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Sample records for 14-fr peel-away sheath

  1. Placement of large suprapubic tube using peel-away introducer.

    PubMed

    Chiou, R K; Morton, J J; Engelsgjerd, J S; Mays, S

    1995-04-01

    We describe a new method for placing a large suprapubic tube and report our experience with 56 patients. This method uses a specially designed fascial dilator and peel-away introducer to place an 18F Foley catheter suprapubically. In our experience the method is simple and effective for the exchange of a small suprapubic tube to an 18F Foley catheter, and for primary placement of a large suprapubic tube. It is easily performed at the bedside or during a minor procedure with the patient under local anesthesia. PMID:7869492

  2. Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Construction PeelAway Great Smoky Mountains National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Construction Peel-Away - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  3. Percutaneous placement of a suprapubic tube with peel away sheath introducer.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, W M

    1991-05-01

    A new technique for percutaneous placement of a suprapubic tube has been developed, which allows controlled entry into the bladder over a guide wire to avoid the potential hazards of blind trocar cystotomy. A Foley style catheter can be placed, which is less likely to become dislodged than other types of percutaneous suprapubic catheters currently available. PMID:2016781

  4. NICMOS PEELS AWAY LAYERS OF DUST TO SHOW INNER REGION OF DUSTY NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The revived Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has penetrated layers of dust in a star-forming cloud to uncover a dense, craggy edifice of dust and gas . This region is called the Cone Nebula (NGC 2264), so named because, in ground-based images, it has a conical shape. NICMOS enables the Hubble telescope to see in near-infrared wavelengths of light, so that it can penetrate the dust that obscures the nebula's inner regions. But the Cone is so dense that even the near-infared 'eyes' of NICMOS can't penetrate all the way through it. The image shows the upper 0.5 light-years of the nebula. The entire nebula is 7 light-years long. The Cone resides in a turbulent star-forming region, located 2,500 light-years away in the constellation Monoceros. Radiation from hot, young stars [located beyond the top of the image] has slowly eroded the nebula over millions of years. Ultraviolet light heats the edges of the dark cloud, releasing gas into the relatively empty region of surrounding space. NICMOS has peeled away the outer layers of dust to reveal even denser dust. The denser regions give the nebula a more three-dimensional structure than can be seen in the visible-light picture at left, taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble telescope. In peering through the dusty facade to the nebula's inner regions, NICMOS has unmasked several stars [yellow dots at upper right]. Astronomers don't know whether these stars are behind the dusty nebula or embedded in it. The four bright stars lined up on the left are in front of the nebula. The human eye cannot see infrared light, so colors have been assigned to correspond with near-infrared wavelengths. The blue light represents shorter near-infrared wavelengths and the red light corresponds to longer wavelengths. The NICMOS color composite image was made by combining photographs taken in J-band, H-band, and Paschen-alpha filters. The NICMOS images were taken

  5. Gravitoelectromagnetic sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutam, H. P.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we propose a gravito-electro-magnetic sheath (GEMS) model to explore the equilibrium properties of the solar plasma system. It describes the solar interior plasma (SIP) on the bounded scale and the solar wind plasma (SWP) on the unbounded scale from the viewpoint of plasma-based theory. This differs from the previously reported gravito-electrostatic sheath (GES) model employed to precisely define the solar surface boundary (SSB) on the fact that the present investigation incorporates variable temperature, magnetic field and collisional processes on the solar plasma flow dynamics. We show that the included parameters play important roles in the solar plasma dynamics. We demonstrate that the SSB location shifts outward as a result of the magnetic field by 14 % in comparison with that predicted by the GES model. As a consequence of the interaction of the plasma with magnetic field, the width of the sheath broadens by 25 % in comparison with the GES model predicted value. This physically means that the magnetic field decreases the distribution of the tiny (inertialess) electrons relative to the massive (inertial) ions, which in turn increases the confining wall potential value resulting in the increased width. Besides, the sonic point moves inward by 8 % as a result of collisions in the SIP that leads to rapid acceleration. Here, collisional dynamics plays an important role in the conversion process of the electron thermal energy into the bulk plasma flow energy. An interesting feature of continuous and smooth transition of the electric current density from the SIP to the SWP (with finite positive divergence on both the scales) through the SSB under inhomogeneous temperature distribution is also reported. Finally, the analyses may be applied to understand the realistic equilibrium dynamics of stellar plasmas never addressed before within the earlier GES framework like establishment of current-field correlation, properties of the slow solar wind and its

  6. No Pixel Left Behind - Peeling Away NASA's Satellite Swaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cechini, M. F.; Boller, R. A.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Roberts, J. T.; Alarcon, C.; Huang, T.; McGann, M.; Murphy, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Discovery and identification of Earth Science products should not be the majority effort of scientific research. Search aides based on text metadata go to great lengths to simplify this process. However, the process is still cumbersome and requires too much data download and analysis to down select to valid products. The EOSDIS Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) is attempting to improve this process by providing "visual metadata" in the form of full-resolution visualizations representing geophysical parameters taken directly fromt he data. Through the use of accompanying interpretive information such as color legends and the natural visual processing of the human eye, researchers are able to search and filter through data products in a more natural and efficient way. The GIBS "visual metadata" products are generated as representations of Level 3 data or as temporal composites of the Level 2 granule- or swath-based data products projected across a geographic or polar region. Such an approach allows for low-latency tiled access to pre-generated imagery products. For many GIBS users, the resulting image suffices for a basic representation of the underlying data. However, composite imagery presents an insurmountable problem: for areas of spatial overlap within the composite, only one observation is visually represented. This is especially problematic in the polar regions where a significant portion of sensed data is "lost." In response to its user community, the GIBS team coordinated with its stakeholders to begin developing an approach to ensure that there is "no pixel left behind." In this presentation we will discuss the use cases and requirements guiding our efforts, considerations regarding standards compliance and interoperability, and near term goals. We will also discuss opportunities to actively engage with the GIBS team on this topic to continually improve our services.

  7. APPARATUS FOR SHEATHING RODS

    DOEpatents

    Ford, W.K.; Wyatt, M.; Plail, S.

    1961-08-01

    An arrangement is described for sealing a solid body of nuclear fuel, such as a uranium metal rod, into a closelyfitting thin metallic sheath with an internal atmosphere of inert gas. The sheathing process consists of subjecting the sheath, loaded with the nuclear fuel body, to the sequential operations of evacuation, gas-filling, drawing (to entrap inert gas and secure close contact between sheath and body), and sealing. (AEC)

  8. Communication through plasma sheaths

    SciTech Connect

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-10-15

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent.

  9. RF Sheath Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2007-11-01

    RF sheath formation on the antennas and walls in ICRF-heated experiments can reduce the heating efficiency, limit the coupled power, and cause damage to plasma-facing structures. The sheaths are driven by a slow wave component of the rf field due to a mismatch between the magnetic field and the boundary (antenna or wall). Quantitative modeling of the highly nonlinear sheaths may now be feasible for the first time in massively-parallel-processing (MPP) codes developed in the RF SciDAC project. Recently, a new approach to sheath modeling was proposed,ootnotetextD.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). in which the sheath physics is incorporated into the RF wave computation by using a modified boundary condition (BC) on the RF fields in both wave propagation and antenna codes. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for near-field sheaths by a model calculation that includes electromagnetic effects and a simple antenna coupling model. Properties of the model (such as the role of sheath-plasma waves) and implications for antenna codes such as TOPICAootnotetextV. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006). will be discussed.

  10. Plasma-Sheath Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Karl-Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    In typical gas discharges a quasineutral plasma is shielded from a negativ absorbing wall by a thin positive sheath that is nearly planar and collision-free. The subdivision of ``plasma'' and ``sheath'' was introduced by Langmuir and is based on a small ratio of the electron Debye lenghth λD to the dominant competing characteristic plasma length l. Depending on the special conditions, l may represent, e.g., the plasma extension, the ionization length, the ion mean free path, the ion gyro radius, or a geometric length. Strictly speaking, this subdivion is possible only in the asymptotic limit λD/l->0. The asymptotic analysis results in singularities at the ``sheath edge'' closely related to the ``Bohm criterion.'' Due to these singularities a direct smooth matching of the separate plasma and sheath soltions is not possible. To obtain a consistent smooth transition, the singular sheath edge must be bridged by an additinal narrow ``intermediate'' model zone accounting both for plasma processes (e.g., collisions) and for the first build up of space charge. Due to this complexity and to different interpretations of the ``classical'' papers by Langmuir and Bohm, the asymptotic plasma-sheath concept and the definition of the sheath edge were questioned and resulted in controversies during the last two decades. We discuss attempts to re-define the sheath edge, to account for finite values of λD/l in the Bohm criterion, and demonstrate the consistent matching of plasma and sheath. The investigations of the plasma-sheath transition discussed so far are based on a simplified fluid analysis that cannot account for the essential inhomogeneity of the boundary layer and for the dominant role of slow ions in space charge formation. Therefore we give special emphasis to the kinetic theory of the plasma-sheath transition. Unfortunately this approach results in an additional mathematical difficulty caused by ions with zero velocity. We discuss attempts to avoid this singularity by

  11. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-15

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  12. Analytic Model of Antenna Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2008-11-01

    RF sheaths are generated on ICRF antennas whenever the launched fast wave also drives a slow wave, e.g. when the magnetic field is tilted (not perpendicular to the current straps). A new approach to sheath modeling was recently proposed in which the RF waves are computed using a modified boundary condition at the sheath surface to describe the plasma-sheath coupling. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for antenna sheaths by a model electromagnetic perturbation calculation, treating the B field tilt as a small parameter. Analytic expressions are obtained for the sheath voltage and the rf electric field parallel to B in both sheath and plasma regions, including the Child-Langmuir (self-consistency) constraint. It is shown that the plasma corrections to the sheath voltage (which screen the rf field) can be important. The simple vacuum-field sheath-voltage estimate is obtained as a limiting case. Implications for antenna codes such as TOPICA will be discussed. D.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006).

  13. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  14. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  15. 21 CFR 884.5320 - Glans sheath.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sheath. (a) Identification. A glans sheath device is a sheath which covers only the glans penis or part... the entire shaft of the penis. It is indicated only for the prevention of pregnancy and not for...

  16. Challenging diagnosis of peripillous sheaths.

    PubMed

    Gnarra, Maria; Saraceni, Pierluigi; Rossi, Alfredo; Murabit, Amera; Caradonna, Emanuela; Fania, Luca; Feliciani, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Peripillous sheaths, or hair casts, are asymptomatic, white, cylindrical concretions that encircle the hair without adhering to it. They are infrequently documented in the literature, are often misdiagnosed, and generate avoidable apprehension and expense for parents and caregivers. Dermoscopy is the standard for a rapid, noninvasive, cost-effective diagnosis. We describe a case of peripillous sheaths presenting in a boy. PMID:24846654

  17. Sheaths: A Comparison of Magnetospheric, ICME, and Heliospheric Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Richardson, J. D.; Liu, W.

    2007-01-01

    When a supersonic flow encounters an obstacles, shocks form to divert the flow around the obstacle. The region between the shock and the obstacle is the sheath, where the supersonic flow is compressed, heated, decelerated, and deflected. Supersonic flows, obstacles, and thus sheaths are observed on many scales throughout the Universe. We compare three examples seen in the heliosphere, illustrating the interaction of the solar wind with obstacles of three very different scales lengths. Magnetosheaths form behind planetary bow shocks on scales ranging from tens to 100 planetary radii. ICME sheath form behind shocks driven by solar disturbances on scale lengths of a few to tens of AU. The heliosheath forms behind the termination shock due to the obstacle presented by the interstellar medium on scale lengths of tens to a hundred AU. Despite this range in scales some common features have been observed. Magnetic holes, possibly due to mirror mode waves, have been observed in all three of these sheaths. Plasma depletion layers are observed in planetary and ICME sheaths. Other features observed in some sheaths are wave activity (ion cyclotron, plasma), energetic particles, transmission of Alfven waves/shocks, tangential discontinuities turbulence behind quasi-parallel shocks, standing slow mode waves, and reconnection on the obstacle boundary. We compare these sheath regions, discussing similarities and differences and how these may relate to the scale lengths of these regions.

  18. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  19. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  20. Modeling Sheaths in DC Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Textbook presentations on sheaths are often limited to a discussion of Bohm's criterion because more detailed analysis results in equations that can be solved only by numerical methods. There are both fluid and kinetic models for sheaths that can be solved by packaged numerical integration routines in a mathematical spreadsheet such as Mathematica, Matlab, or Mathcad. The potential profiles and the currents for sheaths at boundaries usually have monotonic profiles that are easily modeled using a Boltzmann distribution for electrons and for ions using the fluid momentum equation and the continuity equation with a source term describing plasma production. Additional ion species and bi-Maxwellian electron distributions are easily included. Virtual cathodes may form above emissive surfaces which divide the distribution function of emitted electrons into a passing population and a reflected population that can be modeled only by a kinetic approach. For sheaths at inserted objects such as probes and dust particles, it is customary to prescribe the plasma characteristics at infinity, to ignore creation of new plasma by ionization, and to solve for the radial variation of the density near the object and for the current collected by the object. A kinetic model is required for sheaths at inserted objects because the distribution function must be divided into passing particles and collected particles.

  1. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  2. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  3. Silver-sheathed multifilament wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Goretta, K. C.; Shi, D.; Lanagan, M. T.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    The process for manufacturing Ag-sheathed multifilament superconducting wires was investigated. Bi2Sr(1.7)CaCu2O(x), Pb-doped Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x), or YBa2Cu3O(x) powders were packed into Ag tubes and swaged into long wires. Pieces were cut from each wire, packed into a second Ag tube and swaged or rolled into multifilament wires. Each wire was then sintered to produce a superconductor. Processing considerations included the sheath workability, effects of compacting and residual stresses, and heat treatment schedules. The superconducting properties of the Bi-based wires were superior to those of the YBa2Cu3O(x) wires at 4.2 K, but not at 77 K.

  4. Modeling of dynamic bipolar plasma sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, J. M.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a one-dimensional plasma sheath is described in regimes where the sheath is not in equilibrium because it carries current densities that are either time dependent, or larger than the bipolar Child-Langmuir level determined from the injected ion flux. Earlier models of dynamic bipolar sheaths assumed that ions and electrons evolve in a series of quasiequilibria. In addition, sheath growth was described by the equation Zen0ẋs=‖ ji‖-Zen0u0, where ẋs is the velocity of the sheath edge, ji is the ion current density, n0u0 is the injected ion flux density, and Ze is the ion charge. In this paper, a generalization of the bipolar electron-to-ion current density ratio formula is derived to study regimes where ions are not in equilibrium. A generalization of the above sheath growth equation is also developed, which is consistent with the ion continuity equation and which reveals new physics of sheath behavior associated with the emitted electrons and their evolution. Based on these findings, two new models of dynamic bipolar sheaths are developed. Larger sheath sizes and potentials than those of earlier models are found. In certain regimes, explosive sheath growth is predicted.

  5. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  6. Theory and simulation of plasma sheath waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.; DiPeso, G.; Vahedi, V.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1992-12-15

    Sheath waves have been investigated analytically and with particle simulation for an unmagnetized two dimensional plasma slab with periodic boundary conditions in y and conducting walls at x = 0, L{sub x}. Analytically treating the sheath as a vacuum layer, the sheath wave bears a resemblance to plasma vacuum surface waves. The simulations are in agreement with the theory for both bulk Bohm Grow waves and edge sheath waves, with some unanswered questions. Some waves that were expected did not show up, at least, where we thought they should be. Hence, improvements were made in the initialization (a better quiet start), in the diagnostics (especially the spectra in frequency), and in the excitation (ability to pulse). It has become clear that this problem, seeking both sheath (or surface) and body waves in a bounded system, needs far more attention, in analysis (non-uniform density included) and in simulation, especially in diagnostics. Hence, this report is to be treated as a start on the problem. The problem is not dropped, as the understanding of such waves (in 2d and 3d) is very important, for both basic sheath understanding and for applications, such as plasma control via excitation of sheath or pre-sheath waves.

  7. SHEATH BLIGHT RESISTANCE IN SOUTHERN RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight is a serious fungal disease problem in southern US rice production, making it necessary for rice farmers to diligently use fungicides for its control. There are no long grain rice varieties adapted to commercial production in the southern US that have adequate resistance to sheath bli...

  8. Unusual stability of the Methanospirillum hungatei sheath.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T J; Stewart, M; Doyle, R J; Sprott, G D

    1985-01-01

    The proteinaceous sheath of Methanospirillum hungatei was isolated by lysing cells in 50 mM dithiothreitol, separating the sheath from other cellular material by discontinuous sucrose density centrifugation, and removing the "cell spacers" with dilute NaOH. The isolated sheath material consisted of hollow tubes which had a highly ordered surface array. The stability of the sheath to treatment with denaturants and to enzymatic digestion was examined by a turbidimetric assay in conjunction with electron microscopy and optical or electron diffraction. The sheath was resistant to a range of proteases and also was not digested by peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes, a lipase, a cellulase, a glucosidase, or Rhozyme (a mixture of galactosidases, acetylglucosaminidase, acetylgalactosaminidase, fucosidase, and mannosidases). In addition to being unaffected by common salts, thiol-reducing agents, and EDTA, the layer was resistant to powerful denaturants such as 6 M urea, 6 M guanidinium hydrochloride, 10 M LiSCN, cyanogen bromide, sodium periodate, and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate. Strong bases, boiling 3 N HCl, and performic acid did attack the sheath; in these cases, the array was systematically disassembled in a progressive manner, which was followed by electron microscopy. The layer was slightly modified by N-bromosuccinimide in urea, but the array remained intact. The stability of the sheath was remarkable, not only as compared to other bacterial surface arrays, but also as compared to proteins generally, and possibly indicated the presence of covalent cross-links between protein subunits. Images PMID:3988711

  9. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  10. Optical properties of nonextensive inhomogeneous plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic wave through an inhomogeneous magnetized nonextensive plasma sheath is numerically examined for a realistic density profile of a reentry problem around a hypersonic vehicle. The effect of nonextensivity and inhomogeneity on radio wave communication is studied parametrically. Variation of reflection and transmission coefficients, total attenuation, and total phase shift over the plasma sheath with respect to the strength of applied magnetic field are derived and compared for different values of q-nonextensive parameter. The obtained results for inhomogeneous plasma sheath are compared with previously obtained results of authors for homogeneous plasma sheath. The comparison shows that radio communication in the inhomogeneous plasma sheath is more advantageous than that in the homogeneous case. The transmission coefficient of a plasma sheath with superthermal electrons ( /1 3 < q < 1 ) has larger value compared to that with q > 1. Moreover, for ω c e > ω , the minimum value of total attenuation corresponds to the range /1 3 < q < 1 . An interesting result is that nonextensivity effect on wave propagation in plasma sheath depends on the strength of the ambient magnetic field. The effect of nonextensivity on attenuation coefficient is found to be negligible for ω c e < ω while it is significant for ω c e > ω .

  11. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    SciTech Connect

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  12. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-30

    Here, electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell(PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperaturemore » plasma conditions (Te >> Ti), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.« less

  13. Theory of the electron sheath and presheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2015-12-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that they are not so simple. Motivated by EVDFs observed in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath is developed. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions ( Te≫Ti ), an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient generates large flow velocities compared to what would be generated by ballistic motion in response to the electric field. It is found that in many situations, under common plasma conditions, the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma than an analogous ion presheath. PIC simulations reveal that the ion density in the electron presheath is determined by a flow around the electron sheath and that this flow is due to 2D aspects of the sheath geometry. Simulations also indicate the presence of ion acoustic instabilities excited by the differential flow between electrons and ions in the presheath, which result in sheath edge fluctuations. The 1D model and time averaged PIC simulations are compared and it is shown that the model provides a good description of the electron sheath and presheath.

  14. Effects of electron emission on sheath potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, Ansel; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Schamis, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the potential profile of a sheath under the influence of surface electron emission. The plasma and sheath profiles are simulated using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell code. Using one dimensional models we corroborate the analytical relationship between sheath potential and plasma electron and emitted electron temperatures derived earlier. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4-5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  16. Side-welded fast response sheathed thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    A method of fabricating the measuring junction of a grounded-junction sheathed thermocouple to obtain fast time response and good thermal cycling performance is provided. Slots are tooled or machined into the sheath wall at the measuring junction, the thermocouple wires are laser-welded into the slots. A thin metal closure cap is then laser-welded over the end of the sheath. Compared to a conventional grounded-junction thermocouple, the response time is 4 to 5 times faster and the thermal shock and cycling capabilities are substantially improved.

  17. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  18. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Ki, Dong Hyuk; He, Shuning; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are tumors derived from Schwann cells or Schwann cell precursors. Although rare overall, the incidence of MPNST has increased with improved clinical management of patients with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome. Unfortunately, current treatment modalities for MPNST are limited, with no targeted therapies available and poor efficacy of conventional radiation and chemotherapeutic regimens. Many murine and zebrafish models of MPNST have been developed, which have helped to elucidate the genes and pathways that are dysregulated in MPNST tumorigenesis, including the p53, and the RB1, PI3K-Akt-mTOR, RAS-ERK and Wnt signaling pathways. Preclinical results have suggested that new therapies, including mTOR and ERK inhibitors, may synergize with conventional chemotherapy in human tumors. The discovery of new genome editing technologies, like CRISPR-cas9, and their successful application to the zebrafish model will enable rapid progress in the faithful modeling of MPNST molecular pathogenesis. The zebrafish model is especially suited for high throughput screening of new targeted therapeutics as well as drugs approved for other purposes, which may help to bring enhanced treatment modalities into human clinical trials for this devastating disease. PMID:27165368

  19. Sheath rot of rice in Iran.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, S; Okhovvat, S M; Hedjaroude, G A; Khosravi, V

    2003-01-01

    Sheath rot of rice occurs in most rice-growing regions of the world. It usually causes yield losses from 20 to 85%. Sheath rot was reported from Iran in 1993. Year after year, the number of diseased plants increased in the Northern Iran. In summer of 2001, these symptoms were observed in most fields: lesions occur on the upper leaf sheaths, especially the flag leaf sheath. As the disease progresses, lesions enlarge and coalesce and may cover most of the leaf sheath. Panicle may fail to completely or at all. Brown or partially brown not filled or partially filled grain is also associated with infection of the panicle. A whitish powdery growth may be found inside affected sheaths. Infected plants were collected and trasferred to laboratory. Small pieces of diseased tissues were washed under tap water for one hour. Then tissues were placed on WA and incubated at 25 degrees C. These isolates were purified and identified as: Sarocladium oryzae, Fusarium udum, F. semitectum, F. avenaceum, F. flocciferum, F. graminearum, Bipolaris oryzae, Alternaria padwickii, Rhizoctonia solani, Paecilomyces sp., Nigrospora sp. and Trichoderma sp. This is the first report of F. udum in Iran. Also this is the first report that rice is the host for F. semitectum, F. avenaceum and F. flocciferum in Iran. Pathogenicity tests were conducted in glass house. Following species were found to be associated with sheath rot of rice: S. oryzae, F. graminearum, F. udum, F. avenaceum, B. oryzae, A. padwickii. This is the first report in the world that F. udum and A. padwickii are the causal agents of the sheath rot on rice plants. PMID:15151303

  20. Theory of the Electron Sheath and Presheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward

    2015-09-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the velocity distribution function (VDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that electron sheaths are not so simple. Motivated by VDFs observed in recent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions, an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient allows the generation of large flows compared to those that would be generated by the electric field alone. It is due to this pressure gradient that the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma (nominally by a factor of √{mi /me }) than an analogous ion presheath. Results of the model are compared with PIC simulations. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  1. Multidimensional Plasma Sheaths over Electrically Inhomogeneous Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Demetre

    2004-09-01

    Multidimensional plasma sheaths are encountered in a number of applications including plasma immersion ion implantation, extraction of ions (or plasma) through grids, MEMS fabrication, neutral beam sources, and plasma in contact with internal reactor parts (e.g., wafer chuck edge). The sheath may be multidimensional when: (a) plasma is in contact with surface topography, and the size of the topographical features is comparable to or larger than the plasma sheath thickness, or (b) the surface is flat but inhomogeneous, i.e., a conducting surface next to an insulating surface. In either case, the flux, energy and angular distributions of energetic species incident on the substrate are of primary importance. These quantities depend critically on the shape of the meniscus (plasma-sheath boundary) formed over the surface. A two-dimensional fluid/Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to study multidimensional sheaths. The radio frequency (RF) sheath potential evolution, and ion density and flux profiles over the surface were predicted with a self-consistent fluid simulation. The trajectories of ions and energetic neutrals (resulting by ion neutralization on surfaces or charge exchange collisions in the gas phase) were then followed with a Monte Carlo simulation. Ion flow and energy and angular distributions of ions bombarding a flat but electrically inhomogeneous surface will be reported in detail. Ion flow over trenches and holes will also be reported. Work supported by the NSF, Sandia National Laboratories and NIST.

  2. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  3. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  4. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-08-22

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported.

  5. Sheaths: More complicated than you think

    SciTech Connect

    Hershkowitz, Noah

    2005-05-15

    Sheaths in low temperature collisionless and weakly collisional plasmas are often viewed as simple examples of nonlinear physics. How well do we understand them? Closer examination indicates that they are far from simple. Moreover, many predicted sheath properties have not been experimentally verified and even the appropriate 'Bohm velocity' for often encountered two-ion species plasma is unknown. In addition, a variety of sheathlike structures, e.g., double layers, can exist, and many two- and three-dimensional sheath effects have not been considered. Experimental studies of sheaths and presheaths in weakly collisional plasmas are described. A key diagnostic is emissive probes operated in the 'limit of zero emission'. Emissive probes provide a sensitive diagnostic of plasma potential with a resolution approaching 0.1 V and a spatial resolution of 0.1 cm. Combined with planar Langmuir probes and laser-induced fluorescence, they have been used to investigate a wide variety of sheath, presheath, and sheathlike structures. Our experiments have provided some answers but have also raised more questions.

  6. Polarization force-induced changes in the dust sheath formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayout, Saliha; Bentabet, Karima; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-09-15

    The modifications arising in the dusty plasma sheath structure due to the presence of polarization forces acting on the dust grains are investigated. The corresponding appropriate Bohm criterion for sheath formation is obtained. It is found that the critical Mach number, beyond which the dusty plasma electrostatic sheath sets in, decreases whenever the polarization effects become important. In addition, when the polarization force dominates over the electrical one, the dust plasma sheath cannot set in. This happens whenever the dust grain size exceeds a critical threshold. Moreover, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient becomes abruptly steep, and the sheath thickness becomes broader as the polarization force effects strengthen.

  7. Accuracy of the Unified Sheath Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle E.

    1997-10-01

    The Unified Sheath Model ( M. E. Riley, Sandia Labs Tech Reports SAND95-0775 UC-401 (May, 1995) and SAND96-1948 UC-401 (August, 1996)) is designed to bridge the intermediate region of ion response between the high frequency Lieberman model and the low frequency Metze, Ernie, and Oskam model. In order to make a quantitative check of the effective ion response time (inverse ion plasma radian frequency at the presheath boundary), I have compared the semi-analytic Unified Model predictions to time- and space-dependent numerical solutions of the ion fluid equations in an rf-biased plasma sheath. In so doing, one is testing the most crucial of the physical approximations made in the model. The comparisons are good and lend confidence to use of the sheath model in the simulation of rf-biased plasmas in processing applications.

  8. 56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. POWDER MAGAZINE, VIEW OF INTACT WOOD SHEATHING ON THE SOUTHWEST REAR VENTILATION PASSAGE. (SHEATHING HELP CONTROL HUMIDITY AND DECREASE DANGER OF MAETAL STRIKING STONE AND SPARKING.) - Fort Monroe, Fortress, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  9. Massive exophytic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Khorsand, Derek; Porrino, Jack; Flaherty, Erin; Bandhlish, Anshu; Davidson, Darin

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of a solitary neurofibroma involving the right posterior shoulder of a 69-year-old man with degeneration into a massive, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor measuring more than 3 times the average reported size. The radiographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomographic features are compared with the gross appearance and pathology. PMID:27257459

  10. Sheath fold morphology in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Galland, Olivier; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-08-01

    Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We present results for different slip surface orientations and shapes. Cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction through the sheath fold display closed contours, so called eye-structures. The aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour is strongly dependent on the initial slip surface configuration. The center of the eye-structure is subject to change in height with respect to the upper edge of the outermost closed contour for different cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction. This results in a large variability in layer thickness across the sheath fold length, questioning the usefulness of eye-structures as shear sense indicators. The location of the center of the eye structure is largely invariant to the initial configurations of the slip surface as well as to strain. The values of the aspect ratios of the closed contours within the eye-pattern are dependent on the strain and the cross-section location. The ratio (R') of the aspect ratios of the outermost closed contour (Ryz) and the innermost closed contour (Ry'z') shows values above and below 1. R' shows dependence on the slip surface shape and orientation but not on the number of involved contours. Using R' measurements to deduce the bulk strain type may be erroneous.

  11. Radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions with magnetic field tangency points along the sheath surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2013-08-15

    Computer simulations of radio-frequency (RF) waves propagating across a two-dimensional (2D) magnetic field into a conducting boundary are described. The boundary condition for the RF fields at the metal surface leads to the formation of an RF sheath, which has previously been studied in one-dimensional models. In this 2D study, it is found that rapid variation of conditions along the sheath surface promote coupling of the incident RF branch (either fast or slow wave) to a short-scale-length sheath-plasma wave (SPW). The SPW propagates along the sheath surface in a particular direction dictated by the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the surface, and the wave energy in the SPW accumulates near places where the background magnetic field is tangent to the surface.

  12. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1314 - Sheathed explosive units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sheathed explosive units. 75.1314 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1314 Sheathed explosive units. (a) A separate instantaneous detonator shall be used to fire each sheathed explosive...

  17. Effects of plasma sheath on solar power satellite array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of the plasma sheath and equilibrium voltage distribution of a high-power solar array governs various kinds of plasma-interaction phenomena and array losses. Sheath effects of a linearly-connected array are investigated for GEO. Although the array may be large, the thin-sheath-limit analysis may be invalid, necessitating numerical methods. Three-dimensional computer calculations show that potential barriers and over-lapping sheaths can occur, i.e., structures not predictable under the thin-sheath-limit analysis, but nevertheless controlling the distribution of plasma currents impacting on the array.

  18. Male urinary incontinence and the urinary sheath.

    PubMed

    Smart, Clare

    This article addresses the assessment and management of male incontinence with a specific focus on the use of the male external catheter (MEC) or urinary sheath. Education and expertise when dealing with a man with urinary incontinence, as well as a tactful and sensitive attitude towards this embarrassing problem, are essential for a successful outcome. The urinary sheath is often perceived by nurses and patients as a difficult product to master and is prone to failure owing to incorrect fitting and management. With correct usage it can make a great difference to a patient's quality of life and avoid problems often associated with urinary catheters and pads such as urinary infection and skin excoriation. Detailed assessment of the patient as well as his suitability for the MEC is essential for a successful outcome. PMID:24820510

  19. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Feola, Andrew; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome results in a loss of visual function and occurs in astronauts following long-duration spaceflight. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the ocular changes involved in VIIP is of critical importance for space medicine research. Although the exact mechanisms of VIIP are not yet known, it is hypothesized that microgravity-induced increases in intracranial pressures (ICP) drive the remodeling of the optic nerve sheath, leading to compression of the optic nerve which in turn may reduce visual acuity. Some astronauts present with a kink in the optic nerve after return to earth, suggesting that tissue remodeling in response to ICP increases may be taking place. The goal of this work is to characterize the mechanical properties of the optic nerve sheath (dura mater) to better understand its biomechanical response to increased ICP.

  20. Anode sheath contributions in plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, John F.

    1994-03-01

    Contributions of the anode to Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance are considered. High energy losses at this electrode, surface erosion, and sheath/ionization effects must be controlled in designs of practical interest. Current constriction or spotting at the anode, evolving into localized surface damage and considerable throat erosion, is shown to be related to the electron temperature's T(sub e) rise above the gas temperature T(sub o). An elementary one-dimensional description of a collisional sheath which highlights the role of T(sub e) is presented. Computations to model the one-dimensional sheath are attempted using a set of five coupled first-order, nonlinear differential equations describing the electric field, as well as the species current and number densities. For a large temperature nonequilibrium (i.e., T(sub e) greater than T(sub o)), the one-dimensional approach fails to give reasonable answers and a multidimensional description is deemed necessary. Thus, anode spotting may be precipitated by the elevation of T sub e among other factors. A review of transpiration cooling as a means of recouping some anode power is included. Active anode cooling via transpiration cooling would result in (1) quenching T(sub e), (2) adding 'hot' propellant to exhaust, and (3) reducing the local electron Hall parameter.

  1. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numericallymore » to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.« less

  2. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, James R.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describe the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle, θ assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  3. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  4. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall.

  5. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  6. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  7. Nerve sheath myxoma: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Amoolya; Narasimha, Apaparna; C, Vijaya; Vk, Sundeep

    2015-04-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics. PMID:26023558

  8. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-01

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. These predictions are contrasted here with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  9. Detached tip of a transseptal sheath during left atrial ablation.

    PubMed

    El-Damaty, Ahmed; Love, Michael; Parkash, Ratika

    2012-02-15

    Left atrial ablation has become more commonplace with the advent of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. A number of transseptal sheaths have been produced to enhance safe and efficient catheter manipulation in the left atrium (LA) for these procedures. Some of the sheaths have been subject to recall due to partial or complete detachment of its radiopaque tip. We report a case of a 46 year-old female diagnosed with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy that presented with atypical left atrial flutter. During electrophysiologic study, a Swartz braided SL1 (SL-1) transseptal sheath was used to introduce the ablation catheter to the left atrium. During left atrial mapping, the radiopaque tip of the sheath detached from the rest of the sheath and was seen floating in the LA. After exchanging the SL-1 sheath with a deflectable sheath, the detached segment was retrieved out of the LA and eventually out of the vascular system using an angioplasty balloon advanced over a wire and inflated distal to the lumen of the detached tip. The root cause of this malfunction was found to be lack of a secondary bonding process that these sheaths generally undergo during the manufacturing process. We describe the case of a left atrial ablation procedure where a novel percutaneous method was able to successfully retrieve the detached tip of a transseptal sheath from the vascular system, thereby avoiding a potential catastrophic complication or thoracotomy. This method may be useful in other cases where similar circumstances may present. PMID:22162088

  10. Rarefaction solitons initiated by sheath instability

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2015-09-15

    The instability of the cathode sheath initiated by the cold energetic electron beam is studied by the one-dimensional fluid model. Numerical simulations show the generation of travelling rarefaction solitons at the cathode. It is obtained that the parameters of these solitons strongly depend on the parameters of electron beam. The “stretched” variables are derived using the small-amplitude analysis. These variables are used in order to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the propagation of the rarefaction solitons through the plasma with cold energetic electron beam.

  11. Controversies in ureteroscopy: Wire, basket, and sheath

    PubMed Central

    Rizkala, Emad R; Monga, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    In the last one to two decades, flexible ureteroscopy has rapidly expanded its role in the treatment of urologic stone disease. With the frequent and expanded use of flexible ureteroscopy, other ancillary instruments were developed in order to ease and facilitate this technique, such as ureteral access sheaths (UAS) and a variety of wires and baskets. These developments, along with improved surgeon ureteroscopic competence, have often brought into question the need to implement the “traditional technique” of flexible ureteroscopy. In this review, we discuss a brief history of flexible ureteroscopy, its expanded indications, and the controversy surrounding the use of UAS, wires, and baskets. PMID:24082447

  12. Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Holger

    2012-08-15

    Relativistic electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, travel through the target and form a space charge sheath at the rear surface which can be used to accelerate ions to high energies. If the laser pulse duration is comparable or shorter than the time needed for the electrons to travel through the target, the electrons will not have the chance to form an equilibrium distribution but must be described by a non-equilibrium distribution. We present a kinetic theory of the rear sheath for arbitrary electron distribution function f(E), where E is the electron energy, and evaluate it for different shapes of f(E). We find that the far field is mainly determined by the high energy tail of the distribution, a steep decay of f(E) for high energies results in a small electric field and vice versa. The model is extended to account for electrons escaping the sheath region thereby allowing a finite potential drop over the sheath. The consequences of the model for the acceleration of ions are discussed.

  13. CNS Myelin Sheath Lengths Are an Intrinsic Property of Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bechler, Marie E.; Byrne, Lauren; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Summary Since Río-Hortega’s description of oligodendrocyte morphologies nearly a century ago, many studies have observed myelin sheath-length diversity between CNS regions [1–3]. Myelin sheath length directly impacts axonal conduction velocity by influencing the spacing between nodes of Ranvier. Such differences likely affect neural signal coordination and synchronization [4]. What accounts for regional differences in myelin sheath lengths is unknown; are myelin sheath lengths determined solely by axons or do intrinsic properties of different oligodendrocyte precursor cell populations affect length? The prevailing view is that axons provide molecular cues necessary for oligodendrocyte myelination and appropriate sheath lengths. This view is based upon the observation that axon diameters correlate with myelin sheath length [1, 5, 6], as well as reports that PNS axonal neuregulin-1 type III regulates the initiation and properties of Schwann cell myelin sheaths [7, 8]. However, in the CNS, no such instructive molecules have been shown to be required, and increasing in vitro evidence supports an oligodendrocyte-driven, neuron-independent ability to differentiate and form initial sheaths [9–12]. We test this alternative signal-independent hypothesis—that variation in internode lengths reflects regional oligodendrocyte-intrinsic properties. Using microfibers, we find that oligodendrocytes have a remarkable ability to self-regulate the formation of compact, multilamellar myelin and generate sheaths of physiological length. Our results show that oligodendrocytes respond to fiber diameters and that spinal cord oligodendrocytes generate longer sheaths than cortical oligodendrocytes on fibers, co-cultures, and explants, revealing that oligodendrocytes have regional identity and generate different sheath lengths that mirror internodes in vivo. PMID:26320951

  14. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  15. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  16. INCORPORATING FOREIGN SHEATH BLIGHT RESISTANCE GENES INTO US RICE GEMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight disease, caused by the Rhizoctonia solani fungus, has been the most economically significant rice disease throughout Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas since the early 1970s. While diseases such as blast and straighthead can also devastate yield, sheath blight disease occurs more consiste...

  17. Generalized Analytical Model for the Radio-Frequency Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    An analytical model for the planar radio frequency (RF) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed based on the applied RF voltage as the boundary condition. The model applies to all kind of waveforms for the applied RF voltage, includes both sheaths in a discharge of arbitrary symmetry, and allows for an arbitrary degree of ion collisionallity in the sheaths (charge-exchange collisions). Further, effects of the finite floating potential during sheath collapse are included. The model can even be extended to electronegative plasmas with low bulk conductivity. The individual sheath voltages, the self-bias, and the RF floating potentials are explicitly calculated by a voltage balance equation using a cubic-charge voltage relation for the sheaths. In particular, the RF-phase as a function of the sheath voltage is determined. This is an input for a single second order non-linear integro-differential equation which is governing the ion flow velocity in the sheath. Fast numerical integration is straight forward and in many cases approximate analytical solutions can be obtained. Based on the solution for the ion flow velocity, densities, electric fields, currents, and charge-voltage relations are calculated. Further, the Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case are derived. Very good agreement between model and experiments is obtained.

  18. Quality of paper boards from arecanut leaf sheath.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, R; Viswanathan, R; Devadas, C T

    2002-03-01

    A study was carried on utilizing arecanut leaf sheath for making paper boards. Paper boards were made with various combinations of arecanut leaf sheath with waste paper, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 3:1, 2:1, control (100% areca leaf sheath) and the qualities of these paper boards were tested as per the Bureau of Indian Standards (IS: 1060 (part-I)-1966). The paper boards made with more arecanut sheath materials had more resistance to water absorption. The addition of paper increased the substance weight of the paper boards. The 2:1 and 3:1 combinations of arecanut leaf sheath and waste paper had best tear strength, tensile strength, bursting strength and water resistance with minimum substance weight. PMID:11848383

  19. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  20. Gas insulated transmission line having low inductance intercalated sheath

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1978-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line including an outer sheath, an inner conductor disposed within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas between the inner conductor and the outer sheath. The outer sheath comprises an insulating tube having first and second ends, and having interior and exterior surfaces. A first electrically conducting foil is secured to the interior surface of the insulating tube, is spirally wound from one tube end to the second tube end, and has a plurality of overlapping turns. A second electrically conducting foil is secured to the exterior surface of the insulating tube, and is spirally wound in the opposite direction from the first electrically conducting foil. By winding the foils in opposite directions, the inductances within the intercalated sheath will cancel each other out.

  1. Similarities and distinctions of CIR and Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI data and our catalog of large scale solar wind (SW) streams during 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009] we study the average temporal profiles for two types of compressed regions: CIR (corotating interaction region - compressed region before High Speed Stream (HSS)) and Sheath (compressed region before fast Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), including Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Ejecta). As have been shown by Nikolaeva et al, [2015], the efficiency of magnetic storm generation is ~50% higher for Sheath and CIR than for ICME (MC and Ejecta), i.e. reaction magnetosphere depends on type of driver. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (HSS or ICME) type and differences are connected with geometry and full jumps of speed in edges of compression regions. If making the natural assumption that the gradient of speed is directed approximately on normal to the piston, CIR has the largest angle between the gradient of speed and the direction of average SW speed, and ICME - the smallest angle. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-02-00158, 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S. , Yu. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the Corrected Dst* Index Temporal Profile on the Main Phase of the Magnetic Storms Generated by Different Types of Solar Wind, Cosmic Research, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 119-127. Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research

  2. Space charge sheath in plasma-neutral gas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramani, N.; Mattoo, S. K.

    1986-04-01

    A space charge sheath is found to be formed whenever a high-velocity magnetized plasma stream penetrates a gas cloud. The sheath is always located at the head of the plasma stream, and its thickness is very small compared to the length of the plasma stream. Soon after the sheath is formed it quickly slows down to the Alfven critical velocity. The plasma behind the sheath continues to move at higher velocity until the whole plasma stream is retarded to the critical velocity. In the interaction at gas density of about 10 to the 19th/cu cm, the sheaths are observed to be accompanied by a single loop of current with current density of about 10,000 A/sq m. Maximum potential in the sheath ranges between 50 and 200 V. Presently available models for the sheath may explain the initiation of the sheath formation. Physical processes like heating of the electrons and ionization of the gas cloud which come into play at a later stage of the interaction are not included in these models. These processes considerably alter the potential structure in the sheath region. A schematic model of the observed sheath is presented. Experiments reveal a threshold value of the magnetic field for plasma retardation to occur. This seems to correspond to the threshold condition for excitation of the modified two-stream instability, which can lead to the electron heating. The observed currents are found sufficient to account for the plasma retardation at a gas density of about 10 to the 17th/cu m.

  3. Bladder outlet reconstruction: fate of the silicone sheath.

    PubMed

    Kropp, B P; Rink, R C; Adams, M C; Keating, M A; Mitchell, M E

    1993-08-01

    The placement of a 1.5 cm. wide silicone sheath around a newly constructed urethra/bladder neck to ensure maintenance of repair length and to facilitate future placement of a sphincter cuff was reported by our institution in 1985. We present our long-term followup and new recommendations for use of the silicone sheath. A total of 15 silicone sheaths was placed between March 1981 and July 1984. Of the sheaths 14 were placed at the time of urinary reconstruction around the Young-Dees-Leadbetter bladder neck repair and 1 was placed after erosion of an artificial urinary sphincter cuff. Of the 15 sheaths 10 have eroded into the urethra and 4 sheaths remain in situ. Another sheath was replaced 2 years after its original insertion with an artificial urinary sphincter cuff. Mean time to erosion was 48.2 months, with a range of 2 to 108 months. Long-term followup of 10 patients revealed that 4 ultimately required ligation of the bladder neck and construction of continent stoma after erosion, 1 is dry after placement of a bulbar artificial urinary sphincter, 2 remain dry after removal of the eroded sheath alone, 2 required bladder neck revision to achieve continence after erosion and the most recent patient remains diverted with a suprapubic tube. All 4 patients with sheaths still remaining are dry without evidence of erosion (mean duration 116 months). These long-term results using a silicone wrap around a newly constructed bladder neck reveal an unacceptably high rate of erosion. Therefore, we no longer recommend or support the use of the silicone sheath in the manner we have described for bladder neck reconstruction. PMID:8326628

  4. Identification of a Gene Essential for Sheathed Structure Formation in Sphaerotilus natans, a Filamentous Sheathed Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2002-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium that causes bulking in activated sludge processes, can assume two distinct morphologies, depending on the substrate concentration for growth; in substrate-rich media it grows as single rod-shaped cells, whereas in substrate-limited media it grows as filaments. To identify genes responsible for sheath formation, we carried out transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. Of the approximately 20,000 mutants obtained, 7 did not form sheathed structures. Sequencing of the Tn5-flanking regions showed that five of the seven Tn5 insertions converged at the same open reading frame, designated sthA. The deduced amino acids encoded by sthA were found to be homologous to glycosyltransferase, which is known to be involved in linking sugars to lipid carriers during bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene of the wild-type strain by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette also resulted in sheathless growth under either type of nutrient condition. These findings indicate that sthA is a crucial component responsible for sheath formation. PMID:11772646

  5. Charge separation in a magnetized plasma-sheath-lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamate, Eugen

    2009-10-01

    Most of plasma processing technologies are based on radical-assisted ion-induced surface-modification where ions accumulate energy in the sheath, and then strike the surface modifying its properties in a desirable way. Plasma-sheath-lens is a three-dimensional potential distribution of customized shape, formed by the space charge surrounding a biased electrode-insulator interface. The discrete and modal focusing effects have been reveled for this type of electrostatic structures formed in plasma [1] and several applications including sheath thickness evaluation, negative ion detection and extraction of positive or negative ion beams have been developed. A non-magnetized plasma-sheath-lens act as a kinetic energy separator, but it is not mass sensitive. However, a magnetized plasma-sheath-lens exhibits mass separation, so that ions of different mass will impact the electrode at different locations on the biased electrode surface. The mass spectrum can be measured as the radial distribution of the ion current density over the plasma-sheath-lens's electrode. Relevant fluid and particles simulations of the magnetized plasma-sheath-lens structures and ion trajectories within them are presented for different plasma parameters and magnetic filed configurations. Practical aspects linked to the development of a new type of mass spectrometers are also investigated.[0pt] [1] E. Stamate and H. Sugai, Phys. Rev. Lett. (2005) 94, 125004

  6. Nonextensive statistics and the sheath criterion in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-01-15

    The Bohm criterion in an electropositive plasma containing nonextensively distributed electrons and warm ions is investigated by using a steady state two-fluid model. Taking into account the ion-neutral collisions and finite temperature of ions, a modified Bohm criterion is derived which limits both maximum and minimum allowable velocity of ions at the sheath edge (u{sub 0i}). It is found that the degree of nonextensivity of electrons (q) and temperature of positive ions (T{sub i}) affect only the lower limit of the entrance velocity of ions into the sheath while the degree of ion collisionality (α) influences both lower and upper limits of the ion velocities at the sheath edge. In addition, depending on the value of q, it is shown that the minimum velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge can be greater or smaller than its Maxwellian counterpart. Moreover, it is shown that, depending on the values of α and T{sub i}, the positive ions with subsonic velocity may enter the sheath for either q > 1 or −1 < q < 1. Finally, as a practical application, the density distribution of charged particles in the sheath region is studied for different values of u{sub 0i}, and it is shown that monotonical reduction of the positive ion density distribution occurs only when the velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge lies between two above mentioned limits.

  7. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  8. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  9. Ion Dynamics Model for Collisionless Radio Frequency Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T.R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full scale reactor model based on fluid equations is widely used to analyze high density plasma reactors. It is well known that the submillimeter scale sheath in front of a biased electrode supporting the wafer is difficult to resolve in numerical simulations, and the common practice is to use results for electric field from some form of analytical sheath model as boundary conditions for full scale reactor simulation. There are several sheath models in the literature ranging from Child's law to a recent unified sheath model [P. A. Miller and M. E. Riley, J. Appl. Phys. 82, 3689 (1997)l. In the present work, the cold ion fluid equations in the radio frequency sheath are solved numerically to show that the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux inside the sheath, commonly ignored in analytical models, is important in determining the electric field and ion energy at the electrode. Consequently, a semianalytical model that includes the spatiotemporal variation of ion flux is developed for use as boundary condition in reactor simulations. This semianalytical model is shown to yield results for sheath properties in close agreement with numerical solutions.

  10. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    PubMed

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. PMID:26109065

  11. The plasma drag and dust motion inside the magnetized sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Samarian, A.

    2011-05-15

    The motion of micron size dust inside the sheath in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is investigated by self-consistently calculating the charge and various forces acting on the dust. It is shown that the dust trajectory inside the sheath, which is like an Archimedean spiral swinging back and forth between the wall and the plasma-sheath boundary, depends only indirectly on the orientation of the magnetic field. When the Lorentz force is smaller than the collisional momentum exchange, the dust dynamics is insensitive to the obliqueness of the magnetic field. Only when the magnetic field is strong enough, the sheath structure and, thus, the dust dynamics are significantly affected by the field orientation. Balance between the plasma drag, sheath electrostatic field, and gravity plays an important role in determining how far the dust can travel inside the sheath. The dust equilibrium point shifts closer to the wall in the presence of gravity and plasma drag. However, in the absence of plasma drag, dust can sneak back into the plasma if acted only by gravity. The implication of our results to the usability of dust as a sheath probe is discussed.

  12. Morphogenesis of the fibrous sheath in the marsupial spermatozoon

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, M; Breed, WG

    2005-01-01

    The spermatozoon fibrous sheath contains longitudinal columns and circumferential ribs. It surrounds the axoneme of the principal piece of the mammalian sperm tail, and may be important in sperm stability and motility. Here we describe its assembly during spermiogenesis in a marsupial, the brush-tail possum, and compare its structural organization with that of eutherian mammals, birds and reptiles. Transmission electron microscopy showed that possum fibrous sheath assembly is a multistep process extending in a distal-to-proximal direction along the axoneme from steps 4 to 14 of spermiogenesis. For the most part, assembly of the longitudinal columns occurs before that of the circumferential ribs. Immunohistochemical and immunogold labelling showed that fibrous sheath proteins are first present in the spermatid cytoplasm; at least some of the proteins of the sheath precursors differ from those in the mature fibrous sheath. That immunoreactivity develops after initiation of chromatin condensation suggests that fibrous sheath proteins, or their mRNAs, are stored within the spermatid cytoplasmic lobule prior to their assembly along the axoneme. These findings are similar to those in laboratory rats, and thus suggests that the mode of fibrous sheath assembly evolved in a common ancestor over 125 million years ago, prior to the divergence of marsupial and eutherian lineages. PMID:16050902

  13. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of the Sheath of Phormidium uncinatum

    PubMed Central

    Hoiczyk, Egbert

    1998-01-01

    The sheath of the filamentous, gliding cyanobacterium Phormidium uncinatum was studied by using light and electron microscopy. In thin sections and freeze fractures the sheath was found to be composed of helically arranged carbohydrate fibrils, 4 to 7 nm in diameter, which showed a substantial degree of crystallinity. As in all other examined motile cyanobacteria, the arrangement of the sheath fibrils correlates with the motion of the filaments during gliding motility; i.e., the fibrils formed a right-handed helix in clockwise-rotating species and a left-handed helix in counterclockwise-rotating species and were radially arranged in nonrotating cyanobacteria. Since sheaths could only be found in old immotile cultures, the arrangement seems to depend on the process of formation and attachment of sheath fibrils to the cell surface rather than on shear forces created by the locomotion of the filaments. As the sheath in P. uncinatum directly contacts the cell surface via the previously identified surface fibril forming glycoprotein oscillin (E. Hoiczyk and W. Baumeister, Mol. Microbiol. 26:699–708, 1997), it seems reasonable that similar surface glycoproteins act as platforms for the assembly and attachment of the sheaths in cyanobacteria. In P. uncinatum the sheath makes up approximately 21% of the total dry weight of old cultures and consists only of neutral sugars. Staining reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis suggested that the fibrillar component is a homoglucan that is very similar but not identical to cellulose which is cross-linked by the other detected monosaccharides. Both the chemical composition and the rigid highly ordered structure clearly distinguish the sheaths from the slime secreted by the filaments during gliding motility. PMID:9683490

  14. Measurement of sheath thickness at a floating potential

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Oh, Se-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-02-15

    In a cylindrical Langmuir probe measurement, ion current is collected from the surface of the sheath surrounded at probe tip, not at the surface of the probe tip. By using this, the sheath thickness can be obtained, if we know some unknown parameters, such as ion current, plasma density, and electron temperature. In this paper, we present a method to measure sheath thickness by using a wave cutoff method and a floating harmonic method. The measured result is in a good agreement with Allen-Boyd-Reynolds theory.

  15. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  16. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma in a patient treated with apixaban.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Halil; Inci, Sinan; Dogan, Pinar; Izgu, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Apixaban, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, is a Factor Xa inhibitor that is prescribed for the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation. Rectus sheath hematoma is a rare but significant complication of oral anticoagulant treatment. The important causes of rectus sheath hematoma include treatment with anticoagulants, hematologic diseases, trauma, intense physical activity, coughing, sneezing and pregnancy. In this report, we describe case of a 71-year-old woman undergoing apixaban treatment for non valvular atrial fibrillation who presented with spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. PMID:26989650

  17. Analytical model for the radio-frequency sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    A simple analytical model for the planar radio-frequency (rf) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed that is based on the assumptions of a step profile for the electron front, charge exchange collisions with constant cross sections, negligible ionization within the sheath, and negligible ion dynamics. The continuity, momentum conservation, and Poisson equations are combined in a single integro-differential equation for the square of the ion drift velocity, the so called sheath equation. Starting from the kinetic Boltzmann equation, special attention is paid to the derivation and the validity of the approximate fluid equation for momentum balance. The integrals in the sheath equation appear in the screening function which considers the relative contribution of the temporal mean of the electron density to the space charge in the sheath. It is shown that the screening function is quite insensitive to variations of the effective sheath parameters. The two parameters defining the solution are the ratios of the maximum sheath extension to the ion mean free path and the Debye length, respectively. A simple general analytic expression for the screening function is introduced. By means of this expression approximate analytical solutions are obtained for the collisionless as well as the highly collisional case that compare well with the exact numerical solution. A simple transition formula allows application to all degrees of collisionality. In addition, the solutions are used to calculate all static and dynamic quantities of the sheath, e.g., the ion density, fields, and currents. Further, the rf Child-Langmuir laws for the collisionless as well as the collisional case are derived. An essential part of the model is the a priori knowledge of the wave form of the sheath voltage. This wave form is derived on the basis of a cubic charge-voltage relation for individual sheaths, considering both sheaths and the self-consistent self-bias in a discharge with arbitrary

  18. Absence of Debye Sheaths Due to Secondary Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    M.D. Campanell, A. Khrabrov and I. D. Kaganovich

    2012-05-11

    A bounded plasma where the hot electrons impacting the walls produce more than one secondary on average is studied via particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that no classical Debye sheath or space-charge limited sheath exists. Ions are not drawn to the walls and electrons are not repelled. Hence the unconfined plasma electrons travel unobstructed to the walls, causing extreme particle and energy fluxes. Each wall has a positive charge, forming a small potential barrier or "inverse sheath" that pulls some secondaries back to the wall to maintain the zero current condition.

  19. Giant Cell Tumor of the Peroneus Brevis Tendon Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Ch, Li; TH, Lui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath is most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist and is rare in the foot and ankle. Case report: A 49-year-old lady noticed a right lateral foot mass for 10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested that the mass is originated from the peroneal tendons. The mass was excised and intra-operative findings showed that the tumor came from the peroneus brevis tendon sheath. Histological study confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor. Conclusion: Giant cell tumor, although rare, should be one of the differential diagnoses of tendon sheath tumor of the foot and ankle. PMID:27299104

  20. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues were discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.

  1. A radio-frequency sheath model for complex waveforms

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, P.

    2014-04-21

    Plasma sheaths driven by radio-frequency voltages occur in contexts ranging from plasma processing to magnetically confined fusion experiments. An analytical understanding of such sheaths is therefore important, both intrinsically and as an element in more elaborate theoretical structures. Radio-frequency sheaths are commonly excited by highly anharmonic waveforms, but no analytical model exists for this general case. We present a mathematically simple sheath model that is in good agreement with earlier models for single frequency excitation, yet can be solved for arbitrary excitation waveforms. As examples, we discuss dual-frequency and pulse-like waveforms. The model employs the ansatz that the time-averaged electron density is a constant fraction of the ion density. In the cases we discuss, the error introduced by this approximation is small, and in general it can be quantified through an internal consistency condition of the model. This simple and accurate model is likely to have wide application.

  2. Morphological analysis of the sheathed flagellum of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It was recently shown that B. melitensis is flagellated. However, the flagellar structure remains poorly described. Findings We analyzed the structure of the polar sheathed flagellum of B. melitensis by TEM analysis and demonstrated that the Ryu staining is a good method to quickly visualize the flagellum by optical microscopy. The TEM analysis demonstrated that an extension of the outer membrane surrounds a filament ending by a club-like structure. The ΔftcR, ΔfliF, ΔflgE and ΔfliC flagellar mutants still produce an empty sheath. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the flagellum of B. melitensis has the characteristics of the sheathed flagella. Our results also suggest that the flagellar sheath production is not directly linked to the flagellar structure assembly and is not regulated by the FtcR master regulator. PMID:21143933

  3. Ureteric access sheath aided insertion of resonance metal ureteric stent

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Matthew; Strahan, Stephen; Wines, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction caused by malignancy is a challenging and often complicated problem for urologists. We present a novel technique of ureteric access sheath aided insertion of a Resonance metal ureteric stent in the setting of a difficult obstruction. PMID:24879725

  4. Plasma sheath multipath analysis and its effect on GNSS navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yongxing; Xi, Xiaoli; Song, Zhongguo; Liu, Jiangfan

    2015-11-01

    When hypersonic vehicle reenters the Earth's atmosphere, the plasma sheath will be generated by its collision with ambient air that would affect global navigation satellite system (GNSS). In order to understand such effects, the transmission coefficient of the plasma sheath has been investigated using the numerical method before. But this is found to be insufficient, for besides the attenuation on the signal energy, the multipath effect between the plasma sheath and the vehicle surface is also a serious factor, which may result in errors in pseudorange measurement and carrier phase measurement of GNSS receiver and finally affect the positioning accuracy. The multipath of the plasma sheath is analyzed by finite-difference time-domain method combined with further signal processing, and a simulation platform is established to verify this effects on positioning performance. Simulation results indicate the degradation of positioning performance when these multipath signals were present, causing position error with several meters to tens of meters.

  5. Porous protective solid phase micro-extractor sheath

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Randich, Erik

    2005-03-29

    A porous protective sheath for active extraction media used in solid phase microextraction (SPME). The sheath permits exposure of the media to the environment without the necessity of extending a fragile coated fiber from a protective tube or needle. Subsequently, the sheath can pierce and seal with GC-MS septums, allowing direct injection of samples into inlet ports of analytical equipment. Use of the porous protective sheath, within which the active extraction media is contained, mitigates the problems of: 1) fiber breakage while the fiber is extended during sampling, 2) active media coating loss caused by physical contact of the bare fiber with the sampling environment; and 3) coating slough-off during fiber extension and retraction operations caused by rubbing action between the fiber and protective needle or tube.

  6. Scale invariant sheath folds in salt, sediments and shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.

    2007-10-01

    Sheath folds are developed in a broad spectrum of geological environments in which material flow occurs, including gravity-driven surficial deformation in ignimbrites, unconsolidated sediments and salt, together with deeper level ductile shear zones in metamorphic rocks. This study represents the first geometric comparison of sheath folds in these different settings across a wide range of scales. Elliptical closures defining eye-folds represent ( y- z) cross sections through highly-curvilinear sheath folds. Our analysis of the published literature, coupled with field observations, reveals remarkably similar ellipticities ( R yz) for sheath folds in metamorphic shear zones ( R yz 4.23), salt ( R yz 4.29), sediment slumps ( R yz 4.34), glaciotectonites ( R yz 4.48), and ignimbrites ( R yz 4.34). Nested eye-folds across this range of materials ( N = 1800) reveal distinct and consistent differences in ellipticity from the outer- ( R yz) to the inner-most ( R y' z' ) elliptical "rings" of individual sheath folds. The variation in ratios from outer to inner rings ( R' = R yz/ R y' z' ) in gravity-driven surficial flows typically displays a relative increase in ellipticity to define cats-eye-folds ( R' < 1) similar to those observed during simple and general shear in metamorphic rocks. We show that sheath folds develop across a range of scales within these different environments, and display elliptical ratios ( R yz) that are remarkably constant ( R2 > 0.99) across 9 orders of magnitude (sheath y axes range from ˜0.1 mm to >75 km). Our findings lead us to conclude that the geometric properties of sheath folds are scale invariant and primarily controlled by the type and amount of strain, with R' also reflecting the rheological significance of layering associated with original buckle fold mechanisms. The scaling pattern of sheath folds reflects the length scales of the precursor buckle folds (and width of deformation zones) across a broad range of materials and

  7. USP6 genetic rearrangements in cellular fibroma of tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jodi M; Wang, Xiaoke; Dong, Jie; Westendorf, Jennifer; Chou, Margaret M; Oliveira, Andre M

    2016-08-01

    Fibroma of tendon sheath is a benign (myo)fibroblastic neoplasm of the tenosynovial soft tissues, typically affecting the distal extremities. It is classically described as a paucicellular, densely collagenized tumor; however, cellular variants have been described. A subset of cellular fibromas of tendon sheath shares similar histological features with nodular fasciitis. As nodular fasciitis very frequently harbors rearrangement of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 6 (USP6), we hypothesized that cellular fibromas of tendon sheath with nodular fasciitis-like features may also contain USP6 rearrangements. Cases of fibroma of tendon sheath (n=19), including cellular (n=9) and classic (n=10) variants, were evaluated for USP6 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization studies. A subset of cases was tested for MYH9 rearrangements and MYH9-USP6 and CDH11-USP6 fusion products. Classic fibroma of tendon sheath occurred in 5 males and 5 females (median age 67 years, range 23-77 years) as soft tissue masses of the hand (n=4), finger (n=3), forearm (n=1) and foot (n=2). Cellular fibroma of tendon sheath occurred in 5 males and 4 females in a younger age group (median age 32 years, range 12-46 years) as small soft tissue masses of the finger (n=5), hand (n=3) and wrist (n=1). USP6 rearrangements were detected in 6/9 cellular fibromas of tendon sheath. Among cellular fibromas of tendon sheath with USP6 rearrangements, no MYH9 rearrangements were detected. By RT-PCR, neither the MYH9-USP6 or the CDH11-USP6 fusion products were detected in any case. Neither USP6 nor MYH9 rearrangement were detected in any classic fibroma of tendon sheath. We report for the first time the presence of USP6 rearrangements in a subset of cellular fibroma of tendon sheath. Based on the similar morphological and molecular genetic features, we suspect that a subset of cellular fibromas of tendon sheath are under-recognized examples of tenosynovial nodular fasciitis, driven by alternate USP6 fusion

  8. Solitary fibrous tumor surrounding the carotid sheath.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms that are mostly found arising from the pleura. Although SFTs recently have been reported in other regions, they are rare in the head and neck and have often been misdiagnosed due to their rarity. SFTs are benign in most cases. Clinically, SFTs usually manifest as well-circumscribed, slow-growing, smooth and painless masses. Symptoms are often minimal, although they may include sore throat, difficulty in swallowing, change of voice or trismus. CT-Scan and MRI are the most sensitive imaging procedures used. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the lesion. Because recurrences have been noted up to 30 years after surgery, long-term follow up is mandatory. In this article, we present a case of a Solitary Fibrous Tumor arising in the parapharyngeal space in a 20-year-old man, involving the carotid sheath, treated by surgical excision with no recurrence after 1 year. The clinical presentation, surgical management and pathological findings are described. PMID:19767703

  9. Use of ureteral access sheaths in ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Adam G; Lipkin, Michael E; Scales, Charles D; Preminger, Glenn M

    2016-03-01

    The ureteral access sheath (UAS) facilitates the use of flexible ureteroscopy, enabling improved minimally invasive management of complex upper urinary tract diseases. The UAS, which comes in a variety of diameters and lengths, is passed in a retrograde fashion, aided by a hydrophilic coating and other features designed to confer smooth passage into the ureter with sufficient resistance to kinking and buckling. Use of a UAS has the advantage of enabling repeated passage of the ureteroscope while minimizing damage to the ureter, thus improving the flow of irrigation fluid and visualization within the urethra with reductions in operative times, which improves both the effectiveness of the surgery and reduces the costs. Placement of the UAS carries an increased risk of ureteral wall ischaemia and injury to the mucosal or muscular layers of the ureter, and a theoretically increased risk of ureteral strictures. A ureteral stent is typically placed after ureteroscopy with a UAS. Endourologists have found several additional practical uses of a UAS, such as the percutaneous treatment of patients with ureteral stones, and solutions to other endourological challenges. PMID:26597613

  10. Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Briët, Jan Paul; Becker, Stéphanie JE; Oosterhoff, Thijs CH; Ring, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is often thought of as a volar finger mass. We hypothesized that GCTTS are equally common on the dorsal and volar aspects of the hand. In addition, we hypothesized that there are no factors associated with the location (volar versus dorsal) and largest measured dimension of a GCTTS. Methods: A total of 126 patients with a pathological diagnosis of a GCTTS of the hand or finger were reviewed. Basic demographic and GCTTS specific information was obtained. Bivariable analyses were used to assess predicting factors for location (volar or dorsal side) and largest measured diameter of a GCTTS. Results: Seventy-two tumors (57%) were on the volar side of the hand, 47 (37%) were dorsal, 6 (4.8%) were both dorsal and volar, and one was midaxial (0.79%). The most common site of a GCTTS was the index finger (30%). There were no factors significantly associated with the location (volar or dorsal, n=119) of the GCTTS. There were also no factors significantly associated with a larger diameter of a GCTTS. Conclusions: A GCTTS was more frequently seen on the volar aspect of the hand. No significant factors associated with the location or an increased size of a GCTTS were found in this study. PMID:25692164

  11. LH Wave Coupling And ICRF Sheaths At JET

    SciTech Connect

    Kirov, K. K.; Baranov, Yu.; Erents, K.; Jacquet, P.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Stamp, M.; Petrzilka, V.

    2007-09-28

    Lower Hybrid (LH) wave coupling deteriorates when the system is pulsed with Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antennas magnetically connected to the launcher. This has been attributed to the density modifications by the RF sheaths. Reflection Coefficients (RCs) dependencies are investigated and shown consistent with the sheath physics. Gas puffing near the launcher has been used to improve the coupling. Results from a statistical analysis of a particular set of data are summarised.

  12. On the Formation of Particle Sheaths in Columnar Vortices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, John T.

    1984-08-01

    Geophysical columnar vortices such as tornadoes, waterspouts and dust devils are frequently observed to have one or more cylindrical sheaths of dust concentric with the axis of symmetry. The mechanisms by which such sheaths form have previously been investigated by assuming a balance between inward drag force (due to inward radial motion of the fluid) and outward centrifugal form (due to rotation of the particles around the vortex). However, the strong radial inflow required to establish this balance is confined to the surface inflow layer. In the upper two thirds of the vortex core, where the sheaths are most frequently observed, the radial component of fluid motion is very weak and may be outward. In this study, an alternative approach is presented wherein the drag forces arising from radial motion of the fluid are assumed negligible. The particles are thus continuously centrifuged out of the core. It is shown for four representative profiles of the tangential velocity component of the fluid that a particle sheath will form. The time required for its formation, the location of the sheath, and its evolution in time are in agreement with the available field evidence. Also, a two-celled vortex flow field is shown to produce a two-sheath structure. However, the inner sheath is a transient feature, so it is argued that the observed patterns of multiple concentric sheaths are probably due to the combined effects of the lifting of puffs of particles aloft by the vertical motion field while at the same time the particles are centrifuged out of the core.

  13. Sheath ionization model of beam emissions from large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, S. T.; Cohen, H. A.; Bhavnani, K. H.; Tautz, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model of the charging of a spacecraft emitting electron and ion beams has been applied to the case of large spacecraft. In this model, ionization occurs in the sheath due to the return current. Charge neutralization of spherical space charge flow is examined by solving analytical equations numerically. Parametric studies of potential large spacecraft are performed. As in the case of small spacecraft, the ions created in the sheath by the returning current play a large role in determining spacecraft potential.

  14. Volar wrist ganglion excision through the flexor carpi radialis sheath.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Gregory A; DaSilva, Manuel F; Akelman, Edward

    2012-09-01

    Volar wrist ganglions are much less frequent than their dorsal counterparts but provide much more surgical trepidation due to their proximity to the radial artery. With the majority arising from the radiocarpal joint, we have found that entering the flexor carpi radialis sheath and accessing the ganglion through the floor of the sheath allows for a relatively safe excision of these benign hand tumors. PMID:22913995

  15. Type VI secretion system sheaths as nanoparticles for antigen display

    PubMed Central

    Del Tordello, Elena; Danilchanka, Olga; McCluskey, Andrew J.; Mekalanos, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial type 6 secretion system (T6SS) is a dynamic apparatus that translocates proteins between cells by a mechanism analogous to phage tail contraction. T6SS sheaths are cytoplasmic tubular structures composed of stable VipA-VipB (named for ClpV-interacting protein A and B) heterodimers. Here, the structure of the VipA/B sheath was exploited to generate immunogenic multivalent particles for vaccine delivery. Sheaths composed of VipB and VipA fused to an antigen of interest were purified from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli and used for immunization. Sheaths displaying heterologous antigens generated better immune responses against the antigen and different IgG subclasses compared with soluble antigen alone. Moreover, antigen-specific antibodies raised against sheaths presenting Neisseria meningitidis factor H binding protein (fHbp) antigen were functional in a serum bactericidal assay. Our results demonstrate that multivalent nanoparticles based on the T6SS sheath represent a versatile scaffold for vaccine applications. PMID:26929342

  16. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y.; Sydorenko, D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2014-06-15

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T{sub e}/e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux.

  17. Photoelectric sheath formation around small spherical objects in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    The formation of a photoelectron sheath around positively charged small (˜cm) spherical objects roaming in near earth space due to the solar radiation (with continuous spectrum) and the solar wind plasma has been investigated. The sheath structure has been derived, taking into account anisotropic photoelectron flux with the Poisson equation, spherical geometry of the object, and half Fermi Dirac distribution of photoelectron velocities. Two cases, viz., when the object is illuminated by (i) isotropic or (ii) unidirectional (parallel beam) radiation, have been analyzed. The analysis predicts a spherically symmetric sheath in case of isotropic illumination, while a symmetry in sheath about a θ = π / 4 is seen in case of parallel beam illumination; θ is the angle of incidence which is the angle made by the normal to a surface element with the direction of incidence of solar radiation. The radial and angular profiles of the electric potential and electron density in the photoelectron sheath have been evaluated and illustrated graphically; the dependence of the sheath structure on the solar wind plasma parameters, material properties of the spherical object, and its size have been discussed.

  18. Miniature sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.; Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was made of sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade temperature measurements. Tests were performed on the Chromel-Alumel sheathed thermocouples with both two-wire and single-wire configurations. Sheath diameters ranged from 0.25 to 0.76 mm, and temperatures ranged from 1080 to 1250 K. Both steady-state and thermal cycling tests were performed for times up to 450 hr. Special-order and commercial-grade thermocouples were tested. The tests showed that special-order single-wire sheathed thermocouples can be obtained that are reliable and accurate with diameters as small as 0.25 mm. However, all samples of 0.25-mm-diameter sheathed commercial-grade two-wire and single-wire thermocouples that were tested showed unacceptable drift rates for long-duration engine testing programs. The drift rates were about 1 percent in 10 hr. A thermocouple drift test is recommended in addition to the normal acceptance tests in order to select reliable miniature sheathed thermocouples for turbine blade applications.

  19. Photoelectric sheath formation around small spherical objects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The formation of a photoelectron sheath around positively charged small (∼cm) spherical objects roaming in near earth space due to the solar radiation (with continuous spectrum) and the solar wind plasma has been investigated. The sheath structure has been derived, taking into account anisotropic photoelectron flux with the Poisson equation, spherical geometry of the object, and half Fermi Dirac distribution of photoelectron velocities. Two cases, viz., when the object is illuminated by (i) isotropic or (ii) unidirectional (parallel beam) radiation, have been analyzed. The analysis predicts a spherically symmetric sheath in case of isotropic illumination, while a symmetry in sheath about a θ=π/4 is seen in case of parallel beam illumination; θ is the angle of incidence which is the angle made by the normal to a surface element with the direction of incidence of solar radiation. The radial and angular profiles of the electric potential and electron density in the photoelectron sheath have been evaluated and illustrated graphically; the dependence of the sheath structure on the solar wind plasma parameters, material properties of the spherical object, and its size have been discussed.

  20. Why ions enter the sheath entrance at supersonic speed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua

    2015-11-01

    In a boundary plasma of a fusion device, the sheath Knudsen number, which is defined as the ratio of the plasma mean-free-path and the plasma Debye length, is much greater than unity, so one anticipates a collisionless sheath, even though the overall boundary plasma in the scrape-off layer is collisional. This is supposed to be the regime for which the Bohm criteria for the ion entry flow at the sheath entrance, v >=cs with cs the sound speed, is usually satisfied at the equal sign. But numerical simulations using first-principles particle-in-cell codes tend to report a supersonic flow. Here we revisit the two-scale and transition layer analysis of the sheath-presheath transition, in tandem with the conventional Bohm criteria analysis, to understand why and how the supersonic sheath entry flow is established at the sheath entrance, which is a few Debye length away from the wall, and its impact on plasma particle and power load at the wall. Works upported by DOE OFES. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  1. The sheath effect on the floating harmonic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-15

    The floating harmonic method biases sinusoidal voltage to a probe sheath, and as its response, harmonic currents can be obtained. These currents can be used to determine the plasma parameters. However, different shapes of probes have different shapes of sheaths that can affect the diagnostic results. However, no research has been done on the sheath effect on the floating harmonic method. Therefore, we investigate the effect of the sheath during floating harmonic diagnostics by comparing cylindrical and planar probes. While the sinusoidal voltages were applied to a probe, because the sheath oscillated, the time variant ion current and their harmonic currents were added to the electron harmonic currents. In the floating harmonic method, the harmonic currents are composed of only the electron harmonic currents. Therefore, the ion harmonic currents affect the diagnostic results. In particular, the electron temperature obtained by the small probe tip was higher than that of the large probe tip. This effect was exacerbated when the ratio of the probe tip radius to the sheath length was smaller.

  2. An Analytical Model for the Radio-Frequency Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-09-01

    An analytical model for the planar radio frequency (RF) sheath in capacitive discharges is developed based on the applied RF voltage as the boundary condition. In a first step, the individual sheath voltages and the self-bias are calculated using a cubic-charge voltage relation. In the second step, a single integro-differential equation is derived to describe the ion flow velocity in the sheath under all conditions of collisionality. Central to the model is the screening function that describes the screening of the ion density by the mean electron density in the sheath. Numerical integration of the sheath equation is straight forward. However, for the collisionless as well as the collisional case explicit, simple, and precise analytical approximations can be found. Drift velocities, densities, fields, currents, and charge-voltage relations are calculated. Further, the Child-Langmuir laws for both cases of collisonality are derived. These solutions are in very good agreement with experimental data from the literature based on laser electric field measurements, the Brinkmann sheath model, and PIC simulations. The technique works well also for other waveforms, e.g. the electrical asymmetry effect or tailored pulse waveforms.

  3. A theoretical model of sheath fold morphology in simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, Jacqueline E.; Dabrowski, Marcin; Galland, Olivier; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-04-01

    Sheath folds are highly non-cylindrical structures often associated with shear zones. The geometry of sheath folds, especially cross-sections perpendicular to the stretching direction that display eye-patterns, have been used in the field to deduce kinematic information such as shear sense and bulk strain type. However, how sheath folds form and how they evolve with increasing strain is still a matter of debate. We investigate the formation of sheath folds around a weak inclusion acting as a slip surface in simple shear by means of an analytical model. We systematically vary the slip surface orientation and shape and evaluate the impact on the evolving eye-pattern. In addition we compare our results to existing classifications. Based on field observations it has been suggested that the shear sense of a shear zone can be determined by knowing the position of the center of an eye-pattern and the closing direction of the corresponding sheath fold. In our modeled sheath folds we can observe for a given strain that the center of the eye-structure is subject to change in height with respect to the upper edge of the outermost closed contour for different cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction. This results in a large variability in layer thickness, questioning the usefulness of sheath folds as shear sense indicators. The location of the center of the eye structure, however, is largely invariant to the initial configurations of the slip surface as well as to strain. It has been suggested that the ratio of the aspect ratio of the innermost and outermost closed contour in eye-patterns could be linked to the bulk strain type based on filed observations. We apply this classification to our modeled sheath folds and we observe that the values of the aspect ratios of the closed contours within the eye-pattern are dependent on the strain and the cross-section location. The ratio (R') of the aspect ratios of the outermost closed contour (Ryz) and the innermost closed

  4. Ion Velocimetry In Magnetized DC Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Particle dynamics near the magnetic cusps in cusped field plasma thrusters are still not well understood; characterizing the ion velocity distribution functions in these regions can help thruster designs maximize electron trapping and minimize erosion of the channel wall. To that end, a robust argon ion velocity sensor is developed using a three-level laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. The 3d4F7 / 2 --> 4p4D5/ 2 0 ArII transition at 668.61 nm is pumped with a 25 mW tunable external cavity diode laser, and fluorescence down to the 4s4P3 / 2 state at 442.72 nm is collected with phase-sensitive detection. The Doppler shift in the acquired signal peak, compared to a stationary reference, gives the ion velocity component parallel to the exciting laser. We demonstrate this LIF scheme by obtaining the argon ion velocity profile through a magnetized DC sheath. The LIF measurement is used to validate a new optogalvanic velocimetry technique in which two lasers (chopped at different frequencies) intersect one another at 90° in the measurement volume. Using a lock-in amplifier, changes observed in the DC discharge current at the sum and difference of the two chopping frequencies may be related back to the mean ion velocity at that point. The authors acknowledge support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). CY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  5. Collector and source sheaths of a finite ion temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwager, L.A.; Birdsall, C.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The region between a Maxwellian plasma source and an absorbing surface is described theoretically with a static, kinetic plasma--sheath model and modeled numerically with a dynamic, electrostatic particle simulation. In the kinetic theory, Poisson's equation and Vlasov equations govern the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution of the ions and electrons. The results in this paper for collector potential and plasma transport agree with the bounded model of Emmert {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Fluids {bold 23}, 803 (1980)). However, this approach differs from those using traditional Bohm sheath analysis by {plus minus}0.25 (in units of electron temperature) for potential drop through the collector sheath of a hydrogen plasma. In both the theory and simulation, the plasma source injects equal fluxes of ions and electrons with half-Maxwellian velocities and various mass and temperature ratios and is assumed to have a zero electric field. The potential change within a spatially distributed, full Maxwellian source region is represented with the source sheath potential drop that depends primarily on temperature ratio. This source sheath evolves over a few Debye lengths from the source to neutralize the injected plasma. The plasma flows to an electrically floating collector where the more familiar electron-repelling collector sheath appears. The collector potential {psi}{sub {ital C}} and source sheath potential drop {psi}{sub {ital P}} (in units of electron temperature) are evaluated as a function of mass and temperature ratio. The velocity moments of density, drift velocity, temperature, kinetic energy flux, and heat flux are also derived as a function of {psi}{sub {ital C}} and {psi}{sub {ital P}}. Comparisons with electrostatic particle simulations are shown for the ion/electron mass ratios of 40 and 100 and temperature ratios of 0.1, 1, and 10.

  6. On the usefulness of sheath folds as kinematic indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, J. E.; Galland, O.; Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    Sheath folds are cone-shaped structures that can be found in different rock types. They are mostly associated with shear zones. Even though they are three-dimensional structures they are most commonly recognized in nature in cross sections perpendicular to their stretching direction. These cross-sections exhibit so called eye-structures. The geometry of sheath folds has been used to deduce kinematic information such as strain, shear sense, and bulk strain type. However, how sheath folds form and how they evolve with increasing strain is still a matter of debate. We studied the development of sheath folds at the tip of a slip surface (weak inclusion) embedded in a layered matrix subjected to simple shear by means of analytical and experimental modeling. With this combined approach we tested the usefulness of sheath folds as indicators of strain, shear direction and bulk strain type. The analytical model is three-dimensional and based on an adapted external Eshelby solution. The slip surface is embedded in a homogeneous matrix, which is subjected to simple shear. Layers are introduced as passive markers for the visualization. With this method we tested the influence of the initial slip surface orientation (0°, 90°, or 135° with respect to the shear direction) and the number of layers on the evolving eye-structure. To study the effect of mechanical layering (viscosity contrast, layer thickness) on the geometry of the eye-structures we designed an experimental model using silicones as rock analogues. Although sheath folds are commonly considered as high strain markers, the analytical model shows that very little strain is needed to produce a sheath fold and the corresponding eye-pattern, and that the minimum strain is mainly dependent on the orientation of the slip surface and the number of layers. Our analytical as well as the experimental models revealed a sheath fold at both tips of the deformed slip surface. The two sheath folds show opposing closing direction

  7. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  8. Structure of the Type VI secretion system contractile sheath

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Brackmann, Maximilian; Scherer, Sebastian; Maier, Timm; Baker, David; DiMaio, Frank; Stahlberg, Henning; Egelman, Edward H.; Basler, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteria use rapid contraction of a long sheath of the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) to deliver effectors into a target cell. Here we present an atomic resolution structure of a native contracted Vibrio cholerae sheath determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The sheath subunits, composed of tightly interacting proteins VipA and VipB, assemble into a six-start helix. The helix is stabilized by a core domain assembled from four β-strands donated by one VipA and two VipB molecules. The fold of inner and middle layers is conserved between T6SS and phage sheaths. However, the structure of the outer layer is distinct and suggests a mechanism of interaction of the bacterial sheath with an accessory ATPase, ClpV, that facilitates multiple rounds of effector delivery. Our results provide a mechanistic insight into assembly of contractile nanomachines that bacteria and phages use to translocate macromolecules across membranes. PMID:25723169

  9. Mitigating impact of rectified RF sheath potential on the ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Xu, Xueqiao; Xia, Tianyang

    2014-10-01

    Here we report on the BOUT++ simulation results for the mitigating impact of rectified RF sheath potential on the peeling-ballooning modes. The limiter and the RF wave antenna are placed at the outer middle plane in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) in shift-circle geometry. The external shear flow is induced by the limiter and the RF wave. Besides this, the sheath boundary conditions are imposed on the perturbed potential and parallel current. From the three-field simulations, it is found that the energy loss is suppressed by the external shear flow in the nonlinear phase. The external shear flow due to the RF wave leads to a broad turbulence spectrum. The wider spectrum leads to a weaker turbulence transport and results in a smaller energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region are also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition. Based on this work, this effect of limiter will also be applied in six-field which includes more physics effects. The effect of sheath boundary conditions on the thermal conductivities and heat flux will be studied. This work was performed for USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD project 12-ERD-022 and the China Natural Science Foundation under Contract No. 10721505. LLNL-ABS-657008.

  10. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  11. Revisiting the plasma sheath—dust in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Deka, R.; Bora, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have considered the formation of warm plasma sheath in the vicinity of a wall in a plasma with considerable presence of dust particles. As an example, we have used the parameters relevant in case of plasma sheath formed around surfaces of various solid bodies in space, though the results obtained in this work can be applied to any other physical situation such as laboratory plasma. In the ion-acoustic time scale, we neglect the dust dynamics. The dust particles affect the sheath dynamics by affecting the Poisson equation which determines the plasma potential in the sheath region. It is important to note that our calculations are valid only when the amount of dust particles is not sufficient so as to affect the plasma dynamics in the dust-acoustic time scale, but enough to affect the plasma sheath. We have assumed the current to a dust particle to be balanced throughout the analysis. This makes the grain potential dependent on plasma potential, which is then incorporated into the Poisson equation. The resultant numerical model becomes an initial value problem, which is described by a 1-D integro-differential equation, which is then solved self-consistently by incorporating the change in plasma potential caused by inclusion of the dust potential in the Poisson equation.

  12. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y.; You, S. J. Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  13. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.; Oh, W. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  14. Wave rectification in plasma sheaths surrounding electric field antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, M. H.; Carlson, C. W.; Mcfadden, J. P.; Clemmons, J. H.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    Combined measurements of Langmuir or broadband whistler wave intensity and lower-frequency electric field waveforms, all at 10-microsecond time resolution, were made on several recent sounding rockets in the auroral ionosphere. It is found that Langmuir and whistler waves are partically rectified in the plasma sheaths surrounding the payload and the spheres used as antennas. This sheath rectification occurs whenever the high frequency (HF) potential across the sheath becomes of the same order as the electron temperature or higher, for wave frequencies near or above the ion plasma frequency. This rectification can introduce false low-frequency waves into measurements of electric field spectra when strong high-frequency waves are present. Second harmonic signals are also generated, although at much lower levels. The effect occurs in many different plasma conditions, primarily producing false waves at frequencies that are low enough for the antenna coupling to the plasma to be resistive.

  15. Photovoltaic sheathing element with a flexible connector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Langmaid, Joseph A; Keenihan, James R; Mills, Michael E; Lopez, Leonardo C

    2016-07-12

    The present invention is premised upon an assembly including at least a photovoltaic sheathing element capable of being affixed on a building structure, the sheathing element including at least: a photovoltaic cell assembly, a body portion attached to one or more portions of the photovoltaic cell assembly; at least a first and a second connector assembly disposed on opposing sides of the sheathing element and capable of directly or indirectly electrically connecting the photovoltaic cell assembly to at least two adjoining devices that are affixed to the building structure and wherein at least one of the connector assemblies includes a flexible portion; one or more connector pockets disposed in the body portion the pockets capable of receiving at least a portion of the connector assembly.

  16. Micro-Particles as Electrostatic Probes for Plasma Sheath Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Haass, Moritz; Ockenga, Taalke; Kersten, Holger; Blazec, Joseph; Basner, Ralf

    2008-09-07

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles of different sizes with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purpose. In the plasma micro-disperse particles are negatively charged and confined in the sheath. The particles are trapped by an equilibrium of gravity, electric field force and ion drag force. From the behavior, local electric fields can be determined, e.g. particles are used as electrostatic probes. In combination with additional measurements of the plasma parameters with Langmuir probes and thermal probes as well as by comparison with an analytical sheath model, the structure of the sheath can be described. In the present work we focus on the behavior of micro-particles of different sizes and several plasma parameters e.g. the gas pressure and the rf-power.

  17. A spine-sheath model for strong-line blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Marek; Rutkowski, Mieszko; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a quasi-analytical model for the production of radiation in strong-line blazars, assuming a spine-sheath jet structure. The model allows us to study how the spine and sheath spectral components depend on parameters describing the geometrical and physical structure of `the blazar zone'. We show that typical broad-band spectra of strong-line blazars can be reproduced by assuming the magnetization parameter to be of order unity and reconnection to be the dominant dissipation mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spine-sheath model can explain why γ-ray variations are often observed to have much larger amplitudes than the corresponding optical variations. The model is also less demanding of jet power than one-zone models, and can reproduce the basic features of extreme γ-ray events.

  18. Sheath formation under collisional conditions in presence of dust

    SciTech Connect

    Moulick, R. Goswami, K. S.

    2014-08-15

    Sheath formation is studied for collisional plasma in presence of dust. In common laboratory plasma, the dust acquires negative charges because of high thermal velocity of the electrons. The usual dust charging theory dealing with the issue is that of the Orbit Motion Limited theory. However, the theory does not find its application when the ion neutral collisions are significantly present. An alternate theory exists in literature for collisional dust charging. Collision is modeled by constant mean free path model. The sheath is considered jointly with the bulk of the plasma and a smooth transition of the plasma profiles from the bulk to the sheath is obtained. The various plasma profiles such as the electrostatic force on the grain, the ion drag force along with the dust density, and velocity are shown to vary spatially with increasing ion neutral collision.

  19. Anomalous Capacitive Sheath with Deep Radio Frequency Electric Field Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich

    2002-01-18

    A novel nonlinear effect of anomalously deep penetration of an external radio-frequency electric field into a plasma is described. A self-consistent kinetic treatment reveals a transition region between the sheath and the plasma. Because of the electron velocity modulation in the sheath, bunches in the energetic electron density are formed in the transition region adjusted to the sheath. The width of the region is of order V(subscript T)/omega, where V(subscript T) is the electron thermal velocity, and w is frequency of the electric field. The presence of the electric field in the transition region results in a cooling of the energetic electrons and an additional heating of the cold electrons in comparison with the case when the transition region is neglected.

  20. Sheath dynamics and energetic particle distributions on substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Michael A.

    2009-10-01

    The energy and angular distributions (EAD's) of energetic particles arriving at a substrate determine crucial plasma processing characteristics; thus knowledge and control of the EAD's are vital for nanoelectronics design and fabrication during scale-down to the ultimate 4--6 nm transistor gate lengths over the next 15 years. We review the history and state-of-the-art of measurements, simulations, and analyses of ion, fast neutral, and ballistic electron EAD's. Ion measurements have been made using electrostatic energy analyzers, cylindrical mirror analyzers, and retarding grid analyzers, often now coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometers to compare different ions in the same discharge. The state-of-the-art for capacitive rf sheaths has advanced greatly since the first observation of a bi-modal ion energy distribution (IED) over 50 years ago. More recently, measurement techniques and models have been developed to determine fast neutral distributions. Monte Carlo, and particle-in-cell simulations with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC) have been used to study IED's since the late 1980's. Recently, PIC-MCC simulations were used to obtain ballistic electron EAD's. Analytical models of the IED for collisionless rf sheaths have emphasized the role of τi/τrf, the ratio of ion transit time across the sheath to rf period, with separate models for the low and high frequency regimes. Various simplifications and bridging models now exist. For collisional rf sheaths, the important role of λi/s, the ratio of ion-neutral mean free path to sheath width, in modifying the collisionless bi-modal IED was demonstrated in the early 1990's. Surface charging effects on insulating substrates are important for low frequency rf discharges or for pulsed transient sheaths; the latter are found during plasma ion implantation processes. Analytical models of the IED for plasma ion implantation have been extended to insulating surfaces and compared with experimental results.

  1. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  2. Photovoltaic building sheathing element with anti-slide features

    SciTech Connect

    Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.

    2015-09-08

    The present invention is premised` upon an assembly that includes at least a photovoltaic building sheathing element capable of being affixed on a building structure, the photovoltaic building sheathing element. The element including a photovoltaic cell assembly, a body portion attached to one or more portions of the photovoltaic cell assembly; and at feast a first and a second connector assembly capable of directly or indirectly electrically connecting the photovoltaic cell assembly to one or more adjoining devices; wherein the body portion includes one or more geometric features adapted to engage a vertically adjoining device before installation.

  3. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Chis, Octavian; Albu, Silviu

    2014-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) refers to spindle cell sarcomas arising from or separating in the direction of cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. The MPNST of the parotid gland is an extremely rare tumor, usually having a poor prognosis, and only a few cases been described in the literature. In this article, we report the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to a new case of MPNST of the parotid. Diagnosis was made based on clinical, imaging (computed tomography scan), histologic, and immunohistochemistry findings. Despite comprehensive treatment--complete surgical resection and radiotherapy--the tumor displayed a highly aggressive course. PMID:25153067

  4. Formation of pre-sheath boundary layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    In electronegative plasmas Coulomb scattering between positive and negative ions can lead to the formation of a pre-sheath boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. The negative ion boundary layer forms when momentum transfer from positive to negative ions dominates the negative ion acceleration from the electric field. This condition is met in Inductively Coupled Plasma reactors that operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations of the GEC reactor for Chlorine and Oxygen chemistries using the INDUCT95 2D model are presented showing the pre-sheath boundary layer structure as a function of applied power and neutral pressure.

  5. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  6. MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE MATERIALS FOR GLASS MELTING SENSOR SHEATHS

    SciTech Connect

    J. PETROVIC; R. CASTRO; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    Sensors for measuring the properties of molten glass require protective sensor sheaths in order to shield them from the extremely corrosive molten glass environment. MoSi{sub 2} has been shown to possess excellent corrosion resistance in molten glass, making it a candidate material for advanced sensor sheath applications. MoSi{sub 2}-coated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes, MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laminate composite tubes, and MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} functionally graded composite tubes have been produced by plasma spray-forming techniques for such applications.

  7. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Mahesh, Nirujogi; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  8. A suitable boundary condition for bounded plasma simulation without sheath resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E.; Procassini, R.J.; Birdsall, C.K. ); Cohen, B.I. )

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a technique that allows for a sheath boundary layer without having to resolve the inherently small space and time scales of the sheath region. We refer to this technique as the logical sheath boundary condition. This boundary condition, when incorporated into a direct-implicit particle code, permits large space- and time-scale simulations of bounded systems, which would otherwise be impractical on current supercomputers. The lack of resolution of the collector sheath potential drop obtained from conventional implicit simulations at moderate values of [omega][sub pe][Delta]t and [Delta]z/[lambda][sup De] provides the motivation for the development of the logical sheath boundary condition. The algorithm for use of the logical sheath boundary condition in a particle simulation is presented. Results from simulations which use the logical sheath boundary condition are shown to compare reasonably well with those from an analytic theory and simulations in which the sheath is resolved.

  9. Bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in Kidney Transplant Patient: Case Study and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Feizzadeh Kerigh, Behzad; Maddah, Ghodratolah

    2013-01-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma usually occurs unilateral but rare cases of bilateral hematoma have been reported. Herein we report the first case of spontaneous bilateral Rectus Sheath Hematoma in the kidney transplanted patient. PMID:24350093

  10. Measurement of effective sheath width around the cutoff probe based on electromagnetic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.; Yoon, J.-S.; Oh, W. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We inferred the effective sheath width using the cutoff probe and incorporating a full-wave three-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) simulation. The EM simulation reproduced the experimentally obtained plasma-sheath resonance (PSR) on the microwave transmission (S21) spectrum well. The PSR frequency has a one-to-one correspondence with the width of the vacuum layer assumed to be the effective sheath in the EM simulation model. The sheath width was estimated by matching the S21 spectra of the experiment and the EM simulation for different widths of the sheath. We found that the inferred sheath widths quantitatively and qualitatively agree with the sheath width measured by incorporating an equivalent circuit model. These results demonstrate the excellent potential of the cutoff probe for inferring the effective sheath width from its experimental spectrum data.

  11. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombé, K.; Devaux, S.; D'Inca, R.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Jacquot, J.; Louche, F.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  12. Double polymer sheathed carbon nanotube supercapacitors show enhanced cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenqi; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Ouyang, An; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Yibin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices.Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05978j

  13. Dust-Plasma Sheath in an Oblique Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Foroutan, G.; Mehdipour, H.

    2008-09-07

    Using numerical simulations of the multi fluid equations the structure of the magnetized sheath near a plasma boundary is studied in the presence of charged dust particles. The dependence of the electron, ion, and dust densities as well as the electrostatic potential, dust charge, and ion normal velocity, on the magnetic field strength and the edge dust number density is investigated.

  14. High-frequency instability of the sheath-plasma resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Coherent high frequency oscillations near the electron plasma frequency (omega approx. less than omega sub p) are generated by electrodes with positive dc bias immersed in a uniform Maxwellian afterglow plasma. The instability occurs at the sheath-plasma resonance and is driven by a negative RF sheath resistance associated with the electron inertia in the diode-like electron-rich sheath. With increasing dc bias, i.e., electron transit time, the instability exhibits a hard threshold, downward frequency pulling, line broadening and copious harmonics. The fundamental instability is a bounded oscillation due to wave evanescence, but the harmonics are radiated as electromagnetic waves from the electrodes acting like antennas. Wavelength and polarization measurements confirm the emission process. Electromagnetic waves are excited by electrodes of various geometries (planes, cylinders, spheres) which excludes other radiation mechanisms such as orbitrons or beam-plasma instabilities. The line broadening mechanism was identified as a frequency modulation via the electron transit time by dynamic ions. Ion oscillations at the sheath edge give rise to burst-like RF emissions. These laboratory observations of a new instability are important for antennas in space plasmas, generation of coherent beams with diodes, and plasma diagnostics.

  15. On the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikov, I. A.; Skovorodin, D. I.

    2016-02-01

    The question is discussed about the existence of an upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion, according to which the Debye sheath at the interface between plasma and a negatively charged electrode is stable only if the ion flow velocity in plasma exceeds the ion sound velocity. It is stated that, with an exception of some artificial ionization models, the Bohm sheath criterion is satisfied as an equality at the lower bound and the ion flow velocity is equal to the speed of sound. In the one-dimensional theory, a supersonic flow appears in an unrealistic model of a localized ion source the size of which is less than the Debye length; however, supersonic flows seem to be possible in the two- and three-dimensional cases. In the available numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources with a plasma emitter, the presence of the upper bound in the Bohm sheath criterion is not supposed; however, the correspondence with experimental data is usually achieved if the ion flow velocity in plasma is close to the ion sound velocity.

  16. Effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Langendorf, S. Walker, M.

    2015-03-15

    In this experiment, plasma sheath potential profiles are measured over boron nitride walls in argon plasma and the effect of secondary electron emission is observed. Results are compared to a kinetic model. Plasmas are generated with a number density of 3 × 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} at a pressure of 10{sup −4} Torr-Ar, with a 1%–16% fraction of energetic primary electrons. The sheath potential profile at the surface of each sample is measured with emissive probes. The electron number densities and temperatures are measured in the bulk plasma with a planar Langmuir probe. The plasma is non-Maxwellian, with isotropic and directed energetic electron populations from 50 to 200 eV and hot and cold Maxwellian populations from 3.6 to 6.4 eV and 0.3 to 1.3 eV, respectively. Plasma Debye lengths range from 4 to 7 mm and the ion-neutral mean free path is 0.8 m. Sheath thicknesses range from 20 to 50 mm, with the smaller thickness occurring near the critical secondary electron emission yield of the wall material. Measured floating potentials are within 16% of model predictions. Measured sheath potential profiles agree with model predictions within 5 V (∼1 T{sub e}), and in four out of six cases deviate less than the measurement uncertainty of 1 V.

  17. Internal pressure effects in the AIRCO-LCT conductor sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Luton, J.N.; Clinard, J.A.; Lue, J.W.; Gray, W.H.; Summers, L.T.; Kershaw, R.

    1985-01-01

    The large Nb/sub 3/Sn superconducting test coil produced by Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the international Large Coil Task (LCT) utilizes a conductor composed of cabled multifilamentary strands immersed in flowing supercritical helium contained by a square structural sheath made of the high-strength stainless alloy JBX-75. Peak pressures of a few hundred atmospheres are predicted to occur during quench, and measurement of these pressures seems feasible only through penetrations of the sheath wall. Fully processed short lengths of conductor were taken from production ends, fitted with pressure taps and strain gauges, and pressurized with helium gas. Failure, at 1000 atm at liquid nitrogen temperature, was by a catastrophic splitting of the sheath at a corner. Strain measurements and burst pressure agreed with elastic-plastic finite element stress calculations made for the sheath alone. Neither the production seam weld nor the pressure tap penetrations or their fillet welds contributed to the failure, although the finite element calculations show that these areas were also highly stressed, and examination of the failed sample showed that the finite welds were of poor quality. Failure was by tensile overload, with no evidence of fatigue.

  18. Separation system with a sheath-flow supported electrochemical detector

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Emrich, Charles A.; Singhal, Pankaj; Ertl, Peter

    2008-10-21

    An electrochemical detector including side channels associated with a separation channel of a sample component separation apparatus is provided. The side channels of the detector, in one configuration, provide a sheath-flow for an analyte exiting the separation channel which directs the analyte to the electrically developed electrochemical detector.

  19. Modeling a planar sheath in dust-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T. H.

    2014-01-15

    One-dimensional fluid model is utilized to describe the sheath at a dust-containing plasma-wall boundary. The model equations are solved on the scale of the electron Debye length. The spatial distributions of electric potential and of the velocities and densities of charged species are calculated in a wide range of control parameters. The dust charge number, electric force, and ion drag force are also investigated. The impacts of Havnes parameter, the electron to ion temperature ratio, the ion collisionality, and the ionization on the spatial distributions of the plasma species and the incident fluxes of the ions to the wall (or to the probe) are investigated. With increase of Havnes parameter, the sheath thickness and the ion flux to the wall are reduced, whereas the ion drift velocity is increased. Enhanced ion thermal motion causes the ion flux to the wall to increase. An increase in ion collisionality with neutrals causes both the sheath thickness and the ion flux to the wall to decrease. With increase of the ionization rate, the sheath thickness is found to decrease and the ion flux collected by a probe increases. The localization of dust particles above the electrode is intensified by the increases in Havnes parameter, the electron to ion temperature ratio, collisionality, and ionization rate.

  20. The Confinement and Sheath Within a Glass Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mudi; Dropmann, Michael; Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    The confinement structure provided by a glass box placed on the lower powered electrode of a GEC rf Reference Cell is proving to be ideal for the formation of vertically aligned structures which are often difficult to obtain under other types of confinement. A glass box also provides a mechanism for controlling the number of dust particles comprising a particular dust structure as well as their size and symmetry. However, given the small volume of the glass box and the fact that each of the glass panes comprising the box develop a new sheath within the plasma environment, the structure of the overall sheath inside is quite different from that produced by the lower electrode alone. Since both the confinement and sheath structure are vital for producing ordered dust particle structures, a better understanding of the underlying physics is sorely needed. In this experiment, the trajectories of dust particles acting as probes while falling through the glass box under various plasma environments are tracked and analyzed. It will be shown that the resulting data provides a map of both the confining force and the structure of the sheath inside the glass box. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. A novel nonpharmacologic technique to remove entrapped radial sheath.

    PubMed

    Pancholy, Samir B; Karuparthi, Poorna Rajasekhar; Gulati, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Radial artery access for performance of coronary and peripheral diagnostic as well as interventional procedures is on the rise. With increasing adoption comes the expected increase in procedural complications. We describe a novel, simple, and effective nonpharmacologic solution for sheath entrapment related to pharmaco-resistant radial artery spasm. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25045106

  2. Sheath flow SERS for chemical profiling in urine.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Colleen M; Jacobs, Kevin T; Negri, Pierre; Schultz, Zachary D

    2016-06-23

    The molecular specificity and sensitivity of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) makes it an attractive method for biomedical diagnostics. Here we present results demonstrating the utility and complications for SERS characterization in urine. The chemical fingerprint characteristics of Raman spectra suggest its use as a label free diagnostic; however, the complex composition of biological fluids presents a tremendous challenge. In particular, the limited number of surface sites and competing absorption tend to mask the presence of analytes in solution, particularly when the solution contains multiple analytes. To address these problems and characterize biological fluids we have demonstrated a sheath-flow interface for SERS detection. This sheath-flow SERS interface uses hydrodynamic focusing to confine analyte molecules eluting out of a column onto a planar SERS substrate where the molecules are detected by their intrinsic SERS signal. In this report we compare the direct detection of benzoylecgonine in urine using DSERS with chemical profiling by capillary zone electrophoresis and sheath-flow SERS detection. The SERS spectrum from the observed migration peaks can identify benzoylecgonine and other distinct spectra are also observed, suggesting improved chemical diagnostics in urine. With over 2000 reported compounds in urine, identification of each of the detected species is an enormous task. Nonetheless, these samples provide a benchmark to establish the potential clinical utility of sheath-flow SERS detection. PMID:27034996

  3. [Fitting a male sheath urinal while respecting the patient's intimacy].

    PubMed

    Derville, Sandrine; Cellard Du Sordet, Paul; Breuzard, Magali; Béguin, Anne-Marie; Malaquin-Pavan, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    The fitting of a male sheath urinal directly concerns the patient's area of sexual intimacy. The modesty of the patient and caregiver as they interact is tested, leading to discomfort or clumsiness which can provoke a feeling of intrusion. Preparing this care procedure favours the adherence of both parties. PMID:26043631

  4. Effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langendorf, S.; Walker, M.

    2015-03-01

    In this experiment, plasma sheath potential profiles are measured over boron nitride walls in argon plasma and the effect of secondary electron emission is observed. Results are compared to a kinetic model. Plasmas are generated with a number density of 3 × 1012 m-3 at a pressure of 10-4 Torr-Ar, with a 1%-16% fraction of energetic primary electrons. The sheath potential profile at the surface of each sample is measured with emissive probes. The electron number densities and temperatures are measured in the bulk plasma with a planar Langmuir probe. The plasma is non-Maxwellian, with isotropic and directed energetic electron populations from 50 to 200 eV and hot and cold Maxwellian populations from 3.6 to 6.4 eV and 0.3 to 1.3 eV, respectively. Plasma Debye lengths range from 4 to 7 mm and the ion-neutral mean free path is 0.8 m. Sheath thicknesses range from 20 to 50 mm, with the smaller thickness occurring near the critical secondary electron emission yield of the wall material. Measured floating potentials are within 16% of model predictions. Measured sheath potential profiles agree with model predictions within 5 V (˜1 Te), and in four out of six cases deviate less than the measurement uncertainty of 1 V.

  5. Rice Sheath Rot: An Emerging Ubiquitous Destructive Disease Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bigirimana, Vincent de P.; Hua, Gia K. H.; Nyamangyoku, Obedi I.; Höfte, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Around one century ago, a rice disease characterized mainly by rotting of sheaths was reported in Taiwan. The causal agent was identified as Acrocylindrium oryzae, later known as Sarocladium oryzae. Since then it has become clear that various other organisms can cause similar disease symptoms, including Fusarium sp. and fluorescent pseudomonads. These organisms have in common that they produce a range of phytotoxins that induce necrosis in plants. The same agents also cause grain discoloration, chaffiness, and sterility and are all seed-transmitted. Rice sheath rot disease symptoms are found in all rice-growing areas of the world. The disease is now getting momentum and is considered as an important emerging rice production threat. The disease can lead to variable yield losses, which can be as high as 85%. This review aims at improving our understanding of the disease etiology of rice sheath rot and mainly deals with the three most reported rice sheath rot pathogens: S. oryzae, the Fusarium fujikuroi complex, and Pseudomonas fuscovaginae. Causal agents, pathogenicity determinants, interactions among the various pathogens, epidemiology, geographical distribution, and control options will be discussed. PMID:26697031

  6. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the installation requirements of Section 25 of IEEE 45-2002 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1). ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7...

  7. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the installation requirements of Section 25 of IEEE 45-2002 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1). ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7...

  8. 46 CFR 111.05-7 - Armored and metallic sheathed cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Armored and metallic sheathed cable. When installed, the metallic armor or sheath must meet the installation requirements of Section 25 of IEEE 45-2002 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1). ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Armored and metallic sheathed cable. 111.05-7...

  9. Do counts of salivary sheath flanges predict food consumption in herbivorous stink bugs [Hemiptera: Pentatomidae]?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For Pentatomid stink bug agricultural pests, the number of salivary sheaths and sheath flanges—the portion of the sheath visible on the exterior surface of a food item—are good predictors of the loss of crop yield or quality from stink bug feeding. As the often assumed relationship between salivary ...

  10. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that...

  11. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that...

  12. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that...

  13. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that...

  14. 30 CFR 15.32 - Tolerances for weight of explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., wrapper, and specific gravity. 15.32 Section 15.32 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... explosive, sheath, wrapper, and specific gravity. (a) The weight of the explosive, the sheath, and the outer.... (c) The specific gravity of the explosive and sheath shall be within ±7.5 percent of that...

  15. Introduction: Evidence-based in vitro fertilization treatment of fresh versus frozen embryo transfer: peeling away the layers of the onion.

    PubMed

    Legro, Richard S

    2016-08-01

    This introduction to this Views and Reviews examines the current evidence for elective fresh versus frozen embryo transfer, delineates complexities that arise as we sift through the available evidence, and speculates on the ideal design of studies to arrive at an evidence-based consensus. Current gaps in the literature, including a lack of reporting on important outcomes such as live birth and maternal and perinatal adverse events, are noted. The difficulty in designing trials is reviewed, including the choice of the time point in the cycle to randomize patients, how to account for all the patients and embyros that are involved in the trial, whether to incorporate prenatal genetic screening, and the best type of study design to address the risk/benefit ratio of these practices. PMID:27421612

  16. Sheath folds as discriminators of bulk strain type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.

    2006-09-01

    Nested elliptical closures defining "eye-folds" represent classic ( y- z) cross sections through highly curvilinear sheath folds generated during intense ductile deformation in metamorphic rocks. Systematic analysis of 1425 such eye-folds based on our own field observations and examples from the published literature reveals distinct and consistent differences in ellipticites measured from the outer- ( R yz) to the inner-most ( Ry' z' ) elliptical "rings" of individual sheaths. The variation in overall aspect ratios from outer to inner rings is defined as R' (where R' = R yz/ Ry' z' ) and may display a relative increase or decrease in ellipticity to define ' cats-eye' ( R' < 1) or ' bulls-eye' ( R' > 1) fold patterns respectively. Layer thicknesses may also be measured along the y axis (parallel to the axial surface) ( t y) and at 90° to this along the z axis ( t z) to define the ratio of T yz. Sheath folds generated during broadly simple shear deformation ( k ≅ 1) display (mean) R yz 4.61, T yz 3.31 and cats-eye-folds ( R' 0.69). Sheath folds generated during general shear also display cats-eye-folds with identical mean R' 0.69 values, but greater thickness variations and elliptical ratios ( T yz 4.35, R yz 5.76). Thus, within both simple- and general shear-dominated deformations, the overall variation in layer thickness ( T yz) and ellipticity of eye-folds ( R yz) increases with increasing deformation and a greater component of pure shear, whilst the R' value remains constant and reflects original fold patterns. Sheath folds formed during constrictional ( k > 1) deformation display markedly lower aspect ratios ( R yz 2.42) and thickness variations ( T yz 2.94), together with distinctive bulls-eye-folds ( R' 1.23). These empirical relationships suggest fundamental and universal constraints on curvilinear fold generation across this broad spectrum of deformation types, and allow sheath folds to act as both effective (>95% consistent) and robust discriminators of

  17. The magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma with grains size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Jing Gan, Chunyun; Lin, Binbin; Yang, Jinhong

    2015-05-15

    The structure of a plasma sheath in the presence of dust grains size distribution (DGSD) is investigated in the multi-fluid framework. It is shown that effect of the dust grains with different sizes on the sheath structure is a collective behavior. The spatial distributions of electric potential, the electron and ion densities and velocities, and the dust grains surface potential are strongly affected by DGSD. The dynamics of dust grains with different sizes in the sheath depend on not only DGSD but also their radius. By comparison of the sheath structure, it is found that under the same expected value of DGSD condition, the sheath length is longer in the case of lognormal distribution than that in the case of uniform distribution. In two cases of normal and lognormal distributions, the sheath length is almost equal for the small variance of DGSD, and then the difference of sheath length increases gradually with increase in the variance.

  18. Plasma sheath effects and voltage distributions of large high-power satellite solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    Knowledge of the floating voltage configuration of a large array in orbit is needed in order to estimate various plasma-interaction effects. The equilibrium configuration of array voltages relative to space depends on the sheath structure. The latter dependence for an exposed array is examined in the light of two finite-sheath effects. One effect is that electron currents may be seriously underestimated. The other is that a potential barrier for electrons can occur, restricting electron currents. A conducting surface is assumed on the basis of a conductivity argument. Finite-sheath effects are investigated. The results of assuming thin-sheath and thick-sheath limits on the floating configuration of a linearly connected array are studied. Sheath thickness and parasitic power leakage are estimated. Numerically computed fields using a 3-D code are displayed in the thick-sheath limit.

  19. The positive ion temperature effect in magnetized electronegative plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A. K.; Kar, S.; Goswami, K. S.

    2012-10-15

    The properties of a magnetized multi-component (two species of positive ions, negative ions and electrons) plasma sheath with finite positive ion temperature are studied. By using three fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the ion (both lighter and heavier positive ions, and negative ions) densities, the ion (only for positive ions) velocities, and electric potential inside the sheath are investigated. In addition, the absence and presence of magnetic field and the orientation of magnetic field are considered. It is noticed that, with increase of positive ion temperature, the lighter positive ion density peaks increase only at the sheath edge and shift towards the sheath edge for both absence and presence of magnetic field. For heavier positive ions, in the absence of magnetic field, the density peaks increase at the sheath edge. But in the presence of magnetic field, the density fluctuations increase at the sheath edge. For both the cases, the density peaks shift towards the sheath edge.

  20. Role of magnetic field tangency points in ICRF sheath interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Kohno, H.

    2014-02-01

    ICRF waves can sometimes interact with plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak fusion experiments causing degradation of core heating efficiency, impurity injection and even component damage. While presently available low dimensionality rf sheath models are useful in understanding many features of these interactions, more quantitative modeling will require attention to realistic geometrical details of the boundary plasma and surfaces. In this paper, we explore the situation in which there exists a tangency point of the background magnetic field with a surface. We find that the rf interactions are strongly influenced by the generation and propagation of sheath-plasma waves (SPW) along the surface. It is found that these waves preferentially propagate towards, and accumulate at, a convex tangency point. An analytical theory of SPW propagation is developed to understand these features.

  1. Collisionless "thermalization" in the sheath of an argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We performed kinetic Vlasov simulations of the plasma-wall transition for a low-pressure argon discharge without external magnetic fields, using the same plasma parameters as in the experiments of Claire et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 062103 (2006)]. Experimentally, it was found that the ion velocity distribution function is highly asymmetric in the presheath, but, surprisingly, becomes again close to Maxwellian inside the sheath. Here, we show that this "thermalization" can be explained by purely collisionless effects that are akin to the velocity bunching phenomenon observed in charged particles beams. Such collisionless thermalization is also observed in the presheath region close to the sheath entrance, although it is much weaker there and in practice probably swamped by collisional processes (standard or enhanced by instabilities).

  2. Spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture of a postpartum rectus sheath haematoma.

    PubMed

    Elmoghrabi, Adel; Mohamed, Mohamed; McCann, Michael; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) with acute severe abdominal pain at 4 days postpartum. CT of the abdomen revealed a type II rectus sheath haematoma for which she was initially treated conservatively and discharged. A few hours later, she returned to the ED with a picture suggestive of peritonitis. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed and revealed haemoperitoneum and a ruptured area on the posterior rectus sheath. Approximately 2 L of blood was aspirated. Haemostatic control was achieved and closed suction drains secured in position. The patient was discharged in stable condition on postadmission day 6. She continued to follow-up on an outpatient basis and was doing well 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26961567

  3. Mapping and validation of QTLs for rice sheath blight resistance.

    PubMed

    Taguchi-Shiobara, Fumio; Ozaki, Hidenobu; Sato, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hiroaki; Kojima, Yoichiro; Ebitani, Takeshi; Yano, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most serious diseases of rice. Among 33 rice accessions, mainly from National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS) Core Collection, we found three landraces from the Himalayas-Jarjan, Nepal 555 and Nepal 8-with resistance to sheath blight in 3 years' field testing. Backcrossed inbred lines (BILs) derived from a cross between Jarjan and the leading Japanese cultivar Koshihikari were used in QTL analyses. Since later-heading lines show fewer lesions, we used only earlier-heading BILs to avoid association with heading date. We detected eight QTLs; the Jarjan allele of three of these increased resistance. Only one QTL, on chromosome 9 (between markers Nag08KK18184 and Nag08KK18871), was detected in all 3 years. Chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) carrying it showed resistance in field tests. Thirty F2 lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and one CSSL supported the QTL. PMID:24273425

  4. Role of magnetic field tangency points in ICRF sheath interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Kohno, H.

    2014-02-12

    ICRF waves can sometimes interact with plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak fusion experiments causing degradation of core heating efficiency, impurity injection and even component damage. While presently available low dimensionality rf sheath models are useful in understanding many features of these interactions, more quantitative modeling will require attention to realistic geometrical details of the boundary plasma and surfaces. In this paper, we explore the situation in which there exists a tangency point of the background magnetic field with a surface. We find that the rf interactions are strongly influenced by the generation and propagation of sheath-plasma waves (SPW) along the surface. It is found that these waves preferentially propagate towards, and accumulate at, a convex tangency point. An analytical theory of SPW propagation is developed to understand these features.

  5. [Unusual location of a parathyroid adenoma: the carotid sheath].

    PubMed

    Smayra, T; Abi Khalil, S; Abboud, B; Halabi, G; Slaba, S

    2006-01-01

    We report the imaging features of an occult parathyroid adenoma with unusual location in the carotid sheath. Our patient presented with primary hyperparathyroidism. Following negative neck ultrasound and scintigraphy, exploratory neck dissection with partial thyroidectomy was performed twice over a 2 day period without biological response. Cervical and mediastinal CT and MRI were performed with no result. Digital angiography showed a tumoral blush supplied by the left inferior thyroid artery and located in close contact with the carotid artery. Venous sampling of the neck confirmed the left location of the adenoma and a third surgical intervention found the adenoma embedded in the left carotid sheath. This is an unusual case of parathyroid adenoma that necessitated the use of several imaging techniques. PMID:16415782

  6. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Lepage, R.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However,uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and theprocedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  7. Moisture Durability with Vapor-Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Lepage, R.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-09-01

    Exterior sheathing insulation is an effective strategy in increasing the overall R-value of wall assemblies; other benefits include decreasing the effects of thermal bridging and increasing the moisture durability of the built assembly. Vapor-permeable exterior insulation, such as mineral board or expanded polystyrene foam, are one such product that may be used to achieve these benefits. However, uncertainty exists on the effects of inward driven moisture and the interaction of increased sheathing temperatures on the moisture durability of the edifice. To address these concerns, Building Science Corporation (BSC) conducted a series of hygrothermal models for cities representing a range of different climate zones. This report describes the research project, key research questions, and the procedures utilized to analyse the problems.

  8. Surgery for ganglia of the flexor tendon sheath

    PubMed Central

    Finsen, Vilhjalmur; Håberg, Øyvind; Borchgrevink, Grethe Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    There are very few reports in the literature on the results of surgery for ganglia of the flexor tendon sheaths of the digits. We reviewed 24 patients operated for flexor tendon sheath ganglia 8 (3–11) years previously. Two operations were for recurrences and one of these recurred again. There was one permanent digital nerve injury and one patient complained of cold sensibility. VAS (0=best; 100=worst) for mean general complaints from the hand was remembered as 51 before surgery and was 5 at review. Mean pain at review was reported as VAS 4 and general satisfaction with the operation as VAS 3. All stated that they would have consented to surgery if they had known the outcome in advance. We conclude that the results of surgery are good, although complications do occur. PMID:23705064

  9. INTERIOR OF HOG BARN SHOWING MILKING STANCHIONS AND DIAGONAL SHEATHING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF HOG BARN SHOWING MILKING STANCHIONS AND DIAGONAL SHEATHING, LOOKING EAST. (In the 1940s the hog barn was converted to a calf barn to service the growing dairy. After a fire on the property took the Engle’s main barn in 1954, the building was converted into a milking parlor.) - Engle Farm, Barn, 89 South Ebey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  10. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Crombé, K.; D’Inca, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Louche, F.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  11. Vergence and facing patterns in large-scale sheath folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.

    1999-10-01

    The careful geometric analysis of minor structural detail elucidates the relationships and evolution of associated large-scale curvilinear hinge geometries, developed during WNW-directed Caledonian thrusting exposed in Neoproterozoic Moine psammites of the Moine Nappe. Reversals in the polarity of structural facing associated with minor folding, mark the position of major sheath folds which parallel transport. Upwardly convex sheaths (closing in the direction of thrust transport) cored by older gneissose basement inliers are termed culminations, whilst those opening in the transport direction (and cored by Moine psammites) are termed depressions. Sheath folds are bisected by transport parallel and foliation normal (culmination/depression) surfaces which separate not only the reversals in facing, but also delineate zones of minor fold hinge obliquity into clockwise and anticlockwise domains relative to the transport direction. The sense of obliquity of minor Z and S folds is thus dependent on position with respect to the surfaces of culmination and depression and not the fold axial surfaces. Surfaces of culmination and depression may be superimposed on original overturned antiformal and synformal folds to produce a variety of dome (culmination on antiform), saddle (depression on antiform), inverted saddle (culmination on synform) and basin (depression on synform) configurations. The curvilinear hinges of minor folds may also be asymmetrical about the transport direction and within the plane of the regional foliation to define patterns of fold hinge-line vergence. Classical concepts of fold limb vergence may thus relate to larger antiformal and synformal hinges, whilst the fold hinge-line vergence defines major curvilinear hinges associated with culminations and depressions. Major sheath folds may therefore be interpreted in terms of both minor fold hinge-line and limb vergence, coupled with fold axis obliquity and reversals in the polarity of structural facing. The

  12. Silver sheathing of high-Tc superconductor wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Risch, G. A.; Poeppel, R. B.; Goretta, K. C.; Danyluk, S.; Herro, H. M.

    1990-10-01

    The properties of Ag sheaths on high-temperature super-conductors are examined. Ag is chemically compatible with YBa2Cu3O(x) and Bi-based superconductors can be safely coprocessed with them. Residual stresses created by differences in thermal expansion coefficients are favorable and can be controlled by proper annealing. Although Ag forms low-resistance contact with high temperature superconductors, it is not certain that effective cryogenic stabilization by Ag can occur at 77 K and above.

  13. Collector and source sheaths of a finite ion temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwager, L.A.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1988-04-13

    The region between a Maxwellian plasma source and an absorbing surface is modeled with an electrostatic particle simulation and with a kinetic plasma-sheath model. In the kinetic model, Poisson's equation and Vlasov equations govern the velocity distribution of the ions and electrons. Our numerical and theoretical results for collector potential and plasma transport agree with the bounded model of Emmert et al., but differ somewhat from those using traditional Bohm sheath analysis. The plasma source injects equal fluxes of half-Maxwellian ions and electrons with specified mass and temperature ratios and is assumed to have a zero electric field. Representing the potential change within a distributed full-Maxwellian source region, the source potential drop depends primarily on temperature ratio and evolves a few Debye lengths from the source to neutralize the injected plasma. The plasma flows to an electrically floating collector where the more familiar electron-repelling collector sheath appears. Profiles of potential, density, drift velocity, temperature, kinetic energy flux, and heat flux are shown from simulation; all compare very well with theory. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Vanishing of the negative anode sheath in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, E.; Rus, J.

    2005-08-15

    The transition on a Hall thruster discharge from negative to zero anode sheaths is studied with a macroscopic, stationary model. Since electron drift velocities become of the order of the thermal velocity, inertial effects on electrons must be included in the model. For thrusters with the Hall parameter still large at the anode, these effects appear only in a thin region and bound the electron azimuthal velocity at the anode to values of the order of the thermal velocity. The no-sheath regime is reached when the discharge voltage is decreased and corresponds to a small and nonmonotonic portion of the voltage-current curve. Possible connections of this behavior with experimental results are suggested. Modifications on the discharge characteristics at the regime transition are analyzed. Energy losses at the lateral walls decrease with the discharge voltage, due to the changes on the temperature profile, whereas energy losses at the anode increase only moderately. The thrust efficiency presents a maximum within the negative-sheath regime.

  15. Nonextensivity effect on radio-wave transmission in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, new theoretical findings on the application of magnetic field in effective transmission of electromagnetic (EM) waves through a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle are reported. The results are obtained by assuming the plasma sheath to consist of nonextensive electrons and thermal ions. The expressions for the electric field and effective collision frequency are derived analytically in the framework of nonextensive statistics. Examination of the reflection, transmission, and absorption coefficients regarding the strength of the ambient magnetic field shows the significance of q-nonextensive parameter effect on these entities. For small values of the magnetic field, the transmission coefficient increases to unity only in the range of - 1 < q < 1 . It is also found that the EM wave transmission through the nonextensive plasma sheath can take place using lower magnetic field strengths in the presence of superthermal electrons compared with that of Maxwellian ones. It is observed that superthermal electrons, with nonextensive parameter, q < 1, play a dominant role in overcoming the radio blackout for hypersonic flights.

  16. Unified Model of the rf Plasma Sheath, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle

    1996-10-01

    By developing an approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation, one can obtain solutions for the current-voltage characteristics of an rf plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current. (M.E.Riley, 1995 GEC, abstract QA5, published in Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 40, 1587 (1995).) The theory has been shown to adequately reproduce current-voltage characteristics of two extreme cases (M.A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988). A. Metze, D.W. Ernie, and H.J.Oskam, J.Appl.Phys., 60, 3081 (1986).) of ion response. In this work I show the effect of different conventions for connecting the sheath model to the bulk plasma. Modifications of the Mach number and a finite electric field at the Bohm point are natural choices. The differences are examined for a sheath in a high density Ar plasma and are found to be insignificant. A theoretical argument favors the electric field modification. *Work performed at Sandia National Labs and supported by US DoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Self-consistently simulation of RF sheath boundary condition in BOUT + + framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Xu, Xueqiao; Xia, Tianyang

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the RF sheath boundary condition on the edge-localized modes and the turbulent transport is simulated in this work. The work includes two parts. The first part is to calculate the equilibrium radial electric field with RF sheath boundary condition. It is known the thermal sheath or the rectified RF sheath will modify the potential in the SOL region. The modified potential induces addition shear flow in SOL. In this part, the equilibrium radial electric field across the separatrix is calculated by solving the 2D current continuity equation with sheath boundary condition, drifts and viscosity. The second part is applying the sheath boundary condition on the perturbed variables of the six-field two fluid model in BOUT + + framework. The six-field two-fluid model simulates the ELMs and turbulent transport. The sheath boundary condition is applied in this model and it aims to simulate effect of sheath boundary condition on the turbulent transport. It is found the sheath boundary plays as a sink in the plasma and suppresses the local perturbation. Based on this two work, the effect of RF sheath boundary condition on the ELMs and turbulent transport could be self-consistently simulated. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Radio-frequency sheath voltages and slow wave electric field spatial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, Laurent Lu, Ling-Feng; Křivská, Alena; Jacquot, Jonathan

    2015-12-10

    We investigate theoretically how sheath radio-frequency (RF) oscillations relate to the spatial structure of the RF parallel electric field emitted by Ion Cyclotron (IC) wave launchers, using a simple model of Slow Wave (SW) evanescence coupled with Direct Current (DC) plasma biasing via sheath boundary conditions in a plasma-filled 2-dimensional (parallel, radial) rectangle. Within a “wide sheaths” asymptotic regime, valid for large-amplitude near RF fields, our model becomes partly linear: the sheath oscillating voltage at open field line boundaries is a linear combination of elementary contributions by every source point of the radiated RF field map. These individual contributions are all the more intense as the SW emission point is toroidally nearer to the sheath walls. A limit formula is given for a source infinitely close to the sheaths. The decay of sheath RF voltages with the sheath/source parallel distance is quantified as a function of two characteristic SW evanescence lengths. Decay lengths are smaller than antenna parallel extensions. The sheath RF voltages at an IC antenna side limiter are therefore mainly sensitive to SW emission near this limiter, as recent observations suggest. Toroidal proximity effects could also explain why sheath oscillations persist with antisymmetric strap toroidal phasing, despite the parallel anti-symmetry of the radiated field map. They could also justify current attempts at reducing the RF fields induced near antenna boxes to attenuate sheath oscillations in their vicinity.

  19. Model and particle-in-cell simulation of ion energy distribution in collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhuwen; Kong, Bo; Luo, Yuee; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Yuansheng

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we propose a self-consistent theoretical model, which is described by the ion energy distributions (IEDs) in collisionless sheaths, and the analytical results for different combined dc/radio frequency (rf) capacitive coupled plasma discharge cases, including sheath voltage errors analysis, are compared with the results of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional plane-parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The IEDs in collisionless sheaths are performed on combination of dc/rf voltage sources electrodes discharge using argon as the process gas. The incident ions on the grounded electrode are separated, according to their different radio frequencies, and dc voltages on a separated electrode, the IEDs, and widths of energy in sheath and the plasma sheath thickness are discussed. The IEDs, the IED widths, and sheath voltages by the theoretical model are investigated and show good agreement with PIC simulations.

  20. Characteristics of wall sheath and secondary electron emission under different electron temperatures in a Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ping; Qin, Hai-Juan; Zhou, Xin-Wei; Cao, An-Ning; Chen, Long; Gao, Hong

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional physical model is established in a Hall thruster sheath region to investigate the influences of the electron temperature and the propellant on the sheath potential drop and the secondary electron emission in the Hall thruster, by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The numerical results show that when the electron temperature is relatively low, the change of sheath potential drop is relatively large, the surface potential maintains a stable value and the stability of the sheath is good. When the electron temperature is relatively high, the surface potential maintains a persistent oscillation, and the stability of the sheath reduces. As the electron temperature increases, the secondary electron emission coefficient on the wall increases. For three kinds of propellants (Ar, Kr, and Xe), as the ion mass increases the sheath potentials and the secondary electron emission coefficients reduce in sequence.

  1. The Relation of Carbon Dioxide Compensation and Chlorenchymatous Vascular Bundle Sheaths in Leaves of Dicots

    PubMed Central

    Crookston, R. Kent; Moss, Dale N.

    1970-01-01

    Low CO2 compensation points have been found to be associated with several unusual characteristics related to photosynthesis. One such characteristic is a prominent, chlorenchymatous vascular bundle sheath in the leaves. It has been suggested that the presence of this sheath in dicotyledons can serve as a means of detecting low CO2-compensating species. We collected 88 dicotyledon species from 22 families reported to have chlorenchymatous sheaths. Of the 88, only three, Tribulus terrestris, L., Boerhaavia paniculata, L. C. Rich, and Trianthema portulacastrum L., had low CO2 compensation points. Cross sections of the leaves of the other species revealed that they did have chlorenchymatous vascular bundle sheaths. However, these sheath cells contained chloroplasts which were not specialized for starch formation as were the bundle sheath chloroplasts of the low CO2-compensating species. Images PMID:16657506

  2. Dialysis catheter fibrin sheath stripping: a useful technique after failed catheter exchange.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Ali, Af; Uhwut, E; Liew, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin sheath formation around long-term haemodialysis catheter is a common cause of failed dialysis access. Treatment options include pharmacological and mechanical methods. This paper reports a case of failed dialysis access due to fibrin sheath encasement. Pharmacologic thrombolysis, mechanical disruption using guide wire and catheter exchange had failed to address the issue. Eventually, fibrin sheath stripping using the loop snare technique was able to successfully restore the catheter function. PMID:22970064

  3. Development of a core sheath process for production of oxide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freske, S.

    1972-01-01

    Improvements were sought in an oxide fiber of a core sheath configuration intended for structural applications at 2000 F (1093 C). Discontinuities in the core were eliminated by using core materials other than pure alumina, and continuous core sheath fibers were produced. In the case of some core materials, the continuous sections were sufficiently long for applications in short fiber composites. Creep at 2000 F (1093 C) was found to be due, in most cases, to breaks in the core, allowing the glass sheath to creep. Evidence was obtained indicating that a closer match between the thermal expansion coefficient of the sheath and the core would greatly improve the strength.

  4. A Cytochemical Study of Extracellular Sheaths Associated with Rigidoporus lignosus during Wood Decay

    PubMed Central

    Nicole, M.; Chamberland, H.; Rioux, D.; Lecours, N.; Rio, B.; Geiger, J. P.; Ouellette, G. B.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrastructural and cytochemical investigation of the development of Rigidoporus lignosus, a white-rot fungus inoculated into wood blocks, was carried out to gain better insight into the structure and role of the extracellular sheaths produced by this fungus during wood degradation. Fungal sheaths had a dense or loose fibrillar appearance and were differentiated from the fungal cell wall early after wood inoculation. Close association between extracellular fibrils and wood cell walls was observed at both early and advanced stages of wood alteration. Fungal sheaths were often seen deep in host cell walls, sometimes enclosing residual wood fragments. Specific gold probes were used to investigate the chemical nature of R. lignosus sheaths. While labeling of chitin, pectin, β-1,4- and β-1,3-glucans, β-glucosides, galactosamine, mannose, sialic acid, RNA, fucose, and fimbrial proteins over fungal sheaths did not succeed, galactose residues and laccase (a fungal phenoloxidase) were found to be present. The positive reaction of sheaths with the PATAg test indicates that polysaccharides such as β-1,6-glucans are important components. Our data suggest that extracellular sheaths produced by R. lignosus during host cell colonization play an important role in wood degradation. Transportation of lignin-degrading enzymes by extracellular fibrils indicates that alteration of plant polymers may occur within fungal sheaths. It is also proposed that R. lignosus sheaths may be involved in recognition mechanisms in fungal cell-wood surface interactions. Images PMID:16349017

  5. Formation and stability of polarization sheaths of a cross-field beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Dong S.; Buneman, Oscar

    1992-01-01

    A simple description is presented for a pure ion sheath formed on one side and a pure electron sheath formed on the other side of a neutral plasma beam. Both the ion and the electron sheath are found to be one-dimensionally stable and two-dimensionally unstable in a mode known as magnetron, slipping stream, and diocotron. This mode connects with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in neutral matter. The analytical results are confirmed both qualitatively and quantitatively by numerical simulations. The simulations help define the linear behavior of the long-wave instability generated in the electron (or ion) sheath, including a strong shear.

  6. The spatiotemporal oscillation characteristics of the dielectric wall sheath in stationary plasma thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fengkui; Yu Daren; Ding Yongjie; Li Hong

    2011-03-14

    A two-dimensional particle in cell model is used to simulate the sheath oscillation in stationary plasma thrusters. The embedded secondary electron emission (SEE) submodel is based on that of Morozov but improved by considering the electron elastic reflection effect. The simulation results show that when the SEE coefficient is smaller than one due to the relative low electron temperature, one-dimensional static sheath can be found; as the electron temperature increase, the SEE coefficient approaches to one and temporal oscillation sheath appears; when the electron temperature increases so high that the SEE coefficient is beyond one, the sheath oscillates not only in time but also in space.

  7. Sheath and presheath in ion-ion plasmas via particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meige, A.; Leray, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Chabert, P.

    2008-02-11

    A full particle-in-cell simulation is developed to investigate electron-free plasmas constituted of positive and negative ions under the influence of a dc bias voltage. It is shown that high-voltage sheaths following the classical Child-law sheaths form within a few microseconds (which corresponds to the ion transit time) after the dc voltage is applied. It is also shown that there exists the equivalent of a Bohm criterion where a presheath accelerates the ions collected at one of the electrodes up to the sound speed before they enter the sheath. From an applied perspective, this leads to smaller sheaths than one would expect.

  8. Thrombus on Indwelling Central Venous Catheters: The Histopathology of 'Fibrin Sheaths'

    SciTech Connect

    Suojanen, James Norman; Brophy, David Paul; Nasser, Imad

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: Central venous catheters (CVC) may fail for many reasons, though 'fibrin sheaths' blocking catheter ports are usually implicated. We examined the sheaths removed from dialysis catheters to determine their histopathology.Methods: Ten catheter strippings were performed and the removed material was studied grossly and microscopically.Results: The histologic specimens showed thrombus both with and without a proteinaceous sheath.Conclusion: Dialysis catheters fail because of thrombus formation. This can occur in either the absence or presence of a protein coating on the catheter, the so-called 'fibrin sheath.'.

  9. The modeling and simulation of plasma sheath effect on GNSS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhongguo; Liu, Jiangfan; Du, Yongxing; Xi, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Plasma sheath can potentially degrade global navigation satellite system (GNSS) through signal attenuation as well as phase noise when a hypersonic vehicle reenters the Earth's atmosphere. Modeling and simulation method of GNSS system disturbed by plasma sheath is introduced in this paper by means of electromagnetic wave propagation theory combined with the satellite signal simulation technique. The transmission function of the plasma sheath with stratified model is derived utilizing scattering matrix method. The effects of the plasma sheath on GPS signal reception and positioning performance are examined. Experimental results are presented and discussed, partly supporting the validity of the analytical method proposed.

  10. The dust motion inside the magnetized sheath - The effect of drag forces

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, B. P.; Samarian, A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2010-08-15

    The isolated charged dust inside the magnetized plasma sheath moves under the influence of the electron and ion drag force and the sheath electrostatic field. The charge on the dust is a function of its radius as well as the value of the ambient sheath potential. It is shown that the charge on the dust determines its trajectory and dust performs the spiraling motion inside the sheath. The location of the turning spiral is determined by the number of negative charge on the dust, which in turn is a function of the dust radius. The back and forth spiraling motion finally causes the dust to move in a small, narrow region of the sheath. For a bigger dust particle, the dust moves closer to the sheath presheath boundary suggesting that the bigger grains, owing to the strong repulsion between the wall and dust, will be unable to travel inside the sheath. Only small, micron-sized grains can travel closer to the wall before repulsion pushes it back toward the plasma-sheath boundary. The temporal behavior of the spiraling dust motion appears like a damped harmonic oscillation, suggesting that the plasma drag force causes dissipation of the electrostatic energy. However, after initial damping, the grain keeps oscillating although with much smaller amplitude. The possible application of the present results to the ongoing sheath experiments is discussed.

  11. Genetic Analysis of Rough Sheath1 Developmental Mutants of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Becraft, P. W.; Freeling, M.

    1994-01-01

    Maize Rough sheath1 (Rs1) mutants are dominant and cause a proliferation of sheath-like tissue at the base of the blade and throughout the ligular region. They also cause ligule displacement, a chaotic pattern of vasculature and abnormal cellular structure of vascular bundles. The affected region of Rs1-O leaves displays genetic and morphological attributes of both sheath and auricle, suggesting an overlap of these genetic programs. The rs1 locus maps approximately 26 map units distal to opaque2 (o2) on chromosome 7S, defining a new distal-most locus on the genetic map. Three mutant alleles, Rs1-O, Rs1-1025 and Rs1-Z, all display similar phenotypes. The mutations are completely dominant and the Rs1-O phenotype is not affected by dosage of the chromosome arm carrying the rs1(+) allele, indicating that these alleles are neomorphic. Analysis of genetic mosaics showed that the Rs1-O phenotype is non-cell-autonomous, suggesting that intercellular signals convey the phenotype. Rs1 mutant phenotypes are affected by modifiers present in particular genetic backgrounds. An enhancer of Rs1-O was identified; segregation data imply a single recessive gene, ers1. Rs1 mutants were also found to enhance the expression of unlinked rs2 and Rs4 mutants, suggesting that these mutations affect similar developmental processes. We discuss the phenotypic and genetic similarities between Rs1 and Knotted1 (Kn1) mutants that led to the identification of rs1 as a kn1-like homeobox gene (unpublished data). PMID:8138166

  12. Flexor Tendon Sheath Ganglions: Results of Surgical Excision

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Edwin E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the clinical features and determine the results following surgical excision of a flexor tendon sheath ganglion. A retrospective analysis of 24 consecutive patients (25 ganglions) who underwent excision of a painful flexor tendon sheath ganglion by the same surgeon was performed. The patient’s medical and operative records were reviewed. Each patient was invited to return for an evaluation, which consisted of a clinical interview, completion of a questionnaire, and physical examination. Those patients that were unable to return underwent a detailed telephone interview. Sixteen patients returned for a clinical evaluation, while eight patients underwent a telephone interview. There were 15 women and nine men, with an average age of 43 years (range, 21–68 years). The dominant hand was involved in 15 patients. The long finger was most commonly involved (11 cases). The ganglion arose from the A1 pulley in 13 cases, between the A1 and A2 pulleys in three cases, and from the A2 pulley in nine cases. At an average follow-up of 18.5 months (range, 5–38 months), all of the patients were satisfied with their final result. No patient developed a recurrence and all returned to their previous functional level. There were two minor complications that resolved uneventfully; one patient experienced mild incisional tenderness, while an additional patient experienced transient digital nerve paresthesias. We conclude that surgical excision is a simple, safe, and effective method for treating a painful ganglion of the digital flexor tendon sheath. PMID:18780066

  13. Low-current medium-pressure RF discharge with electron photoemission in the electrode sheath and penetration of the sheath electrons into the discharge column

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, I. Ya.; Koptev, A. V.

    2007-12-15

    A model is developed for simulating a low-current moderate-pressure RF discharge with allowance for such characteristic discharge properties as the existence of two sheaths near both electrodes throughout the RF field period; the formation of an electron cloud at the sheath boundary that periodically fills the sheath and leaves it, depending on the phase of the applied RF voltage; the production by the sheath electrons of metastable gas particles that interact with the cloud electrons during subsequent field periods, followed by the excitation of metastable states to the emitting levels; the formation of a sheath in a low-current RF discharge due to the overlap of the secondary electron avalanches triggered by electron photoemission from the electrode surface; and the conditions under which the sheath electrons penetrate into the positive column and accumulate there, which makes, thereby making a low-current RF discharge similar to a non-self-sustained discharge. The parameters of the sheath in a low-current RF discharge are determined by the conditions under which the electron photoemission current from the electrode surface in the sheath is self-sustaining and, like the parameters of the positive discharge column, depend on the sort of gas, the gas pressure, the frequency of the applied RF field, and the interelectrode distance. The results of calculating the parameters of the sheath and column of a low-current RF discharge for nitrogen and helium at different pressures, as well as for different field frequencies and interelectrode distances, are presented and are compared with the experimental data.

  14. Dust Particles Alignments and Transitions in a Plasma Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, J. D. E.; Samarian, A. A.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2008-09-07

    The alignments and transitions of two dust particles in a plasma sheath have been investigated. It is shown that the Hamiltonian description of a non-Hamiltonian system can be used to predict qualitative features of possible equilibria in a variety of confinement potentials and can provide useful plasma diagnostics. The results compare favorably with simulation and are used to create new experimental hypotheses. In particular, the symmetry breaking transition of the particles as they leave the horizontal plane admits a Hamiltonian description which is used to elucidate the wake parameter.

  15. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: CT and MRI Findings.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Massimiliano; Di Poce, Isabelle; Ricci, Aurora; Di Trapano, Roberta; Costanzo, Elisa; Di Cello, Pierfrancesco; Pelle, Fabio; Izzo, Luciano; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is extremely rare malignancy in the general population, occurring more frequently in patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). In the literature five cases of MPNST arising from the parapharyngeal space (PPS) in patients without neurofibromatosis have been reported. We report imaging techniques in a patient with MPNST in the PPS, who had neither a family history nor sign of NF1. Computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed for a correct therapeutic planning. CT and MRI findings were correlated with hystopathological diagnosis. PMID:23970990

  16. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size. PMID:27310300

  17. Microparticles deep in the plasma sheath: Coulomb 'explosion'

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Du, C.-R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Hou, L.-J.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2012-09-15

    A cloud of microparticles was trapped deep in the sheath of a radio-frequency (rf) discharge, very close to the lower (grounded) electrode of the plasma chamber. This was achieved by employing a specifically designed rf-driven segment integrated in the lower electrode, which provided an additional confinement compressing the cloud to a very high density. After switching the rf-driven segment off, the cloud 'exploded' due to mutual interparticle repulsion. By combining a simple theoretical model with different numerical simulation methods, some basic properties of complex plasmas in this highly non-equilibrium regime were determined.

  18. Mechanical Thrombectomy of Iliocaval Thrombosis Using a Protective Expandable Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Tri H.; Spuentrup, Elmar; Staatz, Gundula; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Nolte-Ernsting, Claus C.A.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Haage, Patrick

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of successful percutaneous treatment of a subacute ilio-caval venous thrombosis in a 64-year-old female patient by using a novel combination of a rotatory fragmentation device (percutaneous thrombectomy device: PTD) and large wire basket (temporary Guenther basket filter) under temporary caval filter protection using an expandable sheath. Because the patient had multiple myeloma with increased risk for contrast media-induced renal failure, the therapeutic angiographic procedure was performed without iodinated contrast medium. Non-contrast-enhanced MR venography (high-resolution True FISP) confirmed the effective thrombus removal by the percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy procedure.

  19. Intrarenal pressure and irrigation flow with commonly used ureteric access sheaths and instruments

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Anna; Williams, Kevin; Somani, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flexible ureterorenoscopy is becoming a first-line treatment for many intrarenal stones. Ureteric access sheaths are commonly used to aid access, stone removal and reduce intrarenal pressure. We evaluated the effects of two commonly used access sheaths on irrigation flow and intrarenal pressure during flexible ureterorenoscopy. We measured the effect of scope instrumentation on flow and pressure. Material and methods We utilized a 10/12F and 12/14F, 35 cm Re-Trace™ access sheath with a FlexX2 scope in a cadaveric porcine kidney. We evaluated the effect of four Nitinol baskets (1.3F, 1.5F, 1.9F, 2.2F), three different 200 µm laser fibres and a hand-held pump. Measurements of irrigation flow and intrarenal pressure were recorded and compared between the different sized access sheaths. Results Flow rates varied widely between access sheaths. Without instrumentation, mean flow was 17 mls/min (10/12F access sheath), versus 33 mls/min (12/14F sheath) (p <0.0001). Increasing basket size produced a gradual reduction in flow and pressure in both access sheaths. Reassuringly, pressures were low overall (<40 cm H2O). Pressures were significantly reduced when using the larger 12/14F sheath, with and without all instrumentations (p <0.0001). Hand-held pump devices have a marked effect on flow and pressure in both sheaths; with pressures rising up to 121 cm H2O with a 10/12F sheath, versus 29 cm H2O (12/14F) (p <0.0001). Conclusions A 12/14F access sheath offered significantly improved irrigation whilst maintaining significantly lower intrarenal pressure, when compared to a 10/12F access sheath in a cadaveric porcine model. Scope instrumentation affects irrigation flow and pressure in both sized sheaths. Furthermore, there should be caution with hand-held pump devices, especially with smaller sized sheaths, as intrarenal pressure can be very high. PMID:26855796

  20. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Rectus Sheath Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Heena S; Kumar, Rohit; DiNella, Jeannine; Janov, Cheryl; Kaldas, Hoda; Smith, Roy E

    2016-04-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) develops due to rupture of epigastric arteries or the rectus muscle. Although RSH incidence rate is low, it poses a significant diagnostic dilemma. We evaluated the risk factors for RSH, its presentation, management, and outcomes for 115 patients hospitalized with confirmed RSH by computed tomography scan between January 2005 and June 2009. More than three-fourth (77.4%) of the patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 58.3% patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥3, 51.3% had abdominal injections, 41.7% were on steroids/immunosuppressant therapy, 37.4% had abdominal surgery/trauma, 33.9% had cough, femoral puncture was performed in 31.3% of patients, and 29.5% were on antiplatelet therapy. Rectus sheath hematoma was not an attributable cause in any of the 17 deaths. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with CKD stage ≥3 (P = .03) or who required transfusion (P = .007). Better understanding of RSH risk factors will facilitate early diagnoses and improve management. PMID:25294636

  1. Experimental studies of anode sheath phenomena in a hall thruster.

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Fisch, N. J.; Raitses, Yevgeny F.

    2004-01-01

    Both electron-repelling (negative anode fall) and electron-attracting (positive anode fall) anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were identified experimentally by performing accurate, non-disturbing near-anode measurements with biased and emissive probes. An interesting new phenomenon revealed by the probe measurements is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which appears on the anode surface during the course of Hall thruster operation. Probe measurements in a Hall thruster with three different magnetic field configurations show that an anode fall at the clean anode is a function of the radial magnetic field profile inside the channel. A positive anode fall formation mechanism suggested in this work is that: (1) when the anode front surface is coated with dielectric, a discharge current closes to the anode at the surfaces that remain conductive, (2) a total thermal electron current toward the conductive area is significantly smaller than the discharge current, therefore an additional electron flux needs to be attracted toward the conductive surfaces by the electronattracting sheath that appears at these surfaces.

  2. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    This guide provides information and recommendations to the following groups: insulation contractors; general contractors; builders; home remodelers; mechanical contractors; and homeowners, as a guide to the work that needs to be done. The order of work completed during home construction and retrofit improvements is important. Health and safety issues must be addressed first and are more important than durability issues. And durability issues are more important than saving energy. Not all techniques can apply to all houses. Special conditions will require special action. Some builders or homeowners will wish to do more than the important but basic retrofit strategies outlined by this guide. The following are best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant items were discussed with the group which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane: 1. Horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; 2. Where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; 3. Frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation. Section 5 of this measure guideline contains the detailed construction procedure for the three recommended methods to effectively seal the joints in exterior insulating sheathing to create a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane.

  3. Isolation, Cultural Maintenance, and Taxonomy of a Sheath-Forming Strain of Leptothrix discophora and Characterization of Manganese-Oxidizing Activity Associated with the Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Ghiorse, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Leptothrix discophora SP-6 was isolated from the outflow reservoir of an artificial iron seep. Its sheathforming phenotype was maintained by slow growth in a mineral salts-vitamin-pyruvate medium under minimal aeration at 20 to 25°C. A sheathless variant, SP-6(sl), was isolated from smooth colonies that appeared on spread plates after rapid growth of SP-6 in well-aerated cultures. SP-6 and SP-6(sl) are closely related but not identical to the previously studied sheathless strain SS-1 (ATCC 43182). Increasing Mn2+ concentrations in the growth medium of SP-6 increased the phase density of the sheath, indicating increased Mn oxide deposition in the sheath. Electron microscopy of cultures grown without added Mn2+ revealed that the sheath consisted of a well-defined inner layer, 30 to 100 nm thick, and a diffuse outer capsular layer of variable thickness. Mn oxides were identified in the sheath by their characteristic ultrastructure, electron density, and X-ray-dispersive energy spectra. In heavily encrusted sheaths, the Mn oxides were evenly distributed in both layers of the sheath. Sheathed cells retained more Mn-oxidizing activity than did sheathless cells after washing with distilled, deionized water; the sheath retained some of its activity after an EDTA-lysozyme-detergent treatment which removed the cells. An ultrafiltration-dialysis procedure significantly increased the recovery of activity from spent media of SP-6 over that reported previously for SS-1 (L.F. Adams and W.C. Ghiorse, J. Bacteriol. 169:1279-1285, 1987). A 108-kDa Mn-oxidizing protein was identified in concentrated spent media of SP-6 and SP-6(sl), and the activity of the concentrates showed stability in detergents comparable to that of SS-1 and patterns of heat inactivation and chemical inhibition similar to those of SS-1. Images PMID:16348826

  4. Isolation, Cultural Maintenance, and Taxonomy of a Sheath-Forming Strain of Leptothrix discophora and Characterization of Manganese-Oxidizing Activity Associated with the Sheath.

    PubMed

    Emerson, D; Ghiorse, W C

    1992-12-01

    Leptothrix discophora SP-6 was isolated from the outflow reservoir of an artificial iron seep. Its sheathforming phenotype was maintained by slow growth in a mineral salts-vitamin-pyruvate medium under minimal aeration at 20 to 25 degrees C. A sheathless variant, SP-6(sl), was isolated from smooth colonies that appeared on spread plates after rapid growth of SP-6 in well-aerated cultures. SP-6 and SP-6(sl) are closely related but not identical to the previously studied sheathless strain SS-1 (ATCC 43182). Increasing Mn concentrations in the growth medium of SP-6 increased the phase density of the sheath, indicating increased Mn oxide deposition in the sheath. Electron microscopy of cultures grown without added Mn revealed that the sheath consisted of a well-defined inner layer, 30 to 100 nm thick, and a diffuse outer capsular layer of variable thickness. Mn oxides were identified in the sheath by their characteristic ultrastructure, electron density, and X-ray-dispersive energy spectra. In heavily encrusted sheaths, the Mn oxides were evenly distributed in both layers of the sheath. Sheathed cells retained more Mn-oxidizing activity than did sheathless cells after washing with distilled, deionized water; the sheath retained some of its activity after an EDTA-lysozyme-detergent treatment which removed the cells. An ultrafiltration-dialysis procedure significantly increased the recovery of activity from spent media of SP-6 over that reported previously for SS-1 (L.F. Adams and W.C. Ghiorse, J. Bacteriol. 169:1279-1285, 1987). A 108-kDa Mn-oxidizing protein was identified in concentrated spent media of SP-6 and SP-6(sl), and the activity of the concentrates showed stability in detergents comparable to that of SS-1 and patterns of heat inactivation and chemical inhibition similar to those of SS-1. PMID:16348826

  5. Analytical expression for the sheath edge around wedge-shaped cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2008-03-01

    The sheath is the boundary layer separating a quasi-neutral plasma from a material electrode. Understanding the sheath is important for numerous applications, including plasma-based ion implantation, plasma etching of semiconductors, plasma assisted electrostatic cleaning, and Langmuir probes. In a 1D planar geometry, the Child-Langmuir (CL) law describes the sheath when the bias on a negative electrode, i.e., a cathode, is much greater than the electron temperature. In this case, the sheath width s is an eigenvalue of the problem. In 2D, the sheath edge is an unknown line (an ``eigen-boundary") which is determined by a set of coupled, nonlinear, partial differential equations. I have found an expression for the sheath edge around a 2D wedge-shaped cathode with included angle θw. In polar coordinates (r,θ), the sheath edge is a solution of r(aθ)=as where s is the planar sheath width far from the corner and θw=2π- π/a, so that a=1/2 gives a knife edge, while a=2/3 gives a square corner. This result is verified by comparison with the numerical solutions of Watterson [P. A. Watterson, J. Phys. D 22, 1300 (1989)].

  6. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-09-07

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust{sup 2} and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  7. Plasma-wall interaction in an electrostatic sheath of plasma containing a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Gan, Chunyun

    2016-04-01

    The plasma-wall interaction in the presence of a monoenergetic electron beam has been studied by taking into account the self-consistency among plasma transport in a collisionless electrostatic sheath, deposited energy flux at the wall and material thermal response for carbon and tungsten as wall materials. The variations of the potential drop across the sheath, ion velocity at the sheath edge, and surface temperature of material as a function of electron beam flux are explored in the presence of the electron emission. It is found that when electron beam does not dominate the sheath, potential drop across the sheath depends strongly on the material properties due to the impact of electron emission while the surface temperature of material shows monotonic variation. In the case of carbon wall, the electron beam may dominate the sheath at a certain electron beam concentration or energy. Under this circumstance, both the potential drop across the sheath and surface temperature of material demonstrate the sharp increasing transition. The development of local hot spot on the plasma facing material is caused by the enhanced ion energy flux instead of the electron beam energy flux. If the electron emission is not taken into account, as a smaller electron beam flux, both the potential drop across the sheath and surface temperature of material display the significant change and then it may be easier to develop for the local hot spot on the plasma facing material.

  8. Confirming QTLs and finding additional loci responsible for resistance to rice sheath blight disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight disease (Rhizoctonia solani AG1-1AKühn) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Utilization of host resistance is the most economical and environmentally sound strategy in managing sheath blight (ShB). Ten ShB-QTLs were previously mapped in a LJRIL population using...

  9. Release of four new breeding lines having resistance to blast and sheath blight diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight and rice blast diseases are serious threats to rice production worldwide. High-yielding cultural management practices, such as high nitrogen application and high plant populations, encourage development of these diseases. Complete resistance to sheath blight has not been identified, al...

  10. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-06-01

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential.

  11. Development and characterization of RiceCAP QTL mapping population for sheath blight resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RiceCAP is a USDA CSREES funded project that has as one of its main objectives developing genetic markers associated with sheath blight resistance. Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is an important disease of rice in the southern US. Tolerance to the disease is quantitatively inherited an...

  12. RAPID COMMUNICATION: On the applicability of Sato's equation to capacitative radio frequency sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, J.; Nagabhushana, G. R.

    2000-12-01

    We show that the time-dependent version of Sato's equation, when applied to capacitative radio frequency sheaths, is no longer independent of the electric field of the space charge, and we discuss the use of the equation for a specific sheath model.

  13. Retrieval of a detached transseptal sheath tip from a right pulmonary artery branch following catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Schricker, Amir A; Feld, Gregory K; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-11-15

    Transseptal introducer sheaths are being used with increasing frequency for left-sided arrhythmia ablations and structural heart disease interventions. Sheath tip detachment and embolization is an uncommon but known complication, and several sheaths have been recalled due to such complications. We report a unique case of a fractured transseptal sheath tip that embolized to a branch of the right pulmonary artery in a patient who had undergone ablation of a left-sided atypical atrial flutter. During final removal of one of the two long 8.5-French SL1 transseptal sheaths used routinely as part of the ablation, the radiopaque tip of the sheath fractured and first embolized to the right atrium and subsequently to a secondary right pulmonary artery branch. Using techniques derived from percutaneous interventional approaches, including a multipurpose catheter, coronary guidewire, and monorail angioplasty balloon, the sheath tip was successfully wired through its inner lumen, trapped from the inside with the balloon, and removed from the body via a large femoral vein sheath, without complications. The approach detailed in this case may guide future cases and circumvent urgent surgical intervention. PMID:25913843

  14. 30 CFR 77.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 77.700 Section 77.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.700 Grounding metallic sheaths,...

  15. 30 CFR 77.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 77.700 Section 77.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.700 Grounding metallic sheaths,...

  16. 30 CFR 75.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 75.700 Section 75.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Grounding § 75.700 Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. All...

  17. 30 CFR 75.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 75.700 Section 75.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Grounding § 75.700 Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. All...

  18. Comparison of sheath thickness obtained from the theories of ion correction in the floating potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyeong Sik; Hwang, Kwang Tae; Choe, Ik Jin; Chung, Chin Wook

    2009-10-01

    In the cold plasmas, when the cylindrical probe is used to measure the ion density, an expansion of the sheath thickness related to the sheath voltage increases the ion current. The expansion of the sheath thickness results in an incorrect measurement of ion current. To measure ion density correctly, the sheath thickness should be considered. In the collisionless sheath, the sheath thickness can be calculated by the Child- Langmuir (CL) theory or the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds(ABR) theory. We measured the sheath thicknesses using the floating harmonics method [1] and the cut-off method by the microwave [2], and the results compared with the CL theory [3] and ABR theory [4] in the floating potential. The sheath thicknesses obtained from the ABR theory were in good agreement with the experimental results. [4pt] [1] M. H. Lee, S. H. Jang and C. W. Chung, J. Appl. Phys., 101, 033305 (2007)[0pt] [2] J.H. Kim, S.C. Choi, Y.H. Shin, and K. H. Chung, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2706 (2004)[0pt] [3] FF Chen, JD Evans, D Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 9, 1449 (2002)[0pt] [4] F. F. Chen and D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 8, 5051 (2001)

  19. Investigation on measurement of effective sheath width using a cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Woong; You, Shin-Jae

    2015-09-01

    The plasma density is the key parameter showing electric plasma property as well as processing rate. Therefore, various diagnostic methods have been developed and researched for measuring the absolute plasma density. One of them, cutoff probe, has been developed for more accurate measurement of the plasma density. The cutoff probe is the promising diagnostics method having diagnostic advantages: high accuracy in measured plasma density, simple assumption in measurement process, and readily use and interpretation of results for diagnostics. The sheath is also an important parameter in plasma researches and applications. In this presentation, we introduce measurement method of the effective sheath width using equivalent circuit model of S21 phase spectrum of the cutoff probe. The reliability of this method was verified by investigation of the FDTD simulation and comparative experiment with calculated Child-Langmuir law sheath width from Langmuir probe data. The results show that measured sheath width has an acceptable error when it was compared with input sheath width in the FDTD simulation. Furthermore, the measured sheath width was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law.

  20. PGPR: A novel strategy for the control of rice sheath blight disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is the most important rice disease in Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi and other southern states. Due to the lack of sheath blight resistance in most commonly planted cultivars, southern rice famers apply more than 1 million pounds of fungicides annually to co...

  1. Ultrastructure and chemical composition of the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, D; Ghiorse, W C

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of thin sections and metal-shadowed specimens showed that the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 (ATCC 51168) is a tube-like extracellular polymeric structure consisting of a condensed fabric of 6.5-nm-diameter fibrils underlying a more diffuse outer capsular layer. In thin sections, outer membrane bridges seen to contact the inner sheath layer suggested that the sheath fabric was attached to the outer layer of the gram-negative cell wall. The capsular polymers showed an affinity for cationic colloidal iron and polycationic ferritin, indicating that they carry a negative charge. Cell-free sheaths were isolated by treatment with a mixture of lysozyme, EDTA, and N-lauroylsarcosine (Sarkosyl) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Both Sarkosyl- and SDS-isolated sheaths were indistinguishable in microscopic appearance. However, the Mn-oxidizing activity of Sarkosyl-isolated sheaths was more stable than that of SDS-isolated sheaths. The Sarkosyl-isolated sheaths also contained more 2-keto-3-deoxyoctanoic acid and more outer membrane protein than SDS-isolated sheaths. The oven-dried mass of detergent-isolated sheaths represented approximately 9% of the total oven-dried biomass of SP-6 cultures; the oven-dried sheaths contained 38% C, 6.9% N, 6% H, and 2.1% S and approximately 34 to 35% carbohydrate (polysaccharide), 23 to 25% protein, 8% lipid, and 4% inorganic ash. Gas-liquid chromatography showed that the polysaccharide was an approximately 1:1 mixture of uronic acids (glucuronic, galacturonic, and mannuronic acids and at least one other unidentified uronic acid) and an amino sugar (galactosamine). Neutral sugars were not detected. Amino acid analysis showed that sheath proteins were enriched in cysteine (6 mol%). The cysteine residues in the sheath proteins probably provide sulfhydryls for disulfide bonds that play an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of the sheath (D. Emerson and W.C. Ghiorse, J

  2. Ultrastructure and chemical composition of the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed

    Emerson, D; Ghiorse, W C

    1993-12-01

    Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of thin sections and metal-shadowed specimens showed that the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 (ATCC 51168) is a tube-like extracellular polymeric structure consisting of a condensed fabric of 6.5-nm-diameter fibrils underlying a more diffuse outer capsular layer. In thin sections, outer membrane bridges seen to contact the inner sheath layer suggested that the sheath fabric was attached to the outer layer of the gram-negative cell wall. The capsular polymers showed an affinity for cationic colloidal iron and polycationic ferritin, indicating that they carry a negative charge. Cell-free sheaths were isolated by treatment with a mixture of lysozyme, EDTA, and N-lauroylsarcosine (Sarkosyl) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Both Sarkosyl- and SDS-isolated sheaths were indistinguishable in microscopic appearance. However, the Mn-oxidizing activity of Sarkosyl-isolated sheaths was more stable than that of SDS-isolated sheaths. The Sarkosyl-isolated sheaths also contained more 2-keto-3-deoxyoctanoic acid and more outer membrane protein than SDS-isolated sheaths. The oven-dried mass of detergent-isolated sheaths represented approximately 9% of the total oven-dried biomass of SP-6 cultures; the oven-dried sheaths contained 38% C, 6.9% N, 6% H, and 2.1% S and approximately 34 to 35% carbohydrate (polysaccharide), 23 to 25% protein, 8% lipid, and 4% inorganic ash. Gas-liquid chromatography showed that the polysaccharide was an approximately 1:1 mixture of uronic acids (glucuronic, galacturonic, and mannuronic acids and at least one other unidentified uronic acid) and an amino sugar (galactosamine). Neutral sugars were not detected. Amino acid analysis showed that sheath proteins were enriched in cysteine (6 mol%). The cysteine residues in the sheath proteins probably provide sulfhydryls for disulfide bonds that play an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of the sheath (D. Emerson and W.C. Ghiorse, J

  3. Immunohistochemical study of cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components in the notochord and notochordal sheath of amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Bočina, Ivana; Saraga-Babić, Mirna

    2006-01-01

    A major cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix proteins of the amphioxus notochordal cells and sheath were detected by immunohistochemical techniques. The three-layered amphioxus notochordal sheath strongly expressed fish collagen type I in its outer and middle layers, while in the innermost layer expression did not occur. The amphioxus notochordal sheath was reactive to applied anti-human antibodies for intermediate filament proteins such as cytokeratins, desmin and vimentin, as well as to microtubule components (ß-tubulin), particularly in the area close to the epipharyngeal groove. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was expressed in some notochordal cells and in the area of the notochordal attachment to the sheath. Thus muscular nature of notochordal cells was shown by immunohistochemistry in tissue section. Our results confirm that genes encoding intermediate filament proteins, microtubules and microfilaments are highly conserved during evolution. Collagen type I was proven to be the key extracellular matrix protein that forms the amphioxus notochordal sheath. PMID:16733537

  4. The tail sheath structure of bacteriophage T4: a molecular machine for infecting bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Kostyuchenko, Victor A.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-22

    The contractile tail of bacteriophage T4 is a molecular machine that facilitates very high viral infection efficiency. Its major component is a tail sheath, which contracts during infection to less than half of its initial length. The sheath consists of 138 copies of the tail sheath protein, gene product (gp) 18, which surrounds the central non-contractile tail tube. The contraction of the sheath drives the tail tube through the outer membrane, creating a channel for the viral genome delivery. A crystal structure of about three quarters of gp18 has been determined and was fitted into cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the tail sheath before and after contraction. It was shown that during contraction, gp18 subunits slide over each other with no apparent change in their structure.

  5. Composite pheochromocytoma with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, Takeshi; Utsumi, Takanobu; Imamoto, Takashi; Kawamura, Koji; Oide, Takashi; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Nihei, Naoki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nakatani, Yukio; Ichikawa, Tomohiko

    2016-07-01

    Adrenal tumors with more than one cellular component are uncommon. Furthermore, an adrenal tumor composed of a pheochromocytoma and a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is extremely rare. A composite pheochromocytoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a 42-year-old man is reported here. After adequate preoperative control, left adrenalectomy was performed simultaneously with resection of the ipsilateral kidney for spontaneous rupture of the left adrenal tumor. Pathological findings demonstrated pheochromocytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a ruptured adrenal tumor. To date, there have been only four reported cases of composite pheochromocytoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, so the present case is only the fifth case in the world. Despite the very poor prognosis of patients with pheochromocytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors reported in the literature, the patient remains well without evidence of recurrence or new metastatic lesions at 36 months postoperatively. PMID:27338175

  6. An investigation of friction-based tendon sheath model appropriate for control purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, T. N.; Tjahjowidodo, T.; Lau, M. W. S.; Phee, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    The tendon sheath mechanism plays an important role in many robotic systems from surgical devices to robot hands. However, many unexpected properties such as nonlinear hysteresis and backlash, which appear in the tendon sheath system, cause major losses in force transmission. This report deals with the characterization of hysteresis phenomenon, which is attributed to the presence of frictional effects on its elements, in a tendon-sheath driven surgical robot. Unlike various approaches presented in the literature that utilized multiple lumped mass elements, this proposed approach models the tendon sheath as one element. A new dynamic friction model that allows accurate description of friction lag and hysteresis behavior in two regimes, i.e. presliding and sliding regimes, for a sheath in arbitrary configuration such as helical and spatial shape has been developed.

  7. Computational study on reliability of sheath width measurement by the cutoff probe in low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-W.; You, S.-J.; Kim, J.-H.; Seong, D.-J.; Chang, H.-Y.; Oh, W.-Y.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the technique for measurement of the sheath width by using the cutoff probe and its equivalent circuit model was proposed and conducted experimentally. In this study, we investigate the reliability of this technique based on the computational simulation. The simulation of three-dimensional Finite-Difference Time-Domain reproduces the transmission spectrum of the cutoff probe with an input parameter of sheath width. We measure the sheath width by using the circuit model and calculate the discrepancy between them under various input plasma densities and sheath widths. The results show the acceptable discrepancy under all of the conditions we studied (the largest discrepancy is about 45%). This indicates that the technique for measurement of sheath width around the floating tip of cutoff probe is robust and reliable. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  8. A Sheath Model for Negative Ion Sources Including the Formation of a Virtual Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, R.; King, D. B.; Surrey, E.

    2011-09-26

    A one dimensional model of the sheath between the plasma and the wall in a negative ion source has been developed. The plasma consists of positive ions, electrons and negative ions. The model takes into account the emission of negative ions from the wall into the sheath and thus represents the conditions in a caesiated ion source with surface production of negative ions. At high current densities of the emitted negative ions, the sheath is unable to support the transport of all the negative ions to the plasma and a virtual cathode is formed. This model takes this into account and allows the calculation of the transported negative ions across the sheath with the virtual cathode. The model has been extended to allow the linkage between plasma conditions at the sheath edge and the plasma to be made. Comparisons are made between the results of the model and experimental measurements.

  9. Hertwig's epithelial root sheath cell behavior during initial acellular cementogenesis in rat molars.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Yamada, Tamaki; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Hongo, Hiromi; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to examine developing acellular cementum in rat molars by immunohistochemistry, to elucidate (1) how Hertwig's epithelial root sheath disintegrates and (2) whether epithelial sheath cells transform into cementoblasts through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Initial acellular cementogenesis was divided into three developmental stages, which can be seen in three different portions of the root: portion 1, where the epithelial sheath is intact; portion 2, where the epithelial sheath becomes fragmented; and portion 3, where acellular cementogenesis begins. Antibodies against three kinds of matrix proteinases, which degrade epithelial sheath-maintaining factors, including basement membrane and desmosomes, were used to investigate proteolytic activity of the epithelial sheath. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) and keratin were used to investigate EMT. Epithelial sheath cells showed immunoreactivity for all three enzymes at fragmentation, which suggests that epithelial sheath disintegration is enzymatically mediated. Dental follicle cells and cementoblasts showed intense immunoreactivity for TNALP, and from portion 1 through to 3, the reaction extended from the alveolar bone-related zone to the root-related zone. Cells possessing keratin/TNALP double immunoreactivity were virtually absent. Keratin-positive epithelial sheath cells showed negligible immunoreactivity for TNALP, and epithelial cells did not appear to migrate to the dental follicle. Together, these findings suggest that a transition phenotype between epithelial cells and cementoblasts does not exist in the developing dental follicle and hence that epithelial sheath cells do not undergo EMT during initial acellular cementogenesis. In brief, this study supports the notion that cementoblasts derive from the dental follicle. PMID:24859538

  10. Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, William H.; Cookson, Alan H.; Yoon, Kue H.

    1984-04-10

    A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

  11. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  12. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Alroughani, R.; Behbehani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  13. Bounded multi-scale plasma simulation: Application to sheath problems

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.E. ); Friedman, A.; Ray. S.L. ); Birdsall, C.K. )

    1993-08-01

    In our previous paper we introduced the multi-scale method, a self-consistent plasma simulation technique that allowed particles to have independent timesteps. Here we apply the method to one-dimensional electrostatic bounded plasma problems and demonstrate a significant reduction in computing time. We describe a technique to allow for variable grid spacing and develop consistent boundary conditions for the direct implicit method. Also discussed are criteria for specifying timestep size as a function of position in phase space. Next, an analytically solvable sheath problem is presented, and a comparison to simulation results in made. Finally, we show results for an ion acoustic shock front propagating toward a conducting wall. 20 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Anomalous transport induced by sheath instability in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Schneider, Ralf

    2009-06-22

    It is well recognized to ascribe the anomalous cross-field conductivity inside Hall-effect thrusters to fluctuation-induced transport due to gradient-driven instabilities (Rayleigh or electron drift) and to electron-wall interaction (near-wall conductivity). In this letter, we have performed numerical experiments showing the possibility of another mechanism inducing azimuthal fluctuations: the lateral sheath instability. It is created by a negative differential resistance of the current-voltage I-V characteristic of the floating wall as a consequence of high secondary electron emission. The contribution from this effect to the anomalous axial current is calculated and it accounts of more than 80% of the experimental value.

  15. Electron inertia effects on the planar plasma sheath problem

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, V. N.; Clemente, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    The steady one-dimensional planar plasma sheath problem, originally considered by Tonks and Langmuir, is revisited. Assuming continuously generated free-falling ions and isothermal electrons and taking into account electron inertia, it is possible to describe the problem in terms of three coupled integro-differential equations that can be numerically integrated. The inclusion of electron inertia in the model allows us to obtain the value of the plasma floating potential as resulting from an electron density discontinuity at the walls, where the electrons attain sound velocity and the electric potential is continuous. Results from numerical computation are presented in terms of plots for densities, electric potential, and particles velocities. Comparison with results from literature, corresponding to electron Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution (neglecting electron inertia), is also shown.

  16. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in a sow.

    PubMed

    Resende, Talita P; Pereira, Carlos E R; Vannucci, Fabio A; Araujo, Fernando S; dos Santos, José Lúcio; Cassali, Geovanni D; Damasceno, Karine A; Guedes, Roberto M C

    2015-01-01

    Nodular lung lesions in swine are frequently due to abscesses or granulomatous pneumonia. Although tumours are rarely reported in modern pig farming, they should be considered as a differential diagnosis when nodular lung lesions are found. A first-parity sow exhibiting respiratory signs was euthanized. Several whitish firm nodules, not encapsulated, ranging in diameter from 0.5 to 5 cm were present in all lung lobes. Microscopically, the nodules were composed of dense neoplastic cells, mainly in Antoni types A and B patterns, infiltrative and with development of emboli. All neoplastic cells stained positively by immunohistochemistry for vimentin and S-100 protein, with variable immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and stained negative for cytokeratin. Based on the gross, histological and immunohistochemical features, the tumor was diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour. PMID:26407677

  17. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Alroughani, R; Behbehani, R

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  18. Iterative methods for plasma sheath calculations: Application to spherical probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. W.; Sullivan, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The computer cost of a Poisson-Vlasov iteration procedure for the numerical solution of a steady-state collisionless plasma-sheath problem depends on: (1) the nature of the chosen iterative algorithm, (2) the position of the outer boundary of the grid, and (3) the nature of the boundary condition applied to simulate a condition at infinity (as in three-dimensional probe or satellite-wake problems). Two iterative algorithms, in conjunction with three types of boundary conditions, are analyzed theoretically and applied to the computation of current-voltage characteristics of a spherical electrostatic probe. The first algorithm was commonly used by physicists, and its computer costs depend primarily on the boundary conditions and are only slightly affected by the mesh interval. The second algorithm is not commonly used, and its costs depend primarily on the mesh interval and slightly on the boundary conditions.

  19. Studies of in aere formed stylet sheath from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera: Psyllidae) and other phytophagous Hemiptera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stylet sheath formation is a common feature among phytophagous hemipterans. These sheaths are considered essential to promote a successful feeding event of these piercing-sucking insects. The stylet sheath composition is unknown and it is suggested that it forms through interactions with external (h...

  20. Double copper sheath multiconductor instrumentation cable is durable and easily installed in high thermal or nuclear radiation area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Crae, A. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Multiconductor instrumentation cable in which the conducting wires are routed through two concentric copper tube sheaths, employing a compressed insulator between the conductors and between the inner and outer sheaths, is durable and easily installed in high thermal or nuclear radiation area. The double sheath is a barrier against moisture, abrasion, and vibration.

  1. Effects of experimental hypothyroidism on myelin sheath structural organization.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andréa A; Nazário, José C; Pereira, Mário J S; Azevedo, Neide L; Barradas, Penha C

    2004-03-01

    A previous study using the 2'3'cyclic nucleotide 3'phosphodiesterase (CNPase), an oligodendroglial marker that also stain ensheathed fibers, showed a decrease in the number of immunoreactive fibers and a change in the pattern of CNPase immunoreactivity (CNPase+) in hypothyroid animals. CNPase+ fibers, in mature hypothyroid animals, showed a continuous pattern of staining in contrast with a discontinuous one in controls. As CNPase, in adult animals, can be found only in regions in which oligodendrocyte cytoplasm remains as internal, external and paranodal loops, it was suggested that the reduction of thyroid hormone levels leads to a failure in myelin compaction. Previous data showed a higher frequency of some abnormalities in myelin sheath as multiple cytoplasmic loops and redundant myelin profiles in mutant animals that present a failure in myelin compaction. The increase in the frequency of these abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) indicates a failure in the interrelations between the axons and the oligodendroglial processes. To verify if the thyroid hormone deficiency during CNS development disturbs these interrelations, we evaluated the frequency of the morphological abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) in myelin sheath of corpus callosum (cc) in experimental hypothyroidism. Randomic fields were kept by electron microscopy and the analysis of the frequency of morphological abnormalities showed a significant difference in hypothyroid animals at 60-day-old (PND60), with no significant differences at 90-day-old (PND90) animals. The frequency of multiple internal loops is higher in hypothyroid animals at PND60 that indicates a disturbance in the wrapping by the oligodendroglial process. These findings showed that thyroid hormone might modulate the axon-oligodendroglial relationships that are important for the adequate temporal sequence of events that occur during myelinogenesis, with

  2. Conventional and Functional MR Imaging of Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Demehri, S.; Belzberg, A.; Blakeley, J.; Fayad, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Differentiating benign from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can be very challenging using conventional MR imaging. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that conventional and functional MR imaging can accurately diagnose malignancy in patients with indeterminate peripheral nerve sheath tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS This institutional review board–approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant study retrospectively reviewed 61 consecutive patients with 80 indeterminate peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of these, 31 histologically proved peripheral nerve sheath tumors imaged with conventional (unenhanced T1, fluid-sensitive, contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences) and functional MR imaging (DWI/apparent diffusion coefficient mapping, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging) were included. Two observers independently assessed anatomic (size, morphology, signal) and functional (ADC values, early arterial enhancement by dynamic contrast-enhanced MR) features to determine interobserver agreement. The accuracy of MR imaging for differentiating malignant from benign was also determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS Of 31 peripheral nerve sheath tumors, there were 9 malignant (9%) and 22 benign ones (81%). With anatomic sequences, average tumor diameter (6.3 ± 1.8 versus 3.9 ± 2.3 mm, P = .009), ill-defined/infiltrative margins (77% versus 32%; P = .04), and the presence of peritumoral edema (66% versus 23%, P = .01) were different for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. With functional sequences, minimum ADC (0.47 ± 0.32 × 10−3 mm2/s versus 1.08 ± 0.26 × 10−3 mm2/s; P [H11021] .0001) and the presence of early arterial enhancement (50% versus 11%; P = .03) were different for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The minimum ADC (area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.89; 95

  3. Sheath structure in plasmas with nonextensively distributed electrons and thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-02-15

    Sheath region of an electropositive plasma consisting of q-nonextensive electrons and singly charged positive ions with finite temperature is modeled. Using Sagdeev's pseudo potential technique to derive the modified sheath formation criterion, it is shown that the velocity of ions at the sheath edge is directly proportional to the ion temperatures and inversely proportional to the degree of nonextensivity of electrons (q-parameter). Using the modified Bohm criterion, effect of degree of nonextensivity of electrons and temperature of positive ions on the characteristics of the sheath region are investigated numerically. It is shown that an increase in the ion temperature gives rise to an increase in the electrostatic potential and the velocity of ions in the sheath regardless of the value of q. Furthermore, it is seen that the sheath width and the density distribution of the charged particles decrease by increasing the temperature of positive ions. In addition, it is found that the positive ion temperature is less effective on the sheath structure for higher values of the q-parameter. Finally, the results obtained for a thermal plasma with nonextensively distributed electrons are compared with the results of a cold plasma with nonextensive electrons and an extensive (Maxwellian) plasma with thermal ions.

  4. Verification of high voltage rf capacitive sheath models with particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lieberman, Michael; Verboncoeur, John

    2009-10-01

    Collisionless and collisional high voltage rf capacitive sheath models were developed in the late 1980's [1]. Given the external parameters of a single-frequency capacitively coupled discharge, plasma parameters including sheath width, electron and ion temperature, plasma density, power, and ion bombarding energy can be estimated. One-dimensional electrostatic PIC codes XPDP1 [2] and OOPD1 [3] are used to investigate plasma behaviors within rf sheaths and bulk plasma. Electron-neutral collisions only are considered for collisionless sheaths, while ion-neutral collisions are taken into account for collisional sheaths. The collisionless sheath model is verified very well by PIC simulations for the rf current-driven and voltage-driven cases. Results will be reported for collisional sheaths also. [1] M. A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16 (1988) 638; 17 (1989) 338 [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, J. Comp. Phys. 104 (1993) 321 [3] J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon and N. T. Gladd, Comp. Phys. Comm. 87 (1995) 199

  5. Hertwig’s Epithelial Root Sheath Fate during Initial Cellular Cementogenesis in Rat Molars

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Yamada, Tamaki; Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Hongo, Hiromi; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the fate of the epithelial root sheath during initial cellular cementogenesis, we examined developing maxillary first molars of rats by immunohistochemistry for keratin, vimentin, and tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) and by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). The advancing root end was divided into three sections, which follow three distinct stages of initial cellular cementogenesis: section 1, where the epithelial sheath is intact; section 2, where the epithelial sheath becomes fragmented; and section 3, where initial cellular cementogenesis begins. After fragmentation of the epithelial sheath, many keratin-positive epithelial sheath cells were embedded in the rapidly growing cellular cementum. A few unembedded epithelial cells located on the cementum surface. Dental follicle cells, precementoblasts, and cementoblasts showed immunoreactivity for vimentin and TNALP. In all three sections, there were virtually no cells possessing double immunoreactivity for vimentin-keratin or TNALP-keratin and only embedded epithelial cells showed TUNEL reactivity. Taken together, these findings suggest that: (1) epithelial sheath cells divide into two groups; one group is embedded in the cementum and thereafter dies by apoptosis, and the other survives on the cementum surface as epithelial cell rests of Malassez; and (2) epithelial sheath cells do not undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition during initial cellular cementogenesis. PMID:26160988

  6. Plasma sheath in the presences of non-Maxwellian energetic electrons and secondary emission electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jing; Lin, Binbin; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Yang, Youlei

    2016-07-01

    The formation of a sheath in front of a carbon or tungsten material plane immersed in a plasma containing non-Maxwellian energetic electrons and secondary emission electrons is studied using a 1D model. In the model, energetic electrons are described by the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and secondary electron emission (SEE) is produced by the electrons impinging on the wall. It is found that SEE coefficient depends on not only the sheath potential but also the EEDF profile of energetic electrons when a non-Maxwellian energetic electron component is present. The energetic electrons and associated secondary emission electrons can strongly modify ion velocity at sheath edge, floating potential and I–V probe characteristic. Due to the interdependence between SEE coefficient originating from the impact of non-Maxwellian energetic electrons on the wall and the sheath potential, with the increase in the energy of energetic electrons, a sudden jump phenomenon can be found in the profiles of SEE coefficient and other quantities such as floating potential and ion velocity at the sheath edge for tungsten wall, while for carbon wall they are the continuous variation. To begin with, the energetic electron component does not dominate the sheath, and I–V probe characteristic depends on both the EEDF profile of energetic electrons and material properties. Once the energetic electron component dominates the sheath, the analysis of I–V probe characteristic will yield the energy of energetic electrons.

  7. Effect of electron reflection on magnetized plasma sheath in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Ma, J. X. Wei, Zi-An

    2015-09-15

    Magnetized plasma sheaths in an oblique magnetic field were extensively investigated by conventionally assuming Boltzmann relation for electron density. This article presents the study of the magnetized sheath without using the Boltzmann relation but by considering the electron reflection along the magnetic field lines caused by the negative sheath potential. A generalized Bohm criterion is analytically derived, and sheath profiles are numerically obtained, which are compared with the results of the conventional model. The results show that the ion Mach number at the sheath edge normal to the wall has a strong dependence on the wall potential, which differs significantly from the conventional model in which the Mach number is independent of the wall potential. The floating wall potential is lower in the present model than that in the conventional model. Furthermore, the sheath profiles are appreciably narrower in the present model when the wall bias is low, but approach the result of the conventional model when the wall bias is high. The sheath thickness decreases with the increase of ion-to-electron temperature ratio and magnetic field strength but has a complex relationship with the angle of the magnetic field.

  8. Initial experience in the extraction of chronically implanted pacemaker leads using the Excimer laser sheath

    PubMed Central

    Levy, T; Walker, S; Paul, V

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the safety and efficiency of the Excimer laser sheath in extracting chronically implanted pacemaker leads.
PATIENTS—Eight patients were studied (one female, mean age 62 years, range 34 to 77) with 17 pacemaker leads (five atrial, 10 ventricular, two implantable defibrillator). The mean implantation time was 65 months (range 23 to 188). The indications for lead extraction were chronic infection (7), superior vena cava obstruction (4), lead malfunction (4), and pain (2).
METHODS—A prospective analysis of the use of the Excimer laser sheath in extracting chronically implanted pacemaker leads. Laser sheath extraction was undertaken if conventional extraction techniques with simple traction or traction with a locking stylet had failed. If laser sheath extraction was unsuccessful, basket retrieval of the lead from the groin was performed.
RESULTS—Complete lead removal was achieved in 16 leads (94%). In one case the electrode tip was left behind without complication. Extraction was achieved with the laser sheath alone in 16 leads. Basket retrieval was required in one case after laser failure. There were no complications.
CONCLUSIONS—The Excimer laser sheath appears to be an effective and safe technique for extracting chronically implanted pacemaker leads. It can be used in combination with the currently available techniques for successful lead extraction.


Keywords: Excimer laser sheath; lead extraction; pacing PMID:10377320

  9. Role of Balloon-Sheathed Intraductal Ultrasonography for Patients with Extensive Pneumobilia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha-Na; Park, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Eun-Ae; Rew, Soo-Jung; Park, In-Hyung; Lim, Sung-Uk; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Seon-Young; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) is one of the most useful diagnostic tools for various extrahepatic biliary diseases. However, conventional IDUS has some limitations in providing accurate cross-sectional imaging of the bile duct in patients with extensive pneumobilia. Using a balloon-sheathed catheter, the US system (balloon-sheathed IDUS) can overcome these limitations. Sixteen patients underwent balloon-sheathed IDUS during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. The balloon-sheathed IDUS was inserted via a transpapillary route when visualization of the bile duct with conventional IDUS was distorted by extensive pneumobilia. The patient group had a mean age of 65.5 years, and 56.3% (9/16) were male. The balloon-sheathed IDUS permitted successful visualization of the bile duct in all patients, regardless of the extent of pneumobilia. Using this system, remnant common bile duct stones were detected in five patients (31.3%), and cholangiocarcinoma was detected in one patient (6.3%). The balloon-sheath IDUS aided in stone sweeping. No significant complications, including bleeding, perforation, or pancreatitis, occurred in any of the patients. The balloon-sheathed catheter US system was useful and safe for biliary IDUS in patients with extensive pneumobilia. PMID:26033684

  10. Characteristics of wall sheath and secondary electron emission under different electron temperature in Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ping; Qin, Haijuan; Cao, Anning; Zhou, Xinwei; Chen, Long; Gao, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Characteristics of discharge channel wall plasma sheath in Hall thruster have great effects on its performance. In this paper, we establish a two-dimensional physical model in Hall thruster sheath area to investigate the influences of the different electron temperature, propellant and particle weight on sheath potential and secondary electron emission in Hall thruster, by the method of Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation. And the electric field at the particle position is obtained by solving the Poisson's equation. The numerical results show that when the electron temperature is low, the change of sheath potential drop is bigger than that with electrons at high temperature, the surface potential maintains a stable value and the stability of the sheath is good. When the electron temperature is high, the surface potential maintains persistent oscillation, and the stability of the sheath is reduced. Along with the increase of electron temperature, the coefficient of secondary electron emission in wall reduce after the first increasing. For three kinds of propellant (Ar, Kr, Xe), with the increase of ion mass, sheath potential and the secondary electron emission coefficient in turn reduce.

  11. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  12. Mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio-frequency sheath potentials on edge localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    The mitigating impact of thermal and rectified radio frequency (RF) sheath potentials on the peeling-ballooning modes is studied non-linearly by employing a two-fluid three-field simulation model based on the BOUT++ framework. Additional shear flow and the Kelvin-Helmholtz effect due to the thermal and rectified RF sheath potential are induced. It is found that the shear flow increases the growth rate while the K-H effect decreases the growth rate slightly when there is a density gradient, but the energy loss of these cases is suppressed in the nonlinear phase. The stronger external electrostatic field due to the sheaths has a more significant effect on the energy loss suppression. From this study, it is found the growth rate in the linear phase mainly determines the onset of edge-localized modes, while the mode spectrum width in the nonlinear phase has an important impact on the turbulent transport. The wider mode spectrum leads to weaker turbulent transport and results in a smaller energy loss. Due to the thermal sheath and rectified RF sheath potential in the scrape-off-layer, the modified shear flow tears apart the peeling-ballooning filament and makes the mode spectrum wider, resulting in less energy loss. The perturbed electric potential and the parallel current near the sheath region is also suppressed locally due to the sheath boundary condition.

  13. Features of the photosynthetic tissue in the sheaths of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhao Wu; He, Qiang; Feng, Deng Hua

    The photosynthesis of rice sheath plays a significant role to furnish rice yield, and it is accounted for 10 to 20% of the final yield. But, limited studies have been done to address this phenomenon and to characterize the features of the photosynthetic tissue in rice sheath. In this paper, a super hybrid rice and a hybrid rice were studied as the experimental materials, and the characteristics of the photosynthetic tissue in rice sheaths were examined by microscopic and super-microscopic observation. The results showed that the photosynthetic tissue of rice sheath was rich in the intact mesophyllous cells full of chloroplasts, grana and thylakoids, which were much the same as those of rice blade. The stomatal density in the outer epidermises of the sheaths was comparable to those in the up- and down-epidermises of the blades. The mesophyllous cells in the sheaths were also rich in chlorophylls, and had the net photosynthetic rate (Pn). Therefore, rice sheath was also full of the intact photosynthetic apparatus similar to those in rice blade, and had capabilities of photosynthesis.

  14. 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of plasma sheath formation above lunar craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhanskii, A.; Poppe, A. R.; Piquette, M.; Amyx, K.; Messmer, P.; Horanyi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Comprehensive investigation of plasma sheath formation and consequent dust levitation on lunar surface is important for interpretation of results of future lunar missions (such as LADEE and ARTEMIS). Until recently, most of such studies were done in experimental laboratories at reduced scales. Due to the complexity and nonlinearity of the problem, only simplified theories, describing this effect, were developed. However, recent progress in high-performance kinetic plasma simulations allowed tackling the problem of plasma sheath formation numerically. In this poster we will present the simulation results of plasma sheath formation above the lunar craters in presence of solar wind and photoelectron emission. These results were obtained using 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code VORPAL. In the simulations we considered plasma sheath formation for normal, 45 and 90 degree incidence solar wind. Sample distribution of electric field in plasma sheath is shown in Figure 1. In the second part of the poster, we will present results of simulations of the LASP (Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at University of Colorado) experiments on study of plasma sheath formation above hemispherical isolated dimple. Figure 1. Electric field distribution in the plasma sheath above the lunar crater

  15. The three dimensional shape and localisation of deformation within multilayer sheath folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.

    2012-11-01

    Sheath folds are widely believed to develop by the passive geometric amplification of folds in which layering has no mechanical influence during non-coaxial deformation. Where layering becomes rheologically significant, then active sheath folds may form in which the inner nose of the sheath decouples along detachments, and undergoes a translation relative to the outer folded layers that surround and envelope the nose. We present a systematic 3-D analysis of multiple folded layer geometries in a serially-sectioned natural sheath fold. Weak layers, which are reactivated as detachments, define different-shaped sheath folds relative to other layers, with the sense of cut-off along detachments reversing across the axial surface as the inner fold nose has “protruded” into the surrounding sheath envelope. Detachment layers are more tightly folded meaning that such active sheath folds are non-similar shapes. The obliquely oriented, bifurcating, en-echelon nature of the fold hinges developed in adjacent layers suggest that pre-cursor folds formed with pronounced 3-D obliquity relative to the subsequent shear plane. Mineral lineations folded around sheath closures display asymmetric “star-burst” patterns consistent with recrystallisation during active folding and hinge rotation. We show that the eye-fold shapes exposed in any 2-D y-z slice can be used to predict the geometry of marker horizons back along the x-axis in the third dimension. This self-similarity may be of value when tracing stratiform mineralised horizons in large-scale sheath folds.

  16. Excellent response of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of retroperitoneum to radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Ali; Binesh, Fariba; Ghannadi, Fazlollah; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are high-grade sarcomas originating from Schwann cells or nerve sheath cells. Most of these tumours are associated with major nerves of the body wall and extremities. The lower extremity and the retroperitoneum are the most common sites. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment, however, radiation therapy is usually used as an adjuvant treatment. In this paper we present a 57-year-old Iranian woman with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of retroperitoneum who was operated subtotally and then underwent radiation therapy which led to disappearance of all gross residual disease. PMID:23257269

  17. Dust charging and charge fluctuations in a weakly collisional radio-frequency sheath at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, Alexander Schmidt, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Models for the charging of dust particles in the bulk plasma and in the sheath region are discussed. A new model is proposed that describes collision-enhanced ion currents in the sheath. The collisions result in a substantial reduction of the negative charge of the dust. Experimental data for the dust charge in the sheath can be described by this model when a Bi-Maxwellian electron distribution is taken into account. Expressions for the dust charging rate for all considered models are presented and their influence on the rise of the kinetic dust temperature is discussed.

  18. Fat drops in wrist tendon sheaths on MRI in conjunction with a radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Martijn V; Chesaru, Ileana

    2016-08-01

    A case is presented in which fat drops are seen on MRI inside extensor compartment 2 and 3, in conjunction with a radius fracture. The occurrence of traumatic tendon sheath fat-fluid levels has been sparsely reported on CT and MR imaging. This case is the first report of post-traumatic tendon sheath fat drops. Although the clinical relevance of tendon sheath fat drops seems to be limited, it is important to detect and correctly diagnose these fat drops in order to provide an accurate and complete radiologic report. PMID:27170371

  19. Dissociation and Re-Aggregation of Multicell-Ensheathed Fragments Responsible for Rapid Production of Massive Clumps of Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; McFarlane, Ian R; Tamura, Katsunori; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Species of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix produce tremendous amounts of microtubular, Fe/Mn-encrusted sheaths within a few days in outwells of groundwater that can rapidly clog water systems. To understand this mode of rapid sheath production and define the timescales involved, behaviors of sheath-forming Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 were examined using time-lapse video at the initial stage of sheath formation. OUMS1 formed clumps of tangled sheaths. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of a thin layer of bacterial exopolymer fibrils around catenulate cells (corresponding to the immature sheath). In time-lapse videos, numerous sheath filaments that extended from the periphery of sheath clumps repeatedly fragmented at the apex of the same fragment, the fragments then aggregated and again elongated, eventually forming a large sheath clump comprising tangled sheaths within two days. In this study, we found that fast microscopic fragmentation, dissociation, re-aggregation and re-elongation events are the basis of the rapid, massive production of Leptothrix sheaths typically observed at macroscopic scales. PMID:27490579

  20. 3D Parylene sheath neural probe for chronic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Kuo, J. T. W.; Hara, S. A.; Lee, C. D.; Yu, L.; Gutierrez, C. A.; Hoang, T. Q.; Pikov, V.; Meng, E.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Reliable chronic recordings from implanted neural probes remain a significant challenge; current silicon-based and microwire technologies experience a wide range of biotic and abiotic failure modes contributing to loss of signal quality. Approach. A multi-prong alternative strategy with potential to overcome these hurdles is introduced that combines a novel three dimensional (3D), polymer-based probe structure with coatings. Specifically, the Parylene C sheath-based neural probe is coated with neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory factors loaded onto a Matrigel carrier to encourage the ingrowth of neuronal processes for improved recording quality, reduce the immune response, and promote improved probe integration into brain tissue for reliable, long-term implementation compared to its rigid counterparts. Main results. The 3D sheath structure of the probe was formed by thermal molding of a surface micromachined Parylene C microchannel, with electrode sites lining the interior and exterior regions of the lumen. Electrochemical characterization of the probes via cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was performed and indicated suitable electrode properties for neural recordings (1 kHz electrical impedance of ∼200 kΩ in vitro). A novel introducer tool for the insertion of the compliant polymer probe into neural tissue was developed and validated both in vitro using agarose gel and in vivo in the rat cerebral cortex. In vivo electrical functionality of the Parylene C-based 3D probes and their suitability for recording the neuronal activity over a 28-day period was demonstrated by maintaining the 1 kHz electrical impedance within a functional range (<400 kΩ) and achieving a reasonably high signal-to-noise ratio for detection of resolvable multi-unit neuronal activity on most recording sites in the probe. Immunohistochemical analysis of the implant site indicated strong correlations between the quality of recorded activity and the

  1. Experimental studies of anode sheath phenomena in a Hall thruster discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N. J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1070 (2004)]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, such as a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures.

  2. The endomembrane sheath: a key structure for understanding the plant cell?

    PubMed

    Reuzeau, C; McNally, J G; Pickard, B G

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that integrin is abundant in endomembranes of plant cells, and the endomembranes are clad by a sheath of cytoskeleton including F-actin. A role for endomembrane integrin and the endomembrane sheath is proposed: this system might orchestrate metabolic regulation by providing and modulating loci for channelling, and might accelerate channeling as needed by dragging the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and organelles through the cytoplasm. To accomplish this "streaming", F-actin might lever against the rest of the endomembrane sheath and the ER might also lever against adhesion sites (i.e., plasmodesmata and plasmalemmal control centers). As an important agent in the control of cellular activities, according to this model, the endomembrane sheath would play a major part in responses to diverse signals and stresses, and under extreme stress cell survival would depend on the ability of the system to maintain enough integrity to direct critical syntheses and degradations. PMID:11542471

  3. Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex formation and particle transport in a cross-field plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Theilhaber, K.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-02-13

    The time-dependent behavior of a magnetized, two-dimensional plasma-wall sheath has been studied through particle simulations, whcih have shown that the cross-field sheath develops into a turbulent boundary layer, driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The sheath acquires an equilibrium thickness l/sub x/approx.5rho/sub i/, and maintains long-lived vortices, with amplitudes deltaphiapprox.-2T/sub i//e, which drift parallel to the wall at half the ion thermal velocity. A central simulation result is that for ..omega../sub ..pi../greater than or equal to2..omega../sub ci/, the anomalous particle transport in the sheath scales like Bohn diffusion.

  4. Magnetized sheath near positively biased wall between two permanent magnetic plates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yan; Wei, Zi-an; Ma, J. X. Jiang, Zheng-qi; Wu, Fei

    2015-06-15

    The characteristics of magnetized electron sheath near a positively biased conducting wall parallel to magnetic field formed between two permanent magnetic plates were experimentally investigated in a double plasma device. The magnetic field strength between the magnetic plates is about 1200 G which is sufficient to magnetize the plasma such that the ion gyroradius is comparable to the electron Debye length. A virtual cathode (or potential dip) structure was found between the electron-rich sheath and bulk plasma. For a given neutral gas pressure, the potential minimum (dip position) remains almost the same for different positive biases on the wall. For a given bias on the wall, however, the electron sheath thickness and the potential drop from the bulk plasma to the dip decrease with the increase of the neutral gas pressure. In addition, the electron sheath and potential dip appear to be wider and deeper in the downstream side of the wall.

  5. Experimental studies of anode sheath phenomena in a Hall thruster discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-05-15

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N. J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1070 (2004)]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, such as a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures.

  6. Experimental Studies of Anode Sheath Phenomena in a Hall Thruster Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    L. Dorf; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-12-17

    Both electron-repelling and electron-attracting anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were characterized by measuring the plasma potential with biased and emissive probes [L. Dorf, Y. Raitses, V. Semenov, and N.J. Fisch, Appl. Phys. Let. 84 (2004) 1070]. In the present work, two-dimensional structures of the plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density in the near-anode region of a Hall thruster with clean and dielectrically coated anodes are identified. Possible mechanisms of anode sheath formation in a Hall thruster are analyzed. The path for current closure to the anode appears to be the determining factor in the anode sheath formation process. The main conclusion of this work is that the anode sheath formation in Hall thrusters differs essentially from that in the other gas discharge devices, like a glow discharge or a hollow anode, because the Hall thruster utilizes long electron residence times to ionize rather than high neutral pressures.

  7. Sheath-limited unipolar induction in the solar wind. [plasma interactions with solar system bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    A model of the steady-state interaction between the solar wind and an electrically conducting body having neither an atmosphere nor an intrinsic magnetic field sufficient enough to deflect the plasma flow is presented which considers some effects of a plasma surface sheath on unipolar induction. The Sonett-Colburn (1967, 1968) unipolar dynamo model is reviewed, and it is noted that the unipolar dynamo response of an electrically conducting body in the solar wind's motional field can be controlled by sheath effects in certain cases where the body radius is less than a certain critical value. It is shown that sheath effects do not limit the unipolar response of the moon or Mercury since their body radii are much larger than their critical radii. Sheath effects are also considered for asteroids, the Martian satellites, the irregular Jovian satellites, the outer satellites of Saturn, and meteorite parent bodies in a primordial enhanced solar wind.

  8. The endomembrane sheath: a key structure for understanding the plant cell?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuzeau, C.; McNally, J. G.; Pickard, B. G.

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that integrin is abundant in endomembranes of plant cells, and the endomembranes are clad by a sheath of cytoskeleton including F-actin. A role for endomembrane integrin and the endomembrane sheath is proposed: this system might orchestrate metabolic regulation by providing and modulating loci for channelling, and might accelerate channeling as needed by dragging the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and organelles through the cytoplasm. To accomplish this "streaming", F-actin might lever against the rest of the endomembrane sheath and the ER might also lever against adhesion sites (i.e., plasmodesmata and plasmalemmal control centers). As an important agent in the control of cellular activities, according to this model, the endomembrane sheath would play a major part in responses to diverse signals and stresses, and under extreme stress cell survival would depend on the ability of the system to maintain enough integrity to direct critical syntheses and degradations.

  9. A Semianalytical Ion Current Model for Radio Frequency Driven Collisionless Sheaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We propose a semianalytical ion dynamics model for a collisionless radio frequency biased sheath. The model uses bulk plasma conditions and electrode boundary condition to predict ion impact energy distribution and electrical properties of the sheath. The proposed model accounts for ion inertia and ion current modulation at bias frequencies that are of the same order of magnitude as the ion plasma frequency. A relaxation equation for ion current oscillations is derived which is coupled with a damped potential equation in order to model ion inertia effects. We find that inclusion of ion current modulation in the sheath model shows marked improvements in the predictions of sheath electrical properties and ion energy distribution function.

  10. Effect of anisotropy of electron velocity distribution function on dynamic characteristics of sheath in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Fengkui; Wu Xiande; Ding Yongjie; Li Hong; Yu Daren

    2011-10-15

    In Hall thrusters, the electron velocity distribution function is not only depleted at high energies, but also strongly anisotropic. With these electrons interacting with the channel wall, the sheath will be changed in its dynamic characteristics. In the present letter, a two dimensional particle-in-cell code is used to simulate these effects in a collisionless plasma slab. The simulated results indicate that the sheath changes from steady regime to temporal oscillation regime when the electron velocity distribution function alters from isotropy to anisotropy. Moreover, the temporal oscillation sheath formed by the anisotropic electrons has a much greater oscillating amplitude and a much smaller average potential drop than that formed by the isotropic electrons has. The anisotropic electrons are also found to lower the critical value of electron temperature needed for the appearance of the spatial oscillation sheath.

  11. Three dimensional space charge model for large high voltage satellites. [plasma sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooks, D.; Parker, L. W.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    High power solar arrays for satellite power systems with dimensions of kilometers, and with tens of kilovolts distributed over their surface face many plasma interaction problems that must be properly anticipated. In most cases, the effects cannot be adequately modeled without detailed knowledge of the plasma sheath structure and space charge effects. Two computer programs were developed to provide fully self consistent plasma sheath models in three dimensions as a result of efforts to model the experimental plasma sheath studies at NASA/JSC. Preliminary results indicate that for the conditions considered, the Child-Langmuir diode theory can provide a useful estimate of the plasma sheath thickness. The limitations of this conclusion are discussed. Some of the models presented exhibit the strong ion focusing observed in the JSC experiments.

  12. The structure and development of the starch sheath in pea epicotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Graviperception in plant stems is thought to occur in endodermal cells differentiated as a starch sheath, but little is known about the ultrastructure of these cells in dicots. The structure of the pea starch sheath was studied with respect to gravity and to development in order to determine whether symplastic or apoplastic blockages exist and to describe any intracellular polarity. Amyloplasts increase in size towards the base of the epicotyl hook but are not consistently sedimented until the cells enter the zone exhibiting gravicurvature below the hook. The starch sheath cells are connected to each other and to cells of the cortex and the stele by plasmodesmata. A casparian strip exists in older endodermal cells but not at the stage that the endodermis is differentiated as a starch sheath. Amyloplasts were frequently observed in apparent contact with endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Enhancing resolution of free-flow zone electrophoresis via a simple sheath-flow sample injection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Liu, Ji; Li, Jun-Min; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ju-Fang; Xiao, Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Li, Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a simple and novel sheath-flow sample injection method (SFSIM) is introduced to reduce the band broadening of free-flow zone electrophoresis separation in newly developed self-balance free-flow electrophoresis instrument. A needle injector was placed in the center of the separation inlet, into which the BGE and sample solution were pumped simultaneously. BGE formed sheath flow outside the sample stream, resulting in less band broadening related to hydrodynamics and electrodynamics. Hemoglobin and C-phycocyanin were successfully separated by the proposed method in contrast to the poor separation of free-flow electrophoresis with the traditional injection method without sheath flow. About 3.75 times resolution enhancement could be achieved by sheath-flow sample injection method. PMID:27121853

  14. Effect of flexor sheath integrity on nutrient uptake by chicken flexor tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.W.; Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of varying degrees of flexor sheath integrity (sheath excised, incised, or incised and repaired) on the uptake of /sub 2/H-proline by chicken flexor tendons in Zone II was studied. The tendons were either: normal and uninjured, lacerated and repaired, or uninjured except for vinculum longum ligation. Different degrees of sheath integrity did not influence the uptake of /sub 2/H-proline by the tendons. The tendon does not appear to be dependent on a synovial environment for nutrients and is capable of obtaining these nutrients by diffusion from the surrounding extracellular tissue fluid. Diffusion is the primary nutrient pathway to the flexor tendon in this area, because removing its major vascular attachment (i.e., the vinculum longum) did not effect proline uptake. Careful closure of the sheath with restoration of a synovial environment does not appear to be necessary for tendon nutrition.

  15. ICME-driven sheath regions deplete the outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Kilpua, E. K.; Turner, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    It is an outstanding question in space weather and solar wind-magnetosphere interaction studies, why some storms result in an increase of the outer radiation belt electron fluxes, while others deplete them or produce no change. One approach to this problem is to look at differences in the storm drivers. Traditionally drivers have been classified to Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). However, an 'ICME event' is a complex structure: The core is a magnetic cloud (MC; a clear flux rope structure). If the mass ejection is fast enough, it can drive a shock in front of it. This leads to the formation of a sheath region between the interplanetary shock and the leading edge of the MC. While both the sheath and the MC feature elevated solar wind speed, their other properties are very different. For instance, the sheath region has typically a much higher dynamic pressure than the magnetic cloud. Moreover, the sheath region has a high power in magnetic field and dynamic pressure Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) range fluctuations, while the MC is characterised by an extremely smooth magnetic field. Magnetic clouds have been recognised as important drivers magnetospheric activity since they can comprise long periods of very large southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that sheath regions can also act as storm drivers. In this study, we analyse the effects of ICME-driven sheath regions on the relativistic electron fluxes observed by GOES satellites on the geostationary orbit. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of 31 sheath regions from solar cycle 23. Our results show that the sheaths cause an approximately one order of magnitude decrease in the 24h-averaged electron fluxes. Typically the fluxes also stay below the pre-event level for more than two days. Further analysis reveals that the decrease does not depend on, e.g., whether the sheath interval contains predominantly northward

  16. Bioactive Sheath/Core nanofibers containing olive leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Gamze; Başal, Güldemet; Bayraktar, Oğuz; Özyildiz, Figen; Uzel, Ataç; Erdoğan, İpek

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at producing silk fibroin (SF)/hyaluronic acid (HA) and olive leaf extract (OLE) nanofibers with sheath/core morphology by coaxial electrospinning method, determining their antimicrobial properties, and examining release profiles of OLE from these coaxial nanofibers. Optimum electrospinning process and solution parameters were determined to obtain uniform and bead-free coaxial nanofibers. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the morphology of the nanofibers. The antimicrobial activities of nanofibers were tested according to AATCC test method 100. Total phenolic content and total antioxidant activity were tested using in vitro batch release system. The quality and quantity of released components of OLE were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The changes in nanofibers were examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Uniform and bead-free nanofibers were produced successfully. TEM images confirmed the coaxial structure. OLE-loaded nanofibers demonstrated almost perfect antibacterial activities against both of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Antifungal activity against C. albicans was rather poor. After a release period of 1 month, it was observed that ∼70-95% of the OLE was released from nanofibers and it was still bioactive. Overall results indicate that the resultant shell/core nanofibers have a great potential to be used as biomaterials. PMID:26626545

  17. Vascular access complications in endovascular procedures with large sheaths.

    PubMed

    Lejay, Anne; Caspar, Thibault; Ohana, Mickaël; Delay, Charline; Girsowicz, Elie; Ohlmann, P; Thaveau, Fabien; Geny, Bernard; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular procedures, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), and endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) have been established as promising less invasive therapeutic options. However, despite continuous advances and device improvements, the use of large-sheaths still remains an important challenge, since significant coexisting arterial disease may be encountered in patients undergoing such procedures. Identification of coexisting arterial diseases by optimal preoperative imaging assessment is essential to anticipate these difficulties and avoid the complications by using adequate access options. Should a vascular complication such as iliac rupture occur, vascular interventionists must be aware of salvage procedures to control and treat major complications, such as maintaining wire access across the rupture for occlusion balloon placement and vessel control, while disruption is addressed either through an endovascular or an open approach. The aims of this review are to describe how to prevent vascular complications by optimal preoperative imaging assessment, to detail intraoperative options available for addressing difficult access issues and to discuss how to manage intraoperative major vascular complications. PMID:26603161

  18. Chronic fibrous sheath mistaken for retained pacemaker product.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Sheraz A; Hudsmith, Lucy; Newton, James D; Betts, Tim R

    2009-03-01

    A 71-year-old man underwent implantation of a single-chamber system in 1988 for sinoatrial disease, which was then upgraded to dual-chamber 7 years later following recurrent syncope. He presented with pacemaker erosion but without clinical or laboratory evidence of infective endocarditis. The pacemaker system was uneventfully extracted 5 days later via a transfemoral approach using a needle-eye snare. A post-procedure trans-thoracic echocardiogram was performed, which demonstrated an echogenic structure in the right atrium-this was initially felt to be a retained fragment of pacing lead. A short-axis view of the tricuspid valve with a bright linear echo crossing is shown in Figure 1. However, a post-procedural chest X-ray confirmed the absence of any retained intra-cardiac lead. The reverberant cast-like structure noted is a heavily calcified fibrous sheath as the pacing leads were confirmed to be intact at the time of removal. PMID:19147697

  19. Plasmonic coupling on dielectric nanowire core-metal sheath composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hua; Alexson, Dimitri; Glembocki, Orest; Prokes, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed dielectric core/metal sheath nanowire (NW) composites for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), in which an electroless (EL) Ag plating approach was employed. The NW surface was uniformly covered with a high density of 3D silver islands, having a diameter in the 20-30 nm range and spaced less than ≈10 nm apart. In comparison with the silver deposition via e-beam evaporation, the EL coating approach has the advantage of full metal coverage of the NWs. This approach also provides a fast and simple way to completely cover any nanostructures with Ag, including nanowires, regardless of the orientation or shape. SERS measurements were performed using benzene thiol and the SERS signal strength of the EL-coated NW composites was significantly greater than expected, since the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of 20 nm Ag nanospheres is weak and in the UV, while our measurements were performed using a 514.5 nm laser line. However, we have modeled this system using our electric field calculations and the results indicate that the strong SERS signal is due to plasmonic coupling of neighboring closely spaced islands, as well as an enhanced substrate effect. In addition, the nanowire core serves as a template for the formation of these small, closely spaced Ag islands, resulting in the strong SERS signal.

  20. Temperature response of bundle-sheath conductance in maize leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xinyou; van der Putten, Peter E.L.; Driever, Steven M.; Struik, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    A small bundle-sheath conductance (g bs) is essential for the C4 CO2-concentrating mechanism to suppress photorespiration effectively. To predict the productivity of C4 crops accurately under global warming, it is necessary to examine whether and how g bs responds to temperature. We investigated the temperature response of g bs in maize by fitting a C4 photosynthesis model to combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of irradiance and CO2 response curves at 21% and 2% O2 within the range of 13.5–39 °C. The analysis was based on reported kinetic constants of C4 Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and temperature responses of C3 mesophyll conductance (g m). The estimates of g bs varied greatly with leaf temperature. The temperature response of g bs was well described by the peaked Arrhenius equation, with the optimum temperature being ~34 °C. The assumed temperature responses of g m had only a slight impact on the temperature response of g bs. In contrast, using extreme values of some enzyme kinetic constants changed the shape of the response, from the peaked optimum response to the non-peaked Arrhenius pattern. Further studies are needed to confirm such an Arrhenius response pattern from independent measurement techniques and to assess whether it is common across C4 species. PMID:26969744

  1. High voltage plasma sheath analysis related to TSS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1990-01-01

    On the first mission of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1), a 1.8 m diameter spherical satellite will be deployed a distance of 20 km above the Space Shuttle Orbiter on an insulated conducting tether. The satellite will be held at electric potentials up to 5000 volts positive with respect to the ambient plasma. Due to the passage of the conducting tether through the Earth's magnetic field, an electromagnetic field (EMF) will be created, driving electrons down the tether to the Orbiter, out through an electron gun into the ionosphere and back into the positive-biased satellite. The main problem addressed here is the current-voltage characteristics of the ionospheric interaction with the satellite. The first problem is that while the satellite will be capable of measuring charged particle flow to the surface at several locations, the detectors have a limited range of acceptance angle. The second problem is that the angle of incidence of the incoming electrons will have to be relative to the local normal. This will be important in order to predict the magnitude of the detectable current at each detector location so the detector gain can be pre-set to the correct range. The plasma sheath was analyzed mathematically, and subroutines were written to solve relevant finite element, Taylor-Vlasov, and Poisson equations.

  2. Plasmonic coupling on dielectric nanowire core-metal sheath composites.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hua; Alexson, Dimitri; Glembocki, Orest; Prokes, S M

    2010-02-26

    We have developed dielectric core/metal sheath nanowire (NW) composites for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), in which an electroless (EL) Ag plating approach was employed. The NW surface was uniformly covered with a high density of 3D silver islands, having a diameter in the 20-30 nm range and spaced less than approximately 10 nm apart. In comparison with the silver deposition via e-beam evaporation, the EL coating approach has the advantage of full metal coverage of the NWs. This approach also provides a fast and simple way to completely cover any nanostructures with Ag, including nanowires, regardless of the orientation or shape. SERS measurements were performed using benzene thiol and the SERS signal strength of the EL-coated NW composites was significantly greater than expected, since the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of 20 nm Ag nanospheres is weak and in the UV, while our measurements were performed using a 514.5 nm laser line. However, we have modeled this system using our electric field calculations and the results indicate that the strong SERS signal is due to plasmonic coupling of neighboring closely spaced islands, as well as an enhanced substrate effect. In addition, the nanowire core serves as a template for the formation of these small, closely spaced Ag islands, resulting in the strong SERS signal. PMID:20097974

  3. Temperature response of bundle-sheath conductance in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinyou; van der Putten, Peter E L; Driever, Steven M; Struik, Paul C

    2016-04-01

    A small bundle-sheath conductance (g bs) is essential for the C4 CO2-concentrating mechanism to suppress photorespiration effectively. To predict the productivity of C4 crops accurately under global warming, it is necessary to examine whether and how g bs responds to temperature. We investigated the temperature response of g bs in maize by fitting a C4 photosynthesis model to combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of irradiance and CO2 response curves at 21% and 2% O2 within the range of 13.5-39 °C. The analysis was based on reported kinetic constants of C4 Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and temperature responses of C3 mesophyll conductance (g m). The estimates of g bs varied greatly with leaf temperature. The temperature response of g bs was well described by the peaked Arrhenius equation, with the optimum temperature being ~34 °C. The assumed temperature responses of g m had only a slight impact on the temperature response of g bs In contrast, using extreme values of some enzyme kinetic constants changed the shape of the response, from the peaked optimum response to the non-peaked Arrhenius pattern. Further studies are needed to confirm such an Arrhenius response pattern from independent measurement techniques and to assess whether it is common across C4 species. PMID:26969744

  4. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Infraorbital Nerve.

    PubMed

    D'Addino, José Luis; Piccoletti, Laura; Pigni, María Mercedes; de Gordon, Maria José Rodriguez Arenas

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to report a large, rare, and ulcerative infiltrated skin lesion. Its diagnosis, therapeutic management, and progress are described. The patient is a 78-year-old white man, who presented with a 12-month ulcerative perforated lesion that had affected and infiltrated the skin, with easy bleeding. He had a history of hypertension, although controlled, was a 40-year smoker, had chronic atrial fibrillation, diabetes, and microangiopathy. During the consultation, the patient also presented with ocular obstruction due to an inability to open the eye. He mentioned having reduced vision. The computed tomography scan showed upper maxilla osteolysis without eye involvement. We underwent a radical resection in which upper maxilla and the anterior orbital margin were included. We used a Becker-type flap that allowed us to rebuild the cheek and to complete a modified neck dissection. Progress was favorable; the patient recovered ocular motility and his vision improved to 20/200. The final biopsy result was "malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, malignant schwannoma." Malignant schwannoma of the peripheral nerve is extremely rare. The total resection and reconstruction being completed in one surgery represented a challenge due to the difficulty in obtaining tissues in addition to the necessity of an oncological resection. PMID:27162577

  5. Highly Compliant Vascular Grafts with Gelatin-Sheathed Coaxially Structured Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Nagiah, Naveen; Johnson, Richard; Anderson, Roy; Elliott, Winston; Tan, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We have developed three types of materials composed of polyurethane-gelatin, polycaprolactone-gelatin, or polylactic acid-gelatin nanofibers by coaxially electrospinning the hydrophobic core and gelatin sheath with a ratio of 1:5 at fixed concentrations. Results from attenuated total reflection-Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the gelatin coating around nanofibers in all of the materials. Transmission electron microscopy images further displayed the core-sheath structures showing the core-to-sheath thickness ratio varied greatly with the highest ratio found in polyurethane-gelatin nanofibers. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed similar, uniform fibrous structures in all of the materials, which changed with genipin cross-linking due to interfiber interactions. Thermal analyses revealed varied interactions between the hydrophilic sheath and hydrophobic core among the three materials, which likely caused different core-sheath structures, and thus physicomechanical properties. The addition of gelatin around the hydrophobic polymer and their interactions led to the formation of graft scaffolds with tissue-like viscoelasticity, high compliance, excellent swelling capability, and absence of water permeability while maintaining competent tensile modulus, burst pressure, and suture retention. The hydrogel-like characteristics are advantageous for vascular grafting use, because of the capability of bypassing preclotting prior to implantation, retaining vascular fluid volume, and facilitating molecular transport across the graft wall, as shown by coculturing vascular cells sandwiched over a thick-wall scaffold. Varied core-sheath interactions within scaffolding nanofibers led to differences in graft functional properties such as water swelling ratio, compliance, and supporting growth of cocultured vascular cells. The PCL-gelatin scaffold with thick gelatin-sheathed nanofibers demonstrated a more compliant structure, elastic mechanics, and high

  6. Self-consistent simulation of high-frequency driven plasma sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab, Mohammed; Eremin, Denis; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Low pressure capacitively coupled plasmas are widely used in plasma processing and microelectronics industry. Understanding the dynamics of the boundary sheath is a fundamental problem. It controls the energy and angular distribution of ions bombarding the electrode, which in turn affects the surface reaction rate and the profile of microscopic features. In this contribution, we investigate the dynamics of plasma boundary sheaths by means of a kinetic self-consistent model, which is able to resolve the ion dynamics. Asymmetric sheath dynamics is observed for the intermediate RF regime, i.e., in the regime where the ion plasma frequency is equal to the driving frequency. The ion inertia causes an additional phase difference between the expansion and the contraction phase of the plasma sheath and an asymmetry for the ion energy distribution bimodal shape. A comparison with experimental results and particle in cell simulations is performed. Low pressure capacitively coupled plasmas are widely used in plasma processing and microelectronics industry. Understanding the dynamics of the boundary sheath is a fundamental problem. It controls the energy and angular distribution of ions bombarding the electrode, which in turn affects the surface reaction rate and the profile of microscopic features. In this contribution, we investigate the dynamics of plasma boundary sheaths by means of a kinetic self-consistent model, which is able to resolve the ion dynamics. Asymmetric sheath dynamics is observed for the intermediate RF regime, i.e., in the regime where the ion plasma frequency is equal to the driving frequency. The ion inertia causes an additional phase difference between the expansion and the contraction phase of the plasma sheath and an asymmetry for the ion energy distribution bimodal shape. A comparison with experimental results and particle in cell simulations is performed. The financial support from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research within the frame of

  7. Planar magnetic structures in coronal mass ejection-driven sheath regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerio, Erika; Kilpua, Emilia; Savani, Neel

    2016-04-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) often travel in the interplanetary space faster than the ambient solar wind. When their relative velocities exceed the local magnetosonic speed, a shock wave forms. The region between the shock front and the leading edge is known as sheath region. Sheaths are compressed regions characterized by turbulent magnetic field and plasma properties and they can cause significant space weather disturbances. Moreover, sheaths often exhibit a complex internal structure, which makes understanding their formation and predicting their geoeffectivity particularly difficult. Planar magnetic structures (PMSs) are frequently reported in CME-driven sheath regions. The magnetic field vectors in a PMS are characterized by abrupt changes in direction and magnitude, but they all remain for a time interval of several hours nearly parallel to a single plane that includes the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) spiral direction but is inclined to the ecliptic plane. We present the study of PMSs in the sheath region of CMEs for a sample of 95 events observed in situ by the ACE and Wind spacecraft in the period 1997-2015. The presence of planar structures is detected with an automated method and evaluated through the minimum variance analysis (MVA), needed for determining the normal vector to the PMS-plane. We relate the occurrence and location of the PMSs to various shock, sheath and CME properties. We show in addition the dependence of the angle between the IP shock and PMS plane normals with respect to the PMS location within the sheath. Finally, we study the amount of strongly southward magnetic fields in planar and non-planar parts of the sheath, aiming at determining whether either feature is more likely to drive magnetospheric activity.

  8. Wall current closure effects on plasma and sheath fluctuations in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Frias, Winston Smolyakov, Andrei I.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-06-15

    The excitation of negative energy, ion sound type modes driven by the E × B drift and the reactive/dissipative response of the wall sheath interface is analyzed for conditions typical in a Hall thruster. Such sheath impedance modes are sensitive to the dielectric properties of the thruster wall material, which therefore may have direct influence (other than via the secondary electron emission) on fluctuations and transport. Our results predict mode frequencies consistent with the frequencies of fluctuations observed experimentally.

  9. Benign Nerve Sheath Myxoma in an Infant Misdiagnosed as Infantile Digital Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Şule; Şişman, Servet; Kocaturk, Emek; Oguz Topal, Ilteris; Yıldırım, Selda

    2016-07-01

    Herein we present the case of a 16-month boy, clinically diagnosed with infantile digital fibromatosis, but 9 months after continued growth, the mass was excised and the histopathologic diagnosis was that of a benign nerve sheath myxoma. We present this case to emphasize that nerve sheath myxomas (also known as myxoid neurothekeoma) should be included in the differential diagnosis of dermal nodules in infants. PMID:27196676

  10. Downsized Sheath-Core Conducting Fibers for Weavable Superelastic Wires, Biosensors, Supercapacitors, and Strain Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Liu, Zunfeng; Ding, Jianning; Lepró, Xavier; Fang, Shaoli; Jiang, Nan; Yuan, Ninyi; Wang, Run; Yin, Qu; Lv, Wei; Liu, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Mei; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Inoue, Kanzan; Yin, Shougen; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-07-01

    Hair-like-diameter superelastic conducting fibers, comprising a buckled carbon nanotube sheath on a rubber core, are fabricated, characterized, and deployed as weavable wires, biosensors, supercapacitors, and strain sensors. These downsized sheath-core fibers provide the demonstrated basis for glucose sensors, supercapacitors, and electrical interconnects whose performance is undegraded by giant strain, as well as ultrafast strain sensors that exploit strain-dependent capacitance changes. PMID:27135200

  11. Sheath broadening in imploding z-pinches due to large-bandwidth Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Tabak, M.; Toor, A.; Zimmerman, G.B.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-06-04

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability has been predicted and observed to cause breakup of the plasma sheath in imploding Z-pinches. In this work we show that for the type of density profile encountered in strongly radiating pinches, instability at very short wavelengths grows to the non-linear stage and seeds progressively longer wavelengths. The result is a self-similar broadening of the sheath as found for mix layers in fluid RT unstable systems.

  12. Simulation of the collisional sheath structure near the outer wall of the Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Nejoh, YasuNori; Yamamura, Yuki

    2005-03-01

    In order to study the inner structure of the sheath near the outer wall of the Hall thruster, a simulation associated with the equation of momentum transfer with the ion-neutral collision and Poisson's equation having dust grains and photoelectrons is performed. It is found that the velocity of ions, the potential, the space charge density, and the density distributions of electrons, ions, photoelectrons, and dust grains are different from those of the traditional sheath.

  13. The structural evolution of sheath folds: A case study from Cap de Creus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Carreras, J.

    2007-12-01

    It has long been recognised that within zones of intense non-coaxial deformation, fold hinges may rotate progressively towards the transport direction ultimately resulting in highly curvilinear sheath folds. However, there is a surprising lack of detailed and systematic field analysis of such "evolving" sheath folds. This case study therefore focuses on the sequential development of cm-scale curvilinear folds in the greenschist-facies El Llimac shear zone, Cap de Creus, Spain. This simple shear-dominated dextral shear zone displays superb three dimensional exposures of sheath folds defined by mylonitic quartz bands within phyllonite. Increasing amounts of fold hinge curvature ( δ) are marked by hinge segments rotating into sub-parallelism with the mineral lineation (Lm), whilst the acute angle between the axial-planar hinge girdle and foliation ( ω) also displays a sequential reduction. Although Lm bisects the noses of sheath folds, it is also clearly folded and wrapped-around the sheath hinges. Lm typically preserves a larger angle ( θ) with the fold hinge on the lower limb ( L) compared to the upper ( U) limb ( θL > θU), suggesting that Lm failed to achieve a steady orientation on the lower limb. Adjacent sheath fold hinges forming fold pairs may display the same sense of hinge arcing to define synthetic curvature, or alternatively opposing directions of antithetic curvature. Such patterns reflect original buckle fold geometries coupled with the direction of shearing. The ratio of long/short fold limbs decreases with increasing hinge curvilinearity, indicating sheath folds developed via stretching of the short limb, rather than migrating or rolling hinge models. This study unequivocally demonstrates that both hinges of fold pairs become curvilinear with sheaths closing in the transport direction recording greater hinge-line curvilinearity compared to adjacent return hinges. This may provide a useful guide to bulk shear sense.

  14. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  15. Hertwig's epithelial root sheath cells do not transform into cementoblasts in rat molar cementogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Takahashi, Shigeru

    2009-12-01

    It is generally accepted that cementoblasts originate in the process of differentiation of the mesenchymal cells of the dental follicle. Recently, a different hypothesis for the origin of cementoblasts has been proposed. Hertwig's epithelial root sheath cells undergo the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation to differentiate into cementoblasts. To elucidate whether the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation occurs in the epithelial sheath, developing rat molars were examined by keratin-vimentin and Runx2 (runt-related transcription factor 2)-keratin double immunostaining. In both acellular and cellular cementogenesis, epithelial sheath and epithelial cells derived from the epithelial sheath expressed keratin, but did not express vimentin or Runx2. Dental follicle cells and cementoblasts, however, expressed vimentin and Runx2, but did not express keratin. No cells showed coexisting keratin-vimentin or Runx2-keratin staining. These findings suggest that there is no intermediate phenotype transforming epithelial to mesenchymal cells, and that epithelial sheath cells do not generate mineralized tissue. This study concludes that the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation does not occur in Hertwig's epithelial root sheath in rat acellular or cellular cementogenesis and that the dental follicle is the origin of cementoblasts, as has been proposed in the original hypothesis. PMID:19716687

  16. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases. PMID:26934901

  17. Solid dispersions in the form of electrospun core-sheath nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deng-Guang; Zhu, Li-Min; Branford-White, Christopher J; Yang, Jun-He; Wang, Xia; Li, Ying; Qian, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this investigation was to develop a new type of solid dispersion in the form of core-sheath nanofibers using coaxial electrospinning for poorly water-soluble drugs. Different functional ingredients can be placed in various parts of core-sheath nanofibers to improve synergistically the dissolution and permeation properties of encapsulated drugs and to enable drugs to exert their actions. Methods Using acyclovir as a model drug, polyvinylpyrrolidone as the hydrophilic filament-forming polymer matrix, sodium dodecyl sulfate as a transmembrane enhancer, and sucralose as a sweetener, core-sheath nanofibers were successfully prepared, with the sheath part consisting of polyvinylpyrrolidone, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and sucralose, and the core part composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone and acyclovir. Results The core-sheath nanofibers had an average diameter of 410 ± 94 nm with a uniform structure and smooth surface. Differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffraction results demonstrated that acyclovir, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and sucralose were well distributed in the polyvinylpyrrolidone matrix in an amorphous state due to favoring of second-order interactions. In vitro dissolution and permeation studies showed that the core-sheath nanofiber solid dispersions could rapidly release acyclovir within one minute, with an over six-fold increased permeation rate across the sublingual mucosa compared with that of crude acyclovir particles. Conclusion The study reported here provides an example of the systematic design, preparation, characterization, and application of a novel type of solid dispersion consisting of multiple components and structural characteristics. PMID:22228995

  18. Instability, collapse, and oscillation of sheaths caused by secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanell, M. D.; Khrabrov, A. V.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Debye sheath is shown to be unstable under general conditions. For surface materials with sufficient secondary electron emission (SEE) yields, the surface's current-voltage characteristic has an unstable branch when the bulk plasma temperature (Te) exceeds a critical value, or when there are fast electron populations present. The plasma-surface interaction becomes dynamic where the sheath may undergo spontaneous transitions or oscillations. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we analyze sheath instabilities occurring in a high Te plasma slab bounded by walls with SEE. As the plasma evolves, whenever the sheath enters an unstable state, its amplitude rapidly collapses, allowing a large flux of previously trapped electrons to hit the wall. These hot electrons induce more than one secondary on average, causing a net loss of electrons from the wall. The sheath collapse quenches when the surface charge becomes positive because the attractive field inhibits further electrons from escaping. Sheath instabilities influence the current balance, energy loss, cross-B-field transport and even the bulk plasma properties. Implications for discharges including Hall thrusters are discussed. More generally, the results show that common theories that treat emission as a fixed (time-independent) "coefficient" do not capture the full extent of SEE effects.

  19. Movement and structure of mitochondria in oligodendrocytes and their myelin sheaths.

    PubMed

    Rinholm, Johanne E; Vervaeke, Koen; Tadross, Michael R; Tkachuk, Ariana N; Kopek, Benjamin G; Brown, Timothy A; Bergersen, Linda H; Clayton, David A

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria play several crucial roles in the life of oligodendrocytes. During development of the myelin sheath they are essential providers of carbon skeletons and energy for lipid synthesis. During normal brain function their consumption of pyruvate will be a key determinant of how much lactate is available for oligodendrocytes to export to power axonal function. Finally, during calcium-overload induced pathology, as occurs in ischemia, mitochondria may buffer calcium or induce apoptosis. Despite their important functions, very little is known of the properties of oligodendrocyte mitochondria, and mitochondria have never been observed in the myelin sheaths. We have now used targeted expression of fluorescent mitochondrial markers to characterize the location and movement of mitochondria within oligodendrocytes. We show for the first time that mitochondria are able to enter and move within the myelin sheath. Within the myelin sheath the highest number of mitochondria was in the cytoplasmic ridges along the sheath. Mitochondria moved more slowly than in neurons and, in contrast to their behavior in neurons and astrocytes, their movement was increased rather than inhibited by glutamate activating NMDA receptors. By electron microscopy we show that myelin sheath mitochondria have a low surface area of cristae, which suggests a low ATP production. These data specify fundamental properties of the oxidative phosphorylation system in oligodendrocytes, the glial cells that enhance cognition by speeding action potential propagation and provide metabolic support to axons. GLIA 2016;64:810-825. PMID:26775288

  20. The magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma with nanosize dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdipour, H.; Foroutan, G.

    2010-08-15

    The magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma is investigated via numerical simulations of stationary multifluid equations by taking into account the electric, magnetic, gravitational, ion drag, neutral drag, and thermophoretic forces. Dependence of the sheath properties on the characteristics of the magnetic field and plasma parameters is explored. The sheath dynamics is mainly governed by the electric and ion drag forces and the effect of gravitation is negligible. The sheath demonstrates a nonmonotonic behavior against variations of the magnetic intensity and its angle of incidence. The sheath thickness and the maximum of dust density distribution decrease with increasing the ion to electron density ratio at the sheath edge, but increase with growing electron temperature and the positive temperature gradient of the neutrals. The effects of ion drag are similar to those of the gravitational force as both of them accelerate the dust to the wall. By a suitable configuration of the temperature gradient in the neutral gas, thermophoretic force can be utilized to deposit the building units of nanostructures on a substrate or remove any unwanted contaminant from its neighborhood.

  1. Instability, Collapse and Oscillation of Sheaths Caused by Secondary Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    M.D. Campanell, A.V. Khrabrov and I.D. Kaganovich

    2013-01-03

    The Debye sheath is shown to be unstable under general conditions. For surface materials with sufficient secondary electron emission (SEE) yields, the surface's current-voltage characteristic has an unstable branch when the bulk plasma temperature (Te ) exceeds a critical value, or when there are fast electron populations present. The plasma-surface interaction becomes dynamic where the sheath may undergo spontaneous transitions or oscillations. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we analyze sheath instabilities occurring in a high Te plasma slab bounded by walls with SEE. As the plasma evolves, whenever the sheath enters an unstable state, its amplitude rapidly collapses, allowing a large flux of previously trapped electrons to hit the wall. These hot electrons induce more than one secondary on average, causing a net loss of electrons from the wall. The sheath collapse quenches when the surface charge becomes positive because the attractive field inhibits further electrons from escaping. Sheath instabilities influence the current balance, energy loss, cross-B-field transport and even the bulk plasma properties. Implications for discharges including Hall thrusters are discussed. More generally, the results show that common theories that treat emission as a fixed (time-independent) "coefficient" do not capture the full extent of SEE effects.

  2. GRMHD/RMHD Simulations and Stability of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2007-01-01

    A new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD ) code "RAISHIN" used to simulate jet generation by rotating and non-rotating black holes with a geometrically thin Keplarian accretion disk finds that the jet develops a spine-sheath structure in the rotating black hole case. Spine-sheath structure and strong magnetic fields significantly modify the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) velocity shear driven instability. The RAISHIN code has been used in its relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) configuration to study the effects of strong magnetic fields and weakly relativistic sheath motion, cl2, on the KH instability associated with a relativistic, Y = 2.5, jet spine-sheath interaction. In the simulations sound speeds up to ? c/3 and Alfven wave speeds up to ? 0.56 c are considered. Numerical simulation results are compared to theoretical predictions from a new normal mode analysis of the RMHD equations. Increased stability of a weakly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds and stabilization of a strongly magnetized system resulting from d 2 sheath speeds is found.

  3. Functional analysis of OsPGIP1 in rice sheath blight resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Lu, Liaoxun; Pan, Xuebiao; Hu, Zongliang; Ling, Fei; Yan, Yan; Liu, Yemao; Lin, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most devastating diseases of rice, sheath blight causes severe rice yield loss. However, little progress has been made in rice breeding for sheath blight resistance. It has been reported that polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins can inhibit the degradation of the plant cell wall by polygalacturonases from pathogens. Here, we prokaryotically expressed and purified OsPGIP1 protein, which was verified by Western blot analysis. Activity assay confirmed the inhibitory activity of OsPGIP1 against the PGase from Rhizoctonia solani. In addition, the location of OsPGIP1 was determined by subcellular localization. Subsequently, we overexpressed OsPGIP1 in Zhonghua 11 (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica), and applied PCR and Southern blot analysis to identify the positive T0 transgenic plants with single-copy insertions. Germination assay of the seeds from T1 transgenic plants was carried out to select homozygous OsPGIP1 transgenic lines, and the expression levels of OsPGIP1 in these lines were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Field testing of R. solani inoculation showed that the sheath blight resistance of the transgenic rice was significantly improved. Furthermore, the levels of sheath blight resistance were in accordance with the expression levels of OsPGIP1 in the transgenic lines. Our results reveal the functions of OsPGIP1 and its resistance mechanism to rice sheath blight, which will facilitate rice breeding for sheath blight resistance. PMID:25488398

  4. Fluid simulation of an electrostatic plasma sheath with two species of positive ions and charged nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Foroutan, G.

    2010-12-15

    One-dimensional fluid simulations are used to study the dynamics of an electrostatic plasma sheath containing nanosized dust grains and two species of positive ions, i.e., He{sup +} and Ar{sup +}. The impacts of the concentration of each species, the velocity at the sheath edge of the ions, and the bias voltage of the substrate, on the spatial distribution of the velocity and number density of the plasma particles, and the incident fluxes of the ions on the substrate, are investigated. The numerical results show that the sheath thickness increases with increasing {sigma}, the density ratio of He{sup +} ions to Ar{sup +} ions at the sheath edge. For nanosized dust particles considered in this work, the dominant forces are the ion drag and the electric force and the effects of the neutral drag and gravity are negligible. Due to enhancement of the ion drag force and the electric force, the dust velocity increases and, consequently, the dust number density decreases as the concentration at the sheath edge of Ar{sup +} ions is increased. For the same velocity and number density at the sheath edge, the number density of Ar{sup +} ions near the wall is larger than that of He{sup +} ions, but their incident fluxes are the same. The maximum in the dust number density increases with the velocity of Ar{sup +} ions at the sheath edge, but it weakly changes with the Mach number of He{sup +} ions, except for large values of {sigma}. The position of the maximum dust number density initially decreases very quickly with increasing the velocity at the sheath edge of the ions from small values, but then at larger values it changes quite slowly. The differences in the sheath parameters for different values of {sigma} disappear at some values of the velocity at the sheath edge of the ions and dust particles. The incident flux of the ions are independent of the bias voltage of the substrate, but their kinetic energy is equal to the bias potential.

  5. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  6. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Frank; Doerr, Stefan; Wilhelm, Helmut; Becker, Gerd; Bamberg, Michael; Classen, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  7. Metal telescopic and Amplatz sheath dilation in nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Sameh; Echtle, Dieter; Hasselhof, Viktoria M.; Trojan, Lutz; Heinrich, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Comparison of Amplatz sheath percutaneous nephrolithotomy (Amplatz PCNL) and metal telescopic dilation PCNL (MTD PCNL) with respect to clinical outcomes and complications. Materials and Methods: Single-institution retrospective chart review with 73 patients who underwent PCNL divided into two groups: Amplatz PCNL (n = 26) and MTD PCNL (n = 47). Efficacy (stone-free rate, residual stones, and surgical duration) and safety (transfusion rate and hemoglobin decrease) were evaluated. Complications were recorded and classified using the modified Clavien classification system. Results: The two PCNL groups were similar regarding mean age, stone burden, side, stone location, and stone composition. There were no significant differences in surgery duration (101 ± 28 vs. 98 ± 30 min; P = 0.906), transfusion rate (3.9% vs. 4.3%; P = 0.382), and hemoglobin drop (0.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1 ± 0.7 g/dl; P = 0.424) for Amplatz and MTD PCNL, respectively. Stone-free rate (86% vs. 68%; P = 0.001) was significantly higher while residual fragments rate (37% vs. 60%; P = 0.001) was significantly lower in Amplatz PCNL compared to MTD PCNL. However, tube stay time (4.4 ± 1.8 vs. 5.8 ± 3.6 days; P = 0.005) and hospital time (8.6 ± 2.6 vs. 9.7 ± 5.5 days; P = 0.0001) were significantly longer in Amplatz PCNL compared to MTD PCNL. Clavien grading revealed a significantly higher rate of low-grade complications (I–III) for the MTD PCNL in comparison to Amplatz PCNL (10.6% vs. 3.9%, respectively; P = 0.011). There were no major complications and no tract dilation failure. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that Amplatz PCNL is a safe and effective procedure to remove large renal stones compared with MTD PCNL. PMID:26834405

  8. The research and preparation of a bi-layer biodegradable external sheath with directional drug release profiles for vein graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenjie; Guo, Zhenying; Si, Yi; Zhang, Xiangman; Shi, Zhenyu; Chen, Feng; Fu, Weiguo

    2013-11-01

    External sheath has been suggested for autologous vein grafts to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia and prevent anastomosis stricture. In this study, we prepared a bi-layer biodegradable paclitaxel-loaded sheaths with a synthetic copolymer poly(ethylene carbonate-ɛ-caprolactone) at room temperature. The bi-layer drug release profiles of the Paclitaxel-loaded (PTX-loaded) sheath significantly slow down the paclitaxel (PTX) release rates and result in a directional drug release way. Moreover, the nanofibrous layer of PTX-loaded poly(EC-CL) sheaths reduced the cytotoxicity and provided a better support for fibroblast adhesion and proliferation than the PTX-loaded layer of the sheaths. Thus, this study demonstrates that the bi-layer PTX-loaded poly(EC-CL) sheath with directional drug release profiles have a promising application for vein graft to against neointimal hyperplasia and anastomotic stricture.

  9. Grain growth behavior of Pb-Cu-Te cable sheathing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sahay, S.S.; Guruswamy, S.; Goodwin, F.

    1995-04-01

    Lead alloys are extensively used as sheathing material for power and telecommunication cables. Excellent extrusion properties, high ductility, extremely low recrystallization temperature, good fatigue and creep resistance, make these alloys ideal for cable sheathing application. Though the thickness of the lead sheath is only a few hundred {mu}m, it is a critical component of the cable. The lead layer in the cable is often the limiting factor both during the cable production and during its service phase. Up to several hundred miles of long single piece cables may be required for underground and underwater cables. Cracking in the lead sheath during the cable sheathing extrusion limits the production of such long cables while cracking of the lead sheath due to repeated vibration, creep and recrystallization limits the service life of these cables. The purpose of the present research is to increase the duration of cable extrusion time without compromising sheath integrity by minimizing deleterious precipitate formation and growth. Concentrations of Cu and Te in the commercial alloy are too small to contribute to precipitation strengthening. Therefore their positive influence on mechanical strength should mainly result from the influence of Cu and Te in solution on interdiffusivity and grain boundary mobility. The formation of large precipitates observed in Pb-Cu-Te alloys can be minimized and extrusion times increased without negatively affecting mechanical properties if the solute content is reduced to near solid solubility levels. In order to examine the effect of lowering solute content on microstructural stability and mechanical properties, compressive stress-strain behavior of a Pb-50 wt ppm Cu-100 wt ppm Te alloy with solute contents close to the solubility limits and a Pb-400 wt ppm Cu-400 wt ppm Te alloy was examined at room temperature. The grain growth kinetics in these alloys were studied in a temperature range of 100 to 225 C.

  10. Quantitative modeling of ICRF antennas with integrated time domain RF sheath and plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David N.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Myra, James R.

    2014-02-01

    Significant efforts have been made to quantitatively benchmark the sheath sub-grid model used in our time-domain simulations of plasma-immersed antenna near fields, which includes highly detailed three-dimensional geometry, the presence of the slow wave, and the non-linear evolution of the sheath potential. We present both our quantitative benchmarking strategy, and results for the ITER antenna configuration, including detailed maps of electric field, and sheath potential along the entire antenna structure. Our method is based upon a time-domain linear plasma model [1], using the finite-difference electromagnetic Vorpal/Vsim software [2]. This model has been augmented with a non-linear rf-sheath sub-grid model [3], which provides a self-consistent boundary condition for plasma current where it exists in proximity to metallic surfaces. Very early, this algorithm was designed and demonstrated to work on very complicated three-dimensional geometry, derived from CAD or other complex description of actual hardware, including ITER antennas. Initial work with the simulation model has also provided a confirmation of the existence of propagating slow waves [4] in the low density edge region, which can significantly impact the strength of the rf-sheath potential, which is thought to contribute to impurity generation. Our sheath algorithm is based upon per-point lumped-circuit parameters for which we have estimates and general understanding, but which allow for some tuning and fitting. We are now engaged in a careful benchmarking of the algorithm against known analytic models and existing computational techniques [5] to insure that the predictions of rf-sheath voltage are quantitatively consistent and believable, especially where slow waves share in the field with the fast wave. Currently in progress, an addition to the plasma force response accounting for the sheath potential, should enable the modeling of sheath plasma waves, a predicted additional root to the dispersion

  11. Quantitative modeling of ICRF antennas with integrated time domain RF sheath and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Myra, James R.

    2014-02-12

    Significant efforts have been made to quantitatively benchmark the sheath sub-grid model used in our time-domain simulations of plasma-immersed antenna near fields, which includes highly detailed three-dimensional geometry, the presence of the slow wave, and the non-linear evolution of the sheath potential. We present both our quantitative benchmarking strategy, and results for the ITER antenna configuration, including detailed maps of electric field, and sheath potential along the entire antenna structure. Our method is based upon a time-domain linear plasma model, using the finite-difference electromagnetic Vorpal/Vsim software. This model has been augmented with a non-linear rf-sheath sub-grid model, which provides a self-consistent boundary condition for plasma current where it exists in proximity to metallic surfaces. Very early, this algorithm was designed and demonstrated to work on very complicated three-dimensional geometry, derived from CAD or other complex description of actual hardware, including ITER antennas. Initial work with the simulation model has also provided a confirmation of the existence of propagating slow waves in the low density edge region, which can significantly impact the strength of the rf-sheath potential, which is thought to contribute to impurity generation. Our sheath algorithm is based upon per-point lumped-circuit parameters for which we have estimates and general understanding, but which allow for some tuning and fitting. We are now engaged in a careful benchmarking of the algorithm against known analytic models and existing computational techniques to insure that the predictions of rf-sheath voltage are quantitatively consistent and believable, especially where slow waves share in the field with the fast wave. Currently in progress, an addition to the plasma force response accounting for the sheath potential, should enable the modeling of sheath plasma waves, a predicted additional root to the dispersion, existing at the

  12. Plasma sheath properties in a magnetic field parallel to the wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Devaux, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2016-06-01

    Particle in cell simulations were carried out with a plasma bounded by two absorbing walls and a magnetic field applied parallel to them. Both the sheath extent and the potential drop in it were derived from simulations for different plasma parameters, such as the electron and ion temperature Ti, particle density, and ion mass. Both of them exhibit a power law dependent on the Larmor to plasma ion pulsation ratio Ωi. For increasing values of the magnetic field, the potential drop within the sheath decreases from a few Ti/e down to zero, where e stands for the electron charge. The space charge extent increases with Ωi and saturates to 2.15 ion Larmor radius. A simple model of sheath formation in such a magnetic field configuration is presented. Assuming strongly magnetized electrons, and neglecting collisions and ionizations, a new typical length is evidenced, which depends on the ratio Ωi. The charge separation sheath width is theoretically found to increase from a combination of the electron gyroradius and the ion Debye length for low Ωi ratios up to several ion gyroradii for strongly magnetized ions. Both the calculated sheath extent and plasma potential show a fair agreement with the numerical simulations.

  13. Effect of the q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution on a magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Safa, N. Navab Ghomi, H.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-08-15

    In this work, a sheath model has been developed to investigate the effect of the q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution on the different characteristics of a magnetized plasma. By using Segdeev potential method, a modified Bohm criterion for a magnetized plasma with the nonextensive electron velocity distribution is derived. The sheath model is then used to analyze numerically the sheath structure under different q, the parameter quantifying the nonextensivity degree of the system. The results show that as the q-parameter decreases, the floating potential becomes more negative. The sheath length increases at the lower values of the q-parameter due to the increase in the electron population at the high-energy tail of the distribution function. As q-parameter decreases, the effective temperature of the electrons increases which results in a more extended plasma sheath. The ion velocity and density profiles for the different nonextensivity degrees of the system reflect the gyro-motion of the ions in the presence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the results coincide with those given by the Maxwellian electron distribution function, when q tends to 1.

  14. Elongation growth of the leaf sheath base of Avena sativa seedlings: regulation by hormones and sucrose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, T. G.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1991-01-01

    The leaf sheath base of the seedling of Avena sativa was characterized for growth response to hormones and sucrose. Six day old plants, raised under a 10:14 hr light:dark cycle, were excised at the coleoptilar node and 1 cm above the node for treatment. The growth of the leaf sheath base was promoted by gibberellic acid (GA3) and this response was dose dependent. The lag to response initiation was approximately 4 hr. Growth with or without GA3 (10 micromoles) was transient, diminishing appreciably after 48 hr. The addition of 10 mM sucrose greatly prolonged growth; the effect of GA3 and sucrose was additive. Neither indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) nor the cytokinin N6-benzyladenine (BA), alone or in combination, promoted the growth of leaf sheath bases. However, both significantly inhibited the action of GA3. The inhibitory effect of IAA was dose dependent and was not affected by the addition of BA or sucrose. These results indicate that the growth of leaf sheath bases of Avena sativa is promoted specifically by gibberellin, that this action depends on the availability of carbohydrates from outside of the leaf sheath base, and that the promotional effect of GA3 can be modified by either auxins or cytokinins.

  15. Sheath structure in plasma with two species of positive ions and secondary electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Yun, Zhao; Nong, Xiang; Jing, Ou; De-Hui, Li; Bin-Bin, Lin

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a collisionless plasma sheath are investigated by using a fluid model in which two species of positive ions and secondary electrons are taken into account. It is shown that the positive ion speeds at the sheath edge increase with secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient, and the sheath structure is affected by the interplay between the two species of positive ions and secondary electrons. The critical SEE coefficients and the sheath widths depend strongly on the positive ion charge number, mass and concentration in the cases with and without SEE. In addition, ion kinetic energy flux to the wall and the impact of positive ion species on secondary electron density at the sheath edge are also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475220 and 11405208), the Program of Fusion Reactor Physics and Digital Tokamak with the CAS “One-Three-Five” Strategic Planning, the National ITER Program of China (Grant No. 2015GB101003), and the Higher Education Natural Science Research Project of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. 2015KJ009).

  16. Fully kinetic plasma-sheath theory for a cold-electron emitting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordonez, C. A.

    1992-04-01

    The fully kinetic, one-dimensional, plasma-sheath theory by Schwager and Birdsall [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1057 (1990)] is further developed. A cold-electron emitting surface is included and a three-dimensional plasma is considered. The sheath potential is not assumed to equal the floating potential so that the theory applies to a current-carrying sheath. Appropriate values are found for higher-order moments of the velocity distribution which depend on the three-dimensional velocity distribution width. Distribution functions in terms of energy and angle are derived. The (effective) temperature, the total energy flux, and the heat flux are evaluated in terms of exact analytic functions. The normalized magnitude of the floating potential for a deuterium plasma with equal ion and electron temperatures is calculated to be ψf=3.2 for δ=0 and ψf=1.8 for δ=0.75 where δ is the electron emission coefficient. The normalized magnitude of the sheath potential for the same plasma (with δ=0) is calculated to be ψs=3.9 for γ=0.02 and ψs=2.8 for γ=-0.02 where γ is the normalized current density. A self-consistent integral solution for the electrostatic potential profile within the sheath is derived.

  17. Estimation of sheath potentials in front of ASDEX upgrade ICRF antenna with SSWICH asymptotic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Křivská, A.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Jacquot, J.; Milanesio, D.; Ochoukov, R.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-megawatt Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating became problematic in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak after coating of ICRF antenna limiters and other plasma facing components by tungsten. Strong impurity influx was indeed produced at levels of injected power markedly lower than in the previous experiments. It is assumed that the impurity production is mainly driven by parallel component of Radio-Frequency (RF) antenna electric near-field E// that is rectified in sheaths. In this contribution we estimate poloidal distribution of sheath Direct Current (DC) potential in front of the ICRF antenna and simulate its relative variations over the parametric scans performed during experiments, trying to reproduce some of the experimental observations. In addition, relative comparison between two types of AUG ICRF antenna configurations, used for experiments in 2014, has been performed. For this purpose we use the Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna (TOPICA) code and asymptotic version of the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code. Further, we investigate correlation between amplitudes of the calculated oscillating sheath voltages and the E// fields computed at the lateral side of the antenna box, in relation with a heuristic antenna design strategy at IPP Garching to mitigate RF sheaths.

  18. Particulates from Hydrophilic-Coated Guiding Sheaths Embolize to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, James R.L.; Tzafriri, Abraham R.; Regan, Kathryn; LaRochelle, Alan; Wong, Gee; Zani, Brett G.; Markham, Peter M.; Bailey, Lynn; Spognardi, Anna; Kopia, Gregory A.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims We sought to evaluate the incidence of embolic material in porcine brain following vascular interventions using hydrophilic-coated sheaths. Methods and results A new self-expanding stent and delivery system (SDS) were deployed through a hydrophilic-coated (Cook® Flexor Ansel) Guiding Sheath into iliac and/or carotid arteries of 23 anesthetized Yucatan miniswine. Animals were euthanized at 3, 30, 90 and 180 days and brains were removed for histological analysis. In an additional single control animal, the guiding sheath was advanced but no SDS was deployed. Advancement of the coated guiding sheath with or without the SDS was associated with frequent foreign material in the arterioles of the brain. The embolic material was amorphous, non-refractile, non-crystalline, and non-birefringent and typically lightly basophilic with a slight stippled appearance on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. Material was observed at all time points involving 54% of all study animals (ie, test and control) and in vitro after incubation in 0.9% saline. Conclusions The hydrophilic coating on a clinically used guiding sheath readily avulses and embolizes to the brain during deployment in a porcine model. Further documentation of this effect and monitoring in clinical scenarios is warranted. PMID:25735934

  19. Analysis of Particle Detectors in Plasma Sheaths on Sounding Rockets and in Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lisa; Lynch, Kristina

    2013-10-01

    The influence of plasma sheaths on particle measurements is a well-known problem. Improvements in computational speed and memory have made the use of particle-in-cell codes, attainable on a laptop. These codes can calculate complex sheath structures and include most of the relevant physics. We will discuss how the use of one such code, SPIS, has been integrated into our data processing for the MICA sounding rocket. This inclusion of sheath physics has allowed us to describe the current-voltage signature of an ion retarding potential analyzer, called the PIP, to measure the ambient ionospheric temperature, as well as to examine the possibility of ion upflow. These results will be compared with the other instrumentation on MICA, which use traditional thin-sheath approximations. This comparison will emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of these other data analysis methods and call attention to the need to include sheath physics when measuring very low energy populations. Additionally, these instruments have also been tested in the Dartmouth College plasma facility. This provides another set of plasma conditions for testing and extrapolating our method to a future low-orbit mission.

  20. Involvement of an Extracellular Glucan Sheath during Degradation of Populus Wood by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Katia; Joseleau, Jean-Paul

    1991-01-01

    Observations by transmission electron microscopy of wood samples of Populus tremula inoculated with the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium showed that, at certain stages of their growth cycle, hyphae were encapsulated by a sheath which seems to play an active role in the wood cell wall degradation. Chemical and immunochemical techniques and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied to demonstrate the β-1,3-1,6-d-glucan nature of the sheath. Double-staining methods revealed the interaction between the extracellular peroxidases involved in lignin degradation and the glucan mucilage. The glucan was also shown to establish a material junction between the fungus and the wood cell wall. It was concluded that, by means of these interactions, the sheath provides a transient junction between the hyphae and the wood, thus establishing a point of attachment to the site of the degradation. The association of peroxidases to the glucan matrix is in favor of the role of the sheath as a supporting structure. Furthermore, that the sheath was hydrolyzed during the attack demonstrated its active role both in providing the H2O2 necessary to the action of peroxidases and in providing a mode of transport of the fungal enzymes to their substrates at the surface of the wood cell wall. Images PMID:16348406

  1. The structural sheath protein of aphids is required for phloem feeding.

    PubMed

    Will, Torsten; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Aphids produce two types of saliva that mediate their interactions with plants. Watery saliva is secreted during cell penetration and ingestion, whereas gel saliva is secreted during stylet movement through the apoplast where it forms a sheath around the stylet to facilitate penetration and seal puncture sites on cell membranes. In order to study the function of the sheath when aphids interact with plants, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to silence the aphid structural sheath protein (SHP) in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. The injection of 50 ng of double stranded RNA completely disrupted sheath formation, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Aphid behavior was monitored using the electrical penetration graph technique, revealing that disrupted sheath formation prevented efficient long-term feeding from sieve tubes, with a silencing effect on reproduction but not survival. We propose that sealing the stylet penetration site in the sieve tube plasma membrane is part of a two-step mechanism to suppress sieve-tube occlusion by preventing calcium influx into the sieve tube lumen. The SHP is present in several aphid species and silencing has a similar impact to aphid-resistant plants, suggesting that SHP is an excellent target for RNAi-mediated pest control. PMID:25527379

  2. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of weakly magnetized and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly magnetized and strongly magnetized stationary or weakly relativistic (v = c/2) sheath have been performed. A magnetic field parallel to the flow is used in these simulations performed by the new GRMHD numerical code RAISHIN used in its RMHD configuration. In the numerical simulations the Lorentz factor gamma = 2.5 jet is precessed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. In the simulations sound speeds are less than or equal to c/the square root of 3 in the weakly magnetized simulations and less than or equal to 0.56 c in the strongly magnetized simulations. The Alfven wave speed is less than or equal to 0.07 c in the weakly magnetized simulations and less than or equal to 0.56 c in the strongly magnetized simulations. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode analysis of the linearized relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations capable of describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized relativistically moving sheath. The theoretical dispersion relation allows investigation of effects associated with maximum possible sound speeds, Alfven wave speeds near light speed and relativistic sheath speeds. The prediction of increased stability of the weakly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds and the stabilization of the strongly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds is verified by the numerical simulation results.

  3. Support of Nerve Conduction by Respiring Myelin Sheath: Role of Connexons.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Adriano, Enrico; Garbati, Patrizia; Ferrando, Sara; Ramoino, Paola; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Balestrino, Maurizio; Panfoli, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that myelin conducts an extramitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, hypothesizing a novel supportive role for myelin in favor of the axon. We have also hypothesized that the ATP produced in myelin could be transferred thought gap junctions. In this work, by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques, the existence of a connection among myelin to the axon was evaluated, to understand how ATP could be transferred from sheath to the axoplasm. Data confirm a functional expression of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin. Moreover, WB and immunohistochemistry on optic nerve slices show that connexins 32 and 43 are present in myelin and colocalize with myelin basic protein. Interestingly, addition of carbenoxolone or oleamide, two gap junction blockers, causes a decrease in oxidative metabolism in purified myelin, but not in mitochondria. Similar effects were observed on conduction speed in hippocampal Schaffer collateral, in the presence of oleamide. Confocal analysis of optic nerve slices showed that lucifer yellow (that only passes through aqueous pores) signal was found in both the sheath layers and the axoplasma. In the presence of oleamide, but not with oleic acid, signal significantly decreased in the sheath and was lost inside the axon. This suggests the existence of a link among myelin and axons. These results, while supporting the idea that ATP aerobically synthesized in myelin sheath could be transferred to the axoplasm through gap junctions, shed new light on the function of the sheath. PMID:26033217

  4. Estimation of sheath potentials in front of ASDEX upgrade ICRF antenna with SSWICH asymptotic code

    SciTech Connect

    Křivská, A.; Colas, L.; Milanesio, D.

    2015-12-10

    Multi-megawatt Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating became problematic in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak after coating of ICRF antenna limiters and other plasma facing components by tungsten. Strong impurity influx was indeed produced at levels of injected power markedly lower than in the previous experiments. It is assumed that the impurity production is mainly driven by parallel component of Radio-Frequency (RF) antenna electric near-field E// that is rectified in sheaths. In this contribution we estimate poloidal distribution of sheath Direct Current (DC) potential in front of the ICRF antenna and simulate its relative variations over the parametric scans performed during experiments, trying to reproduce some of the experimental observations. In addition, relative comparison between two types of AUG ICRF antenna configurations, used for experiments in 2014, has been performed. For this purpose we use the Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna (TOPICA) code and asymptotic version of the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code. Further, we investigate correlation between amplitudes of the calculated oscillating sheath voltages and the E// fields computed at the lateral side of the antenna box, in relation with a heuristic antenna design strategy at IPP Garching to mitigate RF sheaths.

  5. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Milanesio, Daniele; Colas, Laurent; Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Heuraux, Stéphane; Kubic, Martin

    2014-02-01

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing RF sheaths as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the RF-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free SOL outside these limiters. Moreover the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the design of the new screen that enhanced RF sheaths.

  6. Cell-selective encapsulation in hydrogel sheaths via biospecific identification and biochemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Liu, Yang; Sengoku, Mikako; Taya, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Selective encapsulation of a particular cell population from heterogeneous cell populations has potential applications such as studies in cell-to-cell communication, regenerative medicine, and cell therapies. However, there are no versatile methods for realizing this. Here we report a method based on biospecific identification of the target cells through antigen-antibody reaction and subsequent enzymatic hydrogel sheath formation on the cell surfaces by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Human hepatoma cell line HepG2 cells were selectively encapsulated in alginate-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with mouse embryo fibroblast-like cell line 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD326 antibody conjugated with HRP. The viability of the encapsulated cells was 93%. The cells released at 6 days of the encapsulation by degrading the sheath using alginate lyase grew almost the same as those free from encapsulation. The versatility of the method was confirmed using another antibody, cells, and hydrogel sheath material: Only human vein endothelial cells were encapsulated in gelatin-based hydrogel sheath from the mixture with 10T1/2 fibroblasts using anti-human CD31 antibody conjugated with HRP. The cell-selective encapsulation was also achieved by a system using a primary antibody with a secondary antibody conjugated with HRP. PMID:25890746

  7. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internode elongation was accompanied by increases in fibre calibre, but these parameters did not change in precise proportion. The internodes of thick fibres were relatively short for calibre, as defined by the length/diameter quotient. This trend of foreshortening changed during growth. Sheath thickness, defined by the quotient axon diameter/fibre diameter, was determined with a computer-assisted method. Fibres of young rabbits had relatively thin sheaths for axon calibre, compared with adult rabbits. The changes in sheath thickness corresponded to the changes in internode geometry. This was consistent with previous studies showing that elongation or foreshortening of an internode of a given calibre has a slight, but definite effect on the thickness of its myelin sheath. PMID:3870716

  8. Anode sheath transition in an anodic arc for synthesis of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The arc discharge with ablating anode or so-called anodic arc is widely used for synthesis of nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes and fullerens, metal nanoparticles etc. We present the model of this arc, which confirms the existence of the two different modes of the arc operation with two different anode sheath regimes, namely, with negative anode sheath and with positive anode sheath. It was previously suggested that these regimes are associated with two different anode ablating modes—low ablation mode with constant ablation rate and the enhanced ablation mode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322). The transition of the arc operation from low ablation mode to high ablation mode is determined by the current density at the anode. The model can be used to self-consistently determine the distribution of the electric field, electron density and electron temperature in the near-anode region of the arc discharge. Simulations of the carbon arc predict that for low arc ablating modes, the current is driven mainly by the electron diffusion to the anode. For positive anode sheath, the anode voltage is close to the ionization potential of anode material, while for negative anode sheath, the anode voltage is an order of magnitude smaller. It is also shown that the near-anode plasma, is far from the ionization equilibrium.

  9. Effect of scuba-diving on optic nerve and sheath diameters

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Shams-Hosseini, Narges Sadat; Rezaali, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is not any data available about the effect of high bar pressure condition on intracranial pressure. In this study, the effect of diving on the optic nerve and sheath diameters as non-invasive markers of intracranial pressure has been investigated. Methods: Twenty professional male divers from twenty one volunteers were chosen for this cross-sectional study. Only one person who had a history of barotraumas was excluded. Each diver then completed a questionnaire on demographic data, medical and diving history. Nineteen other volunteers were selected to represent a control group. A 10-MHz linear ultrasonic probe was used to measure the optic nerve sheath diameters of both eyes in closed and supine position and its relationship with diving history of divers was determined. Results: It was found that divers have a higher mean optic nerve sheath diameter compared to the normal population as previously reported by other studies. The mean diameter of the left and right optic nerve sheaths were 6.4±0.7, 6.5±0.9 mm respectively and a significant relationship between optic nerve sheath diameter and diving history was found. Conclusion: Results showed that divers have a higher optic nerve diameter than the general population. However, our result cannot yet be considered as a marker of intracranial pressure in divers as it was conducted on an limited number of subjects and so a bigger study should be undertaken for this purpose. PMID:25664290

  10. Erosion due to ion sputtering in absence of Debye Sheath at Divertor plates: PIC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, K. S.; Adhikari, S.

    2014-10-01

    A 2D-3V Particle-in-Cell code with Monte Carlo Collision and a Plasma Surface Interaction Code written in Matlab is used to study the effect of grazing angle (α) on solid surface (divertor) erosion due to ion sputtering in magnetic fusion devices, where α is the angle between the magnetic field and the surface tangent. The ion distribution in front of an absorbing wall is computed using a kinetic model. Important factors like ion energy and impact angle for wall erosion and sputtering are highlighted. The dependence of these two parameters on grazing angle is investigated in detail. Physical Sputtering for ion bombardment is strongly dependent on incident ion energy and this energy is mainly gained by the ions when they travel through the potential drop across the combined Chodura Sheath and Debye Sheath. The present work contains the study of two scenario. In the first one we have studied the usual case to compare our result to the other similar work i.e. in presence of both Chodura Sheath and Debye Sheath. In the second one with the idea of previous work we have created the scenario where Debye Sheath cease to appear. The second scenario provides us the result that was never expected that the incident energy profile got reversed. The study is focused on the effect of grazing angle and its relation with the material erosion. Our study covers different materials (e.g. Be, Fe, W etc.) which are used as plasma facing components.

  11. Photoreduction and Oxidation of Cytochrome f in Bundle Sheath Cells of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, D. G.; Andersen, Kirsten S.; Smillie, Robert M.

    1972-01-01

    The photo-oxidation of cytochrome f (cytochrome c554) in bundle sheath cells isolated from leaves of maize (Zea mays var. DS 606A) has been compared with that in intact maize leaf and in isolated pea leaf cells (Pisum sativum L.). In all cases, illumination with red light caused a negative absorbance change at 554 nm which was attributed to the oxidation of cytochrome f. The extent of this change was greater using monochromatic red light at wavelengths above 700 nm compared with wavelengths below 700 nm. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea abolished this difference in bundle sheath cells. After illumination for 1 minute or longer in bundle sheath cells, reduction of cytochrome f in the dark was rapid only if the wavelength of the illuminating light was below 700 nm. In the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethlyurea, reduction was slow after illumination at all wavelengths. Cytochrome f photo-oxidation was also followed in cells of a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardi, ac-21, which has isolated chloroplasts that exhibit photochemical reactions similar to those shown by isolated bundle sheath chloroplasts. No evidence was obtained for photoreduction of cytochrome f in the mutant. It was concluded that in the chloroplast of the intact bundle sheath cell of maize there is electron flow between photosystem II and cytochrome f resulting in photoreduction of the cytochrome. PMID:16657985

  12. Properties of in situ made MgB2 in Nb or Ti sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Kopera, L.; Melišek, T.; Rosová, A.; Dobročka, E.

    2013-02-01

    Pure Nb and Ti have been used as sheath materials for MgB2 wires examined experimentally. The reason for this research is to compare the effects of these metallic sheaths on the basic properties of MgB2 superconductor. Single-core SiC doped MgB2 wires with Nb and/or Ti sheaths have been made by a powder-in-tube in situ process. Different transport currents, phase compositions and grain connectivity were observed for Nb- and Ti sheathed MgB2 heat treated at temperatures 650-850 °C/30 min. It was found that the critical current density of MgB2/Nb annealed above 700 °C rapidly decreases, while Jc of MgB2/Ti is systematically increasing with temperature. This is explained by the positive role of Ti absorbing impurities from the MgB2 core and by the negative effect of boron diffusion into Nb, reducing the quantity and worsening the quality of the MgB2 core. The obtained results show clearly that a Ti sheath offers the application of higher heat treatment temperatures (above 700 °C) and consequently the achievement of higher critical current densities in comparison to MgB2/Nb.

  13. Modeling the ITER ICRF Antenna with Integrated Time Domain RF Sheath and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David; D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James; CSWPI Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We present results from computer simulations of detailed 3D models of the ICRF launcher assembly, including straps, Faraday Shields, and vessel wall. These simulations provide exquisite detail of the antenna near fields, and the sheaths between plasma and the metallic components of the launcher. Significant work has been done to create a sheath model that allows us to estimate local values of sheath potential everywhere on the 3D structure, so that we can estimate RF rectified plasma potential. Those potentials are in turn a likely source of sputtering and impurity creation, when the antennas are operating, and we discuss ongoing work to quantify these effects. Additional study of the antenna near fields also investigates slow waves which can exist in the low density scrape-off layer, and may impact power balance, and also sheath amplitudes. Movies of the 3D field and sheath oscillations will be shown. Supported by DOE Grants DE-08ER54953 and DE-FG02-09ER55006.

  14. Oscillation, Collapse and Disappearance of Debye Sheaths Due to Secondary Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanell, Michael; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Most theories of PSI with secondary electron emission (SEE) implicitly assume a stable sheath exists. Ions are assumed to be drawn to the wall and the SEE is characterized by a fixed ``coefficient'' (e.g. G.D. Hobbs and J.A. Wesson, Plasma Phys. 9, 85 (1967)). We present simulations and basic theory showing a class of sheath instabilities that can arise under general conditions. Instabilities cause abrupt changes in the plasma, drive spontaneous oscillations, and dramatically increase cross-B-field transport, wall flux and energy loss. (M.D. Campanell et. al. PRL 108, 235001 (2012)). Also, if the SEE yield of hot plasma electrons impacting the walls exceeds unity, the sheath and presheath may disappear completely because there is no need for ions to be drawn to the wall in order to maintain current balance (M.D. Campanell et. al. PRL 108, 255001 (2012)). Instead, the walls acquire a positive charge. The plasma potential is negative, the ion flux is zero and plasma electrons are unconfined. These three properties all differ from the ``space charge limited'' sheath often assumed to form when SEE yield exceeds 1. In the new ``inverse sheath'' regime, zero current is maintained only by pulling the ``extra'' secondaries back to the wall.

  15. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  16. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  17. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  18. Role of disulfide bonds in maintaining the structural integrity of the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, D; Ghiorse, W C

    1993-01-01

    Isolated sheaths of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 (ATCC 51168) were tested for susceptibility to degradation by a variety of chemical denaturants and lytic enzymes and found to be resistant to many reagents and enzyme treatments. However, disulfide bond-reducing agents such as dithiothreitol (DTT), beta-mercaptoethanol, sodium cyanide, and sodium sulfite degraded the sheath, especially at elevated pH (pH 9) and temperature (50 degrees C). DTT and beta-mercaptoethanol caused more rapid degradation of the sheath than cyanide or sulfite. Treatment of the sheath with 1 N NaOH resulted in rapid breakdown, while treatment with 1 N HCl resulted in slow but significant hydrolysis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the 6.5-nm fibrils previously shown to be an integral structural element of the sheath fabric (D. Emerson and W. C. Ghiorse, J. Bacteriol. 175:7808-7818, 1993) were progressively dissociated into random masses during DTT-induced degradation. Quantitation of disulfide bonds with DTT showed that the sheaths contained approximately 2.2 mumol of disulfides per mg of sheath protein. Reaction with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) showed that sheaths also contained approximately 0.8 mumol of free sulfhydryls per mg of protein. A sulfhydryl-specific fluorescent probe (fluorescein 5-maleimide) showed that the free sulfhydryls in sheathed cell filaments were evenly distributed throughout the sheath. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography of [14C]iodoacetamide-labeled sheaths and DTT-dissociated sheath fibril suspensions showed that the majority of 14C-labeled sulfhydryls in the sheaths did not enter the gel. However, low-molecular-mass silver-staining bands (14 to 45 kDa) did appear in the gels after iodoacetic acid or iodoacetamide alkylation of the dissociated fibrils. These bands did not stain with Coomassie blue. Their migration in gels was slightly affected by digestion with pronase. The fibrils contained 20 to 25

  19. Role of disulfide bonds in maintaining the structural integrity of the sheath of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed

    Emerson, D; Ghiorse, W C

    1993-12-01

    Isolated sheaths of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 (ATCC 51168) were tested for susceptibility to degradation by a variety of chemical denaturants and lytic enzymes and found to be resistant to many reagents and enzyme treatments. However, disulfide bond-reducing agents such as dithiothreitol (DTT), beta-mercaptoethanol, sodium cyanide, and sodium sulfite degraded the sheath, especially at elevated pH (pH 9) and temperature (50 degrees C). DTT and beta-mercaptoethanol caused more rapid degradation of the sheath than cyanide or sulfite. Treatment of the sheath with 1 N NaOH resulted in rapid breakdown, while treatment with 1 N HCl resulted in slow but significant hydrolysis. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the 6.5-nm fibrils previously shown to be an integral structural element of the sheath fabric (D. Emerson and W. C. Ghiorse, J. Bacteriol. 175:7808-7818, 1993) were progressively dissociated into random masses during DTT-induced degradation. Quantitation of disulfide bonds with DTT showed that the sheaths contained approximately 2.2 mumol of disulfides per mg of sheath protein. Reaction with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) showed that sheaths also contained approximately 0.8 mumol of free sulfhydryls per mg of protein. A sulfhydryl-specific fluorescent probe (fluorescein 5-maleimide) showed that the free sulfhydryls in sheathed cell filaments were evenly distributed throughout the sheath. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography of [14C]iodoacetamide-labeled sheaths and DTT-dissociated sheath fibril suspensions showed that the majority of 14C-labeled sulfhydryls in the sheaths did not enter the gel. However, low-molecular-mass silver-staining bands (14 to 45 kDa) did appear in the gels after iodoacetic acid or iodoacetamide alkylation of the dissociated fibrils. These bands did not stain with Coomassie blue. Their migration in gels was slightly affected by digestion with pronase. The fibrils contained 20 to 25

  20. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. F.; Fang, S.; Moura, F. A.; Ding, J. N.; Jiang, N.; Di, J.; Zhang, M.; Lepró, X.; Galvão, D. S.; Haines, C. S.; Yuan, N. Y.; Yin, S. G.; Lee, D. W.; Wang, R.; Wang, H. Y.; Lv, W.; Dong, C.; Zhang, R. C.; Chen, M. J.; Yin, Q.; Chong, Y. T.; Zhang, R.; Wang, X.; Lima, M. D.; Ovalle-Robles, R.; Qian, D.; Lu, H.; Baughman, R. H.

    2015-07-01

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson’s ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties.

  1. Production of bi-component core-sheath nanofibers using Chitosan and Polyethylene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Satyajeet; Stevens, Derrick; Clarke, Laura; Gorga, Russell

    2007-03-01

    There has been a renewed interest to develop fibers at nanometer scale due to the large number of potential biomedical uses such as tissue engineering, drug delivery and wound care applications. Chitosan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide obtained from crustaceans. Its antibacterial properties have been acknowledged. Our effort has been to develop core-sheath nanofibers using chitosan, and poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), another bio-compatible polymer. The critical properties and parameters such as feed rate, electric field, distance between needle and grounded collector and their consequences on morphology are discussed. Chitosan/PEO solutions have been characterized by surface tension, molecular weight and viscosity which are crucial factors to achieve core-sheath geometry. Tensile and conductive properties of these core-sheath nanofibers have been investigated which could be important for them to be used in wound scaffolds and cell-culture respectively.

  2. Disease-reducing effect of Chromolaena odorata extract on sheath blight and other rice diseases.

    PubMed

    Khoa, Nguyen Đac; Thuy, Phan Thi Hong; Thuy, Tran Thi Thu; Collinge, David B; Jørgensen, Hans Jørgen Lyngs

    2011-02-01

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani (teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris) is a major cause of crop loss in intensive rice production systems. No economically viable control methods have been developed. We screened aqueous extracts of common herbal plants that could reduce sheath blight lesions and found that foliar spraying and seed soaking application of extracts of either fresh or dried leaves of Chromolaena odorata gave up to 68% reduction in sheath blight lesion lengths under controlled and semi-field conditions. The observed reductions were not dependent on growth conditions of C. odorata and rice cultivar. The effect was observed until 21 days after inoculation and was not dependent on microbial activity. Under semi-field conditions, extracts also reduced severity of other important rice diseases, i.e., blast (Pyricularia oryzae) using foliar spray (up to 45%), brown spot (Bipolaris oryzae) using seed treatment (up to 57%), and bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae) using both application methods (up to 50%). PMID:20839964

  3. Predicting the magnetic structure of interplanetary magnetic clouds and their sheath regions: Space weather perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, Emilia

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic clouds and their turbulent sheath regions drive the majority of intense space weather storms. The magnitude and the details of the magnetic storm (timing, affected current systems, response of the high energy radiation belt electron fluxes, etc.) depend strongly on the magnetic topology of the CME flux rope and whether the sheath region makes a significant contribution. Sheath regions are particularly geoeffective due to their large-amplitude magnetic field fluctuations and high Alfven Mach numbers, which may enhance solar wind - magnetospheric coupling efficiency. In this presentation I will present examples of space weather responses driven by different CME structures to demonstrate the necessity to develop detailed prediction models/scenarios for different magnetic field configurations and characteristics. The constraints for solar observations and models will be also discussed.

  4. Sheath effects observed on a 10 meter high voltage panel in simulated low earth orbit plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccox, J. E.; Konradi, A.

    1979-01-01

    A large (1m x 10m) flat surface of conductive material was biased to high voltage (+ or - 3000 V) to simulate the behavior of a large solar array in low earth orbit. The model array was operated in a plasma environment of 1,000 to 1,000,000/cu cm, with sufficient free space around it for the resulting plasma sheaths to develop unimpeded for 5-10 meters into the surrounding plasma. Measurements of the resulting sheath thickness were obtained. The observed thickness varied approximately as V to the 3/4 power and N to the 1/2 power. This effect appears to limit total current leakage from the test array until sheath dimensions exceed about 1 meter. Total leakage current was also measured with the array.

  5. Observation of self-sustaining relativistic ionization wave launched by a sheath field.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M; Arefiev, A V; Quevedo, H J; Bengtson, R D; Ditmire, T

    2014-01-31

    We present experimental evidence supported by simulations of a relativistic ionization wave launched into a surrounding gas by the sheath field of a plasma filament with high energy electrons. Such a filament is created by irradiating a clustering gas jet with a short pulse laser (115  fs) at a peak intensity of 5×10(17)  W/cm2. We observe an ionization wave propagating radially through the gas for about 2 ps at 0.2-0.5 c after the laser has passed, doubling the initial radius of the filament. The gas is ionized by the sheath field, while the longevity of the wave is explained by a moving field structure that traps the high energy electrons near the boundary, maintaining a strong sheath field despite the significant expansion of the plasma. PMID:24580461

  6. Structure of the T4 baseplate and its function in triggering sheath contraction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas M I; Prokhorov, Nikolai S; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Shneider, Mikhail M; Browning, Christopher; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning; Leiman, Petr G

    2016-05-19

    Several systems, including contractile tail bacteriophages, the type VI secretion system and R-type pyocins, use a multiprotein tubular apparatus to attach to and penetrate host cell membranes. This macromolecular machine resembles a stretched, coiled spring (or sheath) wound around a rigid tube with a spike-shaped protein at its tip. A baseplate structure, which is arguably the most complex part of this assembly, relays the contraction signal to the sheath. Here we present the atomic structure of the approximately 6-megadalton bacteriophage T4 baseplate in its pre- and post-host attachment states and explain the events that lead to sheath contraction in atomic detail. We establish the identity and function of a minimal set of components that is conserved in all contractile injection systems and show that the triggering mechanism is universally conserved. PMID:27193680

  7. STRETCHY ELECTRONICS. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z F; Fang, S; Moura, F A; Ding, J N; Jiang, N; Di, J; Zhang, M; Lepró, X; Galvão, D S; Haines, C S; Yuan, N Y; Yin, S G; Lee, D W; Wang, R; Wang, H Y; Lv, W; Dong, C; Zhang, R C; Chen, M J; Yin, Q; Chong, Y T; Zhang, R; Wang, X; Lima, M D; Ovalle-Robles, R; Qian, D; Lu, H; Baughman, R H

    2015-07-24

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson's ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties. PMID:26206929

  8. Sheath and boundary conditions for plasma simulations of a Hall thruster discharge with magnetic lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael; Beilis, Isak I.

    2009-05-11

    The effect of magnetic lens configuration on sheath in a Hall thruster discharge channels is considered. A model of the plasma-wall transition is developed in the case of large magnetic field incidence angle with respect to the wall. Peculiarity of such case consists in that the potential drop across the magnetic field is set externally. In this case, standard boundary conditions at the sheath edge for plasma simulations fail and a new formulation for those boundary conditions is proposed. The results obtained demonstrate importance of the effect of the magnetic field incidence angle on the sheath boundary conditions for plasma simulations as well as on the energy balance in the Hall thruster discharge.

  9. Sheath oscillation characteristics and effect on near-wall conduction in a krypton Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fengkui Kong, Lingyi; Li, Chenliang; Yang, Haiwei; Li, Wei

    2014-11-15

    Despite its affordability, the krypton Hall-effect thruster in applications always had problems in regard to performance. The reason for this degradation is studied from the perspective of the near-wall conductivity of electrons. Using the particle-in-cell method, the sheath oscillation characteristics and its effect on near-wall conduction are compared in the krypton and xenon Hall-effect thrusters both with wall material composed of BNSiO{sub 2}. Comparing these two thrusters, the sheath in the krypton-plasma thruster will oscillate at low electron temperatures. The near-wall conduction current is only produced by collisions between electrons and wall, thereby causing a deficiency in the channel current. The sheath displays spatial oscillations only at high electron temperature; electrons are then reflected to produce the non-oscillation conduction current needed for the krypton-plasma thruster. However, it is accompanied with intensified oscillations.

  10. Particle-in-cell study of the ion-to-electron sheath transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott D.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2016-08-01

    The form of a sheath near a small electrode, with bias changing from below to above the plasma potential, is studied using 2D particle-in-cell simulations. When the electrode is biased within Te/2 e below the plasma potential, the electron velocity distribution functions (EVDFs) exhibit a loss-cone type truncation due to fast electrons overcoming the small potential difference between the electrode and plasma. No sheath is present in this regime, and the plasma remains quasineutral up to the electrode. The EVDF truncation leads to a presheath-like density and flow velocity gradients. Once the bias exceeds the plasma potential, an electron sheath is present. In this case, the truncation driven behavior persists, but is accompanied by a shift in the maximum value of the EVDF that is not present in the negative bias cases. The flow moment has significant contributions from both the flow shift of the EVDF maximum, and the loss-cone truncation.

  11. Measurements of the asymmetric, dynamic sheath around a pulse biased sphere immersed in flowing metal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2008-06-13

    A long-probe technique was utilized to record the expansion and retreat of the dynamic sheath around a spherical substrate immersed in pulsed cathode arc metal plasma. Positively biased, long cylindrical probes were placed on the side and downstream of a negatively pulsed biased stainless steel sphere of 1" (25.4 mm) diameter. The amplitude and width of the negative high voltage pulses (HVP) were 2 kV, 5 kV, 10 kV, and 2 mu s, 4 mu s, 10 mu s, respectively. The variation of the probe (electron) current during the HVP is a direct measure for the sheath expansion and retreat. Maximum sheath sizes were determined for the different parameters of the HVP. The expected rarefaction zone behind the biased sphere (wake) due to the fast plasma flow was clearly established and quantified.

  12. Constrained sheath optics for high thrust density, low specific impulse ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.; Han, Jian-Zhang

    1987-01-01

    The results of an experimental study showing that a contoured, fine wire mesh attached to the screen grid can be used to control the divergence characteristics of ion beamlets produced at low net-to-total accelerating voltage ratios are presented. The influence of free and constrained-sheath optics systems on beamlet divergence characteristics are found to be similar in the operating regime investigated, but it was found that constrained-sheath optics systems can be operated at higher perveance levels than free-sheath ones. The concept of a fine wire interference probe that can be used to study ion beamlet focusing behavior is introduced. This probe is used to demonstrate beamlet focusing to a diameter about one hundreth of the screen grid extraction aperture diameter. Additional testing is suggested to define an optimally contoured mesh that could yield well focused beamlets at net-to-total accelerating voltage ratios below about 0.1.

  13. Sheath oscillation characteristics and effect on near-wall conduction in a krypton Hall thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengkui; Kong, Lingyi; Li, Chenliang; Yang, Haiwei; Li, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Despite its affordability, the krypton Hall-effect thruster in applications always had problems in regard to performance. The reason for this degradation is studied from the perspective of the near-wall conductivity of electrons. Using the particle-in-cell method, the sheath oscillation characteristics and its effect on near-wall conduction are compared in the krypton and xenon Hall-effect thrusters both with wall material composed of BNSiO 2 . Comparing these two thrusters, the sheath in the krypton-plasma thruster will oscillate at low electron temperatures. The near-wall conduction current is only produced by collisions between electrons and wall, thereby causing a deficiency in the channel current. The sheath displays spatial oscillations only at high electron temperature; electrons are then reflected to produce the non-oscillation conduction current needed for the krypton-plasma thruster. However, it is accompanied with intensified oscillations.

  14. A matching approach to communicate through the plasma sheath surrounding a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiaotian; Jiang, Binhao

    2015-06-21

    In order to overcome the communication blackout problem suffered by hypersonic vehicles, a matching approach has been proposed for the first time in this paper. It utilizes a double-positive (DPS) material layer surrounding a hypersonic vehicle antenna to match with the plasma sheath enclosing the vehicle. Analytical analysis and numerical results indicate a resonance between the matched layer and the plasma sheath will be formed to mitigate the blackout problem in some conditions. The calculated results present a perfect radiated performance of the antenna, when the match is exactly built between these two layers. The effects of the parameters of the plasma sheath have been researched by numerical methods. Based on these results, the proposed approach is easier to realize and more flexible to the varying radiated conditions in hypersonic flight comparing with other methods.

  15. Magnetic field generation in core-sheath jets via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Duţan, I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Meli, A.; Sol, H.; Zhang, B.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2014-09-20

    We have investigated magnetic field generation in velocity shears via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI) using a relativistic plasma jet core and stationary plasma sheath. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations consider plasma jet cores with Lorentz factors of 1.5, 5, and 15 for both electron-proton and electron-positron plasmas. For electron-proton plasmas, we find generation of strong large-scale DC currents and magnetic fields that extend over the entire shear surface and reach thicknesses of a few tens of electron skin depths. For electron-positron plasmas, we find generation of alternating currents and magnetic fields. Jet and sheath plasmas are accelerated across the shear surface in the strong magnetic fields generated by the kKHI. The mixing of jet and sheath plasmas generates a transverse structure similar to that produced by the Weibel instability.

  16. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in Neurofibromatosis Type I : Unusual Presentation of Intraabdominal or Intrathoracic Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Gwang; Sung, Woo Jin; Kim, Dong Hwan; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2005-01-01

    A malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an extremely rare soft tissue tumor in the general population. On the other hand, there is a higher incidence of MPNST in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (von Recklinghausen's disease). The common sites are the extremities, trunk, head and neck. However, an intraabdominal or intrathoracic manifestation is uncommon. This paper reports two patients, a 31 year-old woman with multiple neurofibromatosis presenting as an intraabdominal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and a 33 year-old woman with an intrathoracic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. However, one patient died as a result of disease progression 21 months after the diagnosis and the other patient is currently being treated with radiotherapy. PMID:15906964

  17. Linkage between gravity perception and response in the grass leaf-sheath pulvinus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayanandan, P.; Franklin, C. I.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    Cellulose synthesis inhibitors 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile and coumarin inhibit the normal gravitropic response of the leaf-sheath pulvini in several grasses. These inhibitors induce thickenings that are mostly distributed in the radial walls. Their distribution patterns follow a previously published equation that describes the geometry of asymmetric growth in the leaf-sheath pulvinus. It is proposed that radial transport of growth promotors may account for the observed asymmetric growth rather than the classical concept of lateral downward transport in an horizontally placed shoot. Electron microscopic observation of an interaction between the tonoplast membrane and statoliths suggests that such an interaction might be a basis for gravity perception in grass leaf-sheath pulvini.

  18. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  19. Loss of H3K27 trimethylation distinguishes malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors from histologic mimics.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Fletcher, Christopher Dm; Hornick, Jason L

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is challenging, particularly in the sporadic setting. Inactivation of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), resulting from inactivating mutations of its constituents SUZ12 or EED1, has recently been identified in 70-90% of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Homozygous PRC2 inactivation results in loss of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). PRC2 inactivation promotes tumor progression and may render patients sensitive to epigenetic-based targeted therapies. H3K27me3 loss has not yet been validated as a diagnostic marker. We evaluated immunohistochemistry for H3K27me3 in 100 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (70 sporadic, 10 neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, 10 radiation-associated, 10 epithelioid) and 200 other spindle cell neoplasms representing potential mimics (20 each monophasic synovial sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, dedifferentiated liposarcoma, malignant solitary fibrous tumor, low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma, cellular schwannoma, spindle cell melanoma, unclassified postradiation sarcoma; 10 each atypical neurofibroma, spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, fibrosarcomatous dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans). In total, 51 (51%) malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, including 34 (49%) sporadic, 7 (70%) neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, and 10 (100%) radiation-associated, but no epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, were negative for H3K27me3. An additional 6 (6%) tumors showed heterogeneous H3K27me3 expression. Among the 90 sporadic, neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, and radiation-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, complete H3K27me3 loss was observed in 29% of low-grade, 59% of intermediate-grade, and 83% of high-grade tumors (low vs intermediate/high grade, P=0.0003). Among other tumor types, 4 (20%) unclassified postradiation sarcomas were negative for H3K27me3, whereas all other neoplasms were positive. Loss of H3K27me

  20. Measurement of electric field and gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters of floating microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, T E; Katschke, M R; Wells, K D

    2007-02-01

    A method for measuring the time-averaged vertical electric field and its gradient in the plasma sheath using clusters with n = 2 or 3 floating microspheres of known mass is described. The particle charge q is found by determining the ratio of the breathing frequency to the center-of-mass frequency for horizontal (in-plane) oscillations. The electric field at the position of the particles is then calculated using the measured charge-to-mass ratio, and the electric-field gradient is determined from the vertical resonance frequency. The Debye length is also found. Experimental results are in agreement with a simple sheath model. PMID:17578108

  1. Modelling of Charged Particle Dynamics in the Sheath and Plasma-facing Surface Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkina, I. E.; Tsvetkov, I. V.

    In this work a useful analytical approximation for the electric potential profile in the presence of an oblique magnetic field is suggested. It describes the potential profile dependence on the magnitude and angle of a magnetic field and plasma parameters in the Debye sheath and the magnetic pre-sheath. It is in good agreement with the Chodura and Stangeby solutions and respective PIC simulations performed with the SPICE2 code. The influence of the magnetic field inclination angle on the angle and energy distributions of ions which reach the wall, and thus on the effective sputtering, is analyzed for various first wall materials.

  2. Calculation of two-dimensional plasma sheath with application to radial dust oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T.E.

    2005-07-15

    Dust particles are often confined radially in a plasma potential well above a cylindrical depression in an otherwise flat electrode. The structure of the two-dimensional, time-independent sheath is computed for this geometry using cold, collisionless ions and Boltzmann electrons. A depression with a radius of 16 Debye lengths and a depth of 2 Debye lengths is modeled for negative electrode biases from 6 to 32 times the electron temperature. The normalized radial oscillation frequency for a dust particle in the well is computed from the sheath potential structure. The model results agree qualitatively with the experimental measurements.

  3. Sheath effects on current collection by particle detectors with narrow acceptance angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Baugher, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Restriction of the aperture acceptance angle of an ion or electron trap on an attracting spacecraft significantly alters the volt-ampere characteristics of the instrument in a low Mach number plasma. It is shown when the angular acceptance of the aperture is restricted the current to the collector tends to be independent of the Debye length. Expressions for the RPA characteristics for both a thin sheath and a thick sheath are derived; and it is shown that as the aperture is narrowed the curves tend toward equivalence.

  4. General cause of sheath instability identified for low collisionality plasmas in devices with secondary electron emission.

    PubMed

    Campanell, M D; Khrabrov, A V; Kaganovich, I D

    2012-06-01

    A condition for sheath instability due to secondary electron emission (SEE) is derived for low collisionality plasmas. When the SEE coefficient of the electrons bordering the depleted loss cone in energy space exceeds unity, the sheath potential is unstable to a negative perturbation. This result explains three different instability phenomena observed in Hall thruster simulations including a newly found state with spontaneous ∼20  MHz oscillations. When instabilities occur, the SEE propagating between the walls becomes the dominant contribution to the particle flux, energy loss and axial transport. PMID:23003962

  5. General Cause of Sheath Instability Identified for Low Collisionality Plasma in Devices with Secondary Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Campanell, A. Khrabrov and I Kaganovich

    2012-05-11

    A condition for sheath instability due to secondary electron emission (SEE) is derived for low collisionality plasmas. When the SEE coefficient of the electrons bordering the depleted loss cone in energy space exceeds unity, the sheath potential is unstable to a negative perturbation. This result explains three different instability phenomena observed in Hall thruster simulations including a newly found state with spontaneous ~20MHz oscillations. When instabilities occur, the SEE propagating between the walls becomes the dominant contribution to the particle flux, energy loss and axial transport.

  6. Child–Langmuir law applicability for a cathode sheath description of glow discharge in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskiy, V. A.; Artushenko, K. P.; Yegorenkov, V. D.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper reveals that the Child-Langmuir law version with the constant ion mobility has to be applied for the cathode sheath description of the glow discharge in hydrogen. Using the analytical model we demonstrate that even in a high electric field the constant mobility law version rather than that for the constant ion mean free path has to hold in the case of impeded charge exchange and the dominant effect of polarization forces on the ion motion through the cathode sheath.

  7. Anisotropic emission of neutral atoms: evidence of an anisotropic Rydberg sheath in nanoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-02-01

    Intense laser-produced plasma is a complex amalgam of ions, electrons and atoms both in ground and excited states. Little is known about the spatial composition of the excited states that are an integral part of most gaseous or cluster plasma. In cluster-plasma, Rydberg excitations change the charge composition of the ions through charge transfer reactions and shape the angular distributions. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive technique that reveals the anisotropic Rydberg excited cluster sheath by measuring anisotropy in fast neutral atoms. The sheath is stronger in the direction of light polarization and the enhanced charge transfer by the excited clusters results in larger neutralization.

  8. The coexistence of peripheral nerve sheath tumors and vitiligo: more than coincidence?

    PubMed

    Elsherif, Mohamed A; Spinner, Robert J; Miest, Rachel Y

    2016-01-01

    Neurocristopathies arise from abnormal migration, differentiation, or proliferation of neural crest derivatives, leading to diverse clinical and pathological features. They are classified into dysgenetic or neoplastic, and can affect single or multiple sites (simple versus complex). Examples include congenital melanocytic nevi, neuroblastoma, Hirshsprung's disease, Waardenburg's syndrome, neurofibromatosis (NF) 1 and multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A and 2B. We report two cases of peripheral nerve sheath tumors associated with vitiligo and discuss the possible implicated embryologic, genetic and molecular mechanisms. To our knowledge, we also report the first case of de novo malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) associated with vitiligo. PMID:26607956

  9. Development of flexible joint for 500kV Al-sheathed O. F. cable

    SciTech Connect

    Komaba, T.; Kanai, K. ); Yoshida, S.; Shigetoshi, I.; Amano, K. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on a flexible dimensionaly flush joint for 500kV aluminum-sheathed oil-filled cables capable of being assembled, pulled an installed in a similar manner to cables at site which has been developed. This joint is intended for use at intermediate points on long bridges or tunnels where local assembly and installation of conventional joints would be difficult. In developing the joint various novel and original techniques have been employed, including the flexible flush jointing of segmental conductors, the flexible jointing of paper insulation by a combination of wrapping-back and stepping methods, plus on-site aluminum sheath corrugating and sealing methods.

  10. Giant cell tumour of peroneus brevis tendon sheath – a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Radotra, B D; Viswanathan, Vibhu Krishnan; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; S, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue lesion most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist. Being rare in foot and ankle, the unusual presentation of this lesion may sometimes mimic other lesions like lipoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, synovial cyst and ganglion. Hence it is important to include this lesion in differential diagnoses especially if the lesion is found to be anchored to any of the surrounding tendons. This article describes the unusual occurrence of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath of peroneus brevis which is rarely described in literature. PMID:22802558

  11. Two-region model for positive and negative plasma sheaths and its application to Hall thruster metallic anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, E.; Escobar, D.

    2008-03-15

    An asymptotic presheath/sheath model for positive and negative sheaths in front of a conducting electrode, with a continuous parametric transition at the no-sheath case, is presented. Key aspects of the model are as follows: full hydrodynamics of both species in the presheath; a kinetic formulation with a truncated distribution function for the repelled species within the sheath; and the fulfillment of the marginal Bohm condition at the sheath edge, in order to match the two formulations of the repelled species. The sheath regime depends on the ratios of particle fluxes and sound speeds between the two species. The presheath model includes the effect of a magnetic field parallel to the wall on electrons. An asymptotic, parametric study of the anode presheath is carried out in terms of the local ion-to-electron flux ratio and Hall parameter. The drift-diffusive model of magnetized electrons fails in a parametric region that includes parts of the negative sheath regime. In the case of the Hall parameter vanishing near the electrode and a weakly collisional plasma, a quasisonic, quasineutral plateau forms next to the sheath edge.

  12. MOLECULAR AND PATHOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF RICE SHEATH BLIGHT PATHOGEN ISOLATES FROM ARKANSAS USING RDNA-INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER SEQUENCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn (anastomosis group AG1-IA), is a serious disease worldwide. R. solani has a broad host range and no complete genetic resistance is available among cultivated rices. As first step to identify sheath blight resistance gene(s), molecular character...

  13. Numerical investigation of fast-wave propagation and radio-frequency sheath interaction with a shaped tokamak wall

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Interactions between propagating fast waves and radio-frequency (RF) sheaths in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies are numerically investigated based on a cold fluid plasma model coupled with a sheath boundary condition. In this two-dimensional study, the capability of the finite element code rfSOL, which was developed in previous numerical work, is extended to analyze self-consistent RF sheath-plasma interaction problems in a tokamak with a non-circular cross-section. It is found that a large sheath voltage is generated near the edges of the limiter-shaped deformation as a result of the conversion from fast to slow waves on the sheaths. The sheath voltage associated with this conversion is particularly significant in the localized region where the contact angle between the magnetic field line and the conducting wall varies rapidly along the curved sheath surface, which is consistent with the results in previous one-dimensional theoretical work. The dependences of the RF sheaths on various parameters in plasma such as the toroidal wavenumber, edge plasma density, and the degree of the RF wave absorption in the core region are also examined in detail.

  14. Numerical analysis of radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2012-01-15

    A new finite element numerical scheme for analyzing self-consistent radio-frequency (RF) sheath-plasma interaction problems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is applied to various problems represented by simplified models for the tokamak scrape-off layer. The present code incorporates a modified boundary condition, which is called a sheath boundary condition, that couples the radio-frequency waves and sheaths at the material boundaries by treating the sheath as a thin vacuum layer. A series of numerical analyses in one- and two-dimensional domains show several important physical properties, such as the existence of multiple roots, hysteresis effects, presence and characteristics of the sheath-plasma waves, and the phase shift of a reflected slow wave, some of which are newly identified by introducing a spatially varying plasma density and background magnetic field.

  15. Fine structure of modal focusing effect in a three dimensional plasma-sheath-lens formed by disk electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stamate, Eugen; Yamaguchi, Masahito

    2015-08-31

    Modal and discrete focusing effects associated with three-dimensional plasma-sheath-lenses show promising potential for applications in ion beam extraction, mass spectrometry, plasma diagnostics and for basic studies of plasma sheath. The ion focusing properties can be adjusted by controlling the geometrical structure of the plasma-sheath-lens and plasma parameters. The positive and negative ion kinetics within the plasma-sheath-lens are investigated both experimentally and theoretically and a modal focusing ring is identified on the surface of disk electrodes. The focusing ring is very sensitive to the sheath thickness and can be used to monitor very small changes in plasma parameters. Three dimensional simulations are found to be in very good agreement with experiments.

  16. Eye-to-eye with a mega-sheath fold: A case study from Wadi Mayh, northern Oman Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, M. P.; Alsop, G. I.

    2007-11-01

    Sheath folds are highly curvilinear folds, typically considered to develop by hinge rotation toward the transport direction during intense deformation. Most sheath folds are recognized on the centimeter to meter scale, with very few detailed studies of larger kilometer-scale structures. We here present evidence for a mega-scale sheath fold superbly exposed in the northern Oman Mountains. The Saih Hatat culmination consists of an exhumed high-pressure subduction zone with deep-level eclogites and garnet blueschists (As Sifah unit), epidote blueschists (Hulw unit) and carpholite-bearing metasediments (part of the “Upper plate”). Sheath folds are present at a variety of scales throughout the As Sifah, Hulw, and Upper plate tectonic packages. Curvilinear fold hinges along a 15-km-long profile outline the Wadi Mayh mega-sheath fold, which closes to the SSW and faces to the NNE. It consists of at least four secondary sheath folds with cross-sectional (y-z) eye folds measuring 200 m stacked on top of one another within Permian and Triassic shelf carbonates. These eye folds display highly elliptical geometries (Ryz > 5) and cat's-eye fold patterns consistent with simple/general shear. The sheath fold is enveloped by Ordovician and older rocks that do not show equal amounts of internal deformation. The upper bounding envelope is a detachment that has been subsequently sheath folded. The lower boundary of the sheath fold is the Upper plate-Lower plate detachment, which forms a major high-strain shear zone showing little vertical displacement but significant horizontal displacement. The sheath fold displays a SSW elongation (x axis) of at least 15 km and possibly up to 25 km, coupled with significant amounts of vertical flattening and WNW-ESE shortening.

  17. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Hou, J; Zhao, C; Xin, Z; Jin, J; Li, C; Wong, S-C; Yin, J

    2016-01-28

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells. PMID:26701327

  18. Wave properties near the subsolar magnetopause - Pc 1 waves in the sheath transition layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, P.; Russell, C. T.; Huang, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    We study the waves in the frequency range of Pc 1 in the sheath transition layer of the magnetopause from the ISEE 1 and 2 observations. The waves are enhanced in the sheath transition layer, although they are scattered into the magnetosheath when the outer edge of the sheath transition layer is not sharp. The wave frequency is proportional to, and equal to, about 44 percent of the ion gyrofrequency. The waves are left-handed polarized for southward IMF, but linearly polarized for northward IMF. The direction of maximum variation is perpendicular to both the background field and the gradients of the field and density for northward IMF; for southward IMF, the waves are more turbulent. Wave generation mechanisms may depend on IMF orientations rather than the shock geometry. To investigate the free energy generating the waves for northward IMF, a method is developed combining the measurements from the fast plasma experiment and Lepedea to obtain a high time resolution estimate of the temperature anisotropy for strongly northward IMF. The estimated ion temperature anisotropy is enhanced, up to a factor of 2, within the sheath transition layer for northward IMF.

  19. An analytic expression for the sheath criterion in magnetized plasmas with multi-charged ion species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-04-01

    The generalized Bohm criterion in magnetized multi-component plasmas consisting of multi-charged positive and negative ion species and electrons is analytically investigated by using the hydrodynamic model. It is assumed that the electrons and negative ion density distributions are the Boltzmann distribution with different temperatures and the positive ions enter into the sheath region obliquely. Our results show that the positive and negative ion temperatures, the orientation of the applied magnetic field and the charge number of positive and negative ions strongly affect the Bohm criterion in these multi-component plasmas. To determine the validity of our derived generalized Bohm criterion, it reduced to some familiar physical condition and it is shown that monotonically reduction of the positive ion density distribution leading to the sheath formation occurs only when entrance velocity of ion into the sheath satisfies the obtained Bohm criterion. Also, as a practical application of the obtained Bohm criterion, effects of the ionic temperature and concentration as well as magnetic field on the behavior of the charged particle density distributions and so the sheath thickness of a magnetized plasma consisting of electrons and singly charged positive and negative ion species are studied numerically.

  20. Screening and sheath formation in a nonequilibrium mixed Cairns-Tsallis electron distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzit, Omar; Gougam, Leila Ait; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-05-01

    The effects of electron nonextensivity for a given nonthermality state, on Debye shielding and electrostatic sheath formation are examined. A physically meaningful Cairns-Tsallis distribution is outlined and a generalized expression for the Debye screening length λD q , α is obtained. It is shown that an increase of the entropic index q causes λD q , α to decrease whatever the amount of plasma nonthermality α. In addition, smaller pertinent values of q along with relatively higher values of α provide larger values of λD q , α . The shielded electrostatic potential falls off as a function of distance more slowly as α increases, a result somewhat analogous to the dynamical shielding decrease (albeit in a different context) of a free charge as it begins to move. Moreover, smaller pertinent values of q along with relatively higher values of α are found to involve higher ion drift speed v i 0 for proper sheath formation. As α increases, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient d Ψ s / d ξ becomes abruptly steep slowing down the energetic electrons leakage to the wall. Moreover, the sheath thickness broadens as the electron nonthermality strengthens.

  1. Characterization of tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Sachkova, Maria Yu.; Sykilinda, Nina N.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.

    2009-12-20

    The tail sheath protein of giant bacteriophage phiKZ Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoded by gene 29 was identified and its expression system was developed. Localization of the protein on the virion was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Properties of gene product (gp) 29 were studied by electron microscopy, immunoblotting and limited trypsinolysis. Recombinant gp29 assembles into the regular tubular structures (polysheaths) of variable length. Trypsin digestion of gp29 within polysheaths or extended sheath of virion results in specific cleavage of the peptide bond between Arg135 and Asp136. However, this cleavage does not affect polymeric structure of polysheaths, sheaths and viral infectivity. Digestion by trypsin of the C-truncated gp29 mutant, lacking the ability to self-assemble, results in formation of a stable protease-resistant fragment. Although there is no sequence homology of phiKZ proteins to proteins of other bacteriophages, some characteristic biochemical properties of gp29 revealed similarities to the tail sheath protein of bacteriophage T4.

  2. Molecular dynamics of interactions of rice with rice blast and sheath blight pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to develop the molecular strategies to control rice (Oryzae sativa) diseases, molecular interactions of rice with rice blast [Magnaporthe oryzae, formerly (Magnaporthe grisea] and sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani) fungi were analyzed. The interaction of rice with M. oryzae follows a b...

  3. Studies of a sheath structure in an RF discharge using experimental, analytical and simulation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Kawamura, K.; Bowden, M. D.; Muraoka, K.; Choi, Y. W.

    1999-10-01

    The electric field distributions in the sheath region were measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method in capacitively coupled RF glow discharges operated at different pressures in helium. The measured distributions and sheath thicknesses obtained from the electric field distributions were compared with those obtained from an existing analytical theory1 and with a numerical simulation2. The comparison yielded reasonable agreement, both in general tendency with regard to the pressure dependence and in the absolute magnitude. These results provided evidence of the validity of the analytical sheath theory and the numerical simulation for predicting the sheath properties of an RF glow discharge. 1. M. A. Lieberman and A. J. Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials Processing, New York: Wiley, 1994 2. J. P. Verboncoeur, V. Vahedi, M. V. Alves, and C. K. Birdsall, \\x81gPDP1, PDC1, PDS1 plasma device 1 dimensional bounded electrostatic codes,\\x81h Reference manual PDx1 PC version 2.1, 1993

  4. TssA forms a gp6-like ring attached to the type VI secretion sheath.

    PubMed

    Planamente, Sara; Salih, Osman; Manoli, Eleni; Albesa-Jové, David; Freemont, Paul S; Filloux, Alain

    2016-08-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a supra-molecular bacterial complex that resembles phage tails. It is a killing machine which fires toxins into target cells upon contraction of its TssBC sheath. Here, we show that TssA1 is a T6SS component forming dodecameric ring structures whose dimensions match those of the TssBC sheath and which can accommodate the inner Hcp tube. The TssA1 ring complex binds the T6SS sheath and impacts its behaviour in vivo In the phage, the first disc of the gp18 sheath sits on a baseplate wherein gp6 is a dodecameric ring. We found remarkable sequence and structural similarities between TssA1 and gp6 C-termini, and propose that TssA1 could be a baseplate component of the T6SS Furthermore, we identified similarities between TssK1 and gp8, the former interacting with TssA1 while the latter is found in the outer radius of the gp6 ring. These observations, combined with similarities between TssF and gp6N-terminus or TssG and gp53, lead us to propose a comparative model between the phage baseplate and the T6SS. PMID:27288401

  5. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF. PMID:26928128

  6. Magnetic sheath effect on the gross and net erosion rates due to impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellet, N.; Pégourié, B.; Martin, C.; Gunn, J. P.; Bufferand, H.; Roubin, P.

    2016-02-01

    Simulations of impurity trajectories in deuterium plasmas in the vicinity of the surface are performed by taking into account the magnetic sheath in conditions relevant for ITER and WEST. We show that the magnetic sheath has a strong effect on the average impact angle of impurities in divertor conditions and that it can lead to an increase of ≈ 60% at the gross erosion maximum for neon (Ne+4) compared to the case when only the cyclotron motion is considered. The evaluation of the net erosion has been undertaken by retaining local redeposition of tungsten (W). We investigate how it is affected by the sheath magnetic potential profile. The largest effect is however observed when an energy distribution is considered. In this case the number of particles that manage to exit the sheath is larger as it is dominated by the more energetic particles. The comparison with other work is also discussed. The application to a scenario of the WEST project is finally performed, which exhibits a moderate, however non negligible, erosion of the plasma facing components.

  7. Pathology in practice: Peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a Shubunkin goldfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) have been detected in many fish species, including goldfish, several species of snapper, coho salmon, the bicolor damselfish, and rainbow smelt. They originate from neural crest cells and generally occur along the subcutaneous nerves. A viral etiology has bee...

  8. Genetic and genomic dissection of resistance genes to the rice sheath blight pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight disease caused by the anastomosis group AG1-IA of the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most serious rice diseases in the southern US and the world. The use of fungicides is a popular but costly method to control this disease worldwide. Genetic analysis of host re...

  9. An analytic expression for the sheath criterion in magnetized plasmas with multi-charged ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-04-15

    The generalized Bohm criterion in magnetized multi-component plasmas consisting of multi-charged positive and negative ion species and electrons is analytically investigated by using the hydrodynamic model. It is assumed that the electrons and negative ion density distributions are the Boltzmann distribution with different temperatures and the positive ions enter into the sheath region obliquely. Our results show that the positive and negative ion temperatures, the orientation of the applied magnetic field and the charge number of positive and negative ions strongly affect the Bohm criterion in these multi-component plasmas. To determine the validity of our derived generalized Bohm criterion, it reduced to some familiar physical condition and it is shown that monotonically reduction of the positive ion density distribution leading to the sheath formation occurs only when entrance velocity of ion into the sheath satisfies the obtained Bohm criterion. Also, as a practical application of the obtained Bohm criterion, effects of the ionic temperature and concentration as well as magnetic field on the behavior of the charged particle density distributions and so the sheath thickness of a magnetized plasma consisting of electrons and singly charged positive and negative ion species are studied numerically.

  10. 3D visualization of sheath folds in Ancient Roman marble wall coverings from Ephesos, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Passchier, Cees W.; de Kemp, Eric A.; İlhan, Sinan

    2014-10-01

    Archaeological excavations and restoration of a palatial Roman housing complex in Ephesos, Turkey yielded 40 wall-decorating plates of folded mylonitic marble (Cipollino verde), derived from the internal Hellenides near Karystos, Greece. Cipollino verde was commonly used for decoration purposes in Roman buildings. The plates were serial-sectioned from a single quarried block of 1,25 m3 and provided a research opportunity for detailed reconstruction of the 3D geometry of meterscale folds in mylonitized marble. A GOCAD model is used to visualize the internal fold structures of the marble, comprising curtain folds and multilayered sheath folds. The sheath folds are unusual in that they have their intermediate axis normal to the parent layering. This agrees with regional tectonic studies, which suggest that Cipollino verde structures formed by local constrictional non-coaxial flow. Sheath fold cross-section geometry, exposed on the surface of a plate or outcrop, is found to be independent of the intersection angle of the fold structure with the studied plane. Consequently, a single surface cannot be used as an indicator of the three-dimensional geometry of transected sheath folds.

  11. Development of a Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple for Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Edward R.; Weber, Carissa Tudryn; Oishi, Tomo; Santos, Jose; Mach, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Sheathed Miniature Aerothermal Reentry Thermocouple is a micro-miniature thermocouple for high temperature measurement in extreme environments. It is available for use in Thermal Protection System materials for ground testing and flight. This paper discusses the heritage, and design of the instrument. Experimental and analytical methods used to verify its performance and limitations are described.

  12. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission at low gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Irina; Langendorf, Samuel J.; Keidar, Michael; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2014-10-01

    Previously the experiments demonstrated that the growth of the electron temperature with power in the Hall thruster is restricted by plasma-wall interaction if the wall has an enhanced secondary electron emission (SEE) yield. It is known that the plasma and wall is separated by the sheath potential drop to provide the condition of zero-current on the surface with floating potential. The rearrangement of the sheath structure near the plate with enhanced SEE is the subject of our experimental and theoretical study. The experiment was carried out in multidipole plasma device, where plasma is maintained by the negatively-biased emissive filament. The plate with sapphire surface is placed 50 cm apart from the filament. The plasma parameters were measured for different negative biases Ub and discharge currents J at P = 10-4 Torr. In our PIC simulations the plasma was calculated for the experimental conditions. We solved self-consistently the Boltzmann equations for the electron and ion distribution functions and Poisson equation for electrical field. Both in the experiment and simulation we found non-monotonic change in sheath structure near the plate depending on Ub and J. The kinetic simulations allowed us to describe the sheath rearrangement in terms of the electron energy distribution function.

  13. Screening and sheath formation in a nonequilibrium mixed Cairns-Tsallis electron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar; Gougam, Leila Ait; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-05-15

    The effects of electron nonextensivity for a given nonthermality state, on Debye shielding and electrostatic sheath formation are examined. A physically meaningful Cairns-Tsallis distribution is outlined and a generalized expression for the Debye screening length λ{sub D}{sup q,α} is obtained. It is shown that an increase of the entropic index q causes λ{sub D}{sup q,α} to decrease whatever the amount of plasma nonthermality α. In addition, smaller pertinent values of q along with relatively higher values of α provide larger values of λ{sub D}{sup q,α}. The shielded electrostatic potential falls off as a function of distance more slowly as α increases, a result somewhat analogous to the dynamical shielding decrease (albeit in a different context) of a free charge as it begins to move. Moreover, smaller pertinent values of q along with relatively higher values of α are found to involve higher ion drift speed v{sub i0} for proper sheath formation. As α increases, the sheath electrostatic potential-gradient dΨ{sub s}/dξ becomes abruptly steep slowing down the energetic electrons leakage to the wall. Moreover, the sheath thickness broadens as the electron nonthermality strengthens.

  14. The Geo-Effectiveness of CME-Driven Shocks and Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Al-haddad, Nada; Schwadron, Nathan; Riley, Pete; Farrugia, Charles; Winslow, Reka

    2016-07-01

    Past studies have found that ˜30% of intense geomagnetic storms and ˜20% of moderate geomagnetic storms are caused by forward fast magnetosonic shocks and the sheath plasma and magnetic field behind these shocks, making shocks the second most important cause of geomagnetic storms after magnetic ejecta. Since only about 20% of fast-mode shocks are followed by a moderate geomagnetic storm, it is important to understand which shock and upstream properties are most effective in creating optimal conditions for the development of geomagnetic storms. To do so, we identify all fast-mode forwards shocks (˜100), for which the sheath region resulted in a moderate or intense geomagnetic storm during solar cycles 23 and 24 (1997 - 2015). We find that about half such shocks are shocks propagating into a preceding CME or shocks propagating into the sheath region of a preceding shock. Overall, only a small fraction of shocks propagating through normal solar wind are geo-effective (less than 15%), whereas the majority of shocks propagating through a previous CME are geo-effective. We further discuss the conditions which can result in the formation of southward Bz in the sheath region behind a shock.

  15. Computed Tomographic Tenography of Normal Equine Digital Flexor Tendon Sheath: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Lacitignola, Luca; De Luca, Pasquale; Guarracino, Alessandro; Crovace, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to document the normal computed tomographic tenography findings of digital flexor tendon sheath. Six ex vivo normal equine forelimbs were used. An axial approach was used to inject 185 mg/mL of iopamidol in a total volume of 60 mL into the digital flexor tendon sheaths. Single-slice helical scans, with 5 mm thickness, spaced every 3 mm, for a pitch of 0.6, and with bone algorithm reconstruction, were performed before and after injections of contrast medium. To obtain better image quality for multiplanar reconstruction and 3D reformatting, postprocessing retroreconstruction was performed to reduce the images to submillimetre thickness. Computed tomographic tenography of digital flexor tendon sheaths could visualize the following main tendon structures for every forelimb in contrast-enhanced images as low densities surrounded by high densities: superficial digital flexor tendon, deep digital flexor tendon, manica flexoria, mesotendons, and synovial recess. Results of this study suggest that computed tomographic tenography can be used with accuracy and sensitivity to evaluate the common disorders of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath and the intrathecal structures. PMID:26185709

  16. RiceCAP: Sheath blight QTLs identified in two Bengal/O. nivara advanced backcross populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight disease, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important fungal diseases worldwide. Wild relatives of rice may contain novel genes for biotic/abiotic stress resistance lost during domestication. We identified seven moderately resistant accessions from a collection of 67...

  17. PIC Simulation of RF Plasma Sheath Formation and Initial Validation of Optical Diagnostics using HPC Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icenhour, Casey; Exum, Ashe; Martin, Elijah; Green, David; Smithe, David; Shannon, Steven

    2014-10-01

    The coupling of experiment and simulation to elucidate near field physics above ICRF antennae presents challenges on both the experimental and computational side. In order to analyze this region, a new optical diagnostic utilizing active and passive spectroscopy is used to determine the structure of the electric fields within the sheath region. Parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields with respect to the sheath electric field have been presented. This work focuses on the validation of these measurements utilizing the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation method in conjunction with High Performance Computing (HPC) resources on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Plasma parameters of interest include electron density, electron temperature, plasma potentials, and RF plasma sheath voltages and thicknesses. The plasma is modeled utilizing the VSim plasma simulation tool, developed by the Tech-X Corporation. The implementation used here is a two-dimensional electromagnetic model of the experimental setup. The overall goal of this study is to develop models for complex RF plasma systems and to help outline the physics of RF sheath formation and subsequent power loss on ICRF antennas in systems such as ITER. This work is carried out with the support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Tech-X Corporation.

  18. Mapping quantitative trait loci responsible for resistance to rice sheath blight disease using greenhouse assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (RSB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice, causing severe losses in yield and quality annually. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for RSB resistance were analyzed using field phenotypic data in literature re...

  19. Registration of four rice germplasm lines with improved resistance to sheath blight and blast diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (ShB) and blast caused by the fungal pathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Magnaporthe oryzae, respectively, are the two most serious diseases of rice worldwide. Four rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm lines designated as LJRIL103 (PI 660982), LJRIL158 (PI 660983), LJRIL186 (PI 660984),...

  20. Current progress on genetic interactions of rice with rice blast and sheath blight fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of genetic interactions between rice and its pathogenic fungi Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani should lead to a better understanding of molecular mechanisms of host resistance, and the improvement of strategies to manage rice blast and sheath blight diseases. Presently dozens of ri...

  1. Evaluation of the USDA Rice Core Collection for sheath blight disease using micro-chamber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA rice core collection, including 1,794 accessions from 114 countries, was developed using a stratified random sampling method to represent the entire NSGC collection including over 18,000 accessions. Sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani) is one of the most important and widely distributed disea...

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the dynamics of a pulsed planar sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Goeckner, M.J.; Malik, S.M. ); Conrad, J.R. ); Breun, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) the ion density near the edge of an expanding plasma sheath has been measured. These measurements utilized a transition of N[sup +][sub 2] [the P12 component of the [ital X] [sup 2][Sigma][sup +][sub [ital g

  3. Self-sustaining relativistic ionization wave launched by a sheath field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, Alexey; McCormick, Matt; Quevedo, Hernan; Bengtson, Roger; Ditmire, Todd

    2013-10-01

    We present experimental evidence supported by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a self-sustaining relativistic ionization wave launched into a surrounding gas by the sheath field of a high energy density plasma. We create a plasma filament with hot electrons by irradiating a supersonic clustering gas jet with a short pulse laser (115 fs) at an intensity of 5 ×1017 W/cm2. In contrast with a single atom, a cluster of atoms produces super-ponderomotive electrons in the field of the laser. These electrons generate a sheath field at the edge of the plasma filament strong enough to ionize the gas atoms in the sheath. We observe that a collisionless ionization wave is launched in this regime, propagating radially through the gas at up to 0.5 c after the laser has passed. The expansion of the resulting plasma filament due to the ionization wave occurs in about 2 ps, more than doubling the initial radius of the filament. The remarkable longevity of the wave without continuous energy deposition into the electron population is explained by a moving field structure that traps the hot electrons near the boundary. 2D PIC simulations confirm that the trapped hot electrons maintain a sheath field required for the ionization despite the significant expansion of the filament.

  4. The ion polytropic coefficient in a collisionless sheath containing hot ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Binbin; Xiang, Nong; Ou, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The fluid approach has been widely used to study plasma sheath dynamics. For a sheath containing hot ions whose temperature is greater than the electron's, how to truncate the fluid hierarchy chain equations while retaining to the fullest extent of the kinetic effects is always a difficult problem. In this paper, a one-dimensional, collisionless sheath containing hot ions is studied via particle-in-cell simulations. By analyzing the ion energy equation and taking the kinetic effects into account, we have shown that the ion polytropic coefficient in the vicinity of the sheath edge is approximately constant so that the state equation with the modified polytropic coefficient can be used to close the hierarchy chain of the ion fluid equations. The value of the polytropic coefficient strongly depends on the hot ion temperature and its concentration in the plasma. The semi-analytical model is given to interpret the simulation results. As an application, the kinetic effects on the ion saturation current density in the probe theory are discussed.

  5. Nodes of Ranvier and myelin sheath dimensions along exceptionally thin myelinated vertebrate PNS axons.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, F; Hildebrand, C

    1992-11-01

    The trigeminal alveolar branch in the lower jaw of the cichlid Tilapia mariae was examined by light and electron microscopy on single and serial sections, and by light microscopy on teased fibre preparations. The principal purpose was to find out if the exceptionally thin myelinated axons (d < 1 micron) present in this nerve possess true nodes of Ranvier, and to determine the dimensions of their myelin sheaths. This necessitated analysis of the whole size range of myelinated fibres, with respect to nodal and internodal morphology. The results show that the exceptionally thin myelinated fibres exhibit primitive nodal regions, with patches of axolemmal undercoating, and few Schwann cell processes in the node gap. This contrasts with the more complex nodal organization seen in larger trigeminal alveolar branch fibres. For the whole population of myelinated fibres the number of myelin lamellae increases rectilinearly with axon diameter, and sheath length increases with fibre diameter according to a logarithmic expression. The myelin sheaths of the exceptionally thin trigeminal alveolar branch fibres are composed of 10-20 lamellae, and extend 35-50 microns along the axon. These results show that the structural complexity of nodal regions in the trigeminal alveolar branch decreases with decreasing fibre size, that the exceptionally thin myelinated trigeminal alveolar branch fibres possess primitive nodes and that they have very short myelin sheaths. Our crude theoretical calculations suggest that these fibres might be capable of saltatory conduction. PMID:1279131

  6. Metal boot permits fabrication of hermetically sealed splices in metal sheathed instrumentation cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, G.

    1966-01-01

    Metal boot splices hard sheathed instrumentation cables used with high temperature strain gages and thermocouples. Silver brazing the conductors together, hermetically seals the splice. This boot is a highly reliable sealed splice which is equally effective at cryogenic temperatures, high temperatures, nuclear environments, and combinations of the above.

  7. Analysis of rice PDR-like ABC transporter genes in sheath blight resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most damaging diseases of rice worldwide. To understand the molecular mechanism of resistance, we identified 450 differentially expressed genes in a resistant rice cultivar Jasmine 85 after R. solani infection with a combination of DNA microar...

  8. Development of a pathology toolbox for genetic and breeding for resistance to rice sheath blight disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate evaluation of the host response of rice plants to sheath blight disease, Rhizoctonia solani, is important for genetic studies and breeding for improved resistance. In the present study, a method to evaluate the response of a recombinant inbred mapping population, consisting of 574 F10 indiv...

  9. Sensitivity to a phytotoxin from Rhizoctonia solani correlates with sheath blight susceptibility in rice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath Blight is widely regarded as one of the most important diseases of cultivated rice and germplasm improvement is essential for disease management. Genetic sources of tolerance for this disease are known, however, complex quantitative inheritance and high environmental variability make phenoty...

  10. Searching for Germplasm Resistant to Sheath Blight from the USDA Rice Core Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight, caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important and widely distributed diseases capable of infesting numerous crops including rice. Resistant germplasm with wide variation is essential for controlling this disease via breeding efforts, and genetic backgr...

  11. Biocontrol-based sheath blight management to reduce fungicide use on rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important rice diseases in Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, and other southern states. The lack of complete ShB resistance in the most commonly planted varieties and the severity of this disease results in southern U.S. rice farmers ap...

  12. Formation of stylet sheaths in aere (in air) from eight species of phytophagous hemipterans from six families (suborders: Auchenorrhyncha and Sternorrhyncha)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stylet sheath formation is a common feature among phytophagous hemipterans. These sheaths are considered essential to promote a successful feeding event of these piercing-sucking insects. The stylet sheath composition is unknown, and it is suggested that it forms through interactions with external (...

  13. Numerical model of the plasma sheath generated by the plasma source instrument aboard the Polar satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Leung, W. C.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    2001-09-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the Polar satellite is studied by using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low-density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 40-50 V, owing to the photoelectron emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, ion-rich xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at ~2 V. Accordingly, in our three-dimensional PIC simulation we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2 V as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the xenon plasma in the sheath (-10-103cm-3), the ambient plasma of low density (<1 cm-3) is neglected. In the simulations the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an ``apple''-shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations it takes only about a couple of tens of electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe+ ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. After this time the expansion of the sheath in directions transverse to the ambient magnetic field slows down because the electrons are magnetized. Using the quasi steady sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a highly supersonic

  14. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Leung, W. C.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the Polar satellite is studied by using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low-density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 40-50 V, owing to the photoelectron emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, ion-rich xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at approximately 2 V. Accordingly, in our three-dimensional PIC simulation we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2 V as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the xenon plasma in the sheath (10-10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (<1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an 'apple'-shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations it takes only about a couple of tens of electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. After this time the expansion of the sheath in directions transverse to the ambient magnetic field slows down because the electrons are magnetized. Using the quasi steady sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a

  15. A combined analytical and experimental study on the formation of sheath folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, J. E.; Galland, O.; Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    The term 'sheath fold' describes a cone-shaped structure with a rounded apex. Such folds can occur in all rock-types and range in size from sub-millimeters to kilometers. They are in many cases associated with shear zones and shear deformation. Even though sheath folds are three-dimensional structures they are rarely exposed as such. In the field they are more commonly recognized in cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction where they exhibit eye-structures. How sheath folds form and how they evolve with increasing strain is still a matter of debate. Several mechanisms for the sheath fold development have been proposed, such as the passive amplification of pre-existing structures, for example buckle folds, or the disturbance of the flow in simple shear by, for example, weak or rigid inclusions. In this study we trigger the sheath fold development with a slip surface (weak inclusion) embedded in a layered matrix subjected to simple shear. We study the impact of the slip surface orientation, the cross-section location, the viscosity ratio between the layers and the layer thickness on the evolving eye-structures. To address these questions we employ a combined approach of analytical and experimental modeling. In the analytical model setup we place an elliptical, weak inclusion, acting as a slip surface, in a stiff matrix and apply simple shear of up to γ=10. The analytical model is three-dimensional where the flow around the inclusion is obtained with an adapted external Eshelby solution for incompressible viscous materials in the limit of an elliptical and inviscid inclusion. The evolving structures are visualized by tracking passive marker layers in the matrix. We tested the influence of the initial inclusion orientation (0°, 90°, or 135° with respect to the shear direction) on the development of sheath folds. The analytical model shows that the sheath folds and consequently eye-structures develop irrespectively of the initial inclusion orientation

  16. Methylation-based classification of benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    PubMed

    Röhrich, Manuel; Koelsche, Christian; Schrimpf, Daniel; Capper, David; Sahm, Felix; Kratz, Annekathrin; Reuss, Jana; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Becker, Albert; Weis, Joachim; Mawrin, Christian; Mittelbronn, Michel; Perry, Arie; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Hartmann, Christian; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Arp, Mirko; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel; Hänggi, Daniel; Heim, Stefanie; Paulus, Werner; Schittenhelm, Jens; Ahmadi, Rezvan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; von Deimling, Andreas; Reuss, David E

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of peripheral nerve sheath tumors derive from the Schwann cell lineage and comprise diverse histological entities ranging from benign schwannomas and neurofibromas to high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), each with several variants. There is increasing evidence for methylation profiling being able to delineate biologically relevant tumor groups even within the same cellular lineage. Therefore, we used DNA methylation arrays for methylome- and chromosomal profile-based characterization of 171 peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We analyzed 28 conventional high-grade MPNST, three malignant Triton tumors, six low-grade MPNST, four epithelioid MPNST, 33 neurofibromas (15 dermal, 8 intraneural, 10 plexiform), six atypical neurofibromas, 43 schwannomas (including 5 NF2 and 5 schwannomatosis associated cases), 11 cellular schwannomas, 10 melanotic schwannomas, 7 neurofibroma/schwannoma hybrid tumors, 10 nerve sheath myxomas and 10 ganglioneuromas. Schwannomas formed different epigenomic subgroups including a vestibular schwannoma subgroup. Cellular schwannomas were not distinct from conventional schwannomas. Nerve sheath myxomas and neurofibroma/schwannoma hybrid tumors were most similar to schwannomas. Dermal, intraneural and plexiform neurofibromas as well as ganglioneuromas all showed distinct methylation profiles. Atypical neurofibromas and low-grade MPNST were indistinguishable with a common methylation profile and frequent losses of CDKN2A. Epigenomic analysis finds two groups of conventional high-grade MPNST sharing a frequent loss of neurofibromin. The larger of the two groups shows an additional loss of trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3). The smaller one retains H3K27me3 and is found in spinal locations. Sporadic MPNST with retained neurofibromin expression did not form an epigenetic group and most cases could be reclassified as cellular schwannomas or soft tissue sarcomas. Widespread immunohistochemical loss

  17. Scaling of the plasma sheath in a magnetic field parallel to the walla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Tang, Xianzhu; Roytershteyn, Vadim S.

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by the magnetized target fusion [R. E. Siemon et al., Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 18, 363 (1999)] experiment, a systematic investigation of the scaling of a one-dimensional plasma sheath with a magnetic field parallel to the wall was carried out using analytical theory and the particle-in-cell code VPIC [K. J. Bowers et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055703 (2008)]. Starting with a uniform Maxwellian distribution in three-dimensional velocity space, plasma consisting of collisionless electrons, and ions of the same temperature interacts with a perfectly absorbing wall. A much larger ion Larmor radius causes the wall to be charged positively, creating an electric field that tends to repel the ions and attract the electrons, which is the opposite of the conventional Bohm sheath [D. Bohm, Characteristics of Electrical Discharges in Magnetic Fields (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1949)]. This manifests in the form of gyro-orbit modification by this spatially varying electric field, the degree of which is found to intricately depend on the relation between three parameters: electron and ion thermal Larmor radii and plasma Debye length: ρthe, ρthi, and λD. Furthermore, the study of the sheath width scaling through the analysis of the full width at half max of electric field, xEh, elucidates three distinct types of behavior of xEh, corresponding to three different regimes: ρthi<λD, ρthe<λD<ρthi, and λD<ρthe. In addition to the sheath width, the scaling of the wall potential ϕWall, as well as the role of the ion mass and charge Z are investigated. The results of this analytical and computational approach can also be useful in studying the plasma sheath in the conventional magnetic confinement devices, in particular at the first wall of tokamaks.

  18. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heckel, A.; Weiler, M.; Xia, A.; Ruetters, M.; Pham, M.; Bendszus, M.; Heiland, S.; Baeumer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. Methods MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD) was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV) as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Results DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr.) and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. Conclusion AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA) reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26114630

  19. Sheath Effects on Electron Density Measurements in Frequency Shift Probe and their Application to Electron Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keiji; Zhang, Qi; Sugai, Hideo

    2009-10-01

    Technologies of plasma monitoring are important for accurate plasma control. We have developed a frequency shift probe, and the probe enables us to measure an electron density from variation of resonance frequency of the probe head similarly to the hairpin probe. A plane structure of the probe head make it possible to minimizes disturbance to the processing plasma, and the probe is applicable to a reactive polymer-deposition plasmas since the polymer has no significant effects on the resonance frequency. The electron density is usually obtained from a plasma-induced shift of the probe resonance frequency, however influences of a sheath around the probe should been considered for more precise density measurements. In this work, sheath effects on the frequency shift probe were investigated, and the frequency shift probe was applied to measure a electron temperature using the sheath effects. As the sheath thickness increased, the resonance frequency decreased, and the sheath effect is enhanced depending on probe structure. Since the sheath width is proportional to Debye length, the probe resonance frequency depends on electron density and electron temperature, suggesting that resonance frequencies obtained in two probes having different sheath dependence gives an unique solution of the density and temperature of electrons.

  20. Sheath expansion and plasma dynamics in the presence of electrode evaporation: Application to a vacuum circuit breaker

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrailh, P.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.; Sandolache, G.; Rowe, S.

    2009-09-01

    During the postarc dielectric recovery phase in a vacuum circuit breaker, a cathode sheath forms and expels the plasma from the electrode gap. The success or failure of current breaking depends on how efficiently the plasma is expelled from the electrode gap. The sheath expansion in the postarc phase can be compared to sheath expansion in plasma immersion ion implantation except that collisions between charged particles and atoms generated by electrode evaporation may become important in a vacuum circuit breaker. In this paper, we show that electrode evaporation plays a significant role in the dynamics of the sheath expansion in this context not only because charged particle transport is no longer collisionless but also because the neutral flow due to evaporation and temperature gradients may push the plasma toward one of the electrodes. Using a hybrid model of the nonequilibrium postarc plasma and cathode sheath coupled with a direct simulation Monte Carlo method to describe collisions between heavy species, we present a parametric study of the sheath and plasma dynamics and of the time needed for the sheath to expel the plasma from the gap for different values of plasma density and electrode temperatures at the beginning of the postarc phase. This work constitutes a preliminary step toward understanding and quantifying the risk of current breaking failure of a vacuum arc.

  1. Hair matrix germinative epidermal cells confer follicle-inducing capabilities on dermal sheath and high passage papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A J; Jahoda, C A

    1996-10-01

    Low passage cultured dermal papilla cells from adult rats stimulate complete hair follicle neogenesis when re-implanted into heterotypic skin. In contrast, cultured sheath cells are non-inductive despite sharing other behavioural characteristics (a common lineage and in situ proximity) with papilla cells. However, since sheath cells can behave inductively in amputated follicles after regenerating the papilla, this poses the question of what influences the sheath to papilla cell transition? During reciprocal tissue interactions specific epidermal cues are crucial to skin appendage development, and while in vivo assays to date have focussed on dermal interactive influence, our aim was to investigate epidermal potential. We have previously observed that hair follicle epidermal cells display exceptional interactive behaviour when combined with follicle dermal cells in vitro. Thus in the present study, hair follicle germinative, outer root sheath or skin basal epidermal cells were separately combined with each of three non-inductive dermal cell types (high passage papilla, low passage sheath or fibroblast) and then implanted into small ear skin wounds. The sheath/germinative and papilla/germinative cell implants repeatedly induced giant vibrissa-type follicles and fibres. In complete contrast, any single cell type and all other forms of recombination were consistently non-inductive. Hence, the adult germinative epidermal cells enable non-inductive adult dermal cells to stimulate hair follicle neogenesis, effectively, by altering their 'status', causing the sheath cells to 'specialise' and the 'aged' papilla cells to 'rejuvenate'. PMID:8898222

  2. LIF measurements of the ion distribution function in the sheath and pre-sheath of a biased capacitively coupled plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter

    2011-10-01

    The time-dependent argon ion energy distribution function (IEDF) above and within the plasma sheath of a radio frequency (rf) biased substrate has been measured using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in a commercial plasma processing tool. The measurements were acquired at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz rf waveform and show the ion dynamics to vary dramatically throughout a cycle. Discharge parameters were such that the rf bias period was on the order of the ion transit time through the sheath (tion/trf = 0.435). The first experiments measured the IEDF along a line parallel to the normal of the wafer with spatial resolution (dy = 88 um). These measurements have been extended to an x-y plane (y is the height above the wafer) which includes the wafer edge so that f(r,v,t) can be measured within a sheet of light. These measurements include the option for multiple bias voltages (2.2, 60 MHz). A patented technology, which enables rapidly switching either bias or ICP source without a match circuit allows for time sequencing in any combination with (tpulse > 50 usec). The heat flux and plasma flow is derived from the ion distribution function. This work embodies the first time resolved measurement of ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) within an rf biased sheath over a large area (30 cm diameter) substrate. Additional probe measurements of the plasma parameters above the wafer will be presented as well. Comparisons will be made to ion energy and velocity distributions obtained from computer modeling. Work supported by the NSF and done at The Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA (supported by NSF and DOE) and the University of Michigan.

  3. Effect of the electric field of the anode sheath on the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Pal', A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Suetin, N. V.; Timofeev, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.

    2007-01-15

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes on silicon substrates were grown in the anode sheath of a dc glow discharge. In order to clarify the role of the electric field in the growth of nanotubes, numerical simulations of charged particle transport in the anode sheath were carried out in the drift-diffusion approximation. The distributions of the charged particle density and electric field are obtained. Possible mechanisms whereby the electric field influences the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes are analyzed. It is found that the nanotubes grow in the region in which the electric field is enhanced due to the depletion of positive ions in the anode sheath.

  4. Persistent spontaneous synovial drainage from digital flexor sheath in proliferative tenosynovitis: Two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chin, Brian; Cheung, Kevin; Farhangkhoee, Hana; Thoma, Achilleas

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is an inflammatory process involving the synovial sheaths surrounding the tendons. It is most commonly caused by infection, but may also be caused by overuse, diabetes and rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and crystal arthropathies. The present report describes two patients with severe proliferative tenosynovitis, who developed a fistula between the tendon sheath and skin after instrumentation, resulting in persistent synovial drainage. After failing conservative management, both patients were managed with extensive flexor tenosynovectomy to prevent inoculation of bacteria into the flexor sheath. The presentation, management and outcome of each case is described in addition to a discussion of the literature on tenosynovial fistulas. PMID:26090353

  5. The geometry and topology of natural sheath folds: a new tool for structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.

    2004-09-01

    Curvilinear sheath folds are classically depicted as displaying symmetrical geometries about two orthogonal mirror planes centred along the (X-Y) axial surface and the (X-Z) medial (culmination/depression) surface which bisects the fold nose. However, 10,000 geometric analyses of minor folds and fabrics formed during ductile thrusting in the Caledonides of northern Scotland reveals that major dome and basin sheath folds can display distinct and predictable asymmetries across both axial and medial surfaces. The strain is typically heterogeneous so that structural fabrics and younging evidence are preserved within sheath folds at varying stages of development. This allows an analysis of the evolution of such structures from 'tongue' folds to more extreme 'tubular' forms. Geometric relationships between measured orientations of fold hinges, axial planes, extension lineations and foliations are compared on fabric topology plots (FTPs), which provide an effective tool for monitoring planar and linear fabric rotations with increasing progressive non-coaxial deformation. They consistently display systematic variation from regions of lower to higher strain on passing from upper to lower fold limbs across major axial surfaces, and on crossing medial surfaces from short to long hinge-line segments. Axial and medial surfaces effectively therefore divide major sheath folds into quadrants with different amounts, senses and combinations of planar and linear fabric rotation within each domain. Such heterogeneous deformation implies that models of intense non-coaxial deformation uniformly affecting pre-existing folds may overestimate bulk displacement and shear strain. Variable fold hinge-line rotation about medial surfaces also provides an effective mechanism for the closure of major sheaths, which may otherwise project for unfeasible distances in the X direction. Bedding/cleavage intersections are developed at greater angles to the transport direction than fold hinges which they

  6. Understanding the evolution and propagation of coronal mass ejections and associated plasma sheaths in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Phillip

    A Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is an eruption of magnetized plasma from the Coronaof the Sun. Understanding the physical process of CMEs is a fundamental challenge in solarphysics, and is also of increasing importance for our technological society. CMEs are knownthe main driver of space weather that has adverse effects on satellites, power grids, com-munication and navigation systems and astronauts. Understanding and predicting CMEs is still in the early stage of research. In this dissertation, improved observational methods and advanced theoretical analysis are used to study CMEs. Unlike many studies in the past that treat CMEs as a single object, this study divides aCME into two separate components: the ejecta from the corona and the sheath region thatis the ambient plasma compressed by the shock/wave running ahead of the ejecta; bothstructures are geo-effective but evolve differently. Stereoscopic observations from multiplespacecraft, including STEREO and SOHO, are combined to provide a three-dimensionalgeometric reconstruction of the structures studied. True distances and velocities of CMEs are accurately determined, free of projection effects, and with continuous tracking from the low corona to 1 AU.To understand the kinematic evolution of CMEs, an advanced drag-based model (DBM) is proposed, with several improvements to the original DBM model. The new model varies the drag parameter with distance; the variation is constrained by thenecessary conservation of physical parameters. Second, the deviation of CME-nose from the Sun-Earth-line is taken into account. Third, the geometric correction of the shape of the ejecta front is considered, based on the assumption that the true front is a flattened croissant-shaped flux rope front. These improvements of the DBM model provide a framework for using measurement data to make accurate prediction of the arrival times of CME ejecta and sheaths. Using a set of seven events to test the model, it is found that the evolution

  7. Clinical and Procedural Outcomes of 5-French versus 6-French Sheaths in Transradial Coronary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, Alberto; Passafaro, Francesco; De Rosa, Salvatore; Sorrentino, Sabato; Torella, Daniele; Spaccarotella, Carmen; Mongiardo, Annalisa; Indolfi, Ciro

    2015-12-01

    The radial artery has been increasingly used for its favorable safety profile. However, no conclusive data are available on the optimal sheath size. In particular, it is seemingly difficult to weight both advantages and disadvantages of narrower versus larger sheaths size. Despite several studies were performed to compare the use of 6-Fr to the smaller 5-Fr sheaths, these were mostly small, single center-studies, yielding various results.We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of all available studies comparing the use of 5-Fr versus 6-Fr sheaths in coronary procedures through the TRA.Studies comparing a 5-Fr versus a 6-Fr sheaths were searched for in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases.Studies were deemed eligible if they only included patients undergoing transradial cardiac catheterization with 5-Fr or 6-Fr system and reported at least one of these parameters: contrast dye volume, procedural success, procedural time, access complications, radial artery occlusion, and bleedings.Odds ratio (OR) and the mean difference (MD) were respectively used for dichotomous and continuous variables as summary measures. Both the random-effects model and the fixed effect models were used for computation of meta-analyses. Heterogeneity was assessed by means of the Cochrane Q test. Metaregression was calculated using the unrestricted maximal likelihood random effects model.The use of a 5-Fr system is associated with a significant lower contrast medium administration (MD = -22.20 [-36.43 to -7.96], P < 0.01) and significantly reduces bleedings (OR = 0.58 [0.38-0.90], P = 0.02), without compromising procedural success (OR = 0.95 [0.53-1.69], P = 0.86) or procedure length (OR = 0.55 [-2.58 to 3.69], P = 0.73), compared to the 6-Fr system. Despite no significant difference was observed between the groups (OR = 0.88 [0.50-1.56], P = 0.67), at metaregression RAO incidence in the 5-Fr group was increasingly lower as

  8. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Wing C.; Singh, Nagendra; Moore, Thomas E.; Craven, Paul D.

    2000-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the POLAR satellite is studied by using a 3-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 4050Volts due to the photoelectrons emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, an ion-rich Xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at about 2Volts. Accordingly, in our 3-dimensional PIC simulation, we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2Volts as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the Xenon plasma in the sheath (approx. 10 - 10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (less than 1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations, the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an "Apple" shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission, a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Detection Experiment (TIDE) detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations, it takes about a hundred electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi-steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. Using the steady state sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a highly supersonic polar wind flow. The detected ions' velocity distribution shows significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian in the

  9. Nonmagnetic rigid and flexible outer sheath with pneumatic interlocking mechanism for minimally invasive surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiromasa; Zuo, Siyang; Masamune, Ken; Liao, Hongen; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2009-01-01

    We developed a nonmagnetic rigid and flexible outer sheath with pneumatic interlocking mechanism using flexible toothed links and a wire-driven bending distal end. The outer sheath can be switched between rigid and flexible modes easily depending on surgical scenes, and the angle of its distal end can be controlled by three nylon wires. All components of flexible parts are made of MRI-compatible nonmagnetic plastics. We manufactured the device with 300-mm long, 16-mm outer diameter, 7-mm inner diameter and 90-mm bending distal end. Holding power of the device in rigid mode was maximum 3.6 N, which was sufficient for surgical tasks in body cavity. In vivo experiment using a swine, our device performed smooth insertion of a flexible endoscope and a biopsy forceps into reverse side of the liver, intestines and spleen with a curved path. In conclusion, our device shows availability of secure approach of surgical instruments into deep cavity. PMID:20426015

  10. Cellular neurothekeoma: case report and its (un) relation with nerve sheath myxoma.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Curi-Tuma, Maximiliano; Marín, Celeste; González, Sergio; Sandoval-Osses, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Neurothekeoma is an uncommon, benign neoplasm presenting in young adults, primarily on the head and neck. It was initially related to nerve sheath myxoma but with the advent of immunohistochemistry, new insights into its cellular differentiation and origin have emerged, unlinking Neurothekeoma and nerve sheath myxoma. Herein we describe a 19-year-old male who had had a frontal, flesh-colored, asymptomatic papule for 2 years. Histology showed a dermal fusocellular-spindle cell tumor, including an eosinophilic cytoplasm with mild cellular pleomorphism and moderately dense fibrous stroma. IHQ was positive for CD10 and negative for S100 and Claudin-1. These findings were compatible with cellular Neurothekeoma. The lesion was completely extirpated and at the 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and had experienced no recurrences. PMID:26312702

  11. Normalized ion distribution function in expanding sheaths of 2D grid electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changho; Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun

    2016-04-01

    Ion distributions in expanding collisionless sheaths of two-dimensional (2D) grid electrodes were studied by using XOOPIC (particle-in-cell) simulations when short pulses of negative high-voltage were applied to electrodes immersed in plasmas. 2D grid electrodes consist of a periodic array of cylindrical electrodes, and the opening ratio of the grid electrodes is defined by the ratio of the spacing between cylindrical electrodes to the periodic length of the grid electrodes. In this paper, we introduce a normalized ion distribution function in normalized coordinates, and it is shown by simulation that the normalized ion distribution function depends only on the opening ratio of the grid electrodes. When the opening ratio of the grid electrodes is fixed, the ion distribution in expanding sheaths can be easily found in various conditions using only a single run of a PIC simulation, and the computation time can be significantly reduced.

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a cat with nodal and pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Buza, Elizabeth L; Menzies, Robert A; Goldschmidt, Michael H; Durham, Amy C

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors in domestic cats are infrequently reported and are often locally invasive. An 11-year-old Domestic Shorthair cat was originally diagnosed with a right maxillary benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor at incisional biopsy. At necropsy, the neoplasm had features of malignancy including metastases to the regional lymph nodes and lung. Histologically, the neoplasm contained 2 distinct regions: spindle cells arranged in dense interwoven bundles with Antoni A areas and Verocay bodies and Antoni B regions with loosely arranged spindle cells separated by a mucinous matrix. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells in the primary mass and right mandibular lymph node were strongly positive for vimentin, S-100, and glial fibrillar acidic protein. The neoplastic cells within the lung were strongly positive for vimentin and weakly positive for S-100 and glial fibrillar acidic protein. PMID:22604770

  13. Two-dimensional modeling of the cathode sheath formation during the streamer-cathode interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wen; Sang, Chaofeng; Wang, Dezhen; Liu, Fucheng

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, a computational simulation of the sheath formation during the streamer-surface interaction at atmospheric pressure is presented. A two-dimensional fluid model of a point-to-plane configuration is applied to investigate the evolution of the discharge in the vicinity of cathode plane. The effects of the surfaces on the properties of streamer have been studied for three cases, i.e., conductive surface with secondary electron emission (SEE), conductive surface without SEE, and dielectric surface. In all cases, we found that the axial propagation velocity of the streamer front decreases as the streamer arrives at the boundary of the cathode sheath. And the simulation results showed that the properties of the surface have a significant effect on the streamer. Besides the influences, the secondary emission coefficient and the relative permittivity on the streamer-surface interactions are also studied.

  14. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration based on the laser relativistic self-focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B. Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yu, T. P.; Yin, Y.; Ge, Z. Y.; Li, X. H.; Wu, H. C.

    2014-06-15

    The enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of ions in laser target interaction via the laser relativistic self-focusing effect is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. The temperature of the hot electrons in the underdense plasma is greatly increased due to the occurrence of resonant absorption, while the electron-betatron-oscillation frequency is close to its witnessed laser frequency [Pukhov et al., Phys. Plasma 6, 2847 (1999)]. While these hot electrons penetrate through the backside solid target, a stronger sheath electric field at the rear surface of the target is induced, which can accelerate the protons to a higher energy. It is also shown that the optimum length of the underdense plasma is approximately equal to the self-focusing distance.

  15. Eye and sheath folds in turbidite convolute lamination: Aberystwyth Grits Group, Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Woodcock, N. H.; Gladstone, C.

    2011-07-01

    Eye and sheath folds are described from the turbidites of the Aberystwyth Group, in the Silurian of west Wales. They have been studied at outcrop and on high resolution optical scans of cut surfaces. The folds are not tectonic in origin. They occur as part of the convolute-laminated interval of each sand-mud turbidite bed. The thickness of this interval is most commonly between 20 and 100 mm. Lamination patterns confirm previous interpretations that convolute lamination nucleated on ripples and grew during continued sedimentation of the bed. The folds amplified vertically and were sheared horizontally by continuing turbidity flow, but only to average values of about γ = 1. The strongly curvilinear fold hinges are due not to high shear strains, but to nucleation on sinuous or linguoid ripples. The Aberystwyth Group structures provide a warning that not all eye folds in sedimentary or metasedimentary rocks should be interpreted as sections through high shear strain sheath folds.

  16. Collisionless “thermalization” in the sheath of an argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Coulette, David Manfredi, Giovanni

    2015-04-15

    We performed kinetic Vlasov simulations of the plasma-wall transition for a low-pressure argon discharge without external magnetic fields, using the same plasma parameters as in the experiments of Claire et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 062103 (2006)]. Experimentally, it was found that the ion velocity distribution function is highly asymmetric in the presheath, but, surprisingly, becomes again close to Maxwellian inside the sheath. Here, we show that this “thermalization” can be explained by purely collisionless effects that are akin to the velocity bunching phenomenon observed in charged particles beams. Such collisionless thermalization is also observed in the presheath region close to the sheath entrance, although it is much weaker there and in practice probably swamped by collisional processes (standard or enhanced by instabilities)

  17. Ion velocity distributions in the sheath and presheath of a biased object in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Miloch, W. J.; Gulbrandsen, N.; Mishra, L. N.; Fredriksen, A.

    2011-08-15

    Ion velocity distributions in the vicinity of a spherical object with a negative potential with respect to collisionless, source-free plasma are studied with three-dimensional numerical simulations. The ion dynamics around the object leads to distorted radial velocity distributions in the presheath and the sheath edge region. Far in the sheath, an increase in the thermal velocity in the radial direction is observed. Different potentials of the object, ion temperatures, and ion masses are considered, as well as the role of spatial and temporal resolutions in laboratory measurements of ion velocity distributions. The simulations are carried out with the DiP3D, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell numerical code.

  18. Numerical solution of wave equations for the stability of the inner cometo-sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Krishna M.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Goldstein, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical solution of the MHD wave equations for stability of the cometary sheath determined by the balance between the inward Lorentz body force and the outward ion-neutral drag force is obtained by using a two-point boundary value method. The eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions are obtained numerically by treating the cometary inner sheath as a layer of finite thickness, bounded by the contact surface, i.e., the diamagnetic cavity boundary. The magnetic field structure discovered in the ionosphere of Comets Halley and Giacobini-Zinner is found to be unstable. The effects of finite plasma pressure, dissociative recombination, and mass loading due to photoionization are found to be stabilizing but are unable to quench the instability completely. It is also found that the higher the neutral production rate the lesser is the growth rate for the instability.

  19. Shear flow instability in a partially-ionized plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-06-15

    The stability of ion acoustic waves in a sheared-flow, partially-ionized compressible plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle in the upper atmosphere, is described and evaluated for different flow profiles. In a compressible plasma with shear flow, instability occurs for any velocity profile, not just for profiles with an inflection point. A second-order differential equation for the electrostatic potential of excited ion acoustic waves in the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals is derived and solved numerically using a shooting method with boundary conditions appropriate for a finite thickness sheath in contact with the vehicle. We consider three different velocity flow profiles and find that in all cases that neutral collisions can completely suppress the instability.

  20. Plasma wall sheath contributions to flux retention during the formation of field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, R. D.; Slough, J. T.; Hoffman, A. L.

    1984-06-01

    Flux loss during field reversal on the TRX-1 field-reversed θ pinch is found to be much less than predicted by the inertial model of Green and Newton. This can be explained by a pressure bearing, conducting sheath which naturally forms at the wall and limits the flux loss. A one-dimensional (r-t) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model has been used to study the formation and effectiveness of the sheath. The calculations are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements over a wide range of operating parameters. The results indicate that good flux trapping can be achieved through the field reversal phase of FRC formation with much slower external field reversal rates than in current experiments.

  1. A joint computational and experimental study to evaluate Inconel-sheathed thermocouple performance in flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, Aaron L.; Nicolette, Vernon F.; Donaldson, A. Burl; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Gill, Walter

    2005-09-01

    A joint experimental and computational study was performed to evaluate the capability of the Sandia Fire Code VULCAN to predict thermocouple response temperature. Thermocouple temperatures recorded by an Inconel-sheathed thermocouple inserted into a near-adiabatic flat flame were predicted by companion VULCAN simulations. The predicted thermocouple temperatures were within 6% of the measured values, with the error primarily attributable to uncertainty in Inconel 600 emissivity and axial conduction losses along the length of the thermocouple assembly. Hence, it is recommended that future thermocouple models (for Inconel-sheathed designs) include a correction for axial conduction. Given the remarkable agreement between experiment and simulation, it is recommended that the analysis be repeated for thermocouples in flames with pollutants such as soot.

  2. Plasma sheath physics and dose uniformity in enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liuhe; Li Jianhui; Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wang Zhuo

    2009-07-01

    Based on the multiple-grid particle-in-cell code, an advanced simulation model is established to study the sheath physics and dose uniformity along the sample stage in order to provide the theoretical basis for further improvement of enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. At t=7.0 mus, the expansion of the sheath in the horizontal direction is hindered by the dielectric cage. The electron focusing effect is demonstrated by this model. Most of the ions at the inside wall of the cage are implanted into the edge of the sample stage and a relatively uniform ion fluence distribution with a large peak is observed at the end. Compared to the results obtained from the previous model, a higher implant fluence and larger area of uniformity are disclosed.

  3. Studies of sheath characteristics in a double plasma device with a negatively biased separating grid and a magnetic filter field

    SciTech Connect

    Das, B. K.; Chakraborty, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2012-09-15

    A double plasma device has two regions: Source region and target region. These two regions are divided by a magnetic filter field. A grid is placed coplanar to the magnetic filter. To study the sheath structure in the target region, a metallic plate is placed at the center, which can be biased with respect to the chamber (ground) potential. Plasma is created in the source region by filament discharge technique. Plasma diffusing from the source region to the target region is subjected to the magnetic filter field and also an electric field applied on the grid. Plasma thus obtained in the target region forms a sheath on the biased plate. The influence of both the magnetic filter field and the electric field, applied between the grid and the chamber wall, on the sheath structure formed on the biased plate is studied. It is found that the magnetic filter field and the electric field change the sheath structure in different ways.

  4. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    SciTech Connect

    Auluck, S. K. H. E-mail: skauluck@barc.gov.in

    2014-09-15

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  5. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and "wind pressure" resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional "drive parameter," is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  6. A Novel Technique Using a Protection Filter During Fibrin Sheath Removal for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sotiriadis, Charalampos; Hajdu, Steven David; Degrauwe, Sophie; Barras, Heloise; Qanadli, Salah Dine

    2016-08-01

    With the increased use of implanted venous access devices (IVADs) for continuous long-term venous access, several techniques such as percutaneous endovascular fibrin sheath removal, have been described, to maintain catheter function. Most standard techniques do not capture the stripped fibrin sheath, which is subsequently released in the pulmonary circulation and may lead to symptomatic pulmonary embolism. The presented case describes an endovascular technique which includes stripping, capture, and removal of fibrin sheath using a novel filter device. A 64-year-old woman presented with IVAD dysfunction. Stripping was performed using a co-axial snare to the filter to capture the fibrin sheath. The captured fragment was subsequently removed for visual and pathological verification. No immediate complication was observed and the patient was discharged the day of the procedure. PMID:27016091

  7. Installing Windows with Foam Sheathing on a Wood-Frame Wall: January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-01

    In most wall assemblies, connection details around windows have been the source of problems with water penetration into the building. This report describes how to install a window into a wall with insulating sheathing as an integrated drainage plane.

  8. Numerical investigation of the ion temperature effect in magnetized plasma sheath with two species of positive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A. K.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. J.; Kar, S.

    2012-01-15

    The effect of ion temperature, magnitude of magnetic field and its orientation on a magnetized plasma sheath consisting of electrons and two species of positive ions are investigated. Using three-fluid hydrodynamic model and some dimensionless variables, the dimensionless equations are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that with the increase of the ion temperature and magnetic field strength there is a significant change in ion densities and energies in the sheath. It is also noticed that increase of magnetic field angle enhances the ion density near the sheath edge for a constant ion temperature. With increase in ion temperature and magnetic field angle, the lighter ion density near the sheath edge enhances and reverses for the heavier ion species.

  9. Spatial dependence of the sheath power transmission factor in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Futch, A.H.; Hill, D.N.; Porter, G.D. ); Matthews, G.F. ); Buchenauer, D. )

    1991-02-01

    The spatial dependence of the power transmission factor, d, associated with an ion-electron pair passing through the sheath at the DIII-D divertor plate has been determined by sweeping the edge plasma across Langmuir probe detectors. Our results show that d decreases from the classically expected value of eight near the low density edge of the scrape-off-layer plasma to values less than unity at the peak of the profile. 13 refs., 16 figs.

  10. Lost in Translation: Ambiguity in Nerve Sheath Tumor Nomenclature and Its Resultant Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Jones, Kevin B.; Monument, Michael J.; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R. Lor

    2013-01-01

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance. PMID:24216989

  11. Clinical and Radiologic Characteristics of Inferior Rectus Muscle Sheath Entrapment in Orbital Blowout Fracture.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Tavakoli, Mehdi; Khosravifard, Keivan; Yazdani, Shahin

    2015-10-01

    Blowout fracture is a common condition in the oculoplastics clinic. One of the indications for its repair is entrapment of the inferior rectus muscle within the fracture site. Herein, the authors present 3 patients of inferior rectus muscle sheath entrapment without entrapment of the muscle itself. The outcome of treatment was excellent in all patients. The aim of this report is to present the special clinical and radiologic findings in such patients. PMID:26413961

  12. Formation of double sheaths and the J-V characteristics of the obstructed region

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.

    1980-06-01

    The arc drop of the vapor thermionic converter is determined by the difference of sheath heights and the potential difference across the plasma. The J-V characteristics of cesium vapor diodes operating in the ignited mode show a knee corresponding to near optimum power. When the diode is operating in the region above the knee, the dominant contributor to the arc drop is the difference of the sheath heights (i.e., the potential difference across the plasma produces either a very small loss or may, in fact, reverse sign and reduce the arc drop). In this region the power decreases because the increase in output current is usually not able to compensate for the loss of output voltage. When the diode is operating in the region below the knee, the potential difference in the plasma becomes the dominant contributor to the arc drop. For these reasons, the shape of the J-V characteristics below the knee is different from that above the knee. The location of the knee is a good indicator of the maximum power and the maximum efficiency points. Under the fully optimized conditions, the knee also indicates the barrier index of the diode. Therefore, how and where the knee will appear is of great theoretical and practical interest. Some workers in the thermionic field have speculated that the appearance of the knee is due to the formation of the double sheath. However, this study indicates that the formation of the double sheath takes place significantly below the knee. In addition, this study evaluates J-V characteristics in the obstructed region.

  13. Dynamics of auxin movement in the gravistimulated leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Thomas C.; Kapen, E. H.; Ghosheh, Najati S.; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1991-01-01

    The role of auxin redistribution in the graviresponse of the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat was evaluated using H-3-indole-3-acetic acid (H-3-IAA) preloaded into isolated pulvini. Results obtained reveal that, while lateral transport of auxin occurs following gravistimulation, it is not necessary for a graviresponse. Localized changes in tissue responsiveness or the conversion of conjugated hormone to free hormone may suffice to drive the graviresponse.

  14. Thermal Conductivity in Silver Alloys Used as Sheath for Bscco Tapes:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putti, M.; Ferdeghini, C.; Grasso, G.; Goldacker, W.; Vase, P.

    In this paper we present measurements of thermal and electrical conductivity performed on several alloys and composite alloys tipically used as sheaths of BSCCO tapes: AgAu, AgMg, AgAu-AgMg. The thermal conductivity of the alloys is analysed in terms of electron and phonon contribution and we emphasize that in not dilute alloys the phonons contribute largely to the heat transport. In order to reduce the overall thermal conductivity, this latter contribution has to be minimized.

  15. Ethanol Ablation of a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Presenting as a Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chin, Matthew; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Kenneth; Lee, John; Samarasena, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol has historically been used as an ablative agent for a variety of lesions. One of the more common applications of this technique is celiac plexus neurolysis; however, recent reports have suggested a role for the endoscopic alcohol ablation of a variety of solid and cystic lesions. We report a novel case of endoscopic ethanol ablation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a small bowel obstruction. PMID:26504873

  16. Purification and Properties of an Enzyme Capable of Degrading the Sheath of Sphaerotilus natans

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Minoru; Iohara, Keishi; Shinmaru, Sachie; Suzuki, Ichiro; Koizumi, Jun-Ichi

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms which can degrade and grow on the purified sheath of a sheathed bacterium Sphaerotilus natans were collected from soil and river water. Two bacterial strains were isolated from the soil and designated strains TB and TK. Both strains are rod shaped, negatively stained by gram staining, facultatively anaerobic, and formed ellipsoidal endospores. These characteristics suggested that the isolates belong to the genus Paenibacillus, according to Ash et al. (C. Ash, F. G. Priest, and M. D. Collins, Antonie Leeuwenhoek 64:253–260, 1993). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA supported this possibility. Purification of the sheath-degrading enzyme was carried out from the culture broth of strain TB. The molecular weight of the enzyme was calculated to be 78,000 and 50,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography, respectively. Enzyme activity was optimized at pH 6.5 to 7.0 and 30 to 40°C. The reaction was accelerated by the addition of Mg2+, Ca2+, Fe3+, and iodoacetamide, whereas it was inhibited by the addition of Cu2+, Mn2+, and dithiothreitol. The enzyme acted on the polysaccharide moiety of the sheath, producing an oligosaccharide the size of which was between the sizes of maltopentaose and maltohexaose. As the reaction proceeded, the absorbance at 235 nm of the reaction mixture increased, suggesting the generation of unsaturated sugars. Incorporation of unsaturated sugars was also suggested by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. It is possible that the enzyme is not a hydrolytic enzyme but a kind of polysaccharide eliminase which acts on the basic polysaccharide. PMID:11055955

  17. Pediatric and adult vision restoration after optic nerve sheath decompression for idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Thomas A; Meeker, Austin R; Sismanis, Dimitrios N; Carruth, Bryant P

    2016-06-01

    To compare presentations of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and efficacy of optic nerve sheath decompression between adult and pediatric patients, a retrospective cohort study was completed All idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients undergoing optic nerve sheath decompression by one surgeon between 1991 and 2012 were included. Pre-operative and post-operative visual fields, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance were compared between adult and pediatric (<18 years) populations. Outcome measures included percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions. Thirty-one adults (46 eyes) and eleven pediatric patients (18 eyes) underwent optic nerve sheath decompression for vision loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Mean deviation on visual field, visual acuity, color vision, and optic nerve appearance significantly improved across all subjects. Pre-operative mean deviation was significantly worse in children compared to adults (p=0.043); there was no difference in mean deviation post-operatively (p=0.838). Significantly more pediatric eyes (6) presented with light perception only or no light perception than adult eyes (0) (p=0.001). Pre-operative color vision performance in children (19%) was significantly worse than in adults (46%) (p=0.026). Percentage of patients with complications or requiring subsequent interventions did not differ between groups. The consistent improvement after surgery and low rate of complications suggest optic nerve sheath decompression is safe and effective in managing vision loss due to adult and pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Given the advanced pre-operative visual deficits seen in children, one might consider a higher index of suspicion in diagnosing, and earlier surgical intervention in treating pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension. PMID:27163674

  18. Deep crustal deformation by sheath folding in the Adirondack Mountains, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, J. M.

    As described by McLelland and Isachsen, the southern half of the Adirondacks are underlain by major isoclinal (F sub 1) and open-upright (F sub 2) folds whose axes are parallel, trend approximately E-W, and plunge gently about the horizontal. These large structures are themselves folded by open upright folds trending NNE (F sub 3). It is pointed out that elongation lineations in these rocks are parallel to X of the finite strain ellipsoid developed during progressive rotational strain. The parallelism between F sub 1 and F sub 2 fold axes and elongation lineations led to the hypothesis that progressive rotational strain, with a west-directed tectonic transport, rotated earlier F sub 1-folds into parallelism with the evolving elongation lineation. Rotation is accomplished by ductile, passive flow of F sub 1-axes into extremely arcuate, E-W hinges. In order to test these hypotheses a number of large folds were mapped in the eastern Adirondacks. Other evidence supporting the existence of sheath folds in the Adirondacks is the presence, on a map scale, of synforms whose limbs pass through the vertical and into antiforms. This type of outcrop pattern is best explained by intersecting a horizontal plane with the double curvature of sheath folds. It is proposed that sheath folding is a common response of hot, ductile rocks to rotational strain at deep crustal levels. The recognition of sheath folds in the Adirondacks reconciles the E-W orientation of fold axes with an E-W elongation lineation.

  19. Mechanical characterisation of porcine rectus sheath under uniaxial and biaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2014-06-01

    Incisional hernia development is a significant complication after laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is known to initiate the extrusion of intestines through the abdominal wall, but there is limited data on the mechanics of IAP generation and the structural properties of rectus sheath. This paper presents an explanation of the mechanics of IAP development, a study of the uniaxial and biaxial tensile properties of porcine rectus sheath, and a simple computational investigation of the tissue. Analysis using Laplace׳s law showed a circumferential stress in the abdominal wall of approx. 1.1MPa due to an IAP of 11kPa, commonly seen during coughing. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests were conducted on samples of porcine rectus sheath to characterise the stress-stretch responses of the tissue. Under uniaxial tension, fibre direction samples failed on average at a stress of 4.5MPa at a stretch of 1.07 while cross-fibre samples failed at a stress of 1.6MPa under a stretch of 1.29. Under equi-biaxial tension, failure occurred at 1.6MPa with the fibre direction stretching to only 1.02 while the cross-fibre direction stretched to 1.13. Uniaxial and biaxial stress-stretch plots are presented allowing detailed modelling of the tissue either in silico or in a surrogate material. An FeBio computational model of the tissue is presented using a combination of an Ogden and an exponential power law model to represent the matrix and fibres respectively. The structural properties of porcine rectus sheath have been characterised and add to the small set of human data in the literature with which it may be possible to develop methods to reduce the incidence of incisional hernia development. PMID:24725440

  20. Full wave propagation modelling in view to integrated ICRH wave coupling/RF sheaths modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Colas, Laurent; Heuraux, Stéphane; Křivská, Alena; Lu, Lingfeng; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2015-12-01

    RF sheaths rectification can be the reason for operational limits for Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating systems via impurity production or excessive heat loads. To simulate this process in realistic geometry, the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code is a minimal set of coupled equations that computes self-consistently wave propagation and DC plasma biasing. The present version of its wave propagation module only deals with the Slow Wave assumed to be the source of RF sheath oscillations. However the ICRF power coupling to the plasma is due to the fast wave (FW). This paper proposes to replace this one wave equation module by a full wave module in either 2D or 3D as a first step towards integrated modelling of RF sheaths and wave coupling. Since the FW is propagative in the main plasma, Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) adapted for plasmas were implemented at the inner side of the simulation domain to absorb outgoing waves and tested numerically with tilted B0 in Cartesian geometry, by either rotating the cold magnetized plasma dielectric tensors in 2D or rotating the coordinate vector basis in 3D. The PML was further formulated in cylindrical coordinates to account for for the toroidal curvature of the plasma. Toroidal curvature itself does not seem to change much the coupling. A detailed 3D geometrical description of Tore Supra and ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) antennas was included in the coupling code. The full antenna structure was introduced, since its toroidal symmetry with respect to the septum plane is broken (FS bars, toroidal phasing, non-symmetrical structure). Reliable convergence has been obtained with the density profile up to the leading edge of antenna limiters. Parallel electric field maps have been obtained as an input for the present version of SSWICH.

  1. Space Charge Saturated Sheath Regime and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Smirnov; N.J. Fisch

    2005-03-16

    Secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is predicted to lead to space charge saturated wall sheaths resulting in enhanced power losses in the thruster channel. Analysis of experimentally obtained electron-wall collision frequency suggests that the electron temperature saturation, which occurs at high discharge voltages, appears to be caused by a decrease of the Joule heating rather than by the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission.

  2. Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during ejecta and sheath-driven geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllys, M.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Lavraud, B.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the effect of key solar wind driving parameters on solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during sheath and magnetic cloud-driven storms. The particular focus of the study was on the coupling efficiency dependence with Alfvén Mach number (MA). The efficiency has been estimated using the dawn-dusk component of the interplanetary electric field (EY), Newell and Borovsky functions as a proxy for the energy inflow and the polar cap potential (PCN), and auroral electrojet (AE) and SYM-H indices as the measure of the energy output. We have also performed a time delay analysis between the input parameters and the geomagnetic indices. The optimal time lag and smoothing window length depend on the coupling function used and on the solar wind driver. For example, turbulent sheaths are more sensitive to the time shift and the averaging interval than smoother magnetic clouds. The results presented in this study show that the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency depends strongly on the definition used, and it increases with increasing MA. We demonstrate that the PCN index distinctively shows both a Mach number dependent saturation and a Mach number independent saturation, pointing to the existence of at least two underlying physical mechanisms for the saturation of the index. By contrast, we show that the AE index saturates but that the saturation of this index is independent of the solar wind Mach number. Finally, we find that the SYM-H index does not seem to saturate and that the absence of saturation is independent of the Mach number regime. We highlight the difference between the typical MA conditions during sheath regions and magnetic clouds. The lowest MA values are related to the magnetic clouds. As a consequence, sheaths typically have higher solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiencies than magnetic clouds.

  3. Including sheath effects in the interpretation of planar retarding potential analyzer's low-energy ion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. E.; Lynch, K. A.; Fernandes, P. A.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Moen, J.; Zettergren, M.; Miceli, R. J.; Powell, S.; Lessard, M. R.; Horak, P.

    2016-04-01

    The interpretation of planar retarding potential analyzers (RPA) during ionospheric sounding rocket missions requires modeling the thick 3D plasma sheath. This paper overviews the theory of RPAs with an emphasis placed on the impact of the sheath on current-voltage (I-V) curves. It then describes the Petite Ion Probe (PIP) which has been designed to function in this difficult regime. The data analysis procedure for this instrument is discussed in detail. Data analysis begins by modeling the sheath with the Spacecraft Plasma Interaction System (SPIS), a particle-in-cell code. Test particles are traced through the sheath and detector to determine the detector's response. A training set is constructed from these simulated curves for a support vector regression analysis which relates the properties of the I-V curve to the properties of the plasma. The first in situ use of the PIPs occurred during the MICA sounding rocket mission which launched from Poker Flat, Alaska in February of 2012. These data are presented as a case study, providing valuable cross-instrument comparisons. A heritage top-hat thermal ion electrostatic analyzer, called the HT, and a multi-needle Langmuir probe have been used to validate both the PIPs and the data analysis method. Compared to the HT, the PIP ion temperature measurements agree with a root-mean-square error of 0.023 eV. These two instruments agree on the parallel-to-B plasma flow velocity with a root-mean-square error of 130 m/s. The PIP with its field of view aligned perpendicular-to-B provided a density measurement with an 11% error compared to the multi-needle Langmuir Probe. Higher error in the other PIP's density measurement is likely due to simplifications in the SPIS model geometry.

  4. Including sheath effects in the interpretation of planar retarding potential analyzer's low-energy ion data.

    PubMed

    Fisher, L E; Lynch, K A; Fernandes, P A; Bekkeng, T A; Moen, J; Zettergren, M; Miceli, R J; Powell, S; Lessard, M R; Horak, P

    2016-04-01

    The interpretation of planar retarding potential analyzers (RPA) during ionospheric sounding rocket missions requires modeling the thick 3D plasma sheath. This paper overviews the theory of RPAs with an emphasis placed on the impact of the sheath on current-voltage (I-V) curves. It then describes the Petite Ion Probe (PIP) which has been designed to function in this difficult regime. The data analysis procedure for this instrument is discussed in detail. Data analysis begins by modeling the sheath with the Spacecraft Plasma Interaction System (SPIS), a particle-in-cell code. Test particles are traced through the sheath and detector to determine the detector's response. A training set is constructed from these simulated curves for a support vector regression analysis which relates the properties of the I-V curve to the properties of the plasma. The first in situ use of the PIPs occurred during the MICA sounding rocket mission which launched from Poker Flat, Alaska in February of 2012. These data are presented as a case study, providing valuable cross-instrument comparisons. A heritage top-hat thermal ion electrostatic analyzer, called the HT, and a multi-needle Langmuir probe have been used to validate both the PIPs and the data analysis method. Compared to the HT, the PIP ion temperature measurements agree with a root-mean-square error of 0.023 eV. These two instruments agree on the parallel-to-B plasma flow velocity with a root-mean-square error of 130 m/s. The PIP with its field of view aligned perpendicular-to-B provided a density measurement with an 11% error compared to the multi-needle Langmuir Probe. Higher error in the other PIP's density measurement is likely due to simplifications in the SPIS model geometry. PMID:27131671

  5. Deep crustal deformation by sheath folding in the Adirondack Mountains, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclelland, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    As described by McLelland and Isachsen, the southern half of the Adirondacks are underlain by major isoclinal (F sub 1) and open-upright (F sub 2) folds whose axes are parallel, trend approximately E-W, and plunge gently about the horizontal. These large structures are themselves folded by open upright folds trending NNE (F sub 3). It is pointed out that elongation lineations in these rocks are parallel to X of the finite strain ellipsoid developed during progressive rotational strain. The parallelism between F sub 1 and F sub 2 fold axes and elongation lineations led to the hypothesis that progressive rotational strain, with a west-directed tectonic transport, rotated earlier F sub 1-folds into parallelism with the evolving elongation lineation. Rotation is accomplished by ductile, passive flow of F sub 1-axes into extremely arcuate, E-W hinges. In order to test these hypotheses a number of large folds were mapped in the eastern Adirondacks. Other evidence supporting the existence of sheath folds in the Adirondacks is the presence, on a map scale, of synforms whose limbs pass through the vertical and into antiforms. This type of outcrop pattern is best explained by intersecting a horizontal plane with the double curvature of sheath folds. It is proposed that sheath folding is a common response of hot, ductile rocks to rotational strain at deep crustal levels. The recognition of sheath folds in the Adirondacks reconciles the E-W orientation of fold axes with an E-W elongation lineation.

  6. Structural characterization of the human cerebral myelin sheath by small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFelici, M.; Felici, R.; Ferrero, C.; Tartari, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Finet, S.

    2008-10-01

    Myelin is a multi-lamellar membrane surrounding neuronal axons and increasing their conduction velocity. When investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), the lamellar quasi-periodical arrangement of the myelin sheath gives rise to distinct peaks, which allow the determination of its molecular organization and the dimensions of its substructures. In this study we report on the myelin sheath structural determination carried out on a set of human brain tissue samples coming from surgical biopsies of two patients: a man around 60 and a woman nearly 90 years old. The samples were extracted either from white or grey cerebral matter and did not undergo any manipulation or chemical-physical treatment, which could possibly have altered their structure, except dipping them into a formalin solution for their conservation. Analysis of the scattered intensity from white matter of intact human cerebral tissue allowed the evaluation not only of the myelin sheath periodicity but also of its electronic charge density profile. In particular, the thicknesses of the cytoplasm and extracellular regions were established, as well as those of the hydrophilic polar heads and hydrophobic tails of the lipid bilayer. SAXS patterns were measured at several locations on each sample in order to establish the statistical variations of the structural parameters within a single sample and among different samples. This work demonstrates that a detailed structural analysis of the myelin sheath can also be carried out in randomly oriented samples of intact human white matter, which is of importance for studying the aetiology and evolution of the central nervous system pathologies inducing myelin degeneration.

  7. MRI of giant cell turmor of the tendon sheath in the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Bui-Mansfield, L.T.; Youngberg, R.A.; Coughlin, W.; Choolijian, D.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) in the cervical spine, not previously described in the radiologic literature. Diagnostic imaging includes plain film radiographs, bone scintigraphy, CT, and MRI. Only one case of tenosynoviaI giant cell tumor of the cervical spine has been reported. The radiological features of this tumor are described along with a brief review of GCTTS. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Hidden in plain sight: discovery of sheath-forming, iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, USA.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Emily J; Davis, Richard E; McAllister, Sean M; Chan, Clara S; Moyer, Craig L; Tebo, Bradley M; Emerson, David

    2013-07-01

    Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) form microbial mats at focused flow or diffuse flow vents in deep-sea hydrothermal systems where Fe(II) is a dominant electron donor. These mats composed of biogenically formed Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides include twisted stalks and tubular sheaths, with sheaths typically composing a minor component of bulk mats. The micron diameter Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide-containing tubular sheaths bear a strong resemblance to sheaths formed by the freshwater FeOB, Leptothrix ochracea. We discovered that veil-like surface layers present in iron-mats at the Loihi Seamount were dominated by sheaths (40-60% of total morphotypes present) compared with deeper (> 1 cm) mat samples (0-16% sheath). By light microscopy, these sheaths appeared nearly identical to those of L. ochracea. Clone libraries of the SSU rRNA gene from this top layer were dominated by Zetaproteobacteria, and lacked phylotypes related to L. ochracea. In mats with similar morphologies, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data along with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analyses using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific primer confirmed the presence and abundance of Zetaproteobacteria. A Zetaproteobacteria fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe hybridized to ensheathed cells (4% of total cells), while a L. ochracea-specific probe and a Betaproteobacteria probe did not. Together, these results constitute the discovery of a novel group of marine sheath-forming FeOB bearing a striking morphological similarity to L. ochracea, but belonging to an entirely different class of Proteobacteria. PMID:23480633

  9. Contact Force-Guided Deep Engagement with a Steerable Sheath in the Distal Great Cardiac Vein: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Y U; Arimoto, Takanori; Iwayama, Tadateru; Hashimoto, Naoaki; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Ablation of ventricular tachycardia originating from the great cardiac vein involves the difficult step of deep engagement with an ablation catheter. The catheter and a steerable sheath (MobiCath, Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, USA) were advanced alternately only when the contact force vector was parallel to the coronary venous system. Deep engagement with a steerable sheath ensured a powerful backup force during ablation. PMID:26854279

  10. A model of plasma current through a hole of Rogowski probe including sheath effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, H.; Ejiri, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Takase, Y.; Sonehara, M.; Tsujii, N.; Yamaguchi, T.; Shinya, T.; Togashi, H.; Homma, H.; Nakamura, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Yajima, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Toida, K.; Takahashi, W.; Yamazaki, H.

    2016-04-01

    In TST-2 Ohmic discharges, local current is measured using a Rogowski probe by changing the angle between the local magnetic field and the direction of the hole of the Rogowski probe. The angular dependence shows a peak when the direction of the hole is almost parallel to the local magnetic field. The obtained width of the peak was broader than that of the theoretical curve expected from the probe geometry. In order to explain this disagreement, we consider the effect of sheath in the vicinity of the Rogowski probe. A sheath model was constructed and electron orbits were numerically calculated. From the calculation, it was found that the electron orbit is affected by E × B drift due to the sheath electric field. Such orbit causes the broadening of the peak in the angular dependence and the dependence agrees with the experimental results. The dependence of the broadening on various plasma parameters was studied numerically and explained qualitatively by a simplified analytical model.

  11. Self-consistent modeling of the tokamak RF antennas, edge plasma, and sheath voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David; Jenkins, Tom; Austin, Travis; Loverich, John; Stoltz, Peter

    2012-10-01

    We model the 24-strap ITER RF antenna with a time-domain electromagnetic simulation package [1] that faithfully represents the 3D complexity of the launcher geometry. The simulations include a cold-plasma fluid model of the edge plasma [2], with an RF sheath sub-grid model which allows for realistic behavior of plasma in contact with metallic structures, such as Faraday shields [3]. Interestingly, localized short wavelength modes, likely slow waves, have been observed in the vicinity of the launcher, and are very sensitive to density. We investigate the effect on these waves for varying density, density profile, and magnetic shear. We further investigate the contribution to high sheath potentials such waves might have. We also present status and additional highlights of the continuing evolution of the overall model. This includes studies to benchmark the nonlinear sheath width and loss parameters, and more diagnostics aimed towards better characterizing energy balance. It also includes application of the analysis on larger problem domain size, with scaling-study results. Finally, we review recent work to improve the model for warm plasma, and nonlinear effects. Work supported by US. DOE Grants DE-FG02-09ER55006 and DE-FC02-08ER54953.[4pt] [1] Nieter, C. and Cary, J. R., JCP 196 (2004) 448-473.[0pt] [2] Smithe, D., Physics of Plasmas 14, 056104 (2007).[0pt] [3] Myra and D'Ippolito, PRL 101, 195004 (2008).

  12. Electrospun Polymeric Core-sheath Yarns as Drug Eluting Surgical Sutures.

    PubMed

    Padmakumar, Smrithi; Joseph, John; Neppalli, Madhuri Harsha; Mathew, Sumi Elizabeth; Nair, Shantikumar V; Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Menon, Deepthy

    2016-03-23

    Drug-coated sutures are widely used as delivery depots for antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs at surgical wound sites. Although drug-laden coating provides good localized drug concentration, variable loading efficiency and release kinetics limits its use. Alternatively, drug incorporation within suture matrices is hampered by the harsh fabrication conditions required for suture-strength enhancement. To circumvent these limitations, we fabricated mechanically robust electrospun core-sheath yarns as sutures, with a central poly-l-lactic acid core, and a drug-eluting poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid sheath. The electrospun sheath was incorporated with aceclofenac or insulin to demonstrate versatility of the suture in loading both chemical and biological class of drugs. Aceclofenac and insulin incorporated sutures exhibited 15% and 4% loading, and release for 10 and 7 days, respectively. Aceclofenac sutures demonstrated reduced epidermal hyperplasia and cellularity in skin-inflammation animal model, while insulin loaded sutures showed enhanced cellular migration in wound healing assay. In conclusion, we demonstrate an innovative strategy of producing mechanically strong, prolonged drug-release sutures loaded with different classes of drugs. PMID:26936629

  13. A new TGF-β3 controlled-released chitosan scaffold for tissue engineering synovial sheath.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ke; Wang, Ziming; Du, Quanyin; Yu, Jiang; Wang, Aimin; Xiong, Yan

    2014-03-01

    The post-operative outcome of flexor tendon healing remains limited by flexor tendon adhesion that reduces joint range of motion. Despite improvement in different methods, peritendinous adhesion formation continues to present a formidable challenge. Recent studies showed that transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) may be the key factor to reducing adhesion formation in skin or tendon. In this study, we designed a novel type of tissue engineering synovial sheath containing TGF-β3, to prevent flexor tendon adhesion. First, to achieve a stable release of TGF-β3, chitosan microspheres, prepared by crosslinking-emulsion, were used for the delivery of TGF-β3. Second, a three-dimensional chitosan scaffold was prepared by lyophilization, and TGF-β3 microspheres were carefully introduced into the scaffold. Then, synovial cells were cultured and then seeded into the TGF-β3 loaded scaffold to produce TGF-β3 controlled-released tissue engineering synovial sheath. Tests clearly demonstrated that the scaffold has good structure and compatibility with cells. These results expand the feasibility of combinative strategies of controlled protein release and tissue-engineered synovial sheath formation. Application of this scaffold to tendon repair sites may help to prevent adhesion of tendon healing. PMID:23564463

  14. Morphometric Analysis of Connective Tissue Sheaths of Sural Nerve in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  15. Morphometric analysis of connective tissue sheaths of sural nerve in diabetic and nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P < 0.05) and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P < 0.01). The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P < 0.01), as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P < 0.01), in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves. PMID:25147820

  16. Ion sheath effects on RF plasma probes - Experimental results in laboratory plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, R.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory work dealing with the frequency characteristic of the plasma impedance of spherical and cylindrical electrode systems is reported. The influence of the ion sheath on various features of the impedance characteristic is emphasized. Those features are the series and parallel resonance as well as additional resonances due to the excitation of electroacoustic and cyclotron harmonic waves. The dependence of the series and parallel resonances on dc biasing leads to a method of determining the ion sheath capacity for a cylindrical electrode system. The obtained values agree fairly well with those obtained from a theoretical model for the density and potential distribution in the sheath of a cylindrical sensor aligned with a supersonic plasma flow. The amplitude of resonances due to excitation of longitudinal plasma waves (electroacoustic and cyclotron harmonic) is reduced or even vanishes for sufficiently negative dc bias. Positive bias first leads to an increased amplitude up to a certain dc bias value above which, however, the amplitude decreases again due to electron absorption at the sensor surface.

  17. Evaluation of a new low sheath-flow interface for CE-MS.

    PubMed

    González-Ruiz, Víctor; Codesido, Santiago; Far, Johann; Rudaz, Serge; Schappler, Julie

    2016-04-01

    The current trend for increasing technical complexity in the field of CE-ESI-MS interfaces has incited for more accessible alternatives. In this work, a simple low sheath-flow ESI interface operating in the submicroliter nanospray regime without nebulizing gas assistance was evaluated. The use of sheath liquid enabled improving the ionization of the analytes, while the absence of nebulizing gas minimized sample dilution and loss of efficiency. After a rapid qualification, the effect of main operational parameters such as sheath liquid composition and flow rate, working distance and ESI potential was studied. Simulation of the mixing processes inside the Taylor cone proved its size to be of utmost importance in band broadening processes. As a proof of concept, the interface was eventually applied to a set of representative basic drugs analyzed by CE-TOF/MS. Limits of detection reached the 25-100 ppb range with suitable robustness and repeatability results. This design has demonstrated good performance while being simple and accessible to the user. PMID:26846463

  18. Improved fluorescence properties of core-sheath electrospun nanofibers sensitized by silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shipeng; Zhang, Rong; Hu, Shui; Zhang, Liqun; Liu, Li

    2015-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were used to enhance the fluorescence properties of nanofibers containing the Tb(acac)3phen (Tb = terbium, acac = acetylacetone, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) complex. Tb(acac)3phen/PLLA//Ag-NPs/PVP (PLLA = polylacticacid, PVP = polyvinylpyrrolidone) core-sheath fluorescence nanofibers were prepared by coaxial electrospinning. SEM images demonstrated that the fibers had an average diameter of 550 nm. TEM images illustrated that the Ag-NPs and Tb(acac)3phen were uniformly dispersed in the outer and inner fibrous layers in the form of nanoparticles and molecular clusters, respectively. The fluorescence intensity of the Tb(acac)3phen/PLLA//Ag-NPs/PVP core-sheath nanofibers with a molar ratio Ag/Tb of 1 increased by 69%, the quantum efficiency increased by 53%, and the fluorescence lifetime increased by 4% over those of the fibers without Ag-NPs because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect of Ag-NPs. The prepared fibers with a core-sheath structure have great potential in a wide range of fluorescence applications.

  19. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Milanesio, Daniele; Colas, Laurent; Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Heuraux, Stéphane; Kubič, Martin

    2014-06-01

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing the integrated parallel electric field over long field lines as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the radio-frequency (RF)-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and Langmuir probe floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free scrape off layer outside these limiters. Moreover, the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the screen design that enhanced the plasma potential.

  20. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Colas, Laurent Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Kubič, Martin; Milanesio, Daniele; Heuraux, Stéphane

    2014-06-15

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing the integrated parallel electric field over long field lines as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the radio-frequency (RF)-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and Langmuir probe floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free scrape off layer outside these limiters. Moreover, the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the screen design that enhanced the plasma potential.