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Sample records for 135-kilodalton membrane-associated proteins

  1. beta. -Amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer disease occurs as 110- to 135-kilodalton membrane-associated proteins in neural and nonneural tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Selkoe, D.J.; Podlisny, M.B.; Joachim, C.L.; Vickers, E.A.; Lee, G.; Fritz, L.C.; Oltersdorf, T. )

    1988-10-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of extracellular filaments composed of the {beta}-amyloid protein ({beta}AP) is a constant feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Since the gene on chromosome 21 encoding the {beta}AP precursor ({beta}APP) is not known to be altered in AD, transcriptional or posttranslational changes may underlie accelerated {beta}AP deposition. Using two antibodies to the predicted carboxyl terminus of {beta}APP, the authors have identified the native {beta}APP in brain and nonneural human tissues as a 110- to 135-kDa protein complex that is insoluble in buffer and found in various membrane-rich subcellular fractions. These proteins are relatively uniformly distributed in adult brain, abundant in fetal brain, and detected in nonneural tissues that contain {beta}APP mRNA. Similarly sized proteins occur in rat, cow, and monkey brain and in cultured human HL-60 and HeLa cells; the precise patterns in the 110- to 135-kDa range are heterogeneous among various tissues and cell lines. They conclude that the highly conserved {beta}APP molecule occurs in mammalian tissues as a heterogeneous group of membrane-associated proteins of {approx} 120 kDa. Detection of the nonamyloidogenic carboxyl terminus within plaques suggests that proteolytic processing of the {beta}APP into insoluble filaments occurs locally in cortical regions that develop {beta}-amyloid deposits with age.

  2. Intrinsic membrane association of Drosophila cysteine string proteins.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, A; Kohan, S A; Whitelegge, J P; Gundersen, C B

    1998-09-25

    Cysteine string proteins (csps) are highly conserved constituents of vertebrate and invertebrate secretory organelles. Biochemical and immunoprecipitation experiments implied that vertebrate csps were integral membrane proteins that were tethered to the outer leaflet of secretory vesicles via the fatty acyl residues of their extensively acylated cysteine string. Independently, work of others suggested that Drosophila csps were peripheral membrane proteins that were anchored to membranes by a mechanism that was independent of the cysteine string and its fatty acyl residues. We extended these investigation and found first that sodium carbonate treatment partially stripped both csps and the integral membrane protein, synaptotagmin, from Drosophila membranes. Concomitantly, carbonate released fatty acids into the medium, arguing that it has a mild, solubilizing effect on these membranes. Second, we observed that Drosophila csps behaved like integral membrane proteins in Triton X-114 partitioning experiments. Third, we found that when membrane-bound csps were deacylated, they remained membrane bound. Moreover, it appeared that hydrophobic interactions were necessary for this persistent membrane association of csps. Thus, neither reducing conditions, urea, nor chaotropic agents displaced deacylated csps from membranes. Only detergents were effective in solubilizing deacylated csps. Finally, by virtue of the inaccessibility of deacylated csps to thiol alkylation by the membrane-impermeant alkylating reagent, iodoacetic acid, we inferred that it was the cysteine string domain that mediated the membrane association of deacylated csps. Thus, we conclude that under physiological conditions csps are integral membrane proteins of secretory organelles, and that the cysteine string domain plays a vital role in the membrane association of these proteins. PMID:9771899

  3. Chicken Egg Shell Membrane Associated Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Sarbjeet; Liyanage, Rohana; Kannan, Lakshmi; Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Lay, Jack O; Rath, Narayan C

    2015-11-11

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell as a feed supplement, which showed potential to improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. Therefore, to determine their protein and peptide profiles, we extracted the egg shell membranes (ESM) from fresh unfertilized eggs with methanol and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl) to obtain soluble proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. The methanol extract was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), electrospray ionization (ESI), high-performance reverse phase liquid chromatographic separation (HPLC), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to determine its peptide and protein profiles. The GdHCl extract was subjected to ESI-HPLC-MS/MS following trypsin digestion of reduced/alkylated proteins. Nine proteins from the methanol extract and >275 proteins from the GdHCl extract were tentatively identified. The results suggested the presence of several abundant proteins from egg whites, such as ovoalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme as well as many others associated with antimicrobial, biomechanical, cytoskeletal organizational, cell signaling, and enzyme activities. Collagens, keratin, agrin, and laminin were some of the structural proteins present in the ESM. The methanol-soluble fraction contained several clusterin peptides and defensins, particularly, two isoforms of gallin. The ratios of the two isoforms of gallin differed between the membranes obtained from brown and white eggs. The high abundance of several antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and other bioactive proteins in the ESM along with its potential to entrap various microbes and antigens may make it a suitable vehicle for oral immunization of post hatch poultry and improve their disease resistance. PMID:26485361

  4. Membrane association of sucrose synthase: changes during the graviresponse and possible control by protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) plays an important role in sucrose degradation and occurs both as a soluble and as a membrane-associated enzyme in higher plants. We show that membrane association can vary in vivo in response to gravistimulation, apparently involving SuSy dephosphorylation, and is a reversible process in vitro. Phosphorylation of SuSy has little effect on its activity but decreases its surface hydrophobicity as reported with the fluorescent probe bis-ANS. We postulate that phosphorylation of SuSy (and perhaps other membrane proteins) is involved in the release of the membrane-bound enzyme in part as a result of decreased surface hydrophobicity.

  5. Identification of a Novel Determinant for Membrane Association in Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural Protein 4B▿

    PubMed Central

    Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Castet, Valérie; Montserret, Roland; Arora, Naveen; Raussens, Vincent; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Diesis, Eric; Blum, Hubert E.; Penin, François; Moradpour, Darius

    2009-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) plays an essential role in the formation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex. It is a relatively poorly characterized integral membrane protein predicted to comprise four transmembrane segments in its central portion. Here, we describe a novel determinant for membrane association represented by amino acids (aa) 40 to 69 in the N-terminal portion of NS4B. This segment was sufficient to target and tightly anchor the green fluorescent protein to cellular membranes, as assessed by fluorescence microscopy as well as membrane extraction and flotation analyses. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance structural analyses showed that this segment comprises an amphipathic α-helix extending from aa 42 to 66. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy and glycosylation acceptor site tagging revealed that this amphipathic α-helix has the potential to traverse the phospholipid bilayer as a transmembrane segment, likely upon oligomerization. Alanine substitution of the fully conserved aromatic residues on the hydrophobic helix side abrogated membrane association of the segment comprising aa 40 to 69 and disrupted the formation of a functional replication complex. These results provide the first atomic resolution structure of an essential membrane-associated determinant of HCV NS4B. PMID:19357161

  6. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  7. AAA ATPases regulate membrane association of yeast oxysterol binding proteins and sterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Penghua; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hongzhe; Chieu, Hai Kee; Munn, Alan L; Yang, Hongyuan

    2005-09-01

    The yeast genome encodes seven oxysterol binding protein homologs, Osh1p-Osh7p, which have been implicated in regulating intracellular lipid and vesicular transport. Here, we show that both Osh6p and Osh7p interact with Vps4p, a member of the AAA (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) family. The coiled-coil domain of Osh7p was found to interact with Vps4p in a yeast two-hybrid screen and the interaction between Osh7p and Vps4p appears to be regulated by ergosterol. Deletion of VPS4 induced a dramatic increase in the membrane-associated pools of Osh6p and Osh7p and also caused a decrease in sterol esterification, which was suppressed by overexpression of OSH7. Lastly, overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Osh7p (Osh7pCC) resulted in a multivesicular body sorting defect, suggesting a dominant negative role of Osh7pCC possibly through inhibiting Vps4p function. Our data suggest that a common mechanism may exist for AAA proteins to regulate the membrane association of yeast OSBP proteins and that these two protein families may function together to control subcellular lipid transport. PMID:16096648

  8. Nutrient-dependent methylation of a membrane-associated protein of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.C.; Alvarez, J.D.; Bernlohr, R.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Starvation of a mid-log-phase culture of Escherichia coli B/r for nitrogen, phosphate, or carbon resulted in methylation of a membrane-associated protein of about 43,000 daltons (P-43) in the presence of chloramphenicol and (methyl-3H)methionine. The in vivo methylation reaction occurred with a doubling time of 2 to 5 min and was followed by a slower demethylation process. Addition of the missing nutrient to a starving culture immediately prevented further methylation of P-43. P-43 methylation is not related to the methylated chemotaxis proteins because P-43 is methylated in response to a different spectrum of nutrients and because P-43 is methylated on lysine residues. The characteristics of P-43 are similar to those of a methylated protein previously described in Bacillus subtilis and B. licheniformis and are consistent with the proposal that methylation of this protein functions in nutrient sensing.

  9. Differential Expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium of Membrane-Associated Proteins Relevant to Lignin Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Shary, Semarjit; Kapich, Alexander N.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Cullen, Dan; Hammel, Ken

    2008-10-02

    Fungal lignin-degrading systems must include membrane-associated proteins that participate in diverse processes such as uptake and oxidation of lignin fragments, secretion of ligninolytic secondary metabolites, and defense of the mycelium against ligninolytic oxidants. Despite their importance, little is known about the nature or regulation of these membrane-associated components. We grew the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium on cellulose or glucose as the carbon source and monitored the mineralization of a 14C-labeled synthetic lignin by these cultures to assess their ligninolytic competence. The results showed that the cellulose-grown cultures were ligninolytic, whereas the glucose-grown ones were not. We isolated microsomal membrane fractions from both types of culture and analyzed tryptic digests of them by shotgun liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Comparison of the results against the predicted P. chrysosporium proteome showed that a catalase (Joint Genome Institute P. chrysosporium protein I.D. 124398), an alcohol oxidase (126879), two transporters (137220 and 132234), and two cytochrome P450s (5011 and 8912) were up-regulated under ligninolytic conditions. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays showed that RNA transcripts encoding all of these proteins were also up-regulated in ligninolytic cultures. Catalase 124398, alcohol oxidase 126879, and transporter 137220 were found in a proteomic analysis of partially purified plasma membranes from ligninolytic P. chrysosporium, and are therefore most likely associated with the outer envelope of the fungus.

  10. Regulation of membrane associated protein kinase C activity by guanine nucleotide in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.K.; Devanney, J.F.

    1986-03-05

    Addition of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (0.1 ..mu..g/ml) or guanosine-5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP..gamma..S) (10..mu..M) to the membrane fraction from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils results in an increase of phosphorylation of several membrane proteins. To test whether membrane associated protein kinase C is involved in the activation, histone is added to the membrane as a substrate for protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of histone is determined by counting the gel pieces containing histone IIIS after separation from other membrane components by SDS-gel electrophoresis. In the presence of CaC12 (20 ..mu..M), GTP..gamma..S (10 ..mu..M) or PMA (0.1 ..mu..g/ml) stimulates the phosphorylation of histone IIIS (40% to 70% increase). To achieve this effect calcium is required for GTP..gamma..S but not for PMA. The effect of GTP..gamma..S but not PMA is inhibited in membranes obtained from cells pretreated with pertussis toxin. Membrane protein kinase C is solubilized with Triton X-100 (1%) and then applied to a DEAE-52 cellulose column chromatography. Two peaks of protein kinase C activity are observed. Peak one is eluted at 40 mM NaCl, peak two is eluted at 140 mM NaCl. The activity of peak one is stimulated with phosphatidylserine (PS) and PMA but not with PS and calcium. The activity of peak two is stimulated with either PS and PMA or PS and calcium. The results suggest that GTP binding protein is involved in the activation of membrane associated protein kinase C and the kinase may exist in two forms, calcium sensitive and calcium insensitive.

  11. Isoprenoid addition to Ras protein is the critical modification for its membrane association and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Cox, A D; Hisaka, M M; Graham, S M; Buss, J E; Der, C J

    1992-01-01

    We have introduced a variety of amino acid substitutions into carboxyl-terminal CA1A2X sequence (C = cysteine; A = aliphatic; X = any amino acid) of the oncogenic [Val12]Ki-Ras4B protein to identify the amino acids that permit Ras processing (isoprenylation, proteolysis, and carboxyl methylation), membrane association, and transformation in cultured mammalian cells. While all substitutions were tolerated at the A1 position, substitutions at A2 and X reduced transforming activity. The A2 residue was important for both isoprenylation and AAX proteolysis, whereas the X residue dictated the extent and specificity of isoprenoid modification only. Differences were observed between Ras processing in living cells and farnesylation efficiency in a cell-free system. Finally, one farnesylated mutant did not undergo either proteolysis or carboxyl methylation but still displayed efficient membrane association (approximately 50%) and transforming activity, indicating that farnesylation alone can support Ras transforming activity. Since both farnesylation and carboxyl methylation are critical for yeast a-factor biological activity, the three CAAX-signaled modifications may have different contributions to the function of different CAAX-containing proteins. Images PMID:1631135

  12. Nutrient-dependent methylation of a membrane-associated protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Young, C C; Alvarez, J D; Bernlohr, R W

    1990-01-01

    Starvation of a mid-log-phase culture of Escherichia coli B/r for nitrogen, phosphate, or carbon resulted in methylation of a membrane-associated protein of about 43,000 daltons (P-43) in the presence of chloramphenicol and [methyl-3H]methionine. The in vivo methylation reaction occurred with a doubling time of 2 to 5 min and was followed by a slower demethylation process. Addition of the missing nutrient to a starving culture immediately prevented further methylation of P-43. P-43 methylation is not related to the methylated chemotaxis proteins because P-43 is methylated in response to a different spectrum of nutrients and because P-43 is methylated on lysine residues. The characteristics of P-43 are similar to those of a methylated protein previously described in Bacillus subtilis and B. licheniformis (R. W. Bernlohr, A. L. Saha, C. C. Young, B. R. Toth, and K. J. Golden, J. Bacteriol. 170:4113-4118, 1988; K. J. Golden and R. W. Bernlohr, Mol. Gen. Genet. 220:1-7, 1989) and are consistent with the proposal that methylation of this protein functions in nutrient sensing. Images PMID:2203742

  13. Conserved Determinants for Membrane Association of Nonstructural Protein 5A from Hepatitis C Virus and Related Viruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Volker; Pal, Zsuzsanna; Sapay, Nicolas; Deléage, Gilbert; Blum, Hubert E.; Penin, François; Moradpour, Darius

    2007-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is a membrane-associated essential component of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex. An N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix mediates in-plane membrane association of HCV NS5A and at the same time is likely involved in specific protein-protein interactions required for the assembly of a functional replication complex. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants for membrane association of NS5A from the related GB viruses and pestiviruses. Although primary amino acid sequences differed considerably, putative membrane anchor domains with amphipathic features were predicted in the N-terminal domains of NS5A proteins from these viruses. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, as well as membrane flotation analyses, demonstrated that NS5As from GB virus B (GBV-B), GBV-C, and bovine viral diarrhea virus, the prototype pestivirus, display membrane association characteristics very similar to those of HCV NS5A. The N-terminal 27 to 33 amino acid residues of these NS5A proteins were sufficient for membrane association. Circular dichroism analyses confirmed the capacity of these segments to fold into alpha helices upon association with lipid-like molecules. Despite structural conservation, only very limited exchanges with sequences from related viruses were tolerated in the context of functional HCV RNA replication, suggesting virus-specific interactions of these segments. In conclusion, membrane association of NS5A by an N-terminal amphipathic alpha helix is a feature shared by HCV and related members of the family Flaviviridae. This observation points to conserved roles of the N-terminal amphipathic alpha helices of NS5A in replication complex formation. PMID:17192310

  14. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  15. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  16. Heterodimeric Capping Protein from Arabidopsis Is a Membrane-Associated, Actin-Binding Protein1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Wang, Xia; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Huang, Shanjin; Szymanski, Daniel B.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a major regulator of cell morphogenesis and responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. The organization and activities of the cytoskeleton are choreographed by hundreds of accessory proteins. Many actin-binding proteins are thought to be stimulus-response regulators that bind to signaling phospholipids and change their activity upon lipid binding. Whether these proteins associate with and/or are regulated by signaling lipids in plant cells remains poorly understood. Heterodimeric capping protein (CP) is a conserved and ubiquitous regulator of actin dynamics. It binds to the barbed end of filaments with high affinity and modulates filament assembly and disassembly reactions in vitro. Direct interaction of CP with phospholipids, including phosphatidic acid, results in uncapping of filament ends in vitro. Live-cell imaging and reverse-genetic analyses of cp mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) recently provided compelling support for a model in which CP activity is negatively regulated by phosphatidic acid in vivo. Here, we used complementary biochemical, subcellular fractionation, and immunofluorescence microscopy approaches to elucidate CP-membrane association. We found that CP is moderately abundant in Arabidopsis tissues and present in a microsomal membrane fraction. Sucrose density gradient separation and immunoblotting with known compartment markers were used to demonstrate that CP is enriched on membrane-bound organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. This association could facilitate cross talk between the actin cytoskeleton and a wide spectrum of essential cellular functions such as organelle motility and signal transduction. PMID:25201878

  17. Structure elucidation of membrane-associated peptides and proteins in oriented bilayers by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Akira

    2009-10-01

    Solid-state NMR using magnetically oriented bilayer systems provides useful information on the structure and orientation of peptides and proteins bound to lipid bilayers. The ordering of the lipid bilayer along the magnetic field can be achieved in two ways. First, lipid can be macroscopically oriented by pressing lipid-water dispersion between flat glass plates, which is called a mechanically aligned system. Second, lipid molecules themselves can be aligned spontaneously in the magnetic field because of their diamagnetic anisotropy by forming bicelles or magnetically oriented vesicle systems. Structure and orientation of the membrane-associated peptides and proteins can be achieved by analyzing structural constraints obtained from anisotropic chemical shift interactions such as chemical shift oscillation or nuclear dipolar interactions such as dipolar wave and a combination of them such as PISA wheel. Detailed structure elucidation of various kinds of membrane peptides and proteins in such oriented bilayers is presented. PMID:19647984

  18. Potassium-dependent changes in the expression of membrane-associated proteins in barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, M.; Kulpa, J.; Siddiqi, M.Y.; Glass, A.D.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Halcyon) seedlings which has been grown in full strength complete inorganic nutrient media (containing 6 millimolar K{sup +}) had high internal K{sup +} concentrations and low values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx when influx was measured from solutions containing 100 micromolar K{sup +}. Transfer of these plants to solutions lacking K{sup +} resulted in significant reductions of root and shoot K{sup +} concentrations and values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx increased by greater than 10-fold within 3 days. When plants treated in this way were returned to complete solutions, containing K{sup +}, the changes induced by K{sup +} deprivation were reversed. Parallel studies of microsomal membranes by means of SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the expression of a group of polypeptides increased or decreased in parallel with changes of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx. Most prominent of these were 45 and 34 kilodalton polypeptides which specifically responded to K{sup +} status of the barley plants; their expression was not enhanced by N or P deprivation. The 45 kilodalton polypeptide was susceptible to degradation by a membrane associated protease when microsomes were washing in buffer containing 0.2 millimolar PMSF. This loss was prevented by increasing PMSF concentration to 2 millimolar.

  19. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation.

    PubMed

    Gerstmeier, Jana; Newcomer, Marcia E; Dennhardt, Sophie; Romp, Erik; Fischer, Jana; Werz, Oliver; Garscha, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are proinflammatory lipid mediators formed from arachidonic acid in a 2-step reaction catalyzed by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) requiring the formation of 5-HPETE [5(S)-hydroperoxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid] and its subsequent transformation to LTA4 5-LOX is thought to receive arachidonic acid from the nuclear membrane-embedded 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP). The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed an active site concealed by F177 and Y181 (FY cork). We examined the influence of the FY cork on 5-LOX activity and membrane binding in HEK293 cells in the absence and presence of FLAP. Uncapping the 5-LOX active site by mutation of F177 and/or Y181 to alanine (5-LOX-F177A, 5-LOX-Y181A, 5-LOX-F177/Y181A) resulted in delayed and diminished 5-LOX membrane association in A23187-stimulated cells. For 5-LOX-F177A and 5-LOX-F177/Y181A, formation of 5-LOX products was dramatically reduced relative to 5-LOX-wild type (wt). Strikingly, coexpression of FLAP in A23187-activated HEK293 cells effectively restored formation of 5-H(p)ETE (5-hydroxy- and 5-peroxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) by these same 5-LOX mutants (≈60-70% 5-LOX-wt levels) but not of LTA4 hydrolysis products. Yet 5-LOX-Y181A generated 5-H(p)ETE at levels comparable to 5-LOX-wt but reduced LTA4 hydrolysis products. Coexpression of FLAP partially restored LTA4 hydrolysis product formation by 5-LOX-Y181A. Together, the data suggest that the concealed FY cork impacts membrane association and that FLAP may help shield an uncapped active site.-Gerstmeier, J., Newcomer, M. E., Dennhardt, S., Romp, E., Fischer, J., Werz, O., Garscha, U. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation. PMID:26842853

  20. The mechanism of membrane-associated steps in tail-anchored protein insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Mateja, Agnieszka; Dobosz, Malgorzata; Bove, Elia; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Keenan, Robert J.

    2012-06-19

    Tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins destined for the endoplasmic reticulum are chaperoned by cytosolic targeting factors that deliver them to a membrane receptor for insertion. Although a basic framework for TA protein recognition is now emerging, the decisive targeting and membrane insertion steps are not understood. Here we reconstitute the TA protein insertion cycle with purified components, present crystal structures of key complexes between these components and perform mutational analyses based on the structures. We show that a committed targeting complex, formed by a TA protein bound to the chaperone ATPase Get3, is initially recruited to the membrane through an interaction with Get2. Once the targeting complex has been recruited, Get1 interacts with Get3 to drive TA protein release in an ATPase-dependent reaction. After releasing its TA protein cargo, the now-vacant Get3 recycles back to the cytosol concomitant with ATP binding. This work provides a detailed structural and mechanistic framework for the minimal TA protein insertion cycle.

  1. Temporal expression of a membrane-associated protein putatively involved in repression of initiation of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Eident-Wilkinson, B; Mele, L; Laffan, J; Firshein, W

    1992-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis membrane-associated protein that binds specifically to the origin region of DNA replication may act as an inhibitor of DNA replication (J. Laffan and W. Firshein, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:7452-7456, 1988). This protein, originally estimated to be 64 kDa, had a slightly lower molecular size (57 kDa), as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis during these studies. The size difference may be due to processing that results in modification of the protein. The protein can be extracted from both cytosol and membrane fractions, and the amounts in these fractions vary during the developmental cycle of B. subtilis. A complex pattern of expression in which significant levels were detected in spores was revealed; levels decreased dramatically during germination and increased after the first round of DNA replication. The decrease during germination was due to protease activity, as demonstrated by the addition of protease inhibitors and radioactive-labeling chase experiments. During vegetative growth, the protein levels increased until stationary phase, after which there was another decrease during sporulation. The decrease during sporulation may be partially due to sequestering of the protein into forespores, since as the putative repressor protein decreased in the mother cell, it increased in the forespores. However, protease activity was also involved in the decrease in the mother cell. The changes in expression of this protein are consistent with its role as a repressor of initiation of DNA replication. Additional studies, including sequence analysis and further antibody analysis, show that this protein is not a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This relationship had been a possibility based upon the results of others (H. Hemila, A. Pavla, L. Paulin, S. Arvidson, and I. Palva, J. Bacteriol. 172:5052-5063, 1990). Images PMID:1729239

  2. Protein–Protein and Protein–Membrane Associations in the Lignin Pathway[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bassard, Jean-Etienne; Richert, Ludovic; Geerinck, Jan; Renault, Hugues; Duval, Frédéric; Ullmann, Pascaline; Schmitt, Martine; Meyer, Etienne; Mutterer, Jerôme; Boerjan, Wout; De Jaeger, Geert; Mely, Yves; Goossens, Alain; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular organization of enzymes is proposed to orchestrate metabolic complexity and help channel intermediates in different pathways. Phenylpropanoid metabolism has to direct up to 30% of the carbon fixed by plants to the biosynthesis of lignin precursors. Effective coupling of the enzymes in the pathway thus seems to be required. Subcellular localization, mobility, protein–protein, and protein–membrane interactions of four consecutive enzymes around the main branch point leading to lignin precursors was investigated in leaf tissues of Nicotiana benthamiana and cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. CYP73A5 and CYP98A3, the two Arabidopsis cytochrome P450s (P450s) catalyzing para- and meta-hydroxylations of the phenolic ring of monolignols were found to colocalize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and to form homo- and heteromers. They moved along with the fast remodeling plant ER, but their lateral diffusion on the ER surface was restricted, likely due to association with other ER proteins. The connecting soluble enzyme hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT), was found partially associated with the ER. Both HCT and the 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase relocalized closer to the membrane upon P450 expression. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy supports P450 colocalization and interaction with the soluble proteins, enhanced by the expression of the partner proteins. Protein relocalization was further enhanced in tissues undergoing wound repair. CYP98A3 was the most effective in driving protein association. PMID:23175744

  3. Z-scan Fluorescence Profile Deconvolution of Cytosolic and Membrane-associated Protein Populations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth M.; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Further, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 labeled with green fluorescent protein upon ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area to volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. PMID:25862080

  4. The Us2 Gene Product of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Is a Membrane-Associated Ubiquitin-Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ming-Hsi; Roy, Bibhuti B.; Finnen, Renée L.; Le Sage, Valerie; Johnston, Susan M.; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The Us2 gene encodes a tegument protein that is conserved in most members of the Alphaherpesvirinae. Previous studies on the pseudorabies virus (PRV) Us2 ortholog indicated that it is prenylated, associates with membranes, and spatially regulates the enzymatic activity of the MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase ERK (extracellular signal-related kinase) through direct binding and sequestration of ERK at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Here we present an analysis of the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) Us2 ortholog and demonstrate that, like PRV Us2, HSV-2 Us2 is a virion component and that, unlike PRV Us2, it does not interact with ERK in yeast two-hybrid assays. HSV-2 Us2 lacks prenylation signals and other canonical membrane-targeting motifs yet is tightly associated with detergent-insoluble membranes and localizes predominantly to recycling endosomes. Experiments to identify cellular proteins that facilitate HSV-2 Us2 membrane association were inconclusive; however, these studies led to the identification of HSV-2 Us2 as a ubiquitin-interacting protein, providing new insight into the functions of HSV-2 Us2. PMID:23785212

  5. Evaluation of the protective efficacy of four novel identified membrane associated proteins of Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Yan; Deng, Limei; Zheng, Chengkun; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun; Bei, Weicheng; Li, Jinquan

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2) is an important zoonotic pathogen that can also cause epidemics of life-threatening infections in humans. Surface proteins of pathogens play a critical role in the interaction with host system or environment, as they take part in processes like virulence, cytotoxicity, adhesion, signaling or transport, etc. Thus, surface proteins identified by the screening of immunoproteomic techniques are promising vaccine candidates or diagnostic markers. In this study, four membrane associated proteins (MAP) identified by immunoproteomic method were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins with his-tag. Screening for vaccine candidates were firstly performed by protection assay in vivo and immunization with Sbp markedly protected mice against systemic S. suis 2 infection. The immune responses and protective of Sbp were further evaluated. The results showed that Sbp could elicit a strong humoral antibody response and protect mice from lethal challenge with S. suis 2. The antiserum against Sbp could efficiently impede survival of bacterial in whole blood killing assay and conferred significant protection against S. suis 2 infection in passive immunization assays. The findings indicate that Sbp may serve as an important factor in the pathogenesis of S. suis 2 and would be a promising subunit vaccine candidate. PMID:25820064

  6. The membrane-associated proteins FCHo and SGIP are allosteric activators of the AP2 clathrin adaptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Hollopeter, Gunther; Lange, Jeffrey J; Zhang, Ying; Vu, Thien N; Gu, Mingyu; Ailion, Michael; Lambie, Eric J; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Florens, Laurence; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2014-01-01

    The AP2 clathrin adaptor complex links protein cargo to the endocytic machinery but it is unclear how AP2 is activated on the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate that the membrane-associated proteins FCHo and SGIP1 convert AP2 into an open, active conformation. We screened for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that phenocopy the loss of AP2 subunits and found that AP2 remains inactive in fcho-1 mutants. A subsequent screen for bypass suppressors of fcho-1 nulls identified 71 compensatory mutations in all four AP2 subunits. Using a protease-sensitivity assay we show that these mutations restore the open conformation in vivo. The domain of FCHo that induces this rearrangement is not the F-BAR domain or the µ-homology domain, but rather is an uncharacterized 90 amino acid motif, found in both FCHo and SGIP proteins, that directly binds AP2. Thus, these proteins stabilize nascent endocytic pits by exposing membrane and cargo binding sites on AP2. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03648.001 PMID:25303366

  7. The Membrane Associated RING-CH Proteins: A Family of E3 Ligases with Diverse Roles through the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Means, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery that conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins can drive proteolytic degradation, ubiquitination has been shown to perform a diverse range of functions in the cell. It plays an important role in endocytosis, signal transduction, trafficking of vesicles inside the cell, and even DNA repair. The process of ubiquitination-mediated control has turned out to be remarkably complex, involving a diverse array of proteins and many levels of control. This review focuses on a family of structurally related E3 ligases termed the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) ubiquitin ligases, which were originally discovered as structural homologs to the virals E3s, K3, and K5 from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). These proteins contain a catalytic RING-CH finger and are typically membrane-bound, with some having up to 14 putative transmembrane domains. Despite several lines of evidence showing that the MARCH proteins play a complex and essential role in several cellular processes, this family remains understudied.

  8. PutA protein, a membrane-associated flavin dehydrogenase, acts as a redox-dependent transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky de Spicer, P; Maloy, S

    1993-01-01

    The proline utilization (put) operon of Salmonella typhimurium is transcriptionally repressed by PutA protein in the absence of proline. PutA protein also carries out the enzymatic steps in proline catabolism. These two roles require different cellular localizations of PutA. Catabolism of proline requires PutA to associate with the membrane because reoxidation of the FAD cofactor in PutA needs the presence of an electron acceptor. Repression of the put operon requires PutA to bind to the put control-region DNA in the cytoplasm. The presence of proline, the inducer, is necessary but not sufficient for PutA to discriminate between its roles as an enzyme or as a repressor. Two conditions that prevent PutA protein binding to the put control region are (i) when proline and an electron acceptor or the cytoplasmic membrane are present or (ii) when PutA is reduced by dithionite. These two conditions increase the relative hydrophobicity of PutA protein, favoring membrane association and therefore enzymatic activity. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8483946

  9. Poliovirus Proteins Induce Membrane Association of GTPase ADP-Ribosylation Factor

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Fogg, Mark H.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus infection results in the disintegration of intracellular membrane structures and formation of specific vesicles that serve as sites for replication of viral RNA. The mechanism of membrane rearrangement has not been clearly defined. Replication of poliovirus is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite known to prevent normal function of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of small GTPases. During normal membrane trafficking in uninfected cells, ARFs are involved in vesicle formation from different intracellular sites through interaction with numerous regulatory and coat proteins as well as in regulation of phospholipase D activity and cytoskeleton modifications. We demonstrate here that ARFs 3 and 5, but not ARF6, are translocated to membranes in HeLa cell extracts that are engaged in translation of poliovirus RNA. The accumulation of ARFs on membranes correlates with active replication of poliovirus RNA in vitro, whereas ARF translocation to membranes does not occur in the presence of BFA. ARF translocation can be induced independently by synthesis of poliovirus 3A or 3CD proteins, and we describe mutations that abolished this activity. In infected HeLa cells, an ARF1-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion redistributes from Golgi stacks to the perinuclear region, where poliovirus RNA replication occurs. Taken together, the data suggest an involvement of ARF in poliovirus RNA replication. PMID:15890959

  10. In Silico Study of Plant Polyphenols' Interactions with VP24-Ebola Virus Membrane-associated Protein.

    PubMed

    Pleško, Sebastian; Volk, Helena; Lukšič, Miha; Podlipnik, Črtomir

    2015-01-01

    The Zaire Ebola viral protein VP24 selectively inhibits nuclear import of STAT1 and as such blocks interferon-induced antiviral responses vital for cell's emergency. Inhibition of VP24 with small molecule inhibitor may neutralize the threatening action of Ebola virus. We performed molecular docking of compounds from a selected small library of plant polyphenols on to VP24. Our research shows that 1,2,3,6-tetragalloyl glucose, epigallocatechin gallate, chlorogenic acic, oleuropein and miquelianin represent promising leads for further studies. PMID:26454589

  11. Membrane associated protein flotillin-2 in Litopenaeus vannamei plays a role in WSSV infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong; Guo, Guangran; Liu, Rongdiao; Wang, Chuanqi; Xu, Xun; Ruan, Lingwei

    2016-07-01

    Flotillin-2, an important protein of vesicular endocytosis, plays an essential role in a large number of cellular processes, including viruses and pathogen infection. In the present study, a flotillin-2 homolog in Litopenaeus vannamei, designed as Lvflotillin-2, was cloned and characterized. To analyze the putative role of Lvflotillin-2 during white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, real-time quantitative PCR was performed. The result showed that the transcriptional level of Lvflotillin-2 was up-regulated significantly after virus challenge. Furthermore, upon WSSV stimulation, Lvflotillin-2 in shrimp cells could translocate from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and unexpectedly, also into nucleus. Additionally, depletion of Lvflotillin-2 inhibited WSSV gene ie1 transcription. It suggested that Lvflotillin-2 could be hijacked by WSSV. These observations indicated that Lvflotillin-2 was involved in WSSV infection, and presented here should be useful for gaining insight into shrimp immunity and WSSV pathogenesis. PMID:27079424

  12. Investigating polymorphisms in membrane-associated transporter protein SLC45A2, using sucrose transporters as a model.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Anke; Ward, John M

    2015-07-01

    Solute carrier family 45 member 2 encodes the melanosomal membrane protein, membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP), of unknown function, that is required for normal melanin synthesis. The present study analyzed the effects of two human MATP mutations, D93N, which causes oculocutaneous albinism 4 (OCA4), and L374F, which is correlated with light pigmentation in European populations. Corresponding mutations were produced in the related and well-characterized sucrose transporter from rice, OsSUT1, and transport activity was measured by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in addition to 14C-sucrose uptake in yeast. The mutation corresponding to D93N resulted in a complete loss of transport activity. The mutation corresponding to L374F resulted in a 90% decrease in transport activity, although the substrate affinity was unaffected. The results indicated that the D93N mutation causes OCA4 as a result of loss of MATP transport activity, and that the F374 allele confers significantly lower transport activity than L374. PMID:25760657

  13. Identification and functional analysis of the small membrane-associated protein pUL11 of avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Walter; Granzow, Harald; Veits, Jutta; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2012-02-01

    pUL11 is a highly conserved, small, acylated, membrane-associated tegument protein of herpesviruses. It is involved in final envelopment of nascent virions in the cytoplasm, although the precise mechanism is still unknown. By screening of mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) raised against purified particles of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) of chickens (Veits et al., 2003a), we identified two mAb recognizing the 15 kDa UL11 protein (pUL11) of this avian alphaherpesvirus. These mAb permitted detection and precise localization of pUL11 in mature ILT virions, as well as in the cytoplasm of infected chicken cells by Western blot analyses, indirect immunofluorescence tests, and immunoelectron microscopy. For investigation of gene function UL11-deleted ILTV recombinants were generated. Like its homologues in several other alphaherpesviruses, ILTV-pUL11 was shown to be nonessential for productive virus replication. However, compared to wild-type and UL11 rescued ILTV the deletion mutants exhibited significantly reduced virus yields and moderately impaired spread in cell culture. In the absence of pUL11, electron microscopy of infected cells revealed accumulations of tegument proteins with nucleocapsids, and marked distortions of Golgi membranes in the cytoplasm, which obviously inhibited the formation of mature, enveloped virus particles. Taken together, our results demonstrate that pUL11 is relevant for secondary envelopment of ILTV, and confirm functional conservation of this protein in herpesviruses. The now available unique pUL11-specific mAb will help to further analyze this function, which is presumably mediated by physical interactions with other viral gene products, in cultured cells and in the natural animal host of ILTV. PMID:22226986

  14. Structural Analysis of the Roles of Influenza A Virus Membrane-Associated Proteins in Assembly and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chlanda, Petr; Schraidt, Oliver; Kummer, Susann; Riches, James; Oberwinkler, Heike; Prinz, Simone; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

    2015-01-01

    viral proteins in mediating virus assembly and determining virus shape. To do this, we used a range of electron microscopy techniques to obtain and compare two- and three-dimensional images of virus particles and virus-like particles during and after assembly. The virus-like particles were produced using different combinations of viral proteins. Among our results, we found that coexpression of one or both of the viral surface proteins (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) with the viral membrane-associated proteins encoded by the M segment results in assembly and release of filamentous virus-like particles in a manner very similar to that of the budding and release of influenza virions. These data provide novel insights into the roles played by individual viral proteins in influenza A virus assembly. PMID:26085153

  15. Subcellular localization and membrane association of the replicase protein of grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus, family Betaflexiviridae.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Sean W; Xiao, Huogen; Li, Caihong; Nelson, Richard S; Meng, Baozhong

    2015-04-01

    As a member of the newly established Betaflexiviridae family, grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV) has an RNA genome containing five ORFs. ORF1 encodes a putative replicase polyprotein typical of the alphavirus superfamily of positive-strand ssRNA viruses. Several viruses of this superfamily have been demonstrated to replicate in structures designated viral replication complexes associated with intracellular membranes. However, structure and cellular localization of the replicase complex have not been studied for members of Betaflexiviridae, a family of mostly woody plant viruses. As a first step towards the elucidation of the replication complex of GRSPaV, we investigated the subcellular localization of full-length and truncated versions of its replicase polyprotein via fluorescent tagging, followed by fluorescence microscopy. We found that the replicase polyprotein formed distinctive punctate bodies in both Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells and tobacco protoplasts. We further mapped a region of 76 amino acids in the methyl-transferase domain responsible for the formation of these punctate structures. The punctate structures are distributed in close proximity to the endoplasmic reticulum network. Membrane flotation and biochemical analyses demonstrate that the N-terminal region responsible for punctate structure formation associated with cellular membrane is likely through an amphipathic α helix serving as an in-plane anchor. The identity of this membrane is yet to be determined. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on the localization and membrane association of the replicase proteins of a member of the family Betaflexiviridae. PMID:25502653

  16. Structures formed by a cell membrane-associated arabinogalactan-protein on graphite or mica alone and with Yariv phenylglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li Hong; Weizbauer, Renate A.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Xu, Feng; Genin, Guy M.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Certain membrane-associated arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) with lysine-rich sub-domains participate in plant growth, development and resistance to stress. To complement fluorescence imaging of such molecules when tagged and introduced transgenically to the cell periphery and to extend the groundwork for assessing molecular structure, some behaviours of surface-spread AGPs were visualized at the nanometre scale in a simplified electrostatic environment. Methods Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labelled LeAGP1 was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using antibody-coated magnetic beads, deposited on graphite or mica, and examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Key Results When deposited at low concentration on graphite, LeAGP can form independent clusters and rings a few nanometres in diameter, often defining deep pits; the aperture of the rings depends on plating parameters. On mica, intermediate and high concentrations, respectively, yielded lacy meshes and solid sheets that could dynamically evolve arcs, rings, ‘pores’ and ‘co-pores’, and pits. Glucosyl Yariv reagent combined with the AGP to make very large and distinctive rings. Conclusions Diverse cell-specific nano-patterns of native lysine-rich AGPs are expected at the wall–membrane interface and, while there will not be an identical patterning in different environmental settings, AFM imaging suggests protein tendencies for surficial organization and thus opens new avenues for experimentation. Nanopore formation with Yariv reagents suggests how the reagent might bind with AGP to admit Ca2+ to cells and hints at ways in which AGP might be structured at some cell surfaces. PMID:25164699

  17. The membrane-associated form of methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is a copper/iron protein.

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Piku; Katterle, Bettina; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Dalton, Howard

    2003-01-01

    A protocol has been developed which permits the purification of a membrane-associated methane-oxidizing complex from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). This complex has approximately 5 fold higher specific activity than any purified particulate methane mono-oxygenase (pMMO) previously reported from M. capsulatus (Bath). This efficiently functioning methane-oxidizing complex consists of the pMMO hydroxylase (pMMOH) and an unidentified component we have assigned as a potential pMMO reductase (pMMOR). The complex was isolated by solubilizing intracytoplasmic membrane preparations containing the high yields of active membrane-bound pMMO (pMMO(m)), using the non-ionic detergent dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside, to yield solubilized enzyme (pMMO(s)). Further purification gave rise to an active complex (pMMO(c)) that could be resolved (at low levels) by ion-exchange chromatography into two components, the pMMOH (47, 27 and 24 kDa subunits) and the pMMOR (63 and 8 kDa subunits). The purified complex contains two copper atoms and one non-haem iron atom/mol of enzyme. EPR spectra of preparations grown with (63)Cu indicated that the copper ion interacted with three or four nitrogenic ligands. These EPR data, in conjunction with other experimental results, including the oxidation by ferricyanide, EDTA treatment to remove copper and re-addition of copper to the depleted protein, verified the essential role of copper in enzyme catalysis and indicated the implausibility of copper existing as a trinuclear cluster. The EPR measurements also demonstrated the presence of a tightly bound mononuclear Fe(3+) ion in an octahedral environment that may well be exchange-coupled to another paramagnetic species. PMID:12379148

  18. The membrane-associated form of methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is a copper/iron protein.

    PubMed

    Basu, Piku; Katterle, Bettina; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Dalton, Howard

    2003-01-15

    A protocol has been developed which permits the purification of a membrane-associated methane-oxidizing complex from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). This complex has approximately 5 fold higher specific activity than any purified particulate methane mono-oxygenase (pMMO) previously reported from M. capsulatus (Bath). This efficiently functioning methane-oxidizing complex consists of the pMMO hydroxylase (pMMOH) and an unidentified component we have assigned as a potential pMMO reductase (pMMOR). The complex was isolated by solubilizing intracytoplasmic membrane preparations containing the high yields of active membrane-bound pMMO (pMMO(m)), using the non-ionic detergent dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside, to yield solubilized enzyme (pMMO(s)). Further purification gave rise to an active complex (pMMO(c)) that could be resolved (at low levels) by ion-exchange chromatography into two components, the pMMOH (47, 27 and 24 kDa subunits) and the pMMOR (63 and 8 kDa subunits). The purified complex contains two copper atoms and one non-haem iron atom/mol of enzyme. EPR spectra of preparations grown with (63)Cu indicated that the copper ion interacted with three or four nitrogenic ligands. These EPR data, in conjunction with other experimental results, including the oxidation by ferricyanide, EDTA treatment to remove copper and re-addition of copper to the depleted protein, verified the essential role of copper in enzyme catalysis and indicated the implausibility of copper existing as a trinuclear cluster. The EPR measurements also demonstrated the presence of a tightly bound mononuclear Fe(3+) ion in an octahedral environment that may well be exchange-coupled to another paramagnetic species. PMID:12379148

  19. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  20. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  1. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane-associated, uronide binding phosphoprotein with physical properties similar to viral movement proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, P; Kunz, B; Paul-Pletzer, K; Grimm, R; Eckerskorn, C; Farmer, E E

    1996-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides are structural and regulatory homopolymers from the extracellular pectic matrix of plants. In vitro micromolar concentrations of oligogalacturonates and polygalacturonates were shown previously to stimulate the phosphorylation of a small plasma membrane-associated protein in potato. Immunologically cross-reactive proteins were detected in plasma membrane-enriched fractions from all angiosperm subclasses in the Cronquist system. Polygalacturonate-enhanced phosphorylation of the protein was observed in four of the six dicotyledon subclasses but not in any of the five monocotyledon subclasses. A cDNA for the protein was cloned from potato. The deduced protein is extremely hydrophilic and has a proline-rich N terminus. The C-terminal half of the protein was predicted to be a coiled coil, suggesting that the protein interacts with other macromolecules. The recombinant protein was found to bind both simple and complex galacturonides. The behavior of the protein suggests several parallels with viral proteins involved in intercellular communication. PMID:8989883

  2. Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Dixon, R A; Gonzales, R A; Kjellbom, P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    1995-01-01

    An approach was developed for the isolation and characterization of soybean plasma membrane-associated proteins by immunoscreening of a cDNA expression library. An antiserum was raised against purified plasma membrane vesicles. In a differential screening of approximately 500,000 plaque-forming units with the anti-(plasma membrane) serum and DNA probes derived from highly abundant clones isolated in a preliminary screening, 261 clones were selected from approximately 1,200 antiserum-positive plaques. These clones were classified into 40 groups by hybridization analysis and 5'- and 3'-terminal sequencing. By searching nucleic acid and protein sequence data bases, 11 groups of cDNAs were identified, among which valosin-containing protein (VCP), clathrin heavy chain, phospholipase C, and S-adenosylmethionine:delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase have not to date been cloned from plants. The remaining 29 groups did not match any current data base entries and may, therefore, represent additional or yet uncharacterized genes. A full-length cDNA encoding the soybean VCP was sequenced. The high level of amino acid identity with vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein indicates that the soybean protein is a plant homolog of vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753826

  3. Localization of Membrane-Associated Proteins in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Use of Hydrophobic Membrane Probes and Cross-Linking Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Zakowski, Jack J.; Wagner, Robert R.

    1980-01-01

    The location of membrane-associated proteins of vesicular stomatitis virus was investigated by using two monofunctional and three bifunctional probes that differ in the degree to which they partition into membranes and in their specific group reactivity. Two hydrophobic aryl azide probes, [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide and [3H]pyrenesulfonylazide, readily partitioned into virion membrane and, when activated to nitrenes by UV irradiation, formed stable covalent adducts to membrane constituents. Both of these monofunctional probes labeled the glyco-protein G and matrix M proteins, but [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide also labeled the nucleocapsid N protein and an unidentified low-molecular-weight component. Protein labeling of intact virions was unaffected by the presence of cytochrome c or glutathione, but disruption of membrane by sodium dodecyl sulfate greatly enhanced the labeling of all viral proteins except G. Labeling of G protein was essentially restricted to the membrane-embedded, thermolysin-resistant tail fragment. Three bifunctional reagents, tartryl diazide, dimethylsuberimidate, and 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide, were tested for their capacity to cross-link proteins to membrane phospholipids of virions grown in the presence of [3H]palmitate. Only G and M proteins of intact virions were labeled with 3H-phospholipid by these cross-linkers; the reactions were not affected by cytochrome c but were abolished by disruption of virus with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Dimethylsuberimidate, which reacts with free amino groups, cross-linked 3H-phospholipid to both G and M protein. In contrast, the hydrophilic tartryl diazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the M protein, whereas the hydrophobic 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the intrinsic G protein. These data support the hypothesis that the G protein traverses the virion membrane and that the M protein is membrane associated but does not penetrate very deeply, if at all. PMID:6255216

  4. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 translocates protein kinase C beta to nucleus and enhances plasma membrane association of protein kinase C alpha in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Gagnon, A; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1994-02-01

    1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2-D3) increases membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) activity and immunoreactivity in renal epithelial (Madin Darby bovine kidney, MDBK) cells (Simboli-Campbell, M., Franks, D. J., and Welsh, J. E. (1992) Cell Signalling 4, 99-109). We have now characterized the effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 on the subcellular localization of three individual isozymes by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Although the total amount of PKC alpha, PKC beta, and PKC zeta are unaffected by 1,25-(OH)2-D3, this steroid hormone induces subcellular redistribution of both PKC alpha and PKC beta. Treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3 (100 nM, 24 h) enhances plasma membrane association of PKC alpha and induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. The effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 appear to be limited to the calcium-dependent PKC isozymes, since 1,25-(OH)2-D3 has no effect on the calcium independent isozyme, PKC zeta. In contrast to rapid transient PKC translocation seen in response to agents which interact with membrane receptors to induce phospholipid hydrolysis, modulation of PKC alpha and PKC beta is observed after 24 h treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3. In MDBK cells, the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (100 nM, 24 h) down-regulates PKC alpha and, to a lesser extent, PKC zeta, without altering their subcellular distribution. TPA also induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. MDBK cells treated with 1,25-(OH)2-D3, but not TPA, exhibit enhanced phosphorylation of endogenous nuclear proteins. In addition to the distinct effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and TPA on PKC isozyme patterns, 1,25-(OH)2-D3 up-regulates both the vitamin D receptor and calbindin D-28K, whereas TPA down-regulates the expression of both proteins. These data support the involvement of PKC in the mechanism of action of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and specifically implicate PKC beta in 1,25-(OH)2-D3-mediated nuclear events. PMID:8106362

  5. Ameliorative effect of membrane-associated estrogen receptor G protein coupled receptor 30 activation on object recognition memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takashi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kirino, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Membrane-associated estrogen receptor "G protein-coupled receptor 30" (GPR30) has been implicated in spatial recognition memory and protection against neuronal death. The present study investigated the role of GPR30 in object recognition memory in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model (5XFAD) by using novel object recognition (NOR) test. Impairment of long-term (24 h) recognition memory was observed in both male and female 5XFAD mice. Selective GPR30 agonist, G-1, ameliorated this impairment in female 5XFAD mice, but not in male mice. Our study demonstrated the ameliorative role of GPR30 in NOR memory impaired by AD pathology in female mice. PMID:27423484

  6. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  7. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-02-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling.

  8. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling. PMID:24577507

  9. Identification of a Novel Function of Adipocyte Plasma Membrane-Associated Protein (APMAP) in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus by Proteomic Analysis of Omental Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhang; Gao, Jing; Yin, Jiajing; Gu, Liping; Liu, Xing; Chen, Su; Huang, Qianfang; Lu, Huifang; Yang, Yuemin; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Yufan; Peng, Yongde

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is considered as an early stage of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we compared demographic and clinical data between six GDM subjects and six normal glucose tolerance (NGT; healthy controls) subjects and found that homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) increased in GDM. Many previous studies demonstrated that omental adipose tissue dysfunction could induce insulin resistance. Thus, to investigate the cause of insulin resistance in GDM, we used label-free proteomics to identify differentially expressed proteins in omental adipose tissues from GDM and NGT subjects (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003095). A total of 3528 proteins were identified, including 66 significantly changed proteins. Adipocyte plasma membrane-associated protein (APMAP, a.k.a. C20orf3), one of the differentially expressed proteins, was down-regulated in GDM omental adipose tissues. Furthermore, mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes were used to simulate omental adipocytes. The inhibition of APMAP expression by RNAi impaired insulin signaling and activated NFκB signaling in these adipocytes. Our study revealed that the down-regulation of APMAP in omental adipose tissue may play an important role in insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of GDM. PMID:26767403

  10. Mutational Analysis on Membrane Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) and Their Structural Consequences in Oculocutaeous Albinism Type 4 (OCA4)-A Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Balu; Purohit, Rituraj

    2016-11-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type IV (OCA4) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder which is characterized by reduced biosynthesis of melanin pigmentation in skin, hair, and eyes and caused by the genetic mutations in the membrane-associated transporter protein (MATP) encoded by SLC45A2 gene. The MATP protein consists of 530 amino acids which contains 12 putative transmembrane domains and plays an important role in pigmentation and probably functions as a membrane transporter in melanosomes. We scrutinized the most OCA4 disease-associated mutation and their structural consequences on SLC45A2 gene. To understand the atomic arrangement in 3D space, the native and mutant structures were modeled. Further the structural behavior of native and mutant MATP protein was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) approach in explicit lipid and water background. We found Y317C as the most deleterious and disease-associated SNP on SLC45A2 gene. In MDS, mutations in MATP protein showed loss of stability and became more flexible, which alter its structural conformation and function. This phenomenon has indicated a significant role in inducing OCA4. Our study explored the understanding of molecular mechanism of MATP protein upon mutation at atomic level and further helps in the field of pharmacogenomics to develop a personalized medicine for OCA4 disorder. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2608-2619, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019209

  11. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  12. A Visual Screen of Protein Localization during Sporulation Identifies New Components of Prospore Membrane-Associated Complexes in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chien; Santore, Ethan; Lavoie, Elizabeth; Needleman, Leor; Fiacco, Nicholas; Kim, Carey

    2014-01-01

    During ascospore formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the secretory pathway is reorganized to create new intracellular compartments, termed prospore membranes. Prospore membranes engulf the nuclei produced by the meiotic divisions, giving rise to individual spores. The shape and growth of prospore membranes are constrained by cytoskeletal structures, such as septin proteins, that associate with the membranes. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to various proteins that associate with septins at the bud neck during vegetative growth as well as to proteins encoded by genes that are transcriptionally induced during sporulation were examined for their cellular localization during prospore membrane growth. We report localizations for over 100 different GFP fusions, including over 30 proteins localized to the prospore membrane compartment. In particular, the screen identified IRC10 as a new component of the leading-edge protein complex (LEP), a ring structure localized to the lip of the prospore membrane. Localization of Irc10 to the leading edge is dependent on SSP1, but not ADY3. Loss of IRC10 caused no obvious phenotype, but an ady3 irc10 mutant was completely defective in sporulation and displayed prospore membrane morphologies similar to those of an ssp1 strain. These results reveal the architecture of the LEP and provide insight into the evolution of this membrane-organizing complex. PMID:24390141

  13. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Krey, Jocelyn F; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M; Nuttall, Alfred L; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca(2+)-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear's sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5(-/-) mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca(2+)-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5(-/-) mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle's key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance. PMID:27251877

  14. A Fungal Sarcolemmal Membrane-Associated Protein (SLMAP) Homolog Plays a Fundamental Role in Development and Localizes to the Nuclear Envelope, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Nordzieke, Steffen; Zobel, Thomas; Fränzel, Benjamin; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein (SLMAP) is a tail-anchored protein involved in fundamental cellular processes, such as myoblast fusion, cell cycle progression, and chromosomal inheritance. Further, SLMAP misexpression is associated with endothelial dysfunctions in diabetes and cancer. SLMAP is part of the conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex required for specific signaling pathways in yeasts, filamentous fungi, insects, and mammals. In filamentous fungi, STRIPAK was initially discovered in Sordaria macrospora, a model system for fungal differentiation. Here, we functionally characterize the STRIPAK subunit PRO45, a homolog of human SLMAP. We show that PRO45 is required for sexual propagation and cell-to-cell fusion and that its forkhead-associated (FHA) domain is essential for these processes. Protein-protein interaction studies revealed that PRO45 binds to STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and SmMOB3, which are also required for sexual propagation. Superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) further established that PRO45 localizes to the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. SIM also showed that localization to the nuclear envelope requires STRIPAK subunits PRO11 and PRO22, whereas for mitochondria it does not. Taken together, our study provides important insights into fundamental roles of the fungal SLMAP homolog PRO45 and suggests STRIPAK-related and STRIPAK-unrelated functions. PMID:25527523

  15. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Krey, Jocelyn F.; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M.; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca2+-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear’s sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5−/− mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca2+-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5−/− mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle’s key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance. PMID:27251877

  16. Three-dimensional structure and mimetic-membrane association of consensus 11-amino-acid motif from soybean LEA3 protein.

    PubMed

    Xue, Rong; Liu, Yun; Zheng, Yizhi; Wu, Yijie; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui; Ni, Jiazuan

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of a highly conserved 11-mer repeating motif in the primary sequence is a major characteristic of group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA3) proteins, which are strongly associated with abiotic stress tolerance of the plants. In this study, the three-dimensional structure, mimetic membrane association, and salt effect for consensus 11-mer motif from soybean PM2 protein (LEA3) were investigated in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles by NMR techniques. It was shown that the 11-mer motif was disordered in aqueous solution, but adopted an α-helix in SDS micelles. NMR diffusion measurements demonstrated that the 11-mer motif was associated with SDS micelles. Paramagnetic quenching NMR experiments further revealed the orientation of the 11-mer motif with respect to the mimetic membrane: the ordered N-terminal segment was inserted into the mimetic membrane, and the disordered C-terminal segment was exposed to water. In addition, salt addition could not change the secondary structure of the 11-mer motif, but might slightly alter the relative spatial position of some N-terminal residue atoms. These results implied that the 11-mer motif would take an important role in structural plasticity and membrane stabilization for LEA3 proteins. PMID:23325560

  17. Characterization of the mammalian septin H5: distinct patterns of cytoskeletal and membrane association from other septin proteins.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Surka, M; Howard, J; Trimble, W S

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling cytokinesis during yeast budding and animal cell fission appear quite different, yet both require members of the septin protein family. Mammalian homologs of this novel family of GTPases have been identified but little is known about their properties or functions. Using an antibody specific for the mammalian septin H5, we show that this protein is expressed at distinct levels in a variety of tissues. Tissue expression levels in different tissues did not coincide with those of the only previously characterized mammalian septin Nedd5. H5, like Nedd5, localizes to the cleavage furrow in mitotic fibroblast cells but in non-mitotic cells these proteins associate with actin filaments in different ways. Nedd5 predominantly localizes with stress fibers, but only associates with central portions of the microfilament bundles. In contrast, H5 associates with the entire length of the stress fibers and the cortical actin network. Conditions that disrupt the actin cytoskeleton also disrupt the filamentous patterns of both Nedd5 and H5, resulting in a punctate cytoplasmic pattern. Cell fractionation revealed that H5 co-fractionated with actin, while Nedd5 was predominantly restricted to the membrane fraction. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that although H5 will co-precipitate with Nedd5, the precipitation is not quantitative. Taken together, these results not only show that H5 behaves like a septin, but also demonstrate that individual septin proteins have distinct properties, suggesting that they may play different roles in cytokinesis and in other stages of the cell cycle. PMID:10340703

  18. Adaptor protein Ste50p links the Ste11p MEKK to the HOG pathway through plasma membrane association

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cunle; Jansen, Gregor; Zhang, Jianchun; Thomas, David Y.; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    In a variety of yeast cellular pathways, the Ste50p protein regulates the kinase function of the mitogen extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEKK) Ste11p. Both Ste11p and Ste50p contain sterile α motif (SAM) domains; these are interchangeable, and can be replaced by other protein-interacting modules. Furthermore, the function of the Ras association (RA)-like domain of Ste50p can be mimicked by a plasma membrane recruiting signal, and direct plasma membrane targeting of Ste11p bypasses the requirement of Ste50p for Ste11p function. Thus the regulatory role of Ste50p requires both the N-terminal SAM domain to bind Ste11p and the C-terminal RA-like domain to direct kinase localization. We have identified Opy2p, an integral membrane protein that can interact with Ste50p, as a new component in the Sho1p–Ste11p/Ste50p signaling branch of the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway. We propose that Opy2p can serve as a membrane anchor for the Ste50p/Ste11p module in the activation of the HOG pathway. PMID:16543225

  19. Membrane association of the PTEN tumor suppressor: Neutron scattering and MD simulations reveal the structure of protein-membranes complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Hirsh; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Neutron reflection (NR) from planar interfaces is an emerging technology that provides unique and otherwise inaccessible structural information on disordered molecular systems such as membrane proteins associated with fluid bilayers, thus addressing one of the remaining challenges of structural biology. Although intrinsically a low-resolution technique, using structural information from crystallography or NMR allows the construction of NR models that describe the architecture of protein-membrane complexes at high resolution. In addition, a combination of these methods with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has the potential to reveal the dynamics of protein interactions with the bilayer in atomistic detail. We review recent advances in this area by discussing the application of these techniques to the complex formed by the PTEN phosphatase with the plasma membrane. These studies provide insights in the cellular regulation of PTEN, its interaction with PI(4,5)P2 in the inner plasma membrane and the pathway by which its substrate, PI(3,4,5)P3, accesses the PTEN catalytic site. PMID:25461777

  20. Identification and characterization of the gltK gene encoding a membrane-associated glucose transport protein of pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adewoye, L O; Worobec, E A

    2000-08-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprB gene encodes the carbohydrate-selective OprB porin, which translocates substrate molecules across the outer membrane to the periplasmic glucose-binding protein. We identified and cloned two open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the oprB gene but are not in operonic arrangement with the oprB gene. The downstream ORF encodes a putative polypeptide homologous to members of a family of transcriptional repressors, whereas the oprB gene is preceded by an ORF encoding a putative product, which exhibits strong homology to several carbohydrate transport ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The genomic copy of the upstream ORF was mutagenized by homologous recombination. Analysis of the deletion mutant in comparison with the wild type revealed a significant reduction in [14C] glucose transport activity in the mutant strain, suggesting that this ORF likely encodes the inner membrane component of the glucose ABC transporter. It is thus designated gltK gene to reflect its homology to the Pseudomona fluorescens mtlK and its involvement in the high-affinity glucose transport system. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa gltK gene product is a member of the MalK subfamily of ABC proteins. PMID:10940570

  1. Role of the Amphipathic Peptide of Semliki Forest Virus Replicase Protein nsP1 in Membrane Association and Virus Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Spuul, Pirjo; Salonen, Anne; Merits, Andres; Jokitalo, Eija; Kääriäinen, Leevi; Ahola, Tero

    2007-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus RNA replication takes place in association with specific cytoplasmic vacuoles, derived from the endosomal apparatus. Of the four virus-encoded replicase proteins, nsP1 serves as the membrane anchor of the replication complex. An amphipathic peptide segment, G245STLYTESRKLLRSWHLPSV264, has been implicated in the membrane binding of nsP1. nsP1 variants with changes within the peptide were studied after protein expression and in the context of virus infection. Proteins with mutations R253E and W259A accumulated in the cytoplasm and were very poorly palmitoylated. The same mutations also drastically affected the localization of the precursor polyprotein P123, and they were lethal when introduced into the virus genome. Mutations R253A and L255A+L256A partially changed the localization of nsP1, and the respective viruses acquired compensatory changes. L255A+L256A only yielded virus encoding L255A+L256V, indicating the importance of a hydrophobic residue in the central 256 position. When fused to green fluorescent protein, the peptide was required in at least two tandem copies to effect a change in localization, but even then the fusion protein was associated with membranes in a nonspecific manner. Thus, the amphipathic peptide is a crucial element for the membrane association of nsP1 and the replication complex. It provides essential affinity for membranes, and other regions of nsP1 also appear to contribute to the localization of the protein. PMID:17093195

  2. REDOR solid-state NMR as a probe of the membrane locations of membrane-associated peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Sackett, Kelly; Xie, Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Weliky, David P.

    2015-04-01

    Rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) solid-state NMR is applied to probe the membrane locations of specific residues of membrane proteins. Couplings are measured between protein 13CO nuclei and membrane lipid or cholesterol 2H and 31P nuclei. Specific 13CO labeling is used to enable unambiguous assignment and 2H labeling covers a small region of the lipid or cholesterol molecule. The 13CO-31P and 13CO-2H REDOR respectively probe proximity to the membrane headgroup region and proximity to specific insertion depths within the membrane hydrocarbon core. One strength of the REDOR approach is use of chemically-native proteins and membrane components. The conventional REDOR pulse sequence with 100 kHz 2H π pulses is robust with respect to the 2H quadrupolar anisotropy. The 2H T1's are comparable to the longer dephasing times (τ's) and this leads to exponential rather than sigmoidal REDOR buildups. The 13CO-2H buildups are well-fitted to A × (1 - e-γτ) where A and γ are fitting parameters that are correlated as the fraction of molecules (A) with effective 13CO-2H coupling d = 3γ/2. The REDOR approach is applied to probe the membrane locations of the "fusion peptide" regions of the HIV gp41 and influenza virus hemagglutinin proteins which both catalyze joining of the viral and host cell membranes during initial infection of the cell. The HIV fusion peptide forms an intermolecular antiparallel β sheet and the REDOR data support major deeply-inserted and minor shallowly-inserted molecular populations. A significant fraction of the influenza fusion peptide molecules form a tight hairpin with antiparallel N- and C-α helices and the REDOR data support a single peptide population with a deeply-inserted N-helix. The shared feature of deep insertion of the β and α fusion peptide structures may be relevant for fusion catalysis via the resultant local perturbation of the membrane bilayer. Future applications of the REDOR approach may include samples that contain cell

  3. Interaction between maltose-binding protein and the membrane-associated maltose transporter complex in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dean, D A; Hor, L I; Shuman, H A; Nikaido, H

    1992-08-01

    Active transport of maltose in Escherichia coli requires the presence of both maltose-binding protein (MBP) in the periplasm and a complex of MalF, MalG, and MalK proteins (FGK2) located in the cytoplasmic membrane. Earlier, mutants in malF or malG were isolated that are able to grow on maltose in the complete absence of MBP. When the wild-type malE+ allele, coding for MBP, was introduced into these MBP-independent mutants, they frequently lost their ability to grow on maltose. Furthermore, starting from these Mal- strains, Mal+ secondary mutants that contained suppressor mutations in malE were isolated. In this study, we examined the interaction of wild-type and mutant MBPs with wild-type and mutant FGK2 complexes by using right-side-out membrane vesicles. The vesicles from a MBP-independent mutant (malG511) transported maltose in the absence of MBP, with Km and Vmax values similar to those found in intact cells. However, addition of wild-type MBP to these mutant vesicles produced unexpected responses. Although malE+ malG511 cells could not utilize maltose, wild-type MBP at low concentrations stimulated the maltose uptake by malG511 vesicles. At higher concentrations of the wild-type MBP and maltose, however, maltose transport into malG511 vesicles became severely inhibited. This behaviour of the vesicles was also reflected in the phenotype of malE+ malG511 cells, which were found to be capable of transporting maltose from a low external concentration (1 microM), but apparently not from millimolar concentrations present in maltose minimal medium. We found that the mutant FGK2 complex, containing MalG511, had a much higher apparent affinity towards the wild-type MBP than did the wild-type FGK2 complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1406246

  4. Regulation of B Cell Differentiation by Intracellular Membrane-Associated Proteins and microRNAs: Role in the Antibody Response.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zheng; Casali, Paolo; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-01-01

    B cells are central to adaptive immunity and their functions in antibody responses are exquisitely regulated. As suggested by recent findings, B cell differentiation is mediated by intracellular membrane structures (including endosomes, lysosomes, and autophagosomes) and protein factors specifically associated with these membranes, including Rab7, Atg5, and Atg7. These factors participate in vesicle formation/trafficking, signal transduction and induction of gene expression to promote antigen presentation, class switch DNA recombination (CSR)/somatic hypermutation (SHM), and generation/maintenance of plasma cells and memory B cells. Their expression is induced in B cells activated to differentiate and further fine-tuned by immune-modulating microRNAs, which coordinates CSR/SHM, plasma cell differentiation, and memory B cell differentiation. These short non-coding RNAs would individually target multiple factors associated with the same intracellular membrane compartments and collaboratively target a single factor in addition to regulating AID and Blimp-1. These, together with regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activities by endosomes and autophagosomes, show that intracellular membranes and microRNAs, two broadly relevant cell constituents, play important roles in balancing gene expression to specify B cell differentiation processes for optimal antibody responses. PMID:26579118

  5. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A.; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detector (FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs. PMID:25053648

  6. Cleavage by Caspase 8 and Mitochondrial Membrane Association Activate the BH3-only Protein Bid during TRAIL-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Zhang, Jingjing; O'Neill, Katelyn L; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Quadros, Rolen M; Tu, Yaping; Luo, Xu

    2016-05-27

    The BH3-only protein Bid is known as a critical mediator of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis following death receptor activation. However, since full-length Bid possesses potent apoptotic activity, the role of a caspase-mediated Bid cleavage is not established in vivo In addition, due to the fact that multiple caspases cleave Bid at the same site in vitro, the identity of the Bid-cleaving caspase during death receptor signaling remains uncertain. Moreover, as Bid maintains its overall structure following its cleavage by caspase 8, it remains unclear how Bid is activated upon cleavage. Here, Bid-deficient (Bid KO) colon cancer cells were generated by gene editing, and were reconstituted with wild-type or mutants of Bid. While the loss of Bid blocked apoptosis following treatment by TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), this blockade was relieved by re-introduction of the wild-type Bid. In contrast, the caspase-resistant mutant Bid(D60E) and a BH3 defective mutant Bid(G94E) failed to restore TRAIL-induced apoptosis. By generating Bid/Bax/Bak-deficient (TKO) cells, we demonstrated that Bid is primarily cleaved by caspase 8, not by effector caspases, to give rise to truncated Bid (tBid) upon TRAIL treatment. Importantly, despite the presence of an intact BH3 domain, a tBid mutant lacking the mitochondrial targeting helices (α6 and α7) showed diminished apoptotic activity. Together, these results for the first time establish that cleavage by caspase 8 and the subsequent association with the outer mitochondrial membrane are two critical events that activate Bid during death receptor-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27053107

  7. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration < 5 å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and

  8. Development of an enzyme immunoassay specific for a core protein epitope of a novel small basement membrane associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan from human kidney.

    PubMed

    Stöcker, G; Stickeler, E; Switalla, S; Fischer, D C; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1997-02-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans are major components of the glomerular basement membrane and play a key role in their molecular organization and function. Moreover, their presence is essential for the maintenance of the selective permeability of the glomerular basement membrane. Recently, we have isolated and characterized a novel, small basement membrane associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan from human aorta and kidney. Using specific monoclonal antibodies we have shown that the novel heparan sulphate proteoglycan is predominantly located in the glomerular basement membrane, to a lesser extent in the basement membrane of tubuli, and also in the mesangium. Turnover or, in the course of kidney diseases, degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycan from glomerular basement membranes may lead to urinary excretion of heparan sulphate proteoglycan. Therefore, changes in the structure and function of glomerular basement membranes may be directly detected by measuring the excretion of a component of this basement menbrane, e. g. heparan sulphate proteoglycan into urine. Here we describe the establishment of an enzyme immunoassay for the sensitive detection of the novel, small heparan sulphate proteoglycan in urine. In this assay the specific monoclonal antibody 1F10/B8, which recognizes a core protein epitope, was used to detect the polyanionic heparan sulphate proteoglycan bound to the surface of a cationic charge modified microtitre plate. This assay allows the sensitive and specific detection of the small heparan sulphate proteoglycan, which is released from the glomerular basement membrane into urine during normal turnover and also in the course of kidney diseases. PMID:9056750

  9. Ubiquitin-mediated Regulation of CD86 Protein Expression by the Ubiquitin Ligase Membrane-associated RING-CH-1 (MARCH1)*

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Kathleen; Jabbour, Maurice; Bhagwandin, Candida; Deymier, Martin J.; Theisen, Debra L.; Lybarger, Lonnie

    2011-01-01

    The activation of naïve T cells requires antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs), and the process of antigen presentation is regulated over the course of DC maturation. One key aspect of this regulation is the cell surface up-regulation upon DC maturation of peptide·MHC-II complexes and the costimulatory molecule CD86. It is now clear that these critical induction events involve changes in ubiquitin-dependent trafficking of MHC-II and CD86 by the E3 ligase membrane-associated RING-CH-1 (MARCH1). Although ubiquitin-dependent trafficking of MHC-II has been well characterized, much less is known regarding the post-transcriptional regulation of CD86 expression. Here, we examined the physical and functional interaction between CD86 and MARCH1. We observed that CD86 is rapidly endocytosed in the presence of MARCH1 followed by lysosome-dependent degradation. Furthermore, we found that the association between CD86 and MARCH1 was conferred primarily by the transmembrane domains of the respective proteins. In contrast to MHC-II, which has a single, conserved ubiquitin acceptor site in the cytosolic domain, we found that multiple lysine residues in the cytosolic tail of CD86 could support ubiquitination consistent with the relative lack of sequence conservation across species within the CD86 cytosolic domain. These findings suggest that MARCH1 recruits multiple substrates via transmembrane domain-mediated interactions to permit substrate ubiquitination in the face of diverse cytosolic domain sequences. PMID:21896490

  10. Mutation of the Highly Conserved Ser-40 of the HIV-1 p6 Gag Protein to Phe Causes the Formation of a Hydrophobic Patch, Enhances Membrane Association, and Polyubiquitination of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Friedrich; Setz, Christian; Friedrich, Melanie; Rauch, Pia; Solbak, Sara Marie; Frøystein, Nils Åge; Henklein, Petra; Votteler, Jörg; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein contains two late assembly (l-) domains that recruit proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway to mediate membrane fission between the nascent virion and the cell membrane. It was recently demonstrated that mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 to Phe (S40F) disturbs CA-SP1 processing, virus morphogenesis, and infectivity. It also causes the formation of filopodia-like structures, while virus release remains unaffected. Here, we show that the mutation S40F, but not the conservative mutation to Asp (S40D) or Asn (S40N), augments membrane association, K48-linked polyubiquitination, entry into the 26S proteasome, and, consequently, enhances MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag derived epitopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure analyses revealed that the newly introduced Phe-40, together with Tyr-36, causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch at the C-terminal α-helix of p6, providing a molecular rationale for the enhanced membrane association of Gag observed in vitro and in HIV-1 expressing cells. The extended exposure of the S40F mutant to unidentified membrane-resident ubiquitin E3-ligases might trigger the polyubiquitination of Gag. The cumulative data support a previous model of a so far undefined property of p6, which, in addition to MA, acts as membrane targeting domain of Gag. PMID:25279819

  11. The effects of down-regulating expression of Arabidopsis thaliana membrane-associated acyl-CoA binding protein 2 on acyl-lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple classes of acyl-CoA binding proteins are encoded by plant genomes, including a plant-unique class of predicted integral membrane-proteins. Transcript analysis revealed that both of the integral membrane-acyl-CoA binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana, ACBP1 and ACBP2, are expressed in al...

  12. Proteomic analysis of two metabolic proteins with potential to translocate to plasma membrane associated with tumor metastasis development and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Luofu; Yao, Ling; Hu, Xiaofang; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-04-01

    Metastasis is the main cause for death of breast cancer patients. However, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. Plasma membrane (PM) proteins play a key role in various biological processes, especially for cell migration. In this study, we used a set of well-characterized mammary mouse cell lines, 67NR, 168FARN, 4T1, representing the metastatic progression, to study the differentially expressed membrane proteins. These proteins were analyzed by a linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LTQ-MS/MS) following cell surface biotinylation and streptavidin purification. A total of 1667 membrane proteins were identified, out of which 472 were characterized as differentially expressed with at least 2-fold change and p-value < 0.01. Functional clustering of the 472 proteins revealed that 178 of them were metabolic proteins. Finally, we focused on two metabolic proteins, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and NAD(P)H steroid dehydrogenase-like protein (NSDHL), which were validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence. We found that FASN and NSDHL translocated to the plasma membrane from the intracellular compartment, and their expressions increased from 67NR to 4T1. This alteration of localization along with differential expressions might be necessary for metastasis development. Potentially, FASN and NSDHL could serve as drug targets in new antimetastasis therapy. PMID:23445495

  13. Brittle Culm15 Encodes a Membrane-Associated Chitinase-Like Protein Required for Cellulose Biosynthesis in Rice1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Baocai; Dai, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Shang-Guan, Keke; Peng, Yonggang; Zhou, Yihua; Zhu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Plant chitinases, a class of glycosyl hydrolases, participate in various aspects of normal plant growth and development, including cell wall metabolism and disease resistance. The rice (Oryza sativa) genome encodes 37 putative chitinases and chitinase-like proteins. However, none of them has been characterized at the genetic level. In this study, we report the isolation of a brittle culm mutant, bc15, and the map-based cloning of the BC15/OsCTL1 (for chitinase-like1) gene affected in the mutant. The gene encodes the rice chitinase-like protein BC15/OsCTL1. Mutation of BC15/OsCTL1 causes reduced cellulose content and mechanical strength without obvious alterations in plant growth. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that BC15/OsCTL1 is a class II chitinase-like protein that is devoid of both an amino-terminal cysteine-rich domain and the chitinase activity motif H-E-T-T but possesses an amino-terminal transmembrane domain. Biochemical assays demonstrated that BC15/OsCTL1 is a Golgi-localized type II membrane protein that lacks classical chitinase activity. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and β-glucuronidase activity analyses indicated that BC15/OsCTL1 is ubiquitously expressed. Investigation of the global expression profile of wild-type and bc15 plants, using Illumina RNA sequencing, further suggested a possible mechanism by which BC15/OsCTL1 mediates cellulose biosynthesis and cell wall remodeling. Our findings provide genetic evidence of a role for plant chitinases in cellulose biosynthesis in rice, which appears to differ from their roles as revealed by analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PMID:22665444

  14. ERK7 is a negative regulator of protein secretion in response to amino-acid starvation by modulating Sec16 membrane association

    PubMed Central

    Zacharogianni, Margarita; Kondylis, Vangelis; Tang, Yang; Farhan, Hesso; Xanthakis, Despina; Fuchs, Florian; Boutros, Michael; Rabouille, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    RNAi screening for kinases regulating the functional organization of the early secretory pathway in Drosophila S2 cells has identified the atypical Mitotic-Associated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Extracellularly regulated kinase 7 (ERK7) as a new modulator. We found that ERK7 negatively regulates secretion in response to serum and amino-acid starvation, in both Drosophila and human cells. Under these conditions, ERK7 turnover through the proteasome is inhibited, and the resulting higher levels of this kinase lead to a modification in a site within the C-terminus of Sec16, a key ER exit site component. This post-translational modification elicits the cytoplasmic dispersion of Sec16 and the consequent disassembly of the ER exit sites, which in turn results in protein secretion inhibition. We found that ER exit site disassembly upon starvation is TOR complex 1 (TORC1) independent, showing that under nutrient stress conditions, cell growth is not only inhibited at the transcriptional and translational levels, but also independently at the level of secretion by inhibiting the membrane flow through the early secretory pathway. These results reveal the existence of new signalling circuits participating in the complex regulation of cell growth. PMID:21847093

  15. pH-Dependent Vesicle Fusion Induced by the Ectodomain of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Membrane Fusion Protein gp41: Two Kinetically Distinct Processes and Fully-Membrane-Associated gp41 with Predominant β Sheet Fusion Peptide Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U.; Sackett, Kelly; Nethercott, Matthew J.; Weliky, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The gp41 protein of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) catalyzes fusion between HIV and host cell membranes. The ~180-residue ectodomain of gp41 is outside the virion and is the most important gp41 region for membrane fusion. The ectodomain consists of an apolar fusion peptide (FP) region followed by N-heptad repeat (NHR), loop, and C-heptad repeat (CHR) regions. The FP is critical for fusion and is hypothesized to bind to the host cell membrane. Large ectodomain constructs either with or without the FP are highly aggregated at physiologic pH but soluble in the pH 3–4 range with hyperthermostable hairpin structure with antiparallel NHR and CHR helices. The present study focuses on the large gp41 ectodomain constructs “Hairpin” (HP) containing NHR+loop+CHR and “FP-Hairpin” (FP-HP) containing FP+NHR+loop+CHR. Both proteins induce rapid and extensive fusion of anionic vesicles at pH 4 where the protein is positively-charged but do not induce fusion at pH 7 where the protein is negatively charged. This observation, along with lack of fusion of neutral vesicles at either pH supports the significance of attractive protein/membrane electrostatics in fusion. The functional role of the hydrophobic FP is supported by increases in the rate and extent of fusion for FP-HP relative to HP. There are two kinetically distinct fusion processes at pH 4: (1) a faster ~100 ms−1 process with rate strongly positively correlated with vesicle charge; and (2) a slower ~5 ms−1 process with extent strongly inversely correlated with this charge. The faster charge-dependent process is likely related to the electrostatic energy released upon initial monomer protein binding to the vesicle. After dissipation of this energy, the subsequent slower process is likely due to the equilibrium membrane-associated structure of the protein. The slower process may be more physiologically relevant because HIV/host cell fusion occurs at physiologic pH with gp41 restricted to the narrow region

  16. Malaria Parasite CLAG3, a Protein Linked to Nutrient Channels, Participates in High Molecular Weight Membrane-Associated Complexes in the Infected Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Zainabadi, Kayvan

    2016-01-01

    Malaria infected erythrocytes show increased permeability to a number of solutes important for parasite growth as mediated by the Plasmodial Surface Anion Channel (PSAC). The P. falciparum clag3 genes have recently been identified as key determinants of PSAC, though exactly how they contribute to channel function and whether additional host/parasite proteins are required remain unknown. To begin to answer these questions, I have taken a biochemical approach. Here I have used an epitope-tagged CLAG3 parasite to perform co-immunoprecipitation experiments using membrane fractions of infected erythrocytes. Native PAGE and mass spectrometry studies reveal that CLAG3 participate in at least three different high molecular weight complexes: a ~720kDa complex consisting of CLAG3, RHOPH2 and RHOPH3; a ~620kDa complex consisting of CLAG3 and RHOPH2; and a ~480kDa complex composed solely of CLAG3. Importantly, these complexes can be found throughout the parasite lifecycle but are absent in untransfected controls. Extracellular biotin labeling and protease susceptibility studies localize the 480kDa complex to the erythrocyte membrane. This complex, likely composed of a homo-oligomer of 160kDa CLAG3, may represent a functional subunit, possibly the pore, of PSAC. PMID:27299521

  17. Use of Amplicon-6 Vectors Derived from Human Herpesvirus 6 for Efficient Expression of Membrane-Associated and -Secreted Proteins in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Ronen; Singer, Oded; Moseri, Adi; Frenkel, Niza

    2004-01-01

    The composite amplicon-6 vectors, which are derived from human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), can target hematopoietic cells. In the presence of the respective helper viruses, the amplicons are replicated by the rolling circle mechanism, yielding defective genomes of overall size 135 to 150 kb, composed of multiple repeats of units, containing the viral DNA replication origin, packaging signals, and the selected transgene(s). We report the use of amplicon-6 vectors designed for transgene expression in T cells. The selected transgenes included the green fluorescent protein marker, the herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D (gD), and the gD gene deleted in the transmembrane region (gDsec). The vectors were tested after electroporation and passage in T cells with or without helper HHV-6A superinfections. The results were as follows. (i)The vectors could be passaged both as cell-associated and as cell-free secreted virions infectious to new cells. (ii)The intact gD accumulated at the cell surface, whereas the gDsec was dispersed at internal locations of the cells or was secreted into the medium. (iii)Analyses of amplicon-6-gD expression by flow cytometry have shown significant expression in cultures with reiterated amplicons and helper viruses. The vector has spread to >60% of the cells, and the efficiency of expression per cell increased 15-fold, most likely due to the presence of concatemeric amplicon repeats. Current studies are designed to test whether amplicon-6 vectors can be used for gene therapy in lymphocytes and whether amplicon-6 vectors expressed in T cells and dendritic cells can induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:15078955

  18. Membrane-Associated Quinoprotein Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, James A.; Bergmann, David J.; Boyd, Jeffery M.; Kunz, Ryan C.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2001-01-01

    A membrane-associated, dye-linked formaldehyde dehydrogenase (DL-FalDH) was isolated from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The enzyme was the major formaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme in cells cultured in high (above 1 μmol of Cu per mg of cell protein) copper medium and expressing the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase. Soluble NAD(P)+-linked formaldehyde oxidation was the major activity in cells cultured in low-copper medium and expressing the soluble methane monooxygenase (Tate and Dalton, Microbiology 145:159–167, 1999; Vorholt et al., J. Bacteriol. 180:5351–5356, 1998). The membrane-associated enzyme is a homotetramer with a subunit molecular mass of 49,500 Da. UV-visible absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electrospray mass spectrometry suggest the redox cofactor of the DL-FalDH is pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), with a PQQ-to-subunit stochiometry of approximately 1:1. The enzyme was specific for formaldehyde, oxidizing formaldehyde to formate, and utilized the cytochrome b559/569 complex as the physiological electron acceptor. PMID:11698372

  19. Membrane-associated quinoprotein formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Zahn, J A; Bergmann, D J; Boyd, J M; Kunz, R C; DiSpirito, A A

    2001-12-01

    A membrane-associated, dye-linked formaldehyde dehydrogenase (DL-FalDH) was isolated from the obligate methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. The enzyme was the major formaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme in cells cultured in high (above 1 micromol of Cu per mg of cell protein) copper medium and expressing the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase. Soluble NAD(P)(+)-linked formaldehyde oxidation was the major activity in cells cultured in low-copper medium and expressing the soluble methane monooxygenase (Tate and Dalton, Microbiology 145:159-167, 1999; Vorholt et al., J. Bacteriol. 180:5351-5356, 1998). The membrane-associated enzyme is a homotetramer with a subunit molecular mass of 49,500 Da. UV-visible absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electrospray mass spectrometry suggest the redox cofactor of the DL-FalDH is pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), with a PQQ-to-subunit stochiometry of approximately 1:1. The enzyme was specific for formaldehyde, oxidizing formaldehyde to formate, and utilized the cytochrome b(559/569) complex as the physiological electron acceptor. PMID:11698372

  20. Ocular Surface Membrane-Associated Mucins.

    PubMed

    Ablamowicz, Anna F; Nichols, Jason J

    2016-07-01

    Ocular surface epithelial cells produce and secrete mucins that form a hydrophilic barrier for protection and lubrication of the eye. This barrier, the glycocalyx, is formed by high molecular weight heavily glycosylated membrane-associated mucins (MAMs) that include MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16. These mucins extend into the tear film from the anterior surfaces of the conjunctiva and cornea, and, through interactions with galectin-3, prevent penetrance of pathogens into the eye. Due primarily to the glycosylation of the mucins, the glycocalyx also creates less friction during blinking and enables the tear film to maintain wetting of the eye. The secretory mucins include soluble MUC7 and gel-forming MUC5AC. These mucins, particularly MUC5AC, assist with removal of debris from the tear film and contribute to the hydrophilicity of the tear film. While new methodologies and cell culture models have expanded our understanding of mucin structure and function on the ocular surface, there is still a paucity of studies characterizing the glycosylation of MAMs on a normal ocular surface and a diseased ocular surface. Although studies have shown alterations in mucin production and expression in dry eye diseases, the relationship between changes in mucins and functional consequences is unclear. This review focuses on comparing what is known about MAMs in wet-surfaced epithelia of the body to what has been studied on the eye. PMID:27154035

  1. Efficient Exploration of Membrane-Associated Phenomena at Atomic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Baylon, Javier L.; Arcario, Mark J.; Muller, Melanie P.; Wu, Zhe; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes constitute a critical component in all living cells. In addition to providing a conducive environment to a wide range of cellular processes, including transport and signaling, mounting evidence has established active participation of specific lipids in modulating membrane protein function through various mechanisms. Understanding lipid-protein interactions underlying these mechanisms at a sufficiently high resolution has proven extremely challenging, partly due to the semi-fluid nature of the membrane. In order to address this challenge computationally, multiple methods have been developed, including an alternative membrane representation termed HMMM (highly mobile membrane mimetic) in which lateral lipid diffusion has been significantly enhanced without compromising atomic details. The model allows for efficient sampling of lipid-protein interactions at atomic resolution, thereby significantly enhancing the effectiveness of molecular dynamics simulations in capturing membrane-associated phenomena. In this review, after providing an overview of HMMM model development, we will describe briefly successful application of the model to study a variety of membrane processes, including lipid-dependent binding and insertion of peripheral proteins, the mechanism of phospholipid insertion into lipid bilayers, and characterization of optimal tilt angle of transmembrane helices. We conclude with practical recommendations for proper usage of the model in simulation studies of membrane processes. PMID:25998378

  2. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Evan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer. In yeast, cortical ER is stapled to the PM through membrane-tethering proteins, which establish a direct connection between the membranes. In this review, we consider passive and facilitated models for lipid transfer at PM–ER contact sites. Besides the tethering proteins, we examine the roles of an additional repertoire of lipid and protein regulators that prime and propagate PM–ER membrane association. We conclude that instead of being simple mediators of membrane association, regulatory components of membrane contact sites have complex and multilayered functions. PMID:26949334

  3. Electrostatic Interactions Drive Membrane Association of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag MA Domain▿

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Amanda K.; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.

    2007-01-01

    The assembly of most retroviruses occurs at the plasma membrane. Membrane association is directed by MA, the N-terminal domain of the Gag structural protein. For human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), this association is mediated in part by a myristate fatty acid modification. Conflicting evidence has been presented on the relative importance of myristoylation, of ionic interactions between protein and membrane, and of Gag multimerization in membrane association in vivo. We addressed these questions biochemically by determining the affinity of purified myristoylated HIV-1 MA for liposomes of defined composition, both for monomeric and for dimeric forms of the protein. Myristoylation increases the barely detectable intrinsic affinity of the apo-protein for liposomes by only 10-fold, and the resulting affinity is still weak, similar to that of the naturally nonmyristoylated MA of Rous sarcoma virus. Membrane binding of HIV-1 MA is absolutely dependent on the presence of negatively charged lipid and is abrogated at high ionic strength. Forced dimerization of MA increases its membrane affinity by several orders of magnitude. When green fluorescent protein fusions of monomeric or dimeric MA are expressed in cells, the dimeric but not the monomeric protein becomes strongly membrane associated. Computational modeling supports these results and suggests a molecular mechanism for the modest effect of myristoylation on binding, wherein the membrane provides a hydrophobic environment for the myristate that is energetically similar to that provided by the protein. Overall, the results imply that the driving force for membrane association stems largely from ionic interactions between multimerized Gag and negatively charged phospholipids. PMID:17392361

  4. Prevention of hyperoxia-induced alterations in synaptosomal membrane-associated proteins by N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone and 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (Tempol).

    PubMed

    Howard, B J; Yatin, S; Hensley, K; Allen, K L; Kelly, J P; Carney, J; Butterfield, D A

    1996-11-01

    Hyperoxia has been considered a model of free radical reactive oxygen species production in aging and age-related disorders. Previously, we studied the membrane protein alterations that occur during hyperoxia; we found that exposure of young animals to 24 h of hyperoxia provided the greatest degree of oxidation of cortical synaptosomal membrane proteins. We reasoned that free radical oxidation was involved in this protein oxidation. In accordance, in the current study we investigated the protective nature of two known free radical scavengers, N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (Tempol), against 24-h hyperoxia damage. The three techniques used in this study were electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) protein-specific spin labeling, assay of the activity of the oxidatively sensitive enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS), and measurement of protein carbonyl content. Before hyperoxia, gerbils received intraperitoneal injections of varying concentrations of either of the two free radical scavengers. After 30 min, the gerbils were exposed to 90-100% O2 for 24 h. For the spin labeling experiments, cortical synaptosomes were isolated from gerbils. The membrane proteins were spin labeled with the thiol-specific label MAL-6 (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-maleimidopiperidin-1-oxyl). As in our earlier study, the EPR spectral parameter of MAL-6-labeled membranes, the W/S ratio, decreased with hyperoxia (p < 0.00001). This effect was lessened significantly with administration of PBN (p < 0.0003) or Tempol (p < 0.00003). For the GS and protein carbonyl assays, cortical proteins were used. The activity of the GS decreased with hyperoxia (p < 0.000005), and this effect likewise was lessened with administration of PBN (p < 0.004) or Tempol (p < 0.002). The protein carbonyl content increased with hyperoxia (p < 0.0002), and there was a protective effect found with Tempol (p < 0.000001). The optimum doses for PBN and Tempol were 20 and 5 mg

  5. Translocation between membranes and cytosol of p42IP4, a specific inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate/phosphatidylinositol 3,4, 5-trisphosphate-receptor protein from brain, is induced by inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and regulated by a membrane-associated 5-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R; Adelt, S; Vogel, G; Reiser, G

    1999-10-01

    The highly conserved 42-kDa protein, p42IP4 was identified recently from porcine brain. It has also been identified similarly in bovine, rat and human brain as a protein with two pleckstrin homology domains that binds Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity and selectivity. The brain-specific p42IP4 occurs both as membrane-associated and cytosolic protein. Here, we investigate whether p42IP4 can be translocated from membranes by ligand interaction. p42IP4 is released from cerebellar membranes by incubation with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. This dissociation is concentration-dependent (> 100 nM), occurs within a few minutes and and is ligand-specific. p42IP4 specifically associates with PtdIns(3, 4,5)P3-containing lipid vesicles and can dissociate from these vesicles by addition of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. p42IP4 is only transiently translocated from the membranes as Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 can be degraded by a membrane-associated 5-phosphatase to Ins(1,3,4)P3. Then, p42IP4 re-binds to the membranes from which it can be re-released by re-addition of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. Thus, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 specifically induces the dissociation from membranes of a PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding protein that can reversibly re-associate with the membranes. Quantitative analysis of the inositol phosphates in rat brain tissue revealed a concentration of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 comparable to that required for p42IP4 translocation. Thus, in vivo p42IP4 might interact with membranes in a ligand-controlled manner and be involved in physiological processes induced by the two second messengers Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. PMID:10504414

  6. A Plasma Membrane Association Module in Yeast Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Bianchi, Frans; Ruiz, Stephanie J; Meutiawati, Febrina; Poolman, Bert

    2016-07-29

    Amino acid permeases (AAPs) in the plasma membrane (PM) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the uptake of amino acids and involved in regulation of their cellular levels. Here, we report on a strong and complex module for PM association found in the C-terminal tail of AAPs. Using in silico analyses and mutational studies we found that the C-terminal sequences of Gap1, Bap2, Hip1, Tat1, Tat2, Mmp1, Sam3, Agp1, and Gnp1 are about 50 residues long, associate with the PM, and have features that discriminate them from the termini of organellar amino acid transporters. We show that this sequence (named PMasseq) contains an amphipathic α-helix and the FWC signature, which is palmitoylated by palmitoyltransferase Pfa4. Variations of PMasseq, found in different AAPs, lead to different mobilities and localization patterns, whereas the disruption of the sequence has an adverse effect on cell viability. We propose that PMasseq modulates the function and localization of AAPs along the PM. PMasseq is one of the most complex protein signals for plasma membrane association across species and can be used as a delivery vehicle for the PM. PMID:27226538

  7. Nuclear translocation of the 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated rapid response to steroids) receptor protein and NF{kappa}B in differentiating NB4 leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenqing; Beilhartz, Greg; Roy, Yvette; Richard, Cynthia L.; Curtin, Maureen; Brown, Lauren; Cadieux, Danielle; Coppolino, Marc; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Nemere, Ilka; Meckling, Kelly A.

    2010-04-15

    1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) primes NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocyte/macrophage lineage through a non-genomic mechanism. Here we show that NB4 cells express high levels of the recently identified membrane receptor for 1,25D{sub 3}, which is a distinct gene product from the classical nuclear vitamin D receptor. This 57 kDa protein, named 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (Membrane Activated Rapid Response to Steroids)/ERp57/PIA3 appears to associate in a complex with the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B). In unstimulated cells, 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS can be co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies directed at NF{kappa}B, and NF{kappa}B is co-precipitated when antibodies against 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS or ERp57 are used. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies demonstrate that both 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS and NF{kappa}B begin translocating to the nucleus within minutes of co-stimulation with 1,25D{sub 3} and phorbol ester. The predominant nuclear localization of both proteins precedes the expression of the monocyte/macrophage phenotype and suggests that this event may be critical to the differentiation pathway. This suggests a role for 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS in the nucleus as a regulator of gene expression. Here it may also regulate the activity of NF{kappa}B and other factors with which it may be interacting.

  8. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-01-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  9. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-02-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  10. Membrane associated phospholipase C from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Ryu, S.H.; Suh, P.; Choi, W.C.; Rhee, S.G.

    1987-05-01

    Cytosolic fractions of bovine brain contain 2 immunologically distinct phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase (PLC), PLC-I and PLC-II, whose MW are 150,000 and 145,000 respectively, under a denaturing condition. Monoclonal antibodies were derived against each form and specific radioimmunoassays were developed. Distribution of PLC-I and PLC-II in cytosolic and particulate fractions was measured using the radioimmunoassay. More than 90% of PLC-II was found in the cytosolic fraction, while the anti-PLC-I antibody cross-reacting protein was distributed nearly equally between the soluble fraction and the 2 M KCl extract of particulate fraction. The PLC enzyme in the particulate fraction was purified to homogeneity, yielding 2 proteins of 140 KDa and 150 KDa when analyzed on SDS-PAGE. Neither of the 2 enzymes cross-reacted with anti-PLC-II antibodies, but both could be immunoblotted by all 4 different anti-PLC-I antibodies. This suggests that the 140 KDa PLC was derived from the 150 KDa form. The 150 Kda form from particulate fraction was indistinguishable from the cytosolic PLC-I when their mixture was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. In addition, the elution profile of tryptic peptides derived from the 150 KDa particulate form was identical to that of cytosolic PLC-I. This result indicates that PLC-I is reversibly associated to membranes.

  11. Membrane-associated DNA Transport Machines

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Briana; Dubnau, David

    2010-01-01

    DNA pumps play important roles in bacteria during cell division and during the transfer of genetic material by conjugation and transformation. The FtsK/SpoIIIE proteins carry out the translocation of double-stranded DNA to ensure complete chromosome segregation during cell division. In contrast, the complex molecular machines that mediate conjugation and genetic transformation drive the transport of single stranded DNA. The transformation machine also processes this internalized DNA and mediates its recombination with the resident chromosome during and after uptake, whereas the conjugation apparatus processes DNA before transfer. This article reviews these three types of DNA pumps, with attention to what is understood of their molecular mechanisms, their energetics and their cellular localizations. PMID:20573715

  12. Targeting RAS Membrane Association: Back to the Future for Anti-RAS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Adrienne D.; Der, Channing J.; Philips, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins require membrane association for their biological activity, making this association a logical target for anti-RAS therapeutics. Lipid modification of RAS proteins by a farnesyl isoprenoid is an obligate step in that association, and is an enzymatic process. Accordingly, farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) were developed as potential anti-RAS drugs. The lack of efficacy of FTIs as anti-cancer drugs was widely seen as indicating that blocking RAS membrane association was a flawed approach to cancer treatment. However, a deeper understanding of RAS modification and trafficking has revealed that this was an erroneous conclusion. In the presence of FTIs, KRAS and NRAS, which are the RAS isoforms most frequently mutated in cancer, become substrates for alternative modification, can still associate with membranes, and can still function. Thus, FTIs failed not because blocking RAS membrane association is an ineffective approach, but because FTIs failed to accomplish that task. Recent findings regarding RAS isoform trafficking and the regulation of RAS subcellular localization have rekindled interest in efforts to target these processes. In particular, improved understanding of the palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle that regulates RAS interaction with the plasma membrane, endomembranes and cytosol, and of the potential importance of RAS chaperones, have led to new approaches. Efforts to validate and target other enzymatically regulated post-translational modifications are also ongoing. In this review, we revisit lessons learned, describe the current state of the art, and highlight challenging but promising directions to achieve the goal of disrupting RAS membrane association and subcellular localization for anti-RAS drug development. PMID:25878363

  13. Chicken egg shell membrane associated proteins and peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Egg shells are poultry industry byproducts with potential for use in various biological and agricultural applications. We have been interested in the membranes underlying the calcareous shell, as a feed supplement which showed potential to t improve immunity and performance of post hatch poultry. ...

  14. Knowledge-based Potential for Positioning Membrane-Associated Structures and Assessing Residue Specific Energetic Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Chaim A.; Hannigan, Brett T.; Donald, Jason E.; Keasar, Chen; Saven, Jeffrey G.; DeGrado, William F.; Samish, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    The complex hydrophobic and hydrophilic milieus of membrane-associated proteins pose experimental and theoretical challenges to their understanding. Here we produce a non-redundant database to compute knowledge-based asymmetric cross-membrane potentials from the per-residue distributions of Cβ, Cγ and functional group atoms. We predict transmembrane and peripherally associated regions from genomic sequence and position peptides and protein structures relative to the bilayer (available at http://www.degradolab.org/ez). The pseudo-energy topological landscapes underscore positional stability and functional mechanisms demonstrated here for antimicrobial peptides, transmembrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins. Moreover, experimental effects of point mutations on the relative ratio changes of dual-topology proteins are quantitatively reproduced. The functional group potential and the membrane-exposed residues display the largest energetic changes enabling to detect native-like structures from decoys. Hence, focusing on the uniqueness of membrane-associated proteins and peptides, we quantitatively parameterize their cross-membrane propensity thus facilitating structural refinement, characterization, prediction and design. PMID:22579257

  15. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:25919792

  16. Structure–function relationships of membrane-associated GT-B glycosyltransferases†

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Giganti, David; Jackson, Mary; Alzari, Pedro M; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-associated GT-B glycosyltransferases (GTs) comprise a large family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sugar moiety from nucleotide-sugar donors to a wide range of membrane-associated acceptor substrates, mostly in the form of lipids and proteins. As a consequence, they generate a significant and diverse amount of glycoconjugates in biological membranes, which are particularly important in cell–cell, cell–matrix and host–pathogen recognition events. Membrane-associated GT-B enzymes display two “Rossmann-fold” domains separated by a deep cleft that includes the catalytic center. They associate permanently or temporarily to the phospholipid bilayer by a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. They have the remarkable property to access both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates that reside within chemically distinct environments catalyzing their enzymatic transformations in an efficient manner. Here, we discuss the considerable progress that has been made in recent years in understanding the molecular mechanism that governs substrate and membrane recognition, and the impact of the conformational transitions undergone by these GTs during the catalytic cycle. PMID:24253765

  17. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  18. Membrane-association of mRNA decapping factors is independent of stress in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Huch, Susanne; Gommlich, Jessie; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Beckham, Carla; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the degradation of mRNA occurs on translating ribosomes or alternatively within RNA granules called P bodies, which are aggregates whose core constituents are mRNA decay proteins and RNA. In this study, we examined the mRNA decapping proteins, Dcp1, Dcp2, and Dhh1, using subcellular fractionation. We found that decapping factors co-sediment in the polysome fraction of a sucrose gradient and do not alter their behaviour with stress, inhibition of translation or inhibition of the P body formation. Importantly, their localisation to the polysome fraction is independent of the RNA, suggesting that these factors may be constitutively localised to the polysome. Conversely, polysomal and post-polysomal sedimentation of the decapping proteins was abolished with the addition of a detergent, which shifts the factors to the non-translating RNP fraction and is consistent with membrane association. Using a membrane flotation assay, we observed the mRNA decapping factors in the lower density fractions at the buoyant density of membrane-associated proteins. These observations provide further evidence that mRNA decapping factors interact with subcellular membranes, and we suggest a model in which the mRNA decapping factors interact with membranes to facilitate regulation of mRNA degradation. PMID:27146487

  19. ANAC005 is a membrane-associated transcription factor and regulates vascular development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Liu, Jiang-Shu; Meng, Fu-Ning; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Long, Hao; Lin, Wen-Hui; Luo, Xiao-Min; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Sheng-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Vascular tissues are very important for providing both mechanical strength and long-distance transport. The molecular mechanisms of regulation of vascular tissue development are still not fully understood. In this study we identified ANAC005 as a membrane-associated NAC family transcription factor that regulates vascular tissue development. Reporter gene assays showed that ANAC005 was expressed mainly in the vascular tissues. Increased expression of ANAC005 protein in transgenic Arabidopsis caused dwarf phenotype, reduced xylem differentiation, decreased lignin content, repression of a lignin biosynthetic gene and genes related to cambium and primary wall, but activation of genes related to the secondary wall. Expression of a dominant repressor fusion of ANAC005 had overall the opposite effects on vascular tissue differentiation and lignin synthetic gene expression. The ANAC005-GFP fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas deletion of the last 20 amino acids, which are mostly basic, caused its nuclear localization. These results indicate that ANAC005 is a cell membrane-associated transcription factor that inhibits xylem tissue development in Arabidopsis. PMID:26178734

  20. Membrane-associated proteolytic activity in Escherichia coli that is stimulated by ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Klemes, Y.; Voellmy, R.W.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1986-05-01

    The degradation of proteins in bacteria requires metabolism energy. One important enzyme in this process is protease La, a soluble ATP-dependent protease encoded by the lon gene. However, lon mutants that lack a functional protease La still show some ATP-dependent protein breakdown. The authors have reported an ATP-stimulated endoproteolytic activity associated with the inner membrane of E. coli. This ATP-stimulated activity is found in normal levels in membranes derived from lon mutants, including strains carrying insertions in the lon gene. The membrane-bound activity hydrolyzes /sup 14/C-methylglobin at a linear rate for up to 3 hours. These fractions also contain appreciable proteolytic activity that is not affected by ATP. The stimulation by ATP requires the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/. Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs (e.g. AMPPNP or ATP-..gamma..-S) and ADP do not enhance proteolysis. Unlike protease La, the membrane-associated enzyme does not degrade the fluorometric substrate, Glt-Ala-Ala-Phe-MNA, in an ATP-stimulated fashion, and its level is not influenced by high temperature of by the gene which regulates the heat-shock response. The enzyme is inhibited by dichloroisocoumarin and certain peptide chloromethyl ketones. They conclude that E. coli contain at least two ATP-dependent proteases with distinct specificities: one is soluble and the other is membrane-associated.

  1. A membrane-associated neuraminidase in Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Udezulu, I A; Leitch, G J

    1987-01-01

    Trophozoites of the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica HM-1:IMSS possess a surface neuraminidase capable of liberating N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) from N-acetylneuramin-lactose (alpha 2----3 or alpha 2----6) or mucin in their medium. The neuraminidase was found to be membrane associated, with more than 50% of the yield being recovered in the plasma membrane fraction. The neuraminidase specific activity of the plasma membrane fraction was six times that of internal membrane fraction enzyme. The optimum pH and temperature for this enzyme were 6.7 and 37 degrees C, respectively. Neuraminidase activity was inhibited by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, and the optimum Ca2+ concentration was 2 mM. The microfilament disruptor cytochalasin D (30 micrograms/ml) inhibited motility and neuraminidase activity of intact Entamoeba trophozoites. The cytochalasin D-induced loss of surface neuraminidase activity was explained in part by a redistribution of enzyme with a loss of plasma membrane enzyme and an increase in intracellular membrane enzyme. A qualitatively similar cytochalasin D effect was observed with two other membrane-associated enzymes, calcium-regulated ATPase and acid phosphatase. Membrane-associated enzyme was minimally affected by Triton X-100 and saponin. An N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase, optimum pH, 7.4, was found in trophozoite homogenate supernatant fractions. NANA and NANA-containing compounds stimulated trophozoite-directed motility. This motility stimulation by NANA-containing compounds did not apparently require prior release of free NANA by the trophozoite surface neuraminidase. Entamoeba neuraminidase is one of a series of enzymes that may modify the mucus blanket and target cell surface and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of amebiasis. PMID:2878886

  2. Characterization of a membrane-associated serine protease in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.M.; St. John, A.C.

    1987-04-01

    Three membrane-associated proteolytic activities in Escherichia coli were resolved by DEAE-cellulose chromatography from detergent extracts of the total envelope fraction. On the basis of substrate specificity for the hydrolysis of chromogenic amino acid ester substrates, the first two eluting activities were determined previously to be protease V and protease IV, respectively. The third proteolytic activity eluting from the DEAE-cellulose column was further purified by affinity chromatography on benzamidine-Sepharose 6B. They termed this enzyme protease VI. Protease VI did not hydrolyze any of the chromogenic substrates used in the detection of protease IV and protease V. However, all three enzymes generated acid-soluble fragments from a mixture of E. coli membrane proteins which were biosynthetically labeled with radioactive amino acids. The activity of protease VI was sensitive to serine protease inhibitors. Using (/sup 3/H)diisopropylfluorophosphate as an active-site labeling reagent, they determined that protease VI has an apparent molecular weight of 43,000 in polyacrylamide gels. All three membrane-associated serine proteases were insensitive to inhibition by Ecotin, an endogenous, periplasmic inhibitor of trypsin.

  3. MYRF is a membrane-associated transcription factor that autoproteolytically cleaves to directly activate myelin genes.

    PubMed

    Bujalka, Helena; Koenning, Matthias; Jackson, Stacey; Perreau, Victoria M; Pope, Bernard; Hay, Curtis M; Mitew, Stanlislaw; Hill, Andrew F; Lu, Q Richard; Wegner, Michael; Srinivasan, Rajini; Svaren, John; Willingham, Melanie; Barres, Ben A; Emery, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The myelination of axons is a crucial step during vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) development, allowing for rapid and energy efficient saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Accordingly, the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, and their expression of myelin genes are under tight transcriptional control. We previously identified a putative transcription factor, Myelin Regulatory Factor (Myrf), as being vital for CNS myelination. Myrf is required for the generation of CNS myelination during development and also for its maintenance in the adult. It has been controversial, however, whether Myrf directly regulates transcription, with reports of a transmembrane domain and lack of nuclear localization. Here we show that Myrf is a membrane-associated transcription factor that undergoes an activating proteolytic cleavage to separate its transmembrane domain-containing C-terminal region from a nuclear-targeted N-terminal region. Unexpectedly, this cleavage event occurs via a protein domain related to the autoproteolytic intramolecular chaperone domain of the bacteriophage tail spike proteins, the first time this domain has been found to play a role in eukaryotic proteins. Using ChIP-Seq we show that the N-terminal cleavage product directly binds the enhancer regions of oligodendrocyte-specific and myelin genes. This binding occurs via a defined DNA-binding consensus sequence and strongly promotes the expression of target genes. These findings identify Myrf as a novel example of a membrane-associated transcription factor and provide a direct molecular mechanism for its regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelination. PMID:23966833

  4. The membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomains.

    PubMed

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Honvo Houéto, Edith; Pigat, Natascha; Chat, Sophie; Leonil, Joëlle; Chanat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that α(s1)-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that α(s1)-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of α(s1)-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25549363

  5. Turnip mosaic virus Moves Systemically through Both Phloem and Xylem as Membrane-Associated Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  6. Turnip mosaic virus moves systemically through both phloem and xylem as membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juan; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  7. Neobiosynthesis of glycosphingolipids by plasma membrane-associated glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Pilar M; Demichelis, Vanina Torres; Daniotti, José L

    2010-09-17

    Gangliosides, complex glycosphingolipids containing sialic acids, are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and in the Golgi complex. These neobiosynthesized gangliosides move via vesicular transport to the plasma membrane, becoming components of the external leaflet. Gangliosides can undergo endocytosis followed by recycling to the cell surface or sorting to the Golgi complex or lysosomes for remodeling and catabolism. Recently, glycosphingolipid catabolic enzymes (glycohydrolases) have been found to be associated with the plasma membrane, where they display activity on the membrane components. In this work, we demonstrated that ecto-ganglioside glycosyltransferases may catalyze ganglioside synthesis outside the Golgi compartment, particularly at the cell surface. Specifically, we report the first direct evidence of expression and activity of CMP-NeuAc:GM3 sialyltransferase (Sial-T2) at the cell surface of epithelial and melanoma cells, with membrane-integrated ecto-Sial-T2 being able to sialylate endogenously synthesized GM3 ganglioside as well as exogenously incorporated substrate. Interestingly, we also showed that ecto-Sial-T2 was able to synthesize GD3 ganglioside at the cell surface using the endogenously synthesized cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) available at the extracellular milieu. In addition, the expression of UDP-GalNAc:LacCer/GM3/GD3 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GalNAc-T) was also detected at the cell surface of epithelial cells, whose catalytic activity was only observed after feeding the cells with exogenous GM3 substrate. Thus, the relative interplay between the plasma membrane-associated glycosyltransferase and glycohydrolase activities, even when acting on a common substrate, emerges as a potential level of regulation of the local glycosphingolipid composition in response to different external and internal stimuli. PMID:20639193

  8. Membrane Association of the Diphtheria Toxin Translocation Domain Studied by Coarse-Grained Simulations and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Flores-Canales, Jose C; Vargas-Uribe, Mauricio; Ladokhin, Alexey S; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Diphtheria toxin translocation (T) domain inserts in lipid bilayers upon acidification of the environment. Computational and experimental studies have suggested that low pH triggers a conformational change of the T-domain in solution preceding membrane binding. The refolded membrane-competent state was modeled to be compact and mostly retain globular structure. In the present work, we investigate how this refolded state interacts with membrane interfaces in the early steps of T-domain's membrane association. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest two distinct membrane-bound conformations of the T-domain in the presence of bilayers composed of a mixture of zwitteronic and anionic phospholipids (POPC:POPG with a 1:3 molar ratio). Both membrane-bound conformations show a common near parallel orientation of hydrophobic helices TH8-TH9 relative to the membrane plane. The most frequently observed membrane-bound conformation is stabilized by electrostatic interactions between the N-terminal segment of the protein and the membrane interface. The second membrane-bound conformation is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions between protein residues and lipid acyl chains, which facilitate deeper protein insertion in the membrane interface. A theoretical estimate of a free energy of binding of a membrane-competent T-domain to the membrane is provided. PMID:25650178

  9. Purification of a native membrane-associated adenovirus tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Katze, M G; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    A 15,000-dalton protein was purified from HeLa cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Proteins solubilized from a membrane fraction of lytically infected cells was used as the starting material for purification. Subsequent purification steps involved lentil-lectin, phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, DEAE-cellulose, and aminohexyl-Sepharose chromatographies. A monospecific antiserum, raised against the purified protein, immunoprecipitated a 15,000-dalton protein encoded in early-region E1B (E1B/15K protein) of the adenovirus type 2 DNA. Tryptic finger print analysis revealed that the purified protein was identical to the E1B/15K protein encoded in the transforming part of the viral genome. The antiserum immunoprecipitated the E1B/15K protein from a variety of viral transformed cell lines isolated from humans, rats, or hamsters. The E1B/15K protein was associated with the membrane fraction of both lytically and virus-transformed cell lines and could only be released by detergent treatment. Furthermore, a 11,000- to 12,000-dalton protein that could be precipitated with the anti-E1B/15K serum was recovered from membranes treated with trypsin or proteinase K, suggesting that a major part of the E1B/15K protein is protected in membrane vesicles. Translation of early viral mRNA in a cell-free system, supplemented with rough microsomes, showed that this protein was associated with the membrane fraction also in vitro. Images PMID:7097863

  10. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (l-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane. PMID:27120610

  11. Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Platform for Label-Free Detection of Membrane-Associated Species.

    PubMed

    Bruzas, Ian; Unser, Sarah; Yazdi, Sadegh; Ringe, Emilie; Sagle, Laura

    2016-08-16

    Lipid membranes and membrane proteins are important biosensing targets, motivating the development of label-free methods with improved sensitivity. Silica-coated metal nanoparticles allow these systems to be combined with supported lipid bilayers for sensing membrane proteins through localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). However, the small sensing volume of LSPR makes the thickness of the silica layer critical for performance. Here, we develop a simple, inexpensive, and rapid sol-gel method for preparing thin conformal, continuous silica films and demonstrate its applicability using gold nanodisk arrays with LSPRs in the near-infrared range. Silica layers as thin as ∼5 nm are observed using cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy. The loss in sensitivity due to the thin silica coating was found to be only 16%, and the biosensing capabilities of the substrates were assessed through the binding of cholera toxin B to GM1 lipids. This sensor platform should prove useful in the rapid, multiplexed detection and screening of membrane-associated biological targets. PMID:27436204

  12. Structure and Mechanism of GumK, a Membrane-Associated Glucuronosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Barreras, M.; Salinas, S; Abdian, P; Kampel, M; Lelpi, L

    2008-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris GumK (?-1,2-glucuronosyltransferase) is a 44-kDa membrane-associated protein that is involved in the biosynthesis of xanthan, an exopolysaccharide crucial for this bacterium's phytopathogenicity. Xanthan also has many important industrial applications. The GumK enzyme is the founding member of the glycosyltransferase family 70 of carbohydrate-active enzymes, which is composed of bacterial glycosyltransferases involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. No x-ray structures have been reported for this family. To better understand the mechanism of action of the bacterial glycosyltransferases in this family, the x-ray crystal structure of apo-GumK was solved at 1.9A resolution. The enzyme has two well defined Rossmann domains with a catalytic cleft between them, which is a typical feature of the glycosyltransferase B superfamily. Additionally, the crystal structure of GumK complexed with UDP was solved at 2.28A resolution. We identified a number of catalytically important residues, including Asp157, which serves as the general base in the transfer reaction. Residues Met231, Met273, Glu272, Tyr292, Met306, Lys307, and Gln310 interact with UDP, and mutation of these residues affected protein activity both in vitro and in vivo. The biological and structural data reported here shed light on the molecular basis for donor and acceptor selectivity in this glycosyltransferase family. These results also provide a rationale to obtain new polysaccharides by varying residues in the conserved ?/?/? structural motif of GumK.

  13. Purification and characterization of membrane-associated hydrogenase from the deep-sea epsilonproteobacterium Hydrogenimonas thermophila.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Kitano, Yuki; Inoue, Takahiro; Nomura, Keigo; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-associated hydrogenase was purified from the chemolithoautotrophic epsilonproteobacterium Hydrogenimonas thermophila at 152-fold purity. The hydrogenase was found to be localized in the periplasmic space, and was easily solubilized with 0.1% Triton X-100 treatment. Hydrogen oxidation activity was 1,365 micromol H(2)/min/mg of protein at 80 degrees C at pH 9.0, with phenazine methosulphate as the electron acceptor. Hydrogen production activity was 900 micromol H(2)/min/mg of protein at 80 degrees C and pH 6.0, with reduced methyl viologen as the electron donor. The hydrogenase from this organism showed higher oxygen tolerance than those from other microorganisms showing hydrogen oxidation activity. The structural genes of this hydrogenase, which contains N-terminal amino acid sequences from both small and large subunits of purified hydrogenase, were successfully elucidated. The hydrogenase from H. thermophila was found to be phylogenetically related with H(2) uptake hydrogenases from pathogenic Epsilonproteobacteria. PMID:20699572

  14. RNA interference targeting tNOX attenuates cell migration via a mechanism that involves membrane association of Rac

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.-C.; Yang, J.-J.; Shao, K.-N.; Chueh, P.J.

    2008-01-25

    tNOX, a tumor-associated NADH oxidase, is a growth-related protein present in transformed cells. In this study, we employed RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of tNOX protein expression to explore the role of tNOX in regulating cell growth in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. In this first reported use of RNAi to decrease tNOX expression, we found that HeLa cell growth was significantly inhibited by shRNA-knockdown of tNOX. Furthermore, cell migration and membrane association of Rac were decreased concomitantly with the reduction in tNOX protein expression. These results indicate that shRNA targeting of tNOX inhibits the growth of cervical cancer cells, and reduces cell migration via a decrease in the membrane association of Rac. We propose that tNOX is a potential upstream mediator of Rho activation that plays a role in regulating cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

  15. At14a-Like1 participates in membrane-associated mechanisms promoting growth during drought in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Nagaraj; Hsieh, Yi-Fang; Verslues, Paul E

    2015-08-18

    Limited knowledge of how plants regulate their growth and metabolism in response to drought and reduced soil water potential has impeded efforts to improve stress tolerance. Increased expression of the membrane-associated protein At14a-like1 (AFL1) led to increased growth and accumulation of the osmoprotective solute proline without negative effects on unstressed plants. Conversely, inducible RNA-interference suppression of AFL1 decreased growth and proline accumulation during low water potential while having no effect on unstressed plants. AFL1 overexpression lines had reduced expression of many stress-responsive genes, suggesting AFL1 may promote growth in part by suppression of negative regulatory genes. AFL1 interacted with the endomembrane proteins protein disulfide isomerase 5 (PDI5) and NAI2, with the PDI5 interaction being particularly increased by stress. PDI5 and NAI2 are negative regulatory factors, as pdi5, nai2, and pdi5-2nai2-3 mutants had increased growth and proline accumulation at low water potential. AFL1 also interacted with Adaptor protein2-2A (AP2-2A), which is part of a complex that recruits cargo proteins and promotes assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles. AFL1 colocalization with clathrin light chain along the plasma membrane, together with predictions of AFL1 structure, were consistent with a role in vesicle formation or trafficking. Fractionation experiments indicated that AFL1 is a peripheral membrane protein associated with both plasma membrane and endomembranes. These data identify classes of proteins (AFL1, PDI5, and NAI2) not previously known to be involved in drought signaling. AFL1-predicted structure, protein interactions, and localization all indicate its involvement in previously uncharacterized membrane-associated drought sensing or signaling mechanisms. PMID:26240315

  16. At14a-Like1 participates in membrane-associated mechanisms promoting growth during drought in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Nagaraj; Hsieh, Yi-Fang; Verslues, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Limited knowledge of how plants regulate their growth and metabolism in response to drought and reduced soil water potential has impeded efforts to improve stress tolerance. Increased expression of the membrane-associated protein At14a-like1 (AFL1) led to increased growth and accumulation of the osmoprotective solute proline without negative effects on unstressed plants. Conversely, inducible RNA-interference suppression of AFL1 decreased growth and proline accumulation during low water potential while having no effect on unstressed plants. AFL1 overexpression lines had reduced expression of many stress-responsive genes, suggesting AFL1 may promote growth in part by suppression of negative regulatory genes. AFL1 interacted with the endomembrane proteins protein disulfide isomerase 5 (PDI5) and NAI2, with the PDI5 interaction being particularly increased by stress. PDI5 and NAI2 are negative regulatory factors, as pdi5, nai2, and pdi5-2nai2-3 mutants had increased growth and proline accumulation at low water potential. AFL1 also interacted with Adaptor protein2-2A (AP2-2A), which is part of a complex that recruits cargo proteins and promotes assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles. AFL1 colocalization with clathrin light chain along the plasma membrane, together with predictions of AFL1 structure, were consistent with a role in vesicle formation or trafficking. Fractionation experiments indicated that AFL1 is a peripheral membrane protein associated with both plasma membrane and endomembranes. These data identify classes of proteins (AFL1, PDI5, and NAI2) not previously known to be involved in drought signaling. AFL1-predicted structure, protein interactions, and localization all indicate its involvement in previously uncharacterized membrane-associated drought sensing or signaling mechanisms. PMID:26240315

  17. Calcium Causes a Conformational Change in Lamin A Tail Domain that Promotes Farnesyl-Mediated Membrane Association

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Qin, Zhao; Coffey, Kelli; Kodali, Ravi; Buehler, Markus J.; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2013-01-01

    Lamin proteins contribute to nuclear structure and function, primarily at the inner nuclear membrane. The posttranslational processing pathway of lamin A includes farnesylation of the C-terminus, likely to increase membrane association, and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminus. Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder wherein a mutant version of lamin A, Δ50 lamin A, retains its farnesylation. We report here that membrane association of farnesylated Δ50 lamin A tail domains requires calcium. Experimental evidence and molecular dynamics simulations collectively suggest that the farnesyl group is sequestered within a hydrophobic region in the tail domain in the absence of calcium. Calcium binds to the tail domain with an affinity KD ≈ 250 μM where it alters the structure of the Ig-fold and increases the solvent accessibility of the C-terminus. In 2 mM CaCl2, the affinity of the farnesylated protein to a synthetic membrane is KD ≈ 2 μM, as measured with surface plasmon resonance, but showed a combination of aggregation and binding. Membrane binding in the absence of calcium could not be detected. We suggest that a conformational change induced in Δ50 lamin A with divalent cations plays a regulatory role in the posttranslational processing of lamin A, which may be important in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23708364

  18. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    PubMed Central

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors. When precursors are depleted, MreB filaments disassemble into the cytoplasm and peptidoglycan synthesis becomes disorganized. In cells that lack wall teichoic acids, but continue to make peptidoglycan, dynamic MreB filaments are observed, although their presence is not sufficient to establish a rod shape. We propose that the cell regulates MreB filament association with the membrane, allowing rapid and reversible inactivation of cell wall enzyme complexes in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis. PMID:25402772

  19. Conformational plasticity of the essential membrane-associated mannosyltransferase PimA from mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Giganti, David; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Urresti, Saioa; Albesa-Jové, David; Rodrigo-Unzueta, Ane; Comino, Natalia; Kachala, Michael; López-Fernández, Sonia; Svergun, Dmitri I; Fernández, Julio M; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2013-10-11

    Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosyltransferase A (PimA) is an essential glycosyltransferase (GT) that initiates the biosynthetic pathway of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides, lipomannan, and lipoarabinomannan, which are key glycolipids/lipoglycans of the mycobacterial cell envelope. PimA belongs to a large family of peripheral membrane-associated GTs for which the understanding of the molecular mechanism and conformational changes that govern substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis remains a major challenge. Here we used single molecule force spectroscopy techniques to study the mechanical and conformational properties of PimA. In our studies, we engineered a polyprotein containing PimA flanked by four copies of the well characterized I27 protein, which provides an unambiguous mechanical fingerprint. We found that PimA exhibits weak mechanical stability albeit displaying β-sheet topology expected to unfold at much higher forces. Notably, PimA unfolds following heterogeneous multiple step mechanical unfolding pathways at low force akin to molten globule states. Interestingly, the ab initio low resolution envelopes obtained from small angle x-ray scattering of the unliganded PimA and the PimA·GDP complexed forms clearly demonstrate that not only the "open" and "closed" conformations of the GT-B enzyme are largely present in solution, but in addition, PimA experiences remarkable flexibility that undoubtedly corresponds to the N-terminal "Rossmann fold" domain, which has been proved to participate in protein-membrane interactions. Based on these results and on our previous experimental data, we propose a model wherein the conformational transitions are important for the mannosyltransferase to interact with the donor and acceptor substrates/membrane. PMID:23963451

  20. Complete genomic organization of the human erythroid p55 gene (MPP1), a membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.C.; Metzenberg, A.B.; Sahr, K.E.

    1996-01-15

    Human p55 is an abundantly palmitoylated phosphoprotein of the erythroid membrane. It is the prototype of a newly discovered family of membrane-associated proteins termed MAGUKs (membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologues). The MAGUKs interact with the cytoskeleton and regulate cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and intercellular junctions. Here, we report the complete intron-exon map of the human erythroid p55 gene (HGMW-approved symbol MPP1). The structure of the p55 gene was determined from cosmid clones isolated from a cosmid library specific for the human X chromosome. There is a single copy of the p55 gene, composed of 12 exons and spanning approximately 28 kb in the q28 region of the human X chromosome. The exon sizes range from 69 (exon 5) to 203 bp (intron 2) to {approximately}14 kb (intron 1). The intron-exon boundaries conform to the donor/acceptor consensus sequence, GT-AG, for splice junctions. Several of the exon boundaries correspond to the boundaries of functional domains in the p55 protein. These domains include a SH3 motif and a region that binds to cytoskeletal protein 4.1. In addition, a comparison of the genomic and the primary structures of p55 reveals a highly conserved phosphotyrosine domain located between the protein 4.1 binding domain and the guanylate kinase domain. Finally, promoter activity measurements of the region immediately upstream of the p55 gene, which contains several cis-elements commonly found in housekeeping genes, suggest that a CpG island may be associated with the p55 gene expression in vivo. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Membrane-associated signaling in human B-lymphoma lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tauzin, Sebastien; Ding, Heidrun; Burdevet, Dimitri; Borisch, Bettina; Hoessli, Daniel C.

    2011-01-15

    In B-non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Lyn and Cbp/PAG constitute the core of an oncogenic signalosome that captures the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, the Spleen tyrosine kinase and the Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 to generate pro-survival and proliferative signals. Lymphoma lines corresponding to follicular, mantle-cell and Burkitt-derived lymphomas display type-specific signalosome organizations that differentially activate PI3K, Syk and STAT3. In the follicular lymphoma line, PI3K, Syk and STAT3 were optimally activated upon association with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome, while in the Burkitt lymphoma-derived line, the association with Cbp/PAG and activation of PI3K were interfered with by the latent membrane proteins encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus. In the Jeko-1 mantle-cell line, a weak association of Syk with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome resulted in poor activation of Syk, but in those cells, as in the follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, efficient apoptosis induction by the Syk inhibitor R406 indicated that Syk is nonetheless an important prosurvival element and therefore a valuable therapeutic target. In all configurations described herein is the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome independent of external signals and provides efficient means of activation for its associated lipid and protein kinases. In follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, Syk appears to be activated following binding to Cbp/PAG and no longer requires B-cell receptor-associated activation motifs for activation. Assessment of the different modalities of Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome organization could help in selecting the appropriate combination of kinase inhibitors to eliminate a particular type of lymphoma cells.

  2. Determination of structural requirements and probable regulatory effectors for membrane association of maize sucrose synthase 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS) cleaves sucrose to form UDP-glucose and fructose, and exists in soluble (s-SUS) and membrane-associated (m-SUS) forms, with the latter proposed to channel UDP-glucose to the cellulose synthase complex on the plasma membrane of plant cells during synthesis of cellulose. However...

  3. Cytoplasmic Arabidopsis AGO7 accumulates in membrane-associated siRNA bodies and is required for ta-siRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jouannet, Virginie; Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Elmayan, Taline; Vaucheret, Hervé; Crespi, Martin D; Maizel, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Formation of trans-acting small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) from the TAS3 precursor is triggered by the AGO7/miR390 complex, which primes TAS3 for conversion into double-stranded RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR6 and SGS3. These ta-siRNAs control several aspects of plant development. The mechanism routing AGO7-cleaved TAS3 precursor to RDR6/SGS3 and its subcellular organization are unknown. We show that AGO7 accumulates together with SGS3 and RDR6 in cytoplasmic siRNA bodies that are distinct from P-bodies. siRNA bodies colocalize with a membrane-associated viral protein and become positive for stress-granule markers upon stress-induced translational repression, this suggests that siRNA bodies are membrane-associated sites of accumulation of mRNA stalled during translation. AGO7 congregates with miR390 and SGS3 in membranes and its targeting to the nucleus prevents its accumulation in siRNA bodies and ta-siRNA formation. AGO7 is therefore required in the cytoplasm and membranous siRNA bodies for TAS3 processing, revealing a hitherto unknown role for membrane-associated ribonucleoparticles in ta-siRNA biogenesis and AGO action in plants. PMID:22327216

  4. Involvement of the β3-α3 loop of the Proline Dehydrogenase Domain in Allosteric Regulation of Membrane Association of Proline Utilization A†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Haile, Ashley M.; Singh, Ranjan K.; Larson, John D.; Smithen, Danielle; Chan, Jie Y.; Tanner, John J.; Becker, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli is a membrane-associated trifunctional flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate and moonlights as a transcriptional regulator. As a regulatory protein, PutA represses transcription of the put regulon, which contains the genes encoding PutA and the proline transporter PutP. The binding of proline to the proline dehydrogenase active site and the subsequent reduction of the flavin induces high affinity membrane association of PutA and relieves repression of the put regulon, thereby causing PutA to switch from its regulatory to its enzymatic role. Here, we present evidence suggesting that residues of the β3-α3 loop of the proline dehydrogenase domain (βα)8 barrel are involved in proline-mediated allosteric regulation of PutA-membrane binding. Mutation of the conserved residues Asp370 and Glu372 in the β3-α3 loop abrogates the ability of proline to induce functional membrane association. Both in vitro lipid/membrane binding assays and in vivo cell-based assays demonstrate that mutagenesis of Asp370 (D370N/A) or Glu372 (E372A) dramatically impedes PutA functional switching. The crystal structures of the proline dehydrogenase domain mutants PutA86-630D370N and PutA86-630D370A complexed with the proline analog L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid show that the mutations cause only minor perturbations to the active site but no major structural changes, suggesting that the lack of proline response is not due to a failure of the mutated active sites to correctly bind the substrate. Rather, these results suggest that the β3-α3 loop may be involved in transmitting the status of the proline dehydrogenase active site and flavin redox state to the distal membrane association domain. PMID:23713611

  5. Solution NMR and X-ray Crystal Structures of Membrane-associated Lipoprotein-17 Domain Reveal a Novel Fold

    SciTech Connect

    R Mani; S Vorobiev; G Swapna; H Neely; H Janjua; C Ciccosanti; D Xiao; J Hunt; G Montelione; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The conserved Lipoprotein-17 domain of membrane-associated protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA from Ureaplasma parvum was selected for structure determination by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, as part of the Protein Structure Initiative's program on structure-function analysis of protein domains from large domain sequence families lacking structural representatives. The 100-residue Lipoprotein-17 domain is a 'domain of unknown function' (DUF) that is a member of Pfam protein family PF04200, a large domain family for which no members have characterized biochemical functions. The three-dimensional structure of the Lipoprotein-17 domain of protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA was determined by both solution NMR and by X-ray crystallography at 2.5 {angstrom}. The two structures are in good agreement with each other. The domain structure features three {alpha}-helices, {alpha}1 through {alpha}3, and five {beta}-strands. Strands {beta}1/{beta}2, {beta}3/{beta}4, {beta}4/{beta}5 are anti-parallel to each other. Strands {beta}1 and {beta}2 are orthogonal to strands {beta}3, {beta}4, {beta}5, while helix {alpha}3 is formed between the strands {beta}3 and {beta}4. One-turn helix {alpha}2 is formed between the strands {beta}1 and {beta}2, while helix {alpha}1 occurs in the N-terminal polypeptide segment. Searches of the Protein Data Bank do not identify any other protein with significant structural similarity to Lipoprotein-17 domain of Q9PRA0{_}UREPA, indicating that it is a novel protein fold.

  6. Effects of a human plasma membrane-associated sialidase siRNA on prostate cancer invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaojie; Zhang, Ling; Shao, Yueting; Liang, Zuowen; Shao, Chen; Wang, Bo; Guo, Baofeng; Li, Na; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yang; Xu, Deqi

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neu3 is as one of the sialidases and regulates cell surface functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostrate cancer cell invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Neu3-specific siRNA inhibited prostate cancer metastasis in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting Neu3 may have utility for gene-based therapy of human cancer metastasis. -- Abstract: Human plasma membrane-associated sialidase (Neu3) is one of several sialidases that hydrolyze sialic acids in the terminal position of the carbohydrate groups of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Neu3 is mainly localized in plasma membranes and plays crucial roles in the regulation of cell surface functions. In this study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanisms of Neu3 on cell invasion and migration in vivo and in vitro. Initially, we found that the levels of Neu3 expression were higher in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines than in normal prostate tissues based on RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. We then applied a Neu3 siRNA approach to block Neu3 signaling using PC-3M cells as model cells. Transwell invasion assays and wound assays showed significantly decreased invasion and migration potential in the Neu3 siRNA-transfected cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses revealed that Neu3 knockdown decreased the expressions of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. In vivo, mice injected with PC-3M cell tumors were evaluated by SPECT/CT to determine the presence of bone metastases. Mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying the Neu3 siRNA developed fewer bone metastases than mice treated with attenuated Salmonella carrying a control Scramble siRNA, attenuated Salmonella alone or PBS. The results for bone metastasis detection by pathology were consistent with the data obtained by SPECT/CT. Tumor blocks were evaluated by histochemical, RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. The results revealed

  7. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  8. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangxi; Li, Shuang; Han, Yuhong; Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  9. Membrane-associated glucocorticoid activity is necessary for modulation of long-term memory via chromatin modification

    PubMed Central

    Roozendaal, Benno; Hernandez, Angelina; Cabrera, Sara M.; Hagewoud, Roelina; Malvaez, Melissa; Stefanko, Daniel P.; Haettig, Jakob; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones enhance the consolidation of long-term memory of emotionally arousing training experiences. This memory enhancement requires activation of the cAMP-dependent kinase pathway and the subsequent phosphorylation of cAMP response-element binding (CREB) protein. Here, we demonstrate that glucocorticoids enhance the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent aspects of object recognition memory via chromatin modification. More specifically, systemic corticosterone increases histone acetylation, a form of chromatin modification, in both the hippocampus and insular cortex following training on an object recognition task. This led us to examine whether increasing histone acetylation via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition enhances memory in a similar manner as corticosterone. We found a double dissociation between posttraining HDAC inhibitor infusion into the insular cortex and hippocampus on the enhancement of object recognition and object location memory, respectively. In determining the molecular pathway upstream of glucocorticoids’ effects on chromatin modification, we found that activation of membrane-associated glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and the subsequent interaction between phospho-CREB and CREB-binding protein (CBP) appear to be necessary for glucocorticoids to enhance memory consolidation via chromatin modification. In contrast, mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) do not appear to be involved. The findings also indicate that glucocorticoid activity has differential influences on hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent components of memory for objects. PMID:20371824

  10. Measuring membrane association and protein diffusion within membranes with supercritical angle fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuanqing; Benda, Aleš; Nicovich, Philip R.; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF) detection combines the axial discrimination and exquisite signal-to-noise ratio of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) with the lateral discrimination and convenience of confocal excitation. This combination makes SAF ideal for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) on membranes and other structures in close proximity to the coverslip. Here we report a straightforward modification of a commercial microscope to implement SAF FCS and demonstrate in both model supported lipid bilayers and cellular systems that this approach shows an increase in signal from membrane-bound fluorophores relative to fluorophores in solution, benchmarked against line-scanning FCS. SAF FCS allowed us to demonstrate that activation of the T cell receptor resulted in the recruitment of the kinase Lck to the plasma membrane as well as a reduction in Lck mobility within the membrane. PMID:27446675

  11. Novel secreted isoform of adhesion molecule ICAM-4: Potential regulator of membrane-associated ICAM-4 interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gloria; Spring, Frances A.; Parons, Stephen F.; Mankelow, Tosti J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2003-02-18

    ICAM-4, a newly characterized adhesion molecule, is expressed early in human erythropoiesis and functions as a ligand for binding a4b1 and aV integrin-expressing cells. Within the bone marrow, erythroblasts surround central macrophages forming erythroblastic islands. Evidence suggests that these islands are highly specialized subcompartments where cell adhesion events, in concert with cytokines, play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis and apoptosis. Since erythroblasts express a4b1 and ICAM-4 and macrophages exhibit aV, ICAM-4 is an attractive candidate for mediating cellular interactions within erythroblastic islands. To determine whether ICAM-4 binding properties are conserved across species, we first cloned and sequenced the murine homologue. The translated amino acid sequence showed 68 percent overall identity with human ICAM-4. Using recombinant murine ICAM-4 extracellular domains, we discovered that hematopoietic a4b1-expressing HEL cells and non-hematopoietic aV-expressing FLY cells adhered to mouse ICAM-4. Cell adhesion studies showed that FLY and HEL cells bound to mouse and human proteins with similar avidity. These data strongly suggest conservation of integrin-binding properties across species. Importantly, we characterized a novel second splice cDNA that would be predicted to encode an ICAM-4 isoform, lacking the membrane-spanning domain. Erythroblasts express both isoforms of ICAM-4. COS-7 cells transfected with GFP constructs of prototypic or novel ICAM-4 cDNA showed different cellular localization patterns. Moreover, analysis of tissue culture medium revealed that the novel ICAM-4 cDNA encodes a secreted protein. We postulate that secretion of this newly described isoform, ICAM-4S, may modulate binding of membrane-associated ICAM-4 and could thus play a critical regulatory role in erythroblast molecular attachments.

  12. Membrane-Associated Conformation of HIV-1 Nef Investigated with Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry at a Langmuir Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Pirrone, Gregory F; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Wales, Thomas E; Smithgall, Thomas E; Kent, Michael S; Engen, John R

    2015-07-21

    In the companion paper to this work, we described development of a new type of hydrogen exchange (HX) mass spectrometry (MS) measurement that integrates Langmuir monolayers. With Langmuir monolayers, the lipid packing density can be reproducibly controlled and changed as desired. Analysis of HX in proteins that may undergo conformational changes as a function of lipid packing (for example, conformational rearrangements after insertion into a lipid layer) are then possible. We previously used neutron reflection to characterize just such a conformational change in the myristoylated HIV-1 Nef protein (myrNef): at high lipid packing density, myrNef could not insert into the lipids and maintained a compact conformation adjacent to the monolayer, whereas at lower lipid packing density, myrNef was able to insert N-terminal arm residues, causing displacement of the core domain away from the monolayer. In order to locate where conformation may have been altered by lipid association, we applied the HX MS Langmuir monolayer method to myrNef associated with monolayers of packing densities identical to those used for the prior neutron reflection measurements. The results show that the N-terminal region and the C-terminal unstructured loop undergo conformational changes when associated with a low density lipid monolayer. The results are not consistent with the hypothesis of myrNef dimerization upon membrane association in the absence of other myrNef binding partners. The HX MS Langmuir monolayer method provides new and meaningful information for myrNef that helps explain necessary conformational changes required for function at the membrane. PMID:26133569

  13. Membrane-Associated Polypeptides Induced in Chlamydomonas by Limiting CO(2) Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Spalding, M H; Jeffrey, M

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other unicellular green algae have a high apparent affinity for CO(2), little O(2) inhibition of photosynthesis, and reduced photorespiration. These characteristics result from operation of a CO(2)-concentrating system. The CO(2)-concentrating system involves active inorganic carbon transport and is under environmental control. Cells grown at limiting CO(2) concentrations have inorganic carbon transport activity, but cells grown at 5% CO(2) do not. Four membrane-associated polypeptides (M(r) 19, 21, 35, and 36 kilodaltons) have been identified which either appear or increase in abundance during adaptation to limiting CO(2) concentrations. The appearance of two of the polypeptides occurs over roughly the same time course as the appearance of the CO(2)-concentrating system activity in response to CO(2) limitation. PMID:16666503

  14. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  15. Membrane-associated polypeptides induced in Chlamydomonas by limiting CO sub 2 concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, M.H.; Jeffrey, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other unicellular green algae have a high apparent affinity for CO{sub 2}, little O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, and reduced photorespiration. These characteristics result from operation of a CO{sub 2}-concentrating system. The CO{sub 2}-concentrating system involves active inorganic carbon transport and is under environmental control. Cells grown at limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations have inorganic carbon transport activity, but cells grown at 5% CO{sub 2} do not. Four membrane-associated polypeptides (M{sub r}, 19, 21, 35, and 36 kilodaltons) have been identified which either appear or increase in abundance during adaptation to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The appearance of two of the polypeptides occurs over roughly the same time course as the appearance of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system activity in response to CO{sub 2} limitation.

  16. Dephosphorylation of human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors by membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Hauguel-de Mouzon, S; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor exhibits structural and functional similarities to the insulin receptor. Although the regulation of the insulin-receptor tyrosine kinase has been extensively investigated, the mechanisms involved in phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor have received only little attention. To obtain a better understanding of the mode of IGF-I action, we have investigated the effects of protein phosphotyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) on the phosphorylation status of the IGF-I receptor. The dephosphorylation of the human IGF-I receptor by membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatases was studied by an immuno-enzymic assay based on the recognition of phosphotyrosine residues by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. Using intact IGF-I receptors as substrates, we show that they could be completely dephosphorylated by different cellular PTPases. Three pieces of evidence indicate that receptor dephosphorylation takes place on phosphotyrosine, i.e. the inhibition profile of phosphatase activity by zinc and vanadate, its absolute requirement for thiol compounds and the diminution of [32P]phosphotyrosine labelling of the beta subunit assessed by SDS/PAGE and phosphoamino acid analysis. Tyrosine kinase activity and autophosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor were decreased in a dose-dependent manner by PTPases, indicating that partial dephosphorylation of the receptor was associated with a decrease in its intrinsic activity. The sensitivity of the activated human IGF-I receptor to dephosphorylation on tyrosine leads to the speculation that IGF-I receptor activity might be regulated by mechanisms such as those described for the insulin receptor. Further investigation of the pathways of IGF-I receptor dephosphorylation will contribute to define the role(s) of PTPases in the overall mechanism of IGF-I signalling. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1322128

  17. In vitro activation of a transcription factor by gamma interferon requires a membrane-associated tyrosine kinase and is mimicked by vanadate.

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, K; David, M; Larner, A C; Finbloom, D S

    1993-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activates the formation of a DNA-binding protein complex (FcRF gamma) that recognizes the gamma response region (GRR) of the promoter for the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor. In a membrane-enriched fraction prepared from human peripheral blood monocytes, IFN-gamma activation of FcRF gamma occurred within 1 min and was ATP dependent. Activation of FcRF gamma required a tyrosine kinase activity, and recognition of the GRR sequence by FcRF gamma could be abrogated by treatment with a tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase. Treatment of cells with vanadate alone resulted in the formation of FcRF gamma without the need for IFN-gamma. UV cross-linking and antibody competition experiments demonstrated that the FcRF gamma complex was composed of at least two components: the 91-kDa protein of the IFN-alpha-induced transcription complex ISGF3 and a 43-kDa component that bound directly to the GRR. Therefore, specificity for IFN-induced transcriptional activation of early response genes requires at least two events: (i) ligand-induced activation of membrane-associated protein by tyrosine phosphorylation and (ii) formation of a complex composed of an activated membrane protein(s) and a sequence-specific DNA-binding component. Images PMID:8321205

  18. Structural basis for the membrane association of ankyrinG via palmitoylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kondo, Hiroko X.; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kobayashi, Megumi; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    By clustering various ion channels and transporters, ankyrin-G (AnkG) configures the membrane-excitation platforms in neurons and cardiomyocytes. AnkG itself localizes to specific areas on the plasma membrane via s-palmitoylation of Cys. However, the structural mechanism by which AnkG anchors to the membrane is not understood. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the reduced and oxidized forms of the AnkG s-palmitoylation domain and used multiple long-term coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to analyze their membrane association. Here we report that the membrane anchoring of AnkG was facilitated by s-palmitoylation, defining a stable binding interface on the lipid membrane, and that AnkG without s-palmitoylation also preferred to stay near the membrane but did not have a unique binding interface. This suggests that AnkG in the juxtamembrane region is primed to accept lipid modification at Cys, and once that happens AnkG constitutes a rigid structural base upon which a membrane-excitation platform can be assembled.

  19. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase of spinach leaves responds to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Penel, Claude; Greppin, Hubert; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (NOX) of spinach leaf disks is characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of ca. 24 min. Within a single population of plants exposed to light at the same time, NOX activities of all plants function synchronously. Exposure of plants transferred from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) resulted in a complex response pattern but with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity 36 (24+12) min after illumination and then with maxima in the rate of NOX activity every 24 min thereafter. Transient maxima in NOX activity were observed as well after 9.3 + /- 1.4 and 20.7 +/- 2.1 min. The blue light response differed from the response to red (650 nm, 10 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) or white light where activity maxima were initiated 12 min after the light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Green or yellow light was ineffective. The light response was independent of the time in the 24-min NOX cycle when the light was given. The net effects of blue and red light were ultimately the same with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity at 12+24=36 min (and every 24 min thereafter), but the mechanisms appear to be distinct.

  20. Structural basis for the membrane association of ankyrinG via palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kondo, Hiroko X.; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kobayashi, Megumi; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    By clustering various ion channels and transporters, ankyrin-G (AnkG) configures the membrane-excitation platforms in neurons and cardiomyocytes. AnkG itself localizes to specific areas on the plasma membrane via s-palmitoylation of Cys. However, the structural mechanism by which AnkG anchors to the membrane is not understood. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the reduced and oxidized forms of the AnkG s-palmitoylation domain and used multiple long-term coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to analyze their membrane association. Here we report that the membrane anchoring of AnkG was facilitated by s-palmitoylation, defining a stable binding interface on the lipid membrane, and that AnkG without s-palmitoylation also preferred to stay near the membrane but did not have a unique binding interface. This suggests that AnkG in the juxtamembrane region is primed to accept lipid modification at Cys, and once that happens AnkG constitutes a rigid structural base upon which a membrane-excitation platform can be assembled. PMID:27046665

  1. Redox stress in geobacilli from geothermal springs: Phenomenon and membrane-associated response mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghazaryan, Astghik; Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Poladyan, Anna; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-10-01

    Geobacillus toebii ArzA-8, from Armenian geothermal springs, grew well in nutrient broth. During its growth, changes in pH in opposite directions were observed depending on glucose supplementation. Accordingly, the decrease in the redox potential was determined using titanium-silicate (Eh) and platinum (Eh') electrodes: Eh decreased to -150 ± 3 mV and Eh' to -350 ± 2 mV without glucose; the decrease in these potentials was smaller with glucose. Redox stress due to an oxidizer, K3[Fe(CN)6], or a reducer, dl-dithiothreitol (DTT), inhibited bacterial growth. However, a stimulatory effect of K3[Fe(CN)6] or DTT was observed with or without glucose, respectively. With glucose, the H(+) efflux was sensitive to N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of FoF1FOF1-ATPase and other H(+) translocation mechanisms, but the addition of an oxidizer or reducer suppressed the H(+) efflux. The ATPase activity of membrane vesicles was ~1.3-fold higher in cells grown with glucose compared with cells grown without glucose. DCCD and DTT suppressed ATPase activity in cells grown without glucose, whereas DTT stimulated FOF1-ATPase activity in cells grown with glucose. Thus, G. toebii senses redox stress; this thermophile likely presents specific membrane-associated response mechanisms involving FOF1-ATPase to overcome redox stress and survive; these mechanisms are important for adaptation to extreme environments. PMID:25889504

  2. The Membrane-Associated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Channel Is the Central Heat Shock Receptor Controlling the Cellular Heat Shock Response in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Zohar; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Saidi, Younousse; Weiss, Yoram George

    2013-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a highly conserved molecular response to various types of stresses, including heat shock, during which heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are produced to prevent and repair damages in labile proteins and membranes. In cells, protein unfolding in the cytoplasm is thought to directly enable the activation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), however, recent work supports the activation of the HSR via an increase in the fluidity of specific membrane domains, leading to activation of heat-shock genes. Our findings support the existence of a plasma membrane-dependent mechanism of HSF-1 activation in animal cells, which is initiated by a membrane-associated transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor (TRPV). We found in various non-cancerous and cancerous mammalian epithelial cells that the TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX), upregulated the accumulation of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp27 and Hsp70 and Hsp90 respectively, while the TRPV1 antagonists, capsazepine and AMG-9810, attenuated the accumulation of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp27 and Hsp70, Hsp90, respectively. Capsaicin was also shown to activate HSF-1. These findings suggest that heat-sensing and signaling in mammalian cells is dependent on TRPV channels in the plasma membrane. Thus, TRPV channels may be important drug targets to inhibit or restore the cellular stress response in diseases with defective cellular proteins, such as cancer, inflammation and aging. PMID:23468922

  3. Molecular Basis of Membrane Association by the Phosphatidylinositol Mannosyltransferase PimA Enzyme from Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo-Unzueta, Ane; Martínez, Mariano A; Comino, Natalia; Alzari, Pedro M; Chenal, Alexandre; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-07-01

    Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosyltransferase A (PimA) is an essential glycosyltransferase that initiates the biosynthetic pathway of phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannoside, lipomannan, and lipoarabinomannan, which are key glycolipids/lipoglycans of the mycobacterial cell envelope. PimA belongs to a large family of membrane-associated glycosyltransferases for which the understanding of the molecular mechanism and conformational changes that govern substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis remains a major challenge. Here, we determined that PimA preferentially binds to negatively charged phosphatidyl-myo-inositol substrate and non-substrate membrane model systems (small unilamellar vesicle) through its N-terminal domain, inducing an important structural reorganization of anionic phospholipids. By using a combination of single-point mutagenesis, circular dichroism, and a variety of fluorescence spectroscopy techniques, we determined that this interaction is mainly mediated by an amphipathic α-helix (α2), which undergoes a substantial conformational change and localizes in the vicinity of the negatively charged lipid headgroups and the very first carbon atoms of the acyl chains, at the PimA-phospholipid interface. Interestingly, a flexible region within the N-terminal domain, which undergoes β-strand-to-α-helix and α-helix-to-β-strand transitions during catalysis, interacts with anionic phospholipids; however, the effect is markedly less pronounced to that observed for the amphipathic α2, likely reflecting structural plasticity/variability. Altogether, we propose a model in which conformational transitions observed in PimA might reflect a molten globule state that confers to PimA, a higher affinity toward the dynamic and highly fluctuating lipid bilayer. PMID:27189944

  4. Coordination of Synthesis and Assembly of a Modular Membrane-Associated [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Is Determined by Cleavage of the C-Terminal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Claudia; Muhr, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During biosynthesis of [NiFe]-hydrogenase 2 (Hyd-2) of Escherichia coli, a 15-amino-acid C-terminal peptide is cleaved from the catalytic large subunit precursor, pro-HybC. This peptide is removed only after NiFe(CN)2CO cofactor insertion by the Hyp accessory protein machinery has been completed, suggesting that it has a regulatory function during enzyme maturation. We show here that in hyp mutants that fail to synthesize and insert the NiFe cofactor, and therefore retain the peptide, the Tat (twin-arginine translocon) signal peptide on the small subunit HybO is not removed and the subunit is degraded. In a mutant lacking the large subunit, the Tat signal peptide was also not removed from pre-HybO, indicating that the mature large subunit must actively engage the small subunit to elicit Tat transport. We validated the proposed regulatory role of the C-terminal peptide in controlling enzyme assembly by genetically removing it from the precursor of HybC, which allowed assembly and Tat-dependent membrane association of a HybC-HybO heterodimer lacking the NiFe(CN)2CO cofactor. Finally, genetic transfer of the C-terminal peptide from pro-HyaB, the large subunit of Hyd-1, onto HybC did not influence its dependence on the accessory protein HybG, a HypC paralog, or the specific protease HybD. This indicates that the C-terminal peptide per se is not required for interaction with the Hyp machinery but rather suggests a role of the peptide in maintaining a conformation of the protein suitable for cofactor insertion. Together, our results demonstrate that the C-terminal peptide on the catalytic subunit controls biosynthesis, assembly, and membrane association of Hyd-2. IMPORTANCE [NiFe]-hydrogenases are multisubunit enzymes with a catalytic subunit containing a NiFe(CN)2CO cofactor. Results of previous studies suggested that after synthesis and insertion of the cofactor by the Hyp accessory proteins, this large subunit changes conformation upon proteolytic removal of

  5. Membrane-associated GRP78 helps subgroup J avian leucosis virus enter cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Mei, Mei; Qin, Aijian; Ye, Jianqiang; Qian, Kun; Shao, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified chicken Annexin A2 (chANXA2) as a novel receptor for retrovirus avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J), using a DF1 cell line expressing the viral envelope (env) protein. To further probe whether other proteins participate in virus infection, we investigated several host proteins from co-immunoprecipitation with the DF1 cell line expressing viral env. Mass spectrometry analysis indicates that the chicken glucose-regulation protein 78 (chGRP78) of the DF1 membrane interacted with the ALV-J env protein. The results revealed that antibodies or siRNA to chGRP78 significantly inhibited ALV-J infection and replication, and over-expression of chGRP78 enabled the entry of ALV-J into non-susceptible cells. Taken together, these results are the first to report that chGRP78 functions to help ALV-J enter cells. PMID:27599847

  6. Phosphorylation of Lipin 1 and Charge on the Phosphatidic Acid Head Group Control Its Phosphatidic Acid Phosphatase Activity and Membrane Association*

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, James M.; Mullins, Garrett R.; Brindley, David N.; Harris, Thurl E.

    2013-01-01

    The lipin gene family encodes a class of Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphatases involved in the de novo synthesis of phospholipids and triglycerides. Unlike other enzymes in the Kennedy pathway, lipins are not integral membrane proteins, and they need to translocate from the cytosol to intracellular membranes to participate in glycerolipid synthesis. The movement of lipin 1 within the cell is closely associated with its phosphorylation status. Although cellular analyses have demonstrated that highly phosphorylated lipin 1 is enriched in the cytosol and dephosphorylated lipin 1 is found on membranes, the effects of phosphorylation on lipin 1 activity and binding to membranes has not been recapitulated in vitro. Herein we describe a new biochemical assay for lipin 1 using mixtures of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylethanolamine that reflects its physiological activity and membrane interaction. This depends on our observation that lipin 1 binding to PA in membranes is highly responsive to the electrostatic charge of PA. The studies presented here demonstrate that phosphorylation regulates the ability of the polybasic domain of lipin 1 to recognize di-anionic PA and identify mTOR as a crucial upstream signaling component regulating lipin 1 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate how phosphorylation of lipin 1 together with pH and membrane phospholipid composition play important roles in the membrane association of lipin 1 and thus the regulation of its enzymatic activity. PMID:23426360

  7. Coronavirus membrane-associated papain-like proteases induce autophagy through interacting with Beclin1 to negatively regulate antiviral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Wang, Kai; Xing, Yaling; Tu, Jian; Yang, Xingxing; Zhao, Qian; Li, Kui; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in modulating viral replication and antiviral immune response. Coronavirus infection is associated with the autophagic process, however, little is known about the mechanisms of autophagy induction and its contribution to coronavirus regulation of host innate responses. Here, we show that the membrane-associated papain-like protease PLP2 (PLP2-TM) of coronaviruses acts as a novel autophagy-inducing protein. Intriguingly, PLP2-TM induces incomplete autophagy process by increasing the accumulation of autophagosomes but blocking the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. Furthermore, PLP2-TM interacts with the key autophagy regulators, LC3 and Beclin1, and promotes Beclin1 interaction with STING, the key regulator for antiviral IFN signaling. Finally, knockdown of Beclin1 partially reverses PLP2-TM's inhibitory effect on innate immunity which resulting in decreased coronavirus replication. These results suggested that coronavirus papain-like protease induces incomplete autophagy by interacting with Beclin1, which in turn modulates coronavirus replication and antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25311841

  8. Membrane association of the cycling peroxisome import receptor Pex5p.

    PubMed

    Kerssen, Daniela; Hambruch, Eva; Klaas, Wibke; Platta, Harald W; de Kruijff, Ben; Erdmann, Ralf; Kunau, Wolf-H; Schliebs, Wolfgang

    2006-09-15

    Peroxisomal proteins carrying a peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) are recognized in the cytosol by the cycling import receptor Pex5p. The receptor-cargo complex docks at the peroxisomal membrane where it associates with multimeric protein complexes, referred to as the docking and RING finger complexes. Here we have identified regions within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pex5p sequence that interconnect the receptor-cargo complex with the docking complex. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved tryptophan residue within a reverse WXXXF motif abolished two-hybrid binding with the N-terminal half of Pex14p. In combination with an additional mutation introduced into the Pex13p-binding site, we generated a Pex5p mutant defective in a stable association not only with the docking complex but also with the RING finger peroxins at the membrane. Surprisingly, PTS1 proteins are still imported into peroxisomes in these mutant cells. Because these mutations had no significant effect on the membrane binding properties of Pex5p, we examined yeast and human Pex5p for intrinsic lipid binding activity. In vitro analyses demonstrated that both proteins have the potential to insert spontaneously into phospholipid membranes. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that a translocation-competent state of the PTS1 receptor enters the membrane via protein-lipid interactions before it tightly associates with other peroxins. PMID:16849337

  9. Conformational transition of membrane-associated terminally-acylated HIV-1 Nef

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil; Nanda, Hirsh; Pirrone, Gregory F.; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R.; Kent, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins are post-translationally modified by acylation targetting them to lipid membranes. While methods such as X-ray crystallography and NMR are available to determine the structure of folded proteins in solution, the precise position of folded domains relative to a membrane remains largely unknown. We used neutron and X-ray reflection methods to measure the displacement of the core domain of HIV Nef from lipid membranes upon insertion of the N-terminal myristate group. Nef is one of several HIV-1 accessory proteins and an essential factor in AIDS progression. Upon insertion of the myristate and residues from the N-terminal arm, Nef transitions from a closed to open conformation that positions the core domain 70 Å from the lipid headgroups. This work rules out speculation that the Nef core remains closely associated with the membrane to optimize interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of MHC-1. PMID:24035710

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a membrane associated NAC family gene, SiNAC from foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv].

    PubMed

    Puranik, Swati; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad; Srivastava, Prem S; Prasad, Manoj

    2011-10-01

    The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) transcription factors have diverse role in development and stress regulation. A transcript encoding NAC protein, termed SiNAC was identified from a salt stress subtractive cDNA library of S. italica seedling (Puranik et al., J Plant Physiol 168:280-287, 2011). This single/low copy gene containing four exons and four introns within the genomic-sequence encoded a protein of 462 amino acids. Structural analysis revealed that highly divergent C terminus contains a transmembrane domain. The NAC domain consisted of a twisted antiparallel beta-sheet packing against N terminal alpha helix on one side and a shorter helix on the other side. The domain was predicted to homodimerize and control DNA-binding specificity. The physicochemical features of the SiNAC homodimer interface justified the dimeric form of the predicted model. A 1539 bp fragment upstream to the start codon of SiNAC gene was cloned and in silico analysis revealed several putative cis-acting regulatory elements within the promoter sequence. Transactivation analysis indicated that SiNAC activated expression of reporter gene and the activation domain lied at the C terminal. The SiNAC:GFP was detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm while SiNAC ΔC(1-158):GFP was nuclear localized in onion epidermal cells. SiNAC transcripts mostly accumulated in young spikes and were strongly induced by dehydration, salinity, ethephon, and methyl jasmonate. These results suggest that SiNAC encodes a membrane associated NAC-domain protein that may function as a transcriptional activator in response to stress and developmental regulation in plants. PMID:21312005

  11. The membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) and pMMO-NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-W; Kunz, Ryan C; Boyd, Eric S; Semrau, Jeremy D; Antholine, William E; Han, J-I; Zahn, James A; Boyd, Jeffrey M; de la Mora, Arlene M; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2003-10-01

    Improvements in purification of membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) have resulted in preparations of pMMO with activities more representative of physiological rates: i.e., >130 nmol.min(-1).mg of protein(-1). Altered culture and assay conditions, optimization of the detergent/protein ratio, and simplification of the purification procedure were responsible for the higher-activity preparations. Changes in the culture conditions focused on the rate of copper addition. To document the physiological events that occur during copper addition, cultures were initiated in medium with cells expressing soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and then monitored for morphological changes, copper acquisition, fatty acid concentration, and pMMO and sMMO expression as the amended copper concentration was increased from 0 (approximately 0.3 microM) to 95 microM. The results demonstrate that copper not only regulates the metabolic switch between the two methane monooxygenases but also regulates the level of expression of the pMMO and the development of internal membranes. With respect to stabilization of cell-free pMMO activity, the highest cell-free pMMO activity was observed when copper addition exceeded maximal pMMO expression. Optimization of detergent/protein ratios and simplification of the purification procedure also contributed to the higher activity levels in purified pMMO preparations. Finally, the addition of the type 2 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (NADH dehydrogenase [NDH]) from M. capsulatus Bath, along with NADH and duroquinol, to enzyme assays increased the activity of purified preparations. The NDH and NADH were added to maintain a high duroquinol/duroquinone ratio. PMID:13129946

  12. Phytoene Desaturase from Oryza sativa: Oligomeric Assembly, Membrane Association and Preliminary 3D-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Koschmieder, Julian; Brausemann, Anton; Drepper, Friedel; Rodriguez-Franco, Marta; Ghisla, Sandro; Warscheid, Bettina; Einsle, Oliver; Beyer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant phytoene desaturase (PDS-His6) from rice was purified to near-homogeneity and shown to be enzymatically active in a biphasic, liposome-based assay system. The protein contains FAD as the sole protein-bound redox-cofactor. Benzoquinones, not replaceable by molecular oxygen, serve as a final electron acceptor defining PDS as a 15-cis-phytoene (donor):plastoquinone oxidoreductase. The herbicidal PDS-inhibitor norflurazon is capable of arresting the reaction by stabilizing the intermediary FADred, while an excess of the quinone acceptor relieves this blockage, indicating competition. The enzyme requires its homo-oligomeric association for activity. The sum of data collected through gel permeation chromatography, non-denaturing polyacrylamide electrophoresis, chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and electron microscopy techniques indicate that the high-order oligomers formed in solution are the basis for an active preparation. Of these, a tetramer consisting of dimers represents the active unit. This is corroborated by our preliminary X-ray structural analysis that also revealed similarities of the protein fold with the sequence-inhomologous bacterial phytoene desaturase CRTI and other oxidoreductases of the GR2-family of flavoproteins. This points to an evolutionary relatedness of CRTI and PDS yielding different carotene desaturation sequences based on homologous protein folds. PMID:26147209

  13. Subcellular localization of the pyoverdine biogenesis machinery of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a membrane-associated "siderosome".

    PubMed

    Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    The peptidic siderophore pyoverdine is the primary iron uptake system of fluorescent pseudomonads, and a virulence factor in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pyoverdine biogenesis is a co-ordinate process requiring several precursor-generating enzymes and large nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in the cytoplasm, followed by extracytoplasmic maturation. By using cell fractionation, protein-protein interaction, and in vivo labeling assays we obtained evidence that, in P. aeruginosa, pyoverdine NRPSs assemble with precursor-generating enzymes into a membrane-bound multi-enzymatic complex, for which we propose the name "siderosome". The pyoverdine biogenetic complex represents a novel example of subcellular compartmentalization of a secondary metabolic pathway in prokaryotes. PMID:24042050

  14. The Membrane-Associated Methane Monooxygenase (pMMO) and pMMO-NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase Complex from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-W.; Kunz, Ryan C.; Boyd, Eric S.; Semrau, Jeremy D.; Antholine, William E.; Han, J.-I.; Zahn, James A.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.; de la Mora, Arlene M.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in purification of membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) have resulted in preparations of pMMO with activities more representative of physiological rates: i.e., >130 nmol · min−1 · mg of protein−1. Altered culture and assay conditions, optimization of the detergent/protein ratio, and simplification of the purification procedure were responsible for the higher-activity preparations. Changes in the culture conditions focused on the rate of copper addition. To document the physiological events that occur during copper addition, cultures were initiated in medium with cells expressing soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and then monitored for morphological changes, copper acquisition, fatty acid concentration, and pMMO and sMMO expression as the amended copper concentration was increased from 0 (approximately 0.3 μM) to 95 μM. The results demonstrate that copper not only regulates the metabolic switch between the two methane monooxygenases but also regulates the level of expression of the pMMO and the development of internal membranes. With respect to stabilization of cell-free pMMO activity, the highest cell-free pMMO activity was observed when copper addition exceeded maximal pMMO expression. Optimization of detergent/protein ratios and simplification of the purification procedure also contributed to the higher activity levels in purified pMMO preparations. Finally, the addition of the type 2 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (NADH dehydrogenase [NDH]) from M. capsulatus Bath, along with NADH and duroquinol, to enzyme assays increased the activity of purified preparations. The NDH and NADH were added to maintain a high duroquinol/duroquinone ratio. PMID:13129946

  15. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  16. A Novel Membrane-associated Metalloprotease, Ste24p, Is Required for the First Step of NH2-terminal Processing of the Yeast a-Factor Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura-Kamada, Konomi; Nouvet, Franklin J.; Michaelis, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Many secreted bioactive signaling molecules, including the yeast mating pheromones a-factor and α-factor, are initially synthesized as precursors requiring multiple intracellular processing enzymes to generate their mature forms. To identify new gene products involved in the biogenesis of a-factor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we carried out a screen for MATa-specific, mating-defective mutants. We have identified a new mutant, ste24, in addition to previously known sterile mutants. During its biogenesis in a wild-type strain, the a-factor precursor undergoes a series of COOH-terminal CAAX modifications, two sequential NH2-terminal cleavage events, and export from the cell. Identification of the a-factor biosynthetic intermediate that accumulates in the ste24 mutant revealed that STE24 is required for the first NH2-terminal proteolytic processing event within the a-factor precursor, which takes place after COOH-terminal CAAX modification is complete. The STE24 gene product contains multiple predicted membrane spans, a zinc metalloprotease motif (HEXXH), and a COOH-terminal ER retrieval signal (KKXX). The HEXXH protease motif is critical for STE24 activity, since STE24 fails to function when conserved residues within this motif are mutated. The identification of Ste24p homologues in a diverse group of organisms, including Escherichia coli, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Haemophilus influenzae, and Homo sapiens, indicates that Ste24p has been highly conserved throughout evolution. Ste24p and the proteins related to it define a new subfamily of proteins that are likely to function as intracellular, membrane-associated zinc metalloproteases. PMID:9015299

  17. Identification of novel membrane-associated prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) inhibitors with anti-influenza activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hoon; Park, Eun Beul; Lee, Jae Yeol; Min, Ji-Young

    2016-01-22

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major public health concern that leads to high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite various vaccination programs and development of drugs targeting essential viral proteins, the emergence of drug-resistant variants has been frequently reported and the therapeutic options are limited. Because exaggerated inflammation is considered as an important factor in disease pathogenesis, immunomodulatory agents that effectively suppress cytokine responses are needed for the treatment of IAV infection. Membrane-associated prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is an enzyme responsible for the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that is the best-characterized immune modulatory lipid in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation. In the present study, we tested the anti-influenza activities of mPGES-1 inhibitors, using a phenotype-based assay involving image analyses. Seven primary hits among 49 compounds targeting mPGES-1 exhibited anti-influenza activities against A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) in a dose-dependent manner. The most effective hit, MPO-0047, suppressed influenza-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. We also showed that mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-8, CCL5/RANTES, and CXCL10/IP-10 were significantly reduced by the treatment of influenza-infected cells with MPO-0047. Exogenous PGE2 reversed the inhibitory effects of MPO-0047. Our results showed that this selective mPGES-1 inhibitor has anti-influenza effects by inhibiting PGE2 production, which suppresses the induction of pro-inflammatory genes. Taken together our data revealed that mPGES-1 inhibitor has the potential for further development as an influenza therapeutic agent. PMID:26673392

  18. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yijun; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Song, Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Gang

    2012-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 ({omega} - 2, where {omega} is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 ({omega} - 1), and M162 ({omega} + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide-anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

  19. Modification of trout sperm membranes associated with activation and cryopreservation. Implications for fertilizing potential.

    PubMed

    Purdy, P H; Barbosa, E A; Praamsma, C J; Schisler, G J

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of two trout sperm activation solutions on sperm physiology and membrane organization prior to and following cryopreservation using flow cytometry and investigated their impact on in vitro fertility. Overall, frozen-thawed samples had greater phospholipid disorder when compared with fresh samples (high plasma membrane fluidity; P < 0.0001) and sperm activated with water also had high plasma membrane fluidity when compared to sperm activated with Lahnsteiner solution (LAS; P < 0.0001). Following cryopreservation water activated samples had membranes with greater membrane protein disorganization compared with LAS but the membrane protein organization of LAS samples was similar to samples prior to freezing (P < 0.0001). Post-thaw water activation resulted in significant increases in intracellular calcium compared to LAS (P < 0.002). In vitro fertility trials with frozen-thawed milt and LAS activation resulted in greater fertility (45%) compared to water activated samples (10%; P < 0.0001). Higher fertility rates correlated with lower intracellular calcium with water (R(2) = -0.9; P = 0.01) and LAS (R(2) = -0.85; P = 0.03) activation. Greater plasma membrane phospholipid (R(2) = -0.89; P = 0.02) and protein (R(2) = -0.84; P = 0.04) disorder correlated with lower water activation fertility rates. These membrane organization characteristics only approached significance with LAS activation in vitro fertility (P = 0.09, P = 0.06, respectively). Potentially the understanding of sperm membrane reorganizations and the physiology associated with activation following cryopreservation may enable users in a repository or hatchery setting to estimate the fertilizing potential of a sample and determine its value. PMID:27234987

  20. Plant gamma-tubulin interacts with alphabeta-tubulin dimers and forms membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Dryková, Denisa; Cenklová, Vēra; Sulimenko, Vadym; Volc, Jindrich; Dráber, Pavel; Binarová, Pavla

    2003-02-01

    gamma-Tubulin is assumed to participate in microtubule nucleation in acentrosomal plant cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we show that gamma-tubulin is present in protein complexes of various sizes and different subcellular locations in Arabidopsis and fava bean. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association of gamma-tubulin with alphabeta-tubulin dimers. gamma-Tubulin cosedimented with microtubules polymerized in vitro and localized along their whole length. Large gamma-tubulin complexes resistant to salt treatment were found to be associated with a high-speed microsomal fraction. Blue native electrophoresis of detergent-solubilized microsomes showed that the molecular mass of the complexes was >1 MD. Large gamma-tubulin complexes were active in microtubule nucleation, but nucleation activity was not observed for the smaller complexes. Punctate gamma-tubulin staining was associated with microtubule arrays, accumulated with short kinetochore microtubules interacting in polar regions with membranes, and localized in the vicinity of nuclei and in the area of cell plate formation. Our results indicate that the association of gamma-tubulin complexes with dynamic membranes might ensure the flexibility of noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation. Moreover, the presence of other molecular forms of gamma-tubulin suggests additional roles for this protein species in microtubule organization. PMID:12566585

  1. Membrane association of the CD3ε signaling domain is required for optimal T cell development and function1

    PubMed Central

    Bettini, Matthew L.; Guy, Clifford; Dash, Pradyot; Vignali, Kate M.; Hamm, David E.; Dobbins, Jessica; Gagnon, Etienne; Thomas, Paul G.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR):CD3 complex transduces signals that are critical for optimal T cell development and adaptive immunity. In resting T cells, the CD3ε cytoplasmic tail associates with the plasma membrane via a proximal basic-rich stretch (BRS). Here we show that mice lacking a functional CD3ε-BRS exhibited substantial reductions in thymic cellularity and limited CD4−CD8− double negative-3 (DN3) to DN4 thymocyte transition, due to enhanced DN4 TCR signaling resulting in increased cell death and TCR downregulation in all subsequent populations. Furthermore, positive, but not negative, T cell selection was affected in mice lacking a functional CD3ε-BRS, which led to limited peripheral T cell function and substantially reduced responsiveness to influenza infection. Collectively, these results indicate membrane association of the CD3ε signaling domain is required for optimal thymocyte development and peripheral T cell function. PMID:24899501

  2. Functions of the Membrane-Associated and Cytoplasmic Malate Dehydrogenases in the Citric Acid Cycle of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Douwe; van der Rest, Michel E.; Drysch, André; Yücel, Raif

    2000-01-01

    Like many other bacteria, Corynebacterium glutamicum possesses two types of l-malate dehydrogenase, a membrane-associated malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO; EC 1.1.99.16) and a cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (MDH; EC 1.1.1.37) The regulation of MDH and of the three membrane-associated dehydrogenases MQO, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and NADH dehydrogenase was investigated. MQO, MDH, and SDH activities are regulated coordinately in response to the carbon and energy source for growth. Compared to growth on glucose, these activities are increased during growth on lactate, pyruvate, or acetate, substrates which require high citric acid cycle activity to sustain growth. The simultaneous presence of high activities of both malate dehydrogenases is puzzling. MQO is the most important malate dehydrogenase in the physiology of C. glutamicum. A mutant with a site-directed deletion in the mqo gene does not grow on minimal medium. Growth can be partially restored in this mutant by addition of the vitamin nicotinamide. In contrast, a double mutant lacking MQO and MDH does not grow even in the presence of nicotinamide. Apparently, MDH is able to take over the function of MQO in an mqo mutant, but this requires the presence of nicotinamide in the growth medium. It is shown that addition of nicotinamide leads to a higher intracellular pyridine nucleotide concentration, which probably enables MDH to catalyze malate oxidation. Purified MDH from C. glutamicum catalyzes oxaloacetate reduction much more readily than malate oxidation at physiological pH. In a reconstituted system with isolated membranes and purified MDH, MQO and MDH catalyze the cyclic conversion of malate and oxaloacetate, leading to a net oxidation of NADH. Evidence is presented that this cyclic reaction also takes place in vivo. As yet, no phenotype of an mdh deletion alone was observed, which leaves a physiological function for MDH in C. glutamicum obscure. PMID:11092846

  3. Molecular Details of α-Synuclein Membrane Association Revealed by Neutrons and Photons

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiping; Hess, Sara K.; Heinrich, Frank; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is an abundant neuronal protein associated with Parkinson’s disease that is disordered in solution, but exists in equilibrium between a bent- and an elongated-helix on negatively charged membranes. Here, neutron reflectometry (NR) and fluorescence spectroscopy were employed to uncover molecular details of the interaction between α-syn and two anionic lipids, phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylserine (PS). Both NR and site-specific Trp measurements indicate that penetration depth of α-syn is similar for either PA- or PS-containing membranes (~9–11 Å from bilayer center) even though there is a preference for α-syn binding to PA. However, closer examination of the individual Trp quenching profiles by brominated lipids reveal differences into local membrane interactions especially at position 39 where conformational heterogeneity was observed. The data also indicate that while W94 penetrates the bilayer as deeply as W4, W94 resides in a more polar surrounding. Taken together, we suggest the N- and C-terminal regions near positions 4 and 94 are anchored to the membrane, while the putative linker spanning residue 39 samples multiple conformations, which are sensitive to the chemical nature of the membrane surface. This flexibility may enable α-syn to bind diverse biomembranes in vivo. PMID:25790164

  4. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent. PMID:11730002

  5. Biochemical characterization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a paramyxovirus that has three membrane-associate proteins: glycoprotein (G), fusion (F), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins. Among them, the SH protein is a small type II integral membrane protein that is incorporated into virions and is only present in certain para...

  6. Effect of methanobactin on the activity and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong W; Antholine, William E; Do, Young S; Semrau, Jeremy D; Kisting, Clint J; Kunz, Ryan C; Campbell, Damon; Rao, Vinay; Hartsel, Scott C; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2005-10-01

    Improvements in the purification of methanobactin (mb) from either Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b(T) or Methylococcus capsulatus Bath resulted in preparations that stimulated methane-oxidation activity in both whole-cell and cell-free fractions of Methylococcus capsulatus Bath expressing the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO). By using washed membrane factions with pMMO activities in the 290 nmol propylene oxidized min(-1) (mg protein)(-1) range, activities approaching 400 nmol propylene oxidized min(-1) (mg protein)(-1) were commonly observed following addition of copper-containing mb (Cu-mb), which represented 50-75 % of the total whole-cell activity. The stimulation of methane-oxidation activity by Cu-mb was similar to or greater than that observed with equimolar concentrations of Cu(II), without the inhibitory effects observed with high copper concentrations. Stimulation of pMMO activity was not observed with copper-free mb, nor was it observed when the copper-to-mb ratio was <0.5 Cu atoms per mb. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of mb differed depending on the copper-to-mb ratio. At copper-to-mb ratios of <0.4 Cu(II) per mb, Cu(II) addition to mb showed an initial coordination by both sulfur and nitrogen, followed by reduction to Cu(I) in <2 min. At Cu(II)-to-mb ratios between 0.4 and 0.9 Cu(II) per mb, the intensity of the Cu(II) signal in EPR spectra was more representative of the Cu(II) added and indicated more nitrogen coordination. The EPR spectral properties of mb and pMMO were also examined in the washed membrane fraction following the addition of Cu(II), mb and Cu-mb in the presence or absence of reductants (NADH or duroquinol) and substrates (CH4 and/or O2). The results indicated that Cu-mb increased electron flow to the pMMO, increased the free radical formed following the addition of O2 and decreased the residual free radical following the addition of O2 plus CH4. The increase in pMMO activity and EPR spectral changes

  7. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K.; Cifuente, Javier O.; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl–CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl–CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  8. Respiratory activity and mitochondrial membrane associated with fruit senescence in postharvest peaches in response to UV-C treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenfeng; Cao, Shifeng; Su, Xinguo; Jiang, Yueming

    2014-10-15

    The effect of 3.0kJ/m(2) ultraviolet-C (UV-C) treatment on respiratory activity and mitochondrial membrane associated with fruit senescence in peach fruit stored at 20°C for 8days was investigated. UV-C treatment could reduce senescence development, as evidenced by higher fruit firmness due to inhibition of respiration rate via reducing succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase activity. Meanwhile, the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in the UV-C-treated fruit were much higher than those in control fruit, resulting in lower levels of superoxide radicals (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In addition, this treatment maintained a higher level of mitochondrial membrane fluidity and inhibited opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Our results suggest that the induction of antioxidant enzymes to scavenge O2(-) and H2O2 by UV-C treatment was associated with the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity, which also played an important role in senescence retardation in peach fruit. PMID:24837916

  9. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K; Cifuente, Javier O; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl-CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl-CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  10. Integrating Solid-State NMR and Computational Modeling to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Membrane-Associated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Chollet, Constance; Scheidt, Holger A.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Meiler, Jens; Huster, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin activates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a, also known as the ghrelin receptor. This 28-residue peptide is acylated at Ser3 and is the only peptide hormone in the human body that is lipid-modified by an octanoyl group. Little is known about the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated ghrelin. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of ghrelin in lipid vesicles, followed by computational modeling of the peptide using Rosetta. Isotropic chemical shift data of isotopically labeled ghrelin provide information about the peptide’s secondary structure. Spin diffusion experiments indicate that ghrelin binds to membranes via its lipidated Ser3. Further, Phe4, as well as electrostatics involving the peptide’s positively charged residues and lipid polar headgroups, contribute to the binding energy. Other than the lipid anchor, ghrelin is highly flexible and mobile at the membrane surface. This observation is supported by our predicted model ensemble, which is in good agreement with experimentally determined chemical shifts. In the final ensemble of models, residues 8–17 form an α-helix, while residues 21–23 and 26–27 often adopt a polyproline II helical conformation. These helices appear to assist the peptide in forming an amphipathic conformation so that it can bind to the membrane. PMID:25803439

  11. Mössbauer studies of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus bath: evidence for a Diiron center.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Marlène; Choi, Dong W; Dispirito, Alan A; Antholine, William E; Semrau, Jeremy D; Münck, Eckard

    2007-12-26

    Two methane monooxygenase (MMO) systems have been identified in methanotrophic bacteria, namely, a soluble or cytoplasmic MMO and a membrane-associated or particulate MMO. The active site of the well-characterized soluble MMO contains a bis-mu-hydroxo-bridged diiron cluster. X-ray crystallographic studies of the particulate enzyme, pMMO, have identified two copper centers on the alpha subunit (pmoB) of the alphabetagamma trimer and a site at the interface of the betagamma subunits filled by a Zn, apparently from the crystallization buffer. In our hands, pMMO preparations containing 1-2 iron atoms per alphabetagamma show the highest catalytic activity. We have employed Mössbauer spectroscopy to characterize the iron in our preparations. Interestingly, we find in pMMO a component with the same spectral properties as the antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(III) cluster in the soluble enzyme. In whole cells, we find nearly 1 diiron center per alphabetagamma of pMMO; in purified enzyme preparations, only 10% of the sites appear to be occupied. These occupancies correlate well with the measured specific activities of purified pMMO and pMMO in whole cells. We suggest that it is the "Zn site" that accommodates the diiron center in active pMMO. PMID:18052283

  12. High-resolution three-dimensional views of membrane-associated clathrin and cytoskeleton in critical-point-dried macrophages.

    PubMed

    Aggeler, J; Takemura, R; Werb, Z

    1983-11-01

    We obtained high-resolution topographical information about the distribution of clathrin and cytoskeletal filaments on cytoplasmic membrane surfaces of macrophages spreading onto glass coverslips by both critical-point drying of broken-open cells and preparation of rotary platinum replicas. Irregular patches of the adherent ventral surface of the plasma membrane were exposed in these cells, and large areas of these exposed membranes were covered with clathrin-coated patches, pits, and vesicles. Various amounts of cytoskeleton were attached to the plasma membranes of these spreading cells, either as distinct starlike foci, or as individual filaments and bundles radiating out from the cytoskeletal meshwork. In newly adherent cells a well developed Golgi-GERL complex, characterized by smooth, dish-like cisternae associated with rough endoplasmic reticulum, was observed. There were many coated vesicles budding off from the Golgi cisternae, and these were predominantly of the large type (150 nm) usually associated with the plasma membrane. In critical-point-dried samples, both cytoskeleton and membranes were preserved in detail comparable to that of quick-frozen samples, after appropriate fixation. Rotary replication of critical-point-dried cells provides a rapid, easily controlled, and generally easy to perform method for obtaining samples of exposed membrane large enough to permit quantification of membrane-associated clathrin and cytoskeleton under various experimental conditions. PMID:6415067

  13. Membrane-associated CD93 regulates leukocyte migration and C1q-hemolytic activity during murine peritonitis1

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee-Wacker, Mallary C.; Briseño, Carlos; Galvan, Manuel; Moriel, Gabriela; Velázquez, Peter; Bohlson, Suzanne S.

    2011-01-01

    CD93 is emerging as a novel regulator of inflammation; however, its molecular function is unknown. CD93 exists as a membrane-associated glycoprotein on the surface of cells involved in the inflammatory cascade, including endothelial and myeloid cells. A soluble form (sCD93) is detectable in blood and is elevated with inflammation. Here we demonstrate heightened susceptibility to thioglycollate-induced peritonitis in CD93−/− mice. CD93−/− mice showed a 1.6 to 1.8-fold increase in leukocyte infiltration during thioglycollate-induced peritonitis between 3 and 24 hours that returned to wildtype levels by 96 hours. Impaired vascular integrity in CD93−/− mice during peritonitis was demonstrated using fluorescence multi-photon intravital microscopy; however, no differences in cytokine or chemokine levels were detected by Luminex Multiplex or ELISA analysis. C1q-hemolytic activity in CD93−/− mice was decreased by 22% at time zero and by 46% 3 hours post thioglycollate injection suggesting a defect in the classical complement pathway. Leukocyte recruitment and C1q-hemolytic activity was restored to wildtype levels when CD93 was expressed on either hematopoietic cells or non-hematopoietic cells in bone marrow chimeric mice. However, elevated levels of sCD93 in inflammatory fluid were observed only when CD93 was expressed on non-hematopoietic cells. Since cell-associated CD93 was sufficient to restore a normal inflammatory response, these data suggest that cell-associated CD93, and not sCD93, regulates leukocyte recruitment and complement activation during murine peritonitis. PMID:21849679

  14. Membrane-associated CD93 regulates leukocyte migration and C1q-hemolytic activity during murine peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Greenlee-Wacker, Mallary C; Briseño, Carlos; Galvan, Manuel; Moriel, Gabriela; Velázquez, Peter; Bohlson, Suzanne S

    2011-09-15

    CD93 is emerging as a novel regulator of inflammation; however, its molecular function is unknown. CD93 exists as a membrane-associated glycoprotein on the surface of cells involved in the inflammatory cascade, including endothelial and myeloid cells. A soluble form (sCD93) is detectable in blood and is elevated with inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate heightened susceptibility to thioglycollate-induced peritonitis in CD93(-/-) mice. CD93(-/-) mice showed a 1.6-1.8-fold increase in leukocyte infiltration during thioglycollate-induced peritonitis between 3 and 24 h that returned to wild type levels by 96 h. Impaired vascular integrity in CD93(-/-) mice during peritonitis was demonstrated using fluorescence multiphoton intravital microscopy; however, no differences in cytokine or chemokine levels were detected with Luminex Multiplex or ELISA analysis. C1q-hemolytic activity in CD93(-/-) mice was decreased by 22% at time zero and by 46% 3 h after thioglycollate injection, suggesting a defect in the classical complement pathway. Leukocyte recruitment and C1q-hemolytic activity was restored to wild type levels when CD93 was expressed on either hematopoietic cells or nonhematopoietic cells in bone marrow chimeric mice. However, elevated levels of sCD93 in inflammatory fluid were observed only when CD93 was expressed on nonhematopoietic cells. Because cell-associated CD93 was sufficient to restore a normal inflammatory response, these data suggest that cell-associated CD93, and not sCD93, regulates leukocyte recruitment and complement activation during murine peritonitis. PMID:21849679

  15. Two Membrane-Associated Regions within the Nodamura Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Are Critical for both Mitochondrial Localization and RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Vincent U.; Moreno, Stephanie; Varela-Ramirez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses with positive-strand RNA genomes amplify their genomes in replication complexes associated with cellular membranes. Little is known about the mechanism of replication complex formation in cells infected with Nodamura virus. This virus is unique in its ability to lethally infect both mammals and insects. In mice and in larvae of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella), Nodamura virus-infected muscle cells exhibit mitochondrial aggregation and membrane rearrangement, leading to disorganization of the muscle fibrils on the tissue level and ultimately in hind limb/segment paralysis. However, the molecular basis for this pathogenesis and the role of mitochondria in Nodamura virus infection remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Nodamura virus establishes RNA replication complexes that associate with mitochondria in mammalian cells. Our results showed that Nodamura virus replication complexes are targeted to mitochondria, as evidenced in biochemical, molecular, and confocal microscopy studies. More specifically, we show that the Nodamura virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase interacts with the outer mitochondrial membranes as an integral membrane protein and ultimately becomes associated with functional replication complexes. These studies will help us to understand the mechanism of replication complex formation and the pathogenesis of Nodamura virus for mammals. IMPORTANCE This study will further our understanding of Nodamura virus (NoV) genome replication and its pathogenesis for mice. NoV is unique among the Nodaviridae in its ability to infect mammals. Here we show that NoV establishes RNA replication complexes (RCs) in association with mitochondria in mammalian cells. These RCs contain newly synthesized viral RNA and feature a physical interaction between mitochondrial membranes and the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is mediated by two membrane-associated regions. While the nature of the interaction needs to be

  16. Membrane-associated glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enzymes PhcC and PhcD are essential for enantioselective catabolism of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (-)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  17. Membrane-Associated Glucose-Methanol-Choline Oxidoreductase Family Enzymes PhcC and PhcD Are Essential for Enantioselective Catabolism of Dehydrodiconiferyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (−)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of PotA, a membrane-associated ATPase of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Kanai, Ken; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2014-01-01

    A membrane-associated ATPase, PotA, is a component of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in prokaryotes that plays an important role in normal cell growth by regulating the cellular polyamine concentration. No three-dimensional structures of membrane-associated ATPases in polyamine-uptake systems have been determined to date. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PotA from Thermotoga maritima are reported. Diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.7 Å resolution from both native and selenomethionine-labelled crystals. Preliminary crystallographic analysis revealed that the crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P3112 (or P3212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 88.9, c = 221.2 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°, indicating that a dimer was present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24915082

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of GumK, a membrane-associated glucuronosyltransferase from Xanthomonas campestris required for xanthan polysaccharide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barreras, Máximo; Bianchet, Mario A.; Ielpi, Luis

    2006-09-01

    Crystallization of a membrane-associated glucuronosyltransferase. GumK is a membrane-associated inverting glucuronosyltransferase that is part of the biosynthetic route of xanthan, an industrially important exopolysaccharide produced by Xanthomonas campestris. The enzyme catalyzes the fourth glycosylation step in the pentasaccharide-P-P-polyisoprenyl assembly, an oligosaccharide diphosphate lipid intermediate in xanthan biosynthesis. GumK has marginal homology to other glycosyltransferases (GTs). It belongs to the CAZy family GT 70, for which no structure is currently available, and indirect biochemical evidence suggests that it also belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Crystals of recombinant GumK from X. campestris have been grown that diffract to 1.9 Å resolution. Knowledge of the crystal structure of GumK will help in understanding xanthan biosynthesis and its regulation and will also allow a subsequent rational approach to enzyme design and engineering. The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction approach will be used to solve the phase problem.

  20. Analysis of NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H cofactors by imprinted polymer membranes associated with ion-sensitive field-effect transistor devices and Au-quartz crystals.

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, Svetlana P; Zayats, Maya; Bourenko, Tatyana; Kharitonov, Andrei B; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Katz, Eugenii; Willner, Itamar

    2003-02-01

    Specific recognition sites for the NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H cofactors are imprinted in a cross-linked acrylamide-acrylamidophenylboronic acid copolymer membrane. The imprinted membranes, associated with pH-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) or Au-quartz piezoelectric crystals, enable the potentiometric or microgravimetric analysis of the oxidized NAD(P)+ cofactors and the reduced NAD(P)H cofactors, respectively. The NAD+- and NADP+-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET allow the analysis of NAD+ and NADP+ with sensitivities that correspond to 15.0 and 18.0 mVdecade(-1) and detection limits of 4 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The NADH- and NADPH-imprinted membranes associated with the ISFET device enable the analysis of NADH and NADPH with sensitivities that correspond to 24.2 and 21.8 mV x decade(-1) and lower detection limits that are 1 x 10(-7) and 2 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The ISFET devices functionalized with the NADH and NADPH membranes are employed in the analysis of the biocatalyzed oxidation of lactic acid and ethanol in the presence of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. PMID:12585477

  1. A soil actinobacterium scavenges atmospheric H2 using two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Berney, Michael; Hards, Kiel; Cook, Gregory M; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-03-18

    In the Earth's lower atmosphere, H2 is maintained at trace concentrations (0.53 ppmv/0.40 nM) and rapidly turned over (lifetime ≤ 2.1 y(-1)). It is thought that soil microbes, likely actinomycetes, serve as the main global sink for tropospheric H2. However, no study has ever unambiguously proven that a hydrogenase can oxidize this trace gas. In this work, we demonstrate, by using genetic dissection and sensitive GC measurements, that the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 constitutively oxidizes subtropospheric concentrations of H2. We show that two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases mediate this process. Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd1) (MSMEG_2262-2263) is well-adapted to rapidly oxidize H2 at a range of concentrations [Vmax(app) = 12 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 180 nM; threshold = 130 pM in the Δhyd23 (Hyd1 only) strain], whereas Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2720) catalyzes a slower-acting, higher-affinity process [Vmax(app) = 2.5 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 50 nM; threshold = 50 pM in the Δhyd13 (Hyd2 only) strain]. These observations strongly support previous studies that have linked group 5 [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd2) to the oxidation of tropospheric H2 in soil ecosystems. We further reveal that group 2a [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd1) can contribute to this process. Hydrogenase expression and activity increases in carbon-limited cells, suggesting that scavenging of trace H2 helps to sustain dormancy. Distinct physiological roles for Hyd1 and Hyd2 during the adaptation to this condition are proposed. Soil organisms harboring high-affinity hydrogenases may be especially competitive, given that they harness a highly dependable fuel source in otherwise unstable environments. PMID:24591586

  2. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel repeat-containing Leishmania major gene, ppg1, that encodes a membrane-associated form of proteophosphoglycan with a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Montgomery, J; Stierhof, Y D; Handman, E

    1999-10-29

    Leishmania parasites secrete a variety of proteins that are modified by phosphoglycan chains structurally similar to those of the cell surface glycolipid lipophosphoglycan. These proteins are collectively called proteophosphoglycans. We report here the cloning and sequencing of a novel Leishmania major proteophosphoglycan gene, ppg1. It encodes a large polypeptide of approximately 2300 amino acids. The N-terminal domain of approximately 70 kDa exhibits 11 imperfect amino acid repeats that show some homology to promastigote surface glycoproteins of the psa2/gp46 complex. The large central domain apparently consists exclusively of approximately 100 repetitive peptides of the sequence APSASSSSA(P/S)SSSSS(+/-S). Gene fusion experiments demonstrate that these peptide repeats are the targets of phosphoglycosylation in Leishmania and that they form extended filamentous structures reminiscent of mammalian mucins. The C-terminal domain contains a functional glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor addition signal sequence, which confers cell surface localization to a normally secreted Leishmania acid phosphatase, when fused to its C terminus. Antibody binding studies show that the ppg1 gene product is phosphoglycosylated by phosphoglycan repeats and cap oligosaccharides. In contrast to previously characterized proteophosphoglycans, the ppg1 gene product is predominantly membrane-associated and it is expressed on the promastigote cell surface. Therefore this membrane-bound proteophosphoglycan may be important for direct host-parasite interactions. PMID:10531342

  4. Membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis that requires detergent for solubilization: lactoperoxidase 125I localization and molecular weight determination.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Hansa, J G; Stuckmann, K V; Hulett, F M

    1982-05-01

    When membranes of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 were extracted exhaustively with 1 M magnesium, approximately 80% of the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase [alkaline optimum], E.C. 3.1.3.1) was solubilized. The remaining activity could be extracted with a cationic detergent, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, without loss of enzymatic activity. The detergent-extractable alkaline phosphatase was immunoprecipitable with antibody to the salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase or the secreted alkaline phosphatase, had an approximate molecular weight of 60,000, and was localized 100% on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:7040342

  5. Membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis that requires detergent for solubilization: lactoperoxidase 125I localization and molecular weight determination.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Hansa, J G; Stuckmann, K V; Hulett, F M

    1982-01-01

    When membranes of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 were extracted exhaustively with 1 M magnesium, approximately 80% of the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase [alkaline optimum], E.C. 3.1.3.1) was solubilized. The remaining activity could be extracted with a cationic detergent, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, without loss of enzymatic activity. The detergent-extractable alkaline phosphatase was immunoprecipitable with antibody to the salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase or the secreted alkaline phosphatase, had an approximate molecular weight of 60,000, and was localized 100% on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. Images PMID:7040342

  6. Identification, Purification, and Molecular Cloning of N-1-Naphthylphthalmic Acid-Binding Plasma Membrane-Associated Aminopeptidases from Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Angus S.; Hoogner, Karen R.; Peer, Wendy Ann; Taiz, Lincoln

    2002-01-01

    Polar transport of the plant hormone auxin is regulated at the cellular level by inhibition of efflux from a plasma membrane (PM) carrier. Binding of the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) to a regulatory site associated with the carrier has been characterized, but the NPA-binding protein(s) have not been identified. Experimental disparities between levels of high-affinity NPA binding and auxin transport inhibition can be explained by the presence of a low-affinity binding site and in vivo hydrolysis of NPA. In Arabidopsis, colocalization of NPA amidase and aminopeptidase (AP) activities, inhibition of auxin transport by artificial β-naphthylamide substrates, and saturable displacement of NPA by the AP inhibitor bestatin suggest that PM APs may be involved in both low-affinity NPA binding and hydrolysis. We report the purification and molecular cloning of NPA-binding PM APs and associated proteins from Arabidopsis. This is the first report of PM APs in plants. PM proteins were purified by gel permeation, anion exchange, and NPA affinity chromatography monitored for tyrosine-AP activity. Lower affinity fractions contained two orthologs of mammalian APs involved in signal transduction and cell surface-extracellular matrix interactions. AtAPM1 and ATAPP1 have substrate specificities and inhibitor sensitivities similar to their mammalian orthologs, and have temporal and spatial expression patterns consistent with previous in planta histochemical data. Copurifying proteins suggest that the APs interact with secreted cell surface and cell wall proline-rich proteins. AtAPM1 and AtAPP1 are encoded by single genes. In vitro translation products of ATAPM1 and AtAPP1 have enzymatic activities similar to those of native proteins. PMID:11891249

  7. Elipsa is an early determinant of ciliogenesis that links the IFT particle to membrane-associated small GTPase Rab8.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Zhao, Chengtian; Saras, Arunesh; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Kim, Woong; Furukawa, Takahisa; Sengupta, Piali; Veraksa, Alexey; Malicki, Jarema

    2008-04-01

    The formation and function of cilia involves the movement of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles underneath the ciliary membrane, along axonemal microtubules. Although this process has been studied extensively, its molecular basis remains incompletely understood. For example, it is unknown how the IFT particle interacts with transmembrane proteins. To study the IFT particle further, we examined elipsa, a locus characterized by mutations that cause particularly early ciliogenesis defects in zebrafish. We show here that elipsa encodes a coiled-coil polypeptide that localizes to cilia. Elipsa protein binds to Ift20, a component of IFT particles, and Elipsa homologue in Caenorhabditis elegans, DYF-11, translocates in sensory cilia, similarly to the IFT particle. This indicates that Elipsa is an IFT particle polypeptide. In the context of zebrafish embryogenesis, Elipsa interacts genetically with Rabaptin5, a well-studied regulator of endocytosis, which in turn interacts with Rab8, a small GTPase, known to localize to cilia. We show that Rabaptin5 binds to both Elipsa and Rab8, suggesting that these proteins provide a bridging mechanism between the IFT particle and protein complexes that assemble at the ciliary membrane. PMID:18364699

  8. Two conformational states of the membrane-associated Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba {delta}-endotoxin complex revealed by electron crystallography: Implications for toxin-pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ounjai, Puey; Unger, Vinzenz M.; Sigworth, Fred J.; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2007-10-05

    The insecticidal nature of Cry {delta}-endotoxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is generally believed to be caused by their ability to form lytic pores in the midgut cell membrane of susceptible insect larvae. Here we have analyzed membrane-associated structures of the 65-kDa dipteran-active Cry4Ba toxin by electron crystallography. The membrane-associated toxin complex was crystallized in the presence of DMPC via detergent dialysis. Depending upon the charge of the adsorbed surface, 2D crystals of the oligomeric toxin complex have been captured in two distinct conformations. The projection maps of those crystals have been generated at 17 A resolution. Both complexes appeared to be trimeric; as in one crystal form, its projection structure revealed a symmetrical pinwheel-like shape with virtually no depression in the middle of the complex. The other form revealed a propeller-like conformation displaying an obvious hole in the center region, presumably representing the toxin-induced pore. These crystallographic data thus demonstrate for the first time that the 65-kDa activated Cry4Ba toxin in association with lipid membranes could exist in at least two different trimeric conformations, conceivably implying the closed and open states of the pore.

  9. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  10. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  11. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (ECTO-NOX) of mouse skin responds to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2003-01-01

    NADH oxidases of the external plasma membrane surface (ECTO-NOX proteins) are characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of 24 min. Explants of mouse skin exhibit the oscillatory activity as estimated from the decrease in A(340) suggesting that individual ECTO-NOX molecules must somehow be induced to function synchronously. Transfer of explants of mouse skin from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromol m(-1) s(-1)) resulted in initiation of a new activity maximum (entrainment) with a midpoint 36 min after light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Addition of melatonin resulted in a new maximum 24 min after melatonin addition. The findings suggest that the ECTO-NOX proteins play a central role in the entrainment of the biological clock both by light and by melatonin.

  12. HIP1, a human homologue of S. cerevisiae Sla2p, interacts with membrane-associated huntingtin in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kalchman, M A; Koide, H B; McCutcheon, K; Graham, R K; Nichol, K; Nishiyama, K; Kazemi-Esfarjani, P; Lynn, F C; Wellington, C; Metzler, M; Goldberg, Y P; Kanazawa, I; Gietz, R D; Hayden, M R

    1997-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine tract, greater than 35 repeats, in the HD gene product, huntingtin. Here we describe a novel huntingtin interacting protein, HIP1, which co-localizes with huntingtin and shares sequence homology and biochemical characteristics with Sla2p, a protein essential for function of the cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The huntingtin-HIP1 interaction is restricted to the brain and is inversely correlated to the polyglutamine length in huntingtin. This provides the first molecular link between huntingtin and the neuronal cytoskeleton and suggests that, in HD, loss of normal huntingtin-HIP1 interaction may contribute to a defect in membrane-cytoskeletal integrity in the brain. PMID:9140394

  13. Improved Solubilization of Surface Proteins from Listeria monocytogenes for Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solubilization of bacterial surface (cell wall and membrane-associated) proteins for 2-DE is challenging, particularly in the case of Gram-positive bacteria. This is primarily due to strong protein association with the cell wall peptidoglycan and protein hydrophobicity. We solubilized surface protei...

  14. Discovery of Novel Disease-specific and Membrane-associated Candidate Markers in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dagley, Laura F.; Croft, Nathan P.; Isserlin, Ruth; Olsen, Jonathan B.; Fong, Vincent; Emili, Andrew; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disorder characterized by the infiltration of auto-reactive immune cells from the periphery into the central nervous system resulting in axonal injury and neuronal cell death. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis represents the best characterized animal model as common clinical, histological, and immunological features are recapitulated. A label-free mass spectrometric proteomics approach was used to detect differences in protein abundance within specific fractions of disease-affected tissues including the soluble lysate derived from the spinal cord and membrane protein-enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Tissues were harvested from actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice and sham-induced (“vehicle” control) counterparts at the disease peak followed by subsequent analysis by nanoflow liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Relative protein quantitation was performed using both intensity- and fragmentation-based approaches. After statistical evaluation of the data, over 500 and 250 differentially abundant proteins were identified in the spinal cord and peripheral blood mononuclear cell data sets, respectively. More than half of these observations have not previously been linked to the disease. The biological significance of all candidate disease markers has been elucidated through rigorous literature searches, pathway analysis, and validation studies. Results from comprehensive targeted mass spectrometry analyses have confirmed the differential abundance of ∼200 candidate markers (≥twofold dysregulated expression) at a 70% success rate. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to examine the cell-surface proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data provide a unique mechanistic insight into the dynamics of peripheral immune cell infiltration into CNS-privileged sites at a molecular level and has identified

  15. The ABCG family of membrane-associated transporters: you don't have to be big to be mighty.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D; Haider, Ameena J; Gelissen, Ingrid C

    2011-12-01

    Along with many other mammalian ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, members of the ABCG group are involved in the regulated transport of hydrophobic compounds across cellular membranes. In humans, five ABCG family members have been identified, encoding proteins ranging from 638 to 678 amino acids in length. All five have been the subject of intensive investigation to better understand their physiological roles, expression patterns, interactions with substrates and inhibitors, and regulation at both the transcript and protein level. The principal substrates for at least four of the ABCG proteins are endogenous and dietary lipids, with ABCG1 implicated in particular in the export of cholesterol, and ABCG5 and G8 forming a functional heterodimer responsible for plant sterol elimination from the body. ABCG2 has a much broader substrate specificity and its ability to transport numerous diverse pharmaceuticals has implications for the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMETOx) profile of these compounds. ABCG2 is one of at least three so-called multidrug resistant ABC transporters expressed in humans, and its activity is associated with decreased efficacy of anti-cancer agents in several carcinomas. In addition to its role in cancer, ABCG2 also plays a role in the normal physiological transport of urate and haem, the implications of which are described. We summarize here data on all five human ABCG transporters and provide a current perspective on their roles in human health and disease. PMID:21175590

  16. Plasma membrane-associated antigens on tumor cells derived from transitional-cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. II. Identification at the molecular level of plasma membrane-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M U; Paulie, S; Troye, M; Perlmann, P

    1980-08-01

    The surface proteins of seven human cell lines (three bladder carcinomas (TCC), two normal urothelial lines, one colon carcinoma, and one malignant melanoma) were labelled with 125I by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Plasma membranes of the cells were isolated and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). When analysed under reducing conditions by staining with protein stain, approximately 45 distinct membrane polypeptides were detected in all membrane preparations. Although the banding patterns for all cell lines were very similar, a 23 K and a 110 K band were only seen in the five unrothelial lines. When the same gels were analysed by autoradiography, between 13 and 17 bands were detected for each of the cell lines. However, in this case, analysis revealed individual and stable banding profiles for each. One 180 K band and one 100 K band were only seen in the autoradiographs of the two normal lines but not in those of the tumor membranes. Analysis under non-reducing conditions gave similar results. The antigenicity of these surface components was analysed by incubating detergent extracts of surface-iodinated cells with IgG from a rabbit anti-TCC serum, absorbed with fetal bovine serum and bound to protein A (from Staphylococcus aureus) on a matrix of Sepharose 4B. Analysis of the eluates by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions showed that many of the labelled polypeptides were antigenic and shared by all seven cell lines. Analysis of eluates from IgG preparations, exhaustively absorbed with human spleen, revealed the presence of at least one antigenic 110 K polypeptide confined to the membrane of the urothelial cells. Preparation of a rabbit antiserum to this 110 K component, isolated from one of the TCC-lines and tested by ADCC, indicated that this polypeptide constitutes an important surface antigen, present on urothelial cells of both TCC- and normal origin but absent from the colon carcinoma and

  17. REDOR Solid-State NMR as a Probe of the Membrane Locations of Membrane-Associated Peptides and Proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Sackett, Kelly; Xie, Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Weliky, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) solid-state NMR is applied to probe the membrane locations of specific residues of membrane proteins. Couplings are measured between protein 13CO nuclei and membrane lipid or cholesterol 2H and 31P nuclei. Specific 13CO labeling is used to enable unambiguous assignment and 2H labeling covers a small region of the lipid or cholesterol molecule. The 13CO-31P and 13CO-2H REDOR respectively probe proximity to the membrane headgroup region and proximity to specific insertion depths within the membrane hydrocarbon core. One strength of the REDOR approach is use of chemically-native proteins and membrane components. The conventional REDOR pulse sequence with 100 kHz 2H π pulses is robust with respect to the 2H quadrupolar anisotropy. The 2H T1’s are comparable to the longer dephasing times (τ’s) and this leads to exponential rather than sigmoidal REDOR buildups. The 13CO-2H buildups are well-fitted to A × (1 − e−γτ) where A and γ are fitting parameters that are correlated as the fraction of molecules (A) with effective 13CO-2H coupling d = 3γ/2. The REDOR approach is applied to probe the membrane locations of the “fusion peptide” regions of the HIV gp41 and influenza virus hemagglutinin proteins which both catalyze joining of the viral and host cell membranes during initial infection of the cell. The HIV fusion peptide forms an intermolecular antiparallel β sheet and the REDOR data support major deeply-inserted and minor shallowly-inserted molecular populations. A significant fraction of the influenza fusion peptide molecules form a tight hairpin with antiparallel N- and C- α helices and the REDOR data support a single peptide population with a deeply-inserted N-helix. The shared feature of deep insertion of the β and α fusion peptide structures may be relevant for fusion catalysis via the resultant local perturbation of the membrane bilayer. Future applications of the REDOR approach may include samples that

  18. Plasma membrane associated phospholipase C from human platelets: Synergistic stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis by thrombin and guanosine 5 prime -O-(3-thiotriphosphate)

    SciTech Connect

    Baldassare, J.J.; Henderson, P.A.; Fisher, G.J. )

    1989-01-10

    The effects of thrombin and GTP{gamma}S on the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides by membrane-associated phospholipase C (PLC) from human platelets were examined with endogenous ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes or with lipid vesicles containing either ({sup 3}H)phosphatidylinositol or ({sup 3}H)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) or thrombin (1 unit/mL) did not stimulate release of inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), inositol bisphosphate (IP{sub 2}), or inositol phosphate (IP) from ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes. IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3}, but not IP, from ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled membranes were, however, stimulated 3-fold by GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). A higher concentration of GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) alone also stimulated IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3}, but not IP, release. In the presence of 1 mM calcium, release of IP{sub 2} and IP{sub 3} was increased 6-fold over basal levels; however, formation of IP was not observed. At submicromolar calcium concentration, hydrolysis of exogenous phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) by platelet membrane associated PLC was also markedly enhanced by GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) or GTP{gamma}S (1 {mu}M) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). Under identical conditions, exogenous phosphatidylinositol (PI) was not hydrolyzed. The same substrate specificity was observed when the membrane-associated PLC was activated with 1 mM calcium. Thrombin-induced hydrolysis of PIP{sub 2} was inhibited by treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin or pretreatment of intact platelets with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA) prior to preparation of membranes. Pertussis toxin did not inhibit GTP{gamma}S (100 {mu}M) or calcium (1 mM) dependent PIP{sub 2} breakdown, while TPA inhibited GTP{gamma}S-dependent but not calcium-dependent phospholipase C activity.

  19. Monoglucosyldiacylglycerol, a foreign lipid, can substitute for phosphatidylethanolamine in essential membrane-associated functions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wikström, Malin; Xie, Jun; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Heacock, Philip; Wieslander, Ake; Dowhan, William

    2004-03-12

    The mechanisms by which lipid bilayer properties govern or influence membrane protein functions are little understood, but a liquid-crystalline state and the presence of anionic and nonbilayer (NB)-prone lipids seem important. An Escherichia coli mutant lacking the major membrane lipid phosphatidylethanolamine (NB-prone) requires divalent cations for viability and cell integrity and is impaired in several membrane functions that are corrected by introduction of the "foreign" NB-prone neutral glycolipid alpha-monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (MGlcDAG) synthesized by the MGlcDAG synthase from Acholeplasma laidlawii. Dependence on Mg(2+) was reduced, and cellular yields and division malfunction were greatly improved. The increased passive membrane permeability of the mutant was not abolished, but protein-mediated osmotic stress adaptation to salts and sucrose was recovered by the presence of MGlcDAG. MGlcDAG also restored tryptophan prototrophy and active transport function of lactose permease, both critically dependent on phosphatidylethanolamine. Three mechanisms can explain the observed effects: NB-prone MGlcDAG improves the quenched lateral pressure profile across the bilayer; neutral MGlcDAG dilutes the high anionic lipid surface charge; MGlcDAG provides a neutral lipid that can hydrogen bond and/or partially ionize. The reduced dependence on Mg(2+) and lack of correction by high monovalent salts strongly support the essential nature of the NB properties of MGlcDAG. PMID:14688287

  20. Membrane associated cancer-oocyte neoantigen SAS1B/ovastacin is a candidate immunotherapeutic target for uterine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Eusebio S.; D'Souza, Ryan S.; Needham, Marisa A.; Herr, Austin K.; Jazaeri, Amir A.; Li, Hui; Stoler, Mark H.; Anderson-Knapp, Kiley L.; Thomas, Theodore; Mandal, Arabinda; Gougeon, Alain; Flickinger, Charles J.; Bruns, David E.; Pollok, Brian A.; Herr, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The metalloproteinase SAS1B [ovastacin, ASTL, astacin-like] was immunolocalized on the oolemma of ovulated human oocytes and in normal ovaries within the pool of growing oocytes where SAS1B protein was restricted to follicular stages spanning the primary-secondary follicle transition through ovulation. Gene-specific PCR and immunohistochemical studies revealed ASTL messages and SAS1B protein in both endometrioid [74%] and malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT) [87%] of the uterus. A MMMT-derived cell line, SNU539, expressed cell surface SAS1B that, after binding polyclonal antibodies, internalized into EEA1/LAMP1-positive early and late endosomes. Treatment of SNU539 cells with anti-SAS1B polyclonal antibodies caused growth arrest in the presence of active complement. A saporin-immunotoxin directed to SAS1B induced growth arrest and cell death. The oocyte restricted expression pattern of SAS1B among adult organs, cell-surface accessibility, internalization into the endocytic pathway, and tumor cell growth arrest induced by antibody-toxin conjugates suggest therapeutic approaches that would selectively target tumors while limiting adverse drug effects in healthy cells. The SAS1B metalloproteinase is proposed as a prototype cancer-oocyte tumor surface neoantigen for development of targeted immunotherapeutics with limited on-target/off tumor effects predicted to be restricted to the population of growing oocytes. PMID:26327203

  1. Crystallization of the Membrane-Associated Annexin B1: Roles of Additive Screen, Dynamic Light Scattering, and Bioactivity Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, F.; Xu, Y; Azzi, A; Zhu, D; Rehse, D; Chen, C; Sun, S; Lin, S

    2010-01-01

    Annexin B1 (AnxB1) is a calcium-dependent phospholipid binding protein from Taenia solium cysticercus and has been reported to possess anticoagulant activity, to inhibit phospholipase A{sub 2}, and to regulate membrane transport. Native AnxB1 and its selenomethionyl derivative have been overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. The results of dynamic light scattering analysis showed that Hepes buffer combined with low concentration salts (NaCl or CaCl{sub 2}) was beneficial for preventing aggregation and for AnxB1 stabilization in the storage. After the additive screen, crystals have been yielded in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (Gn-HCl). We determined that a low concentration of Gn-HCl significantly delayed clotting time and increased anticoagulant activity. Analysis of the crystal showed that in the presence of Gn-HCl, AnxB1 crystallizes in orthorhombic space group, which is modified from the cubic space group for crystals grown in the absence of Gn-HCl. A high quality data set (at 1.9 {angstrom}) has been collected successfully for crystals of L-selenomethionine labeled protein in the presence of Gn-HCl, to solve the structure with the single anomalous dispersion method (SAD). The unit cell parameters are a = 102.35 {angstrom}, b = 103.59 {angstrom}, c = 114.60 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90.00{sup o}.

  2. A soluble alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis MC14. Histochemical localization, purification, characterization and comparison with the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hansa, J G; Laporta, M; Kuna, M A; Reimschuessel, R; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-13

    Growth conditions affect the quantity and distribution of alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1) in Bacillus licheniformis MC14. The soluble alkaline phosphatase, which has been found in biochemical localization studies between the cell wall and cell membrane (Glynn, J.A., Schaffel, S.D., McNicholas, J.M. and Hulett, F.M. (1977) J. Bacteriol. 129, 1010-1019), was localized via electron microscope histochemistry in cells cultured under conditions which result in increased quantities of this activity. This soluble alkaline phosphatase was stabilized with 20% glycerol and purified to homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme is soluble in dilute buffer. This soluble alkaline phosphatase has been characterized and compared to the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from this organism. PMID:6783099

  3. Crystallization and Preliminary Crystallographic Characterization of GumK, A Membrane-Associated Gluocuronosyltransferase from Xanthomonas campestris Required for Xanthan Polysaccharide Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barreras,M.; Bianchet, M.; Ielpi, L.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    GumK is a membrane-associated inverting glucuronosyltransferase that is part of the biosynthetic route of xanthan, an industrially important exopolysaccharide produced by Xanthomonas campestris. The enzyme catalyzes the fourth glycosylation step in the pentasaccharide-P-P-polyisoprenyl assembly, an oligosaccharide diphosphate lipid intermediate in xanthan biosynthesis. GumK has marginal homology to other glycosyltransferases (GTs). It belongs to the CAZy family GT 70, for which no structure is currently available, and indirect biochemical evidence suggests that it also belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Crystals of recombinant GumK from X. campestris have been grown that diffract to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. Knowledge of the crystal structure of GumK will help in understanding xanthan biosynthesis and its regulation and will also allow a subsequent rational approach to enzyme design and engineering. The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction approach will be used to solve the phase problem.

  4. Evidence of autoantibodies to cell membrane associated DNA (cultured lymphocytes): a new specific marker for rapid identification of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Servais, G.; Guillaume, M.; Dumarey, N.; Duchateau, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Autoantibodies to cell membrane associated DNA are described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The specificity of these antibodies differ from antibodies to nuclear DNA.
METHODS—Using indirect immunofluorescence, a specific IgG was detected giving a characteristic pattern of continuous peripheral membrane fluorescence on cultured B-lymphocytes.
RESULTS—This pattern was observed in 53 of 80 serum samples of SLE patients but absent in the serum samples of the control populations: 15 rheumatoid arthritis, 38 ankylosing spondylarthritis, 17 non-inflammatory osteopenic patients, and 224 blood donors. In 34 Sjögren syndrome's patients one only showed a positive test. The cmDNA specificity of these antibodies was confirmed by pattern extinction with DNAse but not RNase or protease pre-treatment of the cells. IgG to cmDNA, separated by absorption/elution from purified cmDNA immobilised on DEAE-nitrocellulose reproduced the immunofluorescence pattern pictures. Extensive serum depletion of anti-double strand or single strand DNA antibodies by absorption to cellulose bound ds- or ss-DNA affected marginally the pericellular fluorescence revealing some minor cross reactivity with nuclear DNA. Moreover, in SLE patients without detectable antibody to ds-DNA, pericellular fluorescence could be visible.
CONCLUSION—This novel rapid immunofluorescence method may serve as an identification test of SLE patients. Given its positive (97.1%) and negative (92.9%) predictive value, sensitivity (66%) and specificity (99.5%), it improves on other diagnostic tests such as the detection of antibodies to Sm.

 Keywords: anti-nuclear antibodies; systemic lupus erythematosus, immunofluorescence, cytoplasmic membrane associated DNA PMID:9893572

  5. The chloroplast membrane associated ceQORH putative quinone oxidoreductase reduces long-chain, stress-related oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Curien, Gilles; Giustini, Cécile; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Mas-Y-Mas, Sarah; Cobessi, David; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Matringe, Michel; Grechkin, Alexander; Rolland, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Under oxidative stress conditions the lipid constituents of cells can undergo oxidation whose frequent consequence is the production of highly reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. These molecules are toxic because they can add to biomolecules (such as proteins and nucleic acids) and several enzyme activities cooperate to eliminate these reactive electrophile species. CeQORH (chloroplast envelope Quinone Oxidoreductase Homolog, At4g13010) is associated with the inner membrane of the chloroplast envelope and imported into the organelle by an alternative import pathway. In the present study, we show that the recombinant ceQORH exhibits the activity of a NADPH-dependent α,β-unsaturated oxoene reductase reducing the double bond of medium-chain (C⩾9) to long-chain (18 carbon atoms) reactive electrophile species deriving from poly-unsaturated fatty acid peroxides. The best substrates of ceQORH are 13-lipoxygenase-derived γ-ketols. γ-Ketols are spontaneously produced in the chloroplast from the unstable allene oxide formed in the biochemical pathway leading to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, a precursor of the defense hormone jasmonate. In chloroplasts, ceQORH could detoxify 13-lipoxygenase-derived γ-ketols at their production sites in the membranes. This finding opens new routes toward the understanding of γ-ketols role and detoxification. PMID:26678323

  6. The Membrane-Associated Sec1/Munc18 KEULE is Required for Phragmoplast Microtubule Reorganization During Cytokinesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexander; Müller, Lin; Rybak, Katarzyna; Vodermaier, Vera; Facher, Eva; Thellmann, Martha; Ravikumar, Raksha; Wanner, Gerhard; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Assaad, Farhah F

    2016-04-01

    Cytokinesis, the partitioning of the cytoplasm following nuclear division, requires extensive coordination between membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics. In plants, the onset of cytokinesis is characterized by the assembly of a bipolar microtubule array, the phragmoplast, and of a transient membrane compartment, the cell plate. Little is known about the coordination between membrane deposition at the cell plate and the dynamics of phragmoplast microtubules. In this study, we monitor the localization dynamics of microtubule and membrane markers throughout cytokinesis. Our spatiotemporal resolution is consistent with the general view that microtubule dynamics drive membrane movements. Nonetheless, we provide evidence for active sorting at the cell plate and show that this is, at least in part, mediated by the TRAPPII tethering complex. We also characterize phragmoplast microtubule organization and cell plate formation in a suite of cytokinesis-defective mutants. Of four mutant lines with defects in phragmoplast microtubule organization, only mor1 microtubule-associated mutants exhibited aberrant cell plates. Conversely, the mutants with the strongest impairment in phragmoplast microtubule reorganization are keule alleles, which have a primary defect in membrane fusion. Our findings identify the SEC1/Munc18 protein KEULE as a central regulatory node in the coordination of membrane and microtubule dynamics during plant cytokinesis. PMID:26700031

  7. Photoaffinity labeling of retinoic acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, P S; Choi, S Y; Ho, Y C; Rando, R R

    1995-01-01

    Retinoid-binding proteins are essential mediators of vitamin A function in vertebrate organisms. They solubilize and stabilize retinoids, and they direct the intercellular and intracellular trafficking, transport, and metabolic function of vitamin A compounds in vision and in growth and development. Although many soluble retinoid-binding proteins and receptors have been purified and extensively characterized, relatively few membrane-associated enzymes and other proteins that interact with retinoids have been isolated and studied, due primarily to their inherent instabilities during purification. In an effort to identify and purify previously uncharacterized retinoid-binding proteins, it is shown that radioactively labeled all-trans-retinoic acid can be used as a photoaffinity labeling reagent to specifically tag two known retinoic acid-binding proteins, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein and albumin, in complex mixtures of cytosolic proteins. Additionally, a number of other soluble and membrane-associated proteins that bind all-trans-[11,12-3H]retinoic acid with high specificity are labeled utilizing the same photoaffinity techniques. Most of these labeled proteins have molecular weights that do not correspond to any known retinoid-binding proteins. Thus, photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-retinoic acid and related photoactivatable retinoids is a method that should prove extremely useful in the identification and purification of novel soluble and membrane-associated retinoid-binding proteins from ocular and nonocular tissues. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7846032

  8. Biochemical Analysis of Recombinant AlkJ from Pseudomonas putida Reveals a Membrane-Associated, Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Dehydrogenase Suitable for the Biosynthetic Production of Aliphatic Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Kirmair, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    The noncanonical alcohol dehydrogenase AlkJ is encoded on the alkane-metabolizing alk operon of the mesophilic bacterium Pseudomonas putida GPo1. To gain insight into the enzymology of AlkJ, we have produced the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified it to homogeneity using His6 tag affinity and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Despite synthesis in the cytoplasm, AlkJ was associated with the bacterial cell membrane, and solubilization with n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside was necessary to liberate the enzyme. SEC and spectrophotometric analysis revealed a dimeric quaternary structure with stoichiometrically bound reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2). The holoenzyme showed thermal denaturation at moderate temperatures around 35°C, according to both activity assay and temperature-dependent circular dichroism spectroscopy. The tightly bound coenzyme was released only upon denaturation with SDS or treatment with urea-KBr and, after air oxidation, exhibited the characteristic absorption spectrum of FAD. The enzymatic activity of purified AlkJ for 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octanol as well as the n-alkanol derivative ω-hydroxy lauric acid methyl ester (HLAMe) was quantified in the presence of the artificial electron acceptors phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP), indicating broad substrate specificity with the lowest activity on the shortest alcohol, 1-butanol. Furthermore, AlkJ was able to accept as cosubstrates/oxidants the ubiquinone derivatives Q0 and Q1, also in conjunction with cytochrome c, which suggests coupling to the bacterial respiratory chain of this membrane-associated enzyme in its physiological environment. Using gas chromatographic analysis, we demonstrated specific biocatalytic conversion by AlkJ of the substrate HLAMe to the industrially relevant aldehyde, thus enabling the biotechnological production of 12-amino lauric acid methyl ester via subsequent enzymatic transamination. PMID:24509930

  9. Interactions of normal and mutant vesicular stomatitis virus matrix proteins with the plasma membrane and nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, L D; Rose, J K

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that a fraction of the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) binds tightly to cellular membranes in vivo when expressed in the absence of other VSV proteins. This membrane-associated M protein was functional in binding purified VSV nucleocapsids in vitro. Here we show that the membrane-associated M protein is largely associated with a membrane fraction having the density of plasma membranes, indicating membrane specificity in the binding. In addition, we analyzed truncated forms of M protein to identify regions responsible for membrane association and nucleocapsid binding. Truncated M protein lacking the amino-terminal basic domain still associated with cellular membranes, although not as tightly as wild-type M protein, and could not bind nucleocapsids. In contrast, deletion of the carboxy-terminal 14 amino acids did not disrupt stable membrane association or nucleocapsid interaction. These results suggest that the amino terminus of M protein either interacts directly with membranes and nucleocapsids or stabilizes a conformation that is required for M protein to mediate both of these interactions. Images PMID:8254754

  10. Chromosomal mapping of the gene (INPP5A) encoding the 43-kDa membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase to 10q26.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.A.; Speed, C.J.; Nicholl, J.; Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the localization of a membrane-associated inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase gene to human chromosome 10q26.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This 43-kDa 5-phosphatase does not map to the same location as any other 5-phosphatase enzymes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Involvement of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane associated, rapid response steroid-binding), a novel vitamin D receptor, in growth inhibition of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Cynthia L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Rohe, Ben; Nemere, Ilka; Meckling, Kelly A.

    2010-03-10

    In addition to classical roles in calcium homeostasis and bone development, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} [1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}] inhibits the growth of several cancer types, including breast cancer. Although cellular effects of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} traditionally have been attributed to activation of a nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR), a novel receptor for 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} called 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS (membrane-associated, rapid response steroid-binding) protein was identified recently. The purpose of this study was to determine if the level of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS expression modulates 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} activity in breast cancer cells. Relative levels of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS protein in MCF-7, MDA MB 231, and MCF-10A cells were estimated by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. To determine if 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor was involved in the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in MCF-7 cells, a ribozyme construct designed to knock down 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS mRNA was stably transfected into MCF-7 cells. MCF-7 clones in which 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor expression was reduced showed increased sensitivity to 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} ( IC{sub 50} 56 {+-} 24 nM) compared to controls (319 {+-} 181 nM; P < 0.05). Reduction in 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor lengthened the doubling time in transfectants treated with 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. Knockdown of 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor also increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to the vitamin D analogs KH1060 and MC903, but not to unrelated agents (all-trans retinoic acid, paclitaxel, serum/glucose starvation, or the isoflavone, pomiferin). These results suggest that 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS receptor expression interferes with the growth inhibitory activity of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in breast cancer cells, possibly through the nuclear VDR. Further research should examine the potential for pharmacological or natural agents that modify 1,25D{sub 3}-MARRS expression or activity as anticancer agents.

  12. Inhibition of nitrate transport by anti-nitrate reductase IgG fragments and the identification of plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase in roots of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane associated nitrate reductase (NR) was detected in plasma membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) roots. The PM associated NR was not removed by washing vesicles with 500 millimolar NaCl and 1 millimolar EDTA and represented up to 4% of the total root NR activity. PM associated NR was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 whereas soluble NR was only increased 1.7-fold. The latency was a function of the solubilization of NR from the membrane. NR, solubilized from the PM fraction by Triton X-100 was inactivated by antiserum to Chlorella sorokiniana NR. Anti-NR immunoglobulin G fragments purified from the anti-NR serum inhibited NO3- uptake by more than 90% but had no effect on NO2- uptake. The inhibitory effect was only partially reversible; uptake recovered to 50% of the control after thorough rinsing of roots. Preimmune serum immunoglobulin G fragments inhibited NO3- uptake 36% but the effect was completely reversible by rinsing. Intact NR antiserum had no effect on NO3- uptake. The results present the possibility that NO3- uptake and NO3- reduction in the PM of barley roots may be related.

  13. Actin reorganization is required for the formation of polarized BCR signalosomes in response to both soluble and membrane-associated antigens1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Miller, Heather; Orlowski, Gregory; Hang, Haiyin; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2012-01-01

    B-cells encounter both soluble (sAg) and membrane-associated antigens (mAg) in the secondary lymphoid tissue, yet how the physical form of Ag modulates B-cell activation remains unclear. This study compares actin reorganization and its role in BCR signalosome formation in mAg- and sAg-stimulated B-cells. Both mAg and sAg induce F-actin accumulation and actin polymerization at BCR microclusters and at the outer rim of BCR central clusters, but the kinetics and magnitude of F-actin accumulation in mAg-stimulated B-cells are greater than those in sAg-stimulated B-cells. Accordingly, the actin regulatory factors, cofilin and gelsolin, are recruited to BCR clusters in both mAg- and sAg-stimulated B-cells but with different kinetics and patterns of cellular redistribution. Inhibition of actin reorganization by stabilizing F-actin inhibits BCR clustering and tyrosine phosphorylation induced by both forms of Ag. Depolymerization of F-actin leads to unpolarized microclustering of BCRs and tyrosine phosphorylation in BCR microclusters without mAg and sAg, but in much slower kinetics than those induced by Ag. Therefore, actin reorganization, mediated via both polymerization and depolymerization, is required for the formation of BCR signalosomes in response to both mAg and sAg. PMID:22387556

  14. PDZ Protein Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Trafficking and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Henry A; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contribute to the regulation of every aspect of human physiology and are therapeutic targets for the treatment of numerous diseases. As a consequence, understanding the myriad of mechanisms controlling GPCR signaling and trafficking is essential for the development of new pharmacological strategies for the treatment of human pathologies. Of the many GPCR-interacting proteins, postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons, disc large, zona occludens-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins appear most abundant and have similarly been implicated in disease mechanisms. PDZ proteins play an important role in regulating receptor and channel protein localization within synapses and tight junctions and function to scaffold intracellular signaling protein complexes. In the current study, we review the known functional interactions between PDZ domain-containing proteins and GPCRs and provide insight into the potential mechanisms of action. These PDZ domain-containing proteins include the membrane-associated guanylate-like kinases [postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 97 kilodaltons; postsynaptic density protein of 93 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 102 kilodaltons; discs, large homolog 5; caspase activation and recruitment domain and membrane-associated guanylate-like kinase domain-containing protein 3; membrane protein, palmitoylated 3; calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase; membrane-associated guanylate kinase protein (MAGI)-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3], Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor proteins (NHERFs) (NHERF1, NHERF2, PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 1, and PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 2), Golgi-associated PDZ proteins (Gα-binding protein interacting protein, C-terminus and CFTR-associated ligand), PDZ domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) 1 and 2, regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-homology-RhoGEFs (PDZ domain-containing RhoGEF and

  15. A mechanism for inhibition of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by the membrane-associated mucin episialin/MUC1.

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, J; van der Valk, S W; Hilkens, J

    1996-01-01

    Episialin (MUC1, PEM, EMA, CA15-3 antigen) is a sialylated, membrane-associated glycoprotein with an extended mucin-like ectodomain. This domain mainly consists of 30-90 homologous 20-amino acid repeats that are rich in O-glycosylation sites (serines and threonines). It is likely that this part forms a polyproline beta-turn helix. As a result, the ectodomain can protrude more than 200 nm above the cell surface, whereas most cell surface molecules do not exceed a length of 35 nm. Normally, episialin is present at the apical side of glandular epithelial cells. On carcinoma cells, however, it can be strongly overexpressed and it is often present over the entire cell surface. We have previously shown that episialin, if it is interspersed between adhesion molecules, nonspecifically reduces cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions in vitro and in vivo, presumably by steric hindrance caused by the extreme length and high density of the episialin molecules at the cell surface. To analyze the molecular mechanism for this anti-adhesion effect in more detail, we have now deleted an increasing number of repeats in the episialin cDNA and transfected the resulting mutants into murine L929 cells expressing the homophilic adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Here we show that the length of episialin is the dominant factor that determines the inhibition of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions. For the anti-adhesive effect mediated by the full length episialin, charge repulsion by negatively charged sialylated O-linked glycans is far less important. Images PMID:8730100

  16. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: the cell-wall corral

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Runions, John

    2013-01-01

    Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment. PMID:24381579

  17. Activation of a protein tyrosine phosphatase and inactivation of Raf-1 by somatostatin.

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, D B; Wood, S L; Brautigan, D L; Bell, G I; Dent, P; Sturgill, T W

    1996-01-01

    Human somatostatin receptor 3 ('hsstr3') was transiently expressed in NIH 3T3 cells stably transformed with Ha-Ras (G12V). Somatostatin activated a protein tyrosine phosphatase and inactivated the constitutively active, membrane-associated form of the Raf-1 serine kinase present in these cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:8670047

  18. Fe(III) and Fe(II) ions different effects on Enterococcus hirae cell growth and membrane-associated ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Vardanyan, Zaruhi; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 3+} stimulates but Fe{sup 2+} suppresses Enterococcus hirae wild-type and atpD mutant growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe ions change oxidation-reduction potential drop during cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} have opposite effects on a membrane-associated ATPase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These effects are either in the presence of F{sub 0}F{sub 1} inhibitor or non-functional F{sub 0}F{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe ions decrease protons and coupled potassium ions fluxes across the membrane. -- Abstract: Enterococcus hirae is able to grow under anaerobic conditions during glucose fermentation (pH 8.0) which is accompanied by acidification of the medium and drop in its oxidation-reduction potential (E{sub h}) from positive values to negative ones (down to {approx}-200 mV). In this study, iron (III) ions (Fe{sup 3+}) have been shown to affect bacterial growth in a concentration-dependent manner (within the range of 0.05-2 mM) by decreasing lag phase duration and increasing specific growth rate. While iron(II) ions (Fe{sup 2+}) had opposite effects which were reflected by suppressing bacterial growth. These ions also affected the changes in E{sub h} values during bacterial growth. It was revealed that ATPase activity with and without N,N Prime -dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of the F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase, increased in the presence of even low Fe{sup 3+} concentration (0.05 mM) but decreased in the presence of Fe{sup 2+}. It was established that Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} both significantly inhibited the proton-potassium exchange of bacteria, but stronger effects were in the case of Fe{sup 2+} with DCCD. Such results were observed with both wild-type ATCC9790 and atpD mutant (with defective F{sub 0}F{sub 1}) MS116 strains but they were different with Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}. It is suggested that the effects of Fe{sup 3+} might be due to

  19. Proteomic Approach for Characterization of Immunodominant Membrane-Associated 30- to 36-Kilodalton Fraction Antigens of Leishmania infantum Promastigotes, Reacting with Sera from Mediterranean Visceral Leishmaniasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun-Essghaier, Sayda; Guizani, Ikram; Strub, Jean Marc; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Mabrouk, Kamel; Ouelhazi, Lazhar; Dellagi, Koussay

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify and characterize proteins of a 30- to 36-kDa fraction of Leishmania infantum promastigote membranes previously shown to be an immunodominant antigen(s) in Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis (MVL) and a consistent and reliable serological marker of this disease. By the first approach, Coomassie-stained protein bands (32- and 33-kDa fractions) that specifically reacted by immunoblotting with sera from MVL patients were excised from the gel and submitted to enzymatic digestion to generate peptides. Four peptides were sequenced, three of which were shown to be definitely associated with MVL-reactive antigens and ascribed to a mitochondrial integral ADP-ATP carrier protein from L. major, a putative NADH cytochrome b5 reductase, and a putative mitochondrial carrier protein, respectively. The second approach combined two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of membrane antigens and mass spectrometry (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) by using a quadrupole time-of-flight analysis. Six immunoreactive spots that resolved within a molecular mass range of 30 to 36 kDa and a pH range of 6.7 to 7.4 corresponded to four Leishmania products. The sequences derived from two spots were ascribed to a beta subunit-like guanine nucleotide binding protein, known as the activated protein kinase C receptor homolog antigen LACK, and to a probable member of the aldehyde reductase family. One spot was identified as a probable ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (EC 1.10.2.2) Rieske iron-sulfur protein precursor. The remaining three spots were identified as truncated forms of elongation factor 1α. These antigens correspond to conserved proteins ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic cells and represent potential candidates for the design of a reliable tool for the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:15699427

  20. Mass Spectrometry of Membrane Proteins: A Focus on Aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Kevin L.; Grey, Angus C.; Nicklay, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are abundant, critically important biomolecules that conduct essential functions in all cells and are the targets of a significant number of therapeutic drugs. However, the analysis of their expression, modification, protein–protein interactions, and structure by mass spectrometry has lagged behind similar studies of soluble proteins. Here we review the limitations to analysis of integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins and highlight advances in sample preparation and mass spectrometry methods that have led to the successful analysis of this protein class. Advances in the analysis of membrane protein posttranslational modification, protein–protein interaction, protein structure, and tissue distributions by imaging mass spectrometry are discussed. Furthermore, we focus our discussion on the application of mass spectrometry for the analysis of aquaporins as a prototypical integral membrane protein and how advances in analytical methods have revealed new biological insights into the structure and function of this family of proteins. PMID:23394619

  1. Isolation and identification of Enterococcus faecalis membrane proteins using membrane shaving, 1D SDS/PAGE, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cathro, Peter; McCarthy, Peter; Hoffmann, Peter; Zilm, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a significant nosocomial pathogen, which is able to survive in diverse environments and resist killing with antimicrobial therapies. The expression of cell membrane proteins play an important role in how bacteria respond to environmental stress. As such, the capacity to identify and study membrane protein expression is critical to our understanding of how specific proteins influence bacterial survival. Here, we describe a combined approach to identify membrane proteins of E. faecalis ATCC V583 using membranes fractionated by either 1D SDS/PAGE or membrane shaving, coupled with LC-ESI mass spectrometry. We identified 222 membrane-associated proteins, which represent approximately 24% of the predicted membrane-associated proteome: 170 were isolated using 1D SDS/PAGE and 68 with membrane shaving, with 36 proteins being common to both the techniques. Of the proteins identified by membrane shaving, 97% were membrane-associated with the majority being integral membrane proteins (89%). Most of the proteins identified with known physiology are involved with transportation across the membrane. The combined 1D SDS/PAGE and membrane shaving approach has produced the greatest number of membrane proteins identified from E. faecalis to date. These protocols will aid future researchers investigating changes in the membrane proteome of E. faecalis by improving our understanding of how E. faecalis adapts and responds to its environment. PMID:27419061

  2. Multiple Posttranslational Modifications of Leptospira biflexa Proteins as Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, James A.; Olano, L. Rennee; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Rosa, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The saprophyte Leptospira biflexa is an excellent model for studying the physiology of the medically important Leptospira genus, the pathogenic members of which are more recalcitrant to genetic manipulation and have significantly slower in vitro growth. However, relatively little is known regarding the proteome of L. biflexa, limiting its utility as a model for some studies. Therefore, we have generated a proteomic map of both soluble and membrane-associated proteins of L. biflexa during exponential growth and in stationary phase. Using these data, we identified abundantly produced proteins in each cellular fraction and quantified the transcript levels from a subset of these genes using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). These proteins should prove useful as cellular markers and as controls for gene expression studies. We also observed a significant number of L. biflexa membrane-associated proteins with multiple isoforms, each having unique isoelectric focusing points. L. biflexa cell lysates were examined for several posttranslational modifications suggested by the protein patterns. Methylation and acetylation of lysine residues were predominately observed in the proteins of the membrane-associated fraction, while phosphorylation was detected mainly among soluble proteins. These three posttranslational modification systems appear to be conserved between the free-living species L. biflexa and the pathogenic species Leptospira interrogans, suggesting an important physiological advantage despite the varied life cycles of the different species. PMID:26655756

  3. Multiple Posttranslational Modifications of Leptospira biflexa Proteins as Revealed by Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip E; Carroll, James A; Olano, L Rennee; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Rosa, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    The saprophyte Leptospira biflexa is an excellent model for studying the physiology of the medically important Leptospira genus, the pathogenic members of which are more recalcitrant to genetic manipulation and have significantly slower in vitro growth. However, relatively little is known regarding the proteome of L. biflexa, limiting its utility as a model for some studies. Therefore, we have generated a proteomic map of both soluble and membrane-associated proteins of L. biflexa during exponential growth and in stationary phase. Using these data, we identified abundantly produced proteins in each cellular fraction and quantified the transcript levels from a subset of these genes using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). These proteins should prove useful as cellular markers and as controls for gene expression studies. We also observed a significant number of L. biflexa membrane-associated proteins with multiple isoforms, each having unique isoelectric focusing points. L. biflexa cell lysates were examined for several posttranslational modifications suggested by the protein patterns. Methylation and acetylation of lysine residues were predominately observed in the proteins of the membrane-associated fraction, while phosphorylation was detected mainly among soluble proteins. These three posttranslational modification systems appear to be conserved between the free-living species L. biflexa and the pathogenic species Leptospira interrogans, suggesting an important physiological advantage despite the varied life cycles of the different species. PMID:26655756

  4. Gliding Arc Discharge in the Potato Pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica: Mechanism of Lethal Action and Effect on Membrane-Associated Molecules▿

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, M.; Feuilloley, M. G. J.; Veron, W.; Meylheuc, T.; Chevalier, S.; Brisset, J.-L.; Orange, N.

    2007-01-01

    Gliding arc (glidarc) discharge is a physicochemical technique for decontamination at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. It leads to the destruction of bacterial phytopathogens responsible for important losses in industrial agriculture, namely, Erwinia spp., without the formation of resistant forms. We investigated the effect of a novel optimized prototype allowing bacterial killing without lag time. This prototype also decreases the required duration of treatment by 50%. The study of the time course effect of the process on bacterial morphology suggests that glidarc induces major alterations of the bacterial membrane. We showed that glidarc causes the release of bacterial genomic DNA. By contrast, an apparent decrease in the level of extractible lipopolysaccharide was observed; however, no changes in the electrophoretic pattern and cytotoxic activity of the macromolecule were noted. Analysis of extractible proteins from the outer membrane of the bacteria revealed that glidarc discharge induces the release of these proteins from the lipid environment, but may also be responsible for protein dimerization and/or aggregation. This effect was not observed in secreted enzymatic proteins, such as pectate lyase. Analysis of the data supports the hypothesis that the plasma generated by glidarc discharge is acting essentially through oxidative mechanisms. Furthermore, these results indicate that, in addition to effectively destroying bacteria, glidarc discharge should be used to improve the extraction of bacterial molecules. PMID:17644644

  5. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen. PMID:24808104

  6. Inhibition of the Plasma-Membrane-Associated Serine Protease Cathepsin G by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3364c Suppresses Caspase-1 and Pyroptosis in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Danelishvili, Lia; Everman, Jamie L.; McNamara, Michael J.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease associated with the infection of a great part of the world’s population and is responsible for the death of two to three million people annually. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects macrophages and subverts its mechanisms of killing. The pathogen suppresses macrophage apoptosis by many different mechanisms. We describe that, upon uptake by macrophages, M. tuberculosis overexpresses an operon Rv3361c-Rv3365c and secretes Rv3364c. The Rv3365c knockout strain is deficient in apoptosis inhibition. The Rv3364c protein binds to the serine protease cathepsin G on the membrane, inhibiting its enzymatic activity and the downstream activation of caspase-1-dependent apoptosis. In summary, M. tuberculosis prevents macrophage pyroptosis by a novel mechanism involving cytoplasmic surveillance proteins. PMID:22275911

  7. Escherichia coli mrsC Is an Allele of hflB, Encoding a Membrane-Associated ATPase and Protease That Is Required for mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-fu; O’Hara, Eileen B.; Aldea, Marti; Bargmann, Cornelia I.; Gromley, Heather; Kushner, Sidney R.

    1998-01-01

    The mrsC gene of Escherichia coli is required for mRNA turnover and cell growth, and strains containing the temperature-sensitive mrsC505 allele have longer half-lives than wild-type controls for total pulse-labeled and individual mRNAs (L. L. Granger et al., J. Bacteriol. 180:1920–1928, 1998). The cloned mrsC gene contains a long open reading frame beginning at an initiator UUG codon, confirmed by N-terminal amino acid sequencing, encoding a 70,996-Da protein with a consensus ATP-binding domain. mrsC is identical to the independently identified ftsH gene except for three additional amino acids at the N terminus (T. Tomoyasu et al., J. Bacteriol. 175:1344–1351, 1993). The purified protein had a Km of 28 μM for ATP and a Vmax of 21.2 nmol/μg/min. An amino-terminal glutathione S-transferase–MrsC fusion protein retained ATPase activity but was not biologically active. A glutamic acid replacement of the highly conserved lysine within the ATP-binding motif (mrsC201) abolished the complementation of the mrsC505 mutation, confirming that the ATPase activity is required for MrsC function in vivo. In addition, the mrsC505 allele conferred a temperature-sensitive HflB phenotype, while the hflB29 mutation promoted mRNA stability at both 30 and 44°C, suggesting that the inviability associated with the mrsC505 allele is not related to the defect in mRNA decay. The data presented provide the first direct evidence for the involvement of a membrane-bound protein in mRNA decay in E. coli. PMID:9537394

  8. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and characterization of a membrane-associated Prevotella ruminicola B(1)4 beta-glucosidase with cellodextrinase and cyanoglycosidase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Wulff-Strobel, C R; Wilson, D B

    1995-01-01

    Prevotella ruminicola B(1)4 is a gram-negative, anaerobic gastrointestinal bacterium. A 2.4-kbp chromosomal fragment from P. ruminicola encoding an 87-kDa aryl-glucosidase (CdxA) with cellodextrinase activity was cloned into Escherichia coli DH5 alpha and sequenced. CdxA activity was found predominantly in the membrane fraction of both P. ruminicola and E. coli, but P. ruminicola localized the protein extracellularly while E. coli did not. The hydrolase had the highest activity on cellodextrins (3.43 to 4.13 mumol of glucose released min-1 mg of protein-1) and p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucoside (3.54 mumol min-1 mg of protein-1). Significant activity (70% of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-glucoside activity) was also detected on arbutin and prunasin. Less activity was obtained with cellobiose, amygdalin, or gentiobiose. CdxA attacks cellodextrins from the nonreducing end, releasing glucose units, and appears to be an exo-1,4-beta-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.74) which also is able to attack beta-1,6 linkages. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with other glycosyl-hydrolases suggests that this enzyme belongs to family 3 (B. Henrissat, Biochem. J. 280:309-316, 1991). On the basis of this sequence alignment, the catalytic residues are believed to be Asp-275 and Glu-265. This is the first report of a cloned ruminal bacterial enzyme which can cleave cyanogenic plant compounds and which may therefore contribute to cyanide toxicity in ruminants. PMID:7592339

  10. Membrane-association determinants of the omega-amino acid monooxygenase PvdA, a pyoverdine biosynthetic enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Imperi, Francesco; Putignani, Lorenza; Tiburzi, Federica; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Cipollone, Rita; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    The L-ornithine N(delta)-oxygenase PvdA catalyses the N(delta)-hydroxylation of L-ornithine in many Pseudomonas spp., and thus provides an essential enzymic function in the biogenesis of the pyoverdine siderophore. Here, we report a detailed analysis of the membrane topology of the PvdA enzyme from the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Membrane topogenic determinants of PvdA were identified by computational analysis, and verified in Escherichia coli by constructing a series of translational fusions between PvdA and the PhoA (alkaline phosphatase) reporter enzyme. The inferred topological model resembled a eukaryotic reverse signal-anchor (type III) protein, with a single N-terminal domain anchored to the inner membrane, and the bulk of the protein spanning the cytosol. According to this model, the predicted transmembrane region should overlap the putative FAD-binding site. Cell fractionation and proteinase K accessibility experiments in P. aeruginosa confirmed the membrane-bound nature of PvdA, but excluded the transmembrane topology of its N-terminal hydrophobic region. Mutational analysis of PvdA, and complementation assays in a P. aeruginosa DeltapvdA mutant, demonstrated the dual (structural and functional) role of the PvdA N-terminal domain. PMID:18757814

  11. Mycoplasma gallisepticum MGA_0676 is a membrane-associated cytotoxic nuclease with a staphylococcal nuclease region essential for nuclear translocation and apoptosis induction in chicken cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Teng, Da; Jiang, Fei; Zhang, Yuewei; El-Ashram, Saeed A; Wang, Hui; Sun, Zhenhong; He, Jinyan; Shen, Junjun; Wu, Wenxue; Li, Jinxiang

    2015-02-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum can infect a wide variety of birds including the commercial poultry. M. gallisepticum MGA_0676 is a putative lipoprotein, which is similar to bacterial thermostable nucleases. But the possible pathogenic effect of M. gallisepticum MGA_0676 has not been investigated so far. In the present study, we cloned the MGA_0676 gene after deletion of the amino-terminal signal sequence and mutagenesis of the Mycoplasma TGA tryptophan codons to TGG and expressed recombinant MGA_0676 protein in Escherichia coli. We identified and characterized MGA_0676 as a Ca(2+)-dependent cytotoxic nuclease of M. gallisepticum with a staphylococcal nuclease (SNc) region that displays the hallmarks of nucleases. Membrane protein immunoblot analysis and immunogold electron microscopy revealed that MGA_0676 locates on the membrane surface of M. gallisepticum. Furthermore, apoptosis assay using annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (annexin V/PI) indicated that MGA_0676 played significant roles in apoptosis induction and pathological damages in chicken cells. Moreover, confocal microscopy showed that MGA_0676 localizes in the nuclei of host cells. Besides, after the SNc region was deleted, MGA_0676 lost its ability of nuclear localization, nuclease activity, and cytotoxicity, which revealed that the SNc region is essential for nuclear translocation and induction of apoptosis in chicken cells. The above results suggest that MGA_0676 is an important virulence factor in cellular pathology and may play a unique role in the life cycle events of M. gallisepticum. PMID:25363559

  12. Inhibition of lethal inflammatory responses through the targeting of membrane-associated Toll-like receptor 4 signaling complexes with a Smad6-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Sook; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Su Myung; Kim, Sang-Doo; Kim, Jun Hwan; Lee, Jae Young; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Mamura, Mizuko; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Seong-Jin; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-05-01

    We have previously reported that Smad6, one of the inhibitory Smads of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signaling by disrupting the Pellino-1-mediated TLR4 signaling complex. Here, we developed Smaducin-6, a novel membrane-tethered palmitic acid-conjugated Smad6-derived peptide composed of amino acids 422-441 of Smad6. Smaducin-6 interacted with Pellino-1, located in the inner membrane, thereby disrupting the formation of IRAK1-, RIP1-, IKKε-mediated TLR4 signaling complexes. Systemic administration of Smaducin-6 showed a significant therapeutic effect on mouse TLR4-mediated inflammatory disease models, cecal-ligation-puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, and lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production and apoptosis while enhancing neutrophil migration and bacterial clearance. Our findings provide clues to develop new peptide-based drugs to target Pellino-1 protein in TLR4 signaling pathway for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25766838

  13. SusG: A Unique Cell-Membrane-Associated [alpha]-Amylase from a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont Targets Complex Starch Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-09-21

    SusG is an {alpha}-amylase and part of a large protein complex on the outer surface of the bacterial cell and plays a major role in carbohydrate acquisition by the animal gut microbiota. Presented here, the atomic structure of SusG has an unusual extended, bilobed structure composed of amylase at one end and an unprecedented internal carbohydrate-binding motif at the other. Structural studies further demonstrate that the carbohydrate-binding motif binds maltooligosaccharide distal to, and on the opposite side of, the amylase catalytic site. SusG has an additional starch-binding site on the amylase domain immediately adjacent to the active cleft. Mutagenesis analysis demonstrates that these two additional starch-binding sites appear to play a role in catabolism of insoluble starch. However, elimination of these sites has only a limited effect, suggesting that they may have a more important role in product exchange with other Sus components.

  14. TrfA-Dependent Inner Membrane-Associated Plasmid RK2 DNA Synthesis and Association of TrfA with Membranes of Different Gram-Negative Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Trevor; Kim, Peter D.; Firshein, William

    2000-01-01

    TrfA, the replication initiator protein of broad-host-range plasmid RK2, was tested for its ability to bind to the membrane of four different gram-negative hosts in addition to Escherichia coli: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Cells harboring TrfA-encoding plasmids were fractionated into soluble, inner membrane, and outer membrane fractions. The fractions were subjected to Western blotting, and the blots were probed with antibody to the TrfA proteins. TrfA was found to fractionate with the cell membranes of all species tested. When the two membrane fractions of these species were tested for their ability to synthesize plasmid DNA endogenously (i.e., without added template or enzymes), only the inner membrane fraction was capable of extensive synthesis that was inhibited by anti-TrfA antibody in a manner similar to that of the original host species, E. coli. In addition, although DNA synthesis did occur in the outer membrane fraction, it was much less extensive than that exhibited by the inner membrane fraction and only slightly affected by anti-TrfA antibody. Plasmid DNA synthesized by the inner membrane fraction of one representative species, P. aeruginosa, was characteristic of supercoil and intermediate forms of the plasmid. Extensive DNA synthesis was observed in the soluble fraction of another representative species, R. sphaeroides, but it was completely unaffected by anti-TrfA antibody, suggesting that such synthesis was due to repair and/or nonspecific chain extension of plasmid DNA fragments. PMID:10913068

  15. The Presence of Sterols Favors Sticholysin I-Membrane Association and Pore Formation Regardless of Their Ability to Form Laterally Segregated Domains.

    PubMed

    Pedrera, Lohans; Gomide, Andreza B; Sánchez, Rafael E; Ros, Uris; Wilke, Natalia; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Itri, Rosangela; Fanani, María Laura; Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Sticholysin I (St I) is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin protein family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFT. As for actinoporins, it has been proposed that the presence of cholesterol (Chol) and the coexistence of lipid phases increase binding to the target membrane and pore-forming ability. However, little is known about the role of membrane structure and dynamics (phase state, fluidity, and the presence of lipid domains) on the activity of actinoporins or which regions of the membrane are the most favorable for protein insertion, oligomerization, and eventually pore formation. To gain insight into the role of membrane properties on the functional activity of St I, we studied its binding to monolayers and vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), and sterols inducing (ergosterol -Erg and cholesterol -Chol) or not (cholestenone - Cln) membrane phase segregation in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. This study revealed that St I binds and permeabilizes with higher efficiency sterol-containing membranes independently of their ability to form domains. We discuss the results in terms of the relevance of different membrane properties for the actinoporins mechanism of action, namely, molecular heterogeneity, specially potentiated in membranes with sterols inducers of phase separation (Chol or Erg) or Cln, a sterol noninducer of phase separation but with a high propensity to induce nonlamellar phase. The role of the Ld phase is pointed out as the most suitable platform for pore formation. In this regard, such regions in Chol-containing membranes seem to be the most favored due to its increased fluidity; this property promotes toxin insertion, diffusion, and oligomerization leading to pore formation. PMID:26273899

  16. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  17. Mechanism of action of the breast cancer-promoter hormone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (5αP), involves plasma membrane-associated receptors and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, John P; Pawlak, Kevin J; Kwok, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that breast tissues and breast cell lines can convert progesterone to 5α-pregnane-3,20-dione (5aP), and that 5αP stimulates breast cell proliferation and detachment in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo, regardless of presence or absence of receptors for progesterone (PR) or estrogen (ER). Recently it was demonstrated, both in vitro and in vivo, that pro-cancer actions attributed to administered progesterone are due to the in situ produced 5αP. Because of the significant role of 5αP in breast cancers, it is important to understand its molecular mechanisms of action. The aims of the current studies were to identify 5αP binding sites and to determine if the mechanisms of action of 5αP involve the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2) pathway. Binding studies, using tritium-labeled 5αP ([(3)H]5αP), carried out on membrane, cytosol and nuclear fractions from human breast cells (MCF-7, PR/ER-positive; MDA-MB-231, PR/ER-negative) and on highly enriched membrane fractions, identified the plasma membrane as the site of ligand specific 5αP receptors. Localization of 5αP receptors to the cell membrane was confirmed visually with fluorescently labeled conjugate (5αP-BSA-FITC). Treatment of cells with either 5αP or membrane-impermeable 5αP-BSA resulted in significant increases in cell proliferation and detachment. 5αP and 5αP-BSA equally activated the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway as evidenced by phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibitors (PD98059, mevastatin and genistein) of specific sites along the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway, blocked the phosphorylation and concomitantly inhibited 5αP-induced stimulation of cell proliferation and detachment. The study has identified high affinity, stereo-specific binding sites for 5αP that have the characteristics of a functional membrane 5αP receptor, and has shown that the cancer-promoter actions of 5αP are mediated from the liganded receptor

  18. Mutation of the Membrane-Associated M1 Protease APM1 Results in Distinct Embryonic and Seedling Developmental Defects in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Wendy Ann; Hosein, Fazeeda N.; Bandyopadhyay, Anindita; Makam, Srinivas N.; Otegui, Marisa S.; Lee, Gil-Je; Blakeslee, Joshua J.; Cheng, Yan; Titapiwatanakun, Boosaree; Yakubov, Bahktiyor; Bangari, Bharat; Murphy, Angus S.

    2009-01-01

    Aminopeptidase M1 (APM1), a single copy gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes a metallopeptidase originally identified via its affinity for, and hydrolysis of, the auxin transport inhibitor 1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Mutations in this gene result in haploinsufficiency. Loss-of-function mutants show irregular, uncoordinated cell divisions throughout embryogenesis, affecting the shape and number of cotyledons and the hypophysis, and is seedling lethal at 5 d after germination due to root growth arrest. Quiescent center and cell cycle markers show no signals in apm1-1 knockdown mutants, and the ground tissue specifiers SHORTROOT and SCARECROW are misexpressed or mislocalized. apm1 mutants have multiple, fused cotyledons and hypocotyls with enlarged epidermal cells with cell adhesion defects. apm1 alleles show defects in gravitropism and auxin transport. Gravistimulation decreases APM1 expression in auxin-accumulating root epidermal cells, and auxin treatment increases expression in the stele. On sucrose gradients, APM1 occurs in unique light membrane fractions. APM1 localizes at the margins of Golgi cisternae, plasma membrane, select multivesicular bodies, tonoplast, dense intravacuolar bodies, and maturing metaxylem cells. APM1 associates with brefeldin A–sensitive endomembrane structures and the plasma membrane in cortical and epidermal cells. The auxin-related phenotypes and mislocalization of auxin efflux proteins in apm1 are consistent with biochemical interactions between APM1 and NPA. PMID:19531600

  19. Cytoskeletal proteins in gastric H/sup +/ secretion: cAMP dependent phosphorylation, immunolocalization, and protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Cuppoletti, J.; Sachs, G.; Malinowska, D.H.

    1986-05-01

    The rabbit gastric parietal cell is an excellent model for the study of regulation of secretion and the role of cytoskeleton in secretion. Changes in morphology (appearance of expanded secretory canaliculi lined with microvilli) accompany H/sup +/ secretion stimulated by histamine (cAMP mediated). Parietal cells contain immunoreactive tubulin and are highly enriched in F-actin at secretory canaliculi, detected with fluorescently labelled phallacidin. They have previously shown increased protein phosphorylation in histamine-stimulated purified parietal cells concommitant with increases in H/sup +/ secretion. They report here possible functions of the phosphoproteins. Four of these proteins of apparent size on SDS PAGE of 24, 30, 48 and 130 Kd were membrane associated. /sup 125/I-actin binding to three proteins (24, 30 and 48 Kd) was shown using overlays. A 130 Kd protein reacted with anti-vinculin monoclonal antibody on immunoblots, and was immunolocalized at secretory canaliculi. As a working hypothesis, parietal cells possess membrane-associated proteins which change their state of phosphorylation upon stimulation of H/sup +/. These proteins may be cytoskeletal elements involved in regulation of H/sup +/ secretion. The 130 Kd vinculin-like protein may serve a microfilament-membrane linking role.

  20. Thermodynamic and Biophysical Analysis of the Membrane-Association of a Histidine-Rich Peptide with Efficient Antimicrobial and Transfection Activities.

    PubMed

    Voievoda, Nataliia; Schulthess, Therese; Bechinger, Burkhard; Seelig, Joachim

    2015-07-30

    LAH4-L1 is a synthetic amphipathic peptide with antimicrobial activity. The sequence of the 23 amino acid peptide was inspired by naturally occurring frog peptides such as PGLa and magainin. LAH4-L1 also facilitates the transport of nucleic acids through the cell membrane. We have investigated the membrane binding properties and energetics of LAH4-L1 at pH 5.5 with physical-chemical methods. CD spectroscopy was employed to quantitate the membrane-induced random coil-to-helix transition of LAH4-L1. Binding isotherms were obtained with CD spectroscopy as a function of the lipid-to-protein ratio for neutral and negatively charged membranes and were analyzed with both the Langmuir multisite adsorption model and the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model. According to the Langmuir adsorption model each molecule LAH4-L1 binds 4 POPS molecules, independent of the POPS concentration in the membrane. This is supported by the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model which predicts an electric charge of LAH4-L1 of z = 4. Binding affinity is dominated by electrostatic attraction. The thermodynamics of the binding process was elucidated with isothermal titration calorimetry. The ITC data revealed that the binding process is composed of at least three different reactions, that is, a coil-to-helix transition with an exothermic enthalpy of about -11 kcal/mol and two endothermic processes with enthalpies of ∼4 and ∼8 kcal/mol, respectively, which partly compensate the exothermic enthalpy of the conformational change. The major endothermic reaction is interpreted as a deprotonation reaction following the insertion of a highly charged cationic peptide into a nonpolar environment. PMID:26134591

  1. Two Membrane-Associated NiFeS-Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases from the Anaerobic Carbon-Monoxide-Utilizing Eubacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans

    PubMed Central

    Svetlitchnyi, Vitali; Peschel, Christine; Acker, Georg; Meyer, Ortwin

    2001-01-01

    Two monofunctional NiFeS carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenases, designated CODH I and CODH II, were purified to homogeneity from the anaerobic CO-utilizing eubacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans. Both enzymes differ in their subunit molecular masses, N-terminal sequences, peptide maps, and immunological reactivities. Immunogold labeling of ultrathin sections revealed both CODHs in association with the inner aspect of the cytoplasmic membrane. Both enzymes catalyze the reaction CO + H2O → CO2 + 2 e− + 2 H+. Oxidized viologen dyes are effective electron acceptors. The specific enzyme activities were 15,756 (CODH I) and 13,828 (CODH II) μmol of CO oxidized min−1 mg−1 of protein (methyl viologen, pH 8.0, 70°C). The two enzymes oxidize CO very efficiently, as indicated by kcat/Km values at 70°C of 1.3 · 109 M−1 CO s−1 (CODH I) and 1.7 · 109 M−1 CO s−1 (CODH II). The apparent Km values at pH 8.0 and 70°C are 30 and 18 μM CO for CODH I and CODH II, respectively. Acetyl coenzyme A synthase activity is not associated with the enzymes. CODH I (125 kDa, 62.5-kDa subunit) and CODH II (129 kDa, 64.5-kDa subunit) are homodimers containing 1.3 to 1.4 and 1.7 atoms of Ni, 20 to 22 and 20 to 24 atoms of Fe, and 22 and 19 atoms of acid-labile sulfur, respectively. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed signals indicative of [4Fe-4S] clusters. Ni was EPR silent under any conditions tested. It is proposed that CODH I is involved in energy generation and that CODH II serves in anabolic functions. PMID:11489867

  2. Intracellular membrane association of the N-terminal domain of classical swine fever virus NS4B determines viral genome replication and virulence.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Ruggli, Nicolas; Nagashima, Naofumi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Mine, Junki; Hofmann, Martin A; Liniger, Matthias; Summerfield, Artur; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease in pigs that can range from a severe haemorrhagic fever to a nearly unapparent disease, depending on the virulence of the virus strain. Little is known about the viral molecular determinants of CSFV virulence. The nonstructural protein NS4B is essential for viral replication. However, the roles of CSFV NS4B in viral genome replication and pathogenesis have not yet been elucidated. NS4B of the GPE-  vaccine strain and of the highly virulent Eystrup strain differ by a total of seven amino acid residues, two of which are located in the predicted trans-membrane domains of NS4B and were described previously to relate to virulence, and five residues clustering in the N-terminal part. In the present study, we examined the potential role of these five amino acids in modulating genome replication and determining pathogenicity in pigs. A chimeric low virulent GPE- -derived virus carrying the complete Eystrup NS4B showed enhanced pathogenicity in pigs. The in vitro replication efficiency of the NS4B chimeric GPE-  replicon was significantly higher than that of the replicon carrying only the two Eystrup-specific amino acids in NS4B. In silico and in vitro data suggest that the N-terminal part of NS4B forms an amphipathic α-helix structure. The N-terminal NS4B with these five amino acid residues is associated with the intracellular membranes. Taken together, this is the first gain-of-function study showing that the N-terminal domain of NS4B can determine CSFV genome replication in cell culture and viral pathogenicity in pigs. PMID:26018962

  3. Fibronectin phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Sumi; Sugiyama, Yayoi; Imada, Masaru )

    1988-12-01

    The presence of membrane-associated, extracellular protein kinase (ecto-protein kinase) and its substrate proteins was examined with serum-free cultures of Swiss 3T3 fibroblast. When cells were incubated with ({gamma}-{sup 32})ATP for 10 min at 37{degree}C, four proteins with apparent molecular weights between 150 and 220 kDa were prominently phosphorylated. These proteins were also radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase catalyzed iodination and were sensitive to mild tryptic digestion, suggesting that they localized on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix. Phosphorylation of extracellular proteins with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in intact cell culture is consistent with the existence of ecto-protein kinase. Anti-fibronectin antibody immunoprecipitated one of the phosphoproteins which comigrated with a monomer and a dimer form of fibronectin under reducing and nonreducing conditions of electrophoresis, respectively. The protein had affinity for gelatin as demonstrated by retention with gelatin-conjugated agarose. This protein substrate of ecto-protein kinase was thus concluded to be fibronectin. The sites of phosphorylation by ecto-protein kinase were compared with those of intracellularly phosphorylated fibronectin by the analysis of radiolabeled amino acids and peptides. Ecto-protein kinase phosphorylated fibronectin at serine and threonine residues which were distinct from the sites of intracellular fibronectin phosphorylation.

  4. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  5. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-07-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  6. EH domain proteins regulate cardiac membrane protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Hjalti; Hund, Thomas J.; Wright, Patrick J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Snyder, Jedidiah S.; Qian, Lan; Koval, Olha M.; Cunha, Shane R.; George, Manju; Rainey, Mark A.; Kashef, Farshid E.; Dun, Wen; Boyden, Penelope A.; Anderson, Mark E.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac membrane excitability is tightly regulated by an integrated network of membrane-associated ion channels, transporters, receptors, and signaling molecules. Membrane protein dynamics in health and disease are maintained by a complex ensemble of intracellular targeting, scaffolding, recycling, and degradation pathways. Surprisingly, despite decades of research linking dysfunction in membrane protein trafficking with human cardiovascular disease, essentially nothing is known regarding the molecular identity or function of these intracellular targeting pathways in excitable cardiomyocytes. Objective We sought to discover novel pathways for membrane protein targeting in primary cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results We report the initial characterization of a large family of membrane trafficking proteins in human heart. We employed a tissue-wide screen for novel ankyrin-associated trafficking proteins and identified four members of a unique Eps15 homology (EH) domain-containing protein family (EHD1, EHD2, EHD3, EHD4) that serve critical roles in endosome-based membrane protein targeting in other cell types. We show that EHD1-4 directly associate with ankyrin, provide the first information on the expression and localization of these molecules in primary cardiomyocytes, and demonstrate that EHD1-4 are co-expressed with ankyrin-B in the myocyte perinuclear region. Notably, the expression of multiple EHD proteins is increased in animal models lacking ankyrin-B, and EHD3-deficient cardiomyocytes display aberrant ankyrin-B localization and selective loss of Na/Ca exchanger expression and function. Finally, we report significant modulation of EHD expression following myocardial infarction, suggesting that these proteins may play a key role in regulating membrane excitability in normal and diseased heart. Conclusions Our findings identify and characterize a new class of cardiac trafficking proteins, define the first group of proteins associated with the ankyrin

  7. The genetics of the protein 4.1 family: organizers of the membrane and cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Hoover, K B; Bryant, P J

    2000-04-01

    Protein 4.1 (also called band 4.1 or simply 4.1) was originally identified as an abundant protein of the human erythrocyte, in which it stabilizes the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton. The protein and its relatives have since been found in many cell types of metazoan organisms and they are often concentrated in the nucleus, as well as in cell-cell junctions. They form multimolecular complexes with transmembrane and membrane-associated proteins, and these complexes may be important for both structural stability and signal transduction at sites of cell contact. PMID:10712924

  8. A low molecular weight peptide from snow mold with epitopic homology to the winter flounder antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Newsted, W J; Polvi, S; Papish, B; Kendall, E; Saleem, M; Koch, M; Hussain, A; Cutler, A J; Georges, F

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for a small size protein (ca. 3500 kDa) exhibiting epitopic homology to the Atlantic winter flounder antifreeze protein (AFP) is found in the snow molds Coprinus psychromorbidus, Myriosclerotinia borealis, and Typhula incarnata. The protein shows strong cross-reactivity with antisera specific for the flounder AFP. Preliminary studies suggest that the protein is synthesized in response to lowering the culture temperature, and that it is membrane associated and, therefore, may function in an analogous capacity to the fish AFP. Also, the protein is shown to have antifreeze properties as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging experiments. PMID:7818849

  9. Nanolipoprotein particles and related methods and systems for protein capture, solubilization, and/or purification

    DOEpatents

    Chromy, Brett A; Henderson, Paul; Hoeprich, Jr., Paul D

    2014-12-09

    Provided herein are methods and systems for assembling, solubilizing and/or purifying a membrane associated protein in a nanolipoprotein particle, which comprise a temperature transition cycle performed in presence of a detergent, wherein during the temperature transition cycle the nanolipoprotein components are brought to a temperature above and below the gel to liquid crystalling transition temperature of the membrane forming lipid of the nanolipoprotein particle.

  10. Src kinase activity and SH2 domain regulate the dynamics of Src association with lipid and protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsman, Dmitry E.; Donaldson, John C.; Diaz, Begoña; Gutman, Orit; Martin, G. Steven; Henis, Yoav I.

    2007-01-01

    Src functions depend on its association with the plasma membrane and with specific membrane-associated assemblies. Many aspects of these interactions are unclear. We investigated the functions of kinase, SH2, and SH3 domains in Src membrane interactions. We used FRAP beam-size analysis in live cells expressing a series of c-Src–GFP proteins with targeted mutations in specific domains together with biochemical experiments to determine whether the mutants can generate and bind to phosphotyrosyl proteins. Wild-type Src displays lipid-like membrane association, whereas constitutively active Src-Y527F interacts transiently with slower-diffusing membrane-associated proteins. These interactions require Src kinase activity and SH2 binding, but not SH3 binding. Furthermore, overexpression of paxillin, an Src substrate with a high cytoplasmic population, competes with membrane phosphotyrosyl protein targets for binding to activated Src. Our observations indicate that the interactions of Src with lipid and protein targets are dynamic and that the kinase and SH2 domain cooperate in the membrane targeting of Src. PMID:17698610