child with MuSK-associated myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Raghav; Iyadurai, Stanley J; Connolly, Anne; Zaidman, Craig

    2015-08-01

    Neuromuscular junction disorders in children are either genetic, such as congenital myasthenic syndrome, or autoimmune with circulating antibodies most commonly against acetylcholine receptors. There is limited experience recognizing and treating children with myasthenia associated with muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies. We report a seven-year-old child with intermittent esotropia since age 3 months, and two years of progressive and severe diplopia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and facial weakness. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies and genetic testing for congenital myasthenic syndrome were negative. Muscle specific tyrosine kinase antibodies were significantly elevated. Ophthalmoplegia and bulbar weakness were refractory to treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, corticosteroids and IVIg but completely resolved following treatment with rituximab. Her neurologic examination remained normal at the most recent follow-up, 15 months after initiation of rituximab. Children with MuSK myasthenia, like adults, can respond to rituximab despite long standing disease and failure to improve on other immunosuppressant medications. PMID:25998611

  4. A review of the current use of rituximab in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gürcan, Hakan M; Keskin, Derin B; Stern, Joel N H; Nitzberg, Matthew A; Shekhani, Haris; Ahmed, A Razzaque

    2009-01-01

    Rituximab is a human/murine chimeric monoclonal antibody primarily used for treating non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. Recently it has also been used in the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. A literature review was conducted to determine the efficacy of rituximab in the treatment of some of these autoimmune diseases. Multiple mechanisms proposed for the rituximab mediated B cell depletion are also discussed. The efficacy of rituximab is well-established and it is FDA approved for treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, data on the use of rituximab is presented from 92 studies involving 1197 patients with the following diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, pemphigus vulgaris, hemophilia A, cold agglutinin disease, Sjogren's syndrome, graft vs. host disease, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, cryoglobulinemia, IgM mediated neuropathy, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, idiopathic membranous nephropathy, dermatomyositis, and opsoclonus myoclonus. The efficacy varies among different autoimmune diseases. The cumulative data would suggest that in the vast majority of studies in this review, RTX has a beneficial role in their treatment. While rituximab is very effective in the depletion of B cells, current research suggests it may also influence other cells of the immune system by re-establishing immune homeostasis and tolerance. The safety profile of RTX reveals that most reactions are infusion related. In patients with autoimmune diseases the incidence of serious and severe side effects is low. Systemic infection still remains a major concern and may result in death. PMID:19000786

  5. Rituximab treatment for Epstein-Barr virus DNAemia after alternative-donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Coppoletta, Stefania; Tedone, Elisabetta; Galano, Barbara; Soracco, Monica; Raiola, Anna Maria; Lamparelli, Teresa; Gualandi, Francesca; Bregante, Stefania; Ibatici, Adalberto; di Grazia, Carmen; Dominietto, Alida; Varaldo, Riccardo; Bruno, Barbara; Frassoni, Francesco; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    We report 55 patients undergoing an alternative-donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) who developed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNAemia, with >1000 EBV copies/10(5) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and were treated with rituximab (375 mg/m(2)). The median patient age was 47 years (range, 20-65 years), and graft sources were mismatched family members (n = 4), unrelated donors (n = 46), and unrelated cord blood (n = 5). The conditioning regimen included antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in all patients. The median time to development of EBV DNAemia was day 27 post-HSCT (range, day 5 to day 242), with a median of 60 EBV copies/10(5) PBMCs (range, 1-5770 copies/10(5) PBMCs). The number of EBV copies was reduced to <1000/10(5) PBMCs on day +7 after initiation of rituximab therapy in 51% of the patients, on day +14 in 73% of the patients, and on +21 in 92% of the patients. Overall, 50 of 55 patients (91%) cleared EBV after one dose (n = 25) or more than one dose (n = 25) of rituximab. Factors predicting transplantation-related mortality (TRM) in multivariate analysis were a reduction to <1000 EBV copies/10(5) PBMCs by day +7 of treatment (relative risk [RR], 0.2; P = .01) and disease phase in remission (RR, 0.3; P = .05). TRM was 23% in the 40 patients with none or one of the negative predictors and 60% in the 15 patients with both negative predictors (P = .001). Of these latter 15 patients, 3 developed clinical posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). All 3 of these patients had a high EBV load on day +7 of rituximab therapy. This study confirms the effectiveness of rituximab in controlling EBV DNAemia in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Patients with increasing EBV copies despite rituximab therapy are at high risk for EBV PTLD and may be considered for alternative therapies. PMID:20950702

  6. Long-term remission with rituximab in refractory leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 antibody encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Brown, J William L; Martin, Peter J; Thorpe, John W; Michell, Andrew W; Coles, Alasdair J; Cox, Amanda L; Vincent, Angela; Zandi, Michael S

    2014-06-15

    Autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) is recently described and there is a lack of detailed reports on the treatment of relapsing or refractory cases and long-term outcomes. Two case reports are presented. Both cases had faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS) and received rituximab after relapsing or refractory disease. Both cases achieved sustained clinical remission of up to 15 and 56 months respectively. Rituximab use allowed withdrawal of corticosteroids and was well tolerated. Randomized clinical trials are needed in LGI1 encephalitis and other autoimmune encephalitides. PMID:24703099

  7. Sustained Elite Suppression of Replication Competent HIV-1 in a Patient Treated With Rituximab Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Stephanie; Dinoso, Jason B.; Marsh, Julia A.; DeZern, Amy E.; O’Connell, Karen A; Spivak, Adam M.; Alwood, Karla; Durand, Christine M.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of elite control of HIV-1 replication is not fully understood. While immunosuppression due to rituximab based chemotherapy has been associated with increased replication of HBV, CMV, and HIV-1, control of replication-competent HIV-1 was maintained in an elite controller/suppressor treated with a regimen that included vincristine, cyclophosphamide, prednisone, four rounds of plasmapheresis and ten cycles of rituximab. The data suggests that de-novo antibody responses do not play a significant role in the control of viral replication in these patients. PMID:21550842

  8. Recurrent inflammatory pseudotumor of the jaw with perineural intracranial invasion demonstrating sustained response to Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bryan A; Tinsley, Sarah; Schellenberger, Thomas; Bobustuc, George C

    2012-12-01

    Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the head and neck; however, involvement of the skull base and mandible can be unresponsive to steroids and require surgical resection. IPT is known to usually contain a CD20+ lymphocyte subgroup. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody, has been successfully utilized in the treatment of other CD20+ diseases, including the similar idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease. This is the first report to describe successful treatment with Rituximab of a recurrent IPT of the mandible with trigeminal spread and leptomeningeal involvement with clinical and radiologic evidence demonstrating a sustained response to therapy. PMID:22161155

  9. The potential of radioimmunotherapy as a new hope for HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsukrov, Dina; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS remains an enormous public health burden. Advances in anti-retroviral therapy (ART) have greatly reduced mortality and morbidity but HIV remains incurable, with patients suffering numerous disease- and treatment-related side effects. Any curative strategy for HIV must selectively eliminate existing infected cells. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an established clinical modality in cancer treatment and has been shown to be effective in multiple infectious diseases models. We have recently demonstrated that RIT using a gp41-targeting antibody was effective and safe in eliminating HIV-infected cells in vivo (in mice), in vitro, and ex vivo in cells from HIV patients treated with ART. In addition, there is strong evidence that this radiolabeled antibody can eliminate HIV infected cells across the blood brain barrier. We consider RIT to be the most promising backbone strategy for HIV eradication. PMID:24734906

  10. The Role of PAM4 in the Management of Pancreatic Cancer: Diagnosis, Radioimmunodetection, and Radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Suxia; Jin, Guihua; Wang, Lijuan; Li, Meng; He, Chenchen; Guo, Xijing; Zhu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    PAM4, a new monoclonal antibody (MAb) known as clivatuzumab, is highly reactive with pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions. It is absent from the normal tissues and has limited reactivity with nonpancreatic cancer. The detailed characteristic of the PAM4 epitope is unknown but recent studies have shown that it is dependent on MUC1 glycosylation status. The limited PAM4 expression pattern makes it an attractive candidate for management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In addition, PAM4 is a serum biomarker for diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Several different radiolabeled immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic agents of PAM4 have been developed and some are being evaluated in preclinical and/or clinical studies. The review will focus on PAM4 and its potential utility for the diagnosis, radioimmunodetection, and radioimmunotherapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24818166

  11. A Transition Metal Complex (Venus Flytrap Cluster) for Radioimmunodetection and Radioimmunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Raymond J.; Beatty, Barbara G.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Varadarajan, Aravamuthan; Williams, Lawrence E.; Curtis, Frederick L.; Knobler, Carolyn B.; Beatty, J. David; Shiveley, John E.

    1991-04-01

    A novel transition metal complex, Venus flytrap cluster (VFC), is described for the preparation of radiolabeled antibodies. VFC contained 57Co, which was held tightly between the faces of two covalently bridged carborane ligands by cluster bonding of the metal with appropriate ligand orbitals. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody T84.66 was conjugated to 57Co-VFC with full retention of immunological activity. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen-producing tumors showed excellent tumor localization of 57Co-VFC-T84.66. The accumulation of radionuclide in normal liver was low and independent of dose, which may reflect the stability of the radionuclide complex. These results presage the use of VFC systems for binding transition metals that are clinically useful for radio-immunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy.

  12. A transition metal complex (Venus flytrap cluster) for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, R.J.; Curtis, F.L.; Shively, J.E. ); Beatty, B.G.; Williams, L.E.; Beatty, J.D. ); Hawthorne, M.F.; Varadarajan, A.; Knobler, C.B. )

    1991-04-15

    A novel transition metal complex, Venus flytrap cluster (VFC), is described for the preparation of radiolabeled antibodies. VFC contained {sup 57}Co, which was held tightly between the faces of two covalently bridged carborane ligands by cluster bonding of the metal with appropriate ligand orbitals. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody T84,66 was conjugated to {sup 57}Co-VFC with full retention of immunological activity. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen-producing tumors showed excellent tumor localization of {sup 57}Co-VFC-T84.66. The accumulation of radionuclide in normal liver was low and independent of dose, which may reflect the stability of the radionuclide complex. These results presage the use of VFC systems for binding transition metals that are clinically useful for radioimmunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy.

  13. Radioimmunotherapy: A Specific Treatment Protocol for Cancer by Cytotoxic Radioisotopes Conjugated to Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents a selective internal radiation therapy, that is, the use of radionuclides conjugated to tumor-directed monoclonal antibodies (including those fragments) or peptides. In a clinical field, two successful examples of this treatment protocol are currently extended by 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) and 131I-tositumomab (Bexxar), both of which are anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies coupled to cytotoxic radioisotopes and are approved for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. In addition, some beneficial observations are obtained in preclinical studies targeting solid tumors. To date, in order to reduce the unnecessary exposure and to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, various biological, chemical, and treatment procedural improvements have been investigated in RIT. This review outlines the fundamentals of RIT and current knowledge of the preclinical/clinical trials for cancer treatment. PMID:25379535

  14. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  15. Radioisotopes for radioimmunodetection (RAID) and radioimmunotherapy (RAIT)---current and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the availability and properties of radioisotopes for both radioimmunodiagnosis (RAID) and radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) are discussed. Examples are provided for radioisotopes available via direct production in nuclear reactors and accelerators or as daughters obtained from radionuclide generator systems whose parents are either reactor or accelerator produced. Important factors which must be considered for the use of a particular radioisotope include availability, the physical half-life and decay properties, and chemical versatility for protein attachment. Although both direct'' and indirect'' methods are available for attachment of radioisotopes to antibodies, this broad field of research is not reviewed in detail. Practical issues related to the availability and use of a variety of radionuclides are described. 47 refs., 5 tabs.

  16. Orthotopic xenografts of human melanoma and colonic and ovarian carcinoma in sheep to evaluate radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. H.; Rose, A. H.; Glancy, R. J.; Penhale, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Extrapolation to humans from experimental radioimmunotherapy in nude mouse xenograft models is confounded by large relative tumour size and small volume of distribution in mice allowing tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibodies unattainable in patients. Our large animal model of human tumours in cyclosporin-immunosuppressed sheep demonstrated tumour uptake of targeted radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies comparable with uptakes reported in clinical trials. Sheep immunosuppression with daily intravenous cyclosporin augmented by oral ketoconazole maintained trough blood levels of cyclosporin within the range 1000-1500 ng ml(-1). Human tumour cells were transplanted orthotopically by inoculation of 10(7) cells: SKMEL melanoma subcutaneously; LS174T and HT29 colon carcinoma into bowel, peritoneum and liver; and JAM ovarian carcinoma into ovary and peritoneum. Tumour xenografts grew at all sites within 3 weeks of inoculation, preserving characteristic morphology without evidence of necrosis or host rejection. Lymphatic metastasis was demonstrated in regional nodes draining xenografts of melanoma and ovarian carcinoma. Colonic LS1 74T xenografts produced mucin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The anti-CEA IgG1 monoclonal antibody A5B7 was radiolabelled with iodine-131 and administered intravenously to sheep. Peak uptake at 5 days in orthotopic human tumour transplants in gut was 0.027% DI g(-1) (percentage of injected dose per gram) and 0.034% DI g(-1) in hepatic metastases with tumour to blood ratios of 2-2.5. Non-specific tumour uptake in melanoma was 0.003% DI g(-1). Uptake of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in human tumours in our large animal model is comparable with that observed in patients and may be more realistic than nude mice xenografts for prediction of clinical efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716032

  17. Low incidence of radionecrosis in children treated with conventional radiation therapy and intrathecal radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Kim; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Zanzonico, Pat; Wolden, Suzanne L; Humm, John L; DeSelm, Carl; Souweidane, Mark M; Lewis, Jason S; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-06-01

    Radionecrosis is a potentially devastating complication of external beam radiotherapy (XRT). Intraventricular compartmental radioimmunotherapy (cRIT) using (131)I-3F8 or (131)I-8H9 can eradicate malignant cells in the CSF. The incidence of radionecrosis using cRIT (131)I based intraventricular radioimmunotherapy, when used alone or in combination with conventional craniospinal CSI-XRT is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed the incidence of radionecrosis in two cohorts of pediatric patients treated with both CSI-XRT and cRIT at MSKCC since 2003: patients with metastatic CNS neuroblastoma (NB) and medulloblastoma (MB). 94 patients received both CSI-XRT and cRIT, two received cRIT alone, median follow up 41.5 months (6.5-124.8 months). Mean CSI-XRT dose was 28 Gy (boost to the primary tumor site up to 54 Gy) in the MB cohort, and CSI XRT dose 18-21 Gy (boost to 30 Gy for focal parenchymal mass) in the NB cohort. For MB patients, 20 % had focal re-irradiation for a second or more subsequent relapse, mean repeat-XRT dose was 27.5 Gy; seven patients with NB had additional focal XRT. Median CSF cRIT dose was 18.6 Gy in the MB cohort and 32.1 in the NB cohort. One asymptomatic patient underwent resection of 0.6-cm hemorrhagic periventricular white-matter lesion confirmed to be necrosis and granulation tissue, 2.5 years after XRT. The risk of radionecrosis in children treated with XRT and cRIT appears minimal (~1 %). No neurologic deficits secondary to radionecrosis have been observed in long-term survivors treated with both modalities, including patients who underwent re-XRT. Administration of cRIT may safely proceed in patients treated with conventional radiotherapy without appearing to increase the risk of radionecrosis. PMID:25944385

  18. Prediction of tumor response to experimental radioimmunotherapy with {sup 90}Y in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dillehay, L.E.; Mayer, R.; Zhang, Y.G.

    1995-09-30

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify those factors that predict variability in tumor response to {sup 90}Y-radioimmunotherapy based on measurement of incorporated activity and physical dimensions of individual tumors and to apply the concept of effective dose to radioimmunotherapy. Human colon carcinoma xenografts growing in nude mice were treated with anti-CEA antibodies labeled with {sup 90}Y directly or through a bispecific antibody/labeled hapten system. Tumor response was measured as the delay in growth to eight times the treatment volume. Noninvasive activity (based on bremsstrahlung radiation) and dimension measurements were made in these animals at several times after label injection. The following parameters were compared for their ability to predict individual tumor response: (a) injected activity, (b) injected activity times a factor based on average uptake as a function of volume, (c) in vivo activity per volume measured in each animal at a single time, (d) the integral over time of in vivo activity per volume in each animal, and (e) the minimum dose for each animal in a uniformly active ellipsoid whose total activity and dimensions varied over time the same as the tumor. After correcting for differences in injected activity, two parameters account for much of the variability in tumor response. One of these is the general trend of larger tumors to take up less activity per volume. Additional variability can be accounted for by the in vivo activity per volume measurements. The minimum dose as introduced here is likely to be useful in estimating the biologically effective dose delivered by each treatment. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Radioimmunotherapy in the multimodality treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with reference to second-look resection

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Z.Y.; Liu, K.D.; Bao, Y.M.; Lu, J.Z.; Yu, Y.Q.; Ma, Z.C.; Zhou, X.D.; Yang, R.; Gan, Y.H.; Lin, Z.Y. )

    1990-01-15

    Experimental study using nude mice human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenograft indicated that the combination treatment with iodine 131 (131I)-anti-human HCC isoferritin (131I-isoFtAb), cisplatin, and mixed bacterial vaccine (MBV) yielded better inhibition rate as compared with double combination or 131I-isoFtAb alone. Based on these findings, 25 patients with surgically proven nonresectable and pathologically proven HCC have been treated by radioimmunotherapy using 131I-isoFtAb intrahepatic arterial infusion as a part of multimodality treatment. Of the 25 patients, seven (28.0%) received second-look resection after marked shrinkage of tumor. The 1-year survival was 52.5% (12/23) and 2-year survival 27.7% (five of 18) in the entire series. Of the five patients with 2-year survival, four were in the second-look resection group. Patients with tumor less than or equal to 8 cm showed higher second-look resection rate (62.5% versus 11.8%) and 1-year survival (85.7% versus 37.5%) as compared with tumor greater than 8 cm. Mixed bacterial vaccine as adjuvant immunotherapy seemed effective to prolong survival. The 2-year survival was higher in patients with second-look resection as compared with those without (75.0% versus 14.3%). Thus, radioimmunotherapy using 131I-isoFtAb might be one of the modalities of choice, particularly in the conversion of nonresectable to resectable HCC in a well-designed multimodality treatment regimen.

  20. Successful radioimmunotherapy of established syngeneic rat colon carcinoma with 211At-mAb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most carcinomas are prone to metastasize despite successful treatment of the primary tumor. One way to address this clinical challenge may be targeted therapy with α-emitting radionuclides such as astatine-211 (211At). Radioimmunotherapy utilizing α-particle emitting radionuclides is considered especially suitable for the treatment of small cell clusters and single cells, although lesions of different sizes may also be present in the patient. The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the toxicity and secondarily in vivo efficacy of a 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against colon carcinoma with tumor diameters of approximately 10 mm. Methods Eighteen rats with subperitoneal syngeneic colon carcinoma were allocated to three groups of six animals together with three healthy rats in each group. The groups were injected intravenously with either 150 μg of unlabeled mAbs (controls) or 2.5 or 5 MBq 211At-mAbs directed towards the Lewis Y antigen expressed on the cell membrane of several carcinomas. Tumor volume, body weight, and blood cell counts were monitored for 100 days after treatment. Results Local tumors were non-palpable in five out of six rats after treatment with both activities of 211At-mAbs, compared to one out of six in the control group. At the study end, half of the animals in each group given 211At-BR96 and one animal in the control group were free from disease. Radioimmunotherapy resulted in dose-dependent, transient weight loss and myelotoxicity. Survival was significantly better in the groups receiving targeted alpha therapy than in those receiving unlabeled mAbs. Conclusions This study demonstrates the possibility of treating small, solid colon carcinoma tumors with α-emitting radionuclides such as 211At bound to mAbs, with tolerable toxicity. PMID:23557183

  1. t(11;18)(q21;q21)-positive advanced-stage MALT lymphoma associated with monoclonal gammopathy: resistance to rituximab or rituximab-containing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hitoshi; Isoda, Kotaro

    2008-11-01

    Here we describe two cases of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma with monoclonal immunoglobulins (Igs). The first case was a 77-year-old man with primary lymphoma of the lung. Immunoelectrophoresis detected IgM-kappa in serum and kappa light chain excretion into urine. Three months after treatment with single-agent rituximab, a large amount of pleural fluid was found to have accumulated. The fluid contained CD5(-), CD10(-), CD19(+), CD38(+) and CD138(-/+) lymphoma cells with lymphoplasmacytoid appearance. Although a small fraction of the cells were CD20(+), the majority of the lymphoma cells were negative and expressed surface-membrane IgM-kappa at low levels. The cells possessed a karyotype of 46, XY, t(11;18)(q21;q21). The second case was a 55-year-old man who underwent total gastrectomy due to gastric perforation. Surgical specimens demonstrated the histopathological features of MALT lymphoma associated with plasma cell differentiation. The lymphoma cells had a 46, XY, t(11;18)(q21;q21) karyotype. Monoclonal Igs detected were serum IgA (M)-kappa and urinary kappa light chain. The patient was subsequently treated with six cycles of R-CVP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone) ; however, serum monoclonal Ig levels were not affected. The lymphoma cells in both cases may have contained two populations, a rituximab-sensitive CD20(+) population and a rituximab-resistant population that had differentiated into the Ig-secreting plasma cell stage. PMID:19039196

  2. A phase 2 study of Rituximab-Bendamustine and Rituximab-Cytarabine for transplant-eligible patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Armand, Philippe; Redd, Robert; Bsat, Jad; Mayuram, Sangeetha; Giardino, Angela; Fisher, David C; LaCasce, Ann S; Jacobson, Caron; Davids, Matthew S; Brown, Jennifer R; Weng, Li; Wilkins, Jennifer; Faham, Malek; Freedman, Arnold S; Joyce, Robin; Jacobsen, Eric D

    2016-04-01

    Chemoimmunotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a standard therapy for transplant-eligible patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). The achievement of complete remission (CR) and minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity are associated with better outcomes. We tested an induction regimen of rituximab/bendamustine followed by rituximab/high-dose cytarabine (RB/RC). This phase 2 study (NCT01661881) enrolled 23 transplant-eligible patients aged 42-69, of whom 70% were MCL international prognostic index low-risk. Patients received three cycles of RB followed by three cycles of RC. The primary endpoint of the trial was the rate of CR after six cycles of therapy, with a rate of 75% considered promising. 96% of patients achieved a CR/unconfirmed CR after treatment, meeting the primary objective. One patient progressed on study, one declined ASCT in CR, and the remaining 21 underwent successful stem cell collection and ASCT. After a median follow-up of 13 months, the progression-free survival rate was 96%. Among 15 MRD-evaluable patients who completed treatment, 93% achieved MRD negativity after RB/RC. In conclusion, RB/RC achieves very high CR and MRD negativity rates in transplant-eligible patients, with a favourable safety profile. RB/RC warrants further comparative studies, and may become a useful alternative to RCHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone)-based induction regimens in this patient population. PMID:26729345

  3. Preserved Activity of CD20-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T Cells in the Presence of Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Rufener, Gregory A; Press, Oliver W; Olsen, Philip; Lee, Sang Yun; Jensen, Michael C; Gopal, Ajay K; Pender, Barbara; Budde, Lihua E; Rossow, Jeffrey K; Green, Damian J; Maloney, David G; Riddell, Stanley R; Till, Brian G

    2016-06-01

    CD20 is an attractive immunotherapy target for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD20 is a promising strategy. A theoretical limitation is that residual serum rituximab might block CAR binding to CD20 and thereby impede T cell-mediated anti-lymphoma responses. The activity of CD20 CAR-modified T cells in the presence of various concentrations of rituximab was tested in vitro and in vivo CAR-binding sites on CD20(+) tumor cells were blocked by rituximab in a dose-dependent fashion, although at 37°C blockade was incomplete at concentrations up to 200 μg/mL. T cells with CD20 CARs also exhibited modest dose-dependent reductions in cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity, but not proliferation, against lymphoma cell lines. At rituximab concentrations of 100 μg/mL, CAR T cells retained ≥50% of baseline activity against targets with high CD20 expression, but were more strongly inhibited when target cells expressed low CD20. In a murine xenograft model using a rituximab-refractory lymphoma cell line, rituximab did not impair CAR T-cell activity, and tumors were eradicated in >85% of mice. Clinical residual rituximab serum concentrations were measured in 103 lymphoma patients after rituximab therapy, with the median level found to be only 38 μg/mL (interquartile range, 19-72 μg/mL). Thus, despite modest functional impairment in vitro, the in vivo activity of CD20-targeted CAR T cells remains intact at clinically relevant levels of rituximab, making use of these T cells clinically feasible. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 509-19. ©2016 AACRSee related Spotlight by Sadelain, p. 473. PMID:27197068

  4. Occurrence of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma 6 years after amelioration of primary cold agglutinin disease by rituximab therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Shinichiro; Sugita, Yasumasa; Sakai, Shio; Takeda, Yusuke; Abe, Daijiro; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Nakaseko, Chiaki

    2012-10-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a rare autoimmune hemolytic anemia, classified into primary and secondary types. Secondary CAD accompanies infection or malignant disease, most often lymphoma, whereas primary CAD frequently represents a lymphoproliferative bone marrow disorder characterized by clonal expansion of B cells. Here, I describe a case of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) developed 6 years after amelioration of primary CAD by rituximab monotherapy. A 54-year-old Japanese woman was diagnosed with primary CAD characterized by a small fraction of B lymphocytes and kappa laterality in the peripheral blood. M-protein was not detected by immuno-electrophoresis. The patient achieved remission following two courses of rituximab monotherapy. The level of IgM was specifically decreased, although levels of IgG and IgA were slightly increased. Six years after rituximab monotherapy, she developed LPL without CAD recurrence. Flow cytometry performed on bone marrow specimens revealed that lymphoma cells were positive for CD19 and CD20 with kappa laterality. The lymphoma may have transformed from clonal B lymphocytes at presentation of CAD. Rituximab monotherapy induced remission of CAD by specific decrease of IgM level, but did not eliminate the clonal B lymphocytes that may have progressed to LPL. This experience may provide clues toward the understanding of the pathophysiology of primary CAD with clonal lymphoproliferative disease of the bone marrow. PMID:22878940

  5. Use of rituximab as a treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus: retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Roberta Ismael Lacerda; Scheinberg, Morton Aaron; de Queiroz, Maria Yvone Carlos Formiga; de Brito, Danielle Christinne Soares Egypto; Guimarães, Maria Fernanda Brandao de Resende; Giovelli, Raquel Altoé; Freire, Eutilia Andrade Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report the experience in three Brazilian institutions with the use of rituximab in patients with different clinical forms of lupus erythematosus systemic in activity. Methods: The study consisted of a sample of 17 patients with LES, who were already being treated, but that at some stage of the disease showed refractory symptoms. The patients were subdivided into groups according to the clinical manifestation, and the responses for the use of rituximab were rated as complete, partial or no response. Data were collected through a spreadsheet, and used specific parameters for each group. The treatment was carried on by using therapeutic dose of 1g, and repeating the infusion within an interval of 15 days. Results: The clinical responses to rituximab of the group only hematological and of the group only osteoarticular were complete in all cases. In the renal group there was a clinical complete response, two partial and one absent. In the renal and hematological group complete response, there was one death and a missing response. The pulmonary group presented a complete response and two partial. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that rituximab can bring benefits to patients with lupus erythematosus systemic, with good tolerability and mild side effects; it presented, however, variable response according to the system affected. PMID:24728244

  6. High in Vitro Anti-Tumor Efficacy of Dimeric Rituximab/Saporin-S6 Immunotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea; Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 mAb Rituximab has revolutionized lymphoma therapy, in spite of a number of unresponsive or relapsing patients. Immunotoxins, consisting of toxins coupled to antibodies, are being investigated for their potential ability to augment Rituximab efficacy. Here, we compare the anti-tumor effect of high- and low-molecular-weight Rituximab/saporin-S6 immunotoxins, named HMW-IT and LMW-IT, respectively. Saporin-S6 is a potent and stable plant enzyme belonging to ribosome-inactivating proteins that causes protein synthesis arrest and consequent cell death. Saporin-S6 was conjugated to Rituximab through an artificial disulfide bond. The inhibitory activity of HMW-IT and LMW-IT was evaluated on cell-free protein synthesis and in two CD20+ lymphoma cell lines, Raji and D430B. Two different conjugates were separated on the basis of their molecular weight and further characterized. Both HMW-IT (dimeric) and LMW-IT (monomeric) maintained a high level of enzymatic activity in a cell-free system. HMW-IT, thanks to a higher toxin payload and more efficient antigen capping, showed stronger in vitro anti-tumor efficacy than LMW-IT against lymphoma cells. Dimeric HMW-IT can be used for lymphoma therapy at least for ex vivo treatments. The possibility of using HMW-IT augments the yield in immunotoxin preparation and allows the targeting of antigens with low internalization rates. PMID:27338475

  7. High in Vitro Anti-Tumor Efficacy of Dimeric Rituximab/Saporin-S6 Immunotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea; Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 mAb Rituximab has revolutionized lymphoma therapy, in spite of a number of unresponsive or relapsing patients. Immunotoxins, consisting of toxins coupled to antibodies, are being investigated for their potential ability to augment Rituximab efficacy. Here, we compare the anti-tumor effect of high- and low-molecular-weight Rituximab/saporin-S6 immunotoxins, named HMW-IT and LMW-IT, respectively. Saporin-S6 is a potent and stable plant enzyme belonging to ribosome-inactivating proteins that causes protein synthesis arrest and consequent cell death. Saporin-S6 was conjugated to Rituximab through an artificial disulfide bond. The inhibitory activity of HMW-IT and LMW-IT was evaluated on cell-free protein synthesis and in two CD20⁺ lymphoma cell lines, Raji and D430B. Two different conjugates were separated on the basis of their molecular weight and further characterized. Both HMW-IT (dimeric) and LMW-IT (monomeric) maintained a high level of enzymatic activity in a cell-free system. HMW-IT, thanks to a higher toxin payload and more efficient antigen capping, showed stronger in vitro anti-tumor efficacy than LMW-IT against lymphoma cells. Dimeric HMW-IT can be used for lymphoma therapy at least for ex vivo treatments. The possibility of using HMW-IT augments the yield in immunotoxin preparation and allows the targeting of antigens with low internalization rates. PMID:27338475

  8. Rituximab is an effective and safe treatment of relapse in elderly patients with resistant warm AIHA.

    PubMed

    Laribi, Kamel; Bolle, Delphine; Ghnaya, Habib; Sandu, Andrea; Besançon, Anne; Denizon, Nathalie; Truong, Catherine; Pineau-Vincent, Fabienne; de Materre, Alix Baugier

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of rituximab for the treatment of 23 elderly patients (median age 78 years) with warm autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA). The median follow-up was 31 months. Patients had received one to five previous treatments. Rituximab was administered by intravenous infusion at a dose of 375 mg/m(2) once weekly for 4 weeks. The OR rate was 86.9 % (CR = 39.1 %, PR = 47.8 %). Median OS was 87 months. The median OS of patients who reached CR could not be calculated, and that of patients with PR was 67 months. At last follow-up, eight of the 20 responding patients, including one patient in CR and seven in PR, had relapsed after a median of 6 months. Failure to achieve CR was a risk factor for relapse (p = 0.028). We did not identify any pretreatment characteristics predictive of response to rituximab. In conclusion, rituximab is an effective treatment for elderly patients with refractory warm AIHA. PMID:26858026

  9. Target-directed development and preclinical characterization of the proposed biosimilar rituximab GP2013

    PubMed Central

    Kronthaler, Ulrich; Koppenburg, Vera; Fink, Martin; Meyer, Ines; Papandrikopoulou, Anastassia; Hofmann, Matthias; Stangler, Thomas; Visser, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Biosimilar development involves a target-directed iterative process to ensure a similar product to the originator. Here we report the preclinical development of the proposed biosimilar rituximab (GP2013). Post-translational modifications and bioactivities of GP2013 versus originator rituximab were engineered and monitored to ensure similar pharmacological profiles. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was used to illustrate how different glycosylation patterns and structure–function relationships were controlled during process development. Pharmacological comparability between GP2013 and originator rituximab were confirmed in preclinical studies using clinical scale drug product. Similar in vitro ADCC potency was demonstrated when compared in a dose–response manner against two lymphoma cell lines using freshly purified human natural killer (NK) cells. In vivo efficacy was demonstrated in two well characterized mouse xenograft models, testing at sensitive sub-therapeutic dose levels. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (CD20 cell depletion) were likewise comparable in cynomolgus monkeys. This preclinical comparability exercise confirms that GP2013 and originator rituximab are pharmacologically similar. PMID:24024472

  10. Responsiveness to reduced dosage of rituximab in Chinese patients with neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Li; Li, Ting; Zhang, Da-Qi; Jin, Wei-Na; Li, Min-Shu; Su, Ning; Zhangning, Nannan; Liu, Qiang; Shao, Zong-Hong; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of a lower dose of rituximab in depleting B lymphocytes, maintaining low B-cell counts, and relapse in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorders. Methods: We treated 5 Chinese patients with deteriorating NMO and NMO spectrum disorders with a 100-mg IV infusion of rituximab once a week for 3 consecutive weeks, followed by additional infusion of the same dosage depending on circulating B-cell repopulation. Results: This reduced dosage of rituximab was sufficient to deplete B cells and maintain low B-cell counts. None of the treated patients experienced relapse, and all patients exhibited stabilized or improved neurologic function during the 1-year follow-up period. MRI revealed the absence of new lesions, no enhancement in spinal cord and brain, a significant shrinkage of spinal cord segments, and a reduction/disappearance of previous brain lesions. Conclusion: A lower dosage of rituximab may be sufficient in depleting B cells, maintaining low B-cell counts, and preventing disease progression in Chinese patients with NMO. PMID:23884041

  11. Treatment of recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: effect of rituximab.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Christine; Benchimol, Corinne; Hotchkiss, Hilary; Frank, Rachel; Infante, Lulette; Vento, Suzanne; Trachtman, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) after renal transplantation is a complication that often leads to graft loss. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of recurrent FSGS. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody to CD20, may be a useful treatment of this complication. Methods. We report four pediatric cases of recurrent FSGS treated with rituximab and plasmapheresis. Results. Four children (2M/2F), age 15.3 ± 2.6, with recurrent FSGS posttransplant were identified. Four doses of rituximab were administered 171 ± 180 days posttransplant and 114 ± 169 days after the start of plasmapheresis. Three children responded with complete remission, one of whom relapsed after four months. One child had a partial response with a decrease in proteinuria that was not sustained. No adverse side effects were reported during treatment or followup (mean 22.5 months). Conclusions. Rituximab is a safe and well-tolerated ancillary treatment for recurrent FSGS in pediatric patients in conjunction with plasmapheresis. PMID:21577271

  12. Treatment of Recurrent Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients: Effect of Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Sethna, Christine; Benchimol, Corinne; Hotchkiss, Hilary; Frank, Rachel; Infante, Lulette; Vento, Suzanne; Trachtman, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) after renal transplantation is a complication that often leads to graft loss. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of recurrent FSGS. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody to CD20, may be a useful treatment of this complication. Methods. We report four pediatric cases of recurrent FSGS treated with rituximab and plasmapheresis. Results. Four children (2M/2F), age 15.3 ± 2.6, with recurrent FSGS posttransplant were identified. Four doses of rituximab were administered 171 ± 180 days posttransplant and 114 ± 169 days after the start of plasmapheresis. Three children responded with complete remission, one of whom relapsed after four months. One child had a partial response with a decrease in proteinuria that was not sustained. No adverse side effects were reported during treatment or followup (mean 22.5 months). Conclusions. Rituximab is a safe and well-tolerated ancillary treatment for recurrent FSGS in pediatric patients in conjunction with plasmapheresis. PMID:21577271

  13. Treatment of myelitis in Behçet's disease with rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Maria Josè; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Scotti, Roberta; Martinelli, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that involves the parenchymal central nervous system (neuro-BD, NBD) approximately in 5–49% of patients, causing lesions rarely located in the spinal cord (SC). We report the first case of NBD-myelitis treated with intravenous rituximab. A 41-year-old man affected by BD presented with mild paraparesis with a miliary involvement and a ‘net-like’ gadolinium enhancement (Gde) of the SC. After a therapeutic attempt with pulsed cyclophosphamide and intravenous methylprednisolone, the clinical and neuroradiological course worsened. A progressive improvement was observed after rituximab administration associated with low doses of oral prednisone. No disease activity was detected and the patient reported no adverse event. After six rituximab cycles, cervical MRI was normal while thoracic MRI showed a slight T2–weighted hyperintensity of D4–D10 spinal tract without Gde. A combined use of rituximab and oral steroids resulted in a long-term suppression of NBD activity without any safety concern. PMID:24879733

  14. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  15. Preclinical safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution studies with Ad35K++ protein: a novel rituximab cotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Saydaminova, Kamola; Wang, Hongjie; Gough, Michael; Baldessari, Audrey; Cattaneo, Roberto; Lee, Frank; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Jang, Haishan; Astier, Anne; Gopal, Ajay; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a mouse/human chimeric monoclonal antibody targeted toward CD20. It is efficient as first-line therapy of CD20-positive B-cell malignancies. However, a large fraction of treated patients relapse with rituximab-resistant disease. So far, only modest progress has been made in treatment options for rituximab refractory patients. One of the mechanisms for rituximab resistance involves the upregulation of CD46, which is a key cell surface protein that blocks the activation of complement. We have recently developed a technology that depletes CD46 from the cell surface and thereby sensitizes tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. This technology is based on a small recombinant protein, Ad35K++ that binds with high affinity to CD46. In preliminary studies using a 6 × histidinyl tagged protein, we had demonstrated that intravenous Ad35K++ injection in combination with rituximab was safe and increased rituximab-mediated killing of CD20-positive target cells in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). The presence of the tag, while allowing for easy purification by Ni-NTA chromatography, has the potential to increase the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. For clinical application, we therefore developed an Ad35K++ protein without His-tag. In the present study, we performed preclinical studies in two animal species (mice and NHPs) with this protein demonstrating its safety and efficacy. These studies estimated the Ad35K++ dose range and treatment regimen to be used in patients. Furthermore, we showed that intravenous Ad35K++ injection triggers the shedding of the CD46 extracellular domain in xenograft mouse tumor models and in macaques. Shed serum CD46 can be measured in the serum and can potentially be used as a pharmacodynamic marker for monitoring Ad35K++ activity in patient undergoing treatment with this agent. These studies create the basis for an investigational new drug application for the use of Ad35K++ in combination with rituximab in the

  16. Rituximab in refractory myasthenia gravis: a prospective, open-label study with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dustin; Phan, Cecile; Johnston, Wendy S; Siddiqi, Zaeem A

    2016-07-01

    We examined the clinical effectiveness of rituximab in fourteen patients with refractory myasthenia gravis (MG). Manual muscle testing (MMT) score was recorded at baseline and followed during the course of the study. Steroid dose, frequency of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions, and plasma exchange (PLEX) were also monitored throughout the duration of the study. All patients responded dramatically to rituximab, as measured by a change in MMT score, prednisone dose, or the frequency of IVIG infusions or PLEX. Rituximab appears safe and effective for the treatment of refractory MG. It should be considered as a therapeutic option in refractory patients. PMID:27386504

  17. Placebo-controlled trial of rituximab in IgM anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Viala, Karine; Nicolas, Guillaume; Créange, Alain; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Pouget, Jean; Clavelou, Pierre; Vial, Christophe; Steck, Andreas; Musset, Lucile; Marin, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether rituximab 375 mg/m2 was efficacious in patients with immunoglobulin M (IgM) anti-myelin–associated glycoprotein antibody demyelinating neuropathy (IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy). Methods: Fifty-four patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The inclusion criteria were inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) sensory score (ISS) ≥4 and visual analog pain scale >4 or ataxia score ≥2. The primary outcome was mean change in ISS at 12 months. Results: Twenty-six patients were randomized to a group receiving 4 weekly infusions of 375 mg/m2 rituximab, and 28 patients to placebo. Intention-to-treat analysis, with imputation of missing ISS values by the last observation carried forward method, showed a lack of mean change in ISS at 12 months, 1.0 ± 2.7 in the rituximab group, and 1.0 ± 2.8 in the placebo group. However, changes were observed, in per protocol analysis at 12 months, for the number of patients with an improvement of at least 2 points in the INCAT disability scale (p = 0.027), the self-evaluation scale (p = 0.016), and 2 subscores of the Short Form–36 questionnaire. Conclusions: Although primary outcome measures provide no evidence to support the use of rituximab in IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, there were improvements in several secondary outcomes in per protocol analysis. Level of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that rituximab is ineffective in improving ISS in patients with IgM anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy. PMID:23667063

  18. Rapid depletion of B lymphocytes by ultra-low-dose rituximab delivered intrathecally

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Joakim; Dring, Ann; Vågberg, Mattias; Birgander, Richard; Lindqvist, Thomas; Gilthorpe, Jonathan; Bergenheim, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We are conducting an open-label phase 1b study on the efficacy of intrathecal (IT) administration of rituximab, provided via an Ommaya reservoir, for the treatment of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). The objective of this initial study was to monitor B lymphocytes in peripheral blood (PB) and CSF from the first 10 patients 1 year posttreatment. Methods: Dose titration was performed with daily escalation from 1 mg to 25 mg IT rituximab (n = 3). Lymphocyte subpopulations were monitored daily during dose escalation in PB by flow cytometry and subsequently every 3 months for 1 year, after a total dose of 3 × 25 mg. PB B-lymphocyte subpopulations for the remaining patients (n = 7) were monitored at regular intervals. CSF lymphocyte subpopulations for all patients were monitored by flow cytometry every 2–3 months. Results: The PB B-lymphocyte count dropped rapidly after the first 2 injections (total dose of 3.5 mg IT rituximab) to undetectable levels. Three 25-mg doses given once per week depleted peripheral B lymphocytes entirely for the following 3–6 month period. Conclusions: Monoclonal antibodies seem to rapidly redistribute to the peripheral compartment following IT injection. Ultra-low doses of rituximab given IT are sufficient to cause complete depletion of peripheral B lymphocytes, indicating that low-dose IT treatment has the potential to be effective in both the CNS and systemic compartments. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with PMS, rituximab provided via an Ommaya reservoir depletes peripheral blood B lymphocytes. PMID:25745637

  19. Fractionated Radioimmunotherapy With 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan and Low-Dose Gemcitabine Is Active in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ocean, Allyson J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Guarino, Michael J.; Sheikh, Arif; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Serafini, Aldo N.; Lee, Daniel; Sung, Max W.; Gulec, Seza A.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Manzone, Timothy; Holt, Michael; O’Neil, Bert H.; Hall, Nathan; Montero, Alberto J.; Kauh, John; Gold, David V.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been demonstrated that the humanized clivatuzumab tetraxetan (hPAM4) antibody targets pancreatic ductal carcinoma selectively. After a trial of radioimmunotherapy that determined the maximum tolerated dose of single-dose yttrium-90-labeled hPAM4 (90Y-hPAM4) and produced objective responses in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal carcinoma, the authors studied fractionated radioimmunotherapy combined with low-dose gemcitabine in this disease. METHODS Thirty-eight previously untreated patients (33 patients with stage IV disease and 5 patients with stage III disease) received gemcitabine 200 mg/m2 weekly for 4 weeks with 90Y-hPAM4 given weekly in Weeks 2, 3, and 4 (cycle 1), and the same cycle was repeated in 13 patients (cycles 2–4). In the first part of the study, 19 patients received escalating weekly 90Y doses of 6.5 mCi/m2, 9.0 mCi/m2, 12.0 mCi/m2, and 15.0 mCi/m2. In the second portion, 19 additional patients received weekly doses of 9.0 mCi/m2 or 12.0 mCi/m2. RESULTS Grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia or neutropenia (according to version 3.0 of the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) developed in 28 of 38 patients after cycle 1 and in all retreated patients; no grade >3 nonhematologic toxicities occurred. Fractionated dosing of cycle 1 allowed almost twice the radiation dose compared with single-dose radioimmunotherapy. The maximum tolerated dose of 90Y-hPAM4 was 12.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for cycle 1, with ≤9.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for subsequent cycles, and that dose will be used in future trials. Six patients (16%) had partial responses according to computed tomography-based Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and 16 patients (42%) had stabilization as their best response (58% disease control). The median overall survival was 7.7 months for all 38 patients, including 11.8 months for those who received repeated cycles (46% [6 of 13 patients] ≥1 year), with improved efficacy at

  20. Barriers to the Access and Use of Rituximab in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Physician Survey.

    PubMed

    Baer Ii, William H; Maini, Archana; Jacobs, Ira

    2014-01-01

    Biologics such as rituximab are an important component of oncology treatment strategies, although access to such therapies is challenging in countries with limited resources. This study examined access to rituximab and identified potential barriers to its use in the United States, Mexico, Turkey, Russia, and Brazil. The study also examined whether availability of a biosimilar to rituximab would improve access to, and use of, rituximab. Overall, 450 hematologists and oncologists completed a survey examining their use of rituximab in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Less than 40% of physicians considered rituximab as easy to access from a cost perspective. Furthermore, many physicians chose not to treat, were unable to treat, or had to modify treatment with rituximab despite guidelines recommending its use in NHL and CLL patients. Insurance coverage, reimbursement, and cost to patient were commonly reported as barriers to the use of rituximab. Across all markets, over half of physicians reported that they would increase use of rituximab if a biosimilar was available. We conclude that rituximab use would increase across all therapy types and markets if a biosimilar was available, although a biosimilar would have the greatest impact in Brazil, Mexico, and Russia. PMID:24810947

  1. Safety and efficacy of rituximab treatment for vasculitis in hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Systemic B-cell depletion and clinical remission of the systemic effects of cryoglobulins have already been achieved using rituximab in hepatitis C virus-positive immunocompetent patients. Conversely, to the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature regarding the use of rituximab in hepatitis B virus-associated cryoglobulinemia. Case presentation We report here the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia with severe multisystem disease, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with acute renal failure. The vasculitis was refractory to conventional and antiviral therapy but rituximab use led to a fall in cryoglobulin levels and disease control. The B-cell depletion was safe and efficient to induce a complete remission of the disease. Conclusion Our case highlights the benefit and the efficacy of rituximab in association with antiviral therapy in small vessel vasculitis related to hepatitis B virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia. PMID:22284897

  2. Vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy with the alpha-particle emitter 211At.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Mirzadeh, S; Eckelman, W C; Waldmann, T A; Garmestani, K; Yordanov, A T; Stabin, M G; Brechbiel, M W

    2002-06-01

    Astatine-211, an alpha-particle emitter, was employed in a model system for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy of small tumors in mouse lung to compare its performance relative to other radioisotopes in the same system. Astatine-211 was coupled to the lung blood vessel-targeting monoclonal antibody 201B with N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl) succinamate linker. Biodistribution data showed that the conjugate delivered 211At to the lung (260-418% ID/g), where it remained with a biological half-time of about 30 h. BALB/c mice bearing about 100 lung tumor colonies of EMT-6 cells, each about 2000 cells in size, were treated with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B. The administered activity of 185 kBq per animal extended the life span of treated mice over untreated controls. Injections of 370 kBq, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 25-40 Gy, were necessary to eradicate all of the lung tumors. Mice receiving 740 kBq of 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B developed pulmonary fibrosis 3-4 months after treatment, as did mice treated with 3700 kBq of the alpha-particle emitter 213Bi-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B in previous work. Animals that were injected with 211At bound to untargeted IgG or to glycine, as control agents, also demonstrated therapeutic effects relative to untreated controls. Control groups that received untargeted 211At required about twice as much administered activity for effective therapy as did groups with lung-targeted radioisotope. These results were not consistent with radioisotope biodistribution and dosimetry calculations that indicated that lung-targeted 211At should be at least 10-fold more efficient for lung colony therapy than 211At bound to nontargeting controls. The data showed that 211At is useful for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy because lung tumor colonies were eradicated in the mice. Work in this model system demonstrates that vascular targeting of alpha-particle emitters is an efficient therapy for small

  3. Effect of different cell cluster models on the radiobiological output for (211)At-radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Xu, Yuanying

    2011-02-01

    The cell cluster modeling is a widely used method to estimate the small-scale dosimetry and provides the implication for a clinic. This work evaluated the effect of different regular cluster models on the radiobiological outputs for (211)At-radioimmunotherapy. The cell activity threshold was estimated using a tumor control probability of 0.90. Basically, regular models show similar features with cluster configuration and cell dimension variation. However, their individual results such as the cumulated activity threshold per cell and the prescription dose per volume should not be substituted reciprocally. The tissue composed of smaller cells or midcell packing will need a little more high prescription dose per volume. The radiation sensitivity parameters in a linear-quadratic model are critical to decide the radiobiological response with dose. The cumulated cell activity threshold increases exponentially with α decreasing, and its influence on the big cell dimension is more than on the small one. The different subsources affect radioresistant organs or tissues more remarkably than radiosensitive ones, especially the cells with large cytoplasm. The heterogeneous activity of Gaussian distribution will decrease the therapeutical effectiveness for the nucleus source, but its influence on the cytoplasm and cell surface sources is a little uncertain, as their real mean value is always higher than its set mean value by assuming the cell activity uptakes from zero. Careful usage of underdose with heterogeneous activity distribution should be practiced in clinics. The deteriorated heterogeneous distribution will salvage the potential subversive and lead to the failure of tumor local control. Some cells with no or little activity that are located on the edge or vertex of cube or corner models will have the ability to survive, as there is a lack of a part of the cross-fire dose effect, and so more attention should be paid in selecting the dosage. Although this work focuses on

  4. Rituximab and abatacept but not tocilizumab impair antibody response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of newer biologic treatments including rituximab, abatacept and tocilizumab on antibody response following pneumococcal vaccination using a 7-valent conjugate vaccine in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Patients with RA receiving rituximab, abatacept or tocilizumab as monotherapy or combined with methotrexate (MTX) participated in the study. Specific IgG antibodies against 23F and 6B serotypes were measured at vaccination and 4 to 6 weeks after vaccination using standardised ELISA. Geometric mean antibody levels (GML) were calculated. Antibody response (AR) was defined as the ratio between post- and pre-vaccination antibody levels and a positive antibody response (posAR) was AR ≥2. Results In total, 88 patients were enrolled in the study. Of 55 patients treated with rituximab, 26 (46%) were on concomitant MTX. Of patients receiving abatacept (n = 17) and tocilizumab (n = 16) biologic treatment was given in combination with MTX in 13 (76%) and 9 (56%) patients, respectively. Patients treated with rituximab had significantly lower AR compared to those on tocilizumab, as well as compared to previously reported RA patients on MTX and controls (spondylarthropathy patients treated with NSAIDs and/or analgesics). In total, 10.3% of patients on rituximab monotherapy and no patient on rituximab + MTX had posAR for both serotypes. For abatacept and tocilizumab the corresponding figures were 17.6% and 50%. Conclusion In this cohort of patients with established RA, treatment with rituximab and abatacept was associated with diminished antibody response but this was most pronounced for rituximab. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine administrated during ongoing tocilizumab treatment seems to be associated with sufficient antibody response. Pneumococcal vaccination should preferably be encouraged before initiation of rituximab or abatacept treatment. Trial registration NCT

  5. Rituximab off label use for difficult-to-treat auto-immune diseases: reappraisal of benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Sailler, Laurent

    2008-02-01

    Rituximab is increasingly used off label for difficult-to-treat auto-immune diseases. We reviewed the main case series or clinical studies to identify the best indications of rituximab and the situations at substantial risks for adverse events. Refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura was the main indication. However, the long term benefit-to-risk ratio of rituximab treatment before or after splenectomy is unknown. A single 375 mg/m2 infusion may be as efficacious as the classical four infusions cycle. Rituximab is the best treatment for cold agglutinin disease. In warm agglutinin auto-immune anaemia, its efficacy has essentially been reported in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and in children. In CLL patients, lethal adverse events occurred in patients also receiving cyclophosphamide. Rituximab seems to have an interesting benefit-to-risk ratio in Wegener granulomatosis (excepted in granulomatous lesions), HCV-associated symptomatic cryoglobulinemia in patients unresponsive to anti-viral therapy, pemphigus and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Efficacy and safety data in lupus are difficult to interpret. Serum sickness disease is not exceptional in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), lupus and sicca syndrome patients. A substantial infectious risk has been reported in pemphigus patients and in post-renal transplant cryoglobulinemia. Double-blind randomised controlled trials and phase IV studies are mandatory in most clinical settings to confirm the overall favourable perception of rituximab benefit to risk ratio. PMID:18270863

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Rituximab Following Failure of Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C-Associated Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sneller, Michael C.; Hu, Zonghui; Langford, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To report on the results of a randomized controlled trial of rituximab in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated mixed cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. METHODS We conducted an open-label single center randomized controlled trial of rituximab (375 mg/m2 per week for 4 weeks) compared to best available therapy for treatment of patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in whom antiviral therapy failed to induce remission. The primary endpoint was remission at 6 months from study entry. RESULTS A total of 24 patients were enrolled. Baseline disease activity and organ involvement were similar in the two groups. Ten patients in the rituximab group (83%) were in remission at study month 6, compared with 1 patient in the control group (8%), a result that met criterion for stopping the study (P<0.001). The median duration of remission for rituximab-treated patients reaching the primary endpoint was 7 months. No adverse effect of rituximab on HCV plasma viremia or hepatic transaminase levels was observed. CONCLUSIONS Therapy with rituximab was well tolerated and effective treatment for patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in whom antiviral therapy fails to induce remission. PMID:22147444

  7. Analysis of the effectiveness and safety of rituximab in patients with refractory lupus nephritis: a chart review.

    PubMed

    Contis, Anne; Vanquaethem, Helene; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Couzi, Lionel; Rigothier, Claire; Richez, Christophe; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Lupus nephritis is a life-threatening complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The standard treatment for this condition, including corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, results in a 70 % remission rate at 12 months, but it is also associated with significant morbidity. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody, could be useful, given the central role of B cells in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Case reports and retrospective series have reported that rituximab is effective for refractory lupus nephritis. However, the double-blind, placebo-controlled LUNAR trial failed to meet its end point. We studied clinical, biological, and immunological data on 17 patients who received rituximab as an induction treatment for refractory lupus nephritis at the University Hospital Center of Bordeaux. A complete treatment response was defined as a normal serum creatinine with inactive urinary sediment and 24-h urinary albumin <0.5 g and a partial response (PR) as a >50 % improvement in all of the renal parameters that were abnormal at baseline, with no deterioration in any parameter. Seventeen patients received rituximab as induction treatment for lupus nephritis refractory to standard treatment by cyclophosphamide. After a follow-up of 12 months, complete or partial renal remission was achieved in 53 % patients. Rituximab therapy resulted in a significant improvement in proteinuria and steroid dose tapering in all patients. Rituximab should be considered as a treatment option for refractory lupus glomerulonephritis. PMID:26762196

  8. Imaging and measuring the rituximab-induced changes of mechanical properties in B-lymphoma cells using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Tabata, Osamu; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Single B-lymphoma living cells were imaged by AFM with the assistance of microfabricated pillars. {yields} The apoptosis of B-lymphoma cells triggered by rituximab without cross-linking was observed by AO/EB double fluorescent staining. {yields} The B-lymphoma cells became dramatically softer after adding rituximab. -- Abstract: The topography and mechanical properties of single B-lymphoma cells have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). With the assistance of microfabricated patterned pillars, the surface topography and ultrastructure of single living B-lymphoma cell were visualized by AFM. The apoptosis of B-lymphoma cells induced by rituximab alone was observed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) double fluorescent staining. The rituximab-induced changes of mechanical properties in B-lymphoma cells were measured dynamically and the results showed that B-lymphoma cells became dramatically softer after incubation with rituximab. These results can improve our understanding of rituximab'effect and will facilitate the further investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Efficacy and safety of different doses and retreatment of rituximab: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial in patients who are biological naïve with active rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to methotrexate (Study Evaluating Rituximab's Efficacy in MTX iNadequate rEsponders (SERENE))

    PubMed Central

    Emery, P; Deodhar, A; Rigby, W F; Isaacs, J D; Combe, B; Racewicz, A J; Latinis, K; Abud-Mendoza, C; Szczepański, L J; Roschmann, R A; Chen, A; Armstrong, G K; Douglass, W; Tyrrell, H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This phase III study evaluated the efficacy and safety of rituximab plus methotrexate (MTX) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had an inadequate response to MTX and who were naïve to prior biological treatment. Methods Patients with active disease on stable MTX (10–25 mg/week) were randomised to rituximab 2×500 mg (n=168), rituximab 2×1000 mg (n=172), or placebo (n=172). From week 24, patients not in remission (Disease Activity Score (28 joints) ≥2.6) received a second course of rituximab; patients initially assigned to placebo switched to rituximab 2×500 mg. The primary end point was American College of Rheumatology 20 (ACR20) response at week 24. All patients were followed until week 48. Results At week 24, both doses of rituximab showed statistically superior efficacy (p<0.0001) to placebo (ACR20: 54%, 51% and 23%; rituximab (2×500 mg) + MTX, rituximab (2×1000 mg) + MTX and placebo + MTX, respectively). Secondary end points were also significantly improved for both rituximab groups compared with placebo. Further improvements in both rituximab arms were observed from week 24 to week 48. Rituximab + MTX was well tolerated, demonstrating comparable safety to placebo + MTX through to week 24, and between rituximab doses through to week 48. Conclusions Rituximab (at 2×500 mg and 2×1000 mg) plus MTX significantly improved clinical outcomes at week 24, which were further improved by week 48. No significant differences in either clinical or safety outcomes were apparent between the rituximab doses. PMID:20488885

  10. Radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinical development of the Zevalin regimen.

    PubMed

    Theuer, Charles P; Leigh, Bryan R; Multani, Pratik S; Allen, Roberta S; Liang, Bertrand C

    2004-01-01

    Zevalin (ibritumomab tiuxetan; IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corporation, San Diego, CA, USA) was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration on February 19, 2002, following 9 years of clinical development. Six clinical studies supported the Zevalin Biologics License Application. The Zevalin regimen is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or transformed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and for those with follicular NHL refractory to Rituxan (rituximab, MabThera; IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corporation, San Diego, CA and Genentech, South San Francisco, CA). In the year following FDA approval, approximately 1300 patients were treated in clinical trials or with the commercially available product. PMID:15504711

  11. Development of dosimetric approaches to treatment planning for radioimmunotherapy. Annual report 1989--1990

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1990-12-31

    The objective of quantitative imaging is to provide pharmacokinetic information for patients that is analogous to that provided by biodistribution studies in mice. Radionuclide images depict the distribution of labeled antibodies in-vivo; thus the amount of radionuclide in a specific organ or site can be estimated by relating the counts detected in a defined region of interest to the total radionuclide content. This pharmacokinetic information can be used to obtain definitive and relevant answers to basic questions of importance for optimizing radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy and, in addition, can provide a data base from which to calculate the distribution of radiation absorbed doses. The research employs quantitative imaging in evaluating therapies. Quantitative imaging is performed by a certified nuclear medicine technician using the Siemens gamma camera interfaced with the microVAX II. The technician processes the imaging data and obtains pharmacokinetic information from it using programs developed by the authors and others. A large amount of data has been acquired and analyzed on the pharmacokinetics, dosimetry and toxicity of radiolabeled monoclonal therapy. Important dosimetry data on the whole body, marrow and tumor doses are available and all studies are archived so that they can be retrospectively analyzed. Although the radiation absorbed doses delivered to tumor sites were modest, significant biological responses were found.

  12. Macrodosimetry and microdosimetry in radioimmunotherapy. Final report, July 15, 1989 -- July 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes research in beta-particle dosimetry, quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the clinical implementation of these two areas of research in radioimmunotherapy (RIT), and postgraduate training provided since the inception of this grant on July 15, 1989. To improve beta-particle dosimetry, a point source function was developed that is valid for a wide range of beta emitters. Analytical solutions for beta-particle dose rates within out outside slabs of finite thickness were validated in experimental tumors and are now being used in clinical RIT. Quantitative SPECT based on the circular harmonic transform (CHT) algorithm was validated in phantom, experimental, and clinical studies. This has led to improved macrodosimetry in clinical RIT. In dosimetry at the multi-cellular level studies were made of the HepG2 human hepatoblastoma grown subcutaneously in nude mice. Histologic sections and autoradiographs were prepared to quantitate activity distributions of radiolabeled antibodies. Absorbed-dose calculations are being carried out for {sup 131}I and {sup 90}Y beta particles for these antibody distributions.

  13. Synthesis of a new bifunctional chelating agent for radioimmunotherapy: Cyclohexyl fused tetraazacyclodo-decanetetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, M.P.; Mease, R.C.; Lambert, C.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    Preorganization of the coordinating groups within a chelating agent increases the stability of its metal-ligand complexes. For example, 1,2-diaminocyclo-hexanetetraacetic acid (CDTA) forms metal complexes with stability constants 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding complexes of EDTA. Incorporation of a cyclohexyl group into a macrocyclic ligand produces a similar effect; stability constants of Cu complexes of tetrathiocyclotetradecanes are increased by 1.5 orders of magnitude by incorporating one cyclohexyl group into the macrocyclic ring and 3 orders of magnitude by incorporating two cyclohexyl moieties. In this study, we have synthesized cycohexyl DOTA (C-DOTA) in which the cyclohexyl group is fused to two carbons of the macrocyclic ring. Alkylation of disodium ethylene ditosylamide with trans-1,2-di(bromoacetamido)cyclohexane afforded the C{sub 8}N{sub 4} macrocycle. Reduction with lithium aluminum hydride not only reduced the amide moieties to amines but also removed the tosyl protecting groups affording the cyclohexylcyclen. Cyanomethylation followed by hydrolysis gave C-DOTA in an overall yield of 9.4%. C-DOTA is expected to offer improvements in the biodistribution of radiometal immunoconjugates for radioimmunotherapy, in particular with Sc-47, Y-90, and Sm-153 that have given encouraging results using the plain DOTA ligand.

  14. Direct dose confirmation of quantitative autoradiography with micro-TLD measurements for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, M.H.; Yorke, E.D.; Wessels, B.W.; DeNardo, G.L.; Neacy, W.P.

    1988-11-01

    Autoradiography has shown marked heterogeneous distribution of radioactivity in all ten radiolabeled monoclonal antibody/tumor combinations evaluated by our laboratories for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in mice. Quantitative autoradiography was performed on two of these combinations (131I-B72.3/colorectal carcinoma and 131I-LYM-1/Raji B-cell lymphoma) to obtain a correlation of film density with radiolabeled antibody distribution. Through the use of sectioned mini-thermoluminescent dosimeter(s) (TLD) or micro-TLD, isodose curves were generated from the film gradient density lines. A computer program was written to compare theoretical absorbed dose calculations to measured micro-TLD values. First-order agreement was reached for both antibody/tumor systems: (a) B72.3/colorectal system--810 cGy measured/824 cGy calculated per 200 microCi injected and (b) LYM-1/lymphoma system--1,740 cGy measured/1,580 cGy calculated per 656 microCi injected (1 cGy = 1 rad). Additionally, the measured absorbed dose heterogeneity over a 500-micron length of up to 400% which suggests that the use of quantitative autoradiography is necessary in order to correctly determine the underlying radiobiological effects of RIT. Theoretical computer modeling based on similar autoradiographic activity distributions has also provided a convenient means of assessing absorbed dose variation patterns from other radiolabels such as 90Y.

  15. Evaluation of effects on the peritoneum after intraperitoneal α-radioimmunotherapy with (211)At.

    PubMed

    Cederkrantz, Elin; Angenete, Eva; Bäck, Tom; Falk, Peter; Haraldsson, Börje; Ivarsson, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Holger; Lindegren, Sture; Hultborn, Ragnar; Jacobsson, Lars

    2012-08-01

    The introduction of the short-lived α-emitter (211)At to intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy has raised the issue of the tolerance dose of the peritoneum. The short range of the α-particles (70 μm) and the short half-life (7.21 h) of the nuclide yield a dose distribution in which the peritoneum is highly irradiated compared with other normal tissues. To address this issue, mice were injected with (211)At-trastuzumab to irradiate the peritoneum to absorbed doses ranging between 0 and 50 Gy and followed for up to 34 weeks. The peritoneum-to-plasma clearance of a small tracer, (51)Cr-ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, was measured for evaluation of the small solute transport capacity of the peritoneal membrane. The macroscopic status of the peritoneum and the mesenteric windows was documented when the mice were sacrificed. Biopsies of the peritoneum were taken for morphology and immunohistochemical staining against plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and calprotectin. Peritoneum-to-plasma clearance measurements indicated a dose-dependent decrease in peritoneal transport capacity in irradiated mice. However, macroscopic and microscopic evaluations of the peritoneal membrane showed no difference between irradiated mice versus controls. The results imply that the peritoneal membrane tolerates absorbed doses as high as 30-50 Gy from α-particle irradiation with limited response. PMID:22690847

  16. Development of dosimetric approaches to treatment planning for radioimmunotherapy. DOE annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The objective of quantitative imaging is to Provide pharmacokinetic information for patients that is analogous to that provided by biodistribution studies in mice. Radio nuclide images depict the distribution of labeled antibodies in-vivo; thus the amount of radio nuclide in a specific organ or site can be estimated by relating the counts detected in a defined region of interest to the total radio nuclide content. This pharmacokinetic information can be used to obtain definitive and relevant answers to basic questions of importance for optimizing radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy and, in addition, can provide a data base from which to calculate the distribution of radiation absorbed doses. The projects supported by this program routinely employ quantitative imaging in evaluating therapies. Quantitative imaging is performed by a certified nuclear medicine technician using the Siemens gamma camera interfaced with the microVAX II. The technician processes the imaging data and obtains pharmacokinetic information from it using programs developed by us and others. During this grant period project staff have acquired and analyzed a large amount of data on the pharmacokinetics, dosimetry and toxicity of radiolabeled monoclonal therapy. Important dosimetry data on the whole body, marrow and tumor doses are available and all studies are archived so that they can be retrospectively analyzed.

  17. Apoferritin-Templated Yttrium Phosphate Nanoparticle Conjugates for Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zheming; Fisher, Darrell R.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-05-01

    We report a templated-synthetic approach based on apoferritin to prepare radionuclide nanoparticle (NP) conjugates. Non-radioactive yttrium (89Y) was used as model target and surrogate for radioyttrium (90Y) to prepare the nanoparticle conjugate. The center cavity and multiple channel structure of apoferritin offer a fast and facile method to precipitate yttrium phosphate by diffusing yttrium and phosphate ions into the cavity of apofrritin, resulting a core-shell nanocomposite. The yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle was functionalized with biotin for further application. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the resulting nanoparticles were uniform in size, with a diameter of around 8 nm. We tested the pre-targeting capability of the biotin-modified yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle (yttrium phosphate/apoferritin nanoparticle) conjugate with streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and with aid of biotin-modified fluorecein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This work shows that an yttrium phosphate NP conjugate provides a fast, simple and efficient method to prepare radioactive yttrium conjugate for applications in radioimmunotherapy of cancer.

  18. AFM analysis of the multiple types of molecular interactions involved in rituximab lymphoma therapy on patient tumor cells and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2014-08-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody drug approved for the treatment of patients with lymphomas. Rituximab's main killing mechanism is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). During ADCC, rituximab's fragment antigen binding (Fab) region binds to the CD20 antigen on the tumor cell and its fragment crystallizable (Fc) region binds to the Fc receptor (FcR) on the natural killer (NK) cells. In this study, two types of molecular interactions (CD20-rituximab, FcR-rituximab) involved in ADCC were measured simultaneously on cells prepared from biopsy specimens of lymphoma patients by utilizing atomic force microscopy (AFM) with functionalized tips carrying rituximab. NK cells were detected by specific NKp46 fluorescent labeling and tumor cells were detected by specific ROR1 fluorescent labeling. Based on the fluorescence recognition, the binding affinity and distribution of FcRs on NK cells, and CD20 on tumor cells, were quantitatively measured and mapped. The binding affinity and distribution of FcRs (on NK cells) and CD20 (on tumor cells) were associated with rituximab clinical efficacy. The experimental results provide a new approach to simultaneously quantify the multiple types of molecular interactions involved in rituximab ADCC mechanism on patient biopsy cells, which is of potential clinical significance to predict rituximab efficacy for personalized medicine. PMID:25117605

  19. Favorable outcome of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor use in neuromyelitis optica patients presenting with agranulocytosis in the setting of rituximab.

    PubMed

    Mealy, Maureen A; Levy, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe autoimmune condition affecting the central nervous system characterized by a relapsing disease course. Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the protein CD20, and is one of the most utilized medications for management of this disease. A known complication of rituximab use is neutropenia. We report on two patients who developed symptomatic early-onset rituximab-induced agranulocytosis who safely received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Neutrophil counts recovered quickly and both patients continue to receive rituximab without further incident. PMID:26439958

  20. Ofatumumab is active in patients with fludarabine-refractory CLL irrespective of prior rituximab: results from the phase 2 international study

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Swaminathan; Chan, Geoffrey W.; Gupta, Ira V.; Lisby, Steen; Österborg, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Ofatumumab, the human CD20 monoclonal antibody that binds a distinct epitope from rituximab, has demonstrated clinical benefit as monotherapy for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia refractory to fludarabine and alemtuzumab (FA-ref) and patients refractory to fludarabine with bulky (> 5 cm) lymph nodes (BF-ref). To potentially gain insight into outcomes in patients previously treated with or refractory to rituximab, we performed an ad hoc retrospective analysis in the final 96 FA-ref and 111 BF-ref patients. There were 117 patients previously treated with rituximab (98 rituximab-refractory); 89 patients were rituximab-naive. For rituximab-treated, rituximab-refractory, and rituximab-naive patients, overall response rate was 43%, 44%, and 53%; median progression-free survival was 5.3, 5.5, and 5.6 months; and median overall survival was 15.5, 15.5, and 20.2 months. There were no significant differences in ofatumumab-related infusion reactions, or hematologic or infectious adverse events between subgroups. In summary, ofatumumab monotherapy was effective and well tolerated in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia, including in patients with previous rituximab exposure. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00349349. PMID:21856867

  1. Primary renal lymphoma: long-term results of two patients treated with a chemotherapy + rituximab protocol.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Alonso, F; Puche-Sanz, I; Sánchez-Ramos, C; Flores-Martín, J; Vicente-Prados, J; Cózar-Olmo, J M

    2012-01-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare disease of which the etiology and pathogenesis remain controversial, and there is currently no standard treatment for it. We present the results of a long-term followup of two patients who were diagnosed with PRL and treated with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone and rituximab (CHOP + R) regimen. Both patients reached a complete response, and there is no evidence of recurrence after 4.5- and 5-year followup periods. Based on our experience and other recently published studies, we recommend the combination of CHOP + rituximab as the elective treatment for this disease. To our knowledge, this is the longest followup period with a complete response that has been reported with this modality of treatment. PMID:22997596

  2. False Positive B-Cells Crossmatch after Prior Rituximab Exposure of the Kidney Donor

    PubMed Central

    Desoutter, Judith; Apithy, Marie-Joëlle; Bartczak, Ségolène; Guillaume, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Crossmatching is essential prior to kidney transplantation to confirm compatibility between the donor and the recipient, particularly to prevent acute antibody-mediated rejection. An unexpected positive crossmatch may be obtained in recipients with an autoimmune disease or preexisting antibodies not detected by single-antigen bead array due to complement interference or who have been previously treated by desensitization protocols such as rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, or intravenous immunoglobulins. We report donor and recipient investigations that revealed unexpected positive B-cells crossmatch, probably due to donor cells, as the donor had received rituximab therapy shortly before organ harvesting, in a context of severe idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. We consequently detected unexpected Class II IgG complement-dependent cytotoxicity for all sera tested. Other laboratory investigations failed to elucidate the reasons for this recipient-related positivity.

  3. B-cell targeted therapy with rituximab for thyroid eye disease: closer to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sunny; Chan, Anita; Sfikakis, Petros P; Hsiu Ling, Andrea Low; Detorakis, Efstathios T; Boboridis, Kostas G; Mavrikakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    The management of thyroid eye disease (TED) remains a therapeutic challenge. The current established therapies are unsatisfactory in one-third of the patients and have many limitations. Rituximab (RTX) is a CD20+ B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and rheumatoid arthritis. The early experience with RTX suggests that it is a promising alternative therapy for TED. Rituximab may compare favorably to the conventional glucocorticoid therapy and causes less collateral damage than retrobulbar orbital radiation and decompression surgery. In addition, the preliminary studies on RTX's proposed mechanism of action have revealed new insights into the pathogenic role of B-cells in TED. We summarize the current literature on the clinical application of RTX in TED and discuss its putative mechanisms of action. PMID:23253433

  4. Leuconostoc sp. Meningitis in a Patient Treated with Rituximab for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Holik, Hrvoje; Coha, Božena; Šiško, Marijan; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja

    2015-01-01

    We present a 64-year-old man who was treated with R-CHOP (rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) chemoimmunotherapy for mantle cell lymphoma and developed purulent meningitis, probably caused by Leuconostoc sp. The patient had severe hypogammaglobulinemia, which is a possible complication of rituximab therapy. To our knowledge and after reviewing the available medical literature, this is the first described case of purulent meningitis caused by Leuconostoc sp. in a patient with mantle cell lymphoma that appeared after treatment with the R-CHOP protocol. The diagnosis of purulent meningitis was based on clinical, laboratory and cytological cerebrospinal fluid findings, in addition to blood culture results in which we isolated Leuconostoc sp. The patient was treated with meropenem with full recovery. PMID:26376594

  5. Rituximab-induced neutropenia in a patient with inflammatory myopathy and systemic sclerosis overlap disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark; Oddis, Chester; Herrick, Arianne; Chinoy, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX) is a monoclonal chimeric antibody directed against the CD20 antigen of B lymphocytes. Late onset neutropenia (LON) is a recognised complication of rituximab usually occurring 4 weeks after the last dose and is reported in both haematological and rheumatological conditions. However, it has never been described in a patient with myositis and systemic sclerosis overlap disease. We describe a case of LON in a 54-year-old man who was diagnosed with myositis and then systemic sclerosis overlap disease. It resolved within 7 days, and the patient did not suffer neutropenic sepsis or any other complications. We propose similar mechanisms for LON as described in other conditions and routine blood monitoring in such patients. PMID:27407275

  6. Safety and clinical outcomes of rituximab therapy in patients with different autoimmune diseases: experience from a national registry (GRAID)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Evidence from a number of open-label, uncontrolled studies has suggested that rituximab may benefit patients with autoimmune diseases who are refractory to standard-of-care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and clinical outcomes of rituximab in several standard-of-care-refractory autoimmune diseases (within rheumatology, nephrology, dermatology and neurology) other than rheumatoid arthritis or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a real-life clinical setting. Methods Patients who received rituximab having shown an inadequate response to standard-of-care had their safety and clinical outcomes data retrospectively analysed as part of the German Registry of Autoimmune Diseases. The main outcome measures were safety and clinical response, as judged at the discretion of the investigators. Results A total of 370 patients (299 patient-years) with various autoimmune diseases (23.0% with systemic lupus erythematosus, 15.7% antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated granulomatous vasculitides, 15.1% multiple sclerosis and 10.0% pemphigus) from 42 centres received a mean dose of 2,440 mg of rituximab over a median (range) of 194 (180 to 1,407) days. The overall rate of serious infections was 5.3 per 100 patient-years during rituximab therapy. Opportunistic infections were infrequent across the whole study population, and mostly occurred in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. There were 11 deaths (3.0% of patients) after rituximab treatment (mean 11.6 months after first infusion, range 0.8 to 31.3 months), with most of the deaths caused by infections. Overall (n = 293), 13.3% of patients showed no response, 45.1% showed a partial response and 41.6% showed a complete response. Responses were also reflected by reduced use of glucocorticoids and various immunosuppressives during rituximab therapy and follow-up compared with before rituximab. Rituximab generally had a positive effect on patient well-being (physician's visual analogue scale; mean

  7. Fatal haemoptysis in a case of lymphomatoid granulomatosis treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Jaffre, S; Jardin, F; Dominique, S; Duet, E; Hubscher, Ph; Genevois, A; Corne, F; Bota, S; Nouvet, G; Thiberville, L

    2006-03-01

    Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare angiocentric and angiodestructive disease, which commonly involves the lungs but also the brain, kidneys, liver and skin. This report describes the case of a 33-yr-old female with an aggressive form of lymphoid granulomatosis treated with an anti-CD20 antibody. Dramatic radiological improvement was seen at the fourth week. However, the patient died at home 1 month after the last rituximab administration from a massive haemoptysis. PMID:16507866

  8. Successful therapy with rituximab of refractory acute humoral renal transplant rejection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celik, A; Saglam, F; Cavdar, C; Sifil, A; Atila, K; Sarioglu, S; Bora, S; Gulay, H; Camsari, T

    2008-01-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) is generally less responsive to conventional anti-rejection treatment with consequent allograft losses. Therapeutic options include antilymphocyte antibody (ATG), intravenous immunglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, or immunoadsorption with protein A together with intensification of immunsuppression with a tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil combination. This report describes a transplant recipient who responded to rituximab therapy as treatment for steroid-, ATG-, IVIG-, and plasmapheresis-resistant AHR. PMID:18261611

  9. Rituximab: how approval history is reflected by a corresponding patent filing strategy.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Because drug development is not a static process, a drug's market authorisation may change over time. In many cases, the number of indications for which a drug is approved increases. Because this facet of drug development also comes at significant costs, a corresponding patent filing strategy is required to protect these investments. The strategy as applied to rituximab, which is approved for a variety of indications, is discussed in this review. PMID:24866199

  10. High-dose methotrexate with or without rituximab in newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambady, Prakash; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Sarai, Guneet; Bonekamp, David; Blakeley, Jaishri; Grossman, Stuart A.; Ye, Xiaobu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of rituximab (R) when added to high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) in patients with newly diagnosed immunocompetent primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSLs). Methods: Immunocompetent adults with newly diagnosed PCNSL treated at The Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1995 and 2012 were investigated. From 1995 to 2008, patients received HD-MTX monotherapy (8 g/m2 initially every 2 weeks and after complete response [CR] monthly to complete 12 months of therapy). From 2008 to 2012, patients received the same HD-MTX with rituximab (375 mg/m2) with each HD-MTX treatment. CR rates and median overall and progression-free survival were analyzed for each patient cohort in this single-institution, retrospective study. Results: A total of 81 patients were identified: 54 received HD-MTX (median age 66 years) while 27 received HD-MTX/R (median age 65 years). CR rates were 36% in the HD-MTX cohort and 73% in the HD-MTX/R cohort (p = 0.0145). Median progression-free survival was 4.5 months in the HD-MTX cohort and 26.7 months in the HD-MTX/R cohort (p = 0.003). Median overall survival was 16.3 months in the HD-MTX cohort and has not yet been reached in the HD-MTX/R cohort (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The addition of rituximab to HD-MTX appears to improve CR rates as well as overall and progression-free survival in patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL. Comparisons of long-term survival in the 2 cohorts await further maturation of the data. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that in immunocompetent patients with PCNSL, HD-MTX plus rituximab compared with HD-MTX alone improves CR and overall survival rates. PMID:24928128

  11. Successful Management of Refractory Dialysis Independent Wegener's Granulomatosis with Combination of Therapeutic Plasma Exchange and Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sheetal; Dhawan, Hari Krishan; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Aman

    2016-06-01

    Wegeners granulomatosis (WG) is an autoimmune, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody mediated necrotizing vasculitis involving renal, and upper and lower respiratory systems. Treatment relies on a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and tapering regimen of glucocorticoids. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has been recognized as a second line treatment. We report the successful use of TPE in combination with rituximab in achieving remission in a patient with WG (dialysis independent) not responding to conventional therapy. PMID:27408429

  12. Brain Abscess following Rituximab Infusion in a Patient with Pemphigus Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harbi, Talal M.; Muammer, Shahad A.; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 52 Final Diagnosis: Brain abscess Symptoms: Fever • headache • weakness, left sided Medication: Prednisolone • Azathioprine • Rituximab Clinical Procedure: Stereotactic brain biopsy and LP Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for developing meningitis or, rarely, brain abscess with opportunistic organisms like Listeria monocytogenes. Case Report: A 52 year-old Saudi Arabian woman who was diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris and diabetes and had been on prednisolone and azathioprine for about 4 years. She presented with headache, low-grade fever, and left-sided weakness 2 weeks after receiving the second dose of rituximab infusion. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhanced space-occupying lesion with multiple small cyst-like structures and vasogenic edema in the right temporoparietal area. Her blood culture was positive for Listeria monocytogenes, and a brain biopsy showed necrotic tissues with pus and inflammatory cells. She recovered after a 6-week course of antibiotics with ampicillin and gentamycin. Conclusions: Brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes is a risk that should be considered when adding rituximab to the regimen of a patient who is already Immunocompromised. PMID:25659437

  13. Clinical review: Serious adverse events associated with the use of rituximab - a critical care perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The advent of biologic agents has provided a more specific and targeted approach to the treatment of various hematological malignancies and other autoimmune disorders. Such biologic agents have been relatively well tolerated with fewer adverse events reported as compared with many other chemotherapeutic agents. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody to the B-cell marker CD20 and is a common biologic agent widely used for the treatment of B-cell lymphoma, lymphoproliferative disorders, and inflammatory conditions that are refractory to conventional treatment, including rheumatoid arthritis and some vasculitides. However, through randomized controlled trials and post-marketing surveillance, an increasing number of serious adverse events are being associated with the use of rituximab, often leading to or complicating an intensive care unit admission. The purpose of this review is to focus on the severe complications that are associated with the use of rituximab and that require critical care. Management and prevention strategies for the most common complications along with some examples of its uses within the critical care setting are also discussed. PMID:22967460

  14. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Turner, Michael R.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after sc administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyper-osmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as our animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and, O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) on plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after sc administration. We observed an increase in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, as compared to isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph node in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatic, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05 % in isotonic buffer to 13% in hyper-tonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. Our data suggests that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option to improve sc bioavailability. PMID:25377184

  15. Long-term outcomes to fludarabine and rituximab in Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Branagan, Andrew R.; Ioakimidis, Leukothea; Soumerai, Jacob D.; Patterson, Christopher J.; Turnbull, Barry; Wasi, Parveen; Emmanouilides, Christos; Frankel, Stanley R.; Lister, Andrew; Morel, Pierre; Matous, Jeffrey; Gregory, Stephanie A.; Kimby, Eva

    2009-01-01

    We report the long-term outcome of a multicenter, prospective study examining fludarabine and rituximab in Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). WM patients with less than 2 prior therapies were eligible. Intended therapy consisted of 6 cycles (25 mg/m2 per day for 5 days) of fludarabine and 8 infusions (375 mg/m2 per week) of rituximab. A total of 43 patients were enrolled. Responses were: complete response (n = 2), very good partial response (n = 14), partial response (n = 21), and minor response (n = 4), for overall and major response rates of 95.3% and 86.0%, respectively. Median time to progression for all patients was 51.2 months and was longer for untreated patients (P = .017) and those achieving at least a very good partial response (P = .049). Grade 3 or higher toxicities included neutropenia (n = 27), thrombocytopenia (n = 7), and pneumonia (n = 6), including 2 patients who died of non–Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, we observed 3 cases of transformation to aggressive lymphoma and 3 cases of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia. The results of this study demonstrate that fludarabine and rituximab are highly active in WM, although short- and long-term toxicities need to be carefully weighed against other available treatment options. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00020800. PMID:19015393

  16. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab to treat acquired haemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo N.D.; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquired haemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder caused by the development of specific autoantibodies against naturally occurring factor VIII (FVIII). Although about half of cases are idiopathic, AHA may be associated with several non-neoplastic conditions, autoimmune disorders, as well as haematological malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoma. The long-term suppression of inhibitors is one of the mainstays of the treatment of AHA. Apart from standard immunosuppressive treatments, rituximab has been proven to be effective in AHA. Materials and methods The aim of this review is to provide a systematic description of data available in the literature on this topic. To do so, we performed a search using the indexed online database Medline/PubMed, without temporal limits, matching the words “rituximab” and “acquired h(a)emophilia”. Furthermore, additional published studies were identified in the reference list of the publications found in PubMed. Results The review of the literature confirms that rituximab may be a safe and useful treatment for AHA. Discussion Although rituximab is not a standard therapy for AHA, it may be useful in resistant cases. However, the definitive place of this monoclonal antibody in the therapeutic strategy for AHA (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be determined more precisely and warrants further investigation. PMID:26509821

  17. Assessment of physicochemical properties of rituximab related to its immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P; López-Morales, Carlos A; Ramírez-Ibáñez, Nancy D; Piña-Lara, Nelly; Pérez, Nestor O; Molina-Pérez, Aarón; Revilla-Beltri, Jorge; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody employed for the treatment of CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis. It binds specifically to the CD20 antigen expressed on pre-B and consequently on mature B-lymphocytes of both normal and malignant cells, inhibiting their proliferation through apoptosis, CDC, and ADCC mechanisms. The immunomodulatory activity of rituximab is closely related to critical quality attributes that characterize its chemical composition and spatial configuration, which determine the recognition of CD20 and the binding to receptors or factors involved in its effector functions, while regulating the potential immunogenic response. Herein, we present a physicochemical and biological characterization followed by a pharmacodynamics and immunogenicity study to demonstrate comparability between two products containing rituximab. The physicochemical and biological characterization revealed that both products fit within the same response intervals exhibiting the same degree of variability. With regard to clinical response, both products depleted CD20+ B-cells until posttreatment recovery and no meaningful differences were found in their pharmacodynamic profiles. The evaluation of anti-chimeric antibodies did not show differential immunogenicity among products. Overall, these data confirm that similarity of critical quality attributes results in a comparable immunomodulatory activity. PMID:25973441

  18. Recurrence of light chain deposit disease after renal allograft transplantation: potential role of rituximab?

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J; Lerut, Evelyne; Claes, Kathleen; Evenepoel, Pieter; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2007-04-01

    Light chain deposit disease (LCDD) is a monoclonal plasma cell disorder characterized by tissue deposition of nonamyloid immunoglobulin light chains, predominantly kappa chains, causing renal insufficiency. LCDD reoccurs almost invariably after renal grafting, leading to early graft loss, usually within a time span of months to years. We describe a female patient with LCDD who lost her first living donor graft after 1 year due to extensive recurrence of kappa chain deposition. Rituximab was administered on the seventh day after her second transplantation with a graft from a deceased donor, in order to prevent early recurrence of LCDD. The 2-year protocol biopsy - similarly to the completely normal 1-year protocol biopsy - revealed persistent absence of light chain deposition on light microscopy but immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy showed very mild recurrence of light chain deposits. A second 4-week course of rituximab was repeated because of these electron microscopic findings. Subsequently, free kappa light chain concentration decreased from 693 to 74 mg/l and remained low 4 months after completion of therapy. Rituximab could be considered for delaying early LCDD recurrence in patients in whom treatment of the underlying bone marrow disorder failed or is contraindicated, but maintenance therapy is apparently necessary to consolidate this response. PMID:17326779

  19. Prognostic model for mantle cell lymphoma in the rituximab era: a nationwide study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Dai; Asano, Naoko; Ohmachi, Ken; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Masataka; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Mizuno, Ishikazu; Matsue, Kosei; Uchida, Toshiki; Nagai, Hirokazu; Nishikori, Momoko; Nakamura, Shigeo; Ogura, Michinori; Suzuki, Ritsuro

    2015-09-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is essentially incurable with conventional chemotherapy. The MCL International Prognostic Index (MIPI) is a validated specific prognostic index, but was derived from patients with advanced-stage disease primarily in the pre-rituximab era. We analysed 501 MCL patients (median age, 67 years; range 22-90) treated with rituximab-containing chemotherapy, and evaluated the prognostic factors adjusted by the treatment. Five-year overall survival (OS) in the low, intermediate and high MIPI groups was 74%, 70% and 35%, respectively. Additional to MIPI risk factors, multivariate analysis revealed that low serum albumin and bone-marrow involvement were also significantly associated with a poor outcome. The revised-MIPI (R-MIPI) was constructed using six factors, namely age, performance status, white blood cell count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, bone-marrow involvement and serum albumin, which is divided into four prognostic groups. Five-year OS in low, low-intermediate (L-I), high-intermediate (H-I) and high R-MIPI groups was 92%, 75%, 61% and 19%, respectively. Hazard ratio for OS of L-I, H-I and high risk to low risk patients were 5·4, 8·3 and 33·0, respectively. R-MIPI, a new prognostic index with easy application to the general patient population, shows promise for identifying low- and high-risk MCL patients in the rituximab era. PMID:25953436

  20. New insight in the mechanism of action of rituximab: the interferon signature towards personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Cornelis L; Vosslamber, Saskia

    2011-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory disorder of the musculoskeletal system that may cause permanent joint damage. The disease has a major impact on the quality of life of affected individuals, costs for the health care system, and society. Currently, no curative treatment is available, and patients are subjected to a prolonged course of treatment. Due to their role in the pathogenesis of RA, B cells have become an attractive target for therapy. Rituximab (Mabthera®/Rituxan®) is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed on B cells, which is effective in depleting B cells and approved worldwide for the treatment of RA. Rituximab was shown to be highly beneficial in decreasing clinical symptoms, safe, and well tolerated. However, clinical experience revealed that approximately 30-40% of RA patients do not respond to it. Given the destructive nature of RA, the risk of adverse effects, and considerable costs for therapy, there is a strong need to make predictions on the clinical outcome before the start of therapy. Since nearly all treated patients experience an effective depletion of circulating B cells, questions have been raised concerning the mechanism of action. In this review, novel developments, in particular the findings on the role of the interferon system, will be highlighted. This may add new and important information to our understanding of the mechanism that underlies the clinical outcome of rituximab treatment and may lead to the identification of biomarkers to predict the response. PMID:21955850

  1. Assessment of Physicochemical Properties of Rituximab Related to Its Immunomodulatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P.; López-Morales, Carlos A.; Ramírez-Ibáñez, Nancy D.; Piña-Lara, Nelly; Pérez, Nestor O.; Molina-Pérez, Aarón; Revilla-Beltri, Jorge; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody employed for the treatment of CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis. It binds specifically to the CD20 antigen expressed on pre-B and consequently on mature B-lymphocytes of both normal and malignant cells, inhibiting their proliferation through apoptosis, CDC, and ADCC mechanisms. The immunomodulatory activity of rituximab is closely related to critical quality attributes that characterize its chemical composition and spatial configuration, which determine the recognition of CD20 and the binding to receptors or factors involved in its effector functions, while regulating the potential immunogenic response. Herein, we present a physicochemical and biological characterization followed by a pharmacodynamics and immunogenicity study to demonstrate comparability between two products containing rituximab. The physicochemical and biological characterization revealed that both products fit within the same response intervals exhibiting the same degree of variability. With regard to clinical response, both products depleted CD20+ B-cells until posttreatment recovery and no meaningful differences were found in their pharmacodynamic profiles. The evaluation of anti-chimeric antibodies did not show differential immunogenicity among products. Overall, these data confirm that similarity of critical quality attributes results in a comparable immunomodulatory activity. PMID:25973441

  2. Beneficial Effect of Rituximab in the Treatment of Recurrent Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Ben; Lefkowitz, George Ian; Cohen, Scott D.; Stokes, Michael Barry; Valeri, Antony; Appel, Gerald B.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Recurrence of the original kidney disease after renal transplantation is an increasingly recognized cause of allograft loss. Idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN) is a common cause of proteinuria that may progress to ESRD. It is known that iMN may recur after kidney transplantation, causing proteinuria, allograft dysfunction, and allograft loss. Limited data regarding the frequency and treatment of recurrent iMN are available. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: In this single-center study, all patients who had iMN and were receiving a first kidney transplant were included. We retrospectively assessed the incidence of biopsy-confirmed recurrent iMN and compared clinical characteristics of patients with and without recurrence. In addition, the effect of treatment with rituximab on proteinuria and renal allograft function in patients with recurrent iMN was examined Results: The incidence of recurrent iMN was 44%, and recurrences occurred at a median time of 13.6 months after transplantation. Two patterns of recurrence were identified: Early and late. No predictors of recurrence or disease progression could be identified. Treatment with rituximab was effective in four of four patients in stabilizing or reducing proteinuria and stabilizing renal function. Conclusions: Recurrence of iMN is common even in the era of modern immunosuppression. Rituximab seems to be a valuable treatment option for these patients, although lager studies are needed to confirm our data. PMID:20185599

  3. Association between -174 interleukin-6 gene polymorphism and biological response to rituximab in several systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Gema; Dávila-Fajardo, Cristina Lucía; Márquez, Ana; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Callejas Rubio, José Luis; de Ramón Garrido, Enrique; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco J; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; González-Escribano, Maria Francisca; Camps García, Maria Teresa; Castillo Palma, Maria Jesús; Ayala, Maria Del Mar; Martín, Javier

    2012-09-01

    Rituximab has become a pivotal treatment for systemic autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genetic variant -174 IL-6 contributes to differences in the response to rituximab in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), inflammatory myopathies, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-mediated vasculitis, systemic sclerosis, Sjöegren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. DNA samples from 144 Spanish patients with different systemic autoimmune diseases receiving rituximab were genotyped for -174 IL-6 (rs1800795) gene polymorphism using the TaqMan(®) allelic discrimination technology. Six months after the first infusion with rituximab, we evaluated the response to the drug: 60.4% of the patients showed a complete response, partial 27.8%, and 11.8% did not respond to the treatment. The CC genotype frequency was significantly increased in nonresponders with respect to responders (23.5% vs. 7.1%, respectively; p=0.049; odds ratio (OR)=4.03, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.78-16.97). According to the genotype distribution, rituximab was effective in 69.2% of the CC carriers, 91.9% of the CG carriers, and 88.4% of the GG carriers. A similar trend was observed when SLE patients were analyzed separately (27.3% carried CC homozygosis in nonresponders and 6.9% in responders; p=0.066; OR=5.10, 95% CI 0.65-31.73). Rituximab was effective in 62.5% of the CC carriers, 88.9% of the GC carriers, and 90% of the GG carriers. These results suggest that -174 IL-6 (rs1800795) gene polymorphism plays a role in the response to rituximab in systemic autoimmune diseases. Validation of these findings in independent cohorts is warranted. PMID:22734797

  4. Anti-Apoptotic Effects of Lentiviral Vector Transduction Promote Increased Rituximab Tolerance in Cancerous B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Benyamin; Krogh, Louise Bechmann; Laursen, Maria Bach; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Marques, Sara Correia; Dybkær, Karen; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by great genetic and clinical heterogeneity which complicates prognostic prediction and influences treatment efficacy. The most common regimen, R-CHOP, consists of a combination of anthracycline- and immuno-based drugs including Rituximab. It remains elusive how and to which extent genetic variability impacts the response and potential tolerance to R-CHOP. Hence, an improved understanding of mechanisms leading to drug tolerance in B-cells is crucial, and modelling by genetic intervention directly in B-cells is fundamental in such investigations. Lentivirus-based gene vectors are widely used gene vehicles, which in B-cells are an attractive alternative to potentially toxic transfection-based methodologies. Here, we investigate the use of VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in B-cells for exploring the impact of microRNAs on tolerance to Rituximab. Notably, we find that robust lentiviral transduction of cancerous B-cell lines markedly and specifically enhances the resistance of transduced germinal center B-cells (GCBs) to Rituximab. Although Rituximab works partially through complement-mediated cell lysis, increased tolerance is not achieved through effects of lentiviral transduction on cell death mediated by complement. Rather, reduced levels of PARP1 and persistent high levels of CD43 in Rituximab-treated GCBs demonstrate anti-apoptotic effects of lentiviral transduction that may interfere with the outcome and interpretation of Rituximab tolerance studies. Our findings stress that caution should be exercised exploiting lentiviral vectors in studies of tolerance to therapeutics in DLBCL. Importantly, however, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the lentiviral gene delivery platform in studies addressing the impact of specific microRNAs on Rituximab responsiveness. PMID:27045839

  5. Rituximab in steroid-dependent or frequently relapsing idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruggenenti, Piero; Ruggiero, Barbara; Cravedi, Paolo; Vivarelli, Marina; Massella, Laura; Marasà, Maddalena; Chianca, Antonietta; Rubis, Nadia; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Rudnicki, Michael; Pollastro, Rosa Maria; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pisani, Antonio; Pennesi, Marco; Emma, Francesco; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    The outcome of steroid-dependent or frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome of minimal change disease (MCD), mesangial proliferative GN (MesGN), or FSGS may be poor and with major treatment toxicity. This academic, multicenter, off-on trial (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00981838) primarily evaluated the effects of rituximab therapy followed by immunosuppression withdrawal on disease recurrence in 10 children and 20 adults with MCD/MesGN (n=22) or FSGS who had suffered ≥2 recurrences over the previous year and were in steroid-induced remission for ≥1 month. Participants received one dose (n=28) or two doses of rituximab (375 mg/m(2) intravenously). At 1 year, all patients were in remission: 18 were treatment-free and 15 never relapsed. Compared with the year before rituximab treatment, total relapses decreased from 88 to 22 and the per-patient median number of relapses decreased from 2.5 (interquartile range [IQR], 2-4) to 0.5 (IQR, 0-1; P<0.001) during 1 year of follow-up. Reduction was significant across subgroups (children, adults, MCD/MesGN, and FSGS; P<0.01). After rituximab, the per-patient steroid maintenance median dose decreased from 0.27 mg/kg (IQR, 0.19-0.60) to 0 mg/kg (IQR, 0-0.23) (P<0.001), and the median cumulative dose to achieve relapse remission decreased from 19.5 mg/kg (IQR, 13.0-29.2) to 0.5 mg/kg (IQR, 0-9.4) (P<0.001). Furthermore, the mean estimated GFR increased from 111.3±25.7 to 121.8±29.2 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (P=0.01), with the largest increases in children and in FSGS subgroups. The mean height z score slope stabilized in children (P<0.01). Treatment was well tolerated. Rituximab effectively and safely prevented recurrences and reduced the need for immunosuppression in steroid-dependent or frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome, and halted disease-associated growth deficit in children. PMID:24480824

  6. MLN2238, a proteasome inhibitor, induces caspase-dependent cell death, cell cycle arrest, and potentiates the cytotoxic activity of chemotherapy agents in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive or rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Gu, Juan J; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J; Mavis, Cory; Czuczman, Natalie M; Deeb, George; Gibbs, John; Skitzki, Joseph J; Patil, Ritesh; Czuczman, Myron S

    2013-11-01

    To further develop therapeutic strategies targeting the proteasome system, we studied the antitumor activity and mechanisms of action of MLN2238, a reversible proteasome inhibitor, in preclinical lymphoma models. Experiments were conducted in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines, rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell lines (RRCL), and primary B-cell lymphoma cells. Cells were exposed to MLN2238 or caspase-dependent inhibitors, and differences in cell viability, alterations in apoptotic protein levels, effects on cell cycle, and the possibility of synergy when combined with chemotherapeutic agents were evaluated. MLN2238 showed more potent dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation in lymphoma cells than bortezomib. Our data suggest that MLN2238 can induce caspase-independent cell death in RRCL. MLN2238 (and to a much lesser degree bortezomib) reduced RRCL S phase and induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Exposure of rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines and RRCL to MLN2238 potentiated the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel and overcame resistance to chemotherapy in RRCL. MLN2238 is a potent proteasome inhibitor active in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive and rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell models and potentiates the antitumor activity of chemotherapy agents and has the potential of becoming an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of therapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:23995855

  7. Low Incidence of Radionecrosis in Children Treated with Conventional Radiation Therapy and Intrathecal Radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Kim; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Zanzonico, Pat; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Humm, John L.; DeSelm, Carl; Souweidane, Mark M.; Lewis, Jason S.; Cheung, Nai-Kong. V.

    2015-01-01

    Radionecrosis is a potentially devastating complication of external beam radiotherapy (XRT). Intraventricular compartmental radioimmunotherapy (cRIT) using 131I-3F8 or 131I-8H9 can eradicate malignant cells in the CSF. The incidence of radionecrosis using cRIT 131I based intraventricular radioiimunotherapy, when used alone or in combination with conventional craniospinal CSI-XRT is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed the incidence of radionecrosis in 2 cohorts of pediatric patients treated with both CSI-XRT and cRIT at MSKCC since 2003: patients with metastatic CNS neuroblastoma (NB) and medulloblastoma (MB). 94 patients received both CSI-XRT and cRIT, 2 received cRIT alone, median follow up 41.5 months (6.5–124.8 months). Mean CSI-XRT dose was 28 Gy (boost to the primary tumor site up to 54 Gy) in the MB cohort, and CSI XRT dose 18–21 Gy (boost to 30 Gy for focal parenchymal mass) in the NB cohort. For MB patients, 20% had focal re-irradiation for a second or more subsequent relapse, mean repeat-XRT dose was 27.5 Gy; 7 patients with NB had additional focal XRT. Median CSF cRIT dose was 18.6 Gy in the MB cohort and 32.1 in the NB cohort. One asymptomatic patient underwent resection of 0.6-cm hemorrhagic periventricular white-matter lesion confirmed to be necrosis and granulation tissue, 2.5 years after XRT. The risk of radionecrosis in children treated with XRT and cRIT appears minimal (~1%). No neurologic deficits secondary to radionecrosis have been observed in long-term survivors treated with both modalities, including patients who underwent re-XRT. Administration of cRIT may safely proceed in patients treated with conventional radiotherapy without appearing to increase the risk of radionecrosis. PMID:25944385

  8. SU-E-J-03: A Comprehensive Comparison Between Alpha and Beta Emitters for Cancer Radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.Y.; Guatelli, S; Oborn, B; Allen, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to perform a comprehensive comparison of the therapeutic efficacy and cytotoxicity of alpha and beta emitters for Radioimmunotherapy (RIT). For each stage of cancer development, specific models were built for the separate objectives of RIT to be addressed:a) kill isolated cancer cells in transit in the lymphatic and vascular circulation,b) regress avascular cell clusters,c) regress tumor vasculature and tumors. Methods: Because of the nature of short range, high LET alpha and long energy beta radiation and heterogeneous antigen expression among cancer cells, the microdosimetric approach is essential for the RIT assessment. Geant4 based microdosimetric models are developed for the three different stages of cancer progression: cancer cells, cell clusters and tumors. The energy deposition, specific energy resulted from different source distribution in the three models was calculated separately for 4 alpha emitting radioisotopes ({sup 211}At, {sup 213}Bi, {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac) and 6 beta emitters ({sup 32}P, {sup 33}P, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I and {sup 177}Lu). The cell survival, therapeutic efficacy and cytotoxicity are determined and compared between alpha and beta emitters. Results: We show that internal targeted alpha radiation has advantages over beta radiation for killing isolated cancer cells, regressing small cell clusters and also solid tumors. Alpha particles have much higher dose specificity and potency than beta particles. They can deposit 3 logs more dose than beta emitters to single cells and solid tumor. Tumor control probability relies on deep penetration of radioisotopes to cancer cell clusters and solid tumors. Conclusion: The results of this study provide a quantitative understanding of the efficacy and cytotoxicity of RIT for each stage of cancer development.

  9. A preclinical model of CD38-pretargeted radioimmunotherapy for plasma cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Green, Damian J.; Orgun, Nural N.; Jones, Jon C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Pagel, John M.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D.S.; Lin, Yukang; Fisher, Darrell R.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Wood, Brent L.; Bensinger, William I.; Press, Oliver W.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with plasma cell neoplasms die of progressive disease despite high response rates to novel agents. Malignant plasma cells are very radiosensitive, but the potential role of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in the management of plasmacytomas and multiple myeloma (MM) has undergone only limited evaluation. Furthermore, CD38 has not been explored as a RIT target despite its uniform high expression on plasma cell malignancies. In this report, both conventional RIT (directly radiolabeled antibody) and streptavidin-biotin pretargeted RIT (PRIT) directed against the CD38 antigen, were assessed as approaches to deliver radiation doses sufficient for MM cell eradication. PRIT demonstrated biodistributions that were markedly superior to conventional RIT. Tumor-to-blood ratios as high as 638:1 were seen 24hr after PRIT, while ratios never exceeded 1:1 with conventional RIT. 90Yttrium absorbed dose estimates demonstrated excellent target-to-normal organ ratios (6:1 for the kidney, lung, liver; 10:1 for the whole body). Objective remissions were observed within 7 days in 100% of the mice treated with doses ranging from 800 µCi to 1200 µCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted 90Y-DOTA-biotin, including 100% complete remissions (no detectable tumor in treated mice compared to tumors that were 2982±2834% of initial tumor volume in control animals) by day 23. Furthermore, 100% of animals bearing NCI-H929 multiple myeloma tumor xenografts treated with 800 µCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted 90Y-DOTA-biotin achieved long-term myeloma-free survival (>70 days) compared to none (0%) of the control animals. PMID:24371230

  10. Dosimetric model for intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer micrometastases.

    PubMed

    Syme, A M; McQuarrie, S A; Middleton, J W; Fallone, B G

    2003-05-21

    A simple model has been developed to investigate the dosimetry of micrometastases in the peritoneal cavity during intraperitoneal targeted liposomal radioimmunotherapy. The model is applied to free-floating tumours with radii between 0.005 cm and 0.1 cm. Tumour dose is assumed to come from two sources: free liposomes in solution in the peritoneal cavity and liposomes bound to the surface of the micrometastases. It is assumed that liposomes do not penetrate beyond the surface of the tumours and that the total amount of surface antigen does not change over the course of treatment. Integrated tumour doses are expressed as a function of biological parameters that describe the rates at which liposomes bind to and unbind from the tumour surface, the rate at which liposomes escape from the peritoneal cavity and the tumour surface antigen density. Integrated doses are translated into time-dependent tumour control probabilities (TCPs). The results of the work are illustrated in the context of a therapy in which liposomes labelled with Re-188 are targeted at ovarian cancer cells that express the surface antigen CA-125. The time required to produce a TCP of 95% is used to investigate the importance of the various parameters. The relative contributions of surface-bound radioactivity and unbound radioactivity are used to assess the conditions required for a targeted approach to provide an improvement over a non-targeted approach during intraperitoneal radiation therapy. Using Re-188 as the radionuclide, the model suggests that, for microscopic tumours, the relative importance of the surface-bound radioactivity increases with tumour size. This is evidenced by the requirement for larger antigen densities on smaller tumours to affect an improvement in the time required to produce a TCP of 95%. This is because for the smallest tumours considered, the unbound radioactivity is often capable of exerting a tumouricidal effect before the targeting agent has time to accumulate

  11. Modern trends in radioimmunotherapy of cancer: pretargeting strategies for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, S A; Xiao, Z; Miller, G G; Mercer, J R; Suresh, M R

    2001-06-01

    A review of published data on some of the problems associated in treating cancer using radioimmunotherapy is presented. Potential improvements for this type of therapy using pretargeting strategies are discussed and preliminary results on a novel multistep regimen to treat human ovarian cancer are presented. A pretargeting strategy using a biotinylated, anti-CA125 monoclonal antibody (MAb) to attract biotinylated long-circulating liposomes to the surface of CA125-expressing ovarian cancer cells, was employed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent labels were used to establish the biodistribution patterns in NIH:OVCAR-3 (CA-125 positive) and SK-OV-3 (CA-125 negative) human ovarian cancer cells. Shedding kinetics of the pretargeted stage were measured using 125I labeled MAbs. No significant internalization of the MAb used in the pretargeting step was observed by 4 hrs. The antibody was gradually internalized starting at 6 hrs, and most of the labelled MAb was detected in cytoplasm by 24 hrs. Shedding and exocytosis of the antigen-MAb complex was not significant for up to 6-hours following administration of the iodinated MAb. Biotinylated liposomes were shown to specifically target the biotinylated MAb/streptavidin complex on the cell surface. We have demonstrated that by a three-step pretargeting approach, biotinylated liposomes can be specifically delivered to cells pretargeted with biotinylated MAb/SAv complex. The slow internalization and shedding properties of the two MAbs are ideal for multistep pretargeting methods. A successful multistep linkage was established with the biotinylated MAb B27.1, streptavidin and biotinylated liposomes to OVCAR-3 cells, but not to SK-OV-3 cells. PMID:11476165

  12. Successful radioimmunotherapy for micro and occult metastases in a SCID mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Koshida, K.; Kinuya, S. |

    1996-05-01

    It is often addressed that the most appropriate candidate, theoretically, for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is not bulky tumor burden but for micro or occult metastatic foci, The major obstacles in the verification for veracious efficacy of RIT had been clinically and preclinically the difficulty in obtaining such a model. We have developed the model of testicular tumor (primary site) with visible small metastases to the lymph nodes (LNs) and non-visible (occult) lesions to distant organs in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. And thus, the suppression of minute tumor depositions after RIT was evaluated. One week after hemilateral intratesticular injection of 2 million of HELA Hep 2 cells that expressed placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), the group of the mice were treated with a single dose of I-131 labeled HPMS-1, anti-PLAP MoAb or with saline control. The I-131 labeled HPMS-1 (5.6 MBq / 150 {mu}g) was intravenously administered and at 2 weeks after, the testis, retroperitoneal and intraperitoneal LNs and other gans were removed. For the control group, the testicular tumor and LNs metastases were found in 100% and 86% of the mice. The metastases in the liver and lung were not observed by histological examination but in all mouse samples, the PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assay could identify the human {beta}-globin gene derived from HeLa cells, indicating the presence of definitive metastases. For the treated group, the average testicular tumor weight was significantly reduced by the factor of 2.4 (132 mg vs 311 mg, p<0.01). The LNs metastases were even more distinctively suppressed by the factor of 45.7 (13 mg vs 599 mg, p,0.05). Remarkably, the PCR products from the occult metastases were almost completely controlled; 97% suppression found for the liver and 81% for the lung. Thus, we conclude that using I-131 as a label, RIT is justified to used for targeting and killing minute tumor foci.

  13. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy without TBI before transplantation facilitates persistent haploidentical donor engraftment.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Johnnie J; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R; Gooley, Ted A; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Hylarides, Mark D; Frost, Sofia H L; Mawad, Raya; O'Donnell, Paul; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Fuchs, Ephraim J; Luznik, Leo; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2016-01-21

    Many patients with hematologic malignancies cannot tolerate hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), whereas others may not have a compatible human leukocyte antigen-matched donor. To overcome these limitations, we optimized a conditioning regimen employing anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) replacing total body irradiation (TBI) before haploidentical HCT in a murine model. Mice received 200 to 400 μCi (90)Y-anti-CD45 antibody (30F11), with or without fludarabine (5 days starting day -8), with cyclophosphamide (CY; days -2 and +2) for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis, and 1.5 × 10(7) haploidentical donor bone marrow cells (day 0). Haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with 300 μCi (90)Y-anti-CD45 RIT and CY, without TBI or fludarabine, led to mixed chimeras with 81.3 ± 10.6% mean donor origin CD8(+) cells detected 1 month after BMT, and remained stable (85.5 ± 11% mean donor origin CD8(+) cells) 6 months after haploidentical BMT. High chimerism levels were induced across multiple hematopoietic lineages 28 days after haploidentical BMT with 69.3 ± 14.1%, 75.6 ± 20.2%, and 88.5 ± 11.8% CD3(+) T cells, B220(+) B cells, and CD11b(+) myeloid cells, respectively. Fifty percent of SJL leukemia-bearing mice treated with 400 μCi (90)Y-DOTA-30F11, CY, and haploidentical BMT were cured and lived >200 days. Mice treated with 200 μCi (90)Y-DOTA-30F11 had a median overall survival of 73 days, while untreated leukemic mice had a median overall survival of 34 days (P < .001, Mantel-Cox test). RIT-mediated haploidentical BMT without TBI may increase treatment options for aggressive hematologic malignancies. PMID:26576864

  14. A preclinical model of CD38-pretargeted radioimmunotherapy for plasma cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Green, Damian J; Orgun, Nural N; Jones, Jon C; Hylarides, Mark D; Pagel, John M; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D S; Lin, Yukang; Fisher, Darrell R; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Frayo, Shani L; Gopal, Ajay K; Orozco, Johnnie J; Gooley, Theodore A; Wood, Brent L; Bensinger, William I; Press, Oliver W

    2014-02-15

    The vast majority of patients with plasma cell neoplasms die of progressive disease despite high response rates to novel agents. Malignant plasma cells are very radiosensitive, but the potential role of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in the management of plasmacytomas and multiple myeloma has undergone only limited evaluation. Furthermore, CD38 has not been explored as a RIT target despite its uniform high expression on malignant plasma cells. In this report, both conventional RIT (directly radiolabeled antibody) and streptavidin-biotin pretargeted RIT (PRIT) directed against the CD38 antigen were assessed as approaches to deliver radiation doses sufficient for multiple myeloma cell eradication. PRIT demonstrated biodistributions that were markedly superior to conventional RIT. Tumor-to-blood ratios as high as 638:1 were seen 24 hours after PRIT, whereas ratios never exceeded 1:1 with conventional RIT. (90)Yttrium absorbed dose estimates demonstrated excellent target-to-normal organ ratios (6:1 for the kidney, lung, liver; 10:1 for the whole body). Objective remissions were observed within 7 days in 100% of the mice treated with doses ranging from 800 to 1,200 μCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted (90)Y-DOTA-biotin, including 100% complete remissions (no detectable tumor in treated mice compared with tumors that were 2,982% ± 2,834% of initial tumor volume in control animals) by day 23. Furthermore, 100% of animals bearing NCI-H929 multiple myeloma tumor xenografts treated with 800 μCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted (90)Y-DOTA-biotin achieved long-term myeloma-free survival (>70 days) compared with none (0%) of the control animals. PMID:24371230

  15. Combining α-Radioimmunotherapy and Adoptive T Cell Therapy to Potentiate Tumor Destruction.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Jérémie; Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Maurel, Catherine; Drujont, Lucile; Gouard, Sébastien; Louvet, Cédric; Chérel, Michel; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Guilloux, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces direct and indirect killing of cancer cells and for long has been considered as immunosuppressive. However, this concept has evolved over the past few years with the demonstration that irradiation can increase tumor immunogenicity and can actually favor the implementation of an immune response against tumor cells. Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is also used to treat cancer and several studies have shown that the efficacy of this immunotherapy was enhanced when combined with radiation therapy. α-Radioimmunotherapy (α-RIT) is a type of internal radiotherapy which is currently under development to treat disseminated tumors. α-particles are indeed highly efficient to destroy small cluster of cancer cells with minimal impact on surrounding healthy tissues. We thus hypothesized that, in the setting of α-RIT, an immunotherapy like ACT, could benefit from the immune context induced by irradiation. Hence, we decided to further investigate the possibilities to promote an efficient and long-lasting anti-tumor response by combining α-RIT and ACT. To perform such study we set up a multiple myeloma murine model which express the tumor antigen CD138 and ovalbumine (OVA). Then we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy in the mice treated with α-RIT, using an anti-CD138 antibody coupled to bismuth-213, followed by an adoptive transfer of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells (OT-I CD8+ T cells). We observed a significant tumor growth control and an improved survival in the animals treated with the combined treatment. These results demonstrate the efficacy of combining α-RIT and ACT in the MM model we established. PMID:26098691

  16. Radioimmunotherapy treatment planning based on radiation absorbed dose or patient size

    SciTech Connect

    Eary, J.F.; Krohn, K.A.; Press, O.W. |

    1996-05-01

    Several approaches have been used to plan treatment doses for patients undergoing radioimmunotherapy. Investigators often use fixed doses, or doses based on patient size (mCi/kg or mCi/m{sup 2}). Our treatment protocols for lymphoma and leukemia involved calculation of tissue radiation absorbed dose based on images from a trace labeled infusion of antibody prior to treatment. In a recent analysis of patients treated in the Phase I and II dose escalation trial for treatment of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with I-131 anti-CD20 antibody (B1), we investigated the relationship between our dosimetry based treatment and dose based on patient size. Tissue radiation dose for several normal organs and for tumors were plotted versus the mCi administered per kg or m{sup 2} of the patient to evaluate the relationship between the two treatment approaches. These graphs showed correlation coefficients ranging from 0.021 to 0.684, demonstrating the variability in antibody catabolism between patients. This means that fixed doses or administrations based on patient size do not deliver consistent radiation doses to normal organs or tumors. This finding was extrapolated to show that toxicity from doses based on patient size di not correlate with treatment dose; those based on calculated rad/organ did. Phase I clinical trials using treatment doses based on patient size where there are likely to be variations in patient antibody catabolism will result in confounding toxicities at apparently similar mCi dose levels. Use of pre-treatment scans for treatment dose planning are worth the additional effort by normalizing the normal tissue toxicity.

  17. Combining α-Radioimmunotherapy and Adoptive T Cell Therapy to Potentiate Tumor Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Ménager, Jérémie; Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Maurel, Catherine; Drujont, Lucile; Gouard, Sébastien; Louvet, Cédric; Chérel, Michel; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Davodeau, François

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces direct and indirect killing of cancer cells and for long has been considered as immunosuppressive. However, this concept has evolved over the past few years with the demonstration that irradiation can increase tumor immunogenicity and can actually favor the implementation of an immune response against tumor cells. Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is also used to treat cancer and several studies have shown that the efficacy of this immunotherapy was enhanced when combined with radiation therapy. α-Radioimmunotherapy (α-RIT) is a type of internal radiotherapy which is currently under development to treat disseminated tumors. α-particles are indeed highly efficient to destroy small cluster of cancer cells with minimal impact on surrounding healthy tissues. We thus hypothesized that, in the setting of α-RIT, an immunotherapy like ACT, could benefit from the immune context induced by irradiation. Hence, we decided to further investigate the possibilities to promote an efficient and long-lasting anti-tumor response by combining α-RIT and ACT. To perform such study we set up a multiple myeloma murine model which express the tumor antigen CD138 and ovalbumine (OVA). Then we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy in the mice treated with α-RIT, using an anti-CD138 antibody coupled to bismuth-213, followed by an adoptive transfer of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells (OT-I CD8+ T cells). We observed a significant tumor growth control and an improved survival in the animals treated with the combined treatment. These results demonstrate the efficacy of combining α-RIT and ACT in the MM model we established. PMID:26098691

  18. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of humanised A33 immunoconjugates for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    King, D. J.; Antoniw, P.; Owens, R. J.; Adair, J. R.; Haines, A. M.; Farnsworth, A. P.; Finney, H.; Lawson, A. D.; Lyons, A.; Baker, T. S.

    1995-01-01

    A humanised IgG1/k version of A33 (hA33) has been constructed and expressed with yields up to 700 mg l-1 in mouse myeloma NS0 cells in suspension culture. The equilibrium dissociation constant of hA33 (KD = 1.3 nM) was shown to be equivalent to that of the murine antibody in a cell-binding assay. hA33 labelled with yttrium-90 using the macrocyclic chelator 12N4 (DOTA) was shown to localise very effectively to human colon tumour xenografts in nude mice, with tumour levels increasing as blood concentration fell up to 144 h. A Fab' variant of hA33 with a single hinge thiol group to facilitate chemical cross-linking has also been constructed and expressed with yields of 500 mg l-1. Trimaleimide cross-linkers have been used to produce a trivalent Fab fragment (hA33 TFM) that binds antigen on tumour cells with greater avidity than hA33 IgG. Cross-linkers incorporating 12N4 or 9N3 macrocycles have been used to produce hA33 TFM labelled stably and site specifically with yttrium-90 or indium-111 respectively. These molecules have been used to demonstrate that hA33 TFM is cleared more rapidly than hA33 IgG from the circulation of animals but does not lead to accumulation of these metallic radionuclides in the kidney. 90Y-labelled hA33 TFM therefore appears to be the optimal form of the antibody for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal carcinoma. Images Figure 3 PMID:8519646

  19. Rituximab for the treatment of relapsed or refractory stage III or IV follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Boland, A; Bagust, A; Hockenhull, J; Davis, H; Chu, P; Dickson, R

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of rituximab for the treatment of relapsed or refractory stage III or IV follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), in accordance with the licensed indication, based upon the evidence submission from Roche Products Ltd to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The submitted clinical evidence included two randomised controlled trials [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and German Low Grade Lymphoma Study Group - Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide and Mitoxantrone and (GLSG-FCM)] comparing the clinical effects of chemotherapy with or without rituximab in the induction of remission at first or second relapse and the clinical benefits of rituximab maintenance therapy versus the NHS's current clinical practice of observation for follicular lymphoma (FL) patients. Both trials showed that in patients with relapsed FL the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy induction treatment increased overall response rates. Furthermore, rituximab maintenance therapy increased the median length of remission when compared with observation only. Safety data from the two trials showed that while the majority of patients reported some adverse events, the number of patients withdrawing from treatment in the EORTC trial was low, with rates not being reported for the GLSG-FCM trial. The most commonly reported adverse events were blood/bone marrow toxicity, skin rashes and allergies. The ERG reran the manufacturer's economic model after altering several of the assumptions and parameter values in order to recalculate the cost-utility ratios, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and estimates of benefits. The manufacturer reported that maintenance therapy with rituximab was cost-effective compared with observation against commonly applied thresholds, with an incremental

  20. Phase II Study of Lenalidomide and Rituximab As Salvage Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Badoux, Xavier C.; Keating, Michael J.; Wen, Sijin; Wierda, William G.; O'Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan; Sargent, Rachel; Burger, Jan A.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug active as salvage therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We combined lenalidomide with rituximab to improve response rates in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients and Methods Fifty-nine adult patients (age 42 to 82 years) with relapsed or refractory CLL were enrolled onto a phase II study of lenalidomide and rituximab. Patients had received prior fludarabine-based therapy or chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab (375 mg/m2 intravenously) was administered weekly during cycle one and on day 1 of cycles three to 12. Lenalidomide was started on day 9 of cycle one at 10 mg orally and administered daily continuously. Each cycle was 28 days. Rituximab was administered for 12 cycles; lenalidomide could continue indefinitely if patients benefitted clinically. Results The overall response rate was 66%, including 12% complete responses and 12% nodular partial remissions. Time to treatment failure was 17.4 months. Median overall survival has not been reached; estimated survival at 36 months is 71%. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity was neutropenia (73% of patients). Fourteen patients (24%) experienced a grade 3 to 4 infection or febrile episode. There was one episode of grade 3 tumor lysis; one patient experienced renal failure during the first cycle of therapy, and one venous thromboembolic event occurred during the study. Conclusion The combination of lenalidomide and rituximab is active in patients with recurrent CLL and warrants further investigation. PMID:23270003

  1. Safety and efficacy of intrathecal rituximab in children with B cell lymphoid CD20+ malignancies: An international retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Weitzman, Sheila; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Davies, Kimberly; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Reismüller, Bettina; Mellgren, Karin; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Maia, Iris; Abdullah, Shaker; Miakova, Natasha; Glaser, Darryl; Cohn, Richard; Abla, Oussama; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Alexander, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in patients with mature B non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post-transplantation proliferative disorder and acute lymphoblastic leukemia confers a significantly inferior prognosis as compared to patients without CNS disease. Intrathecal (IT) or intraventricular administration of rituximab is an option for this group of patients. We report 25 children with CNS involvement of CD20+ B lymphoid malignancies who received in total 163 IT/intraventricular rituximab doses. The median number of doses received by each patient was 6, with a median dose of 25 mg. The most common adverse events were Grades 1 and 2 peripheral neuropathies in five patients (20%), allergy in two patients, and headache in two patients. These events were self-limited, occurring in the 48 hours after treatment and resolving within 24 hr. Three patients presented with more severe though transient side effects, one with a Grade III neuropathy and two with seizure. Eighteen patients (72%) of those treated with IT/intraventricular rituximab, with or without other CNS directed treatment, achieved a CNS remission. This case series suggests that IT/intraventricular rituximab has therapeutic efficacy and relatively limited toxicity. Prospective trials of IT/intraventricular rituximab for patients with CNS involvement of CD20 + B lymphoid malignancies are warranted. Am. J. Hematol. 91:486-491, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26872652

  2. Efficacy and safety of rituximab therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lan; Han, Fei; Chen, Jiang-hua

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To review the efficacy and safety of rituximab therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).Methods: We searched for randomized controlled trails and observational studies that evaluated the effect of rituximab based on the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI), British Isles lupus assessment group index (BILAG), urine protein levels, and the prednisolone dose, and had adequate data to calculate the mean, standard deviation (SD), and 95% confidence intervals, and to systematically review and meta-analyze observational studies with fixed effects model or random effects model. Results: We included 2 randomized controlled studies and 19 observational clinical studies. We summarized the data from the 19 observational studies, analyzed the heterogeneity of the literature, and then used fixed effect model or random effect model for statistical analysis. The SLEDAI, BILAG, and urine protein levels and the prednisolone dosage were decreased after rituximab treatment, and the decreases in the BILAG, urine protein levels, and the prednisolone dose were found to be significant (P<0.05), when compared with baseline level. Rituximab’s adverse effects generally could be controlled with an effective dosing regimen. Conclusions: Although there are still controversies about rituximab’s treatment on SLE, but our study had showed that rituximab had favorable effects on refractory lupus. The long-term efficacy and safety of rituximab require further study. PMID:22949364

  3. Different sensitivity of rituximab-treatment to B-cells between ABO-incompatible kidney and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Hiroshi; Ide, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yuka; Ishiyama, Kohei; Ohira, Masahiro; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Akita, Tomonori; Tanaka, Junko; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    A desensitization protocol with rituximab is currently widely used for kidney transplantation (KT) and liver transplantation (LT) across the ABO blood group-incompatible (ABO-I) barrier. However, it remains to be elucidated whether rituximab is equally effective for B-cell and T-cell immune responses in both KT and LT recipients. To clarify these effects of rituximab, we enrolled 46 KT and 77 LT recipients in this study. The proportion of peripheral blood B-cells was determined at the perioperative period. T-cell responses to allostimulation were evaluated by a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay. One week after rituximab administration, peripheral B-cells became undetectable in ABO-I KT recipients but remained detectable in some of the ABO-I LT recipients; B-cells were undetectable in both groups by week 2. B-cells remained below the detection limit throughout the first year in the ABO-I KT recipients, whereas they reappeared in the periphery after 6months in the ABO-I LT recipients. There were no significant differences in alloreactive T-cell responses based on MLR analyses between ABO-I and ABO-compatible groups. This study indicates that rituximab has differing B-cell sensitivity between KT and LT recipients and a minimal effect on the alloreactive T-cell responses in KT and LT recipients. PMID:27085793

  4. Suppression of Rituximab-resistant B-cell lymphoma with a novel multi-component anti-CD20 mAb nanocluster

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Mengxin; Chen, Di; Zhu, Xiandi; Zhang, Li; Li, Bohua; Dai, Jianxin; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab has revolutionized the treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL), resistance to treatment still existed. Thus, strategies for suppressing Rituximab-resistant NHLs are urgently needed. Here, an anti-CD20 nanocluster (ACNC) is successfully constructed from its type I and type II mAb (Rituximab and 11B8). These distinct anti-CD20 mAbs are mass grafted to a short chain polymer (polyethylenimine). Compared with parental Rituximab and 11B8, the ACNC had a reduced “off-rate”. Importantly, ACNC efficiently inhibited Rituximab-resistant lymphomas in both disseminated and localized human NHL xenograft models. Further results revealed that ACNC is significantly potent in inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and lysosome-mediated programmed cell death (PCD). This may help explain why ACNC is effective in suppressing rituximab-resistant lymphoma while Rituximab and 11B8 are not. Additionally, ACNC experienced low clearance from peripheral blood and high intratumor accumulation. This improved pharmacokinetics is attributed to the antibody-antigen reaction (active targeting) and enhanced permeability and retention (ERP) effect (passive targeting). This study suggested that ACNC might be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of rituximab-resistant lymphomas. PMID:26284588

  5. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy after rituximab therapy in HIV-negative patients: a report of 57 cases from the Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports project

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Kenneth R.; Evens, Andrew M.; Richey, Elizabeth A.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Focosi, Daniele; Seymour, John F.; Laubach, Jacob; Bawn, Susie D.; Gordon, Leo I.; Winter, Jane N.; Furman, Richard R.; Vose, Julie M.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Mamtani, Ronac; Raisch, Dennis W.; Dorshimer, Gary W.; Rosen, Steven T.; Muro, Kenji; Gottardi-Littell, Numa R.; Talley, Robert L.; Sartor, Oliver; Green, David; Major, Eugene O.

    2009-01-01

    Rituximab improves outcomes for persons with lymphoproliferative disorders and is increasingly used to treat immune-mediated illnesses. Recent reports describe 2 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and 1 with rheumatoid arthritis who developed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) after rituximab treatment. We reviewed PML case descriptions among patients treated with rituximab from the Food and Drug Administration, the manufacturer, physicians, and a literature review from 1997 to 2008. Overall, 52 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders, 2 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 1 patient with rheumatoid arthritis, 1 patient with an idiopathic autoimmune pancytopenia, and 1 patient with immune thrombocytopenia developed PML after treatment with rituximab and other agents. Other treatments included hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (7 patients), purine analogs (26 patients), or alkylating agents (39 patients). One patient with an autoimmune hemolytic anemia developed PML after treatment with corticosteroids and rituximab, and 1 patient with an autoimmune pancytopenia developed PML after treatment with corticosteroids, azathioprine, and rituximab. Median time from last rituximab dose to PML diagnosis was 5.5 months. Median time to death after PML diagnosis was 2.0 months. The case-fatality rate was 90%. Awareness is needed of the potential for PML among rituximab-treated persons. PMID:19264918

  6. Rapid infusion rituximab in combination with corticosteroid-containing chemotherapy or as maintenance therapy is well tolerated and can safely be delivered in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Sehn, Laurie H; Donaldson, Jane; Filewich, Allison; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Gill, Karamjit K; Runzer, Nancy; Searle, Barb; Souliere, Sheila; Spinelli, John J; Sutherland, Judy; Connors, Joseph M

    2007-05-15

    The increasing usage of rituximab in the management of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has created huge logistical challenges with respect to the delivery of this time- and labor-intensive drug. To address these challenges, we developed and tested the feasibility of a 90-minute infusion schedule for rituximab (20% of the dose administered in the first 30 minutes, remaining 80% administered over 60 minutes). A safety analysis performed in 150 patients receiving rituximab with corticosteroid-containing chemotherapy and 56 patients receiving rituximab as maintenance therapy demonstrated that this schedule was well tolerated, with no grade 3 or 4 infusion reactions observed. In addition, no increase in minor reactions was noted. More than 1200 patients have been treated with this rapid rituximab infusion schedule in the province of British Columbia (BC), demonstrating its safety in the community setting. The adoption of this 90-minute schedule as standard practice has had a positive impact on resource utilization. PMID:17244675

  7. A Case of Fulminant Hepatitis due to Echovirus 9 in a Patient on Maintenance Rituximab Therapy for Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, S. J.; Legg, Joanne; Narat, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is a CD20 monoclonal antibody commonly used in the treatment of haematological malignancies. It causes lymphopenia with subsequent compromised humoral immunity resulting in an increased risk of infection. A number of infections and viral reactivations have been described as complicating Rituximab therapy. We report an apparently unique case of echovirus 9 (an enterovirus) infection causing an acute hepatitis and significant morbidity in an adult patient on maintenance treatment of Rituximab for follicular lymphoma. We also describe potential missed opportunities to employ more robust screening for viral infections which may have prevented delays in the appropriate treatment and thus may have altered the patient's clinical course. We also make suggestions for lowering the threshold of viral testing in similar patients in the future. PMID:26106492

  8. [Successful treatment with rituximab in two cases of IgM-monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Koike, Michiaki; Sugimoto, Keiji; Tusui, Miyuki; Yahata, Yuriko

    2012-04-01

    A 66-year-old male was hospitalized with muscle weakness and gait disturbance. Examination revealed IgM 3,407 mg/dl (IgM, κ-type M protein) and he was diagnosed as having IgM-MGUS neuropathy. He suffered from paralysis of respiratory muscles and required a respirator support. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin were performed and he was weaned from the respirator. Rituximab given as 8 weekly infusions improved gait disturbance. A 71-year-old male was hospitalized with lumbago, numbness of lower extremities and gait disturbance. Examination revealed IgM 1,553 mg/dl (IgM, λ-type M protein) and he was diagnosed with IgM-MGUS neuropathy. Rituximab given as 8 weekly infusions improved gait disturbance. It was concluded that rituximab is a well-tolerated treatment that may be effective in some patients with IgM-MGUS neuropathy. PMID:22687979

  9. Delayed-onset grade 4 neutropenia associated with rituximab therapy in a patient with lymphoma: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Motl, Susannah E; Baskin, Reed C

    2005-08-01

    A 53-year-old man developed delayed-onset neutropenia 6 weeks after completing first-line therapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, mitoxantrone, vincristine, and prednisone for high-grade B-cell lymphoma. Bone marrow biopsy demonstrated hypercellular marrow with normal maturation. He also developed interstitial pneumonitis, an adverse event associated with rituximab use. Infiltrates of T cells were found in the patient's lungs. For the next 6 months, the patient required subcutaneous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 300 mug twice/week to maintain a granulocyte count above 1000 cells/mm3. He also received oral antibiotics for mouth sores and thrush. Based on the existing evidence, monitoring blood counts for as long as 8 weeks after rituximab therapy may be advisable, although the literature reports that neutropenia can develop up to 1 year after treatment. The development of a registry and uniform testing may help uncover the cause of this delayed-onset neutropenia. PMID:16207108

  10. Could we use a lower dose of rituximab to treat rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: pros and cons?

    PubMed

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Tolusso, Barbara; Gremese, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    The CERERRA database provides evidence that low-dose rituximab performs as well as the conventional dose in the real world, thus highlighting the possible pharmacoeconomic impact. In clinical trials, it has been shown that rituximab 500 mg twice, performs as well as 1 g twice, 2 weeks apart, in terms of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)20 and ACR50, but not the ACR70. The choice should always be made after considering that the IMAGE trial has demonstrated similar radiographic progression after the first 6 months, but with less control, with low-dose rituximab in the first 6 months. A possible alternative can be hypothesized. PMID:27255529

  11. Human Cytokine Genetic Variants Associated With HBsAg Reverse Seroconversion in Rituximab-Treated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ching-Fen; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Liu, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Wen-Chun; Chen, Po-Min; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Huang, Yi-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation has been noted in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-seronegative patients with CD20+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing rituximab treatment. Clinically, hepatitis flares are usually associated with the reappearance of HBsAg (reverse seroconversion of HBsAg, HBV-RS). It is unclear whether human genetic factors are related to rituximab-associated HBV reactivation. Unvaccinated HBsAg-seronegative adults (n = 104) with CD20+ NHL who had received rituximab-containing therapy without anti-HBV prophylaxis were enrolled. Eighty-nine candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 49 human cytokine genes were chosen and were analyzed using the iPLEX technique. Competing risk regression was used to identify the factors associated with HBV-RS. Participants had a median age of 66.1 years and 56.7% were male (n = 59). The anti-HBs and anti-HBc positivity rates were 82.4% and 94.1%, respectively, among patients for whom data were available (approximately 81%). A mean of 7.14 cycles of rituximab therapy were administered, and a total of 14 (13.4%) patients developed HBV-RS. Nine SNPs showed significant differences in frequency between patients with or without HBV-RS: CD40 rs1883832, IL4 rs2243248 and rs2243263, IL13 rs1295686, IL18 rs243908, IL20 rs1518108, and TNFSF13B rs12428930 and rs12583006. Multivariate analysis showed that ≥6 cycles of rituximab therapy, IL18 rs243908, and the IL4 haplotype rs2243248∼rs2243263 were independently associated with HBV-RS. The IL4 haplotype rs2243248∼rs2243263 was significantly associated with HBV-RS regardless of anti-HBs status. Polymorphisms in human cytokine genes impact the risk of rituximab-associated HBV-RS. PMID:26986131

  12. Characterization of Self-Assembled Monolayers of Peptide Mimotopes of CD20 Antigen and Their Binding with Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Leo, Norman; Shang, Yuqin; Yu, Jing-jiang; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2015-12-29

    CD20, expressed in greater than 90% of B-lymphocytic lymphomas, is a target for antibody therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the protein CD20, allowing it to destroy B cells and to treat lymphoma, leukemia, transplant rejection, and autoimmune disorder. In this work, the binding of rituximab to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of peptide mimotopes of CD20 antigen was systematically characterized. Four peptide mimotopes of CD 20 antigen were selected from the literature and redesigned to allow their SAM immobilizations on gold electrodes through a peptide linker with cysteine. The bindings of these peptides with rituximab and control mAbs (trastuzumab and bevacizumab) were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Among the four peptide mimotopes initially selected, the peptide designated as CN-14 (CGSGSGSWPRWLEN) was the most selective and sensitive for rituximab binding. The CN-14 SAM was further characterized by ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the CN-14 SAM film was approximately 32 Å, and the CN-14 SAM is suggested to be stabilized by a salt bridge of Arg-10 and Glu-13 between CN-14 peptides. The CN-14 salt bridge was evaluated by a series of modifications to the CN-14 peptide sequence and characterized by QCM. The CN-14 amide variant produced a better affinity to rituximab than CN-14 without a significant impact on selectivity. As the pKa of the Glu residue of CN-14 increased, the affinity of the SAM to rituximab increased, whereas the selectivity decreased. This was attributed to the weakening of the salt bridge between the CN-14 Arg-10 and Glu-13 at higher pKa values for Glu-13. Our study shows that peptide mimotopes have potential benefits in sensor applications, as the peptide-peptide interactions in the SAMs can be manipulated by the addition of functional groups to the peptide to influence the binding of target proteins. PMID:26609837

  13. Rituximab in the Treatment of Refractory Adult and Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Adult Polymyositis: A Randomized, Placebo-phase Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G.; Ascherman, Dana P.; Levesque, Marc C.; Barohn, Richard J.; Feldman, Brian M.; Harris-Love, Michael O.; Koontz, Diane C.; Fertig, Noreen; Kelley, Stephanie S.; Pryber, Sherrie L.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rockette, Howard E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of rituximab in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-phase, trial of adult and pediatric myositis. Methods Adults with refractory polymyositis and adults and children with refractory dermatomyositis were enrolled. Entry criteria included muscle weakness and ≥2 additional abnormal core set measures (CSM) for adults. JDM patients required ≥ 3 abnormal CSM with or without muscle weakness. Patients were randomized to either ‘rituximab early’ or ‘rituximab late’ and glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive therapy were allowed at entry. The primary endpoint compared the time to achieve the preliminary International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group definition of improvement (DOI) between the 2 groups. The secondary endpoints were time to achieve ≥20% improvement in muscle strength, and the proportion of early and late rituximab patients achieving DOI at week 8. Results Among 200 randomized patients (76 PM/76 DM/48 JDM), 195 showed no difference in the time to DOI between the rituximab late (n=102) and rituximab early (n=93) groups (p=0.74, log rank) with a median time to DOI of 20.2 weeks and 20.0 weeks respectively. The secondary endpoints also did not significantly differ between the two treatment groups. However, 161 (83%) of randomized patients met the DOI and individual CSM improved in both groups throughout the 44-week trial. Conclusion Although there were no significant differences in the two treatment arms for the primary and secondary endpoints, 83% of refractory adult and juvenile myositis patients met the DOI. The role of B cell depleting therapies in myositis warrants further study with consideration for a different trial design. PMID:23124935

  14. Rituximab therapy for chonic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a long-term follow-up analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Chavez, Jaime; Montiel-Cervantes, Laura; Esparza, Miriam García-Ruiz; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term response to rituximab in patients with chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Adults with ITP fail to respond to conventional therapies in almost 30% of cases, developing a refractory disease. Rituximab has been successfully used in these patients. We used rituximab at 375 mg/m2, IV, weekly for a total of four doses in 18 adult patients. Complete remission (CR) was considered if the platelet count was >100 × 109/l, partial remission (PR) if platelets were >50 × 109/l, minimal response (MR) if the platelet count was >30 × 109/l and <50 × 109/l, and no response if platelet count remained unchanged. Response was classified as sustained (SR) when it was stable for a minimum of 6 months. Median age was 43.5 years (range, 17 to 70). Median platelet count at baseline was 12.5 × 109/l (range, 3.0 to 26.3). CR was achieved in five patients (28%), PR in five (28%), MR in four (22%), and two patients were classified as therapeutic failures (11%). Two additional patients were lost to follow-up. The median time between rituximab therapy and response was 14 weeks (range, 4 to 32). SR was achieved in 12 patients (67%). There were no severe adverse events during rituximab therapy. During follow-up (median, 26 months; range, 12 to 59), no other immunosuppressive drugs were used. In conclusion, rituximab therapy is effective and safe in adult patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Overall response rate achieved is high, long term, and with no risk of adverse events. PMID:17874322

  15. Cytomegalovirus infection in autologous stem cell transplant recipients in the era of rituximab.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tania; John, Jisha; Kotecha, Aditya; Deol, Abhinav; Saliminia, Tanaz; Revankar, Sanjay; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation/disease after autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is much lower than that after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. With the recent use of rituximab during cancer chemotherapy or conditioning regimens prior to transplantation, there has been an increasing concern of opportunistic infections including CMV. In the present study, we reviewed the patients undergoing ASCT from December 2007 to December 2013 to identify those developing CMV reactivation/disease. Out of the 978 patients who underwent ASCT at the Karmanos Cancer Institute, 239 patients were tested for symptomatic CMV reactivation based on clinical suspicion. Of the tested patients, 7/239 (2.9 %) were documented to have CMV reactivation within 90 days of ASCT. The median time to develop CMV viremia was 32 days from transplantation. Of the 239 patients tested, CMV viremia was detected in 3 out of 72 patients who received rituximab as compared to 4 out of 167 patients who did not. Three of these seven viremic patients were treated with anti-viral drugs; viremia resolved in all patients at a median of 24 days. Three patients were found to develop other bacterial and/or fungal infections following CMV viremia. Two of the seven patients died during 1-year follow-up, due to primary disease progression or Candida sepsis. None of the patients developed proven tissue-invasive CMV disease. The study did not evaluate the incidence of asymptomatic CMV infection/reactivation. Despite prior publications based on limited data, rituximab does not appear to contribute to an increased frequency of symptomatic CMV reactivation following ASCT. PMID:27225264

  16. Rituximab for the Treatment of IgG4-Related Tubulointerstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Blaithin A.; Novick, Tessa; Scheel, Paul J.; Bagnasco, Serena; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Immunoglobulin type gamma 4 (IgG4)-related disease is a relatively newly described clinical entity characterized by a distinctive histopathological appearance, increased numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells and often, but not always, elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. The most common renal manifestation of IgG4-related disease is tubulointerstitial nephritis marked with proteinuria, hematuria, decreased kidney function, hypocomplementemia, and radiologic abnormalities. Renal biopsy characteristics include dense lymphoplasmacytic tubulointerstitial nephritis that stains for IgG4, storiform fibrosis, and immune complex deposition in the interstitium and along tubule basement membranes. Treatment traditionally consists of prolonged glucocorticoids but cases refractory to glucocorticoids have been reported. We report a case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man who presented with fatigue, 50 pound weight loss, dyspnea, lymphadenopathy, and nephromegaly. The patient was first misdiagnosed as chronic interstitial nephritis secondary to renal sarcoid and was treated with repeated doses of prednisone. On his third relapse, he underwent a repeat renal biopsy and a diagnosis of IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis was confirmed. He was refractory to treatment with prednisone. The patient received Rituximab and had prompt sustained improvement in renal function. At 1 year post Rituximab treatment, his serum creatinine remains at baseline and imaging study revealed reduction in his kidney size. This is the first case report using Rituximab as a steroid sparing option for refractory IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. More information is needed on the long-term effects of using of B-cell depleting agents for glucocorticoid resistant IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:26266393

  17. Late Occurrence of PML in a Patient Treated for Lymphoma with Immunomodulatory Chemotherapies, Bendamustine, Rituximab, and Ibritumomab Tiuxetan

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Michael A.; Renga, Vijay; Pachner, Andrew R.; Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    PML caused by John Cunningham (JC) virus is a rare but an increasingly recognized entity. With the advent of newer immunomodulatory therapies with monoclonal antibodies, there is an increasing incidence of PML. Initially concern was restricted to patients treated for multiple sclerosis with natalizumab but more case reports are being reported during treatment for other conditions like Crohn's disease and lymphoma with agents such as rituximab. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman who developed PML a year after completion of therapy with rituximab, ibritumomab, and bendamustine. PMID:25705531

  18. Risk of Reverse Seroconversion of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen in Rituximab-Treated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yang, Ching-Fen; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Liu, Chun-Yu; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chen, Po-Min; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Huang, Yi-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rituximab causes hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-seronegative patients with CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (CD20+ NHL), especially for those seropositive to the antibody of core antigen (anti-HBc). Clinical hepatitis usually develops after reverse seroconversion of HBsAg (HBV-RS), indicated by the reappearance of HBsAg in serum. Because of the relatively high prevalence of anti-HBc seropositivity in unvaccinated HBsAg-seronegative adults in an HBV hyperendemic area, we aimed to investigate additional factors influencing the development of rituximab-associated HBV-RS. Between January 2000 and December 2010, unvaccinated HBsAg-seronegative adults with CD20+ NHL who had received rituximab-containing therapy but not anti-HBV agents were enrolled. Patients with and without HBV-RS were compared in terms of clinical factors and treatments including the number of cycles of rituximab therapy, and transplantation. Competing risk regression was used to identify the factors associated with HBV-RS. For the 482 patients enrolled, the serological status of anti-HBc was available in 75.9%, with a seropositivity rate of 86.6%. At the last follow-up, a total of 33 (6.85%) patients had HBV-RS, with 95.8% anti-HBc seropositive, 78.9% anti-HBs seropositive, and none anti-HCV seropositive. HBV-RS patients have received more cycles (≥6) and prolonged durations of rituximab therapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The overall survival was not different between patients with and those without HBV-RS. At the time of HBV-RS, a total of 25 (78.1%) patients had hepatitis flare, especially when HBV-RS appeared during/after induction therapy (100%, 10 of 10). Three (9.1%) patients had fulminant hepatitis, resulting in death in 1 (3%) patient. A higher rituximab cycle intensity was associated with a higher rate of hepatitis flare at the time of HBV-RS. When death in the absence of HBV-RS was considered as the competing risk

  19. Protein-losing enteropathy associated with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus with a good response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Sansinanea, Pierina; Carrica, Sebastián Augusto; Marcos, Josefina; García, Mercedes Argentina

    2016-01-01

    A case is presented of a protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a 17 year-old female patient, who presented with ascites, edema and hypoalbuminemia. The diagnosis of SLE was based on the presence of: malar rash, oral ulcers, thrombocytopenia, antinuclear antibodies, IgM anticardiolipin antibody, and lupus anticoagulant. Renal and liver diseases were ruled out. The PLE diagnosis was confirmed with fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin clearance. The PLE was refractory to different lines of immunosuppressive agents like glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and cyclosporine, showing a satisfactory and sustained response with rituximab, allowing steroid sparing and long term remission. PMID:25818375

  20. Steroid Refractory Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia Secondary to Sarcoidosis Successfully Treated with Rituximab and Mycophenolate Mofetil.

    PubMed

    Green, Sarah; Partridge, Erica; Idedevbo, Edore; Borg, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is not a well-recognised complication of sarcoidosis. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with acute warm haemolytic anaemia and widespread lymphadenopathy. Sarcoidosis was diagnosed on lymph node biopsy and further investigation. The haemolytic anaemia responded only to a high dose of steroids. Evidence regarding treatment of steroid refractory autoimmune haemolysis secondary to sarcoidosis is lacking. Based on the emergent evidence that both disorders share common immunopathogenic mechanisms involving Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes, our patient was given rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil to successfully suppress the haemolysis and sarcoid activity. PMID:27563474

  1. Lenalidomide plus Rituximab as Initial Treatment for Mantle-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Jia; Martin, Peter; Shah, Bijal; Schuster, Stephen J.; Smith, Sonali M.; Furman, Richard R.; Christos, Paul; Rodriguez, Amelyn; Svoboda, Jakub; Lewis, Jessica; Katz, Orel; Coleman, Morton; Leonard, John P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mantle-cell lymphoma is generally incurable. Initial treatment is not standardized but usually includes cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory compound, and rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, are active in patients with recurrent mantle-cell lymphoma. We evaluated lenalidomide plus rituximab as a first-line therapy. METHODS We conducted a single-group, multicenter, phase 2 study with induction and maintenance phases. During the induction phase, lenalidomide was administered at a dose of 20 mg daily on days 1 through 21 of every 28-day cycle for 12 cycles; the dose was escalated to 25 mg daily after the first cycle if no dose-limiting adverse events occurred during the first cycle and was reduced to 15 mg daily during the maintenance phase. Rituximab was administered once weekly for the first 4 weeks and then once every other cycle until disease progression. The primary end point was the overall response rate. Secondary end points included outcomes related to safety, survival, and quality of life. RESULTS A total of 38 participants were enrolled at four centers from July 2011 through April 2014. The median age was 65 years. On the basis of the Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index scores, the proportions of participants with low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk disease at baseline were similar (34%, 34%, and 32%, respectively). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (in 50% of the patients), rash (in 29%), thrombocytopenia (in 13%), an inflammatory syndrome (“tumor flare”) (in 11%), anemia (in 11%), serum sickness (in 8%), and fatigue (in 8%). At the median follow-up of 30 months (through February 2015), the overall response rate among the participants who could be evaluated was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78 to 98), and the complete response rate was 64% (95% CI, 46 to 79); median progression-free survival had not been reached. The 2-year progression-free survival was estimated to be

  2. Steroid Refractory Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia Secondary to Sarcoidosis Successfully Treated with Rituximab and Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Idedevbo, Edore; Borg, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is not a well-recognised complication of sarcoidosis. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with acute warm haemolytic anaemia and widespread lymphadenopathy. Sarcoidosis was diagnosed on lymph node biopsy and further investigation. The haemolytic anaemia responded only to a high dose of steroids. Evidence regarding treatment of steroid refractory autoimmune haemolysis secondary to sarcoidosis is lacking. Based on the emergent evidence that both disorders share common immunopathogenic mechanisms involving Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes, our patient was given rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil to successfully suppress the haemolysis and sarcoid activity. PMID:27563474

  3. Activity and safety of combined rituximab with chlorambucil in patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bauwens, Deborah; Maerevoet, Marie; Michaux, Lucienne; Théate, Ivan; Hagemeijer, Anne; Stul, Michel; Danse, Etienne; Costantini, Sabrina; Vannuffel, Pascal; Straetmans, Nicole; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Deneys, Véronique; Ferrant, Augustin; Van Den Neste, Eric

    2005-11-01

    We evaluated the combination of rituximab with chlorambucil in patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) not eligible for aggressive therapy. Fourteen patients (male/female: 9/5) were included (two newly diagnosed, 12 relapsed/refractory). The toxicities were neutropenia, thrombopenia and infection. Nine (64%) patients responded; five (36%) achieved complete remission and four (29%) achieved partial remission. The median progression-free survival for responders was 26 months (95% CI, 4-48). Marrow polymerase chain reaction negativity was attained in seven responders. These results suggest that this schedule may have notable antitumour activity in patients with MCL, including patients in relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:16225653

  4. Consensus statement on the use of rituximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J S; Keystone, E C; Emery, P; Breedveld, F C; Betteridge, N; Burmester, G R; Dougados, M; Ferraccioli, G; Jaeger, U; Klareskog, L; Kvien, T K; Martin‐Mola, E; Pavelka, K

    2007-01-01

    A large number of experts experienced in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis were involved in formulating a consensus statement on the use of B cell‐targeted treatment with rituximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The statement was supported by data from randomised controlled clinical trials and the substantial literature on oncology. The statement underwent three rounds of discussions until its ultimate formulation. It should guide clinicians in the use of this newly approved biological agent in treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17068064

  5. Optimizing radioimmunotherapy by matching dose distribution with tumor structure using 3D reconstructions of serial images.

    PubMed

    Flynn, A A; Pedley, R B; Green, A J; Boxer, G M; Boden, R; Begent, R H

    2001-10-01

    The biological effect of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is most commonly assessed in terms of the absorbed radiation dose. In tumor, conventional dosimetry methods assume a uniform radionuclide and calculate a mean dose throughout the tumor. However, the vasculature of solid tumors tends to be highly irregular and the systemic delivery of antibodies is therefore heterogeneous. Tumor-specific antibodies preferentially localize in the viable, radiosensitive parts of the tumor whereas non-specific antibodies can penetrate into the necrosis where the dose is wasted. As a result, the observed biological effect can be very different to the predicted effect from conventional dose estimates. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential for optimizing the biological effect of RIT by matching the dose-distribution with tumor structure through the selection of appropriate antibodies and radionuclides. Storage phosphor plate technology was used to acquire images of the antibody distribution in serial tumor sections. Images of the distributions of a trivalent (TFM), bivalent (A5B7-IgG), monovalent (MFE-23) and a non-specific antibody (MOPC) were obtained. These images were registered with corresponding images showing tumor morphology. Serial images were reconstructed to form 3D maps of the antibody distribution and tumor structure. Convolution of the image of antibody distribution with beta dose point kernals generated dose-rate distributions for 14C, 131I and 90Y. These were statistically compared with the tumor structure. The highest correlation was obtained for the multivalent antibodies combined with 131I, due to specific retention in viable areas of tumor coupled with the fact that much of the dose was deposted locally. With decreasing avidity the correlation also decreased and with the non-specific antibody this correlation was negative, indicating higher concentrations in the necrotic regions. In conclusion, the dose distribution can be optimized in tumor by selecting

  6. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of novel ligands for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hyun-Soon; Milenic, Diane E; Garmestani, Kayhan; Brady, Erik D; Arora, Hans; Pfiester, Candice; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2006-05-01

    Novel ligands cis-2,6-bis[N,N-bis(carboxymethyl)aminomethyl]-1-piperidineacetic acid (PIP-DTPA), cis-[(1R,11S)-6,9,15-Tris-carboxymethyl-3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadec-3-yl]-acetic acid (PIP-DOTA), cis-{2,7-bis-[bis-carboxymethyl-amino)-methyl]-azepan-1-yl}-acetic acid (AZEP-DTPA), [2-(4,7-bis-carboxymethyl-[1,4,7]triazacyclononan-1-yl-ethyl]-2-carbonylmethyl-amino]-tetraacetic acid (NETA) and [{4-carboxymethyl-7-[2-(carboxymethylamino)-ethyl]-perhydro-1,4,7-triazonin-1-yl}-acetic acid (NPTA) are investigated as potential chelators of 177Lu, 90Y, 212Pb and 213Bi for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The new ligands are radiolabeled with 177Lu, 86/88/90Y, 203Pb and 205/6Bi, and in vitro stability and in vivo stability of the radiolabeled complexes are assessed in human serum and athymic mice, respectively. In vitro studies indicate that all radiolabeled complexes with the exception of 90Y-AZEP-DTPA are stable in serum for 5-11 days. All new ligands examined herein are found to tightly hold 177Lu in vivo. Piperidine-backboned DTPA (PIP-DTPA) complexes radiolabeled with all radioisotopes examined display excellent in vivo stability, that is, excretion without dissociation. The azepane-backboned DTPA derivative, AZEP-DTPA, appears ineffective in binding all but 177Lu in vivo. NETA and NPTA radiolabeled with 86Y or 177Lu exhibit rapid blood clearance and low organ uptakes. Significant accretion in the kidney, femur and/or liver is observed with 203Pb-labeled AZEP-DTPA, PIP-DOTA and NPTA. Both 203Pb-PIP-DOTA and 205/6Bi-PIP-DOTA result in moderate to high renal accumulation of radioactivity. NETA exhibits improved renal accumulation with respect to PIP-DOTA for 205/6Bi but also shows significant liver uptake. Of all ligands studied, only PIP-DTPA appears to effectively bind 203Pb and 205/6Bi in vivo. PIP-DTPA, PIP-DOTA, NETA and NPTA all show strong evidence of rapid blood clearance and low organ uptake for 177Lu and 90Y. Serum stability and in vivo biodistribution

  7. Radioimmunotherapy with a 64Cu-labeled monoclonal antibody: a comparison with 67Cu.

    PubMed Central

    Connett, J M; Anderson, C J; Guo, L W; Schwarz, S W; Zinn, K R; Rogers, B E; Siegel, B A; Philpott, G W; Welch, M J

    1996-01-01

    67Cu (t1/2 = 62 h) has demonstrated potential as a radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy, but limited availability severely restricts its widespread use. 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 h) has been shown to have comparable effectiveness in vitro and in vivo. The present study was undertaken to examine the therapeutic potential of 64Cu- and 67Cu-bromoacetamidobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca ne-N, N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid (BAT)-2-iminothiolane (2IT)-1A3 (1A3 is a mouse anti-human colorectal cancer mAb) for treatment of GW39 human colon carcinoma carried in hamster thighs. Hamsters were injected with 64Cu- or 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 or Cu-labeled nonspecific IgG (MOPC) or saline. Hamsters were killed 6-7 months after therapy or when tumors were > or = 10 g. Of the hamsters with small tumors (mean weight 0.43 +/- 0.25 g), 87.5% were disease-free 7 months after treatment with 2 mCi (1 Ci = 37 GBq) of 64Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 or 0.4 MCi of 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3. The mean tumor doses at these activities of 64Cu- and 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 were 586 and 1269 rad (1 rad = 0.01 Gy), respectively. In contrast, 76% of hamsters treated with 2 mCi of 64Cu-BAT-2IT-MOPC or 0.4 mCi of 67Cu-BAT-2IT-MOPC had to be killed before 6 months because of tumor regrowth. When hamsters with larger tumors (mean weight 0.66 +/- 0.11 g) were treated with 64Cu- or 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3, survival was extended compared with controls, but only one animal remained tumor-free to 6 months. These results demonstrate that 64Cu- and 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 given in a single administered dose can eradicate small tumors without significant host toxicity, but additional strategies to deliver higher tumor doses will be needed for larger tumors. PMID:8692901

  8. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  9. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  10. Complex cell geometry and sources distribution model for Monte Carlo single cell dosimetry with iodine 125 radioimmunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, F. X.; Paillas, S.; Pouget, J. P.; Incerti, S.; Bardiès, M.; Bordage, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    In cellular dosimetry, common assumptions consider concentric spheres for nucleus and cell and uniform radionuclides distribution. These approximations do not reflect reality, specially in the situation of radioimmunotherapy with Auger emitters, where very short-ranged electrons induce hyper localised energy deposition. A realistic cellular dosimetric model was generated to give account of the real geometry and activity distribution, for non-internalizing and internalizing antibodies (mAbs) labelled with Auger emitter I-125. The impact of geometry was studied by comparing the real geometry obtained from confocal microscopy for both cell and nucleus with volume equivalent concentric spheres. Non-uniform and uniform source distributions were considered for each mAbs distribution. Comparisons in terms of mean deposited energy per decay, energy deposition spectra and energy-volume histograms were calculated using Geant4. We conclude that realistic models are needed, especially when energy deposition is highly non-homogeneous due to source distribution.

  11. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Jun; Fisher, Darrell R.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-04-01

    We report a novel approach for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin core-shell nanoparticles based on an apoferritin template, conjugated to the protein biotin. To prepare the nanoparticle conjugates, we used non-radioactive lutetium as a model target or surrogate for radiolutetium (177Lu). The central cavity, multi-channel structure, and chemical properties of apoferritin are well-suited for sequentially diffusing lutetium and phosphate ions into the cavity--resulting in a stable core-shell composite. We characterized the synthesized LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We tested the pre-targeting capability of biotin-modified lutetium/apoferritin nanoparticle using streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and streptavidin-modified fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This paper presents a simple, fast, and efficient method for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle conjugates with biotin for potential applications in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoimaging of cancer.

  12. Immunreconstitution and Infectious Complications After Rituximab Treatment in Children and Adolescents: What Do We Know and What Can We Learn from Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Worch, Jennifer; Makarova, Olga; Burkhardt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is widely used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies in adults and increasingly in pediatric patients. By depleting B-cells, rituximab interferes with humoral immunity. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immune reconstitution and infectious complications after rituximab treatment in children and adolescents. Immune reconstitution starts usually after six months with recovery to normal between nine to twelve months. Extended rituximab treatment results in a prolonged recovery of B-cells without an increase of clinically relevant infections. The kinetic of B-cell recovery is influenced by the concomitant chemotherapy and the underlying disease. Intensive B-NHL treatment such as high-dose chemotherapy followed by rituximab bears a risk for prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia. Overall transient alteration of immune reconstitution and infections after rituximab treatment are acceptable for children and adolescent without significant differences compared to adults. However, age related disparities in the kinetic of immune reconstitution and the definitive role of rituximab in the treatment for children and adolescents with B-cell malignancies need to be evaluated in prospective controlled clinical trials. PMID:25643241

  13. Immunreconstitution and infectious complications after rituximab treatment in children and adolescents: what do we know and what can we learn from adults?

    PubMed

    Worch, Jennifer; Makarova, Olga; Burkhardt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is widely used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies in adults and increasingly in pediatric patients. By depleting B-cells, rituximab interferes with humoral immunity. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immune reconstitution and infectious complications after rituximab treatment in children and adolescents. Immune reconstitution starts usually after six months with recovery to normal between nine to twelve months. Extended rituximab treatment results in a prolonged recovery of B-cells without an increase of clinically relevant infections. The kinetic of B-cell recovery is influenced by the concomitant chemotherapy and the underlying disease. Intensive B-NHL treatment such as high-dose chemotherapy followed by rituximab bears a risk for prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia. Overall transient alteration of immune reconstitution and infections after rituximab treatment are acceptable for children and adolescent without significant differences compared to adults. However, age related disparities in the kinetic of immune reconstitution and the definitive role of rituximab in the treatment for children and adolescents with B-cell malignancies need to be evaluated in prospective controlled clinical trials. PMID:25643241

  14. Therapeutic effectiveness of rituximab in a patient with unresponsive autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Amital, Anat; Dux, Shlomo; Shitrit, David; Shpilberg, Ofer; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2010-11-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterised by the accumulation of lung surfactant in the alveoli. In most cases it is an autoimmune disease with antibodies directed against the growth factor granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Standard of care consists of whole lung lavages in symptomatic patients. An alternative treatment is GM-CSF injections. The case history is reported of a patient with PAP and severe dyspnoea and hypoxaemia. Whole lung lavages and GM-CSF initially resulted in partial remission. However, the patient's condition deteriorated and her saturation during rest with high-flow oxygen treatment was 85%. The patient was treated with an anti-CD20 antibody rituximab which resulted in dramatic improvement. Room air saturation increased to 98% with exercise and she no longer required supplemental oxygen. The diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide increased from 27% to 48% of predicted and the chest x-rays improved. Rituximab may be useful in the treatment of patients with unresponsive PAP. PMID:20855439

  15. Cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, alemtuzumab, and rituximab as salvage therapy for heavily pretreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Badoux, Xavier C.; Keating, Michael J.; Wang, Xuemei; O'Brien, Susan M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan; Koller, Charles; Lerner, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2011-01-01

    Patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and high-risk features, such as fludarabine refractoriness, complex karyotype, or abnormalities of chromosome 17p, experience poor outcomes after standard fludaradine-based regimens. Alemtuzumab is a chimeric CD52 monoclonal antibody with activity in CLL patients with fludarabine-refractory disease and 17p deletion. We report the outcome for 80 relapsed or refractory patients with CLL enrolled in a phase 2 study of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, alemtuzumab, and rituximab (CFAR). All patients were assessed for response and progression according to the 1996 CLL-working group criteria. For the intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 65%, including 29% complete response. The estimated progression-free survival was 10.6 months and median overall survival was 16.7 months. Although we noted higher complete response in high-risk patients after CFAR compared with a similar population who had received fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab as salvage therapy, there was no significant improvement in progression-free survival and overall survival appeared worse. CFAR was associated with a high rate of infectious complications with 37 patients (46%) experiencing a serious infection during therapy and 28% of evaluable patients experiencing late serious infections. Although CFAR produced good response rates in this highly pretreated high-risk group of patients, there was no benefit in survival outcomes. PMID:21670470

  16. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis treated successfully with rituximab in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Castrale, Cindy; El Haggan, Wael; Chapon, Françoise; Reman, Oumedaly; Lobbedez, Thierry; Ryckelynck, Jean Philippe; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG) in renal transplant recipients is rare multisystemic angiocentric lymphoproliferative disorder with significant malignant potential. Here, we describe LYG in a 70-year-old renal allograft recipient who, 4 years after transplantation, on tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone maintenance immunosuppression, complained of low-grade fever, persistent headache and gait disturbance. The MRI of the brain revealed diffuse periventricular cerebral and cerebellar contrast-enhanced lesions. The CT scan of the thorax showed multiple pulmonary nodular opacities in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed LYG based on the cerebral biopsy showing perivascular infiltration of CD20-positive B-lymphocytes with granulomatous lesions and immunofluorescence staining with anti-EBV antibodies. With careful reduction of the immunossuppression combined with the use of rituximab, our patient showed a complete disappearance of LYG, and she is clinically well more than 4 years after the diagnosis, with good kidney function. No recurrence has been observed by radiological imaging until now. This is the first report of a durable (>4 years) complete remission of LYG after treatment with rituximab in renal transplantation. PMID:21559262

  17. Rituximab plus liposomal doxorubicin in HIV-infected patients with KSHV-associated multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Uldrick, Thomas S; Polizzotto, Mark N; Aleman, Karen; Wyvill, Kathleen M; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Wang, Victoria; Pittaluga, Stefania; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Steinberg, Seth M; Little, Richard F; Yarchoan, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus-associated multicentric Castleman disease (KSHV-MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder, most commonly seen in HIV-infected patients, that has a high mortality if untreated. Concurrent KS is common. Although rituximab has reported activity in KSHV-MCD, its use is often associated with KS progression. Within a natural history study of KSHV-MCD, we prospectively evaluated rituximab 375 mg/m(2) combined with liposomal doxorubicin 20 mg/m(2) (R-Dox) every 3 weeks in 17 patients. Patients received a median of 4 cycles (range 3-9). All received antiretroviral therapy, 11 received consolidation interferon-α, and 6 received consolidation high-dose zidovudine with valganciclovir. Using NCI KSHV-MCD response criteria, major clinical and biochemical responses were attained in 94% and 88% of patients, respectively. With a median 58 months' potential follow-up, 3-year event-free survival was 69% and 3-year overall survival was 81%. During R-Dox therapy, cutaneous KS developed in 1 patient, whereas 5 of 6 patients with it had clinical improvement. R-Dox was associated with significant improvement in anemia and hypoalbuminemia. KSHV viral load, KSHV viral interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, human interleukin-6, and serum immunoglobulin free light chains decreased with therapy. R-Dox is effective in symptomatic KSHV-MCD and may be useful in patients with concurrent KS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00092222. PMID:25331113

  18. Rituximab in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma primary of the lung.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Agustin; Nambo, Maria J; Huerta-Guzman, Judith; Silva, Luis; Neri, Natividad

    2013-03-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma primary of lung (DLBCL-PL) is a rare presentation of extranodal lymphoma, in most cases chemotherapy-based anthracyclines: CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) has been the treatment, with excellent outcome. The addition of rituximab to CHOP (R-CHOP) has been considered the gold standard in the treatment of nodal DLBCL. Thus, we assess in a large number of cases of DLBCL-PL whether the use of R-CHOP could improve survival in this setting of patients. Forty-two patients with DLBCL-PL, stage IE, age 65 years or younger, were treated with standard R-CHOP, no consolidation radiotherapy or maintenance therapy were considered. They were matched with patients who received CHOP alone to assess efficacy and toxicity. Complete response was observed in 35 patients (83%), and 7 patients were considered failure (16%). The study has a median follow-up of 42.8 months. Actuarial curves at 5 years showed that progression-free survival was 88 % and overall survival was 70 %. The results were not statistically different when compared retrospectively with patients who received CHOP alone. Treatment was well tolerated. The addition of rituximab to chemotherapy did not improve outcome in patients with DLBCL-PL. PMID:23394581

  19. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed; Rameez, Huda; Al-Taee, Maha F

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou–Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies. PMID:27579294

  20. Outcomes 5 years after response to rituximab therapy in children and adults with immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Lee, Soo Y.; Stasi, Roberto; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Godeau, Bertrand; Kanter, Julie; Neufeld, Ellis; Taube, Tillmann; Ramenghi, Ugo; Shenoy, Shalini; Ward, Mary J.; Mihatov, Nino; Patel, Vinay L.; Bierling, Philippe; Lesser, Martin; Cooper, Nichola; Bussel, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Treatments for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) providing durable platelet responses without continued dosing are limited. Whereas complete responses (CRs) to B-cell depletion in ITP usually last for 1 year in adults, partial responses (PRs) are less durable. Comparable data do not exist for children and 5-year outcomes are unavailable. Patients with ITP treated with rituximab who achieved CRs and PRs (platelets > 150 × 109/L or 50-150 × 109/L, respectively) were selected to be assessed for duration of their response; 72 adults whose response lasted at least 1 year and 66 children with response of any duration were included. Patients had baseline platelet counts < 30 × 109/L; 95% had ITP of > 6 months in duration. Adults and children each had initial overall response rates of 57% and similar 5-year estimates of persisting response (21% and 26%, respectively). Children did not relapse after 2 years from initial treatment whereas adults did. Initial CR and prolonged B-cell depletion predicted sustained responses whereas prior splenectomy, age, sex, and duration of ITP did not. No novel or substantial long-term clinical toxicity was observed. In summary, 21% to 26% of adults and children with chronic ITP treated with standard-dose rituximab maintained a treatment-free response for at least 5 years without major toxicity. These results can inform clinical decision-making. PMID:22566601

  1. Neuromyelitis optica: Contribution of therapeutic responses markers monitoring in patients given rituximab.

    PubMed

    Romero, G; Ticchioni, M; Cohen, M; Rosenthal-Allieri, M A; Mondot, L; Lebrun Frenay, C

    2016-03-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a central nervous system inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by medullary and/or optical nerve damage. It is rare but life-threatening. Concerning the treatment of NMO, many drugs have been used in background therapy. Some studies have shown efficacy of rituximab (an antiCD20 monoclonal anti-body) either on the reduction of the annual number of exacerbation or the mean score EDSS. In 2013, a Korean team reported a new protocol during which they administered rituximab only when memory B lymphocytes CD27+ were detectable in the bloodstream. In our patient, institution of this protocol led to clinical benefit with a major decrease in the EDSS score over time (7 in August 2012 vs. 1 in October 2015), a reduction of the total administered dose (4g in 2013 vs. 1.375g in 2014 vs. 0g in 2015) and side effects. Compared with the rate of theoretical administration, health expenditure savings reached 1700 Euros per month over the 11-month treatment. Monitoring therapeutic response markers with memory B lymphocyte counts appear to be an efficient cost-effective way to measure clinical efficiency, reduce total doses, and limit side effects. PMID:26915311

  2. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed; Rameez, Huda; Al-Taee, Maha F

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou-Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies. PMID:27579294

  3. Rituximab for refractory subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMI, SEYED MEHDI; FAZELI, SEYED AMIRHOSSEIN; VAHEDI, ABDOLBASET; GOLABCHIFARD, REZA

    2016-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is a neutrophilic dermatosis characterised by sudden onset of fever, neutrophilia, erythematous skin rashes and neutrophilic infiltration of the dermis. Subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome, or Sweet's panniculitis, is an uncommon variant of the classic syndrome, with hypodermal neutrophilic infiltration. The association of Sweet's syndrome with various malignancies has been reported. The most common underlying hematological malignancies are of myeloid origin; however, there have been several reports of the classic Sweet's syndrome in patients with a lymphoproliferative disorder, although the association of subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome with lymphoproliferative disorders has not been well-documented thus far. Herein, we present the case of a 48-year-old man with a 2-year history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia who developed fever and skin rashes, without any evidence of a relapse. The clinical and pathological investigation resulted in the diagnosis of subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome. The patient exhibited no significant response to conventional therapeutic measures; however, following two subsequent doses of rituximab, his general condition and skin rash improved. The follow-up skin biopsy demonstrated dermal neutrophilic infiltrations in conjunction with prior mixed lobular and septal panniculitis, suggesting evolution of subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome to its classic form. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports of rituximab as a novel biological treatment for Sweet's syndrome. However, further randomized trials are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of such biological therapies for Sweet's syndrome. PMID:26998300

  4. Experimental α-particle radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer using 227Th-labeled p-benzyl-DOTA-trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to explore the biodistribution, normal tissue toxicity, and therapeutic efficacy of the internalizing low-dose rate alpha-particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate 227Th-trastuzumab in mice with HER2-expressing breast cancer xenografts. Methods Biodistribution of 227Th-trastuzumab and 227Th-rituximab in nude mice bearing SKBR-3 xenografts were determined at different time points after injection. Tumor growth was measured after administration of 227Th-trastuzumab, 227Th-rituximab, cold trastuzumab, and saline. The toxicity of 227Th-trastuzumab was evaluated by measurements of body weight, blood cell, and clinical chemistry parameters, as well as histological examination of tissue specimens. Results The tumor uptake reached peak levels of 34% ID/g (4.6 kBq/g) 3 days after injection of 400 kBq/kg of 227Th-trastuzumab. The absorbed radiation dose to tumor was 2.9 Gy, while it was 2.4 Gy to femur due to uptake of the daughter nuclide 223Ra in bone; the latter already explored in clinical phases I and II trials without serious toxicity. A significant dose-dependent antitumor effect was observed for dosages of 200, 400, and 600 kBq/kg of 227Th-trastuzumab but no effect of 400 and 600 kBq/kg 227Th-rituximab (non-tumor binding). No serious delayed bone marrow or normal organ toxicity was observed, but there was a statistical significant reduction in blood cell parameters for the highest-dose group of 227Th-trastuzumab treatment. Conclusion Internalizing 227Th-trastuzumab therapy was well tolerated and resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of breast cancer xenograft growth. These results warrant further preclinical studies aiming at a clinical trial in breast cancer patients with metastases to bone. PMID:22214432

  5. MRI assessment of suppression of structural damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving rituximab: results from the randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind RA-SCORE study

    PubMed Central

    Peterfy, Charles; Emery, Paul; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; DiCarlo, Julie; Otsa, Kati; Navarro Sarabia, Federico; Pavelka, Karel; Bagnard, Marie-Agnes; Gylvin, Lykke Hinsch; Bernasconi, Corrado; Gabriele, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in structural damage and joint inflammation assessed by MRI following rituximab treatment in a Phase 3 study of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX) who were naive to biological therapy. Methods Patients were randomised to receive two infusions of placebo (n=63), rituximab 500 mg (n=62), or rituximab 1000 mg (n=60) intravenously on days 1 and 15. MRI scans and radiographs of the most inflamed hand and wrist were acquired at baseline, weeks 12 (MRI only), 24 and 52. The primary end point was the change in MRI erosion score from baseline at week 24. Results Patients treated with rituximab demonstrated significantly less progression in the mean MRI erosion score compared with those treated with placebo at weeks 24 (0.47, 0.18 and 1.60, respectively, p=0.003 and p=0.001 for the two rituximab doses vs placebo) and 52 (−0.30, 0.11 and 3.02, respectively; p<0.001 and p<0.001). Cartilage loss at 52 weeks was significantly reduced in the rituximab group compared with the placebo group. Other secondary end points of synovitis and osteitis improved significantly with rituximab compared with placebo as early as 12 weeks and improved further at weeks 24 and 52. Conclusions This study demonstrated that rituximab significantly reduced erosion and cartilage loss at week 24 and week 52 in MTX-inadequate responder patients with active RA, suggesting that MRI is a valuable tool for assessing inflammatory and structural damage in patients with established RA receiving rituximab. Trial registration number NCT00578305 PMID:25355728

  6. Chemokine/cytokine profiling after rituximab: reciprocal expression of BCA-1/CXCL13 and BAFF in childhood OMS.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D; Travelstead, Anna L; Verhulst, Steven J

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that B-cell repopulation following rituximab (anti-CD20) therapy is orchestrated by chemokines and non-chemokine cytokines. Twenty-five children with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) received rituximab with or without conventional agents. A comprehensive panel of 40 chemokines and other cytokines were measured in serum by ELISA and multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Serum BAFF concentration changed dramatically (even after first infusion) and inversely with B-cell depletion/repopulation and CXCL13 concentration at 1, 3, and 6 months. Negative correlations were found for BAFF concentration vs blood B cell percentage and serum CXCL13 concentration; positive correlations with serum rituximab concentrations. Six months after initiation of therapy, no significant difference in the levels of APRIL, CXCL10, IL-6, or 17 other cytokines/chemokines were detected. These data reveal a major role for BAFF in peripheral B cell repopulation following rituximab-induced B-cell depletion, and novel changes in CXCL13. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT0024436. PMID:21211990

  7. High response rate and durable remissions following fludarabine and rituximab combination therapy for chronic cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Vågan, Anne Marita; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Vik, Anders; Dalgaard, Jakob; Jacobsen, Eva-Marie; Thoresen, Aud S; Beiske, Klaus; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2010-10-28

    Most patients diagnosed with primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) have a clonal lymphoproliferative bone marrow disorder. Treatment with rituximab is the only well-documented effective therapy, leading to 45%-60% partial responses (PR). Complete responses (CR) are rare, and median response duration is only 11 months. In a prospective multicenter trial, 29 patients received rituximab 375 mg/m(2) on days 1, 29, 57 and 85; and fludarabine orally, 40 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, 29-34, 57-61 and 85-89. Twenty-two patients (76%) responded, 6 (21%) achieving CR and 16 (55%) PR. Among 10 patients nonresponsive to rituximab monotherapy, 1 achieved CR and 6 PR. Median increase in hemoglobin level was 3.1 g/dL among the responders and 4.0 g/dL in those who achieved CR. Lower quartile of response duration was not reached after 33 months. Estimated median response duration was more than 66 months. Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity occurred in 12 patients (41%). In conclusion, fludarabine and rituximab combination therapy is very efficient in patients with CAD. Toxicity may be a concern, and benefits should be carefully weighed against risks in very old and comorbid patients. It remains to be established whether the combination should be first-line or an efficient second-line therapy in CAD patients requiring treatment. PMID:20634373

  8. Plitidepsin (Aplidin) is a potent inhibitor of diffuse large cell and Burkitt lymphoma and is synergistic with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Nora M; Medina, Daniel J; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin; Aracil, Miguel; Jimeno, José M; Bertino, Joseph R; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2012-01-15

    Plitidepsin (Aplidin), an antitumor agent of marine origin, presently is undergoing phase II/III clinical trials, and has shown promise for the treatment of lymphoma. Here, we describe the antitumor effects of plitidepsin alone and in combination with rituximab and investigated the effects of each drug and the combination on the cell cycle and mechanism of cell death. Several Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLCL) lines and Burkitt cell lines were tested for sensitivity to plitidepsin and rituximab. All DLCL and Burkitt lymphoma cell lines were inhibited by plitidepsin in nanomolar concentrations, while rituximab sensitivity varied among different cell lines. Ramos and the RL cell lines proved sensitive to rituximab and were used to test the effects of each of the two drugs. The two agents exhibited synergism at all tested concentrations. For in vivo studies, irradiated athymic nude mice were engrafted with the Ramos lymphoma. Treatment was initiated when the tumors were ~0.5 cm in diameter, and toxic and therapeutic effects were monitored. In the in vivo study, additive effects of the combined two drugs, was demonstrated without an increase in host toxicity. The in vitro synergy and the in vivo additive antitumor effects without an increase in host toxicity with two relatively non-marrow suppressive agents encourages further development of this combination for treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. PMID:22336911

  9. Navitoclax (ABT-263) and bendamustine ± rituximab induce enhanced killing of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma tumours in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ackler, S; Mitten, MJ; Chen, J; Clarin, J; Foster, K; Jin, S; Phillips, DC; Schlessinger, S; Wang, B; Leverson, JD; Boghaert, ER

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Bendamustine with or without rituximab provides an effective and more tolerable alternative to the polytherapy cyclophosphamide–doxorubicin–vincristine–prednisolone (CHOP) in the treatment of haematological tumours and is currently approved for the treatment of many haematological malignancies. Navitoclax (ABT-263) is a potent inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w, which has demonstrated efficacy in haematological tumours alone and in combination with other agents. This paper describes the in vivo efficacy of combining either bendamustine or bendamustine plus rituximab (BR) with navitoclax in xenograft models of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Activity was tested in xenograft models of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DoHH-2, SuDHL-4), mantle cell lymphoma (Granta 519) and Burkitt's lymphoma (RAMOS). Activity was also monitored in a systemic model of Granta 519. KEY RESULTS Navitoclax potentiated bendamustine activity in all cell lines tested. Bendamustine activated p53 in Granta 519 tumours, concurrent with activation of caspase 3. Navitoclax also improved responses to bendamustine-rituximab (BR) in a subset of tumours. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Navitoclax in combination with bendamustine and BR is a viable combination strategy for use in the clinic and demonstrated superior efficacy compared with previously reported data for navitoclax plus CHOP and rituximab-CHOP. PMID:22624727

  10. A phase II trial of extended induction epratuzumab and rituximab for previously untreated follicular lymphoma: CALGB 50701

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Barbara W.; Jung, Sin-Ho; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Kostakoglu, Lale; His, Eric; Byrd, John C.; Jones, Jeffrey; Leonard, John P.; Martin, S. Eric; Cheson, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Rituximab combined with chemotherapy has improved the survival of previously untreated patients with follicular lymphoma (FL). Nevertheless, many patients neither want nor can tolerate chemotherapy, leading to interest in biological approaches. Epratuzumab is a humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody with efficacy in relapsed FL. Since both rituximab and epratuzumab have single agent activity in FL, we evaluated the antibody combination as initial treatment of patients with FL. Patients and Methods Fifty-nine untreated patients with FL received epratuzumab 360 mg/m2 with rituximab 375 mg/m2 weekly for four induction doses. This combination was continued as extended induction in weeks 12, 20, 28, and 36. Response assessed by CT was correlated with clinical risk factors, FDG-PET findings at week 3, Fcg polymorphisms, immunohistochemical markers, and statin use. Results Therapy was well-tolerated with toxicities similar to expected with rituximab monotherapy. Fifty-two (88.2%) evaluable patients responded, including 25 complete responses (CR)(42.4%), and 27 partial responses (45.8%). At 3 years follow-up, 60% of patients remain in remission. Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (FLIPI) risk strongly predicted progression-free survival (p=0.022). Conclusions The high response rate and prolonged time to progression observed with this antibody combination are comparable to those observed after standard chemo-immunotherapies and further support the development of biologic, non-chemotherapeutic approaches for these patients. PMID:23922187

  11. Paraneoplastic pemphigus and myasthenia gravis, associated with inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma: response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifang; Deng, Hui; Mao, Mei

    2016-08-01

    Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP) is an autoimmune blistering disease associated with neoplasms. The disease is most commonly of lymphoproliferative origin and presents high mortality. We describe a patient with PNP and myasthenia gravis associated with inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma, as well as the response to rituximab. PMID:27525088

  12. [Rituximab therapy in the treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -positive interstitial pneumonia: case report].

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Kumon, Saeko; Akiyama, Kenichi; Iwabuchi, Yuko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Takahito; Takei, Takashi; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient treated with rituximab for interstitial pneumonia (IP) associated with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and who was undergoing hemodialysis. A 59-year-old woman who had been treated with tacrolimus for 1 year for rheumatic arthritis was referred to the Department of Nephrology for fatigue, fever, weight loss, and rapidly developing renal dysfunction. On the first admission, severe renal dysfunction, proteinuria, hematuria, and an elevated titer of MPO-ANCA were observed, and the woman was diagnosed with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis because of MPA. At that point, IP was found to be present but not active. Although steroid semipulse therapy following an initial prednisolone (PSL) administration of 40 mg/day, IVCY, and plasma exchange were administered, renal dysfunction did not recover, and the patient required maintenance hemodialysis. Upon discharge, a high titer of MPO-ANCA was continuously observed. Nine months after the initiation of hemodialysis, respiratory discomfort and desaturation developed. Interstitial shadow and ground glass opacity were seen on a CT scan, and the patient was diagnosed with exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia caused by MPA recurrence. At the second admission, acute findings identified by imaging techniques had improved. However, the high titer of MPO-ANCA continued in spite of the steroid semi-pulse therapy following PSL administration, and rituximab corresponding to 200 mg/weekly for 1 month was also administered. The dose of rituximab was decreased subsequently because the patient was judged to be compromised by the hemodialysis. At the same time, internal administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim was initiated. After the rituximab treatment, MPO-ANCA antibodies gradually decreased, and the respiratory condition improved. Five months after the rituximab treatment, respiratory dysfunction recurred. Based on the CT findings and a high level of β-D-glycan, the patient was diagnosed with ARDS due to

  13. Improvement in Gemcitabine-Induced Thrombotic Microangiopathy with Rituximab in a Patient with Ovarian Cancer: Mechanistic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Murugapandian, Sangeetha; Bijin, Babitha; Mansour, Iyad; Daheshpour, Sepehr; Pillai, Biju G.; Thajudeen, Bijin; Salahudeen, Abdulla K.

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a potent and widely used anticancer drug. We report a case of gemcitabine-induced thrombotic microangiopathy (GCI-TMA), a known but not widely recognized complication of gemcitabine use, and our experience of treating GCI-TMA with rituximab. A 74-year-old woman was referred to our clinic for an evaluation of worsening renal function. She has recently been treated for ovarian cancer (diagnosed in 2011) with surgery (tumor debulking and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy) along with cisplatin chemotherapy in 2012, followed by carboplatin/doxorubicin in 2013 and recent therapy for resistant disease with gemcitabine. Laboratory tests showed anemia, normal platelets and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. A peripheral smear revealed numerous schistocytes, and a kidney biopsy showed acute as well as chronic TMA. The patient continued on gemcitabine therapy, and treatment with plasma exchange was started. Since there was no response to treatment even after 5 sessions of plasma exchange, one dose of rituximab was given, which was associated with a drop in the creatinine level to 2 mg/dl. The pathogenesis of renal injury could be the effect of direct injury to the endothelium mediated by cytokines. Usual treatment includes withdrawing the drug and initiation of treatment with plasmapheresis with or without steroids. In cases resistant to plasmapheresis, treatment with rituximab can be tried. The mechanism of action of rituximab might be due to the reduced production of B-cell-dependent cytokines that drive endothelial dysfunction by depleting B cells. Patients receiving gemcitabine chemotherapy should be monitored for the development of TMA, and early treatment with plasma exchange along with rituximab might benefit these patients who already have a bad prognosis. PMID:26266248

  14. Assessment of flares in lupus patients enrolled in a phase II/III study of rituximab (EXPLORER).

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jt; Buyon, Jp; Furie, Ra; Latinis, Km; Gordon, C; Hsieh, H-J; Brunetta, P

    2011-06-01

    The EXPLORER study was designed to assess the response to rituximab versus placebo in patients with moderate to severe extrarenal systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) receiving background immunosuppression. The definition of response required reduced clinical activity without subsequent flares over 52 weeks, and the study did not meet its efficacy endpoint. The current exploratory analysis assessed flare rates in patients who achieved initial low disease activity response (British Isles Lupus Assessment Group [BILAG] C or better in all organs) during the study. Exploratory reanalysis of data from the EXPLORER trial was conducted, considering alternative definitions for flare. No difference was found between rituximab and placebo in preventing or delaying moderate to severe flares. However, when severe (BILAG A) flares alone were examined, rituximab reduced the risk of a subsequent first A flare (hazard ratio = 0.61; p = 0.052) and lowered mean ± SD annualized A flare rates (0.86 ± 1.47 vs. 1.41 ± 2.14; p = 0.038). Eighty-four (49.7%) rituximab-treated patients achieved low disease activity without subsequent A flares versus 31 (35.2%) placebo-treated patients (p = 0.027). Prednisone rescue for A flares was similar in rituximab- (24%) and placebo-treated (14%) patients (p = 0.204). This post hoc analysis evaluates the hypothesis that assessment of BILAG A flares may distinguish potential treatment effects with greater sensitivity than assessment of BILAG B flares. PMID:21478286

  15. Depletion of B‐Cells With Rituximab Improves Endothelial Function and Reduces Inflammation Among Individuals With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Scherzer, Rebecca; Grunfeld, Carl; Imboden, John; Wu, Yuaner; del Puerto, Gus; Nitta, Elaine; Shigenaga, Judy; Schnell Heringer, Amanda; Ganz, Peter; Graf, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, partly due to systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. B‐cells play an important pathogenic role in the inflammatory process that drives RA disease activity. Rituximab, a chimeric murine/human monoclonal antibody that depletes B‐cells, is an effective therapy for RA. The purpose of this study was to determine whether B‐cell depletion with rituximab reduces systemic inflammation and improves macrovascular (brachial artery flow‐mediated dilation, FMD) and microvascular (reactive hyperemia) endothelial function in RA patients. Methods and Results RA patients received a single course of rituximab (1000 mg IV infusion at baseline and on day 15). FMD, reactive hyperemia, inflammatory markers, and clinical assessments were performed at baseline, week 12, and week 24. Twenty patients (95% female, median age 54 years) completed the study. Following treatment, FMD improved from a baseline of 4.5±0.4% to 6.4±0.6% at 12 weeks (mean±SE; P<0.0001), followed by a decline at week 24; a similar pattern was observed for hyperemic velocity. Significant decreases in RA disease scores, high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and circulating CD19+ B‐cells were sustained through week 24. Cholesterol and triglycerides became significantly although modestly elevated during the study. Conclusions Depletion of B‐cells with rituximab improved macrovascular and microvascular endothelial function and reduced systemic inflammation, despite modest elevation in lipids. Given these results, rituximab should be evaluated in the future for its possible role in reducing excess cardiovascular risk in RA. Clinical Trial Registration URL http://ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00844714. PMID:25336464

  16. Diminishing prognostic role of preexisting diabetes mellitus for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsueh-Ju; Huang, Yu-Chung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Hung, Man-Hsin; Hu, Ming-Hung; Wu, Chia-Yun; Hong, Ying-Chung; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Yu, Yuan-Bin

    2013-11-01

    Rituximab reforms the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the prognostic significance of baseline patient features should be reevaluated. Few population-based studies have investigated the association of diabetes mellitus (DM) and outcomes of lymphoma; however, the results remain inconclusive. From January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009, a total of 468 consecutive newly diagnosed DLBCL patients receiving first-line chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisolone (CHOP) or rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP) were enrolled. Pre-existing DM was defined according to medical history, use of antidiabetic medications, or any record of an abnormal hemoglobin A1c test. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test. CHOP was administered in 194 patients, and 274 patients received R-CHOP. DM was identified in 16.2 % (76/468) of patients. Diabetic patients were older and more performance restricted, compared to the non-DM patients in both the CHOP and R-CHOP groups. In the CHOP group, 5-year PFS and OS were inferior in DM patients (PFS, 32.4 vs. 50.0 % (P = 0.039); OS, 38.2 vs. 62.5 % (P = 0.002)). However, outcomes were similar for both DM and non-DM patients in the context of R-CHOP treatment (PFS, 69.0 vs. 57.3 % (P = 0.179); OS, 76.2 vs. 69.8 % (P = 0.586)). The response rate of chemotherapy in DM patients was also improved to a level similar to non-DM patients with rituximab use. In conclusion, the prognostic significance of preexisting DM in DLBCL patients is changing in the rituximab era. The potentially additional benefit of rituximab in DM patients merits further investigation. PMID:23712292

  17. A randomized phase II crossover study of imatinib or rituximab for cutaneous sclerosis after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Sally; Pidala, Joseph; Pusic, Iskra; Chai, Xiaoyu; Jaglowski, Samantha; Khera, Nandita; Palmer, Jeanne; Chen, George L; Jagasia, Madan H; Mayer, Sebastian A; Wood, William A; Green, Michael; Hyun, Teresa S.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Storer, Barry E; Miklos, David B; Shulman, Howard M.; Martin, Paul J; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Lee, Stephanie J; Flowers, Mary E D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cutaneous sclerosis (CS) occurs in 20% of patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and can compromise mobility and quality of life. Experimental design We conducted a prospective, multi-center, randomized, two-arm phase II crossover trial of imatinib (200 mg daily) or rituximab (375 mg/m2 intravenously weekly × 4 doses, repeatable after 3 months) for treatment of CS diagnosed within 18 months (NCT01309997). The primary endpoint was significant clinical response (SCR) at 6 months, defined as quantitative improvement in skin sclerosis or joint range of motion. Treatment success was defined as SCR at 6 months without crossover, recurrent malignancy or death. Secondary end points included changes of B cell profiles in blood (BAFF levels and cellular subsets), patient-reported outcomes, and histopathology between responders and non-responders with each therapy. Results SCR was observed in 9 of 35 (26%, 95% CI 13-43%) participants randomized to imatinib and 10 of 37 (27%, 95% CI 14-44%) randomized to rituximab. Six (17%, 95% CI 7-34%) patients in the imatinib arm and 5 (14%, 95% CI 5-29%) in the rituximab arm had treatment success. Higher percentages of activated B cells (CD27+) were seen at enrollment in rituximab-treated patients who had treatment success (p = 0.01), but not in imatinib-treated patients. Conclusion These results support the need for more effective therapies for CS and suggest that activated B cells define a subgroup of patients with CS who are more likely to respond to rituximab. PMID:26378033

  18. Long-Term Maintenance Therapy Using Rituximab-Induced Continuous B-Cell Depletion in Patients with ANCA Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Pendergraft, William F.; Cortazar, Frank B.; Wenger, Julia; Murphy, Andrew P.; Rhee, Eugene P.; Laliberte, Karen A.; Niles, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Remission in the majority of ANCA vasculitis patients is not sustained after a single course of rituximab, and risk of relapse warrants development of a successful strategy to ensure durable remission. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective analysis of ANCA vasculitis patients who underwent maintenance therapy using rituximab-induced continuous B-cell depletion for up to 7 years was performed. Maintenance therapy with rituximab was initiated after achieving remission or converting from other prior maintenance therapy. Continuous B-cell depletion was achieved in all patients by scheduled rituximab administration every 4 months. Disease activity, serologic parameters, adverse events, and survival were examined. Results In the study, 172 patients (mean age=60 years, 55% women, 57% myeloperoxidase–ANCA) treated from April of 2006 to March of 2013 underwent continuous B-cell depletion with rituximab. Median remission maintenance follow-up time was 2.1 years. Complete remission (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score [BVAS]=0) was achieved in all patients. Major relapse (BVAS≥3) occurred in 5% of patients and was associated with weaning of other immunosuppression drugs. Remission was reinduced in all patients. Survival mirrored survival of a general age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched United States population. Conclusion This analysis provides evidence for long-term disease control using continuous B-cell depletion. This treatment strategy in ANCA vasculitis patients also seems to result in survival rates comparable with rates in a matched reference population. These findings suggest that prospective remission maintenance treatment trials using continuous B-cell depletion are warranted. PMID:24626432

  19. Optimizing the use of combined radioimmunotherapy and hypoxic cytotoxin therapy as a function of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, R D; Taylor, A; Osorio, L; Ochakovskaya, R; Raleigh, J A; Papadopoulou, M; Bloomer, W D; Goldenberg, D M

    2001-11-01

    Combined radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) and hypoxic cytotoxin therapy (SR4233 or NLCQ-1) have been evaluated with both modalities administered on the same day with only moderate improvement compared with the effects of RAIT alone. In a series of studies using oxygen electrodes, immunohistochemistry and radiotracers, we have demonstrated that RAIT induces a prolonged state of hypoxia in most tumors, without affecting the pO(2) levels in normal tissues. Using serial microelectrode measurements through subcutaneous (s.c.) GW-39 human colonic xenografts, we established that the median pO(2) was unrelated to the initial size of the tumor, over a range of sizes from 1.0 to 4.0 cm. Fourteen days after mice were given a 240-microCi dose of (131)I-MN-14 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen immunoglobulin G, their median pO(2) declined from 26.1 +/- 9.6 mmHg to 9.8 +/- 3.9 mmHg (p < 0.001). Using the radiotracer (3)H-MISO that accumulates in hypoxic regions, uptake in GW-39, LoVo and LS174T s.c. human colonic tumors increased 3.0- to 4.2-fold from day 14 through day 28 post-RAIT, but uptake of (3)H-MISO in CALU-3 tumors remained unchanged after RAIT. Normal tissue (liver, kidney, lung) uptake of (3)H-MISO did not exhibit significant changes. The increase in tumor hypoxia was also demonstrated visually using anti-PIMO staining of tumor sections. We postulated that sequential delivery of the 2 therapeutic agents, with the hypoxic cytotoxin given 2 weeks after RAIT when tumor pO(2) levels were at their nadir, would improve the therapeutic response above either modality alone or above the 2 agents delivered on the same day. Tumor growth was compared in mice given either RAIT or cytotoxin alone, the combined treatment on the same day or with the cytotoxin delivered 14 days after RAIT. Tumor size on day 35 for RAIT-treated and SR4233-treated GW-39 were 3.56 +/- 0.40 and 7.98 +/- 2.50 cm(3). When RAIT + SR4233 were delivered on the same day, tumor size dropped to 2.78 +/- 0.80 cm(3). If RAIT

  20. A multicenter randomized open-label study of rituximab plus rhTPO vs rituximab in corticosteroid-resistant or relapsed ITP

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai; Xu, Miao; Qin, Ping; Zhang, Hai-yan; Yuan, Cheng-lu; Zhao, Hong-guo; Cui, Zhong-guang; Meng, Yue-sheng; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Fang; Wang, Xin; Li, Da-qi; Bi, Ke-hong; Zhu, Chuan-sheng; Guo, Cheng-shan; Chu, Xiao-xia; Wu, Qing-chao; Liu, Xin-guang; Dong, Xiao-yuan; Li, Jie; Peng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of rituximab (RTX) plus recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) with RTX alone in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) who had failed to respond to corticosteroids or relapsed. Recruited patients were randomized at a ratio of 2:1 into 2 groups: the combination group (RTX + rhTPO, n = 77) and the monotherapy group (RTX, n = 38). Overall response was achieved in 79.2% of patients in the combination group vs 71.1% in the monotherapy group (P = .36), and the complete response (CR) rate was 45.4% in the combination group compared with 23.7% in the monotherapy group (P = .026). The combination group had significantly shorter time to response (TTR; median and range, 7 and 4-28 days) compared with the monotherapy group (28 and 4-90 days) (P < .01). There was no difference between these 2 groups in terms of the long-term response (P = .12). Our findings demonstrated that the combination of RTX and rhTPO significantly increased the CR rate and shortened TTR compared with RTX monotherapy in the treatment of corticosteroid-resistant or relapsed ITP but failed to show a beneficial effect on the long-lasting response. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01525836. PMID:25575541

  1. Corticosteroid-Free Primary Treatment of Chronic Extensive Graft-versus-Host Disease Incorporating Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Scott R; Sizemore, Connie A; Ridgeway, Michelle; Zhang, Xu; Smith, Judith; Brown, Stacey; Holland, H Kent; Morris, Lawrence E; Bashey, Asad

    2015-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a significant determinant of overall outcome and quality of life in survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Standard initial therapy of cGVHD is based on prolonged use of corticosteroids and a calcineurin inhibitor and has not changed for over 3 decades, despite limited efficacy and long-term toxicity. Rituximab is an attractive agent for the upfront treatment of cGVHD because of its favorable toxicity profile, efficacy in steroid-refractory cGVHD, and ability to serve as a steroid-sparing agent in autoimmune diseases. We hypothesized that a corticosteroid-free regimen incorporating rituximab would result in improved outcomes when used for the initial treatment of cGVHD. Twenty-five patients (median age, 56 years; range, 29 to 77) with extensive cGVHD were enrolled on a prospective phase II trial. Enrollment was limited to patients with first onset extensive cGVHD requiring systemic immunosuppression and without residual or concurrent acute graft-versus-host disease. cGVHD was classified as de novo, interrupted, and progressive in 12, 11, and 2 patients, respectively. cGVHD severity (National Institutes of Health grade) was mild, moderate, and severe in 3, 14, and 8 patients, respectively. All patients received rituximab 375 mg/m(2) × 4 weekly doses, then 1 dose every 3 months × 4 doses, in addition to mycophenolate mofetil and either tacrolimus or sirolimus. No other systemic immunosuppression was permitted, and only a short-course of steroids (≤4 weeks) was allowed at physician discretion; otherwise, treatment was deemed a failure and patients were treated off study. Twenty-two of 25 patients (88%) responded to treatment. Of the 22 responding patients, the median time to maximum response was 161 days (range, 35 to 300 days) with maximum response being complete in 21 of 22 patients and partial in 1 patient. Excluding the 3 patients taken off study for treatment failure, corticosteroids were used

  2. Drug-induced progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: Lessons learned from contrasting natalizumab and rituximab.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, N S; Straus, S M J M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A K; Hidalgo-Simon, A; Egberts, A C G; Leufkens, H G M; De Bruin, M L

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) has been identified as a serious adverse drug reaction (ADR) of several immunomodulatory biologicals. In this study, we contrasted the reporting patterns of PML for two biologicals for which the risk was identified at different points in their lifecycle: natalizumab (before reapproval) and rituximab (nine years postapproval). We found that, apart from the differences in clinical characteristics (age, gender, indication, time to event, fatality), which reflect the diversity in context of use, PML reports for natalizumab were more complete and were received sooner after occurrence. This study serves as an important reminder that spontaneous reports should only be used with great caution to quantify and compare safety profiles across products over time. The observed variability in reporting patterns and heterogeneity of PML cases presents challenges to such comparisons. Lumping uncharacterized PML reports together without taking these differences into account may result in biased comparisons and flawed conclusions about differential safety. PMID:26347128

  3. Retroperitoneal fibrosis due to B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Responding to rituximab!

    PubMed

    Alvarez Argote, Juliana; Bauer, Frank A; Posteraro, Anthony F; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-02-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare disease manifesting as chronic soft tissue fibrosis in the retroperitoneum, with potential anatomic and/or functional compromise of adjacent organs. It can be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other conditions such as cancers, autoimmune disorders, or drugs. We report herein a 66-year-old patient with symptomatic retroperitoneal fibrosis leading to bilateral hydronephrosis and renal failure, in whom, after a complex diagnostic work-up and protracted clinical course, a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the retroperitoneal space and several vertebral bodies was identified. The patient was treated with radiation therapy and weekly rituximab infusions, with resolution of hydronephrosis and lower back pain. We include a thorough literature review on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of retroperitoneal fibrosis. A meticulous search for malignancy is necessary in this rare condition that, if positive, may have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:25013186

  4. Successful use of rituximab in refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, M; Al-Rasheed, M; Al-Muhani, A

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a common autoimmune disease in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We describe a 36-year-old woman with CVID. The clinical course of her disease was complicated by bronchiectasis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and portal vein thrombosis. She developed recurrent attacks of ITP refractory to high doses of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and splenectomy. She received a total of 5 doses of rituximab (375 mg/m2) and achieved an immediate and persistent response. Therapy was well tolerated. Her platelet count remained above 370,000/microL for 8 months of follow-up, despite repeated infections. During this period the patient remained off corticosteroids and on continuous IVIG replacement therapy. PMID:20635793

  5. Clopidogrel-induced refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Khodor, Sara; Castro, Miguel; McNamara, Colin; Chaulagain, Chakra P

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a multisystem disorder characterized by microvascular aggregation of platelets and fibrin strands causing thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and organ dysfunction. TTP can develop as a result of a deficiency in ADAMTS13 enzyme activity due to either a genetic defect or, more commonly, the development of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. TTP can also be associated with pregnancy, organ transplant, lupus, infections, and drugs. Here, we present a case of TTP that developed shortly after the start of clopidogrel treatment for acute ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction, and describe the clinical presentation, refractory course of the disease, and successful induction of remission through the use of rituximab in a setting of pre-existing autoimmune diseases. PMID:26684918

  6. Rituximab for the Treatment of Relapses in ANCA-associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavsky, EM; Specks, U; Merkel, PA; Seo, P; Spiera, R; Langford, CA; Hoffman, GS; Kallenberg, CGM; St. Clair, EW; Tchao, NK; Viviano, L; Ding, L; Ikle, D; Villarreal, M; Jepson, B; Brunetta, P; Allen, NB; Fervenza, FC; Geetha, D; Keogh, K; Kissin, EY; Monach, PA; Peikert, T; Stegeman, C; Ytterberg, SR; Stone, JH

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Disease relapses are frequent in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis (AAV). We evaluated the outcomes of patients re-treated with rituximab (RTX) and prednisone for severe disease relapses. Methods The Rituximab in AAV trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing the rates of remission induction among patients treated with RTX (n = 99) and patients treated with cyclophosphamide (CYC) followed by azathioprine (AZA) (n = 98). Prednisone was tapered to discontinuation after 5.5 months. After achieving remission, patients who experienced a severe disease relapse between months 6 and 18 were eligible to receive RTX and prednisone on an open-label basis according to a pre-specified protocol. Investigators remained blinded to the original treatment assignment. Results Twenty-six patients received treatment with RTX for disease relapse after initially achieving remission on their originally assigned treatment. Fifteen patients were initially randomized to RTX and 11 to CYC/AZA. Thirteen (87%) of the patients originally assigned to RTX and 10 (91%) originally assigned to CYC/AZA achieved remission again with open-label RTX, an overall percentage of 88%. Half of the patients treated with open-label RTX were able to discontinue prednisone entirely. Patients in this cohort experienced fewer adverse events compared to the overall study population (4.7 adverse events/patient-year versus 11.8 adverse events/patient-year, respectively). Conclusion Re-treatment of AAV relapses with RTX and glucocorticoids appears to be a safe and effective strategy, regardless of previous treatment. PMID:25047592

  7. Rituximab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with another medication to treat the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA; a condition in which the body attacks ... and CLL by killing cancer cells. It treats rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and microscopic polyangiitis by blocking ...

  8. Rituximab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a condition in which the body attacks its own joints, causing pain, swelling, and loss of function) ... are conditions in which the body attacks its own veins and other blood vessels, which causes damage ...

  9. Pancreas-protective effect of rituximab for acute-onset type 1 diabetes in the honeymoon period: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kurozumi, Akira; Okada, Yosuke; Arao, Tadashi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Maiko; Torimoto, Keiichi; Kubo, Satoshi; Nakayamada, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Summary A randomized controlled study of rituximab demonstrated that the drug protects pancreatic function in patients with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (AOT1DM). However, the mechanism of this protective effect is poorly understood. We examined the effects of rituximab in two patients with AOT1DM in the honeymoon period and the mechanism of these effects. Case 1 was a 40-year-old man and Case 2 was a 45-year-old man, both diagnosed with AOT1DM. Various tests indicated intact capacity for endogenous insulin secretion and that they were in the honeymoon phase of AOT1DM. Treatment with rituximab protected against pancreatic β-cell damage and maintained somewhat the endogenous insulin secretion. In Case 2, HbA1c level was maintained below 6.5% up to 24 months after treatment. However, in Case 1, the patient showed a gradual increase in HbA1c level starting around 9 months but fell at 12 months to >9.0% and required an insulin dose about twice greater than that of Case 2. High spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) levels were recorded in the two patients before rituximab administration and after the treatment, the levels were further increased in Case 1, but decreased in Case 2. Both patients require continuous careful follow-up for glycemic control, insulin secretion capacity, and adverse reactions in the future. Although the clinical relevance of high Syk levels in AOT1DM patients remains unclear, the difference in the change in Syk level between the two patients may explain the different clinical courses. Learning points We described the pancreas-protective effect of rituximab in two patients with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus in the honeymoon period and investigated the possible mechanism of action. The present study demonstrated that treatment with rituximab maintained endogenous insulin secretion capacity for 2 years in the two patients. The phosphorylated-spleen tyrosine kinase (p-Syk) data suggest that the differences in HbA1c level and the required

  10. Successful Treatment of Life-Threatening Interstitial Lung Disease Secondary to Antisynthetase Syndrome Using Rituximab: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Dasa, Osama; Ruzieh, Mohammed; Oraibi, Omar

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case of antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) that manifested with severe interstitial pneumonitis in the presence of anti-Jo-1 and Ro (SSA) antibodies. Our patient developed respiratory failure with high oxygen requirements despite treatment by high-dose steroids. The patient was then treated with rituximab. This treatment led to significant improvement in the patient condition, with resolution of the ground glass opacities on high-resolution computerized tomography and near normalization of pulmonary function tests. In this communication, we performed a literature review and summarized previous reports pertinent to using of rituximab to treat interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to ASS by searching the PubMed database from 1980 to 2014. We were able to find 14 reports that included total of 45 patients with ILD secondary to ASS. A significant improvement in ILD was reported in the majority of reported patients who received rituximab, while there was only 1 mortality-related to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Rituximab treatment was tolerated well in the majority of cases. It is our conclusion that rituximab can be considered a therapeutic option in ILD secondary to ASS based on our experience with this case and the currently available evidence in the literature. Nevertheless, there is a need for additional controlled studies to assess the efficacy and safety of rituximab in ILD secondary to ASS compared with other immunosuppressive regimens. PMID:25830868

  11. Enhanced tumor retention of radioiodinated anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody using novel bifunctional iodination linker for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Byoung Soo; Choi, Dan Bee; Chi, Sung-Gil; Choi, Tae Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses an antibody labeled with a radionuclide to deliver cytotoxic radiation to a target tumor cells. Radioiodine is most commonly employed to prepare radiolabeled proteins (antibodies, peptides) for in vitro and in vivo applications. A major shortcoming of radioiodinated proteins prepared by direct labeling methods is their deiodination in vivo. For the preparation of more stable radioiodinated antibodies, we developed a new linker (N-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-2-(3-(tributylstannyl)phenyl) acetamide (IBPA). This study evaluated the usefulness of IBPA as a linker for the stable radioiodinated internalizing antibody, cetuximab. Directly labeled cetuximab ([125I]-cetuximab) was prepared by the chloramine T method. To prepare indirectly labeled cetuximab using IBPA ([125I]-IBPA-cetuximab), IBPA was radioiodinated using chloramine-T to give N-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-2-(3-[125I]phenyl)acetamide ([125I]‑IBPA), which was purified by high performance liquid chromatography. [125I]-IBPA was then conjugated to cetuximab. In vitro target binding and internalizing assays were performed in PC9, LS174T, and FaDu cell lines. In vivo planar images were obtained using an Inveon SPECT scanner 3, 24, 48, and 168 h after i.v. injection of [125I]-cetuximab or [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab in athymic mice bearing LS174T tumor xenografts. Specific binding and internalized radioactivity of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab were higher than those of [125I]-cetuximab in PC9, LS174T, and FaDu cell lines. In planar images scant radioactivity was evident in thyroid glands after injection of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab, while a high level of radioactivity was present in thyroid glands after injection of [125I]-cetuximab. Tumor uptake value of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab was higher than that of [125I]-cetuximab for up to 168 h. [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab is stable and resistant to deiodination in vivo. IBPA is a promising bi-functional linker for radioiodination of internalizing monoclonal antibodies

  12. Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: Biological doses and treatment efficiency for vascularized tumors with or without a central hypoxic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchat, V.; Nuttens, V. E.; Michiels, C.; and others

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Radioactive atoms attached to monoclonal antibodies are used in radioimmunotherapy to treat cancer while limiting radiation to healthy tissues. One limitation of this method is that only one radioactive atom is linked to each antibody and the deposited dose is often insufficient to eradicate solid and radioresistant tumors. In a previous study, simulations with the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code showed that physical doses up to 50 Gy can be delivered inside tumors by replacing the single radionuclide by a radioactive nanoparticle of 5 nm diameter containing hundreds of radioactive atoms. However, tumoral and normal tissues are not equally sensitive to radiation, and previous works did not take account the biological effects such as cellular repair processes or the presence of less radiosensitive cells such as hypoxic cells. Methods: The idea is to adapt the linear-quadratic expression to the tumor model and to determine biological effective doses (BEDs) delivered through and around a tumor. This BED is then incorporated into a Poisson formula to determine the shell control probability (SCP) which predicts the cell cluster-killing efficiency at different distances ''r'' from the center of the tumor. BED and SCP models are used to analyze the advantages of injecting radioactive nanoparticles instead of a single radionuclide per vector in radioimmunotherapy. Results: Calculations of BED and SCP for different distances r from the center of a solid tumor, using the non-small-cell lung cancer as an example, were investigated for {sup 90}Y{sub 2} O{sub 3} nanoparticles. With a total activity of about 3.5 and 20 MBq for tumor radii of 0.5 and 1.0 cm, respectively, results show that a very high BED is deposited in the well oxygenated part of the spherical carcinoma. Conclusions: For either small or large solid tumors, BED and SCP calculations highlight the important benefit in replacing the single {beta}-emitter {sup 90}Y attached to each antibody by a {sup

  13. Optimising the therapeutic ratio of radioimmunotherapy; an investigation of the roles of chimerisation, fractionation and radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violet, John Albert

    2007-12-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a targeted form of treatment for cancer which uses tumour-associated antibodies to selectively deliver a therapeutic radionuclide to sites of disease. In lymphoma, radioimmunotherapy has proved a remarkably effective agent due to the high radiosensitivity of the tumour and its propensity to undergo apoptosis following irradiation. However, success in the treatment of the more radioresistant common solid tumours has been less successful, and for these patients RIT remains investigative. The effectiveness of RIT is limited by non-specific irradiation of normal tissues whilst antibody remains in the circulation, in particular bone marrow, and also by immunogenicity of antibody which does not allow for repeated therapy. In the first chapter I have hypothesised that lymphomas expressing the interleukin-2 receptor might be effectively treated using a radiolabeled antibody to this receptor. In a phase I/II clinical study, 131I labelled CHT-25, a chimeric antibody against the IL-2Ra chain, has shown encouraging evidence of efficacy in the 9 patients with multiply- relapsed lymphomas treated so far. In addition, use of this antibody has been associated with low immunogenicity allowing for repeated therapies to be given. In the second chapter I have hypothesised that dosimetry led, individual patient therapy, might further optimise 1311 CHT-25 treatment. To investigate this I have used marrow toxicity as a biological assay of absorbed dose and shown that simple, but individual, patient biodistribution indices correlate better with observed toxicity than the population-based dose estimates currently employed. I have proposed that adoption of individual patient dosimetry using tracer studies is worthy of further investigation for the future development of 131I- CHT-25. In the third chapter I have hypothesised that dose fractionation might improve the therapeutic ratio of RIT. This has been investigated in a pre-clinical human colorectal xenograft

  14. Enhanced tumor retention of radioiodinated anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody using novel bifunctional iodination linker for radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    KIM, EUN JUNG; KIM, BYOUNG SOO; CHOI, DAN BEE; CHI, SUNG-GIL; CHOI, TAE HYUN

    2016-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses an antibody labeled with a radionuclide to deliver cytotoxic radiation to a target tumor cells. Radioiodine is most commonly employed to prepare radiolabeled proteins (antibodies, peptides) for in vitro and in vivo applications. A major shortcoming of radioiodinated proteins prepared by direct labeling methods is their deiodination in vivo. For the preparation of more stable radioiodinated antibodies, we developed a new linker (N-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-2-(3-(tributylstannyl)phenyl) acetamide (IBPA). This study evaluated the usefulness of IBPA as a linker for the stable radioiodinated internalizing antibody, cetuximab. Directly labeled cetuximab ([125I]-cetuximab) was prepared by the chloramine T method. To prepare indirectly labeled cetuximab using IBPA ([125I]-IBPA-cetuximab), IBPA was radioiodinated using chloramine-T to give N-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-2-(3-[125I]phenyl)acetamide ([125I]-IBPA), which was purified by high performance liquid chromatography. [125I]-IBPA was then conjugated to cetuximab. In vitro target binding and internalizing assays were performed in PC9, LS174T, and FaDu cell lines. In vivo planar images were obtained using an Inveon SPECT scanner 3, 24, 48, and 168 h after i.v. injection of [125I]-cetuximab or [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab in athymic mice bearing LS174T tumor xenografts. Specific binding and internalized radioactivity of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab were higher than those of [125I]-cetuximab in PC9, LS174T, and FaDu cell lines. In planar images scant radioactivity was evident in thyroid glands after injection of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab, while a high level of radioactivity was present in thyroid glands after injection of [125I]-cetuximab. Tumor uptake value of [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab was higher than that of [125I]-cetuximab for up to 168 h. [125I]-IBPA-cetuximab is stable and resistant to deiodination in vivo. IBPA is a promising bi-functional linker for radioiodination of internalizing monoclonal antibodies for in

  15. Rituximab does not improve clinical outcome in a randomized phase 3 trial of CHOP with or without rituximab in patients with HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma: AIDS-Malignancies Consortium Trial 010

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Lawrence D.; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Cesarman, Ethel; Chadburn, Amy; Levine, Alexandra M.; Scadden, David T.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of rituximab to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy results in significant improvement in clinical outcome for individuals with non–HIV-associated aggressive B-cell lymphoma. To assess the potential risks and benefits of the addition of rituximab to CHOP for HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HIV-NHL) 150 patients receiving CHOP for HIV-NHL were randomized (2:1) to receive 375 mg/m2 rituximab with each chemotherapy cycle (n = 99) or no immunotherapy (n = 50) in a multicenter phase 3 trial. The complete response rate (CR + CRu) was 57.6% for R-CHOP and 47% for CHOP (P = .147). With a median follow-up of 137 weeks, time to progression, progression-free survival, and overall survival times were 125, 45, and 139 weeks, respectively, for R-CHOP and 85, 38, and 110 weeks, respectively, for CHOP (P = not significant, all comparisons). Treatment-related infectious deaths occurred in 14% of patients receiving R-CHOP compared with 2% in the chemotherapy-alone group (P = .035). Of these deaths, 60% occurred in patients with CD4 counts less than 50/mm3. Progression-free survival was significantly influenced by CD4+ count (P < .001) and International Prognostic Index score (P = .022), but not bcl-2 status. The addition of rituximab to CHOP in patients with HIV-NHL may be associated with improved tumor responses. However, these benefits may be offset by an increase in infectious deaths, particularly in those individuals with CD4+ lymphocyte counts less than 50/mm3. PMID:15914552

  16. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) with hard palate and bronchial perforations treated with rituximab - a case report.

    PubMed

    Kosałka, Joanna; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława; Zugaj, Anna; Ignacak, Maria; Zuk, Joanna; Sokołowska, Barbara; Musiał, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 57-year-old woman suffering from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), who in the seventh months of immunosuppressive treatment (cyclophosphamide) progressed with new pulmonary changes and perforations of the hard palate and bronchi. Rituximab was introduced resulting in B-cell depletion and disappearance of anti-PR3 antibody. Palatal holes have substantially diminished and all bronchial perforations disappeared, covered by fibrous tissue. In the fourth month after rituximab administration, large scarring obstruction of the right main bronchus with upper and middle lobes atelectasis emerged. Because of increasing dyspnoea, stenotic bronchus was re-opened by bronchoscopy. Intervention was complicated by bilateral pneumothorax and later, on the seventh day, by fatal pulmonary bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GPA refractory to cyclophosphamide complicated by palatal and bronchial perforations. PMID:25133814

  17. An update on the evidence for the efficacy and safety of rituximab in the management of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Collongues, Nicolas; de Seze, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) is a new concept which includes classical neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and partial forms of NMO such as recurrent optic neuritis with positive aquaporin-4 antibodies (AQP4) or brainstem symptoms (intractable hiccups or vomiting). This disease is clearly distinguished from multiple sclerosis (MS) and the therapeutic approach is clearly different. Rituximab is actually considered to be one of the most efficient treatments of NMOSD, even if class I studies are clearly lacking. In the present review, we describe the state of the art about rituximab treatment in NMOSD, including adults and children, plus its efficacy and tolerance and we also underline the questions that should be addressed in the near future. PMID:27134673

  18. An update on the evidence for the efficacy and safety of rituximab in the management of neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Collongues, Nicolas; de Seze, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) is a new concept which includes classical neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and partial forms of NMO such as recurrent optic neuritis with positive aquaporin-4 antibodies (AQP4) or brainstem symptoms (intractable hiccups or vomiting). This disease is clearly distinguished from multiple sclerosis (MS) and the therapeutic approach is clearly different. Rituximab is actually considered to be one of the most efficient treatments of NMOSD, even if class I studies are clearly lacking. In the present review, we describe the state of the art about rituximab treatment in NMOSD, including adults and children, plus its efficacy and tolerance and we also underline the questions that should be addressed in the near future. PMID:27134673

  19. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in a patient with lymphoma treated with rituximab: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Banda, Ramzi W; Daabil, Riyadh A; Dawamneh, M F

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare demyelinating disease caused by reactivation of a latent JC polyoma virus. The first cases of PML were described 50 years ago in patients with lymphoma. PML typically occurs in immunocompromised individuals, particularly those infected with HIV. We present a 52-year-old male with lymphoma who was treated with R-CHOP (R: Rituximab; C: Cyclophosphamide; H: Doxorubicin; O: Vincristine; P: Prednisone). After six cycles of therapy, the patients developed tonic-clonic seizure. MRI of the brain showed multiple brain lesions. The pathology of a brain biopsy was diagnostic for PML. We review radiographic and histopathological features of the disease. The literature on PML and its association with immunosuppressant agents is reviewed, and the impact of rituximab and other biological agents in the setting is highlighted. PMID:25666327

  20. Improvement of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis after systemic treatment with rituximab in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nogai, Hendrik; Israel-Willner, Heike; Zschenderlein, Rolf; Pezzutto, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterized by diverse neurologic symptoms including mnestic disturbances, hallucinations, and seizures as well as behavioral symptoms like depression, personality changes, and acute confusional states resembling dementia. Several antibodies have been described in the pathogenesis of limbic encephalitis. It is often a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, or Hodgkin's lymphoma among others. Here, we report a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), presenting with otherwise unexplained neurologic symptoms consistent with limbic encephalitis. Despite intensive diagnostic procedures, no causing agent could be identified. Pleocytosis consisting of T cells was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We initiated anti-B-cell therapy with Rituximab for B-CLL with quick and durable resolution of symptoms. We speculate that disruption of interaction between autoreactive T and malignant B cells is responsible for the therapeutic effect of Rituximab. PMID:23984126

  1. [Successful treatment with rituximab in a patient with splenic marginal zone B-cell lymphoma accompanied by cold agglutinin disease].

    PubMed

    Yasuyama, Masako; Kawauchi, Kiyotaka; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Fujibayashi, Mariko

    2014-01-01

    An 81-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to dyspnea in July 2008. A physical examination revealed marked splenomegaly, and the results of laboratory tests were as follows: hemoglobin (Hb)=7.0 g/dL, Ret=6.4%, WBC=24,100/μL (Ly: 20,003/μL), indirect bilirubin=3.6 mg/dL, LDH=232 IU/L. The cold agglutinin titer was 1 : 8,192, and a direct antiglobulin test was positive. A PET scan showed abnormal accumulation in the spleen and bone marrow. A bone marrow aspirate examination and biopsy demonstrated diffuse involvement of abnormal lymphocytes that were found to be positive for CD20 and negative for CD5, CD10, and cyclin D1. The immunoglobulin genes were clonally rearranged. Based on these findings, splenic marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (SMZL) associated with cold agglutinin disease (CAD) was diagnosed. Because the patient refused splenectomy, he was treated with four cycles of rituximab therapy (375 mg/kg, once a week). The Hb level and lymphocyte count subsequently normalized and the splenomegaly resolved. One year later, he relapsed and was again treated with rituximab therapy with complete remission. CAD accompanied by SMZL is very rare. Rituximab may be chosen as an alternative and effective therapeutic option in patients with SMZL-particularly those with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:25749330

  2. Phase II trial of weekly bortezomib in combination with rituximab in untreated patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, Irene M; Xie, Wanling; Padmanabhan, Swaminathan; Badros, Ashraf; Rourke, Meghan; Leduc, Renee; Chuma, Stacey; Kunsman, Janet; Warren, Diane; Poon, Tiffany; Harris, Brianna; Sam, Amy; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul G; Treon, Steven P; Weller, Edie; Matous, Jeffrey

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the activity and safety of weekly bortezomib and rituximab in patients with untreated Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM). Patients with no prior therapy and symptomatic disease were eligible. Patients received bortezomib IV weekly at 1.6 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, 15, q 28 days × 6 cycles, and rituximab 375 mg/m(2) weekly on cycles 1 and 4. Primary endpoint was the percent of patients with at least a minor response (MR). Twenty-six patients were treated. At least MR was observed in 23/26 patients (88%) (95% CI: 70-98%) with 1 complete response (4%), 1 near-complete response (4%), 15 partial remission (58%), and 6 MR (23%). Using IgM response evaluated by nephlometry, all 26 patients (100%) achieved at least MR or better. The median time to progression has not been reached, with an estimated 1-year event free rate of 79% (95% CI: 53, 91%). Common grade 3 and 4 therapy related adverse events included reversible neutropenia in 12%, anemia in 8%, and thrombocytopenia in 8%. No grade 3 or 4 neuropathy occurred. The combination of weekly bortezomib and rituximab exhibited significant activity and minimal neurological toxicity in patients with untreated WM. PMID:20652865

  3. Clinical experience with lenalidomide alone or in combination with rituximab in indolent B-cell and mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Ruan, J; Shah, B; Martin, P; Schuster, S J

    2016-07-01

    Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory drug with significant activity in indolent B-cell and mantle cell lymphomas. Lenalidomide has a manageable safety profile whether administered as a single agent or in combination with rituximab. The combination of lenalidomide with rituximab, known as the 'R(2)' regimen, enhances efficacy over what has been shown with monotherapy and has demonstrated activity in patients considered resistant to rituximab. Tolerability of these regimens has been consistent among studies. Asymptomatic neutropenia is the most common grade 3/4 adverse event, typically managed by dose interruption, followed by dose reduction once neutrophils have recovered. Nonhematologic toxicities (e.g. fatigue) are generally low-grade, manageable with concomitant treatment, and/or lenalidomide dose modification. More frequent with R(2), immune-related symptoms such as rash and tumor flare are important to recognize as lenalidomide-associated treatment effects in patients with lymphoma who require supportive care and potential dose modifications. Severe tumor flare reactions with painful lymphadenopathy are not typically observed outside of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Venous thromboembolism is uncommon in lymphomas, though prophylaxis is recommended. The general safety profile, differences between lenalidomide monotherapy and R(2) treatment, and optimal strategies for managing adverse events are discussed here. PMID:27052651

  4. Low-Dose Rituximab Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Highly Sensitized Heart-Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ashim; Pyle, Joseph; Hamilton, John; Bhat, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the B-cell–mediated production of immunoglobulin G antibody against the transplanted heart. The currently available therapies for antibody-mediated rejection have had marginal success, and chronic manifestations of rejection can result in an increased risk of graft vasculopathy and perhaps require repeat transplantation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 receptor of B-lymphocytes and approved as therapy for lymphoma, can be used in heart-transplant patients for the management of antibody-mediated rejection. We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with high allosensitization (pre-transplantation panel reactive antibody level, 72%) who underwent successful orthotopic heart transplantation. Postoperatively, her acute antibody-mediated rejection with concomitant cellular rejection was successfully treated with low-dose rituximab. The patient died 5 months later because of multiple other medical problems. The present case suggests a role for low-dose rituximab as therapy for antibody-mediated rejection in heart-transplant patients. PMID:23304051

  5. RadioImmunotherapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma: a single-institution series of combined treatment with cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Local control in adjuvant/definitive RT of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is largely dose-dependent. However, some clinical situations do not allow application of tumouricidal doses (i.e. re-irradiation) hence radiation sensitization by exploitation of high endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expression in ACC seems beneficial. This is a single-institution experience of combined radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with the EGFR-inhibitor cetuximab. Methods Between 2006 and 2010, 9 pts received RIT for advanced/recurrent ACC, 5/9 pts as re-irradiation. Baseline characteristics as well as treatment parameters were retrieved to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of the combination regimen were evaluated. Control rates (local/distant) and overall survival were calculated using Kaplan-Meier estimation. Results Median dose was 65 Gy, pts received a median of 6 cycles cetuximab. RIT was tolerated well with only one °III mucositis/dysphagia. Overall response/remission rates were high (77,8%); 2-year estimate of local control was 80% hence reaching local control levels comparable to high-dose RT. Progression-free survival (PFS) at 2 years and median overall survival were only 62,5% and 22,2 mo respectively. Conclusion While local control and treatment response in RIT seems promising, PFS and overall survival are still hampered by distant failure. The potential benefit of RIT with cetuximab warrants exploration in a prospective controlled clinical trial. PMID:21047402

  6. High-dose CD20-targeted radioimmunotherapy-based autologous transplantation improves outcomes for persistent mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cassaday, Ryan D; Stevenson, Philip A; Gooley, Theodore A; Chauncey, Thomas R; Pagel, John M; Rajendran, Joseph; Till, Brian G; Philip, Mary; Orozco, Johnnie J; Bensinger, William I; Holmberg, Leona A; Shustov, Andrei R; Green, Damian J; Smith, Stephen D; Libby, Edward N; Maloney, David G; Press, Oliver W; Gopal, Ajay K

    2015-12-01

    Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) can improve outcomes for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) patients, yet relapses are frequent. We hypothesized that high-dose anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning could improve results in this setting. We thus assessed 162 consecutive patients with MCL at our centre undergoing ASCT following high-dose RIT-based (n = 61) or standard (n = 101) conditioning. RIT patients were less likely to be in first remission (48% vs. 72%; P = 0·002), be in complete remission (CR) (26% vs. 61%; P < 0·001) and have chemosensitive disease (84% vs. 96%; P = 0·006). RIT-based conditioning was associated with a reduced risk of treatment failure [hazard ratio (HR) 0·40; P = 0·001] and mortality (HR 0·49; P = 0·01) after adjusting for these imbalances. This difference increased as disease status worsened (from CR to partial remission to stable/progressive disease), with respective HRs of 1·14, 0·53 and 0·04 for mortality, and 0·66, 0·36 and 0·14 for treatment failure. RIT-based conditioning appears to improve outcome following ASCT for MCL patients unable to achieve CR after controlling for imbalances in important risk factors. These data support the further study of RIT and radiation-based strategies in a risk-adapted approach to ASCT for persistent MCL. PMID:26455717

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: From the ‘Magic Bullets’ to ‘Radioactive Magic Bullets’

    PubMed Central

    Chamarthy, Murthy R.; Williams, Scott C.; Moadel, Renee M.

    2011-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of lymphoma with Zevalin and Bexxar was approved by FDA in 2002 and 2003, respectively, for the treatment of relapsed or refractory CD20+ follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin´s lymphoma. In 2009, Zevalin was also approved for consolidation therapy in patients with follicular non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma that achieve a partial or complete response to first-line chemotherapy. For follicular lymphoma patients, the overall response and progression-free survival rates have significantly improved since the implementation of RIT. The predominant complication of RIT is hematological toxicity that is usually manageable. There are ongoing trials to further define the expanding role of RIT as first line or concomitant therapy in the treatment of lymphoma as well as for certain antibiotic resistant infections and aggressive malignancies. There is also growing interest in the development of newer protocols for increased and more uniform dose delivery resulting in better outcomes and improved patient survival. This review will primarily focus on the role of RIT in treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which is of established clinical utility and FDA approved. The mechanism of RIT, available radionuclides and pharmacokinetics, therapy administration, clinical utility and toxicities, and future directions would be discussed. PMID:22180677

  8. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as 211At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using 211At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of 211At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, 211At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that 211At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML. PMID:23471305

  9. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using (211)At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Johnnie J; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Frayo, Shani L; Hylarides, Mark D; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2013-05-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as (211)At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using (211)At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of (211)At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, (211)At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that (211)At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML. PMID:23471305

  10. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with rhenium-186 using the MAG3 chelate for radioimmunotherapy of cancer: a technical protocol.

    PubMed

    Visser, G W; Gerretsen, M; Herscheid, J D; Snow, G B; van Dongen, G

    1993-11-01

    A detailed technical protocol is provided for reproducible and aseptical production of stable 186Re-monoclonal antibody conjugates. Labeled Mab E48 IgG and its F(ab')2 fragment which are promising candidates for radioimmunotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were used for evaluation. S-benzoylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (S-benzoyl-MAG3) was used as a precursor. Rhenium-186-MAG3 was prepared via a unique solid-phase synthesis, after which known strategies for esterification and conjugation to Mab IgG/F(ab')2 were applied. The biodistribution of 186Re-E48 F(ab')2 in tumor-bearing nude mice was found to be comparable to that of analogously labeled 99mTc-E48 F(ab')2 or 131I-E48 F(ab')2, indicating that the intrinsic behavior of the antibody remains preserved when using this labeling technique. Radiolytic decomposition of 186Re-E48 IgG/F(ab')2 solutions of 10 mCi.ml-1 was effectively reduced by the antioxidant ascorbic acid. Upon increase of the Re-MAG3 molar amount, a conjugation of seven to eight Re-MAG3 molecules per Mab molecule was generally the maximum ratio that could chemically be obtained. Such a ratio did not impair the immunoreactivity or alter the in vivo biodistribution characteristics of the immunoconjugate, making this labeling procedure suitable for general clinical application. PMID:8229241

  11. Rituximab extended schedule or retreatment trial for low tumour burden non-follicular indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Protocol E4402.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael E; Hong, Fangxin; Gascoyne, Randy D; Wagner, Lynne I; Krauss, John C; Habermann, Thomas M; Swinnen, Lode J; Schuster, Stephen J; Peterson, Christopher G; Sborov, Mark D; Martin, S Eric; Weiss, Matthias; Ehmann, W Christopher; Horning, Sandra J; Kahl, Brad S

    2016-06-01

    The rituximab extended schedule or retreatment trial (RESORT; E4402) was a phase 3 randomized prospective trial comparing maintenance rituximab (MR) versus a retreatment (RR) dosing strategy in asymptomatic, low tumour burden indolent lymphoma. A planned exploratory sub-study compared the two strategies for small lymphocytic (SLL) and marginal zone lymphomas (MZL). Patients responding to rituximab weekly × 4 were randomized to MR (single dose rituximab every 3 months until treatment failure) or RR (rituximab weekly × 4) at the time of each progression until treatment failure. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure (TTTF). Patients with SLL (n = 57), MZL (n = 71) and unclassifiable small B-cell lymphoma (n = 3) received induction rituximab. The overall response rate (ORR) was 40% [95% confidence interval (CI) 31-49%; SLL ORR 22·8%; MZL ORR 52·1%]; all 52 responders were randomized. At a median of 4·3 years from randomization, treatment failure occurred in 18/23 RR and 15/29 MR. The median TTTF was 1·4 years for RR and 4·8 years for MR (P = 0·012); median time to first cytotoxic therapy was 6·3 years for RR and not reached for MR (P = 0·0002). Survival did not differ (P = 0·72). In low tumour burden SLL and MZL patients responding to rituximab induction, MR significantly improved TTTF as compared with RR. PMID:26970533

  12. Impact of dose intensity on outcome of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab regimen given in the first-line therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouvet, Emmanuelle; Borel, Cécile; Obéric, Lucie; Compaci, Gisèle; Cazin, Bruno; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Laurent, Guy; Ysebaert, Loic

    2013-01-01

    Fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab is the most efficient first-line treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. Many dose adjustments of the original MD Anderson Cancer Center regimen have been proposed. However, whether fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab relative dose intensity may have an impact on outcome has not yet been investigated. We retrospectively assessed relative dose intensity in 106 community-based patients included in our regional healthcare network from 2004-11, all receiving fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab as first-line treatment outside clinical trials. Dose reductions were observed in 51.4% of patients, mainly decided by the individual physician and not based on recommendations (52.7%), while there were fewer reports of toxicity or dose reduction because of impaired renal function. Progression-free survival was significantly reduced in patients who had a reduction in dose intensity of more than 20% in fludarabine-cyclophosphamide and/or rituximab. Multivariate analysis showed dose of rituximab had a significant impact on minimal residual disease and progression-free survival. Although prophylactic granulocyte-colony stimulating factor significantly reduced the rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia, it had no impact on relative dose intensity and outcome. This study shows that, in routine clinical practice, there is low adherence to the original MD Anderson Cancer Center fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab schedule, and that the decision to modify dosage was mostly taken by the individual physician and was based on anticipated toxicity. This study shows that reduction of fludarabine-cyclophosphamide and, more importantly, of rituximab doses seriously interferes with progression-free survival. PMID:23065520

  13. Efficacy and safety of front-line therapy with fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab regimen for chronic lymphocytic leukemia outside clinical trials: the Israeli CLL Study Group experience.

    PubMed

    Herishanu, Yair; Goldschmidt, Neta; Bairey, Osnat; Ruchlemer, Rosa; Fineman, Riva; Rahimi-Levene, Naomi; Shvidel, Lev; Tadmor, Tamar; Ariel, Aviv; Braester, Andrea; Shapiro, Mika; Joffe, Erel; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab regimen for young physically fit patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the "real-life" setting. We specifically focused on the impact of dose reduction on patient outcomes. The patient cohort consisted of 128 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (≤ 70 years) treated at 10 Israeli centers with front-line fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab. We defined reduced chemotherapy as two-thirds or less of the total indicated dose. Patients treated with rituximab were divided into two groups and compared: those who received full dosages of 375 mg/m(2) or 500 mg/m(2), and patients given less than six cycles with either dose. Overall and clinical complete response rates (92.8% and 70.4%), as well as toxicities and overall survival (median not reached at 6 years), were similar to other reported clinical trials, but progression-free survival was shorter (42.5 months). Almost 50% of patients had some dose reduction of chemotherapy, 21% receiving less than two-thirds of the indicated dose, while close to 30% did not complete six cycles of rituximab. Reduced doses of chemotherapy and rituximab were independently associated with shorter progression-free survival (hazard ratio 3.6, P<0.0001 for reduced chemotherapy; hazard ratio 2.5, P=0.003 for incomplete-treatment with rituximab). Achieving a complete response was associated with longer overall survival but was not linked to the given dose of chemoimmunotherapy. In younger physically fit patients, front-line fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab therapy in the "real-life" setting achieves long remissions (albeit shorter than in clinical trials) and prolonged overall survival. However, dose reductions are commonly administered and may impact outcome. PMID:25661442

  14. Impact of Fc gamma-receptor polymorphisms on the response to rituximab treatment in children and adolescents with mature B cell lymphoma/leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Birgit; Yavuz, Deniz; Zimmermann, Martin; Schieferstein, Jutta; Kabickova, Edita; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Reiter, Alfred; Makarova, Olga; Worch, Jennifer; Bonn, Bettina R; Damm-Welk, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies in adult lymphoma patients have indicated a correlation between polymorphisms of Fc gamma-receptors (FcγRs, encoded by the respective FCGR genes) and the response to rituximab treatment. In vitro, cells expressing FcγRIIIa-158V mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) more efficiently than cells expressing FcγRIIIa-158F. The impact of the FCGR2A-131HR polymorphism is unclear. In this study, the FCGR polymorphisms FCGR3A-158VF and FCGR2A-131HR were analyzed in pediatric patients with mature aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma/leukemia (B-NHL). Pediatric patients received a single dose of rituximab monotherapy. Response was evaluated on day 5 followed by standard chemotherapy for B-NHL. Among 105 evaluable patients, a response to rituximab was observed in 21 % of those homozygous for FcγRIIa-131RR (5/24) compared to 48 % of patients who were HH and HR FcγRIIa-131 allele carriers (18/34 and 21/47, respectively; p = 0.044). Among patients with the FCGR3A-158 polymorphism, those homozygous for the FF genotype had a significantly favorable rituximab response rate of 59 % (22/37) compared to 32 % in patients who were FcγRIIIa-158VV and FcγRIIIa-VF allele carriers (2/9 and 20/59, respectively; p = 0.022). A stringent phase II response evaluation of children and adolescents with B-NHL after one dose of rituximab monotherapy showed a significant association between the rituximab response rate and FCGR polymorphisms. These findings support the hypothesis that FCGR polymorphisms represent patient-specific parameters that influence the response to rituximab. PMID:27376362

  15. Alpha imaging confirmed efficient targeting of CD45-positive cells after astatine-211 (211At)-radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H.L.; Miller, Brian W.; Bäck, Tom A.; Santos, Erlinda B.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Knoblaugh, Sue E.; Frayo, Shani L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Storb, Rainer; Press, Oliver W.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Pagel, John M.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-radioimmunotherapy targeting CD45 may substitute for total body irradiation in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) preparative regimens for lymphoma. Our goal was to optimize the anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody (MAb; CA12.10C12) protein dose for astatine-211 (211At)-radioimmunotherapy, extending the analysis to include intra-organ 211At activity distribution and α-imaging-based small-scale dosimetry, along with immunohistochemical staining. Methods Eight normal dogs were injected with either 0.75 (n=5) or 1.00 mg/kg (n=3) of 211At-B10-CA12.10C12 (11.5–27.6 MBq/kg). Two were euthanized and necropsied 19–22 hours post injection (p.i.), and six received autologous HCT three days after 211At-radioimmunotherapy, following lymph node and bone marrow biopsies at 2–4 and/or 19 hours p.i. Blood was sampled to study toxicity and clearance; CD45 targeting was evaluated by flow cytometry. 211At localization and small-scale dosimetry were assessed using two α-imaging systems: α-camera and iQID. Results Uptake of 211At was highest in spleen (0.31–0.61 %IA/g), lymph nodes (0.02–0.16 %IA/g), liver (0.11–0.12 %IA/g), and marrow (0.06–0.08 %IA/g). Lymphocytes in blood and marrow were efficiently targeted using either MAb dose. Lymph nodes remained unsaturated, but displayed targeted 211At localization in T lymphocyte-rich areas. Absorbed doses to blood, marrow, and lymph nodes were estimated at 3.1, 2.4, and 3.4 Gy/166 MBq, respectively. All transplanted dogs experienced transient hepatic toxicity. Liver enzyme levels were temporarily elevated in 5 of 6 dogs; 1 treated with 1.00 mg MAb/kg developed ascites and was euthanized 136 days after HCT. Conclusion 211At-anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy with 0.75 mg MAb/kg efficiently targeted blood and marrow without severe toxicity. Dosimetry calculations and observed radiation-induced effects indicated that sufficient 211At-B10-CA12.10C12 localization was achieved for efficient conditioning for HCT. PMID:26338894

  16. B-Lymphocyte Depletion in Myalgic Encephalopathy/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. An Open-Label Phase II Study with Rituximab Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fluge, Øystein; Risa, Kristin; Lunde, Sigrid; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid Gurvin; Sapkota, Dipak; Kristoffersen, Einar Kleboe; Sørland, Kari; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Background Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We previously reported a pilot case series followed by a small, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study, suggesting that B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab can yield clinical benefit in ME/CFS. Methods In this single-center, open-label, one-armed phase II study (NCT01156909), 29 patients were included for treatment with rituximab (500 mg/m2) two infusions two weeks apart, followed by maintenance rituximab infusions after 3, 6, 10 and 15 months, and with follow-up for 36 months. Findings Major or moderate responses, predefined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score, were detected in 18 out of 29 patients (intention to treat). Clinically significant responses were seen in 18 out of 28 patients (64%) receiving rituximab maintenance treatment. For these 18 patients, the mean response durations within the 156 weeks study period were 105 weeks in 14 major responders, and 69 weeks in four moderate responders. At end of follow-up (36 months), 11 out of 18 responding patients were still in ongoing clinical remission. For major responders, the mean lag time from first rituximab infusion until start of clinical response was 23 weeks (range 8–66). Among the nine patients from the placebo group in the previous randomized study with no significant improvement during 12 months follow-up after saline infusions, six achieved a clinical response before 12 months after rituximab maintenance infusions in the present study. Two patients had an allergic reaction to rituximab and two had an episode of uncomplicated late-onset neutropenia. Eight patients experienced one or more transient symptom flares after rituximab infusions. There was no unexpected toxicity. Conclusion In a subgroup of ME/CFS patients, prolonged B-cell depletion with rituximab maintenance infusions was associated with sustained clinical responses. The observed

  17. Low absolute lymphocyte count and addition of rituximab confer high risk for interstitial pneumonia in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Liu, Chun-Yu; Pai, Jih-Tung; Hong, Ying-Chung; Teng, Hao-Wei; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chao, Ta-Chung; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chen, Po-Min; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2011-10-01

    Several small-scale studies have reported pulmonary toxicity among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy, though whether the use of rituximab predisposes to interstitial pneumonia (IP) remains unclear. This retrospective study was intended to identify the characteristics and risk factors of IP in patients with DLBCL. Between 2000 and 2009, 529 consecutive patients with DLBCL receiving first-line tri-weekly COP- or CHOP-based chemotherapy with or without rituximab were enrolled as subjects. IP was defined as diffuse pulmonary interstitial infiltrates found on computed tomography scans in conjunction with respiratory symptoms. IP was observed in 26 patients (4.9%), six of whom were confirmed with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The median number of chemotherapy courses before IP was four cycles. Using multivariate analysis, absolute lymphocyte count less than 1×10(9)/l at diagnosis [odds ratio (OR) 2.75, p=0.014] and the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy (OR 4.56, p=0.003) were identified as independent risk factors for IP. In conclusion, the incidence of IP is increased in patients with DLBCL receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy. Specific subgroups with lymphopenia at diagnosis may justify close scrutiny to detect pulmonary complications. PMID:21647583

  18. IMPACT OF PRE-TRANSPLANT RITUXIMAB ON SURVIVAL AFTER AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR DIFFUSE LARGE B-CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Timothy S.; Hari, Parameswaran N.; Carreras, Jeanette; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Champlin, Richard E.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory A.; Ilhan, Osman; Khoury, H. Jean; Lister, John; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Marks, David I.; Munker, Reinhold; Pecora, Andrew L.; Rowlings, Philip A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Stiff, Patrick; Wiernik, Peter H.; Winter, Jane N.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; van Besien, Koen; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Vose, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab into front-line regimens for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has resulted in improved survival. Despite this progress, many patients develop refractory or recurrent DLBCL and then receive autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AuHCT). It is unclear to what extent pre-transplant exposure to rituximab affects outcomes following AuHCT. Outcomes of 994 patients receiving AuHCT for DLBCL between 1996 and 2003 were analyzed according to whether rituximab was (n=176, “+R” group) or was not (n=818, “ −R” group) administered with front-line or salvage therapy prior to AuHCT. The +R group had superior progression-free survival (50% versus 38%, p=0.008) and overall survival (57% versus 45%, p=0.006) at 3 years. Platelet and neutrophil engraftment were not affected by exposure to rituximab. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) did not differ significantly between the +R and −R groups. In multivariate analysis, the +R group had improved progression-free survival (relative risk of relapse/progression or death 0.64, p<0.001) and improved overall survival (relative risk of death of 0.74, p=0.039). We conclude that pre-transplant rituximab is associated with a lower rate of progression and improved survival following AuHCT for DLBCL, with no evidence of impaired engraftment or increased NRM. PMID:19822306

  19. Rituximab is a safe and effective long-term treatment for children with steroid and calcineurin inhibitor-dependent idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ravani, Pietro; Ponticelli, Alessandro; Siciliano, Chiara; Fornoni, Alessia; Magnasco, Alberto; Sica, Felice; Bodria, Monica; Caridi, Gianluca; Wei, Changli; Belingheri, Mirco; Ghio, Luciana; Merscher-Gomez, Sandra; Edefonti, Alberto; Pasini, Andrea; Montini, Giovanni; Murtas, Corrado; Wang, Xiangyu; Muruve, Daniel; Vaglio, Augusto; Martorana, Davide; Pani, Antonello; Scolari, Francesco; Reiser, Jochen; Ghiggeri, Gian M

    2013-11-01

    In children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, rituximab can maintain short-term remission with withdrawal of prednisone and calcineurin inhibitors. Long-term effects including the number of repeated infusions to maintain remission are unknown. To test this, we treated 46 consecutive children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome lasting for at least 1 year (mean 6.3 years), maintained in remission with oral prednisone and calcineurin inhibitors. They received 1-5 rituximab courses during a median follow-up of 3 years. Oral agents were tapered after each infusion, and completely withdrawn within 45 days. Rituximab was well tolerated. Six-month probabilities of remission were 48% after the first infusion and 37% after subsequent infusions. One- and 2-year-remission probabilities were, respectively, 20 and 10%. Median time intervals between complete oral-agent withdrawal and relapse were 5.6 and 8.5 months, respectively, following the first and subsequent courses. The time to reconstitution of CD20 cells correlated with the duration of remission, but was not associated with variation in FcyR, CD20, or SMPDL-3B polymorphisms. Podocyte Src phosphorylation was normal. Thus, rituximab can be safely and repeatedly used as a prednisone and calcineurin inhibitor-sparing therapy in a considerable proportion of children with dependent forms of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Further study is needed to identify patients who will benefit most from rituximab therapy. PMID:23739238

  20. Long-term follow up of the FL2000 study comparing CHVP-interferon to CHVP-interferon plus rituximab in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Houot, Roch; Morschhauser, Franck; Sonet, Anne; Brice, Pauline; Belhadj, Karim; Cartron, Guillaume; Audhuy, Bruno; Fermé, Christophe; Feugier, Pierre; Sebban, Catherine; Delwail, Vincent; Maisonneuve, Hervé; Le Gouill, Steven; Lefort, Sophie; Brousse, Nicole; Foussard, Charles; Salles, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Anti-CD20-containing chemotherapy regimens have become the standard of care for patients with follicular lymphoma needing cytotoxic therapy. Four randomized trials demonstrated a clinical benefit for patients treated with rituximab. However, no long-term follow up (i.e. > 5 years) of these trials is yet available. Between May 2000 and May 2002, 358 newly diagnosed patients with high tumor burden follicular lymphoma were randomized to receive cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, etoposide and prednisolone plus interferon-α2a or a similar chemotherapy-based regimen plus rituximab, and outcome was up-dated. With a median follow up of 8.3 years, addition of rituximab remained significantly associated with prolonged event-free survival (primary end point) (P=0.0004) with a trend towards a benefit for overall survival (P=0.076). The Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index score was strongly associated with outcome for both event-free and overall survival in univariate analysis and its prognostic value remained highly significant after adjusting for other significant covariates in multivariate models (P<0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively). Considering long-term toxicity, the addition of rituximab in the first-line setting was confirmed as safe with regards to development of secondary malignancies. Long-term follow up of patients with follicular lymphoma treated in the FL2000 study confirms the sustained clinical benefit of rituximab without long-term toxicity. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier:00136552). PMID:23645690

  1. Long-term follow up of the FL2000 study comparing CHVP-interferon to CHVP-interferon plus rituximab in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Houot, Roch; Morschhauser, Franck; Sonet, Anne; Brice, Pauline; Belhadj, Karim; Cartron, Guillaume; Audhuy, Bruno; Fermé, Christophe; Feugier, Pierre; Sebban, Catherine; Delwail, Vincent; Maisonneuve, Hervé; Le Gouill, Steven; Lefort, Sophie; Brousse, Nicole; Foussard, Charles; Salles, Gilles

    2013-07-01

    Anti-CD20-containing chemotherapy regimens have become the standard of care for patients with follicular lymphoma needing cytotoxic therapy. Four randomized trials demonstrated a clinical benefit for patients treated with rituximab. However, no long-term follow up (i.e. > 5 years) of these trials is yet available. Between May 2000 and May 2002, 358 newly diagnosed patients with high tumor burden follicular lymphoma were randomized to receive cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, etoposide and prednisolone plus interferon-α2a or a similar chemotherapy-based regimen plus rituximab, and outcome was up-dated. With a median follow up of 8.3 years, addition of rituximab remained significantly associated with prolonged event-free survival (primary end point) (P=0.0004) with a trend towards a benefit for overall survival (P=0.076). The Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index score was strongly associated with outcome for both event-free and overall survival in univariate analysis and its prognostic value remained highly significant after adjusting for other significant covariates in multivariate models (P<0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively). Considering long-term toxicity, the addition of rituximab in the first-line setting was confirmed as safe with regards to development of secondary malignancies. Long-term follow up of patients with follicular lymphoma treated in the FL2000 study confirms the sustained clinical benefit of rituximab without long-term toxicity. PMID:23645690

  2. Immunologic effects of rituximab on the human spleen in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Audia, Sylvain; Samson, Maxime; Guy, Julien; Janikashvili, Nona; Fraszczak, Jennifer; Trad, Malika; Ciudad, Marion; Leguy, Vanessa; Berthier, Sabine; Petrella, Tony; Aho-Glélé, Serge; Martin, Laurent; Maynadié, Marc; Lorcerie, Bernard; Rat, Patrick; Cheynel, Nicolas; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease with a complex pathogenesis. As in many B cell–related autoimmune diseases, rituximab (RTX) has been shown to increase platelet counts in some ITP patients. From an immunologic standpoint, the mode of action of RTX and the reasons underlying its limited efficacy have yet to be elucidated. Because splenectomy is a cornerstone treatment of ITP, the immune effect of RTX on this major secondary lymphoid organ was investigated in 18 spleens removed from ITP patients who were treated or not with RTX. Spleens from ITP individuals had follicular hyperplasia consistent with secondary follicles. RTX therapy resulted in complete B-cell depletion in the blood and a significant reduction in splenic B cells, but these patients did not achieve remission. Moreover, whereas the percentage of circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs) was similar to that in controls, splenic Tregs were reduced in ITP patients. Interestingly, the ratio of proinflammatory Th1 cells to suppressive Tregs was increased in the spleens of patients who failed RTX therapy. These results indicate that although B cells are involved in ITP pathogenesis, RTX-induced total B-cell depletion is not correlated with its therapeutic effects, which suggests additional immune-mediated mechanisms of action of this drug. PMID:21876120

  3. Association of rituximab with graphene oxide confers direct cytotoxicity for CD20-positive lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengke; Deng, Zhenghao; Li, Lan; Clayton, Frederic; Chen, Alexander L.; Wei, Ran; Miles, Rodney; Stephens, Deborah M.; Glenn, Martha; Wang, Xiyang; Jensen, Peter E.; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is one of the most common hematologic malignancies among adults for which the chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (Ab) rituximab (RTX) is used as first-line therapy. As RTX itself is not directly cytotoxic but relies on host immune effector mechanisms or chemotherapeutic agents to attack target cells, its therapeutic capacity may become limited when host effector mechanisms are compromised. Currently, refractory disease and relapse with NHL are still common, highlighting the need for novel anti-CD20 antibody strategies with superior therapeutic efficacy over current protocols. We hypothesized that making RTX directly cytotoxic might improve the therapeutic efficacy. Graphene oxide (GO) has recently emerged as a highly attractive nanomaterial for biomedical applications; and several studies have reported cytotoxic effect of GO on benign and malignant cells in vitro. Herein, we report that RTX can be stably associated with GO, and that GO-associated RTX (RTX/GO) demonstrates remarkably high avidity for CD20. Binding of GO-associated RTX to CD20-positive lymphoma cells induces CD20 capping and target cell death through an actin dependent mechanism. In vivo, GO-associated RTX, but not free RTX, quickly eliminates high-grade lymphomas in the absence of host effector mechanisms in a xenograft lymphoma mouse model. Our findings represent the first demonstration of using GO-associated antibody as effective cytotoxic therapy for human B cell malignancies in the absence of chemotherapy, and these findings could have important clinical implications. PMID:26859679

  4. Cladribine plus rituximab is an effective therapy for newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Stephen E; Pindyck, Talia; Okada, Craig; Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Zunqiu; Mater, Elana; Abbi, Kamal; Epner, Elliot M

    2011-08-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is incurable with standard chemotherapy. There is no consensus on the best initial therapy, especially for elderly patients, who are not candidates for aggressive treatment approaches. Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) treatment guidelines include rituximab (R) plus cladribine for the initial treatment of MCL. However, few data are available to substantiate this recommendation. Therefore, to further define the role of R-cladribine for the initial treatment of MCL, we performed a retrospective chart review of 31 patients with MCL (median age, 67) treated with R-cladribine. The majority of responding patients also received R maintenance. The overall response rate was 87%, with 61% of patients achieving a complete remission (CR/CRu). The estimated median follow-up was 32.5 months, median PFS was 37.5 months, and median OS was 85.2 months. One of 19 (5.3%) subjects in CR/CRu relapsed (median follow-up of 23 months). CR/CRu was associated with improved survival (p < 0.0001), while a high mantle cell international prognostic index (MIPI) was associated with worse survival (p = 0.05). There was one toxic death (neutropenic pseudomonal sepsis) related to treatment. R-cladribine is an effective therapy for previously untreated MCL, and these results validate the use of R-cladribine for the initial treatment of MCL. PMID:21623691

  5. [Rituximab (MabThera)--a new biological medicine in rheumatoid arthritis therapy].

    PubMed

    Nemec, P

    2007-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious, chronic, inflammatory disorder that damages the joints. The chronic destructive process causes pain to patients with RA and leads to the development of permanent disability. At present, great emphasis is placed on timely and effective therapy for RA, which is able to halt or slow the development of the disorder. At present we do not have any means of curing RA, the main objective for treatment is to induce remission of the disorder and prevent structural damage to the joints and the development of permanent disability. The relatively frequent failure of disease modifying medications (DMARDs) lead to efforts to find new resources for the treatment of RA. So called biological medicines were recently introduced into therapeutic use. These were mainly TNFalpha blockers. Experience has shown that approximately a third of patients with RA do not respond even to treatment with such medicines. Rituximab (MabThera), a monoclonal antibody against CD20 positive B-lymphocytes, is a new biological medicine approved for RA therapy. It represents a new hope for patients with active RA, for whom earlier therapy with TNFa blockers has failed. PMID:18277630

  6. Clinical efficacy of combined rituximab treatment in a woman with severe Graves' ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomei; Guo, Hui; Liu, Juan; Shi, Bingyin

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a female Chinese patient with Graves' disease (GD) and severe Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) in its active phase, who was treated with propylthiouracil and oral prednisolone for 2 months at a local hospital. However, a lack of improvement in symptoms meant that the patient was transferred to the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University (Xi'an, China), whereupon the patient received high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy, although with limited efficacy. Subsequently, rituximab (RTX; anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) combined with orbital irradiation treatment was initiated. The patient responded positively to the combined treatment; the clinical symptoms and enlargement of the extraocular muscles were ameliorated, and there were marked decreases in the clinical activity and NOSPECS grading scores. Furthermore, the serum levels of anti-thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb) were markedly decreased at 2 months following RTX therapy. The patient was maintained in a euthyroid state by treatment with methimazole during and following RTX therapy. It was concluded that RTX treatment may attenuate severe GO by depleting lymphocytes, and may promote the recovery of GD by reducing the serum levels of TRAb. PMID:27446325

  7. Radiolabelling rituximab with (99m)Tc in three steps procedure.

    PubMed

    Fontan, Charlotte; Bezombes, Christine; Salabert, Anne Sophie; Costes, Julien; Lopez, Raphael; Fournie, Jean-Jacques; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Coulais, Yvon; Payoux, Pierre; Tafani, Mathieu

    2015-06-15

    Lymphomas are the most frequent haematological malignancy. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL), more than 90% of tumor cells express the cluster of differentiation (CD) 20 antigen. At the end of frontline therapy, the evaluation of remission is based on computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography coupled with computer tomography (PET/CT) with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG). Unfortunately, these techniques are not specific and cannot distinguish residual active tumor from inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a specific radiotracer of NHL CD 20+ cells for clinical applications. The radiolabelling technique presented, based on the use of tricarbonyl compound, does not include an antibody reduction because this step could damage the protein. Actually, rituximab, an anti-CD 20 chimeric antibody used for the treatment of these NHL, was radiolabelled with Isolink® (99m)Tc-tricarbonyl compound in a three-step procedure without using a specific antibody reducer. Radiolabelling yield was greater than 97%. In vitro experiments showed a conservation of antibody integrity. In vivo experiments using Single-photon emission computed tomography/CT showed significant tumor targeting 24 h after injection of the radiotracer. It was consequently possible to develop an immunoradiolabelling method to specifically detect the residual disease. As this procedure is fast, reproducible and gentle, it will be possible to comply with Good Manufacturing Practices. PMID:26017396

  8. Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shang; Forero, Andres; LoBuglio, Albert F.; Breitz, H; Khazaeli, M B.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wang, W Q.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2005-04-01

    Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies. Shen S, Forero A, Lobuglio AF, Breitz H, Khazaeli MB, Fisher DR, Wang W, Meredith RF. Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, and Radioisotopes Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using CC49 fusion protein, comprised of CC49-(scFv)(4) and streptavidin, in conjunction with (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin (DOTA = dodecanetetraacetic acid) provides a new opportunity to improve efficacy by increasing the tumor-to-normal tissue dose ratio. To our knowledge, the patient-specific dosimetry of pretargeted (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin after CC49 fusion protein in patients has not been reported previously. METHODS: Nine patients received 3-step pretargeted RIT: (a) 160 mg/m(2) of CC49 fusion protein, (b) synthetic clearing agent (sCA) at 48 or 72 h later, and (c) (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin 24 h after the sCA administration. Sequential whole-body (111)In images were acquired immediately and at 2-144 h after injection of (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin. Geometric-mean quantification with background and attenuation correction was used for liver and lung dosimetry. Effective point source quantification was used for spleen, kidneys, and tumors. Organ and tumor (90)Y doses were calculated based on (111)In imaging data and the MIRD formalism using patient-specific organ masses determined from CT images. Patient-specific marrow doses were determined based on radioactivity concentration in the blood. RESULTS: The (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin had a rapid plasma clearance, which was biphasic with <10% residual at 8 h. Organ masses ranged from 1,263 to 3,855 g for liver, 95 to 1,009 g for spleen, and 309 to 578 g for kidneys. The patient-specific mean (90)Y dose (cGy/37 MBq, or rad/mCi) was 0.53 (0.32-0.78) to whole body

  9. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  10. Comparison of I-131 Radioimmunotherapy Tumor Dosimetry: Unit Density Sphere Model Versus Patient-Specific Monte Carlo Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Howard, David M.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; Wilderman, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract High computational requirements restrict the use of Monte Carlo algorithms for dose estimation in a clinical setting, despite the fact that they are considered more accurate than traditional methods. The goal of this study was to compare mean tumor absorbed dose estimates using the unit density sphere model incorporated in OLINDA with previously reported dose estimates from Monte Carlo simulations using the dose planning method (DPMMC) particle transport algorithm. The dataset (57 tumors, 19 lymphoma patients who underwent SPECT/CT imaging during I-131 radioimmunotherapy) included tumors of varying size, shape, and contrast. OLINDA calculations were first carried out using the baseline tumor volume and residence time from SPECT/CT imaging during 6 days post-tracer and 8 days post-therapy. Next, the OLINDA calculation was split over multiple time periods and summed to get the total dose, which accounted for the changes in tumor size. Results from the second calculation were compared with results determined by coupling SPECT/CT images with DPM Monte Carlo algorithms. Results from the OLINDA calculation accounting for changes in tumor size were almost always higher (median 22%, range −1%–68%) than the results from OLINDA using the baseline tumor volume because of tumor shrinkage. There was good agreement (median −5%, range −13%–2%) between the OLINDA results and the self-dose component from Monte Carlo calculations, indicating that tumor shape effects are a minor source of error when using the sphere model. However, because the sphere model ignores cross-irradiation, the OLINDA calculation significantly underestimated (median 14%, range 2%–31%) the total tumor absorbed dose compared with Monte Carlo. These results show that when the quantity of interest is the mean tumor absorbed dose, the unit density sphere model is a practical alternative to Monte Carlo for some applications. For applications requiring higher accuracy, computer-intensive Monte

  11. (212)Pb@C(60) and its water-soluble derivatives: synthesis, stability, and suitability for radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Diener, Michael D; Alford, John M; Kennel, Stephen J; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2007-04-25

    Fullerenes could potentially play a valuable role in radioimmunotherapy by more stably encapsulating radionuclides, especially where conventional chelation chemistry is inadequate due to the physical and/or chemical properties of the radionuclide. One of the therapeutically useful radionuclides that requires improved containment in vivo is 212Pb (tau1/2 = 10.6 h), the beta-emitting parent to alpha-emitting 212Bi (tau1/2 = 60.6 min). Myelotoxicity resulting from the accumulation of 212Pb in the bone marrow has limited the use of this radionuclide despite its favorable decay characteristics. In this work, 212Pb@C60 and its malonic ester derivatives were prepared for the first time by allowing the 212Pb to recoil into C60 following alpha-decay from its parent, 0.15-s 216Po, generated in situ from the decay of 224Ra (tau1/2 = 15 days). Repeated washing of the organic phase containing the 212Pb@C60 malonic esters with challenge solutions containing cold Pb2+ ions demonstrated that some of the 212Pb could not be exchanged and was apparently inside of the fullerenes. Malonic esters of endohedral alpha-emitting 213Bi (tau1/2 = 45 min) fullerenes were prepared by an analogous procedure. Following acidification of the esters, a preliminary biodistribution study in mice was performed with the untargeted water-soluble radiofullerenes. It was found that 212Pb did not accumulate in bone after being administered as an endohedral fullerene, in contrast to results with polyhydroxylated radiofullerenes and conventional polyaminocarboxylate chelators for 212Pb. The results indicate that 212Pb is held more tightly in the fullerene than in other methods and suggest that fullerenes may have an important role in the targeted delivery of 212Pb. PMID:17394315

  12. High resolution computed tomography and MRI for monitoring lung tumor growth in mice undergoing radioimmunotherapy: correlation with histology.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Davis, I A; Branning, J; Pan, H; Kabalka, G W; Paulus, M J

    2000-05-01

    A model lung tumor system has been developed in mice for the evaluation of vascular targeted radioimmunotherapy. In this model, EMT-6 mammary carcinoma tumors growing in the lung are treated with 213Bi, an alpha particle emitter, which is targeted to lung blood vessels using a monoclonal antibody. Smaller tumors (< 100 microm in diameter) are cured, but larger tumors undergo a period of regression and then regrow and ultimately prove lethal. The goal of this work was to determine if external imaging with MRI or CT could be used routinely to monitor the growth/ regression of lung tumors in live mice. To attempt to evaluate individual tumors in vivo, animals were initially imaged with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution MRI images could be obtained only after sacrifice when lungs were not moving. In contrast, high resolution computed tomography (CT) produced evaluable images from anesthetized animals. Serial CT images (up to 5/animal) were collected over a 17 day period of tumor growth and treatment. When tumored animals became moribund, animals were sacrificed and lungs were inflated with fixative, embedded in paraffin, and then sectioned serially to compare the detection of tumors by high resolution CT with detection by histology. CT proved most useful in detecting lung tumors located in the hilar area and least useful in detecting serosal surface and anterior lobe tumor foci. Overall, CT images of live animals revealed tumors in approximately 2/3 of cases detected in histologic serial sections when relatively few tumors were present per lung. Detection of lesions and their resolution post therapy were complicated due to residual hemorrhagic, regressing tumor nodules and the development of lung edema both of which appeared as high density areas in the CT scans. We conclude that the microCT method used could identify some lung tumors as small as 100 microm in diameter; however, no concrete evaluation of therapy induced regression of the tumors could be

  13. 131I-tositumomab myeloablative radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: radiation dose to the testes

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Naoya; Gopal, Ajay K.; Shields, Andrew T.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.; Rajendran, Joseph G.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation doses to the testes delivered by a radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibody and its effects on male sex hormone levels. Materials and methods: Testicular uptake and retention of 131I-tositumomab were measured, and testicular absorbed doses were calculated for 67 male patients (54+/-11 years of age) with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who had undergone myeloablative radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab. Time-activity curves for the major organs, testes, and whole body were generated from planar imaging studies. In a subset of patients, male sex hormones were measured before and 1 year after the therapy. Results: The absorbed dose to the testes showed considerable variability (range=4.4-70.2 Gy). Pretherapy levels of total testosterone were below the lower limit of the reference range, and post-therapy evaluation demonstrated further reduction [4.6+/-1.8 nmol/l (pre-RIT) vs. 3.8+/-2.9 nmol/l (post-RIT), P<0.05]. Patients receiving higher radiation doses to the testes (>=25 Gy) showed a greater reduction [4.7+/-1.6 nmol/l (pre-RIT) vs. 3.3+/-2.7 nmol/l (post-RIT), P<0.05] compared with patients receiving lower doses (<25 Gy), who showed no significant change in total testosterone levels. Conclusion: The testicular radiation absorbed dose varied highly among individual patients. Finally, patients receiving higher doses to the testes were more likely to show post-RIT suppression of testosterone levels.

  14. Radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer metastases with alpha-particle emitter 225Ac: comparing efficacy with 213Bi and 90Y.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2009-12-01

    alpha-Particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. alpha-Particle emitter (213)Bi-based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of (225)Ac, high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T(1/2) = 45.6 min) on site, and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac, parent of (213)Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of (225)Ac (400 nCi)-labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in approximately 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to 1 year. Treatment with (225)Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than (213)Bi-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 61 days; P = 0.001) and (90)Y-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 50 days; P < 0.001) as well as untreated control (median survival, 41 days; P < 0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that (225)Ac-treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from (213)Bi and 2.4 Gy from (90)Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that (225)Ac daughters, (221)Fr and (213)Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest (225)Ac-labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:19920193

  15. Rituximab, cyclophosphamide-fractionated, vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone alternating with rituximab, methotrexate and cytarabine overcomes risk features associated with inferior outcomes in treatment of newly diagnosed, high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mato, Anthony; Feldman, Tatyana; Zielonka, Tania; Singavi, Arun; Gadaletta, Gabriella; Waksmundzki, Kathryn; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Chow, Kar Fai; Yang, Xiao; Panush, David; Agress, Harry; Rosario, Maria; Howlett, Christina; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre

    2013-12-01

    Subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that have inferior outcomes after front-line therapy with R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) have been identified. While it is agreed that R-CHOP is probably not adequate in these patients, there is no standard treatment approach for patients with DLBCL with high-risk features. We present results of a retrospective cohort study of high-risk DLBCL (defined as having at least one unfavorable risk factor: non-germinal center [GC] subtype by immunohistochemistry [IHC], Ki-67 ≥ 80%, high International Prognostic Index [IPI], c-MYC rearrangement) treated with R-HCVAD/R-MTX-AraC (rituximab, cyclophosphamide-fractionated, vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone alternating with rituximab, methotrexate and cytarabine; R-HCVAD) as front-line therapy. With a median follow-up of 25.3 months, the 3-year PFS and OS estimates are 79% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65-88%) and 76% (95% CI, 61-86%), respectively, which are higher than those for historical comparisons with R-CHOP data for high-risk patients. These data are in accord with other recent reports of dose-intense front-line therapy of high-risk DLBCL. This analysis represents the largest reported cohort of patients with DLBCL treated with R-HCVAD. These data suggest that R-HCVAD can overcome traditional poor risk features such as high IPI, high Ki-67 and non-GC IHC pattern. Future work will focus on identifying molecular markers for failure in patients with DLBCL treated with dose-intensive regimens. PMID:23488604

  16. [Cold agglutinin disease -  no response to glucocorticoids and rituximab, what treatment is best for the 3rd line of therapy? Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Pejchalová, A; Chlupová, G; Ríhová, L; Pour, L; Krejčí, M; Cervinek, L; Král, Z; Mayer, J

    2013-09-01

    Acquired autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is divided according to the characteristics of immunoglobulin causing haemolysis. The most frequent are haemolytic anaemia with thermal antibodies. They bind to erythrocytes and initiate their destruction in the reticuloendothelial system cells, leading to extravascular haemolysis. Cold agglutinin disease differs significantly from haemolytic anaemia with thermal antibodies. Agglutination is caused by monoclonal antibodies, in most cases class IgM and very rarely class IgG. Under cold conditions they bind to erythrocytes and cause their agglutination and subsequent disorder of blood circulation in body parts with a lower temperature. Agglutinins binding initiate the binding of the complement to the erythrocytes. Under warm conditions the binding becomes loose but the parts of the complement, which are already bound, cause haemolysis, which is mainly of an intravascular nature. The loose haemoglobin causes haemoglobinuria. Description of a patient with the disease. The 1st symptoms of the disease, i.e. anaemia + circulatory disorders in the acral parts of the body, disappearing under warm conditions followed with haemoglobinuria, led to the dia-gnosis of cold agglutinin disease. The 1st line treatment, prednison, did not show any response. The 2nd line treatment used was rituximab and dexametazon. Rituximab was administered in doses of 500 mg/ m2 to 4 times in a row in weekly intervals. Dexametazon was administered in doses of 40 mg from 1st to 4th day and from 15th to 18th day of the cycle. This treatment, however, did not show any response either. Therefore this article brings an overview of all publications regarding the disease treatment with the aim of choosing the most effective treatment options in the case of failure of the monotherapy using rituximab. The 1st line treatment for cold agglutinin disease is rituximab in monotherapy, usually administered once per week at least for 4 weeks. This treatment shows a response

  17. Effect of response quality and line of treatment with rituximab on overall and disease-free survival of patients with B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Mateja; Novakovic, Barbara Jezersek

    2010-01-01

    Background The introduction of rituximab into the treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas has improved the overall response rate, as well as the response duration and the overall survival of patients with B-cell lymphomas. But only a few studies have addressed the question whether the better response (complete response) and the early introduction of rituximab into the treatment translate into the better survival. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the potential relationship between either the quality of the response or the line of the rituximab treatment and the overall survival (OS) as well as the disease-free survival (DFS) of patients with B-cell lymphomas. Patients and methods. In the study, we analysed treatment outcomes in patients with different histological types of B-cell lymphomas who were treated at the Institute of Oncology between 2003 and 2007 with rituximab and chemotherapy. We included only patients who had the level of CD20 expression assessed prior to the introduction of the treatment with quantitative flow-cytometric measurements. The OS and DFS were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Results One hundred and fourteen patients were enrolled in the study. Patients who achieved a complete response after the rituximab containing treatment had a significantly longer OS than those reaching a partial response (hazard ratio [HR], 0.34; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.91, P = 0.0375) and than patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR], 0.11; 95% CI, 0.0002 to 0.033, P < 0.0001) or progressive disease (hazard ratio [HR], 0.09; 95% CI, 0.003 to 0.03, P < 0.0001). Patients who achieved a complete response (CR; n = 70; 61.4%) had also a significantly longer DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.26; 95% CI, 0.021 to 0.538, P = 0.0068) than those reaching only a partial response (PR; n = 17; 14.9%). Patients treated with rituximab as the first-line treatment (n = 50; 43.9%) had a significantly longer OS than those treated with rituximab for the first

  18. RE-186 labeled 16.88 IgM and 88BV59 IgG human antibody studies to assess potential for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Breitz, H.; Seiler, C.; Weiden, P. ||

    1994-05-01

    Two studies with Re-186-MAG{sub 2}GABA labeled human antibodies were carried out to assess feasibility for radioimmunotherapy. Antibodies 16.88 and 88BV59 react with different epitopes of CTA 16.88, a tumor associated antigen of colorectal carcinoma. In a phase I dose escalation study, 14 patients received 60 mg/m{sup 2} 16.88 IgM MoAb. The dose of Re-186 ranged from 25 mCi/m{sup 2} to 210 mCi/m{sup 2} divided into 3 weekly infusions. In a pilot study with 88BV59, a human IgG3k MoAb, 20 mg antibody was labeled with 25 mCi/m{sup 2} Re-186 and administered to 4 patients with colon carcinoma. Tumor targeting was seen in 12 of 14 patients with 16.88 and all 4 patients with 88BV59. Retention of antibody at the tumor was longer with 88BV59. One patient developed a rash. No other acute or delayed toxicities were observed. Human anti-human antibody did not develop in any patient. The slower metabolism of the 88BV59 IgG suggests that this form of immunoconjugate merits further investigation for use in radioimmunotherapy.

  19. (211)At-labeled and biotinylated effector molecules for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy using poly-L- and poly-D-Lysine as multicarriers.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Sture; Karlsson, Börje; Jacobsson, Lars; Andersson, Håkan; Hultborn, Ragnar; Skarnemark, Gunnar

    2003-09-01

    Poly-L- and poly-D-lysine were evaluated as carriers of astatine and biotin for prospective use as effector molecules in pretargeted radioimmunotherapy of micrometastases. The precursor polylysine was derivatized in a three-step, single-pot procedure, including biotinylation with biotin amidocaproic N-hydroxysuccinimide, astatination via the intermediate reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate, and, finally, charge modification using succinic anhydride. The chemistry was shown to be very facile, with a biotinylation efficiency of 75 +/- 5%, and overall radiochemical yields in the range of 50-70%. After charge modification, no amines could be detected in the final product. The biotin function was unaffected by the chemistry and the radiation, as confirmed by almost complete binding of the effector molecule to avidin beads using a convenient filter tube assay. The effector molecules were evaluated in tumor-free female nude mice with regard to whole-body retention and tissue distribution after i.p. administration. The distribution of the L-isomer effector molecule showed rapid whole-body clearance with low uptake in all tissues, whereas the D-isoform showed whole-body clearance related to uptake in the kidneys. Both D-isomer and L-isomer showed faster blood clearance and generally lower tissue uptakes than labeled antibodies. The normal tissue distribution after the peritoneal administration implies that pretargeting using L-structure polylysine as the effector molecule may give a higher therapeutic index than that achieved in conventional radioimmunotherapy. PMID:14506185

  20. Generation of biologically active linear and cyclic peptides has revealed a unique fine specificity of rituximab and its possible cross-reactivity with acid sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b precursor.

    PubMed

    Perosa, Federico; Favoino, Elvira; Caragnano, Maria Antonietta; Dammacco, Franco

    2006-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the effector functions displayed by rituximab and other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) apparently recognizing the same CD20 epitope suggests that additional mechanisms, probably related to mAb fine specificity, are responsible for B-cell depletion. To improve our understanding of rituximab's function, its fine specificity was investigated by means of phage display peptide library (PDPL)-expressing 7-mer cyclic (c7c) or 7-/12-mer linear peptides. Rituximab-specific c7c PDPL-derived clone insert sequences expressed the motif A(S)NPS overlapping the human CD20 170ANPS173. P172 was the most critical for rituximab binding, since its replacement with S172 (of mouse CD20) abolished the reactivity. The WPXWLE motif expressed by the linear PDPL-derived clone insert sequences could only be aligned to the reverse-oriented 161WPXWLE156 of acid sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b precursor (ASMLPD), though linear peptides bearing WPXWLE competed with cyclic ones for rituximab-paratope binding. Anti-CD20 mAb 1F5 only displayed a reactivity profile similar to that of rituximab, which also reacted with ASMLPD-derived peptides. Peptides induced antibodies with specificity and effector functions similar to those of rituximab. Our results show a unique fine specificity of rituximab, define the molecular basis for the lack of rituximab reactivity with mouse CD20 (mCD20), and the potential of targeting CD20 in an active immunotherapy setting. A possible rituximab interaction with ASMLPD is suggested. PMID:16223774

  1. Rituximab Maintenance Therapy After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation in Patients With Relapsed CD20+ Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Final Analysis of the Collaborative Trial in Relapsed Aggressive Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Christian; Schmitz, Norbert; Mounier, Nicolas; Singh Gill, Devinder; Linch, David C.; Trneny, Marek; Bosly, Andre; Milpied, Noel J.; Radford, John; Ketterer, Nicolas; Shpilberg, Ofer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Hagberg, Hans; Ma, David D.; Viardot, Andreas; Lowenthal, Ray; Brière, Josette; Salles, Gilles; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Glass, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The standard treatment for relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is salvage chemotherapy followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). The impact of maintenance rituximab after ASCT is not known. Patients and Methods In total, 477 patients with CD20+ DLBCL who were in their first relapse or refractory to initial therapy were randomly assigned to one of two salvage regimens. After three cycles of salvage chemotherapy, the responding patients received high-dose chemotherapy followed by ASCT. Then, 242 patients were randomly assigned to either rituximab every 2 months for 1 year or observation. Results After ASCT, 122 patients received rituximab, and 120 patients were observed only. The median follow-up time was 44 months. The 4-year event-free survival (EFS) rates after ASCT were 52% and 53% for the rituximab and observation groups, respectively (P = .7). Treatment with rituximab was associated with a 15% attributable risk of serious adverse events after day 100, with more deaths (six deaths v three deaths in the observation arm). Several factors affected EFS after ASCT (P < .05), including relapsed disease within 12 months (EFS: 46% v 56% for relapsed disease after 12 months), secondary age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (saaIPI) more than 1 (EFS: 37% v 61% for saaIPI < 1), and prior treatment with rituximab (EFS: 47% v 59% for no prior rituximab). A significant difference in EFS between women (63%) and men (46%) was also observed in the rituximab group. In the Cox model for maintenance, the saaIPI was a significant prognostic factor (P < .001), as was male sex (P = .01). Conclusion In relapsed DLBCL, we observed no difference between the control group and the rituximab maintenance group and do not recommend rituximab after ASCT. PMID:23091101

  2. Rituximab Extended Schedule or Re-Treatment Trial for Low–Tumor Burden Follicular Lymphoma: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Protocol E4402

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Brad S.; Hong, Fangxin; Williams, Michael E.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Krauss, John C.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Schuster, Stephen J.; Peterson, Christopher G.; Sborov, Mark D.; Martin, S. Eric; Weiss, Matthias; Ehmann, W. Christopher; Horning, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In low–tumor burden follicular lymphoma (FL), maintenance rituximab (MR) has been shown to improve progression-free survival when compared with observation. It is not known whether MR provides superior long-term disease control compared with re-treatment rituximab (RR) administered on an as-needed basis. E4402 (RESORT) was a randomized clinical trial designed to compare MR against RR. Patients and Methods Eligible patients with previously untreated low–tumor burden FL received four doses of rituximab, and responding patients were randomly assigned to either RR or MR. Patients receiving RR were eligible for re-treatment at each disease progression until treatment failure. Patients assigned to MR received a single dose of rituximab every 3 months until treatment failure. The primary end point was time to treatment failure. Secondary end points included time to first cytotoxic therapy, toxicity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Results A total of 289 patients were randomly assigned to RR or MR. With a median follow-up of 4.5 years, the estimated median time to treatment failure was 3.9 years for patients receiving RR and 4.3 years for those receiving MR (P = .54). Three-year freedom from cytotoxic therapy was 84% for those receiving RR and 95% for those receiving MR (P = .03). The median number of rituximab doses was four patients receiving RR and 18 for those receiving MR. There was no difference in HRQOL. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities were infrequent in both arms. Conclusion In low–tumor burden FL, a re-treatment strategy uses less rituximab while providing disease control comparable to that achieved with a maintenance strategy. PMID:25154829

  3. Chlorambucil-rituximab as first-line therapy in patients affected by follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a retrospective single-centre study.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Montoro, Juan; Vanazzi, Anna; Andreola, Giovanna; Liptrott, Sarah; Radice, Davide; Negri, Mara; Preda, Lorenzo; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Laszlo, Daniele

    2015-12-01

    Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has been shown to be active in newly diagnosed and relapsed patients with follicular lymphoma (FL), both as monotherapy and in combination with chemotherapy. Many studies suggest that the prognosis of patients with FL may improve when it is used in combination with chemotherapy. Despite these advances, the disease remains essentially incurable with standard therapy, and novel approaches to treatment are needed because optimal therapy is not defined. The combination of chlorambucil-rituximab is one of several standard treatment options for FL. Here, we considered data arising from 75 patients with newly diagnosed FL at the European Institute of Oncology treated with the combination of rituximab plus chlorambucil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of chlorambucil and rituximab, delivered 6 mg/m(2) /day orally for 6 weeks and 375 mg/m(2) in a standard 4-weekly schedule, respectively. Patients responding to the induction therapy received a prolonged therapy with four additional cycles of chlorambucil plus rituximab. Seventy-one patients (94.6%) completed the treatment; four patients discontinued treatment because of grade 3-4 hematological toxicity. The overall response rate was 97.3% including 74.7% of complete responses. Only two patients had a stable disease at revaluation after treatment. With a median follow-up of 57 months, 72 patients (96%) are alive. Median event-free survival (EFS) and median overall survival (OS) were not reached; 5-year OS rate was 98.4%. The 5-year EFS was 71.3%. By univariate and multivariate analyses, elevated beta-2 microglobulin levels and partial responses to therapy were correlated with worse EFS. These results suggest that the combination of chlorambucil and rituximab is an active and safe regimen in patients with newly diagnosed FL, principally in those with low tumour burden and favourable prognostic factors. PMID

  4. Phase 2 study of panobinostat with or without rituximab in relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Assouline, Sarit E; Nielsen, Torsten Holm; Yu, Stephen; Alcaide, Miguel; Chong, Lauren; MacDonald, David; Tosikyan, Axel; Kukreti, Vishal; Kezouh, Abbas; Petrogiannis-Haliotis, Tina; Albuquerque, Marco; Fornika, Daniel; Alamouti, Sepideh; Froment, Remi; Greenwood, Celia M T; Oros, Kathleen Klein; Camglioglu, Errol; Sharma, Ayushi; Christodoulopoulos, Rosa; Rousseau, Caroline; Johnson, Nathalie; Crump, Michael; Morin, Ryan D; Mann, Koren K

    2016-07-14

    The majority of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) tumors contain mutations in histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs), indicating a potential therapeutic benefit of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs), and preclinical data suggest that HDIs augment the effect of rituximab. In this randomized phase 2 study, we evaluated the response rate and toxicity of panobinostat, a pan-HDI administered 30 mg orally 3 times weekly, with or without rituximab, in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory de novo (n = 27) or transformed (n = 13) DLBCL. Candidate genes and whole exomes were sequenced in relapse tumor biopsies to search for molecular correlates, and these data were used to quantify circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in serial plasma samples. Eleven of 40 patients (28%) responded to panobinostat (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.6-43.9) and rituximab did not increase responses. The median duration of response was 14.5 months (95% CI 9.4 to "not reached"). At time of data censoring, 6 of 11 patients had not progressed. Of the genes tested for mutations, only those in MEF2B were significantly associated with response. We detected ctDNA in at least 1 plasma sample from 96% of tested patients. A significant increase in ctDNA at day 15 relative to baseline was strongly associated with lack of response (sensitivity 71.4%, specificity 100%). We conclude that panobinostat induces very durable responses in some patients with relapsed DLBCL, and early responses can be predicted by mutations in MEF2B or a significant change in ctDNA level at 15 days after treatment initiation. This clinical trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (#NCT01238692). PMID:27166360

  5. Rituximab for the Treatment of IgG4-Related Tubulointerstitial Nephritis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Blaithin A; Novick, Tessa; Scheel, Paul J; Bagnasco, Serena; Atta, Mohamed G

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin type gamma 4 (IgG4)-related disease is a relatively newly described clinical entity characterized by a distinctive histopathological appearance, increased numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells and often, but not always, elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. The most common renal manifestation of IgG4-related disease is tubulointerstitial nephritis marked with proteinuria, hematuria, decreased kidney function, hypocomplementemia, and radiologic abnormalities. Renal biopsy characteristics include dense lymphoplasmacytic tubulointerstitial nephritis that stains for IgG4, storiform fibrosis, and immune complex deposition in the interstitium and along tubule basement membranes. Treatment traditionally consists of prolonged glucocorticoids but cases refractory to glucocorticoids have been reported.We report a case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man who presented with fatigue, 50 pound weight loss, dyspnea, lymphadenopathy, and nephromegaly. The patient was first misdiagnosed as chronic interstitial nephritis secondary to renal sarcoid and was treated with repeated doses of prednisone. On his third relapse, he underwent a repeat renal biopsy and a diagnosis of IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis was confirmed. He was refractory to treatment with prednisone. The patient received Rituximab and had prompt sustained improvement in renal function. At 1 year post Rituximab treatment, his serum creatinine remains at baseline and imaging study revealed reduction in his kidney size.This is the first case report using Rituximab as a steroid sparing option for refractory IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. More information is needed on the long-term effects of using of B-cell depleting agents for glucocorticoid resistant IgG4-tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:26266393

  6. Cholestatic Liver Disease after Rituximab and Adalimumab and the Possible Role of Cross-Reacting Antibodies to Fab 2 Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Koetter, Ina; Schwab, Matthias; Fritz, Peter; Kimmel, Martin; Alscher, M. Dominik; Braun, Niko

    2013-01-01

    Background Millions of patients are treated with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (Tmabs) for miscellaneous diseases. We investigated sera from six patients who received immune globulin, from one patient with refractory anti-neutrophil-cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) who developed two episodes of acute cholestatic liver disease, one after treatment with rituximab and a second after adalimumab and a healthy control group. Methods Three sera from the patient and six sera from patients who received immune globulin were analyzed for antibodies to rituximab and adalimumab by ELISA. Additionally, sera from the patients and from nine healthy blood donors were coated with the Fab fragment of an unrelated humanized monoclonal antibody, with human Fc proteins as well as a mouse IgG globulin. Results Viral serology for hepatitis A, B, C and autoantibodies specific for autoimmune liver disorders were negative. In all three sera from the patient antibodies to rituximab could be detected, but also antibodies to adalimumab were present even at time points when the patient had not yet received adalimumab, indicating cross reactivity between both substances. Testing against an unrelated human Fab fragment revealed positive results, indicating that the patient had antibodies against human Fab fragments in general. The Fc proteins were negative, and patients’ sera did also not react with mouse IgG globulins. Remarkably, 2 out of 5 patients which were treated with immune globulin had antibodies against human Fab fragments in general whereas in none of the samples from healthy controls antibodies to Fab fragment could be detected. Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating cholestatic liver disease induced by two different Tmabs. Cross - reacting antibodies to Fab2 fragments in general are probably involved. Further studies must show if these Fab2 antibodies in general are related with drug-induced side effects and accelerated drug

  7. Five years of experience with rituximab plus high-dose dexamethasone for relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Šimkovič, Martin; Motyčková, Monika; Belada, David; Vodárek, Pavel; Kapoor, Rahul; Jaffar, Hamna; Vrbacký, Filip; Žák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) in combination with rituximab is active in the treatment of relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but serious infections are frequent. Recently published data suggested that high-dose dexamethasone might be equally effective as HDMP despite a lower cumulative dose. Material and methods We performed retrospective analysis of 60 patients with relapsed/refractory CLL (median age: 66 years; range: 37–86) treated with rituximab plus dexamethasone (R-dex) at a single tertiary center between September 2008 and October 2012. The schedule of R-dex consisted of rituximab 500 mg/m2 i.v. day 1 (375 mg/m2 in cycle 1) and dexamethasone 40 mg orally on days 1-4 and 10-13 repeated every 3 weeks for a maximum of 8 cycles. Unfavorable prognostic features were frequent (Rai stages III/IV in 67%, unmutated IgVH 82%, del 11q 43%, TP53 mutation/deletion 23%, bulky lymphadenopathy 58% of patients). Results Overall response (OR)/complete remission (CR) was achieved in 75/3%. At the median follow-up of 21 months, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 months, median time to next treatment 12.9 months and median overall survival 25.5 months. Refractoriness to fludarabine (p = 0.04) and age ≥ 65 years (p = 0.03) were significant predictors of shorter PFS. R-dex was successfully used for debulking before allogenic stem cell transplantation in 7 patients (12%). Serious (CTCAE grade III/IV) infections occurred in 27% of patients; 20% of patients developed steroid diabetes requiring temporary short-acting insulin. Conclusions Our results show that R-dex is an active and well-tolerated regimen for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL; however, major infections remain frequent despite combined antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  8. Phase 2 study of panobinostat with or without rituximab in relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Torsten Holm; Yu, Stephen; Alcaide, Miguel; Chong, Lauren; MacDonald, David; Tosikyan, Axel; Kukreti, Vishal; Kezouh, Abbas; Petrogiannis-Haliotis, Tina; Albuquerque, Marco; Fornika, Daniel; Alamouti, Sepideh; Froment, Remi; Greenwood, Celia M. T.; Oros, Kathleen Klein; Camglioglu, Errol; Sharma, Ayushi; Christodoulopoulos, Rosa; Rousseau, Caroline; Johnson, Nathalie; Crump, Michael; Morin, Ryan D.; Mann, Koren K.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) tumors contain mutations in histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs), indicating a potential therapeutic benefit of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs), and preclinical data suggest that HDIs augment the effect of rituximab. In this randomized phase 2 study, we evaluated the response rate and toxicity of panobinostat, a pan-HDI administered 30 mg orally 3 times weekly, with or without rituximab, in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory de novo (n = 27) or transformed (n = 13) DLBCL. Candidate genes and whole exomes were sequenced in relapse tumor biopsies to search for molecular correlates, and these data were used to quantify circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in serial plasma samples. Eleven of 40 patients (28%) responded to panobinostat (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.6-43.9) and rituximab did not increase responses. The median duration of response was 14.5 months (95% CI 9.4 to “not reached”). At time of data censoring, 6 of 11 patients had not progressed. Of the genes tested for mutations, only those in MEF2B were significantly associated with response. We detected ctDNA in at least 1 plasma sample from 96% of tested patients. A significant increase in ctDNA at day 15 relative to baseline was strongly associated with lack of response (sensitivity 71.4%, specificity 100%). We conclude that panobinostat induces very durable responses in some patients with relapsed DLBCL, and early responses can be predicted by mutations in MEF2B or a significant change in ctDNA level at 15 days after treatment initiation. This clinical trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (#NCT01238692). PMID:27166360

  9. Therapeutic target of memory B cells depletion helps to tailor administration frequency of rituximab in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Christine; Bourg, Véronique; Bresch, Saskia; Cohen, Mikael; Rosenthal-Allieri, Maria Alessandra; Desnuelle, Claude; Ticchioni, Michel

    2016-09-15

    Rituximab (RTX) has demonstrated efficacy in limiting relapses in myasthenia gravis (MG). We investigated the interest of CD27+ memory B cell monitoring in patients as a biological marker of clinical relapse. Twenty-four patients have been treated with RTX (375mg/m(2)/week-month as an induction treatment). Maintenance treatment consisted with either systematic treatment every 3months or only when CD27+ memory B cells were detectable. After the induction treatment, the mean infusions were 1.3/year compared with 4/year. We suggest that RTX administration frequency can be decreased safely by monitoring the re-emerging CD27+ memory B cells. PMID:27609279

  10. Cost-effectiveness of adding rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Mandrik, Olena; Corro Ramos, Isaac; Knies, Saskia; Al, Maiwenn; Severens, Johan L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness, from a health care perspective, of adding rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide scheme (FCR versus FC) for treatment-naïve and refractory/relapsed Ukrainian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A decision-analytic Markov cohort model with three health states and 1-month cycle time was developed and run within a life time horizon. Data from two multinational, prospective, open-label Phase 3 studies were used to assess patients’ survival. While utilities were generalized from UK data, local resource utilization and disease-associated treatment, hospitalization, and side effect costs were applied. The alternative scenario was performed to assess the impact of lower life expectancy of the general population in Ukraine on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for treatment-naïve patients. One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the results. The ICER (in US dollars) of treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with FCR versus FC is US$8,704 per quality-adjusted life year gained for treatment-naïve patients and US$11,056 for refractory/relapsed patients. When survival data were modified to the lower life expectancy of the general population in Ukraine, the ICER for treatment-naïve patients was higher than US$13,000. This value is higher than three times the current gross domestic product per capita in Ukraine. Sensitivity analyses have shown a high impact of rituximab costs and a moderate impact of differences in utilities on the ICER. Furthermore, probabilistic sensitivity analyses have shown that for refractory/relapsed patients the probability of FCR being cost-effective is higher than for treatment-naïve patients and is close to one if the threshold is higher than US$15,000. State coverage of rituximab treatment may be considered a cost-effective treatment for the Ukrainian population under conditions of economic

  11. Cost-effectiveness of adding rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Mandrik, Olena; Corro Ramos, Isaac; Knies, Saskia; Al, Maiwenn; Severens, Johan L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness, from a health care perspective, of adding rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide scheme (FCR versus FC) for treatment-naïve and refractory/relapsed Ukrainian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A decision-analytic Markov cohort model with three health states and 1-month cycle time was developed and run within a life time horizon. Data from two multinational, prospective, open-label Phase 3 studies were used to assess patients' survival. While utilities were generalized from UK data, local resource utilization and disease-associated treatment, hospitalization, and side effect costs were applied. The alternative scenario was performed to assess the impact of lower life expectancy of the general population in Ukraine on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for treatment-naïve patients. One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the results. The ICER (in US dollars) of treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with FCR versus FC is US$8,704 per quality-adjusted life year gained for treatment-naïve patients and US$11,056 for refractory/relapsed patients. When survival data were modified to the lower life expectancy of the general population in Ukraine, the ICER for treatment-naïve patients was higher than US$13,000. This value is higher than three times the current gross domestic product per capita in Ukraine. Sensitivity analyses have shown a high impact of rituximab costs and a moderate impact of differences in utilities on the ICER. Furthermore, probabilistic sensitivity analyses have shown that for refractory/relapsed patients the probability of FCR being cost-effective is higher than for treatment-naïve patients and is close to one if the threshold is higher than US$15,000. State coverage of rituximab treatment may be considered a cost-effective treatment for the Ukrainian population under conditions of economic

  12. Successful treatment of severe myasthenia gravis developed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with plasma exchange and rituximab.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Sag, Erdal; Kuskonmaz, Baris; Kesici, Selman; Bayrakci, Benan; Ayvaz, Deniz C; Tezcan, Ilhan; Yalnızoglu, Dilek; Uckan, Duygu

    2014-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is among the rare complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and is usually associated with chronic GVHD. Herein, we report a 2-year and 10 months of age female with Griscelli syndrome, who developed severe myasthenia gravis at post-transplant +22nd month and required respiratory support with mechanical ventilation. She was unresponsive to cyclosporine A, methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and mycophenolate mofetil and the symptoms could only be controlled after plasma exchange and subsequent use of rituximab, in addition to cyclosporine A and mycophenolate mofetil maintenance. She is currently asymptomatic on the 6th month of follow-up. PMID:24307660

  13. Comparison of Residence Time Estimation Methods for Radioimmunotherapy Dosimetry and Treatment Planning—Monte Carlo Simulation Studies

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Wahl, Richard L.; Du, Yong; Sgouros, George; Jacene, Heather; Flinn, Ian; Frey, Eric C.

    2008-01-01

    Estimating the residence times in tumor and normal organs is an essential part of treatment planning for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This estimation is usually done using a conjugate view whole body scan time series and planar processing. This method has logistical and cost advantages compared to 3-D imaging methods such as Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), but, because it does not provide information about the 3-D distribution of activity, it is difficult to fully compensate for effects such as attenuation and background and overlapping activity. Incomplete compensation for these effects reduces the accuracy of the residence time estimates. In this work we compare residence times estimates obtained using planar methods to those from methods based on quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) reconstructions. We have previously developed QSPECT methods that provide compensation for attenuation, scatter, collimator-detector response, and partial volume effects. In this study we compared the use of residence time estimation methods using QSPECT to planar methods. The evaluation was done using the realistic NCAT phantom with organ time activities that model 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan. Projection data were obtained using Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) that realistically model the image formation process including penetration and scatter in the collimator-detector system. These projection data were used to evaluate the accuracy of residence time estimation using a time series of QSPECT studies, a single QSPECT study combined with planar scans and the planar scans alone. The errors in the residence time estimates were <3.8%, <15%, and 2%–107% for the QSPECT, hybrid planar/QSPECT, and planar methods, respectively. The quantitative accuracy was worst for pure planar processing and best for pure QSPECT processing. Hybrid planar/QSPECT methods, where a single QSPECT study was combined with a series of planar scans, provided a large and statistically significant improvement

  14. Beta emitters rhenium-188 and lutetium-177 are equally effective in radioimmunotherapy of HPV-positive experimental cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Phaeton, Rebecca; Jiang, Zewei; Revskaya, Ekaterina; Fisher, Darrell R; Goldberg, Gary L; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer caused by the infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) remains the fourth leading killer of women worldwide. Therefore, more efficacious treatments are needed. We are developing radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of HPV-positive cervical cancers by targeting E6 and E7 viral oncoproteins expressed by the cancer cells with the radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). To investigate the influence of different radionuclides on the RIT efficacy-we performed RIT of experimental cervical cancer with Rhenium-188 ((188) Re) and Lutetium-177 ((177) Lu)-labeled mAb C1P5 to E6. The biodistribution of (188) Re- and (177) Lu-labeled C1P5 was performed in nude female mice bearing CasKi cervical cancer xenografts and the radiation dosimetry calculations for the tumors and organs were carried out. For RIT the mice were treated with 7.4 MBq of either (188) Re-C1P5 or (177) Lu-C1P5 or left untreated, and observed for their tumor size for 28 days. The levels of (188) Re- and (177) Lu-C1P5 mAbs-induced double-strand breaks in CasKi tumors were compared on days 5 and 10 post treatment by staining with anti-gamma H2AX antibody. The radiation doses to the heart and lungs were similar for both (177) Lu-C1P5 and (188) Re-C1P5. The dose to the liver was five times higher for (177) Lu-C1P5. The doses to the tumor were 259 and 181 cGy for (177) Lu-C1P5 and (188) Re-C1P5, respectively. RIT with either (177) Lu-C1P5 or (188) Re-C1P5 was equally effective in inhibiting tumor growth when each was compared to the untreated controls (P = 0.001). On day 5 there was a pronounced staining for gamma H2AX foci in (177) Lu-C1P5 group only and on day 10 it was observed in both (177) Lu-C1P5 and (188) Re-C1P5 groups. (188) Re- and (177) Lu-labeled mAbs were equally effective in arresting the growth of CasKi cervical tumors. Thus, both of these radionuclides are candidates for the clinical trials of this approach in patients with advanced, recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer. PMID:26625938

  15. SU-C-201-05: Imaging 212Pb-TCMC-Trastuzumab for Alpha Radioimmunotherapy for Ovarian Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Meredith, R; Azure, M; Yoder, D; Torgue, J; Banaga, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To support the phase I trial for toxicity, biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of intra-peritoneal (IP) 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in patients with HER-2 expressing malignancy. A whole body gamma camera imaging method was developed for estimating amount of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab left in the peritoneal cavity. Methods: {sup 212}Pb decays to {sup 212}Bi via beta emission. {sup 212}Bi emits an alpha particle at an average of 6.1 MeV. The 238.6 keV gamma ray with a 43.6% yield can be exploited for imaging. Initial phantom was made of saline bags with 212Pb. Images were collected for 238.6 keV with a medium energy general purpose collimator. There are other high energy gamma emissions (e.g. 511keV, 8%; 583 keV, 31%) that penetrate the septae of the collimator and contribute scatter into 238.6 keV. An upper scatter window was used for scatter correction for these high energy gammas. Results: A small source containing 212Pb can be easily visualized. Scatter correction on images of a small 212Pb source resulted in a ∼50% reduction in the full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), while change in full width at half maximum (FWHM) was <10%. For photopeak images, substantial scatter around phantom source extended to > 5 cm outside; scatter correction improved image contrast by removing this scatter around the sources. Patient imaging, in the 1st cohort (n=3) showed little redistribution of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab out of the peritoneal cavity. Compared to the early post-treatment images, the 18-hour post-injection images illustrated the shift to more uniform anterior/posterior abdominal distribution and the loss of intensity due to radioactive decay. Conclusion: Use of medium energy collimator, 15% width of 238.6 keV photopeak, and a 7.5% upper scatter window is adequate for quantification of 212Pb radioactivity inside peritoneal cavity for alpha radioimmunotherapy of ovarian cancer. Research Support: AREVA Med, NIH 1UL1RR025777-01.

  16. Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibodies to Deliver Radiation to Murine Hematolymphoid Tissues and Human Myeloid Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Matthews, Dana C.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Lin, Yukang; Saganic, Laura; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for treatment of patients with hematological malignancies frequently fails because of disease recurrence. We therefore conducted pretargeted RIT studies to augment the efficacy in mice of therapy using a pretargeted anti-human (h)CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate followed by delivery of a biotinylated clearing agent and radiolabeled-DOTA-biotin. Tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 hours were 20:1 using pretargeted anti-hCD45 RIT and <1:1 with conventional RIT. In vivo imaging studies confirmed that the pretargeted RIT approach provided high-contrast tumor images with minimal blood-pool activity, whereas directly-labeled anti-hCD45 Ab produced distinct tumor images but the blood pool retained a large amount of labeled antibody for a prolonged time. Therapy experiments demonstrated that 90Y-DOTA-biotin significantly prolonged survival of mice treated pretargeted with anti-hCD45 Ab-SA compared to mice treated with conventional RIT using 90Y-labeled anti-hCD45 Ab at the maximally tolerated dose (400 µCi). Since human CD45 antigens are confined to xenograft tumor cells in this model, and all murine tissues are devoid of hCD45 and will not bind anti-hCD45 Ab, we also compared one-step and pretargeted RIT using an anti-murine (m)CD45 Ab (A20 ) in a model where the target antigen is present on normal hematopoietic tissues. After 24 hours, 27.3 ± 2.8% of the injected dose of radionuclide was delivered per gram (% ID/g) of lymph node using 131I-A20-Ab compared with 40.0 ± 5.4% ID/g for pretargeted 111In-DOTA-biotin (p value). These data suggest that multi-step pretargeted methods for delivering RIT are superior to conventional RIT when targeting CD45 for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for the intensification of therapy, while minimizing toxicities.

  17. [Successful treatment with rituximab and romiplostim for thrombocytopenia associated with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia initially presenting as Evans syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yumi; Koshiishi, Megumi; Sueki, Yuki; Kawashima, Ichirou; Yamamoto, Takeo; Nakajima, Kei; Mitsumori, Toru; Kirito, Keita

    2015-03-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with anemia and thrombocytopenia. Serum testing showed platelet-associated IgG elevation and she was positive on the direct and indirect Coombs tests. Together with bone marrow examination, these findings indicated a diagnosis of Evans syndrome. At diagnosis, she also had an IgM-κ type of monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance. Initially, we administered steroids and her hemolytic anemia showed improvement. In contrast, only transient recovery of platelet counts was observed and her platelet counts rapidly decreased after steroid dose reduction. Thus, we treated her with a TPO-agonist, romiplostim. During the clinical course, she showed gradual serum IgM elevation. We thus performed another bone marrow biopsy and diagnosed her as having Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). We started treatment with rituximab for WM. Together with the serum IgM reduction, she showed marked improvement of thrombocytopenia. This is a very rare case of WM initially presenting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immunethrombocytopenia associated with IgG class auto-antibody. Our experience suggests the usefulness of rituximab and romiplostim for the treatment of immunethrombocytopenia associated with WM. PMID:25876786

  18. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy Following Treatment with Rituximab in an HIV-Negative Patient with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Felli, Valentina; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Anselmi, Monica; Gennarelli, Antonio; Sucapane, Patrizia; Splendiani, Alessandra; Catalucci, Alessia; Marini, Carmine; Gallucci, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare rapidly progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by reactivation of latent John Cunningham (JC) polyomavirus (JCV) infection. We describe an unusual case of PML in a 54-year-old patient with follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma who received rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovicin and prednisolone (R-CHOP) therapy. She started to notice gradual progressive neurological symptoms about two months after completion of rituximab treatment and was therefore admitted to hospital. On admission, brain CT and MRI showed widespread lesions consistent with a demyelinating process involving the subcortical and deep white matter of the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. CT and MRI findings were suggestive of PML, and JC virus DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction assay of the cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The patient was treated supportively but reported a progressive worsening of the clinical and radiological findings. Our report emphasizes the role of CT and MRI findings in the diagnosis of PML and suggests that PML should be considered in patients with progressive neurological disorders involving the entire nervous system and mainly the white matter, especially in the presence of previous immunomodulatory treatment or immunosuppression. PMID:25489887

  19. A phase 2 study of idelalisib plus rituximab in treatment-naïve older patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Susan M; Lamanna, Nicole; Kipps, Thomas J; Flinn, Ian; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Burger, Jan A; Keating, Michael; Mitra, Siddhartha; Holes, Leanne; Yu, Albert S; Johnson, David M; Miller, Langdon L; Kim, Yeonhee; Dansey, Roger D; Dubowy, Ronald L; Coutre, Steven E

    2015-12-17

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class oral inhibitor of PI3Kδ that has shown substantial activity in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To evaluate idelalisib as initial therapy, 64 treatment-naïve older patients with CLL or small lymphocytic leukemia (median age, 71 years; range, 65-90) were treated with rituximab 375 mg/m(2) weekly ×8 and idelalisib 150 mg twice daily continuously for 48 weeks. Patients completing 48 weeks without progression could continue to receive idelalisib on an extension study. The median time on treatment was 22.4 months (range, 0.8-45.8+). The overall response rate (ORR) was 97%, including 19% complete responses. The ORR was 100% in patients with del(17p)/TP53 mutations and 97% in those with unmutated IGHV. Progression-free survival was 83% at 36 months. The most frequent (>30%) adverse events (any grade) were diarrhea (including colitis) (64%), rash (58%), pyrexia (42%), nausea (38%), chills (36%), cough (33%), and fatigue (31%). Elevated alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase was seen in 67% of patients (23% grade ≥3). The combination of idelalisib and rituximab was highly active, resulting in durable disease control in treatment-naïve older patients with CLL. These results support the further development of idelalisib as initial treatment of CLL. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01203930. PMID:26472751

  20. Impact of rituximab-associated B-cell defects on West Nile virus meningoencephalitis in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Marilyn E.; Quan, Dianna; Ho, Joseph T.; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B. K.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Grazia, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that West Nile virus (WNV) neuroinvasive disease occurs more frequently in both solid organ and human stem cell transplant recipients. The effect of concomitant anti-B-cell therapy with rituximab, a CD20+ monoclonal antibody, on WNV infection in this population, however, has not been reported. We describe a case of a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency who underwent single lung transplantation in 2005 and was maintained on tacrolimus, cytoxan and prednisone. More recently, she had received two courses of rituximab for recurrent A2–A3 grade rejection with concomitant capillaritis and presented six months later with rapid, fulminant WNV meningoencephalitis. Her diagnosis was made by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) PCR but serum and CSF WNV IgM and IgG remained negative. She received WNV-specific hyperimmune globulin (Omr-Ig-Am®) through a compassionate protocol. She experienced a rapidly progressive and devastating neurological course despite treatment and died three wk after onset of her symptoms. Autopsy revealed extensive meningoencephalomyelitis. PMID:19659514

  1. A novel triple therapy for ITP using high-dose dexamethasone, low-dose rituximab, and cyclosporine (TT4)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Philip Young-Ill; Roncolato, Fernando; Badoux, Xavier; Ramanathan, Sundra; Ho, Shir-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Promising reports of combination immunosuppression with high-dose dexamethasone and rituximab for the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have recently emerged. They suggest a potential to further optimize the efficacy of therapy. We investigate the use of a novel combination of conventional therapies in ITP given over 4 weeks. From 2011 to 2014, 20 patients were prospectively enrolled onto a single-arm phase 2b study to describe the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of oral dexamethasone 40 mg for days 1 to 4, oral cyclosporine 2.5 to 3 mg/kg daily for day 1 to 28, and intravenous low-dose rituximab 100 mg for days 7, 14, 21, and 28. There were no therapy-related serious adverse side effects, 6-month response rate was 60%, and treatment was well tolerated. Responders enjoyed relapse-free survivals of 92% and 76%, respectively, at 12 and 24 months. This study highlights the possibility of achieving an enduring remission from 4 weeks of therapy. This study is registered at www.anzctr.org.au (#ANZCTRN12611000015943). PMID:25972158

  2. Improved outcome of adult Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia with rituximab and chemotherapy: report of a large prospective multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    Walewski, Jan; Döhner, Hartmut; Viardot, Andreas; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten; Serve, Hubert; Dührsen, Ulrich; Hüttmann, Andreas; Thiel, Eckhard; Dengler, Jolanta; Kneba, Michael; Schaich, Markus; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G. H.; Beck, Joachim; Hertenstein, Bernd; Reichle, Albrecht; Domanska-Czyz, Katarzyna; Fietkau, Rainer; Horst, Heinz-August; Rieder, Harald; Schwartz, Stefan; Burmeister, Thomas; Gökbuget, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This largest prospective multicenter trial for adult patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia aimed to prove the efficacy and feasibility of short-intensive chemotherapy combined with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. From 2002 to 2011, 363 patients 16 to 85 years old were recruited in 98 centers. Treatment consisted of 6 5-day chemotherapy cycles with high-dose methotrexate, high-dose cytosine arabinoside, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, ifosphamide, corticosteroids, and triple intrathecal therapy. Patients >55 years old received a reduced regimen. Rituximab was given before each cycle and twice as maintenance, for a total of 8 doses. The rate of complete remission was 88% (319/363); overall survival (OS) at 5 years, 80%; and progression-free survival, 71%; with significant difference between adolescents, adults, and elderly patients (OS rate of 90%, 84%, and 62%, respectively). Full treatment could be applied in 86% of the patients. The most important prognostic factors were International Prognostic Index (IPI) score (0-2 vs 3-5; P = .0005), age-adjusted IPI score (0-1 vs 2-3; P = .0001), and gender (male vs female; P = .004). The high cure rate in this prospective trial with a substantial number of participating hospitals demonstrates the efficacy and feasibility of chemoimmunotherapy, even in elderly patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00199082. PMID:25359988

  3. A phase 2 study of idelalisib plus rituximab in treatment-naïve older patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lamanna, Nicole; Kipps, Thomas J.; Flinn, Ian; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Burger, Jan A.; Keating, Michael; Mitra, Siddhartha; Holes, Leanne; Yu, Albert S.; Johnson, David M.; Miller, Langdon L.; Kim, Yeonhee; Dansey, Roger D.; Dubowy, Ronald L.; Coutre, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class oral inhibitor of PI3Kδ that has shown substantial activity in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To evaluate idelalisib as initial therapy, 64 treatment-naïve older patients with CLL or small lymphocytic leukemia (median age, 71 years; range, 65-90) were treated with rituximab 375 mg/m2 weekly ×8 and idelalisib 150 mg twice daily continuously for 48 weeks. Patients completing 48 weeks without progression could continue to receive idelalisib on an extension study. The median time on treatment was 22.4 months (range, 0.8-45.8+). The overall response rate (ORR) was 97%, including 19% complete responses. The ORR was 100% in patients with del(17p)/TP53 mutations and 97% in those with unmutated IGHV. Progression-free survival was 83% at 36 months. The most frequent (>30%) adverse events (any grade) were diarrhea (including colitis) (64%), rash (58%), pyrexia (42%), nausea (38%), chills (36%), cough (33%), and fatigue (31%). Elevated alanine transaminase/aspartate transaminase was seen in 67% of patients (23% grade ≥3). The combination of idelalisib and rituximab was highly active, resulting in durable disease control in treatment-naïve older patients with CLL. These results support the further development of idelalisib as initial treatment of CLL. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01203930. PMID:26472751

  4. The role of radiotherapy for patients over age 60 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, R J; Jegadeesh, N; Switchenko, J; Danish, H; Esiashvili, N; Flowers, C R; Khan, M K

    2016-08-01

    The role of consolidative radiotherapy (RT) in patients ≥60 years old with DLBCL in the rituximab era is controversial. We examined the impact on disease control and overall survival by the addition of consolidative RT after completion of chemotherapy, while adjusting for known adverse risk factors. Retrospective chart review from 2004 to 2012 of 83 consecutive patients ≥60 years old with DLBCL treated in the rituximab era, 68 of which had a complete response to chemotherapy, was performed. Amongst patients with a complete response, consolidative RT use was associated with 100% 5-year local control, improved progression-free survival (p = 0.047), and a trend for overall survival (p = .098) on multivariate analysis. Amongst all patients, the use of consolidative RT was associated with improved overall survival (p = 0.03). The use of consolidative RT should be considered for patients ≥60 years old independent of stage and response to chemotherapy. PMID:26759182

  5. The immunological phenotype of rituximab-sensitive chronic graft-versus-host disease: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Suzanne; Resemann, Henrike; te Boome, Liane; Pietersma, Floor; van Baarle, Debbie; Gmelig-Meyling, Frits; de Weger, Roel; Petersen, Eefke; Minnema, Monique; Lokhorst, Henk; Ebeling, Saskia; Beijn, Scott J.P.; Knol, Edward F.; van Dijk, Marijke; Meijer, Ellen; Kuball, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease is the major long-term complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a suboptimal response rate to current treatments. Therefore, clinical efficacy and changes in lymphocyte subsets before and after rituximab treatment were evaluated in a prospective phase II study in patients with steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease. Overall response rate was 61%. Only responding patients were found to have increased B-cell numbers prior to treatment. B cells had a naïve-antigen-presenting phenotype and were mainly CD5 negative or had a low CD5 expression. Normal B-cell homeostasis was reestablished in responding patients one year after ritxumab treatment and associated with a significant decline in skin-infiltrating CD8+ T cells, suggesting that host B cells play a role in maintaining pathological CD8+ T-cell responses. Imbalances in B-cell homeostasis could be used to identify patients a priori with a higher chance of response to rituximab treatment (Eudra-CT 2008-004125-42). PMID:21546493

  6. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0

  7. A multicenter phase II study of sepantronium bromide (YM155) plus rituximab in patients with relapsed aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Lopez-Jimenez, Javier; Smith, Scott E; Steinberg, Joyce; Keating, Anne; Sasse, Carolyn; Jie, Fei; Thyss, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    This phase II study evaluated YM155, a novel small-molecule survivin suppressant, in combination with rituximab in patients with relapsed aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who failed or were not candidates for autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). During 14-day cycles, 41 patients received YM155 (5mg/m(2)/d) by continuous intravenous (IV) infusion for 168 hours (day 1-7), and rituximab (375mg/m(2)) IV on days 1 and 8 during cycles 1-4 and repeated for 4 cycles every 10 cycles. Forty patients (97.6%) had prior rituximab and 15 patients (36.6%) prior ASCT. Most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia (19.5%) and thrombocytopenia (12.2%). In the per-protocol set (n = 34), objective response rate was 50% and median progression-free survival 17.9 months. Median overall survival was not reached at study termination (median follow-up, 23 months). YM155 in combination with rituximab was tolerable with encouraging antitumor activity and durable responses in relapsed aggressive B-cell NHL patients. PMID:26857688

  8. Phase II multicenter study of oblimersen sodium, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide, in combination with rituximab in patients with recurrent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pro, Barbara; Leber, Brian; Smith, Mitchell; Fayad, Luis; Romaguera, Jorge; Hagemeister, Fredrick; Rodriguez, Alma; McLaughlin, Peter; Samaniego, Felipe; Zwiebel, James; Lopez, Adriana; Kwak, Larry; Younes, Anas

    2008-11-01

    Oblimersen sodium plus rituximab was evaluated in relapsed/refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients. Oblimersen was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion at a daily dose of 3 mg/kg/d for 7 d on alternate weeks for 3 weeks. Rituximab was given at a weekly dose of 375 mg/m(2) for six doses. Patients with stable disease or objective response were allowed to receive a second course of treatment. The overall response rate (ORR) was 42% with 10 complete responses (CR) and eight partial responses (PR). Twelve (28%) patients achieved a minimal response or stable disease. Among the 20 patients with follicular lymphoma the ORR was 60% (eight CR, four PR). Three of the responders were refractory to prior treatment with rituximab, and two of the responses occurred in patients who had failed an autologous stem cell transplant. Median duration of response was 12 months. Most toxicities were low grade and reversible. In conclusion, oblimersen sodium can be safely combined with rituximab. The combination appears to be most beneficial in patients with indolent NHL and warrants further investigation in a large randomized trial. PMID:18764869

  9. Randomized trial of bendamustine-rituximab or R-CHOP/R-CVP in first-line treatment of indolent NHL or MCL: the BRIGHT study.

    PubMed

    Flinn, Ian W; van der Jagt, Richard; Kahl, Brad S; Wood, Peter; Hawkins, Tim E; Macdonald, David; Hertzberg, Mark; Kwan, Yiu-Lam; Simpson, David; Craig, Michael; Kolibaba, Kathryn; Issa, Samar; Clementi, Regina; Hallman, Doreen M; Munteanu, Mihaela; Chen, Ling; Burke, John M

    2014-05-01

    This randomized, noninferiority (NI), global, phase 3 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of bendamustine plus rituximab (BR) vs a standard rituximab-chemotherapy regimen (rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [R-CHOP] or rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone [R-CVP]) for treatment-naive patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or mantle cell lymphoma. Investigators preassigned the standard treatment regimen they considered most appropriate for each patient; patients were randomized to receive BR (n = 224) or standard therapy (R-CHOP/R-CVP, n = 223) for 6 cycles; 2 additional cycles were permitted at investigator discretion. Response was assessed by a blinded independent review committee. BR was noninferior to R-CHOP/R-CVP, as assessed by the primary end point of complete response rate (31% vs 25%, respectively; P = .0225 for NI [0.88 margin]). The overall response rates for BR and R-CHOP/R-CVP were 97% and 91%, respectively (P = .0102). Incidences of vomiting and drug-hypersensitivity reactions were significantly higher in patients treated with BR (P < .05), and incidences of peripheral neuropathy/paresthesia and alopecia were significantly higher in patients treated with standard-therapy regimens (P < .05). These data indicate BR is noninferior to standard therapy with regard to clinical response with an acceptable safety profile. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00877006. PMID:24591201

  10. [Hepatitis B virus reactivation after cessation of prophylactic lamivudine therapy in B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab combined CHOP therapy].

    PubMed

    Mimura, Naoya; Tsujimura, Hideki; Ise, Mikiko; Sakai, Chikara; Kojima, Hiroshige; Fukai, Kenichi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Kyoya

    2009-12-01

    Here we report three cases of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation after cessation of preemptive lamivudine therapy in B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP). Two patients received eight cycles of R-CHOP, and one received two cycles of R-CHOP followed by two courses of rituximab. As all the patients were HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive, lamivudine was administered simultaneously with R-CHOP to prevent virus reactivation. All the patients developed hepatitis due to HBV reactivation 6, 8 and 13 months after completion of chemotherapy, and 4, 2 and 2 months after cessation of lamivudine, respectively. They were treated with either lamivudine or entecavir and all achieved full recovery. When HBV carriers undergo immunosuppressive anticancer treatment, prophylactic antiviral therapy is well recognized as effective. However, the optimal method of prophylaxis has not yet been established. Since the introduction of rituximab, new problems such as delayed HBV reactivation from HBsAg positive patients and de novo hepatitis B from HBsAg negative patients have emerged. Guidelines for prophylactic antiviral therapy in the era of rituximab need to be established. PMID:20068280

  11. Rituximab as Successful Adjunct Treatment in a Patient With Disseminated Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection Due to Acquired Anti–Interferon-γ Autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Christopher A.; Merkel, Patricia A.; Chan, Edward D.; Lenz, Laurel L.; Wolf, Molly L.; Alam, Rafeul; Frankel, Stephen K.; Fischer, Aryeh; Gogate, Shaila; Perez-Velez, Carlos M.; Knight, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    An acquired immune deficiency due to interferon gamma (IFN-γ) autoantibodies was diagnosed in a 78-year-old Japanese man with treatment-refractory disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. In addition to standard antimycobacterial therapy, he was successfully treated with rituximab to eliminate B cells and thereby the autoantibody. Subsequently, he obtained a sustained remission from infection. PMID:24336756

  12. CD20-positive primary gastric T-cell lymphoma poorly responding to initial treatment with rituximab plus CHOP, and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kakinoki, Yasutaka; Hashiguchi, Junichi; Ishio, Takashi; Chiba, Koji; Niino, Daisuke; Ohshima, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    There have been rare reported cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) that co-expressed CD20. A 44-year-old Japanese male was initially misdiagnosed as CD20-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with a background of reactive CD3-positive T-cells in the stomach. After four cycles of R-CHOP [rituximab plus cyclophosphamide (CY), doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (PSL)], total gastrectomy with regional lymph node dissection was performed due to the poor response to R-CHOP. A final diagnosis of CD20-positive primary gastric PTCL-NOS was made based on the immunohistochemical, flow cytometric, and molecular genetic findings. In the present case, CD20 immunostaining for T-cell lymphoma cells in tumor tissue varied; in a large part, these were strong to weak-positive, and in some parts, absent. We additionally reviewed the literature focusing on CD20-positive PTCL-NOS treated with rituximab. The administration of rituximab has been performed as an initial treatment in 11 cases, including the case reported here. The response was good in cases with high expression of CD20, while it was poor in cases with variable intensity in CD20 staining, which is consistent with our experience in the present case. The efficacy of rituximab may be associated with intensity of CD20 expression in T cells and its homogeneity in the tumor tissue. PMID:26251099

  13. Single dose of rituximab in children with steroid-dependent minimal change nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiao-Ling; Hao, Sheng; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Gui-Mei; Wu, Ying; Kuang, Xin-Yu; Zhu, Guang-Hua; Huang, Wen-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX) can be used in children with nephrotic syndrome, particularly in those with steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (SDNS). However, at present there is no unified standard of how to use RTX, with regard to the amount of doses and frequency, in children with nephrotic syndrome. The study aimed to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of a single dose of RTX in children with steroid-dependent minimal change nephrotic syndrome (SD-MCNS). The patients with biopsy-proven minimal change disease (MCD) and clinical features of SDNS received a single dose of RTX (375 mg/m2). The toxicity and side effects of RTX were also observed. The study included 19 patients (10 males and 9 females). Follow-up of the patients was 1–50 months (28.1±16.6 months). B-cell depletion was achieved with RTX infusion (CD20<0.5%) and lasted 1–6 months (mean, 2.92±1.57 months). During follow-up, 10 patients remained in complete remission and did not relapse without administration of oral steroids or immunosuppressants for 4–50 months (mean, 30.1±12.6 months), despite recovery of the B-cell count. Nine patients relapsed in the process of reducing steroids, thus, treatment was maintained at a lower dosage (T=0, P<0.05) than prior to use of RTX. The number of relapses also decreased significantly (T=95, P<0.05). Five of the patients relapsed after stopping steroid for several months. At the end of follow-up, the efficacy of a single induction of RTX was 47.4% (9/19). There were no significant side effects associated with administration of RTX. In conclusion, RTX is a safe and effective alternative for children with SD-MCNS. RTX is an effective treatment for the rapid induction of remission and reduces relapse and steroid dependency. A single dose of RTX for children with SD-MCNS is recommended for rapid induction of remission, reduction of long-term steroid dosage, and decrease in the number of relapses, as it has few side effects. PMID:27446549

  14. Retrospective analysis of primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma in the rituximab era: a multicenter study of 95 patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Niwa, Yasumasa; Sugiura, Isamu; Kitamura, Kunio; Kosugi, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Goto, Hidemi; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2012-03-01

    Primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PG-DLBCL) is common subtype of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The optimal treatment strategy for PG-DLBCL in the rituximab era still remains unknown. To evaluate clinical outcomes of PG-DLBCL in the rituximab era, we conducted a retrospective, multicenter analysis of 95 patients with PG-DLBCL. In 58 patients with localized disease, 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 91% and 91% for patients with six cycles of rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP) and 92% and 95% for patients with three to four cycles of R-CHOP plus radiotherapy (Log-rank test, P = 0.595 and P = 0.278, respectively). In 37 patients with advanced disease, 3-year PFS and 3-year OS were 43% and 64% for patients with R-CHOP chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy. On multivariate analysis, advanced stage and elevated serum LDH levels were independent predictors of survival in patients with PG-DLBCL. One patient with localized disease relapsed in lymph node, and eight patients with advanced disease relapsed in lymph node (n = 3), stomach (n = 2), central nervous system (CNS; n = 2), and duodenum (n = 1). Intriguingly, CNS relapse developed within 6 months after initial series of treatment (4.9 and 5.8 months, respectively), and stomach relapse developed in later phase (27.2 and 32.9 months, respectively). Clinical outcomes of PG-DLBCL were extremely favorable for localized-stage patients in the rituximab era, although these might be poor for advanced-stage patients even in the rituximab era. Further prospective analyses are warranted. PMID:21822617

  15. Estimating the Population Benefits and Costs of Rituximab Therapy in the United States from 1998 to 2013 Using Real-World Data

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Carolina M.; Gleeson, Michelle L.; Halperin, Marc; Skettino, Sandra L.; Mikhael, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rituximab was approved in 1997 and is regularly one of the largest drug expenditures for Medicare; however, its benefits and costs have not been estimated from a population perspective. Objectives: To estimate both the clinical and the economic outcomes of rituximab for its approved hematological uses at the population level. Research Design: Analyses using cancer registry incidence data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, and outcomes data from SEER data linked with Medicare administrative claims (SEER-Medicare data). These results were incorporated into an epidemiological simulation model of the population over time. Subjects: We modeled all United States patients from 1998 to 2013 diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Measures: Using this model, we estimated the life-years saved, as well as their economic benefit, in the United States population. We also estimated the incremental cost of adding rituximab to chemotherapy. All economic inputs were based on Medicare reimbursed amounts inflated to 2013 dollars. Results: There were 279,704 cumulative life-years saved which were valued at $25.44 billion. The incremental direct medical cost of rituximab was estimated to be $8.92 billion, resulting in an incremental economic gain of $16.52 billion. Conclusions: These analyses, based on real-world evidence, show that the introduction of rituximab into clinical practice has produced a substantial number of incremental life-years. Importantly, the economic benefit of the life-years gained greatly exceeds the added costs of treatment. PMID:26759977

  16. Rituximab as first choice for patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis: cost-effectiveness analysis in Iran based on a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadiani, Saeed; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Karimi, Somayeh; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Akbari-Sari, Ali; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using rituximab as first line for patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with continuing conventional DMARDs, from a perspective of health service governors. A systematic review was implemented through searching PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library. Quality assessment was performed by Jadad scale. After meta-analysis of ACR index results, QALY gain was calculated through mapping ACR index to HAQ and utility index. To measure the direct and indirect medical costs, a set of interviews with patients were applied. Thirty-two patients were selected from three referral rheumatology clinics in Tehran with definite diagnosis of refractory rheumatoid arthritis in the year before and treatment regimen of either rituximab or DMARDs within last year. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated for base case and scenario of generic rituximab. Threefold of GDP per capita was considered as threshold of cost-effectiveness. Four studies were eligible to be considered in this systematic review. Total risk differences of 0.3 for achieving ACR20 criteria, 0.21 for ACR50 and 0.1 for ACR70 were calculated. Also mean of total medical costs of patients for 24 weeks were $3985 in rituximab group and $932 for DMARDs group. Thus, the incremental cost per QALY ratio will be $45,900-$70,223 in base case and $32,386-$49,550 for generic scenario. Rituximab for treatment of patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis is not considered as cost-effective in Iran in none of the scenarios. PMID:27136919

  17. Validation of 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab injection preparation under good manufacturing practices: a PET tracer for imaging of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Arutselvan; Arksey, Natasha; Iagaru, Andrei; Chin, Frederick T; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2015-01-01

    Manufacturing of 64Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-rituximab injection under good manufacturing practices (GMP) was validated for imaging of patients with CD20+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Rituximab was purified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and conjugated to DOTA-mono-(N-hydroxysuccinimidyl) ester. 64CuCl2, buffers, reagents, and other raw materials were obtained as high-grade quality. Following a semi-automated synthesis of 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab, a series of quality control tests was performed. The product was further tested in vivo using micro-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to assess targeting ability towards human CD20 in transgenic mice. Three batches of 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab final product were prepared as per GMP specifications. The radiolabeling yield from these batches was 93.1 ± 5.8%; these provided final product with radiopharmaceutical yield, purity, and specific activity of 59.2 ± 5.1% (0.9 ± 0.1 GBq of 64Cu), > 95% (by HPLC and radio-thin layer chromatography), and 229.4 ± 43.3 GBq/µmol (or 1.5 ± 0.3 MBq/µg), respectively. The doses passed apyrogenicity and human serum stability specifications, were sterile up to 14 days, and retained > 60% immunoreactivity. In vivo micro-PET/CT mouse images at 24 hours postinjection showed that the tracer targeted the intended sites of human CD20 expression. Thus, we have validated the manufacturing of GMP grade 64Cu-DOTA-rituximab for injection in the clinical setting. PMID:25762106

  18. De novo CD5+ diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Adverse outcomes with and without stem cell transplantation in a large, multicenter, rituximab treated cohort.

    PubMed

    Alinari, Lapo; Gru, Alejandro; Quinion, Carl; Huang, Ying; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; Poston, Jacqueline; Venkataraman, Girish; Oak, Eunhye; Kreisel, Friederike; Park, Steven I; Matthews, Stephanie; Abramson, Jeremy S; Iris Lim, Hana; Martin, Peter; Cohen, Jonathon B; Evens, Andrew; Al-Mansour, Zeina; Singavi, Arun; Fenske, Timothy S; Blum, Kristie A

    2016-06-01

    De novo CD5+ diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are a distinct subgroup of DLBCL with poor prognosis. However the role of rituximab-containing therapy and salvage stem cell transplantation in this patients' population remain to be defined. We retrospectively reviewed clinical features and outcomes of 102 patients with de novo CD5+ DLBCL treated with rituximab-containing therapy at nine different institutions. By Hans' criteria, 64 patients had activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, 24 germinal center B-cell (GCB) subtype, and 14 were not evaluated. No patients had a myc translocation. Eighty-three patients were treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (R-CHOP), 7 with rituximab, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (R-EPOCH), and 6 with R-CHOP with methotrexate, 3 g/m(2) . The overall response rate to front-line therapy was 85%. The 3-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 40 and 65%, respectively. The 3-year PFS for ABC- and GCB-subtypes was 34 and 45%, respectively. The 3-year OS for ABC- and GCB-subtypes was 62 and 67%, respectively. The median time to second treatment failure was 3 months and 1 month for ABC- and GCB-subtypes, respectively. Twenty of 28 (71%) transplanted patients with autologous, allogeneic, or both, relapsed. This study confirms the poor prognosis of de novo CD5+ DLBCL in a large multi-center cohort despite initial rituximab-containing chemotherapy and suggests that stem cell transplantation fails to salvage the majority of these patients. Approaches to prevent recurrence and/or novel therapies for relapsed disease are needed for this subgroup of DLBCL patients. PMID:26800311

  19. Durable donor engraftment after radioimmunotherapy using α-emitter astatine-211–labeled anti-CD45 antibody for conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Kornblit, Brian; Hamlin, Donald K.; Sale, George E.; Santos, Erlinda B.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Storer, Barry E.; Storb, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    To reduce toxicity associated with external γ-beam radiation, we investigated radioimmunotherapy with an anti-CD45 mAb labeled with the α-emitter, astatine-211 (211At), as a conditioning regimen in dog leukocyte antigen-identical hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Dose-finding studies in 6 dogs treated with 100 to 618 μCi/kg 211At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) without HCT rescue demonstrated dose-dependent myelosuppression with subsequent autologous recovery, and transient liver toxicity in dogs treated with 211At doses less than or equal to 405 μCi/kg. Higher doses of 211At induced clinical liver failure. Subsequently, 8 dogs were conditioned with 155 to 625 μCi/kg 211At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) before HCT with dog leukocyte antigen-identical bone marrow followed by a short course of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil immunosuppression. Neutropenia (1-146 cells/μL), lymphopenia (0-270 cells/μL), and thrombocytopenia (1500-6560 platelets/μL) with prompt recovery was observed. Seven dogs had long-term donor mononuclear cell chimerism (19%-58%), whereas 1 dog treated with the lowest 211At dose (155 μCi/kg) had low donor mononuclear cell chimerism (5%). At the end of follow-up (18-53 weeks), only transient liver toxicity and no renal toxicity had been observed. In conclusion, conditioning with 211At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb is safe and efficacious and provides a platform for future clinical trials of nonmyeloablative transplantation with radioimmunotherapy-based conditioning. PMID:22134165

  20. Durable donor engraftment after radioimmunotherapy using α-emitter astatine-211-labeled anti-CD45 antibody for conditioning in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Kornblit, Brian; Hamlin, Donald K; Sale, George E; Santos, Erlinda B; Wilbur, D Scott; Storer, Barry E; Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2012-02-01

    To reduce toxicity associated with external γ-beam radiation, we investigated radioimmunotherapy with an anti-CD45 mAb labeled with the α-emitter, astatine-211 ((211)At), as a conditioning regimen in dog leukocyte antigen-identical hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Dose-finding studies in 6 dogs treated with 100 to 618 μCi/kg (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) without HCT rescue demonstrated dose-dependent myelosuppression with subsequent autologous recovery, and transient liver toxicity in dogs treated with (211)At doses less than or equal to 405 μCi/kg. Higher doses of (211)At induced clinical liver failure. Subsequently, 8 dogs were conditioned with 155 to 625 μCi/kg (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb (0.5 mg/kg) before HCT with dog leukocyte antigen-identical bone marrow followed by a short course of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil immunosuppression. Neutropenia (1-146 cells/μL), lymphopenia (0-270 cells/μL), and thrombocytopenia (1500-6560 platelets/μL) with prompt recovery was observed. Seven dogs had long-term donor mononuclear cell chimerism (19%-58%), whereas 1 dog treated with the lowest (211)At dose (155 μCi/kg) had low donor mononuclear cell chimerism (5%). At the end of follow-up (18-53 weeks), only transient liver toxicity and no renal toxicity had been observed. In conclusion, conditioning with (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 mAb is safe and efficacious and provides a platform for future clinical trials of nonmyeloablative transplantation with radioimmunotherapy-based conditioning. PMID:22134165

  1. Risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen negative/hepatitis B core antibody positive patients receiving rituximab-containing combination chemotherapy without routine antiviral prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Koo, Yu Xuan; Tay, Matthew; Teh, Yii Ean; Teng, David; Tan, Daniel S W; Tan, Iain B H; Tai, David W M; Quek, Richard; Tao, Miriam; Lim, Soon Thye

    2011-10-01

    The use of rituximab has been associated with increased risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in patients who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative and antihepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) positive. We aim to determine the rate of HBV reactivation in this group of patients who received rituximab-containing combination chemotherapy without concomitant antiviral prophylaxis and to identify potential risk factors for reactivation. Sixty-two HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive patients with B-cell lymphoma treated with rituximab-based immunochemotherapy from 2006 to 2009 were included. None of the patients received concomitant antiviral prophylaxis. In this cohort, 48 (77%) patients received rituximab with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP), eight (13%) received rituximab with cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisolone, and six (10%) received other chemotherapy regimens. Two patients suffered HBV reactivation; both were above 70 years of age, received R-CHOP chemotherapy and were negative for antihepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) at baseline. One of the two patients reactivated shortly after completion of R-CHOP chemotherapy while the other reactivated during rituximab maintenance treatment. Thus, the overall reactivation rate in this cohort of patients is 3% (2/62), 4% (2/48), and 25% (1/4) in patients who received R-CHOP chemotherapy and who received rituximab maintenance, respectively. The rate of HBV reactivation is low in patients who are HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive receiving rituximab-based combination chemotherapy without concomitant antiviral prophylaxis. However, elderly patients, particularly those without anti-HBs, seemed particularly at risk. PMID:21520001

  2. Greatly reduced risk of EBV reactivation in rituximab-experienced recipients of alemtuzumab-conditioned allogeneic HSCT.

    PubMed

    Burns, D M; Rana, S; Martin, E; Nagra, S; Ward, J; Osman, H; Bell, A I; Moss, P; Russell, N H; Craddock, C F; Fox, C P; Chaganti, S

    2016-06-01

    EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) remains an important complication of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We retrospectively analysed the incidence and risk factors for EBV reactivation in 186 adult patients undergoing consecutive allo-HSCT with alemtuzumab T-cell depletion at a single centre. The cumulative incidence of EBV reactivation was 48% (confidence interval (CI) 41-55%) by 1 year, with an incidence of high-level EBV reactivation of 18% (CI 13-24%); 8 patients were concurrently diagnosed with PTLD. Amongst patients with high-level reactivation 31/38 (82%) developed this within only 2 weeks of first EBV qPCR positivity. In univariate analysis age⩾50 years was associated with significantly increased risk of EBV reactivation (hazard ratio (HR) 1.54, CI 1.02-2.31; P=0.039). Furthermore, a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was associated with greatly reduced risk of reactivation (HR 0.10, CI 0.03-0.33; P=0.0001) and this was confirmed in multivariate testing. Importantly, rituximab therapy within 6 months prior to allo-HSCT was also highly predictive for lack of EBV reactivation (HR 0.18, CI 0.07-0.48; P=0.001) although confounding with NHL was apparent. Our data emphasise the risk of PTLD associated with alemtuzumab. Furthermore, we report the clinically important observation that rituximab, administered in the peri-transplant period, may provide effective prophylaxis for PTLD. PMID:26901708

  3. [PET-CT documented remission of multicentric Castleman disease after treatment with rituximab: case report and review].

    PubMed

    Adam, Zdeněk; Szturz, Petr; Koukalová, Renata; Řehák, Zdeněk; Pour, Luděk; Krejčí, Marta; Šmardová, Lenka; Eid, Michal; Volfová, Pavlína; Čermáková, Zdeňka; Křen, Leoš; Sokol, Filip; Hanke, Ivo; Michalková, Eva; Král, Zdeněk; Mayer, Jiří

    2015-03-01

    We describe a case of multicentric Castleman disease with generalized lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, accompanied by typical B symptoms - loss of 15 kg, fever of non-infectious origin, night sweats, symptoms of anemia. Histological examination of the nodes with the highest accumulation of fluorodeoxyglucose, taken from mediastinum by thoracoscopy, revealed plasmocellular type of Castleman disease. Tests for HIV and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) were negative. Three recurrences of herpes zoster indicating an alteration of immunity preceded the dia-gnosis of disease. Treatment was initiated with combination of thalidomide, dexamethasone, and cyclophosphamide. The response after 2 months therapy was not clear and patient doesn't tolerated the therapy well. Therefore, this treatment was terminated and R-CHOP (Mabthera - rituximab, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone) was selected as a second-line therapy. Lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were reduced during the 2 cycles of treatment, however, serious infectious complications accompanied the therapy. Therefore, only use of Mabthera monotherapy 375 mg /m2 was administered in 28-day intervals. This treatment has shown efficacy and tolerability. PET-CT scan has demonstrated disappearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, in addition, normalized accumulation of fluorodeoxyglucose. Monotherapy with Mabthera has proved to be effective and well tolerated drug in this case. Currently, there are more effective therapeutic alternatives in multicentric Castleman disease: treatment with monotherapy of rituximab or in combination therapy with immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide or lenalidomide, treatment with anti-IL-6 (siltuximab) or against its receptor (tocilizumab). In the case of ineffectiveness of one treatment option must be tested other alternative. In this case the therapy based on thalidomide wasn't successful, whereas the treatment with Mabthera has achieved disappearance of disease symptoms. PMID

  4. Fludarabine-Mitoxantrone-Rituximab regimen in untreated indolent non-follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: experience on 143 patients.

    PubMed

    Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Pellegrini, Cinzia; Broccoli, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Letizia; Stefoni, Vittorio; Casadei, Beatrice; Maglie, Roberto; Argnani, Lisa; Pileri, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Indolent non-follicular lymphomas (inFLs) are generally regarded as incurable, apart from extranodal mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue lymphomas, which can be partially cured by surgery, local radiotherapy, or antibiotic treatment. The aim of the present study was to test the degree of effectiveness and the safety of the regimen containing fludarabine, mitoxantrone, and rituximab (FMR) in inFL patients considering all the different entities belonging to this group. An observational retrospective study was conducted on 143 inFL patients providing that their first chemoimmunotherapy performed was FMR regimen and diagnosis from September 2000 to March 2011. There were 32 small lymphocytic lymphomas and 111 marginal zone lymphomas. At the end of treatment, overall response rate was 96.5% with 88% of complete responses (CR) and 8.5% of partial responses. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 10 out of 125 (8%) CR patients had disease relapse, yielding an estimated 9-year disease-free survival (DFS) of 74.9% and an estimated 10-year overall survival of 92.8%. The estimated 9-year progression free survival was 70.5%. The 10 relapsed patients showed lymphoma recurrence within 52 months: after this time, the DFS curve presented a plateau configuration. Only two (1.4%) patients developed a secondary hematological neoplasia. This study showed promising findings for the use of a fludarabine-based regimen in combination with rituximab in the front-line treatment of symptomatic inFL with a noteworthy high percentage of CR associated to an interesting long-term DFS and favorable acute and long-term safety profile. PMID:24986783

  5. A multicenter phase II study incorporating high-dose rituximab and liposomal doxorubicin into the CODOX-M/IVAC regimen for untreated Burkitt's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Evens, A. M.; Carson, K. R.; Kolesar, J.; Nabhan, C.; Helenowski, I.; Islam, N.; Jovanovic, B.; Barr, P. M.; Caimi, P. F.; Gregory, S. A.; Gordon, L. I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite improvement with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates for adults with high-risk Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) remains <55%. Patients and methods We conducted a phase II trial for newly diagnosed classic BL utilizing liposomal doxorubicin (Adriamycin) in lieu of doxorubicin and incorporating intravenous rituximab (at 500 mg/m2 twice/cycle) into the CODOX-M/IVAC regimen. Correlative analyses included paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rituximab levels and close examination of cardiac function. Results Among 25 BL patients, the median age was 44 years (23–70) and 4 patients were HIV positive. There were 20 high-risk and 5 low-risk patients. At baseline, 40% of high-risk patients had bone marrow involvement, 35% had bulky disease and 15% had central nervous system involvement. The overall response rate was 100% (complete remission 92%). At 34-month median follow-up, the 2-year PFS and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 80% and 84%, respectively (low-risk: both 100%; high-risk: 76% and 81%, respectively). Furthermore, the 2-year PFS, OS, and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates for high-risk, HIV-negative patients were 84%, 89% and 100%, respectively. Adverse events (AEs) appeared to be consistent with prior CODOX-M/IVAC data, although there were several grade 3 cardiac events noted (all declined ejection fraction without clinical symptoms). The mean serum rituximab levels at 24 h after cycles 1 and 3 for patients without relapse were 258 and 306 μg/ml, respectively, versus 131 and 193 μg/ml, respectively, for patients with early progression (P = 0.002 and 0.002, respectively). The mean CSF rituximab levels for all patients were 0.11 and 0.24 μg/ml, respectively, at cycle 1 (24/72 h), which equated to serum:CSF ratios of 0.05% and 0.20%, respectively. Conclusions The integration of rituximab into CODOX-M/IVAC for adult BL was feasible and tolerable, while changes in cardiac function

  6. Persistence and selection of an expanded B-cell clone in the setting of rituximab therapy for Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subjects with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) have an increased risk of developing B-cell lymphoma and may harbor monoclonal B-cell expansions in the peripheral blood. Expanded B-cell clones could be pathogenic, and their persistence could exacerbate disease or predispose toward the development of lymphoma. Therapy with anti-CD20 (rituximab) has the potential to eliminate expanded B-cell clones and thereby potentially ameliorate disease. This study was undertaken to identify and track expanded B-cell clones in the blood of subjects with primary SjS who were treated with rituximab. Methods To determine whether circulating B-cell clones in subjects with primary SjS emerge or remain after B cell-depleting therapy with rituximab, we studied the antibody heavy-chain repertoire. We performed single-memory B-cell and plasmablast sorting and antibody heavy-chain sequencing in six rituximab-treated SjS subjects over the course of a 1-year follow-up period. Results Expanded B-cell clones were identified in four out of the six rituximab-treated SjS subjects, based upon the independent amplification of sequences with identical or highly similar VH, DH, and JH gene segments. We identified one SjS subject with a large expanded B-cell clone that was present prior to therapy and persisted after therapy. Somatic mutations in the clone were numerous but did not increase in frequency over the course of the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that the clone had been present for a long period of time. Intriguingly, a majority of the somatic mutations in the clone were silent, suggesting that the clone was under chronic negative selection. Conclusions For some subjects with primary SjS, these data show that (a) expanded B-cell clones are readily identified in the peripheral blood, (b) some clones are not eliminated by rituximab, and (c) persistent clones may be under chronic negative selection or may not be antigen-driven. The analysis of sequence variation among members of an

  7. Rituximab-CHOP-ESHAP vs CHOP-ESHAP-high-dose therapy vs conventional CHOP chemotherapy in high-intermediate and high-risk aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Intragumtornchai, Tanin; Bunworasate, Udomsak; Nakorn, Thanyaphong Na; Rojnuckarin, Ponlapat

    2006-07-01

    With currently available combination chemotherapy regimens, the outcome of the patients newly diagnosed with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) identified as 'high' and 'high-intermediate' risk groups according to the international prognostic index (IPI) is still unsatisfactory and a more innovative therapy is urgently required to improve the survival of the patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of rituximab given in combination with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) and ESHAP (etoposide, methylprednisolone, high-dose Ara-C, cisplatin) vs CHOP-ESHAP and upfront high-dose therapy (HDT) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) vs standard CHOP in patients aged < or = 65 years old newly diagnosed with 'high' and 'high-intermediate' risk aggressive lymphoma enrolled onto two consecutive treatment trials at the institute. Between May 1995 - July 2002, 84 patients, aged 15 - 65 years old, with newly diagnosed aggressive NHL and an age-adjusted IPI of 2 or 3 were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 38 years (range 15 - 65). The baseline demographic features, in particular the major prognostic variables, were similar between the treatment groups. Patients treated with rituximab-CHOP-ESHAP received eight cycles of rituximab (375 mg m(-2) on day 1 of cycles 1 - 6 and days 21 and 28 of cycle 7) plus CHOP (day 3 of cycles 1, 3 and 5) and ESHAP (day 3 of cycles 2, 4 and 6 and day 1 of cycle 7) at 21-day intervals. Patients enrolled onto the CHOP-ESHAP-HDT arm (n = 23) were treated with three courses of CHOP and then switched to two or four cycles of ESHAP followed by HDT. Patients treated with CHOP alone (n = 25) were treated with the standard eight cycles of CHOP. The rate of complete remission was significantly improved with rituximab-CHOP-ESHAP compared with either CHOP-ESHAP-HDT or CHOP alone (67% compared with 44% and 36%, respectively; p = 0.043). With a median follow-up time of 53 months, the 5

  8. Immune-mediated necrotising myopathy associated with antibodies to the signal recognition particle treated with a combination of rituximab and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Fernandes das Neves, Marisa; Caetano, Joana; Oliveira, Susana; Delgado Alves, José

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with dysphagia and proximal muscle weakness. He was diagnosed with immune-mediated necrotising myopathy associated with antibodies to the signal recognition particle. After an initial response following treatment with high-dose steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and methotrexate, there was a relapse of the immune condition. The clinical deterioration occurred less than 2 months after disease onset. The refractoriness of this disease was characterised by an increase of the already severe muscle wasting that led to respiratory failure and progressive dysphagia, regardless of the immunosuppressant treatment. At this time the patient was referred to our department. He was restarted on intravenous pulses of methylprednisolone associated with intravenous cyclophosphamide, but with no effect. After 3 weeks, rituximab was started with a dramatic and progressive improvement. There were no complications associated with rituximab/cyclophosphamide treatment and the disease has been kept in remission, for the last 3 years. PMID:26240092

  9. Disseminated juvenile xanthogranuloma associated with follicular lymphoma in an adult: successful treatment with chemotherapy and rituximab. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Moreno, B; Pulpillo-Ruiz, Á; De Zulueta-Dorado, T; Conejo-Mir, J

    2013-04-01

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma is a non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis that typically affects children, but several cases have been reported in adults, some in connection with hematologic malignancies. We present the case of a 61-year-old woman with multiple xanthogranulomas who developed a follicular lymphoma after 4 years of follow-up. After 6 months of treatment with chemotherapy and rituximab, the cutaneous lesions disappeared and the patient achieved remission from lymphoma. We highlight this case because xanthogranuloma is a rare disorder that is difficult to diagnose in adults and also because this is the first report of an association between xanthogranuloma and follicular lymphoma. Excellent response was achieved with chemotherapy and rituximab. Finally, given the possible association between xanthogranulomas and hematologic diseases, these lesions may be a cutaneous manifestation of an occult malignancy. PMID:22681714

  10. Validated LC/MS Bioanalysis of Rituximab CDR Peptides Using Nano-surface and Molecular-Orientation Limited (nSMOL) Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Noriko; Takanashi, Megumi; Hamada, Akinobu; Shimada, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Presently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) therapeutics have big global sales and are starting to receive competition from biosimilars. We previously reported that the nano-surface and molecular-orientation limited (nSMOL) proteolysis which is optimal method for bioanalysis of antibody drugs in plasma. The nSMOL is a Fab-selective limited proteolysis, which utilize the difference of protease nanoparticle diameter (200 nm) and antibody resin pore diameter (100 nm). In this report, we have demonstrated that the full validation for chimeric antibody Rituximab bioanalysis in human plasma using nSMOL proteolysis. The immunoglobulin fraction was collected using Protein A resin from plasma, which was then followed by the nSMOL proteolysis using the FG nanoparticle-immobilized trypsin under a nondenaturing condition at 50°C for 6 h. After removal of resin and nanoparticles, Rituximab signature peptides (GLEWIGAIYPGNGDTSYNQK, ASGYTFTSYNMHWVK, and FSGSGSGTSYSLTISR) including complementarity-determining region (CDR) and internal standard P14R were simultaneously quantified by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). This quantification of Rituximab using nSMOL proteolysis showed lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.586 µg/mL and linearity of 0.586 to 300 µg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay precision of LLOQ, low quality control (LQC), middle quality control (MQC), and high quality control (HQC) was 5.45-12.9% and 11.8, 5.77-8.84% and 9.22, 2.58-6.39 and 6.48%, and 2.69-7.29 and 4.77%, respectively. These results indicate that nSMOL can be applied to clinical pharmacokinetics study of Rituximab, based on the precise analysis. PMID:27150271

  11. Catastrophic multiple organ ischemia due to an anti-Pr cold agglutinin developing in a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia after treatment with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Joshua; McMahon, Brandon; Ramsey, Glenn; Kwaan, Hau C

    2009-02-01

    Cold agglutinin disease occurring with cryoglobulinemia is a rare occurrence. Here, we report a patient with mixed cryoglobulinemia that was treated with rituximab and, after response, developed an anti-Pr cold agglutinin that manifested with hemolysis and microvascular occlusion causing mesenteric ischemia and cerebral infarction. Unlike previous reports of patients with cryoglobulinemia and cold agglutinin disease, our patient did not have a detectable cryoprecipitate when his cold agglutinin manifested. PMID:19097173

  12. Molecular characterization of a variant virus that caused de novo hepatitis B without elevation of hepatitis B surface antigen after chemotherapy with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Masami; Minami, Masahito; Fujii, Kota; Sendo, Rei; Mori, Kojiro; Shimizu, Daisuke; Nakajima, Tomoaki; Yasui, Kohichiroh; Itoh, Yoshito; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Okanoue, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2008-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative patients following treatment with rituximab has been reported increasingly. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying HBV reactivation in an HBsAg-negative patient. HBV was reactivated in a 75-year-old man following chemotherapy with rituximab, without elevation of HBsAg. The patient's full-length HBV genome was cloned and the entire sequence was determined. Transfection studies were performed in vitro using recombinant wild-type HBV (wild-type), the patient's HBV (patient), and two chimeric HBV constructs, in which the preS/S region of the patient and wild-type virus had been exchanged with one another. Secreted HBsAg and intra- and extra-cellular HBV DNA were measured. The number of amino acid substitutions in HBV from this patient was much higher than in previous reports of HBV mutants, such as occult HBV and vaccine escape HBV mutants. Levels of HBsAg and HBV DNA production in vitro were significantly lower in the patient compared to wild-type transfections. From analyses of the chimeric constructs, the altered preS/S region was responsible mainly for this impairment. These results show that highly mutated HBV can reactivate after chemotherapy with rituximab, despite an unusually large number of mutations, resulting in impaired viral replication in vitro. Severe immune suppression, probably caused by rituximab, may permit reactivation of highly mutated HBV. These findings have important clinical implications for the prevention and management of HBV reactivation and may explain partially the mechanism of recent, unusual cases of HBV reactivation. PMID:19040281

  13. Successful Curative Therapy With Rituximab and Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for MALT Lymphoma Associated With STK4-Mutated CD4+ Lymphocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lum, Su Han; Bonney, Denise; Cheesman, Edmund; Wrignt, Neville B; Hughes, Stephen; Wynn, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic CD4+ lymphocytopenia and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) are rare diseases in children. We report the first case of a child with STK4-mutated CD4+ lymphocytopenia who developed Epstein-Barr virus associated MALT lymphoma arising in the salivary gland. The child achieved complete remission with rituximab, and her immunodeficiency was cured by haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The child remained well 24 months post transplantation. PMID:27163767

  14. Survival impact of rituximab combined with ACVBP and upfront consolidation autotransplantation in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma for GELA

    PubMed Central

    Fitoussi, Olivier; Belhadj, Karim; Mounier, Nicolas; Parrens, Marie; Tilly, Hervé; Salles, Gilles; Feugier, Pierre; Ferme, Christophe; Ysebaert, Loic; Gabarre, Jean; Herbrecht, Raoul; Janvier, Maud; Van Den Neste, Eric; Morschhauser, Franck; Casasnovas, Olivier; Ghesquieres, Hervé; Anglaret, Bruno; Brechignac, Sabine; Haioun, Corinne; Gisselbrecht, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background As rituximab combined with CHOP improves complete remission and overall survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, intensified chemotherapy followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation has also been advocated for high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not combining rituximab with high-dose chemotherapy and auto-transplantation also benefits patient survival. Design and Methods The LNH2003-3 study was a phase II trial including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with 2 or 3 International Prognostic Index factors. They received four cycles of intensive biweekly chemotherapy with rituximab, doxorubicine, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycine, prednisolone (R-ACVBP) followed by auto-transplantation in responding patients. Two hundred and nine patients under 60 years of age were included in the study and 155 responding patients underwent auto-transplantation. In addition, a case-control study was performed by matching (1:1) 181 patients treated with R-ACVBP with ACVBP patients not given rituximab but submitted to auto-transplantation from the previous LNH1998-3 trial. Results With a median follow up of 45 months, 4-year progression-free survival and overall survival were estimated at 76% (CI: 69–81) and 78% (CI: 72–83), respectively. There was no difference between patients with 2 or 3 International Prognostic Index factors. Four year progression-free survival was significantly higher in R-ACVBP than ACVBP patients (74% vs. 58%; P=0.0005). There was also a significant increase in 4-year overall survival (76% vs. 68%; P=0.0494). Conclusions In high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients, treatment with R-ACVBP followed by auto-transplantation results in a 78% 4-year overall survival which should be compared to other approaches. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00144807) PMID:21546499

  15. The role of rituximab and positron emission tomography in the treatment of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma: experience on 74 patients.

    PubMed

    Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Broccoli, Alessandro; Casadei, Beatrice; Stefoni, Vittorio; Pellegrini, Cinzia; Gandolfi, Letizia; Maglie, Roberto; Argnani, Lisa; Pileri, Stefano; Fanti, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Regarding primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBCL), there are several controversial topics that warrant further investigation: the superiority of third-generation regimens, the impact of rituximab, the use of involved field radiotherapy (RT) and the assessment of clinical response by positron emission tomography (PET). We report our experience on 74 PMLBCL patients treated with a combination of a third-generation chemotherapy regimen (MACOP-B) and rituximab: an observational retrospective single-centre study was conducted on patients diagnosed and treated between February 2002 and July 2011. All patients were evaluated by computed tomography scan and PET scan; after the final PET evaluation, PET-negative patients were observed, whereas PET-positive patients underwent mediastinal RT. Sixty-one (82.4%) patients achieved a complete response after the MACOP-B plus rituximab regimen; 68.9% presented a positive final PET and were treated with local RT, whereas 31.1% had a negative PET. Five patients relapsed within 12 months. At 10 years, overall survival was 82%, progression-free survival was 87.6% and disease-free survival (DFS) was 90.5% (median follow-up 4 years). No statistically significant differences were observed in DFS between the patients treated also with RT (PET positive) and patients only observed (PET negative): 90.7% vs 90% (p = 0.85), respectively. In our experience, adding rituximab does not change the final results in terms of complete response and DFS utilizing third-generation regimen. Furthermore, the introduction of the PET-guided RT approach leads to a patient-tailored treatment, which preserves the outcome and, at the same time, allows reducing the use of RT. PMID:25256959

  16. RITPBC: B-cell depleting therapy (rituximab) as a treatment for fatigue in primary biliary cirrhosis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jopson, Laura; Newton, Julia L; Palmer, Jeremy; Floudas, Achilleas; Isaacs, John; Qian, Jessica; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Trenell, Mike; Blamire, Andrew; Howel, Denise; Jones, David E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an autoimmune liver disease with approximately 50% of patients experiencing fatigue. This can be a particularly debilitating symptom, affecting quality of life and resulting in social isolation. Fatigue is highlighted by patients as a priority for research and patient support groups were involved in designing this trial. This is the first randomised controlled trial to investigate a treatment for fatigue in PBC. The trial protocol is innovative as it utilises novel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques as an outcome measure. The protocol will be valuable to research groups planning clinical trials targeting fatigue in PBC and also transferrable to other conditions associated with fatigue. Methods and analysis RITPBC is a Medical Research Council (MRC) and National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme (EME)-funded project. It is a phase II, single-centre, randomised controlled, double-blinded trial comparing rituximab with placebo in fatigued PBC patients. 78 patients with PBC and moderate to severe fatigue will be randomised to receive two infusions of rituximab or placebo. The study aims to assess whether rituximab improves fatigue in patients with PBC, the safety, and tolerability of rituximab in PBC and the sustainability of any beneficial actions. The primary outcome will be an improvement in fatigue domain score of the PBC-40, a disease-specific quality of life measure, evaluated at 12-week assessment. Secondary outcome measures include novel MRS techniques assessing muscle bioenergetic function, physical activity, anaerobic threshold and symptom, and quality of life measures. The trial started recruiting in October 2012 and recruitment is ongoing. Ethics and dissemination The trial has ethical approval from the NRES Committee North East, has Clinical Trial Authorisation from MHRA and local R&D approval. Trial results will be communicated to participants

  17. Impaired Response to Influenza Vaccine Associated with Persistent Memory B Cell Depletion in Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Patients Treated with Rituximab-Containing Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Bedognetti, Davide; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Massucco, Carlotta; Zanardi, Elisa; Zupo, Simonetta; Bruzzone, Andrea; Sertoli, Mario Roberto; Balleari, Enrico; Racchi, Omar; Messina, Marco; Caltabiano, Graziano; Icardi, Giancarlo; Durando, Paolo; Marincola, Francesco M.; Boccardo, Francesco; Ferrarini, Manlio; Ansaldi, Filippo; De Maria, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is generally recommended for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) patients, but no data are available about the activity of this vaccine after treatment with rituximab-containing regimens. We evaluated the humoral response to the trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine in a group of NHL patients in complete remission for ≥6 mo (median, 29 mo) after treatment with rituximab-containing regimens (n = 31) compared with age-matched healthy subjects (n = 34). B cell populations and incidence of influenza-like illness were also evaluated. For each viral strain, the response was significantly lower in patients compared with controls and was particularly poor in patients treated with fludarabine-based regimens. In the patient group, the response to vaccination did not fulfill the immunogenic criteria based on the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use requirements. Among the patients, CD27+ memory B cells were significantly reduced, and their reduction correlated with serum IgM levels and vaccine response. Episodes of influenza-like illness were recorded only in patients. These results showed that NHL patients treated with rituximab-containing regimens have persisting perturbations of B cell compartments and Ig synthesis and may be at particular risk for infection, even in long-standing complete remission. PMID:21498665

  18. Clinico-biological characterization and outcome of primary nodal and extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, Gonzalo; Colomo, Lluis; Villamor, Neus; Arenillas, Leonor; Martínez, Antonio; Cardesa, Teresa; García-Herrera, Adriana; Setoain, Xavier; Rodríguez, Sonia; Ghita, Gabriela; Abrisqueta, Pau; Giné, Eva; Bosch, Francesc; Campo, Elías; Montserrat, Emilio; López-Guillermo, Armando

    2010-07-01

    To study the main clinico-biological characteristics and the outcome of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) according to the primary site (nodal vs. extranodal), we included 262 patients consecutively diagnosed with DLBCL in a single institution, 5 years before and after immunochemotherapy was considered as the standard treatment. Altogether 116 patients received CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone) and 146 rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP). The primary site was the lymph node in 140 patients (53%), Waldeyer's ring (WR) in 22, gastrointestinal (GI) in 33, and other extranodal in 67. The addition of rituximab significantly improved the CR rate in nodal, but not in extranodal, lymphomas. Patients receiving R-CHOP showed higher OS than those treated with CHOP alone (5-year OS: 71% vs. 48%). This difference was maintained in primary nodal (5-year OS: 69% vs. 37%, p < 0.0001), but was not observed in primary extranodal (75% vs. 65%, p = 0.45) lymphomas. The IPI, treatment, and primary site were the main variables for OS in multivariate analysis. In nodal cases, IPI and treatment maintained value, whereas only IPI predicted OS in extranodal cases. In conclusion, immunochemotherapy treatment dramatically improved the outcome of patients with nodal DLBCL; however, its effect was less in primary extranodal cases, so the prognosis of patients with nodal and extranodal lymphomas has been equalized in the rituximab era. PMID:20497002

  19. Role of radiation therapy in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma in rituximab era: A US population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Giri, Smith; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Pathak, Ranjan; Bociek, R Gregory; Vose, Julie M; Armitage, James O

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation (RT) in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) may predispose young patients to the risk of cardiopulmonary toxicities and secondary malignancies. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 18 database to compare the overall survival (OS) differences among adult patients treated with and without RT after rituximab approval in the US. Multivariate analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards regression to compare OS based on the use of RT while adjusting for age, year of diagnosis, race, stage and gender. PMBCL patients (n = 258), who received RT (48%), were similar in terms of age, gender, race, and stage at diagnosis to patients who did not receive RT. The five year OS was similar between patients treated with versus without RT (82.5% vs. 78.6%, P = 0.47). In a multivariate analysis, the use of RT did not influence OS in the rituximab era (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.43-1.59; P = 0.56). Rituximab may reduce the benefit of RT in select patients such as those who achieve a metabolic complete remission at the end of chemotherapy. PMID:26270899

  20. Long-term efficacy of rituximab in IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy: RIMAG follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Iancu Ferfoglia, Ruxandra; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Viala, Karine; Musset, Lucile; Neil, Jean; Marin, Benoit; Léger, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    The Rituximab vs. Placebo in Polyneuropathy Associated With Anti-MAG IgM Monoclonal Gammopathy (RIMAG) study showed no improvement using the inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment sensory score (ISS) as primary outcome in patients with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy (IgM anti-MAG neuropathy) treated with rituximab, when compared with placebo. However, some secondary outcomes seemed to improve in the per protocol analysis. Patients from one participating center in the RIMAG study underwent a new evaluation after a median follow-up of 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 4.9; 6.5) years, using the same outcome measures used in the original study. Data were recorded in seven rituximab patients (group 1) and in eight placebo patients (group 2). In group 2, six of eight patients received immunotherapy during follow-up, while only two of seven did in group 1. No significant change was observed in either the ISS or the secondary outcomes in both groups, with the exception of worsening in the 10-m walk time in group 2 (p = 0.016). The RIMAG follow-up study failed to find any significant change in most outcome measures in patients from the RIMAG study, some of them having received new immunotherapies. This study stresses the lack of useful clinical scales sensitive enough to capture small, even meaningful, improvement in IgM anti-MAG neuropathy. PMID:26748872

  1. Cost-effectiveness of rituximab in addition to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (R-FC) for the first-line treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dirk; Fischer, Kirsten; Kaiser, Peter; Eichhorst, Barbara; Walshe, Ronald; Reiser, Marcel; Kellermann, Lenka; Borsi, Lisa; Civello, Daniele; Mensch, Alexander; Bahlo, Jasmin; Hallek, Michael; Stock, Stephanie; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter

    2016-05-01

    The cost-effectiveness of rituximab in combination with fludarabine/cyclophosphamide (R-FC) for the first line treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was evaluated. Based on long-term clinical data (follow-up of 5.9 years) from the CLL8-trial, a Markov-model with three health states (Free from disease progression, Progressive disease, Death) was used to evaluate the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) and cost per life years gained (LYG) of R-FC from the perspective of the German statutory health insurance (SHI). The addition of rituximab to FC chemotherapy results in a gain of 1.1 quality-adjusted life-years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of R-FC compared with FC was €17 979 per QALY (€15 773 per LYG). Results were robust in deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. From the German SHI perspective, rituximab in combination with FC chemotherapy represents good value for first-line treatment of patients with CLL and compares favorably with chemotherapy alone. PMID:26584689

  2. Chlorambucil plus Rituximab as Front-Line Therapy in Elderly/Unfit Patients Affected by B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Results of a Single-Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Laurenti, Luca; Vannata, Barbara; Innocenti, Idanna; Autore, Francesco; Santini, Francesco; Piccirillo, Nicola; Za, Tommaso; Bellesi, Silvia; Marietti, Sara; Sica, Simona; Efremov, Dimitar G.; Leone, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The current standard first line therapy for fit patients with B-CLL/SLL is based on combination of fludarabine-cyclophosphamide and rituximab. However, elderly patients or patients with comorbidities poorly tolerate purine analogue-based chemotherapy and they are often treated with Chlorambucil (Chl) only. However, complete response (CR) and overall response (OR) rates with Chl are relatively low. We now investigated whether the addition of Rituximab to Chl will improve the efficacy without impairing the tolerability in elderly and unfit patients. We included in our study 27 elderly or unfit patients that had not received prior therapy. All patients were treated with Chl (1mg/Kg per 28-day cycle for 8 cycles) plus Rituximab (375 mg/m2 for the first course and 500 mg/m2 for subsequent cycles until the 6th cycle). We obtained an OR rate of 74%. The most frequent adverse effect was grade 3–4 neutropenia, which occurred in 18.5% of the patients. Infections or grade 3–4 extra-hematological side effects were not recorded. None of the patients required reduction of dose, delay of therapy or hospitalization. Overall, these data suggest that Chl-R is an effective and well tolerated regimen in elderly/unfit patients with CLL. PMID:23667729

  3. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy secondary to rituximab-induced immunosuppression and the presence of John Cunningham virus: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Deirdre; Monaghan, Bernadette; McMahon, Eileen; Watson, Geoffrey; Kavanagh, Eoin; O'Rourke, Killian; McCaffrey, John; Carney, Desmond

    2016-09-01

    We present the case of a 60-year-old man who developed subacute neurologic changes, in the setting of stage III non-Hodgkin's follicular lymphoma, and was treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by a year of maintenance rituximab. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium was pathognomonic for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). He was treated with sequential plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin with clinical improvement. A literature review of the diagnostic workup of rituximab-induced PML was undertaken. This case and the literature review demonstrate the important role of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in diagnosis and follow-up of rituximab-induced PML. Specific radiologic features in combination with cerebrospinal fluid can be diagnostic and avoid the morbidity and mortality of a diagnostic brain biopsy. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin have a therapeutic role and demonstrate symptom improvement and disease control. Follow-up imaging in combination with clinical response is important in demonstrating a treatment response. PMID:27594961

  4. Combined therapy with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide/vincristine/prednisone for Sjogren's syndrome-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Carbone, J; Perez-Fernandez, R; Muñoz, A; Sabin, P; Carreño, L; Fernandez-Cruz, E

    2008-02-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is characterized by an increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Optimal treatment for NHL-complicating SS is not clearly established. NHL, which expresses the CD20 antigen on tumor cell surfaces, is a disease entity candidate to treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. We report clinical and immunological data of a patient with SS and NHL who was treated with a regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide/vincristine/prednisone (CVP) plus rituximab. A 68-year-old women had a 26-year history of SS and autoimmune thyroiditis. The clinical course of SS was complicated with severe splenomegaly. An increased percentage of CD19+ B cells (up to 30%) was detected in peripheral blood during follow-up. Clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain was detected. Low-grade B marginal zone lymphoma was diagnosed (peripheral blood immunophenotype: CD19+CD20+CD23+sIg+Kappa; bone marrow immunophenotype: 25% lymphocytes; CD19+CD20+CD79A/BCL2+). She received a total of six cycles of CVP plus rituximab (375 mg/m2). Therapy was well tolerated, and B lymphocytes were depleted from the peripheral blood. Splenomegaly normalized. No evidence of neoplastic infiltration was detected in bone marrow after completion of therapy, while certain symptoms of SS (sicca and arthralgia) improved with treatment. CVP plus rituximab proved effective in a patient with SS with NHL. PMID:18270861

  5. Phase I study of radioimmunotherapy with an anti-CD20 murine radioimmunoconjugate ((90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan) in relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Terui, Shoji; Itoh, Kuniaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Igarashi, Tadahiko; Usubuchi, Noriko; Nakata, Masanobu; Nawano, Shigeru; Sekiguchi, Naohiro; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Tanimoto, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Yukio; Endo, Keigo; Seriu, Taku; Hayashi, Masaki; Tobinai, Kensei

    2005-12-01

    We conducted a phase I study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-90-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Y2B8) in Japanese patients with relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell lymphoma. Indium-111-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan (In2B8; 3.5 or 5 mCi [129.5 or 185 MBq]) was administered on day 1, followed by serial gamma-camera imaging to investigate the distribution of In2B8 in the whole body of patients and to judge the feasibility of Y2B8 administration. Y2B8 with a dose of 0.3 mCi/kg (11.1 MBq/kg) or 0.4 mCi/kg (14.8 MBq/kg) was administered on day 8. Grade 4 neutropenia and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were observed in three of nine of the patients evaluated for safety. Critical toxicities (prolonged thrombocytopenia or severe non-hematological toxicities) were observed in two of six patients in the 0.4 mCi/kg (14.8 MBq/kg) dose group but were not seen in any of the three patients in the 0.3 mCi/kg (11.1 MBq/kg) dose group. The non-hematological toxicities of the nine patients were of grade 2 or less, except in two patients who had been heavily treated previously. They experienced critical toxicities such as infection, diarrhea, hyponatremia and prolonged thrombocytopenia, as well as other frequent grade 2 non-hematological toxicities. Although the pharmacokinetic profiles were similar to those in the US study, one of the two patients was clarified retrospectively as showing abnormal biodistribution of In2B8 in the bone marrow, as judged by an independent third party panel of radiologists. Five of the 10 participants achieved complete responses or unconfirmed complete responses and two partial responses. In conclusion, the recommended dose of Y2B8 for the subsequent phase II study for Japanese patients is 0.4 mCi/kg (14.8 MBq/kg). This dose of radioimmunotherapy was feasible when patients with altered biodistribution of In2B8 were excluded, and it was highly effective. (Cancer Sci 2005; 96: 903-910). PMID:16367911

  6. Immunochemotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma with rituximab, methotrexate, cytarabine and dexamethasone: Retrospective analysis of 18 cases

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JING; SUN, XUE-FEI; QIAN, JUN; BAI, XUE-YAN; ZHU, HONG; CUI, QU; LI, XIAO-YAN; CHEN, YUE-DAN; WANG, YA-MING; LIU, YUAN-BO

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) has increased in the last two decades and the clinical research regarding the treatment for PCNSL patients has also increased. However, the optimal induction chemotherapy has not been fully established. In the present retrospective study, the aim was to analyze the outcome in PCNSL patients treated with the combination of rituximab, methotrexate (MTX), cytarabine (Ara-C) and dexamethasone (R-MAD). Eighteen patients from Beijing Tiantan Hospital (Beijing, China) between January 2010 and March 2014 were newly diagnosed with PCNSL [diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) type] and received R-MAD as first-line treatment. The dosage was as follows: 375 mg/m2 rituximab was administered on day 0, 3.5 g/m2 MTX was administered on day 1, 1 g/m2 Ara-C was administered on day 2 and 10 mg dexamethasone was administered on days 1–3, every 3 weeks. After 6 cycles, the overall response rate was 94.5%. Ten (55.6%) patients achieved complete response (CR), 7 (38.9%) achieved partial response (PR) and 1 (5.6%) had progressive disease (PD). Patients were followed up from the start of the treatment, median 24.2 months (range 6–48). The overall survival (OS) rate was 94.5% and progression-free survival rate was 94.5%. The median OS was 22 months (95% confidence interval, 19.4–24.6). The high level of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentration was associated with a poor outcome. Among 5 patients with an abnormally high LDH concentration, 1 achieved CR, 3 had PR and 1 had PD. None of the patients experienced any grade 4 toxicity. These results indicated that the R-MAD immunochemotherapy regimen is effective in PCNSL patients without serious toxicity. A prospective investigation with more patients should be administered in order to understand the more accurate effect of the regimen. PMID:26171213

  7. Chemotherapy tolerance after radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-CC49 monoclonal antibody in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: clinical effects and hematologic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Robert, Francisco; Busby, Elizabeth M; LoBuglio, Albert F

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the hematologic toxicity and clinical outcome of salvage chemotherapy following (90)Y-CC49 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Sixteen patients from a total of 37 who were enrolled in a phase I trial of (90)Y-CC49 monoclonal therapy were treated with post-RIT salvage chemotherapy at our institution. Five patients had received chest radiation therapy prior to RIT, and seven patients had prior chemotherapy. The majority of these patients were treated with doses of (90)Y of >/= 14 mCi/m(2) (8-20 mCi/m(2)), and four of them received concurrent 96-hour taxol infusion. The maximum tolerated dose of this study was exceeded at 17 mCi/m(2), and grade 4 thrombocytopenia/neutropenia were the dose-limiting toxicities. Twelve patients received one chemotherapy regimen as salvage therapy, and four patients had more than one regimen. Four patients (25%) experienced reversible grade 4 neutropenia, but no grade 4 thrombocytopenia was observed. Five patients had stable disease. The median survival from start of salvage therapy was 5.5 months. Our data suggest that therapy with RIT did not significantly affect survival of these patients. Taking into consideration the potential clinical relevance of integration of RIT with other treatment modalities, it is important to expand this clinical experience in order to support combined modality strategies. PMID:12954119

  8. Radioimmunotherapy with [188Re]-labelled anti-CD66 antibody in the conditioning for allogeneic stem cell transplantation for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koenecke, Christian; Hofmann, Michael; Bolte, Oliver; Gielow, Peter; Dammann, Elke; Stadler, Michael; Franzke, Anke; Boerner, Anne Rose; Eder, Matthias; Ganser, Arnold; Knapp, Wolfram; Hertenstein, Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Between July 2000 and June 2003 a total of 21 patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 14), AML after myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 6) or advanced MDS (n = 1) were treated with an 188-Re labelled anti-CD66 antibody in the conditioning regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was followed by standard full-dose conditioning with busulfan and high-dose cyclophosphamide in 11 patients and reduced intensity conditioning regimen in 10 patients. All patients received an unmanipulated allogeneic graft from alternative donors (n = 15) or a HLA-identical familiy donor (n = 6). With a median follow up of 42 months (23-60) disease free survival for all patients was 43%. Nine patients are still alive and in ongoing complete hematological remission. The treatment related mortality was 28.6% (n = 6) and an equal number of patients died of relapsing disease within 30-385 days after transplantation. Late organ toxicity, monitored for more than 1 year, was mild and not clinically relevant. The combination of RIT with chemotherapeutic conditioning seems to be a therapy with an acceptable risk of treatment related morbidity and mortality as well as occurrence of severe acute GvHD. PMID:18415659

  9. Review of Salvage Therapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer: The Role of Imaging and Rationale for Systemic Salvage Targeted Anti-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kosuri, Satyajit; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Smith, Michael; Osborne, Joseph R.; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Despite local therapy with curative intent, approximately 30% of men suffer from biochemical relapse. Though some of these PSA relapses are not life threatening, many men eventually progress to metastatic disease and die of prostate cancer. Local therapy is an option for some men, but many have progression of disease following local salvage attempts. One significant issue in this setting is the lack of reliable imaging biomarkers to guide the use of local salvage therapy, as the likely reason for a low cure rate is the presence of undetected micrometastatic disease outside of the prostate/prostate bed. Androgen deprivation therapy is a cornerstone of therapy in the salvage setting. While subsets may benefit in terms of delay in time to metastatic disease and/or death, research is ongoing to improve salvage systemic therapy. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is highly overexpressed by the majority of prostate cancers. While initial methods of exploiting PSMA's high and selective expression were suboptimal, additional work in both imaging and therapeutics is progressing. Salvage therapy and imaging modalities in this setting are briefly reviewed, and the rationale for PSMA-based systemic salvage radioimmunotherapy is described. PMID:22693495

  10. Rituximab in combination with CHOP chemotherapy for the treatment of diffuse large B cell lymphoma in Japan: a retrospective analysis of 1,057 cases from Kyushu Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Seki, Ritsuko; Ohshima, Koichi; Nagafuji, Koji; Fujisaki, Tomoaki; Uike, Naokuni; Kawano, Fumio; Gondo, Hisashi; Makino, Shigeyoshi; Eto, Tetsuya; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Ryosuke; Shimoda, Kazuya; Yamashita, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Keiko; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Tsukazaki, Kunihiro; Higuchi, Masakazu; Utsunomiya, Atae; Iwahashi, Masahiro; Imamura, Yutaka; Tamura, Kazuo; Suzumiya, Junji; Yoshida, Minoru; Abe, Yasunobu; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Okamura, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma treated with rituximab plus CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisone) as a first-line therapy at 22 hospitals of the Kyushu Lymphoma Study Group. During the period 1996-2005, 1,057 patients (aged 22-90 years) were analyzed. Of these, 678 were treated with CHOP, and 379 were treated with rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP). The complete response rate was 59.9% in the CHOP group and 67.0% in the R-CHOP group (P < 0.001). Three-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were significantly higher in the R-CHOP group than in the CHOP group (61.3 vs. 45.6% for PFS, P < 0.001; 68.3 vs. 54.5% for OS, P < 0.001). The International Prognostic Index was a good prognostic marker for both groups; a survival benefit of rituximab addition was found for each risk subgroup and also for both age groups (60 years). Among 345 patients who received localized radiation therapy, the adding rituximab to CHOP attenuated the survival difference between CHOP and R-CHOP groups (P = 0.104), compared with no radiation group (P < 0.001). Results of this large-scale, multicenter study confirm that rituximab plus CHOP provided a greater survival benefit than CHOP alone. PMID:20066574

  11. Primary central nervous system lymphoma treated with high-dose methotrexate and rituximab: A single-institution experience

    PubMed Central

    LY, K. INA; CREW, LAURA L.; GRAHAM, CARRIE A.; MRUGALA, MACIEJ M.

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX) improves the outcome in patients with systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but its benefit in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is unclear. In the present study, a single-institution retrospective analysis was performed for 12 patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL treated with combined high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) and RTX. MTX was administered biweekly at 8 g/m2/dose until a complete response (CR) was achieved or for a maximum of eight doses. RTX was provided for a total of eight weekly doses at 375 mg/m2/dose. Following a median of 11 cycles of MTX, the radiographic overall response rate was 91% and the CR rate was 58%. A CR was achieved after a median 6 cycles of MTX. The median progression-free survival time was 22 months and the median overall survival time has not yet been attained. These results compare favorably to single-agent HD-MTX and suggest a role for immunochemotherapy in the treatment of PCNSL. PMID:27123138

  12. Long-lasting uveitis remission and hearing loss recovery after rituximab in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    PubMed

    Caso, Francesco; Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Costa, Luisa; Bascherini, Vittoria; Latronico, Eugenia; Franceschini, Rossella; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKHD) is a multisystemic disorder characterized by granulomatous panuveitis variably combined with T cell-mediated neurologic and cutaneous manifestations. Early and aggressive treatment with systemic corticosteroids is the mainstay of treatment for VKHD. Additional use of immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulins, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors can help the most severely affected patients and work as corticosteroid-sparing agents. We report the case of a young woman with relapsing and multiresistant VKHD who demonstrated a stable remission of both uveitis and high-frequency hearing loss following rituximab intravenous administration (1 g. twice, 2 weeks apart, and 6 months later). A complete clinical response was observed 1 month since the first infusion, and no ocular relapses were recorded during the following year; in addition, audiometry showed a high-frequency hearing recovery in the right ear. Further observational studies are required to define the role of CD20 inhibition in the management of VKHD. PMID:25224382

  13. Tocilizumab for AA Amyloidosis after Treatment of Multicentric Castleman Disease with Steroids, Chemotherapy and Rituximab for Over 20 Years.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takashi; Hoshino, Junichi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Sumida, Keiichi; Mise, Koki; Kawada, Masahiro; Ueno, Toshiharu; Hamanoue, Satoshi; Hayami, Noriko; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the long-term outcome (30 years) of a human immunodeticiency virus- and human herpesvirus 8-negative Japanese man who was diagnosed to have multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) of the plasmacytic type after investigation of generalized lymphadenopathy at 34 of age in 1983. He received chemotherapy based on lymphoma regimens (combinations of prednisolone, vincristine, vindesine, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, melphalan, and ranimustine, etc.) for over 20 years. Although the systemic lymphadenopathy resolved, AA amyloidosis-related nephropathy occurred, with a serum creatinine (Cre) level of 0.9 mg/dL and urinary protein excretion (UP) of 7.5 g daily. Rituximab was started, but Cre increased to 2.6 mg/dL in 2010 and UP was unchanged. Therefore, treatment with tocilizmab was started. As a result, his hypergammaglobulinemia was well controlled, C-reactive protein became normal, UP decreased to 3.5 g daily, and Cre remained at 2.5 mg/dL in 2013. When AA amyloid nephropathy occurred after long-term chemotherapy, lituximab could not control it, but tocilizmab stopped the progression of nephropathy. This case suggests that MCD and AA amyloidosis may both have a close relationship to the overproduction of interleukin-6. PMID:26666616

  14. Bendamustine and Rituximab, as First Line Treatment, in Intermediate, High Risk Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphomas of Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Roberto; Gidaro, Antonio; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2016-01-01

    Background Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is a chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, comprising less than 2% of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, and affecting mainly middle-aged and elderly patients with a median survival of >10 years. The typical clinical features of SMZL include splenomegaly. Treatment should be patient-tailored and can range from a ‘watchful waiting’ approach for asymptomatic patients without cytopenias to surgery, localized radiation therapy or immuno/chemotherapies. Recently, the combination of rituximab and Bendamustine (R-Benda) has been defined as highly active in patients with follicular lymphomas, but little is known about the efficacy of R-Benda in SMZL. Aim of the study The purpose of this retrospective study was to report our experience on the efficacy of R-Benda as first line treatment in 23 consecutive elderly SMZL patients. Results All patients had a complete resolution of splenomegaly along with restoration of their blood counts. Nineteen patients (83%) achieved a complete response (CR) to therapy; three patients (13%) achieved a partial response (PR).Ten patients (43%) obtained molecular remission. Toxicities were mild and mainly haematological and result in dose reductions for fourteen patients. Conclusions Our data suggest a high activity and good tolerance of R-Benda, despite dose reduction due to potential toxicity. PMID:27413523

  15. Epratuzumab with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy in patients with previously untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Ivana N. M.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Kurtin, Paul J.; Cannon, Michael W.; Perez, Domingo G.; Soori, Gamini S.; Link, Brian K.; Habermann, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 60% of patients with diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (DLBCL) are curable with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemoimmunotherapy. Epratuzumab (E) is an unlabeled anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody with efficacy in relapsed DLBCL. This phase 2 trial tested the safety and efficacy of combining E with R-CHOP (ER-CHOP) in untreated DLBCL. A secondary aim was to assess the efficacy of interim positron emission tomography (PET) to predict outcome in DLBCL. Standard R-CHOP with the addition of E 360 mg/m2 intravenously was administered for 6 cycles. A total of 107 patients were enrolled in the study. Toxicity was similar to standard R-CHOP. Overall response rate in the 81 eligible patients was 96% (74% CR/CRu) by computed tomography scan and 88% by PET. By intention to treat analysis, at a median follow-up of 43 months, the event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years in all 107 patients were 70% and 80%, respectively. Interim PET was not associated with EFS or OS. Comparison with a cohort of 215 patients who were treated with R-CHOP showed an improved EFS in the ER-CHOP patients. ER-CHOP is well tolerated and results appear promising as a combination therapy. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00301821. PMID:21673350

  16. Molecular prediction of durable remission after first-line fludarabine-cyclophosphamide-rituximab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Terzi-di-Bergamo, Lodovico; De Paoli, Lorenzo; Cerri, Michaela; Ghilardi, Guido; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Bulian, Pietro; Visco, Carlo; Mauro, Francesca R.; Morabito, Fortunato; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Zaja, Francesco; Forconi, Francesco; Laurenti, Luca; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Gentile, Massimo; Vincelli, Iolanda; Motta, Marina; Coscia, Marta; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Neri, Antonino; Marasca, Roberto; Perbellini, Omar; Moreno, Carol; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Massaia, Massimo; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Montillo, Marco; Cuneo, Antonio; Gattei, Valter; Foà, Robin; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) has represented a significant treatment advancement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In the new scenario of targeted agents, there is an increasing interest in identifying patients who gain the maximum benefit from FCR. In this observational multicenter retrospective analysis of 404 CLL patients receiving frontline FCR, the combination of three biomarkers that are widely tested before treatment (IGHV mutation status, 11q deletion and 17p deletion; available in 80% of the study cohort) allowed to identify a very low-risk category of patients carrying mutated IGHV genes but neither 11q or 17p deletion that accounted for 28% of all cases. The majority of very low-risk patients (71%) remained free of progression after treatment and their hazard of relapse decreased after 4 years from FCR. The life expectancy of very low-risk patients (91% at 5 years) was superimposable to that observed in the matched normal general population, indicating that neither the disease nor complications of its treatment affected survival in this favorable CLL group. These findings need a prospective validation and may be helpful for the design of clinical trials aimed at comparing FCR to new targeted treatments of CLL, and, possibly, for optimized disease management. PMID:26276669

  17. Effects of pretransplant plasmapheresis and rituximab on recurrence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adult renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoon Suk; Hong, Yuah; Sun, In O; Chung, Byung Ha; Kim, Hyung Wook; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Jin, Dong Chan; Kim, Yong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) following renal transplantation is relatively common. However, the risk factors and optimal pretransplant treatment preventing recurrence of FSGS remain controversial. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 27 adult renal transplant recipients with FSGS over a period of 10 years. We first compared possible risk factors for FSGS recurrence between the recurrence and nonrecurrence groups. Then we evaluated the effect of pretransplant plasmapheresis (PP; n = 4) and PP with rituximab (PP + RTX; n = 5) on recurrence of FSGS after transplantation compared to control patients that were not treated with these modalities. Results There were seven recurrences in 27 patients (25.9%), but there were no significant differences in possible risk factors for FSGS recurrence between the two groups. Recurrence rates between patients with pretransplant PP or PP + RTX and control patients were not significantly different (22.2% vs. 27.7%, p > 0.05). There was also no significant difference in recurrence between the pretransplant PP and PP + RTX groups (25% vs. 20%, p > 0.05). Conclusions Pretransplant PP or PP + RTX do not significantly decrease the recurrence of FSGS in adult renal transplant candidates. PMID:25045296

  18. First-line treatment with rituximab-hyperCVAD alternating with rituximab-methotrexate-cytarabine and followed by consolidation with 90Y-ibritumomab-tiuxetan in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. Results of a multicenter, phase 2 pilot trial from the GELTAMO group

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Reyes; García-Noblejas, Ana; Grande, Carlos; Cannata-Ortiz, Jimena; Sánchez, José J.; García-Marco, José-Antonio; Aláez, Concepción; Pérez-Calvo, Javier; Martínez-Sánchez, Pilar; Sánchez-González, Blanca; Canales, Miguel-Angel; Conde, Eulogio; Martín, Alejandro; Arranz, Eva; Terol, María-José; Salar, Antonio; Caballero, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis for fit patients with mantle cell lymphoma has improved with intensive strategies. Currently, the role of maintenance/consolidation approaches is being tested as relapses continue to appear. In this trial we evaluated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of rituximab-hyperCVAD alternating with rituximab-methotrexate-cytarabine followed by consolidation with 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Patients received six cycles followed by a single dose of 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Thirty patients were enrolled; their median age was 59 years. Twenty-four patients finished the induction treatment, 23 achieved complete remission (77%, 95% confidence interval 60–93) and one patient had progressive disease (3%). Eighteen patients (60%), all in complete remission, received consolidation therapy. In the intent-to-treat population, failure-free, progression-free and overall survival rates at 4 years were 40% (95% confidence interval 20.4–59.6), 52% (95% confidence interval 32.4–71.6) and 81% (95% confidence interval 67.28–94.72), respectively. For patients who received consolidation, failure-free and overall survival rates were 55% (95% confidence interval 31.48–78.52) and 87% (95% confidence interval 70–100), respectively. Hematologic toxicity was significant during induction and responsible for one death (3.3%). After consolidation, grade 3–4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 72% and 83% of patients, with a median duration of 5 and 12 weeks, respectively. Six (20%) patients died, three due to secondary malignancies (myelodysplastic syndrome and bladder and rectum carcinomas). In conclusion, in our experience, rituximab-hyperCVAD alternated with rituximab-methotrexate-cytarabine and followed by consolidation with 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan was efficacious although less feasible than expected. The unacceptable toxicity observed, especially secondary malignancies, advise against the use of this strategy. Trial registration: clinical.gov identifier

  19. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy results in a significant improvement in overall survival in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma: results of a randomized UK National Cancer Research Institute trial

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Simon; Smith, Paul; Johnson, Peter W.M.; Bolam, Simon; Follows, George; Gambell, Joanne; Hillmen, Peter; Jack, Andrew; Johnson, Stephen; Kirkwood, Amy A; Kruger, Anton; Pocock, Christopher; Seymour, John F.; Toncheva, Milena; Walewski, Jan; Linch, David

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an incurable and generally aggressive lymphoma that is more common in elderly patients. Whilst a number of different chemotherapeutic regimens are active in this disease, there is no established gold standard therapy. Rituximab has been used widely to good effect in B-cell malignancies but there is no evidence that it improves outcomes when added to chemotherapy in this disease. We performed a randomized, open-label, multicenter study looking at the addition of rituximab to the standard chemotherapy regimen of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. A total of 370 patients were randomized. With a median follow up of six years, rituximab improved the median progression-free survival from 14.9 to 29.8 months (P<0.001) and overall survival from 37.0 to 44.5 months (P=0.005). This equates to absolute differences of 9.0% and 22.1% for overall and progression-free survival, respectively, at two years. Overall response rates were similar, but complete response rates were significantly higher in the rituximab arm: 52.7% vs. 39.9% (P=0.014). There was no clinically significant additional toxicity observed with the addition of rituximab. Overall, approximately 18% of patients died of non-lymphomatous causes, most commonly infections. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. However, these regimens have significant late toxicity and should be used with caution. This trial has been registered (ISRCTN81133184 and clinicaltrials.gov:00641095) and is supported by the UK National Cancer Research Network. PMID:26611473

  20. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy results in a significant improvement in overall survival in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma: results of a randomized UK National Cancer Research Institute trial.

    PubMed

    Rule, Simon; Smith, Paul; Johnson, Peter W M; Bolam, Simon; Follows, George; Gambell, Joanne; Hillmen, Peter; Jack, Andrew; Johnson, Stephen; Kirkwood, Amy A; Kruger, Anton; Pocock, Christopher; Seymour, John F; Toncheva, Milena; Walewski, Jan; Linch, David

    2016-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an incurable and generally aggressive lymphoma that is more common in elderly patients. Whilst a number of different chemotherapeutic regimens are active in this disease, there is no established gold standard therapy. Rituximab has been used widely to good effect in B-cell malignancies but there is no evidence that it improves outcomes when added to chemotherapy in this disease. We performed a randomized, open-label, multicenter study looking at the addition of rituximab to the standard chemotherapy regimen of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. A total of 370 patients were randomized. With a median follow up of six years, rituximab improved the median progression-free survival from 14.9 to 29.8 months (P<0.001) and overall survival from 37.0 to 44.5 months (P=0.005). This equates to absolute differences of 9.0% and 22.1% for overall and progression-free survival, respectively, at two years. Overall response rates were similar, but complete response rates were significantly higher in the rituximab arm: 52.7% vs. 39.9% (P=0.014). There was no clinically significant additional toxicity observed with the addition of rituximab. Overall, approximately 18% of patients died of non-lymphomatous causes, most commonly infections. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. However, these regimens have significant late toxicity and should be used with caution. This trial has been registered (ISRCTN81133184 and clinicaltrials.gov:00641095) and is supported by the UK National Cancer Research Network. PMID:26611473

  1. The FCGR3A polymorphism predicts the response to rituximab-based therapy in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Duo; Tian, Yuyang; Sun, Donglin; Sun, Haiming; Jin, Yan; Dong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have assessed the association between Fc gamma receptor IIIA (FCGR3A) 158 V/F and the response to rituximab-based therapy in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but the findings have been inconsistent. We performed this meta-analysis to obtain a better assessment of this relationship. Electronic database searches were conducted for relevant studies. A pooled odds ratio (OR) with a 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) was used to assess the strength of the association. Analyses of the subgroup and publication bias were conducted. A total of 10 studies involving 1050 patients were analyzed. In all the genetic models, no clear relationship was found between the FCGR3A 158 V/F polymorphism and the response to rituximab-based therapy in NHL patients. When categorized by ethnicity, Asian individuals with the FCGR3A 158 V/V allele (OR = 4.37; 95 % CI = 1.07-17.73; P = 0.039) or the non-F/(FV + VV) (OR = 2.50; 95 % CI = 1.04-5.98; P = 0.040) allele have a significantly higher complete response rate (CR) compared to FF individuals. No obvious heterogeneities were observed. In addition, no statistical evidence for a publication bias was found. Our study suggested that the FCGR3A 158 V/F polymorphism can predict the treatment response to rituximab-based chemotherapy in NHL patients, especially for Asian individuals. PMID:27431582

  2. High titers of anti-HBs prevent rituximab-related viral reactivation in resolved hepatitis B patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yuri; Yu, Su Jong; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is associated with an increased risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. This study aimed to determine the predictive factors for rituximab-related HBV reactivation in resolved hepatitis B patients, defined as HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc-positive, and undetectable HBV DNA. Among 840 consecutive patients with CD20-positive B-cell lymphoma who received rituximab-based chemotherapy from 2003 through 2014 at Seoul National University Hospital, 732 patients were excluded because either anti-HBc was not assessed or they were HBsAg-seropositive. This retrospective study included 108 resolved hepatitis B patients. During a median 33.5-month follow-up period, eight cases of HBV reactivation occurred only among the patients with low anti-HBs titers (<100 mIU/ml) at baseline and those who did not receive antiviral prophylaxis. Using multivariate analyses, antiviral prophylaxis and baseline anti-HBs titers were the protective factors for HBV reactivation (hazard ratio [HR], 0.90 and 0.95, respectively). Among those who did not receive antiviral prophylaxis, patients with high baseline anti-HBs (≥100 mIU/ml) experienced significantly lower risk of HBV reactivation (HR, 0.49; P = 0.006) than the patients with low baseline anti-HBs (<100 mIU/ml) whose cumulative HBV reactivation rates at 6 and 24 months after chemotherapy were 8.3% and 17.3%, respectively. High anti-HBs titer at baseline and antiviral prophylaxis prevented HBV reactivation, suggesting antiviral prophylaxis should be considered according to baseline anti-HBs titer. Meticulous follow-up for ALT and HBV DNA without antiviral prophylaxis might be possible for the patients with high baseline anti-HBs (≥100 mIU/ml). J. Med. Virol. 88:1010-1017, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26531242

  3. Rituximab Plus Chlorambucil As First-Line Treatment for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Final Analysis of an Open-Label Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Hillmen, Peter; Gribben, John G.; Follows, George A.; Milligan, Donald; Sayala, Hazem A.; Moreton, Paul; Oscier, David G.; Dearden, Claire E.; Kennedy, Daniel B.; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Nathwani, Amit; Varghese, Abraham; Cohen, Dena; Rawstron, Andy; Oertel, Stephan; Pocock, Christopher F.E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Most patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are elderly and/or have comorbidities that may make them ineligible for fludarabine-based treatment. For this population, chlorambucil monotherapy is an appropriate therapeutic option; however, response rates with chlorambucil are low, and more effective treatments are needed. This trial was designed to assess how the addition of rituximab to chlorambucil (R-chlorambucil) would affect safety and efficacy in patients with CLL. Patients and Methods Patients with first-line CLL were treated with rituximab (375 mg/m2 on day 1, cycle one, and 500 mg/m2 thereafter) plus chlorambucil (10 mg/m2/d all cycles; day 1 through 7) for six 28-day cycles. For patients not achieving complete response (CR), six additional cycles of chlorambucil alone could be administered. The primary end point of the study was safety. Results A total of 100 patients were treated with R-chlorambucil, with a median follow-up of 30 months. Median age of patients was 70 years (range, 43 to 86 years), with patients having a median of seven comorbidities. Hematologic toxicities accounted for most grade 3/4 adverse events reported, with neutropenia and lymphopenia both occurring in 41% of patients and leukopenia in 23%. Overall response rates were 84%, with CR achieved in 10% of patients. Median progression-free survival was 23.5 months; median overall survival was not reached. Conclusion These results compare favorably with previously published results for chlorambucil monotherapy, suggesting that the addition of rituximab to chlorambucil may improve efficacy with no unexpected adverse events. R-chlorambucil may improve outcome for patients who are ineligible for fludarabine-based treatments. PMID:24638012

  4. Novel Assessment Tools to Evaluate Clinical and Laboratory Responses in a Subset of Patients Enrolled in the Rituximab in Myositis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Yip, Adrienne L.; Horkay