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Sample records for 14-ton thin-wall depleted

  1. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  2. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  3. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  4. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  5. Isotropic thin-walled pressure vessel experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Nancy L.; Hillsman, Vernon S.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) to investigate the stress and strain distributions on the surface of a thin walled cylinder subject to internal pressure and/or axial load; and (2) to relate stress and strain distributions to material properties and cylinder geometry. The experiment, supplies, and procedure are presented.

  6. Thin walled liner hanger equipment enables well deepening project

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.; Weaver, C.; Aiello, P.

    1996-12-31

    Shell Canada estimates that a thin-walled, slimhole design for liner equipment can save up to $3--4 million (US) per well in deep re-entry applications by allowing existing wells to be deepened (or sidetracked) rather than drilling new wells from surface. The design makes it possible to reenter existing wells, successfully isolate depleted zones, and deepen the well into virgin-pressured reservoirs. The design includes thin-walled, close-tolerance liner hangers, liner top packers, tie-back seal assemblies, and liner setting sleeves that provide reasonable burst and collapse resistance while maintaining an inside diameter to facilitate drilling deep, deviated 4-3/4 in. hole with a tapered 2-7/8 in. x 3-1/2 in. drill string. The authors will explain the design and the rationale behind it, and illustrate its value, using case studies from Shell Canada`s Waterton field as examples. In this field, gas-producing wells originally drilled in the 1950s, `60s and `70s to depths of up to 14,760 ft (4,500 m) were completed with perforations in 7 in. casing and open hole. These wells are now being reentered in an attempt to tap new reserves. The reentries encounter particularly challenging sour-gas/low-temperature/diverse-formation-pressure conditions. The objective of the reentry program is to seal off the depleted bottom zones of the wells and tap into the same fault-repeated formations at virgin pressure, at a deeper level.

  7. Corrections to the thin wall approximation in general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkle, David; Gregory, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    The question is considered whether the thin wall formalism of Israel applies to the gravitating domain walls of a lambda phi(exp 4) theory. The coupled Einstein-scalar equations that describe the thick gravitating wall are expanded in powers of the thickness of the wall. The solutions of the zeroth order equations reproduce the results of the usual Israel thin wall approximation for domain walls. The solutions of the first order equations provide corrections to the expressions for the stress-energy of the wall and to the Israel thin wall equations. The modified thin wall equations are then used to treat the motion of spherical and planar domain walls.

  8. Theory of thin-walled rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldenveizer, A L

    1951-01-01

    Starting with the Love equations for bending of extensible shells, "principal stress states" are sought for a thin-walled rod of arbitrary but open cross section. Principal stress states exclude those local states arising from end conditions which damp out with distance from the ends. It is found that for rods of intermediate length, long enough to avoid local bending at a support, and short enough that elementary torsion and bending are not the most significant stress states, four principal states exist. Three of these states are associated with the planar distribution of axial stress and are equivalent to the engineering theory of extension and bending of solid sections. The fourth state resembles that which has been called in the literature "bending stress due to torsional", except that cross sections are permitted to bend and the shear along the center line of the cross section is permitted to differ from zero.

  9. Nondestructive testing of welds on thin-walled tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagemaier, D. J.; Posakony, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Special ultrasonic search unit, or transducer assembly, reliably inspects the quality of melt-through welds of fusion welded tubing couplers for hydraulic lines. This instrumentation can also be used to detect faulty braze bonds in thin-walled, small diameter joints and wall thickness of thin-walled metal tubing.

  10. On the theory of thin and thin-walled rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzhanelidze, G Y

    1951-01-01

    Through the work of V. Z. Vlasov a theory of thin-walled rods has been established that is widely applicable in practice. This theory was extended by A. A. Umanski to thin-walled rods of closed profile section. The authors based their work on the concepts of the modern theory of shells. An attempt is made herein to construct a theory of thin-walled rods including the classical theory of deformation of thin rods by making use of a kinematic assumption.

  11. Plastic shoe facilitates ultrasonic inspection of thin wall metal tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambermeyer, D. J.; Peterson, R. M.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic shoe aids inspection of thin walled stainless steel welded tubing to locate voids or other material defects in critical component equipment. Incorporated in available ultrasonic inspection equipment, it couples the transducer to the tube at desired incident angles.

  12. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for mesoscale fluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Robin R.; Schumann, Daniel L.

    1999-06-01

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors form the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  13. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2001-10-01

    The automotive industry is seeking to replace current car parts made of aluminum and iron castings with thin wall (down to 2 mm) iron castings to reduce the cost and weight of automobiles. The mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings are affected strongly by the thickness of the castings. The thinner castings cool at a faster rate, and microstructural features that form during solidification, and subsequently, transform in the solid state, are strongly dependent on a geometrical parameter related to the ratio of surface area-to-volume of the casting. As this ratio becomes larger, castings cool faster. As a result, the nodule count on the observation plane of the specimens increases dramatically (>2000 nodules/mm2 in most specimens), i.e. as the thickness of castings decreases. Also, the matrix of the thin walled ductile iron castings becomes more ferritic as the ratio of surface area-to-volume decreases.

  14. Nonlinear fracture mechanics-based analysis of thin wall cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Leis, Brian N.; Forte, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analysis technique to predict the crack initiation, growth, and rupture of large-radius, R, to thickness, t, ratio (thin wall) cylinders. The method is formulated to deal both with stable tearing as well as fatigue mechanisms in applications to both surface and through-wall axial cracks, including interacting surface cracks. The method can also account for time-dependent effects. Validation of the model is provided by comparisons of predictions to more than forty full scale experiments of thin wall cylinders pressurized to failure.

  15. Thin-walled liner equipment cuts costs on well deepening project

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.; Weaver, C.; Aiello, P.

    1996-08-26

    Thin-walled, slim hole liner equipment can save $3--4 million per well in deep reentry applications by allowing existing wells to be deepened or sidetracked rather than drilling new wells from surface. The design makes it possible to reenter existing wells, successfully isolate depleted zones, and deepen the well into virgin-pressured reservoirs. The design includes thin-walled, close-tolerance liner hangers, liner top packers, tieback seal assemblies, and liner setting sleeves that provide reasonable burst and collapse resistance while maintaining an inside diameter to facilitate drilling a deep, deviated 4 3/4 in. hole with a tapered 2 7/8 in. x 3 1/2 in. drillstring. In Shell Canada`s Waterton field, gas-producing wells originally drilled in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s to depths of 14,760 ft were completed with perforations in 7 in. casing and open hole. These wells are now being reentered to tap new reserves. The reentries encounter particularly challenging sour gas, low temperature, diverse formation pressure conditions. The objective of the reentry program is to seal off the depleted bottom zones of the wells and tap into the same fault-repeated formations ar virgin pressure, at a deeper level.

  16. Method for preparing thin-walled ceramic articles of configuration

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Powell, G.L.

    1975-11-01

    A method for preparing a hollow thin-walled ceramic product is described. Ceramic powder is plasma-sprayed onto a concave surface of a substrate having a coefficient of thermal expansion less than that of the ceramic. The coated substrate is heated to sinter the ceramic and then cooled to effect a separation of the ceramic product from the substrate. (auth)

  17. Twisting of thin walled columns perfectly restrained at one end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazzarino, Lucio

    1938-01-01

    Proceeding from the basic assumptions of the Batho-Bredt theory on twisting failure of thin-walled columns, the discrepancies most frequently encountered are analyzed. A generalized approximate method is suggested for the determination of the disturbances in the stress condition of the column, induced by the constrained warping in one of the end sections.

  18. Extrusion of small-diameter, thin-wall tungsten tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Small-diameter, thin-wall seamless tubing of tungsten has been fabricated in lengths of up to 10 feet by hot extrusion over a floating mandrel. Extrusion of 0.50-inch-diameter tubing over 0.4-inch-diameter mandrels was accomplished at temperatures ranging from 3000 degrees to 4000 degrees F.

  19. Silver plating technique seals leaks in thin wall tubing joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blenderman, W. H.

    1966-01-01

    Leaks in thin wall tubing joints are sealed by cleaning and silver plating the hot gas side of the joint in the leakage area. The pressure differential across the silver during hydrostatic test and subsequent use forces the ductile silver into the leak area and seals it.

  20. Welded repairs of punctured thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    Punctures in thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels are repaired by plugging the hole with an interference-fit disc and welding the unit. The repaired vessels withstood test pressures in excess of vessel ultimate design values for 2-, 4-, and 6-inch holes in 0.202-inch-thick aluminum alloy parent material.

  1. Standard surface grinder for precision machining of thin-wall tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.; Kotora, J., Jr.; Rein, J.; Smith, S. V.; Strack, D.; Stuckey, D.

    1967-01-01

    Standard surface grinder performs precision machining of thin-wall stainless steel tubing by electrical discharge grinding. A related adaptation, a traveling wire electrode fixture, is used for machining slots in thin-walled tubing.

  2. On milling of thin-wall conical and tubular workpieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Mu-Ping; Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; Yeh, Cheng-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Thin-wall tubular-geometry workpieces have been widely applied in aircraft and medical industries. However, due to the special geometry of this kind of workpieces and induced poor machinability, the desired accuracy of machining tends to be greatly degraded, no matter what type of metal-cutting task such as milling, drilling or turning is undertaken. Though numerous research reports are available that the tool path can be planned on the basis of preset surface profile before actual milling operation is performed, it is still difficult to predict the real-time surface profile errors for peripheral milling of thin-wall tubular workpieces. Instead of relying on tool path planning, this research is focused on how to real-time formulate the appropriate applied cutting torque via feedback of spindle motor current. On the other hand, a few suitable cutting conditions which are able to prevent potential break/crack of thin-wall workpieces and enhance productivity but almost retain the same cutting quality is proposed in this research. To achieve this goal, estimated surface profile error on machined parts due to deflections caused by both tool and workpiece is studied at first. Traditionally, by adjusting cutting parameters such as feed rate or cut depth, the deflection of tool or workpiece can be expected not to exceed the specified limit. Instead, an effective feedback control loop is proposed by this work for applying real-time appropriate applied cutting torque to prevent potential break/crack of the thin-wall conical workpieces. The torque estimation approach by spindle motor current feedback and the corresponding fuzzy logic controller are employed. Compared with constant cutting torque during milling operation in tradition manner, it is observed that the time consumption of milling cycle by aid of the aforesaid fuzzy logic controller is greatly shortened while the resulted cutting accuracy upon finish of workpiece can be almost retained.

  3. Inflated Sporopollenin Exine Capsules Obtained from Thin-Walled Pollen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Jackman, Joshua A.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin is a physically robust and chemically resilient biopolymer that comprises the outermost layer of pollen walls and is the first line of defense against harsh environmental conditions. The unique physicochemical properties of sporopollenin increasingly motivate the extraction of sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) from pollen walls as a renewable source of organic microcapsules for encapsulation applications. Despite the wide range of different pollen species with varying sizes and wall thicknesses, faithful extraction of pollen-mimetic SECs has been limited to thick-walled pollen capsules with rigid mechanical properties. There is an unmet need to develop methods for producing SECs from thin-walled pollen capsules which constitute a large fraction of all pollen species and have attractive materials properties such as greater aerosol dispersion. Herein, we report the first successful extraction of inflated SEC microcapsules from a thin-walled pollen species (Zea mays), thereby overcoming traditional challenges with mechanical stability and loss of microstructure. Morphological and compositional characterization of the SECs obtained by the newly developed extraction protocol confirms successful protein removal along with preservation of nanoscale architectural features. Looking forward, there is excellent potential to apply similar strategies across a wide range of unexplored thin-walled pollen species. PMID:27302853

  4. Inflated Sporopollenin Exine Capsules Obtained from Thin-Walled Pollen.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Jackman, Joshua A; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin is a physically robust and chemically resilient biopolymer that comprises the outermost layer of pollen walls and is the first line of defense against harsh environmental conditions. The unique physicochemical properties of sporopollenin increasingly motivate the extraction of sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) from pollen walls as a renewable source of organic microcapsules for encapsulation applications. Despite the wide range of different pollen species with varying sizes and wall thicknesses, faithful extraction of pollen-mimetic SECs has been limited to thick-walled pollen capsules with rigid mechanical properties. There is an unmet need to develop methods for producing SECs from thin-walled pollen capsules which constitute a large fraction of all pollen species and have attractive materials properties such as greater aerosol dispersion. Herein, we report the first successful extraction of inflated SEC microcapsules from a thin-walled pollen species (Zea mays), thereby overcoming traditional challenges with mechanical stability and loss of microstructure. Morphological and compositional characterization of the SECs obtained by the newly developed extraction protocol confirms successful protein removal along with preservation of nanoscale architectural features. Looking forward, there is excellent potential to apply similar strategies across a wide range of unexplored thin-walled pollen species. PMID:27302853

  5. Inflated Sporopollenin Exine Capsules Obtained from Thin-Walled Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Jackman, Joshua A.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Sporopollenin is a physically robust and chemically resilient biopolymer that comprises the outermost layer of pollen walls and is the first line of defense against harsh environmental conditions. The unique physicochemical properties of sporopollenin increasingly motivate the extraction of sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) from pollen walls as a renewable source of organic microcapsules for encapsulation applications. Despite the wide range of different pollen species with varying sizes and wall thicknesses, faithful extraction of pollen-mimetic SECs has been limited to thick-walled pollen capsules with rigid mechanical properties. There is an unmet need to develop methods for producing SECs from thin-walled pollen capsules which constitute a large fraction of all pollen species and have attractive materials properties such as greater aerosol dispersion. Herein, we report the first successful extraction of inflated SEC microcapsules from a thin-walled pollen species (Zea mays), thereby overcoming traditional challenges with mechanical stability and loss of microstructure. Morphological and compositional characterization of the SECs obtained by the newly developed extraction protocol confirms successful protein removal along with preservation of nanoscale architectural features. Looking forward, there is excellent potential to apply similar strategies across a wide range of unexplored thin-walled pollen species.

  6. Development on thin wall tubes of dispersion type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shien; Wang, Xiyou; Li, Jianshan; Zhang, Rongsheng; Xue, Zhenshu

    A method using powder metallurgy and metallic extrusion to manufacture three kinds of magnesium based thin wall tubes of dispersion type is presented. In each case, the composition of dispersed gold, boron and hafnium in magnesium matrix is 0.5 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%, 4 wt% and 8 wt%, respectively. The diameter of the tubes are 20 mm with wall thickness of 1 mm. The process of mixing, compacting, lubricating, heat-extrusion, checking and die designing are described in detail. Measures for controlling tube tolerance and even distribution of dispersion phase, and improving the surface quality are suggested.

  7. Elastic torsional buckling of thin-walled composite cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. E.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Dexter, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    The elastic torsional buckling strength has been determined experimentally for thin-walled cylinders fabricated with glass/epoxy, boron/epoxy, and graphite/epoxy composite materials and composite-reinforced aluminum and titanium. Cylinders have been tested with several unidirectional-ply orientations and several cross-ply layups. Specimens were designed with diameter-to-thickness ratios of approximately 150 and 300 and in two lengths of 10 in. and 20 in. The results of these tests were compared with the buckling strengths predicted by the torsional buckling analysis of Chao.

  8. Mechanical properties of thin-wall ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2000-10-01

    The use of cast iron in automotive applications in this era of increasing fuel efficiency requires the ability to cast very thin sections (2-7 mm). Although thin-wall iron castings have been produced, difficulty arises in predicting the mechanical properties of these castings because mechanical behavior is closely related to thickness, which in turn is a direct consequence of the section cooling rate. Experiments relating casting thickness with ultimate tensile strength, elongation, reduction in area, and hardness were performed. An inverse relationship was found between ultimate tensile strength and thickness. Elongation was found to depend only on the thickness of the sample and approached zero as the thickness of the sample decreased below 1.5 mm. Percent reduction in area was found to depend linearly on thickness. Although average hardness also correlated with the inverse of thickness, it was not found to be a useful measure of ultimate tensile strength. The results of this study show that cooling rate of the thin wall casting very much affects the mechanical properties.

  9. Modeling and response analysis of thin-walled beam structures constructed of advanced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Song, O.

    1990-01-01

    Thin-walled beam structures are adopted as structural members in various fields of modern technology including aeronautical/aerospacial, naval, mechanical and civil ones. With the advent of advanced composite material systems, there is a vital need to reformulate the classical theory of thin-walled beams in a wide framework. In this dissertation, the aeroelastic divergence instability of aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams as well as the eigenfrequency problem of cantilevered composite thin-walled beams of closed cross-section are considered in the framework of a refined theory incorporating non-classical effects.

  10. Thin Wall Pipe Ultrasonic Inspection through Paint Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin; Petre, Cristian Cătălin

    Classical ultrasonic inspection of welds is currently done for plates thicker than 8 mm. The inspection of but welds in thin walled pipes has considerable implementation difficulties, due to guided waves dominating ultrasonic pulses propagation. Generation of purely symmetric modes, either torsional or longitudinal, requires a circumferential uniform distribution of transducers and dedicated inspection equipment, which are increasing the inspection costs. Moreover, if the surface is paint coated, the received signals are close to the detection level. The present work implies a single transducer, coupled to the painted surface. The proper choice of the guided mode and frequency range, allows the detection of a standard, small diameter through thickness hole. In this way, the inspection of pipe welds can use the same equipment as for thick materials, with only wedge adaptation.

  11. Biaxial fatigue properties of thin-walled composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krempl, E.; Elzey, D. M.; Ayar, T.; Loewy, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    A testing method for obtaining fatigue and fracture data under biaxial loading and for negative R-ratios is described. Thin-walled tubes of 1-in. outer nominal diameter with a tapered grip section were tested in an Axial-Torsion Servohydraulic Testing Machine with a 463 Data Control Processor at frequencies below 10 Hz up to the 1-million cycle range. Room temperature, uniaxial constant amplitude fatigue data for high temperature cure graphite-epoxy material are presented at R = -0.4 for a (+, - 5 deg) fiber orientation. The fatigue curve is almost horizontal. Tests on (+, - 5 deg) 'SP-328' resulted in failures which predominantly originated in the grip section. Presently, a new specimen design is being tested intended to eliminate cracking in the grip section. Biaxial in-phase loading of (0/+, - 45) tubes of Fiberite graphite-epoxy resulted in much steeper fatigue curves than observed under uniaxial loading.

  12. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    Step plate castings with section thicknesses of 1.5 mm to 6 mm and individual (single) castings with section thicknesses of 2 mm to 6 mm were produced using a ductile iron chemistry. Microstructures of these thin wall ductal iron castings were characterized quantitatively using an image analyzer. Matrix structure (amount of pearlite, ferrite, and massive carbides) and graphite structure (volume fraction, nodule size, nodule content, and nodularity) were investigated as a function of section thickness. Pearlite content, nodule count, and nodularity increased with decreasing section thickness, whereas the nodule size decreased. Nodule content exceeded 2000 nodules per mm{sup 2} at the thinnest sections. Statistical analysis was performed to investigate the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure.

  13. Nonlinear analysis of composite thin-walled helicopter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfon, J. P.; Rand, O.

    Nonlinear theoretical modeling of laminated thin-walled composite helicopter rotor blades is presented. The derivation is based on nonlinear geometry with a detailed treatment of the body loads in the axial direction which are induced by the rotation. While the in-plane warping is neglected, a three-dimensional generic out-of-plane warping distribution is included. The formulation may also handle varying thicknesses and mass distribution along the cross-sectional walls. The problem is solved by successive iterations in which a system of equations is constructed and solved for each cross-section. In this method, the differential equations in the spanwise directions are formulated and solved using a finite-differences scheme which allows simple adaptation of the spanwise discretization mesh during iterations.

  14. Mechanical testing of thin-walled zirconia abutments

    PubMed Central

    CANULLO, Luigi; COELHO, Paulo G.; BONFANTE, Estevam A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of zirconia abutments for implant-supported restorations has gained momentum with the increasing demand for esthetics, little informed design rationale has been developed to characterize their fatigue behavior under different clinical scenarios. However, to prevent the zirconia from fracturing, the use of a titanium connection in bicomponent aesthetic abutments has been suggested. Objective: Mechanical testing of customized thin-walled titanium-zirconia abutments at the connection with the implant was performed in order to characterize the fatigue behavior and the failure modes for straight and angled abutments. Material and Methods: Twenty custom-made bi-component abutments were tested according to ISO 14801:2007 either at a straight or a 25º angle inclination (n=10 each group). Fatigue was conducted at 15 Hz for 5 million cycles in dry conditions at 20ºC±5ºC. Mean values and standard deviations were calculated for each group. All comparisons were performed by t-tests assuming unequal variances. The level of statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. Failed samples were inspected in a polarized-light and then in a scanning electron microscope. Results: Straight and angled abutments mean maximum load was 296.7 N and 1,145 N, the dynamic loading mean Fmax was 237.4 N and 240.7 N, respectively. No significant differences resulted between the straight and angled bi-component abutments in both static (p=0.253) and dynamic testing (p=0.135). A significant difference in the bending moment required for fracture was detected between the groups (p=0.01). Fractures in the angled group occurred mainly at the point of load application, whereas in the straight abutments, fractures were located coronally and close to the thinly designed areas at the cervical region. Conclusion: Angled or straight thin-walled zirconia abutments presented similar Fmax under fatigue testing despite the different bending moments required for fracture. The main implication is

  15. Menu driven heat treatment control of thin walled bodies

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Booth, Jr., Russell R.; Grimm, Noel P.; Batenburg, Abram; Thomas, Vaughn M.

    1992-01-01

    A process for controlling the heating of a thin-walled body according to a predetermined temperature program by means of electrically controllable heaters, comprising: disposing the heaters adjacent one surface of the body such that each heater is in facing relation with a respective zone of the surface; supplying heat-generating power to each heater and monitoring the temperature at each surface zone; and for each zone: deriving (16,18,20), on the basis of the temperature values obtained in the monitoring step, estimated temperature values of the surface at successive time intervals each having a first selected duration; generating (28), on the basis of the estimated temperature values derived in each time interval, representations of the temperature, THSIFUT, which each surface zone will have, based on the level of power presently supplied to each heater, at a future time which is separated from the present time interval by a second selected duration; determining (30) the difference between THSIFUT and the desired temperature, FUTREFTVZL, at the future time which is separated from the present time interval by the second selected duration; providing (52) a representation indicating the power level which sould be supplied to each heater in order to reduce the difference obtained in the determining step; and adjusting the power level supplied to each heater by the supplying step in response to the value of the representation provided in the providing step.

  16. Optimum design of the carbon fiber thin-walled baffle for the space-based camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Song, Gu; Yuan, An; Jin, Guang

    2011-08-01

    The thin-walled baffle design of the space-based camera is an important job in the lightweight space camera research task for its stringent quality requirement and harsh mechanical environment especially for the thin-walled baffle of the carbon fiber design. In the paper, an especially thin-walled baffle of the carbon fiber design process was described and it is sound significant during the other thin-walled baffle design of the space camera. The designer obtained the design margin of the thin-walled baffle that structural stiffness and strength can tolerated belong to its development requirements through the appropriate use of the finite element analysis of the walled parameters influence sensitivity to its structural stiffness and strength. And the designer can determine the better optimization criterion of thin-walled baffle during the geometric parameter optimization process in such guiding principle. It sounds significant during the optimum design of the thin-walled baffle of the space camera. For structural stiffness and strength of the carbon fibers structure which can been designed, the effect of the optimization will be more remarkable though the optional design of the parameters chose. Combination of manufacture process and design requirements the paper completed the thin-walled baffle structure scheme selection and optimized the specific carbon fiber fabrication technology though the FEM optimization, and the processing cost and process cycle are retrenchment/saved effectively in the method. Meanwhile, the weight of the thin-walled baffle reduced significantly in meet the design requirements under the premise of the structure. The engineering prediction had been adopted, and the related result shows that the thin-walled baffle satisfied the space-based camera engineering practical needs very well, its quality reduced about 20%, the final assessment index of the thin-walled baffle were superior to the overall design requirements significantly. The design

  17. Thin-walled compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R R; Schumann, D L

    1998-12-29

    Thin-walled, compliant plastic structures for meso-scale fluidic systems were fabricated, tested and used to demonstrate valving, pumping, metering and mixing. These structures permit the isolation of actuators and sensors from the working fluid, thereby reducing chemical compatibility issues. The thin-walled, compliant plastic structures can be used in either a permanent, reusable system or as an inexpensive disposable for single-use assay systems. The implementation of valving, pumping, mixing and metering operations involve only an elastic change in the mechanical shape of various portions of the structure. Advantages provided by the thin-walled plastic structures include reduced dead volume and rapid mixing. Five different methods for fabricating the thin-walled plastic structures discussed including laser welding, molding, vacuum forming, thermal heat staking and photolithographic patterning techniques.

  18. On the interpretation of combined torsion and tension tests of thin-wall tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, W

    1948-01-01

    General ways of testing thin-wall tubes under combined tension and torsion as a means of checking the various theories of plasticity are discussed. Suggestions also are given for the interpretation of the tests.

  19. High ampacity, thin-wall, novel polymer cable. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraj, K.

    1998-12-01

    , voids and thickness non uniformity in the insulation were not completely eliminated. This result clearly indicates that it is possible to manufacture higher ampacity thin wall cables with the candidate insulation materials.

  20. Novel Adaptive Fixturing for Thin Walled Aerospace Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, Angelo; Ricciardi, Donato; Salvi, Edoardo; Fantinati, Dario; Iorio, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    In the aerospace industry the monolithic structures have been introduced to reduce the costs of assembling large numbers of components. The expected benefit of using thin walled monolithic parts is given by a large reduction in the overall manufacturing costs, nevertheless this kind of component encounters a critical phase in fixturing. Fixtures are used to locate and hold workpieces during manufacturing. Because workpiece surface errors and fixture set-up errors (called source errors) always exist, the fixtured workpiece will consequently have position and/or orientation errors (called resultant errors) that will definitely affect the final machining accuracy. Most often the current clamping procedure is not straightforward, it implies several steps and the success of the operation hardly depends by the skill of the human operator. It is estimated that fixturing could constitute 10-20% of the total manufacturing costs, assuming that the fixtures are amortized over relatively small batches. Fixturing devices must satisfy two requisites, which, in some terms, are opposite: to provide relatively high forces in order to guarantee that the workpiece will be maintained in position under the maximum cutting forces to reduce as much as possible strains induced in the workpiece. Limiting the strains induced in the workpiece is crucial because of elastic strain recovery: releasing the clamped workpiece would result in an unwanted final deformation. In this paper a novel adaptive fixturing based on active clamping forces (supplied by piezoelectric actuators) is presented: a real aerospace part case study, - a Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV) -, is introduced, the related problems are identified, and the adopted solutions shown. The proposed adaptive fixturing device can lead to the following advantages: to perform an automatic errors-free workpiece clamping and then drastically reduce the overall fixturing set up time; to recover unwanted strains induced to the workpiece, in order to

  1. Free vibrations of thin-walled semicircular graphite-epoxy composite frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed study is made of the effects of variations in lamination and material parameters of thin walled composite frames on their vibrational characteristics. The structures considered are semicircular thin walled frames with I and J sections. The flanges and webs of the frames are modeled by using 2-D shell and plate finite elements. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both the generalized displacements and stress resultants in the frame. The frequencies and modes predicted by the 2-D finite element model are compared with those obtained from experiments, as well as with the predictions of a non-dimensional thin walled beam finite element model. A detailed study is made of the sensitivity of the vibrational response to variations in the fiber orientation, material properties of the individual layers, and boundary conditions.

  2. Free vibrations of thin-walled semicircular graphite-epoxy composite frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Carden, Huey D.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed study is made of the effects of variations in lamination and material parameters of thin walled composite frames on their vibrational characteristics. The structures considered are semicircular thin walled frames with I and J sections. The flanges and webs of the frames are modelled by using 2-D shell and plate finite elements. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of both the generalized displacements and stress resultants in the frames. The frequencies and modes predicted by the 2-D finite element model are compared with those obtained from experiments, as well as with the predictions of a 1-D thin walled beam finite element model. A detailed study is made of the sensitivity of the vibrational response to variations in the fiber orientation, material properties of the individual layers, and boundary conditions.

  3. Vibrational behavior of adaptive aircraft wing structures modelled as composite thin-walled beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, O.; Librescu, L.; Rogers, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vibrational behavior of cantilevered aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams and incorporating piezoelectric effects is studied. Based on the converse piezoelectric effect, the system of piezoelectric actuators conveniently located on the wing yield the control of its associated vertical and lateral bending eigenfrequencies. The possibility revealed by this study enabling one to increase adaptively the eigenfrequencies of thin-walled cantilevered beams could play a significant role in the control of the dynamic response and flutter of wing and rotor blade structures.

  4. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  5. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures oftungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  6. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thin-Walled Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Tyrała, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the effect of cooling rate on microstructure and mechanical properties as determined by changing molding media and section size. The research was conducted for thin-walled iron castings with 2-5-mm wall thickness and for the reference casting with 13-mm wall thickness, using different molding materials (silica sand and insulating sand "LDASC") to achieve various cooling rates. Thermal analysis was performed to determine the real cooling rate at the beginning of the graphite eutectic solidification. In general, it was found that the predictions based on theoretical analysis of the solidification process of ductile iron are in good agreement with the experimental outcomes. Finally, the present study provides insights into the effect of cooling rate on the graphite nodule count, the ferrite fraction and mechanical properties of thin-walled ductile iron castings. The study shows that the cooling rate of thin-walled castings varies in a wide range (80-15 °C/s) when changing the wall thickness from 2 to 5 mm, accompanied by significantly changing the mechanical properties of ductile iron. The cooling rate can be effectively reduced by applying an insulating sand to obtain the desired properties of thin-walled castings practically in the whole range of ductile iron grades in accordance with the ASTM Standard.

  7. Fabrication techniques developed for small- diameter, thin-wall tungsten and tungsten alloy tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, D. C.; Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Mayfield, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes methods for the fabrication of tungsten and tungsten alloys into small-diameter, thin-wall tubing of nuclear quality. The tungsten, or tungsten alloy tube blanks are produced by double extrusion. Plug-drawing has emerged as an excellent secondary fabrication technique for the reduction of the overall tube dimensions.

  8. NUMERICAL CALCULATION: ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aspiration efficiency of particles from a flowing airstream into a thin-walled sampling inlet is accurately predicted using a numerical model. he model combines the Boundary Integral Equation Method for predicting the velocity field into the inlet with an analytical solution to t...

  9. Development of processes, means, and theoretical principles of thin-walled detail plastic forming at Kazan Aviation Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirov, I. M.

    1993-05-01

    The scientific school of thin-walled detail plastic forming was established at Kazan Aviation Institute in the transition period from wood to metal aircraft construction. High precision requirements to thin walled detail plastic forming drove the development of new processes to secure high productivity and a work culture under conditions of low volume production.

  10. High Resolution X-Ray Micro-CT of Ultra-Thin Wall Space Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, R. W.; Bowman, Randy R.; Bonacuse, Peter; Martin, Richard E.; Locci, I. E.; Kelley, M.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution micro-CT system has been assembled and is being used to provide optimal characterization for ultra-thin wall space components. The Glenn Research Center NDE Sciences Team, using this CT system, has assumed the role of inspection vendor for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) project at NASA. This article will discuss many aspects of the development of the CT scanning for this type of component, including CT system overview; inspection requirements; process development, software utilized and developed to visualize, process, and analyze results; calibration sample development; results on actual samples; correlation with optical/SEM characterization; CT modeling; and development of automatic flaw recognition software. Keywords: Nondestructive Evaluation, NDE, Computed Tomography, Imaging, X-ray, Metallic Components, Thin Wall Inspection

  11. Development of a Thin-Wall Magnesium side door Inner Panel for Automobiles

    SciTech Connect

    Jekl, J.; Auld, J.; Sweet, C.; Carter, Jon; Resch, Steve; Klarner, A.; Brevick, J.; Luo, A.

    2015-05-17

    Cast magnesium side door inner panels can provide a good combination of weight, functional, manufacturing and economical requirements. However, several challenges exist including casting technology for thin-wall part design, multi-material incompatibility and relatively low strength vs steel. A project has been initiated, supported by the US Department of Energy, to design and develop a lightweight frame-under-glass door having a thin-wall, full die-cast, magnesium inner panel. This development project is the first of its kind within North America. Phase I of the project is now complete and the 2.0mm magnesium design, through casting process enablers, has met or exceeded all stiffness requirements, with significant mass reduction and part consolidation. In addition, a corrosion mitigation strategy has been established using industry-accepted galvanic isolation methods and coating technologies.

  12. Evaluation of stresses in large diameter, thin walled piping at support locations

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.; Rawls, G.B. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The highest stresses in many thin walled piping systems are the local stresses at the pipe supports. These secondary stresses are caused by saddles or other structural discontinuities that restrain pipe ovalization. A static analysis of a thin walled pipe supported on structural steel saddle under dead weight loading is presented. The finite element analysis is performed using a shell model with distributed gravity and hydrostatic pressure loading. Parametric studies on global and local stress are performed to determine the effect of the pipe diameter to thickness ratio. Two aspects of the saddle design are also investigated: the effect of saddle width, and the effect of saddle wrap angle. Additionally, the computed stresses are compared to closed form solutions.

  13. Evaluation of stresses in large diameter, thin walled piping at support locations

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.; Rawls, G.B. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    The highest stresses in many thin walled piping systems are the local stresses at the pipe supports. These secondary stresses are caused by saddles or other structural discontinuities that restrain pipe ovalization. A static analysis of a thin walled pipe supported on structural steel saddle under dead weight loading is presented. The finite element analysis is performed using a shell model with distributed gravity and hydrostatic pressure loading. Parametric studies on global and local stress are performed to determine the effect of the pipe diameter to thickness ratio. Two aspects of the saddle design are also investigated: the effect of saddle width, and the effect of saddle wrap angle. Additionally, the computed stresses are compared to closed form solutions.

  14. Process stability strategies in milling of thin-walled Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, B.; Eynian, M.; Beno, T.; Pejryd, L.

    2012-04-01

    Trends in Aerospace development have led to thin-walled, reduced-weight engine designs. The demands in manufacturing have forced production speeds and material removal rates (MRR) to increase. As component wall thickness gets thinner, the consequence oftentimes is an increase in chatter vibrations. This paper suggests that a correctly chosen tool-to-workpiece offset geometry may lead to a robust and chatter free process. The results show the differences in force response for three geometries while varying the height overhang of the workpiece. This is part of a concerted effort to develop a robust methodology for the prediction of chatter vibrations during milling operations of thin-walled Aerospace components. This paper gives guidelines on how to accomplish robust machining practices. It also answers the following questions: How critical is the choice of offset between tool and workpiece during milling setup? And what effects do the entry and exit of cut have on system vibrations?

  15. Axial Crushing of Thin-Walled Columns with Octagonal Section: Modeling and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng; Day, Michael L.

    This chapter focus on numerical crashworthiness analysis of straight thinwalled columns with octagonal cross sections. Two important issues in this analysis are demonstrated here: computer modeling and crashworthiness design. In the first part, this chapter introduces a method of developing simplified finite element (FE) models for the straight thin-walled octagonal columns, which can be used for the numerical crashworthiness analysis. Next, this chapter performs a crashworthiness design for such thin-walled columns in order to maximize their energy absorption capability. Specific energy absorption (SEA) is set as the design objective, side length of the octagonal cross section and wall thickness are selected as design variables, and maximum crushing force (Pm) occurs during crashes is set as design constraint. Response surface method (RSM) is employed to formulate functions for both SEA and Pm.

  16. Mixed finite element models for free vibrations of thin-walled beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.; Min, Byung-Jin

    1989-01-01

    Simple, mixed finite element models are developed for the free vibration analysis of curved thin-walled beams with arbitrary open cross section. The analytical formulation is based on a Vlasov's type thin-walled beam theory with the effects of flexural-torsional coupling, transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia included. The fundamental unknowns consist of seven internal forces and seven generalized displacements of the beam. The element characteristic arrays are obtained by using a perturbed Lagrangian-mixed variational principle. Only C(sup o) continuity is required for the generalized displacements. The internal forces and the Lagrange multiplier are allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the high accuracy and effectiveness of the elements developed. The standard of comparison is taken to be the solutions obtained by using 2-D plate/shell models for the beams.

  17. Electroless-plating technique for fabricating thin-wall convective heat-transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.; Ballard, G. K.; Wilson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for fabricating uniform thin-wall metallic heat-transfer models and which simulates a Shuttle thermal protection system tile is described. Two 6- by 6- by 2.5-in. tiles were fabricated to obtain local heat transfer rates. The fabrication process is not limited to any particular geometry and results in a seamless thin-wall heat-transfer model which uses a one-wire thermocouple to obtain local cold-wall heat-transfer rates. The tile is relatively fragile because of the brittle nature of the material and the structural weakness of the flat-sided configuration; however, a method was developed and used for repairing a cracked tile.

  18. Coupled deflection analysis of thin-walled Timoshenko laminated composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Shin, Dong Ku

    2009-03-01

    For the deflection analyses of thin-walled Timoshenko laminated composite beams with the mono- symmetric I-, channel-, and L-shaped sections, the stiffness matrices are derived based on the solutions of the simultaneous ordinary differential equations. A general thin-walled composite beam theory considering shear deformation effect is developed by introducing Vlasov’s assumptions. The shear stiffnesses of thin-walled composite beams are explicitly derived from the energy equivalence. The equilibrium equations and force-deformation relations are derived from energy principles. By introducing 14 displacement parameters, a generalized eigenvalue problem that has complex eigenvalues and multiple zero eigenvalues is formulated. Polynomial expressions are assumed as trial solutions for displacement parameters and eigenmodes containing undetermined parameters equal to the number of zero eigenvalues are determined by invoking the identity condition to the equilibrium equations. Then the displacement functions are constructed by combining eigenvectors and polynomial solutions corresponding to nonzero and zero eigenvalues, respectively. Finally, the stiffness matrices are evaluated by applying the member force-displacement relations to the displacement functions. In addition, the finite beam element formulation based on the classical Lagrangian interpolation polynomial is presented. In order to verify the validity and the accuracy of this study, the numerical solutions are presented and compared with the finite element results using the isoparametric beam elements and the detailed three-dimensional analysis results using the shell elements of ABAQUS. Particularly the effects of shear deformations on the deflection of thin-walled composite beams with the mono-symmetric I-, channel-, and L-shaped sections with various lamination schemes are investigated.

  19. Calculation of Centrally Loaded Thin-Walled Columns Above the Buckling Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinitzhuber, F.

    1945-01-01

    When thin-walled columns formed from flanged sheet, such as used in airplane construction, are subjected to axial load, their behavior at failure varies according to the slenderness ratio. On long columns the axis deflects laterally while the cross section form is maintained; buckling results. The respective breaking load in the elastic range is computed by Euler's formula and for the plastic range by the Engesser- Karman formula. Its magnitude is essentially dependent upon the length. On intermediate length columns, especially where open sections are concerned, the cross section is distorted while the cross section form is preserved; twisting failure results. The buckling load in twisting is calculated according to Wagner and Kappus. On short columns the straight walls of low-bending resistance that form the column are deflected at the same time that the cross section form changes - buckling occurs without immediate failure. Then the buckling load of the total section computable from the buckling loads of the section walls is not the ultimate load; quite often, especially on thin-walled sections, it lies considerably higher and is secured by tests. Both loads, the buckling and the ultimate load are only in a small measure dependent upon length. The present report is an attempt to theoretically investigate the behavior of such short, thin-walled columns above the buckling load with the conventional calculating methods.

  20. Method for precision forming of low-cost, thin-walled slotted waveguide arrays for the SPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the precision forming of thin walled, slotted waveguide arrays was devised. Models were constructed with temporary tools and evaluated. The application of the method to the solar power satellite requirements was investigated.

  1. Method for precision forming of low-cost, thin-walled slotted waveguide arrays for the SPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the precision-forming of thin-walled, slotted-waveguide arrays was devised. Models were constructed with temporary tools and evaluated. The application of the method to the SPS requirements is discussed.

  2. Structure and machinability of thin-walled parts made of titanium alloy powder using electron beam melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A.; Grechishnikov, V.; Kozochkin, M.; Volosova, M.; Petuhov, Yu; Peretyagin, P.

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims at study of structure and properties of raw and thermal treated titanium-based powder material used to produce the thin-walled components by electron beam melting technology. Producing the end product means also studying the finishing cutting process. Examining the quality of end product in terms of geometric tolerance and thin walls thickness stability consists of control the surface roughness is also included in this study.

  3. Fatigue-crack growth properties of thin-walled superelastic austenitic Nitinol tube for endovascular stents.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J M; Robertson, S W; Ritchie, R O

    2007-06-01

    Over the past 10 years, the supereleastic nickel-titanium alloy Nitinol has found widespread application in the manufacture of small-scale biomedical devices, such as self-expanding endovascular stents. Although conventional stress/strain-life (S/N) analyses are invariably used as the primary method for design against fatigue loading and for predicting safe lifetimes, fracture mechanics-based methodologies provide a vital means of assessing the quantitative effect of defects on such lifetimes. Unfortunately, fracture mechanics studies on fatigue in Nitinol are scarce, and most results do not pertain to the (thin-walled tube) product forms that are typically used in the manufacture of endovascular stents. In the current work, we document the basic fatigue-crack growth properties of flattened thin-walled ( approximately 400 microm thick) Nitinol tubing in a 37 degrees C air environment. Crack-growth behavior is characterized over a wide range of growth rates ( approximately 6 orders of magnitude) and load ratios, that is, as a function of the alternating and maximum stress intensities, at 50 Hz. Limited experiments at both 5 and 50 Hz were also performed in 37 degrees C air and simulated body fluid to determine whether the cyclic frequency affects the fatigue behavior. Fatigue-crack growth-rate properties in such thin-walled Nitinol tube are found to be quite distinct from limited published data on other (mainly bulk) product forms of Nitinol, for example, bar and strip, both in terms of the relative fatigue thresholds and the variation in steady-state growth rates. PMID:17187394

  4. Extensional and Flexural Waves in a Thin-Walled Graphite/Epoxy Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Dorighi, John

    1992-01-01

    Simulated acoustic emission signals were induced in a thin-walled graphite/epoxy tube by means of lead breaks (Hsu-Neilsen source). The tube is of similar material and layup to be used by NASA in fabricating the struts of Space Station Freedom. The resulting waveforms were detected by broad band ultrasonic transducers and digitized. Measurements of the velocities of the extensional and flexural modes were made for propagation directions along the tube axis (0 degrees), around the tube circumference (90 degrees) and at an angle of 45 degrees. These velocities were found to be in agreement with classical plate theory.

  5. Large structural, thin-wall castings made of metals subject to hot tearing, and their fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An article, such as a gas turbine engine mixer, is made by providing a mold structure defining a thin-walled, hollow article, and a base metal that is subject to hot tear cracking when cast in a generally equiaxed polycrystalline form, such as Rene' 108 and Mar-M247. The article is fabricated by introducing the molten base metal into the mold structure, and directionally solidifying the base metal in the mold structure to form a directionally oriented structure. The directionally oriented structure may be formed of a single grain or oriented multiple grains.

  6. Theory of anisotropic thin-walled closed-section beams with hygrothermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf M.

    1992-01-01

    A variationally consistent theory is developed in order to derive the governing equations of anisotropic thin-walled beams with closed sections subjected to axial load, torsion, bending and hygrothermal loads. The theory is based on an asymptotical analysis of two-dimensional shell theory. Closed-form expressions for the beam stiffness coefficients, equivalent hygrothermal loads, stress and displacement fields are provided. The influence of material anisotropy and hygrothermal coefficients on the displacement field is identified. The analysis is applied to predict the response of composite beams under thermomechanical loading.

  7. Theory of anisotropic thin-walled closed-cross-section beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdichevsky, Victor; Armanios, Erian; Badir, Ashraf

    1992-01-01

    A variationally and asymptotically consistent theory is developed in order to derive the governing equations of anisotropic thin-walled beams with closed sections. The theory is based on an asymptotic analysis of two-dimensional shell theory. Closed-form expressions for the beam-stiffness coefficients, stress and displacement fields are provided. The influence of material anisotropy on the displacement field is identified. A comparison with the displacement fields obtained by other analytical developments is performed. The stiffness coefficients and static response are also compared with finite element predictions, closed-form solutions and test data.

  8. High resolution X-ray micro-CT of ultra-thin wall space components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D. J.; Rauser, R. W.; Bowman, R. R.; Bonacuse, P. J.; Martin, R. E.; Locci, I. E.; Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    A high resolution micro-CT system has been assembled and is being used to provide optimal characterization for ultra-thin wall space components. The Glenn Research Center NDE Sciences Team, using this CT system, has assumed the role of inspection vendor for the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) project at NASA. This article will discuss many aspects of the development of the CT scanning for this type of component, including CT system overview; inspection requirements; process development, software utilized and developed to visualize, process, and analyze results; calibration sample development; results on actual samples; correlation with optical/SEM characterization; CT modeling; and development of automatic flaw recognition software.

  9. Optimal design of thin walled I beams for extreme natural frequency of torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, C.

    1983-01-01

    The optimal design of thin-walled I beams so as to extremize the natural frequency of torsional vibration is considered. It is assumed that only one dimension of the cross-section, except for the web height, may be variable in given limits, along the axis of the beam. The optimality condition for the variable dimension is settled by means of Pontryagin's maximum principle. The effect of the constant, axial loads is also included. the solution of the problem formulated is generally found in an iterative way. Some numerical examples of optimization of the I beam with variable widt of flanges are given.

  10. Thin-walled graphitic nanocages as a unique platform for amperometric glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun Xian; Sheng, Zhao Min; Shen, Yi Qiang; Dong, Zhi Li; Li, Chang Ming

    2010-09-01

    A thin-walled graphitic nanocages material with well-developed graphitic structure, large specific surface area and pronounced mesoporosity was synthesized and used to construct a sensing interface for an amperometric glucose biosensor, showing a high and reproducible sensitivity of 13.3 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), linear dynamic range of 0.02-6.2 mM, and fast response time of 5 s. It was successfully used to accurately detect glucose in human serum with effective discrimination to common interference species such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, acetaminophen, and uric acid. PMID:20722406

  11. Creep bending of thin-walled shells and plates by consideration of finite deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, H.; Naumenko, K.

    A phenomenological constitutive model for the characterization of creep-damage processes of metals is applied to the numerical analysis of thin-walled shells and plates. The governing equations of the theory of shallow shells are used taking into account geometrical nonlinearities connected with finite time-dependent deflections by moderate bending. The solutions of the initial-boundary value problem are obtained for thin rectangular plates in order to show the influence of geometrical nonlinearity on results of time-dependent deformation and stress redistribution as well as on estimations of the failure time.

  12. Analysis of a thin-walled pressurized torus in contact with a plane. [aircraft tires study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, M. J., Jr.; Gassman, P. M.; Baumgarten, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis is applied to study the large deflection of a standing torus loaded by a plane. The internally pressurized thin-walled structure is found to have an elliptical footprint area. Considerable bulge occurs in the sidewall in the region of the load plane. Stress distributions throughout the torus are shown for various load levels and for various modeling strategies at a given load level. In large load ranges finite element calculations show compressive circumferential stress and negative curvature in the footprint region. Results are compared with inelastic wall analysis.

  13. Interactive buckling of thin-walled structural components under static and dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, S.; Benito, R.

    1984-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of interactive buckling of thin walled structural components achieved with the aid of finite strip technique used in conjunction with the theory of mode interaction are summarized. The interaction of the primary local mode with Euler buckling (in columns) and flexural torsional buckling (in columns and beams) is of primary interest. The interaction of two companion local modes with the overall mode is also considered briefly for the columns with doubly symmetric cross sections. The effect of dynamic loads in the form of suddenly applied and compression is also investigated.

  14. Analytical Investigation of Elastic Thin-Walled Cylinder and Truncated Cone Shell Intersection Under Internal Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zamani, J; Soltani, B; Aghaei, M

    2014-10-01

    An elastic solution of cylinder-truncated cone shell intersection under internal pressure is presented. The edge solution theory that has been used in this study takes bending moments and shearing forces into account in the thin-walled shell of revolution element. The general solution of the cone equations is based on power series method. The effect of cone apex angle on the stress distribution in conical and cylindrical parts of structure is investigated. In addition, the effect of the intersection and boundary locations on the circumferential and longitudinal stresses is evaluated and it is shown that how quantitatively they are essential. PMID:25053860

  15. A thin-walled Taylor column surrounding a bathtub vortex in rotating tank.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chin-Chou; Lai, Kuan-Ruei; Chen, Yin-Chung; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Vortex Dynamics Team

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments were jointly conducted to investigate a bathtub vortex under the influence of a protruding cylinder in a rotating tank. The flow pattern depends on Rossby number (Ro = U /fR), Ekman number (Ek = ν /fR2) , and height ratio, h/ H, where R is the radius of the cylinder, f the Coriolis parameter, ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid, h the vertical length of the cylinder and H the height of the tank. Steady-state solutions obtained by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the rotating frame are shown to have good agreements with flow visualizations measurements. The bathtub vortex exhibits an interesting two-celled structure with an inner Ekman pumping and an outer up-drafting motion. The two regions of up-drafting motion are separated by a notable finite-thickness structure, identified as thin-walled Taylor column. The Taylor column sets a barrier to the fluid flow that flows into the inner region only through the narrow gaps, one above the Taylor column and one beneath it. Moreover, the dependence of thickness and height of the thin-walled Taylor column on angular velocity ratio of cylinder to background rotation (ω/ Ω) , ranging from -8/3 to 8/3 are also discussed. Supported by Ministry of Science and Technology, TAIWAN ROC, under contract no's 102-2221-E-002-068-MY3 & 103C-4514-1.

  16. Laser bending of pre-stressed thin-walled nickel micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Jamil, M. S.; Imam Fauzi, E. R.; Juinn, C. S.; Sheikh, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Laser forming is an innovative technique of producing bending, spatial forming and alignment of both metallic and non-metallic parts by introducing thermal stresses into a work piece with a laser beam. It involves a complex interaction of process parameters to mechanical and thermal characteristics of materials. This paper presents a comprehensive experimental and numerical study of laser bending process of thin-walled micro-tubes. The effect of input parameters, namely laser power, pulse length and pre-stress constraint, on the process and the final product characteristics are investigated. Results of the analysis show that the bending angle of the tube increases considerably when a constraint is imposed at the tube's free end during the heating period. The introduction of compressive pre-stresses (from mechanical bending) in the irradiated region increases the final deformation which varies almost linearly with the amount of pre-stress. Due to high thermal conductivity and thin-walled structure of the tube, the heat dissipates quickly from the irradiated region to its surrounding material. Therefore, a combination of short pulse duration and high power is preferable to generate a higher thermal gradient and induce plastic strain. Design of experiment and regression analysis are implemented to develop an empirical model based on simulation results. Sensitivity analysis is also performed to determine the influence of independent variables on output response. It is evident that initial displacement and pulse length have a stronger positive effect on the output response as compared to laser power.

  17. Dynamic stiffness matrix of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Shin, Dong Ku; Park, Young-Suk

    2008-11-01

    For the spatially coupled free vibration analysis of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations, the exact dynamic stiffness matrix based on the solution of the simultaneous ordinary differential equations is presented. For this, a general theory for the vibration analysis of composite beam with arbitrary lamination including the restrained warping torsion is developed by introducing Vlasov's assumption. Next, the equations of motion and force-displacement relationships are derived from the energy principle and the first order of transformed simultaneous differential equations are constructed by using the displacement state vector consisting of 14 displacement parameters. Then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are derived and the exact dynamic stiffness matrix is determined using force-displacement relationships. In addition, the finite-element (FE) procedure based on Hermitian interpolation polynomials is developed. To verify the validity and the accuracy of this study, the numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, the results from available references and the FE analysis using the thin-walled Hermitian beam elements. Particular emphasis is given in showing the phenomenon of vibrational mode change, the effects of increase of the modulus and the bending-twisting coupling stiffness for beams with various boundary conditions.

  18. Exact dynamic and static stiffness matrices of shear deformable thin-walled beam-columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon-Young, Kim; Nam, Kim; Hee-Taek, Yun

    2003-10-01

    Total potential energy of non-symmetric thin-walled beam-columns in the general form is presented by introducing the displacement field based on semitangential rotations and deriving transformation equations between displacement and force parameters defined at the arbitrary axis and the centroid-shear center axis, respectively. Next, governing equations and force-deformation relations are derived from the total potential energy for a shear-deformable, uniform beam element and a system of linear eigenproblem with non-symmetric matrices is constructed based on 14 displacement parameters. And then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are derived and exact dynamic stiffness matrices are determined using force-deformatin relationships. In addition, the modified numerical method to eliminate multiple zero eigenvalues and to evaluate the exact static stiffness matrix is developed for spatial stability analysis. Finally, in order to demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of this study, the spatially coupled natural frequencies and buckling loads are evaluated and compared with analytical solutions or results analyzed by thin-walled beam elements and ABAQUS's shell elements.

  19. Stiffness matrices for flexural torsional/lateral buckling and vibration analysis of thin-walled beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Fu, Chung C.; Kim, Moon-Young

    2007-02-01

    Based on the power series method, the static and dynamic stiffness matrices for the flexural-torsional buckling and free vibration analysis of thin-walled beam with non-symmetric cross-section subjected to linearly variable axial force are newly presented. Additionally, the static stiffness matrix for the lateral buckling analysis of non-symmetric beam is presented for the first time. For this, the elastic strain energy, the potential energy considering the second-order terms of finite rotations, and the kinetic energy for thin-walled beam with non-symmetric cross-section are introduced. Then equations of motion and force-deformation relations are derived from the energy principle. Explicit expressions for displacement parameters are derived based on power series expansions of displacement components. Finally, the static and dynamic element stiffness matrices are determined using force-deformation relationships. In order to verify the accuracy of this study, the numerical solutions are presented and compared with the finite element solutions using the Hermitian beam elements and ABAQUS's shell elements.

  20. Finite element analysis of the torsional behavior of thin-walled members using a warping superelement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofie, Emmanuel

    1993-04-01

    A finite element stiffness matrix technique for analyzing thin-walled open isotropic sections subjected to torsional loading is considered in this paper. Such beam sections are widely used for structural components and stiffeners in aerospace and civil engineering applications. The torsional stiffness term in a stiffness matrix for a 12 degree-of-freedom (d.o.f.) beam element called a 'warping superelement' is developed using the differential equation derived by Vlasov. This stiffness matrix term which implicitly includes the effects of warping, is used in the region of the beam where warping is considered critical. The length of this region, which determines the length of the superelement, depends on the geometrical and mechanical properties of the section. Elements outside of this region are considered as conventional Euler-Bernoulli beam elements (with St. Venant torsion). Numerical examples of several thin-walled beams with different torsional restraints are presented. Results obtained using the proposed superelement procedure are compared with theoretical results based on Vlasov, St. Venant, and 2-D finite element analysis. The results indicate good agreement with the Vlasov, and 2-D finite element analysis results, which account for warping.

  1. Statistical analysis of the mechanical properties of thin walled ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Ductile iron castings have long been used in the automotive market. Ductile iron is inexpensive to produce and has desirable fracture resistance and mechanical properties. However, the weight of ductile iron is driving an effort to reduce wall thickness in order to increase fuel economy. Traditionally, cast iron has been cast into thick, bulky shapes. Reducing the section size of cast iron can be done, but pushes foundry practice into new areas. A consortium of foundries, foundry suppliers, and automotive manufacturers has been pursuing the use of thin walled ductile cast iron. This paper investigates the mechanical behavior of three experimental heats of thin-wall castings in order to evaluate property trends and limits. Castings as thin as 1.7 mm (0.07 in) have been successfully cast. The study was designed to investigate the effects of thickness and different casting heats on the dependent variables of ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation-to-failure, reduction in area, and hardness. The ultimate tensile strength of the castings is found to increase as the casting thickness decreases. Conversely, the elongation-to-failure is found to decrease as the casting thickness decreases. Heat-to-heat differences were found, but they were usually within the scatter of the data.

  2. Material Behavior Based Hybrid Process for Sheet Draw-Forging Thin Walled Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Z.Q.; Shivpuri, R.

    2005-08-05

    Magnesium alloys are conventionally formed at the elevated temperatures. The thermally improved formability is sensitive to the temperature and strain rate. Due to limitations in forming speeds, tooling strength and narrow processing windows, complex thin walled parts cannot be made by traditional warm drawing or hot forging processes. A hybrid process, which is based on the deformation mechanism of magnesium alloys at the elevated temperature, is proposed that combines warm drawing and hot forging modes to produce an aggressive geometry at acceptable forming speed. The process parameters, such as temperatures, forming speeds etc. are determined by the FEM modeling and simulation. Sensitivity analysis under the constraint of forming limits of Mg alloy sheet material and strength of tooling material is carried out. The proposed approach is demonstrated on a conical geometry with thin walls and with bottom features. Results show that designed geometry can be formed in about 8 seconds, this cannot be formed by conventional forging while around 1000s is required for warm drawing. This process is being further investigated through controlled experiments.

  3. Thin-walled boron nitride microtubes exhibiting intense band-edge UV emission at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi; Terao, Takeshi; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-02-25

    Boron nitride (BN) microtubes were synthesized in a vertical induction furnace using Li(2)CO(3) and B reactants. Their structures and morphologies were investigated using x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The microtubes have diameters of 1-3 microm, lengths of up to hundreds of micrometers, and well-structured ultrathin walls only approximately 50 nm thick. A mechanism combining the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) and template self-sacrificing processes is proposed to explain the formation of these novel one-dimensional microstructures, in which the Li(2)O-B(2)O(3) eutectic reaction plays an important role. Cathodoluminescence studies show that even at room temperature the thin-walled BN microtubes can possess an intense band-edge emission at approximately 216.5 nm, which is distinct compared with other BN nanostructures. The study suggests that the thin-walled BN microtubes should be promising for constructing compact deep UV devices and find potential applications in microreactors and microfluidic and drug delivery systems. PMID:19417466

  4. PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,DG; CASTILLO,ER; PONTELANDOLFO,JM

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA. Thin walled polymer shells are needed for OMEGA cryogenic laser experiments. These capsules need to be about 900 {micro}m in diameter and as thin as possible (approx 1-2 {micro}m), while having enough strength to be filled with DT as fast as possible to about 1000 atm. The authors have found that by optimizing the coating parameters in the glow discharge polymer (GDP) deposition system, traditionally used for making ICF targets, they can routinely make robust, {approx} 1.5 {micro}m thick, 900 {micro}m diameter GDP shells with buckle strengths of over 0.3 atm. This is twice the strength of shells made prior to the optimization and is comparable to values quoted for polyimide shells. In addition, these shells were found to be approximately three times more permeable and over 20% denser than previously made GDP shells. The combination of higher strength and permeability is ideal for direct drive cryogenic targets at OMEGA. Shells as thin as 0.5 {micro}m have been made. In this paper, the authors discuss the shell fabrication process, effects of modifying various GDP deposition parameters on shell properties and chemical composition.

  5. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Based Numerical Simulation of Machining of Thin-Wall Components with Varying Wall Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shrikrishna Nandkishor; Bolar, Gururaj

    2016-06-01

    Control of part deflection and deformation during machining of low rigidity thin-wall components is an important aspect in the manufacture of desired quality products. This paper presents a comparative study on the effect of geometry constraints on the product quality during machining of thin-wall components made of an aerospace alloy aluminum 2024-T351. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) based simulations of machining of thin-wall parts were carried out by considering three variations in the wall constraint viz. free wall, wall constrained at one end, and wall with constraints at both the ends. Lagrangian formulation based transient FE model has been developed to simulate the interaction between the workpiece and helical milling cutter. Johnson-Cook material and damage model were adopted to account for material behavior during machining process; damage initiation and chip separation. A modified Coulomb friction model was employed to define the contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece. The numerical model was validated with experimental results and found to be in good agreement. Based on the simulation results it was noted that deflection and deformation were maximum in the thin-wall constrained at one end in comparison with those obtained in other cases. It was noted that three dimensional finite element simulations help in a better way to predict the product quality during precision manufacturing of thin-wall components.

  6. Behavior of thin-walled beams made of advanced composite materials and incorporating non-classical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Librescu, Liviu; Song, Ohseop

    1991-11-01

    Several results concerning the refined theory of thin-walled beams of arbitrary closed cross-section incorporating nonclassical effects are presented. These effects are related both with the exotic properties characterizing the advanced composite material structures and the nonuniform torsional model. A special case of the general equations is used to study several problems of cantilevered thin-walled beams and to assess the influence of the incorporated effects. The results presented in this paper could be useful toward a more rational design of aeronautical or aerospace constructions, as well as of helicopter or tilt rotor blades constructed of advanced composite materials.

  7. Application of manufacturing constraints to structural optimization of thin-walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczek, T.

    2016-02-01

    Topology optimization can be a very useful tool for creating conceptual designs for vehicles. Structures suggested by topology optimization often turn out to be difficult to implement in manufacturing processes. Presently, rail vehicle structures are made by welding sheet metal parts. This leads to many complications and increased weight of the vehicle. This article presents a new design concept for modern rail vehicle structures made of standardized, thin-walled, closed, steel profiles that fulfil the stress and manufacturing requirements. For this purpose, standard software for topology optimization was used with a new way of preprocessing the design space. The design methodology is illustrated by an example of the topology optimization of a freight railcar. It is shown that the methodology turns out to be a useful tool for obtaining optimal structure design that fulfils the assumed manufacturing constraints.

  8. Computation of macro-fiber composite integrated thin-walled smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, S. Y.; Chen, M.; Bai, J.; Li, J.

    2016-07-01

    Due to high flexibility, reliability, and strong actuation forces, piezo fiber based composite smart material, macro-fiber composite (MFC), is increasingly applied in various fields for vibration suppression, shape control, and health monitoring. The complexity arrangement of MFC materials makes them difficult in numerical simulations. This paper develops a linear electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model for composite laminated thin-walled smart structures bonded with MFC patches considering arbitrary piezo fiber orientation. Two types of MFCs are considered, namely, MFC-d31 in which the d 31 effect dominates the actuation forces, and MFC-d33 which mainly uses the d 33 effect. The proposed FE model is validated by static analysis of an MFC bonded smart plate.

  9. Deformability of molybdenum during the production of thin-wall pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, S. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.

    2008-10-01

    The deformation properties of commercial-purity MChVP molybdenum are studied. Plasticity diagrams that relate the limiting strain to failure to the state-of-stress indices are constructed. The plasticity of the material is found to depend substantially on the type of state of stress, which is characterized by the Lode parameter. The plasticity of the material is analyzed under alternating deformation conditions. A damage theory is used to study the healing of the deformation-induced damage during annealing and to determine the conditions under which irreversible damage, which cannot be healed by heat treatment, appears. The simulation results are used to analyze the damage accumulation during the production of thin-wall pipes. The plasticity margin is found to decrease most strongly during the multipass pressing of a pipe workpiece in a punch. As follows from the damage calculation results, intermediate annealing between pressing passes should be introduced at a size of 18 × 3.1 mm.

  10. Effect of processing on properties of thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, K.; Padmaprabu, C.; Ramana Rao, S. V.; Sanyal, T.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2003-02-01

    Thin walled calandria tubes for pressurised heavy water reactors are manufactured either by seam welding of Zircaloy-4 sheets or by seamless route. In the present study, the effect of processing on the critical properties such as texture, microstructure, hydriding behaviour and residual stress for both the routes as well as the mechanical anisotropy developed due to seam welding are investigated. The properties of the seam welded tube in the fusion and adjoining region are markedly different from the base material and from the seamless tube. Residual stress measurements indicate that heat affected zone (HAZ) of seam welded tubes have longitudinal tensile residual stress and the seamless tubes have uniform compressive stress along the circumference. The phase transition in the presence of residual stresses due to thermal gradient is found to modify the texture in the HAZ. The hydride orientation and mechanical anisotropy in these regions are found to be dependent on the texture of the material.

  11. Pulsed eddy-current inspection of thin-walled stainless steel tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.; Koerner, D.W.; Deeds, W.E.; Pickett, C.A.

    1987-09-01

    A pulsed eddy-current system has been developed for production inspection of small, thin-wall, non-ferromagnetic tubing. To detect and accurately size both outer and bore-side flaws required an operating frequency higher than available from present commercial equipment. A pulsed eddy-current instrument was designed and constructed that used 3.2 MHz square waves, with a bandwidth of 20 MHz. The system is able to reliably detect flaws as small as 0.015 mm (0.6 mils) on either the inner or outer surface of the tube. A computer controls the scanning of the tube, as recording, analyzing, and plotting the data. The computer programs and instrument details are given in the report.

  12. Fiber pigtailed thin wall capillary coupler for excitation of microsphere WGM resonator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanzheng; Lan, Xinwei; Huang, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Xiao, Hai

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a fiber pigtailed thin wall capillary coupler for excitation of Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) of microsphere resonators. The coupler is made by fusion-splicing an optical fiber with a capillary tube and consequently etching the capillary wall to a thickness of a few microns. Light is coupled through the peripheral contact between inserted microsphere and the etched capillary wall. The coupling efficiency as a function of the wall thickness was studied experimentally. WGM resonance with a Q-factor of 1.14 × 10(4) was observed using a borosilicate glass microsphere with a diameter of 71 μm. The coupler operates in the reflection mode and provides a robust mechanical support to the microsphere resonator. It is expected that the new coupler may find broad applications in sensors, optical filters and lasers. PMID:23842369

  13. Severe edge effects and simple complimentary interior solutions for thin-walled anisotropic and composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, C. O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    1994-12-01

    Many useful thin-walled structures of interest to the U.S. Army, such as rifle barrels, automotive parts, rocket casings, helicopter blades, driveshafts, and containment vessels, are often constructed of layers of anisotropic, filament or fiber-reinforced materials. While many of these structures are subject to severe mechanical, inertial, or thermal loads, they often must be designed to remain elastic. This means that it is particularly important to be able to compute accurately global characteristics, such as buckling loads and natural frequencies, as well as local information such as stresses near holes or edges. Two important, complementary regions of such structures, have been studied, namely, the interior where there are no steep stress gradients, and the edge zone(s) where stress gradients are high. For both regions, simplified, cost-effective asymptotic methods have been developed. These considerations are particularly important in layered, anisotropic structures because many investigators have (1) claimed that higher-order (and hence computationally expensive) beam, plate, or shell theories are needed for such structures and (2) not paid sufficient attention to the particularly severe end effects (breakdown of Saint-Venant's principle) such structures engender.

  14. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  15. Miniaturized fracture tests for thin-walled tubular SiC specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Lowden, Richard Andrew; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2007-01-01

    Two testing methods have been developed for miniaturized tubular specimens to evaluate the fracture stress of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC coatings in nuclear fuel particles. In the first method hoop stress is applied to a thin-walled tubular specimen by internal pressurization using a polyurethane insert. The second method is a crushing technique, in which tubular specimen is fractured by diametrical compressive loading. Tubular SiC specimens with a wall thickness of about 100 {micro}m and inner diameters of about 0.9 mm (SiC-A) and 1 mm (SiC-B) were extracted from surrogate nuclear fuels and tested using the two test methods. Mean fracture stresses of 239, 263, and 283 MPa were measured for SiC-A and SiC-B by internal pressurization, and SiC-A by diametrical loading, respectively. In addition, size effects in the fracture stress were investigated using tubular alumina specimens with various sizes. A significant size effect was found in the experimental data and was also predicted by the effective area-based scaling method.

  16. Disturbance rejection control for vibration suppression of piezoelectric laminated thin-walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Li, H. N.; Schmidt, R.; Müller, P. C.

    2014-02-01

    Thin-walled piezoelectric integrated smart structures are easily excited to vibrate by unknown disturbances. In order to design and simulate a control strategy, firstly, an electro-mechanically coupled dynamic finite element (FE) model of smart structures is developed based on first-order shear deformation (FOSD) hypothesis. Linear piezoelectric constitutive equations and the assumption of constant electric field through the thickness are considered. Based on the dynamic FE model, a disturbance rejection (DR) control with proportional-integral (PI) observer using step functions as the fictitious model of disturbances is developed for vibration suppression of smart structures. In order to achieve a better dynamic behavior of the fictitious model of disturbances, the PI observer is extended to generalized proportional-integral (GPI) observer, in which sine or polynomial functions can be used to represent disturbances resulting in better dynamics. Therefore the disturbances can be estimated either by PI or GPI observer, and then the estimated signals are fed back to the controller. The DR control is validated by various kinds of unknown disturbances, and compared with linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) control. The results illustrate that the vibrations are better suppressed by the proposed DR control.

  17. Exact solutions for coupled free vibrations of tapered shear-flexible thin-walled composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piovan, Marcelo T.; Filipich, Carlos P.; Cortínez, Víctor H.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, analytical solutions for the free vibration analysis of tapered thin-walled laminated-composite beams with both closed and open cross-sections are developed. The present study is based on a recently developed model that incorporates in a full form the shear flexibility. The model considers shear flexibility due to bending as well as warping related to non-uniform torsion. The theory is briefly reviewed with the aim to present the equilibrium equations, the related boundary conditions and the constitutive equations. The stacking sequences in the panels of the cross-sections are selected in order to behave according to certain elastic coupling features. Typical laminations for a box-beam such as circumferentially uniform stiffness (CUS) or circumferentially asymmetric stiffness (CAS) configurations are adopted. For open cross-sections, special laminations behaving elastically like the CAS and CUS configurations of closed sections are also taken into account. The exact values (i.e. with arbitrary precision) of frequencies are obtained by means of a generalized power series methodology. A recurrence scheme is introduced with the aim to simplify the algebraic manipulation by shrinking the number of unknown variables. A parametric analysis for different taper ratios, slenderness ratios and stacking sequences is performed. Numerical examples are also carried out focusing attention in the validation of the present theory with respect to 2D FEM computational approaches, as well as to serve as quality test and convergence test of former finite elements schemes.

  18. Eikonal-based initiation of fibrillatory activity in thin-walled cardiac propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlin, Antoine; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Reentrant arrhythmias can be simulated in electrophysiological models of electrical impulse propagation governed by a reaction-diffusion system. To facilitate the initiation of a large number of independent episodes of simulated arrhythmias with controllable level of complexity, a new approach is proposed for thin-walled geometries in which depolarization wave dynamics is essentially two-dimensional. Points representing phase singularities are first randomly distributed over the epicardial surface and are assigned a topological charge (direction of rotation). A qualitatively-correct phase map is then reconstructed on the whole surface by interpolation. The eikonal-diffusion equation is used to iteratively regularize the phase map based on a priori information on wavefront propagation. An initial condition for the reaction-diffusion model is created from the resulting phase map with multiple functional/anatomical reentries. Results in an atrial model demonstrate the ability to generate statistical realizations of the same dynamics and to vary the level of complexity measured by the number of phase singularities. A library of 100 simulations with an average number of phase singularities ranging from 1 to 10 is created. An extension to volumetric patient-specific atrial models including fiber orientation and a fast conducting system is presented to illustrate possible applications.

  19. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  20. Effects of substrate preheating on the thin-wall part built by laser metal deposition shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Shijie; Liu, Weijun; Long, Risheng

    2014-10-01

    Laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) is a state-of-the-art technology that combines rapid prototyping and laser processing. There are many factors affecting the quality, precision, microstructure and performance of the LMDS-deposited parts. Among these factors, substrate preheating is a significant one because it can change the heat history of the LMDS process. Preheating is generally adopted to reduce the residual stresses and the risk of thermal distortion and cracking. However, it changes the heat transfer conditions and affects the final microstructure and properties. In this work a numerical simulation model was established to analyze the heat transfer characteristics between deposited material and substrate, the influence rules of substrate preheating on the thermal behavior during LMDS, and the distribution characters of temperature and stress field. And then, the experimental methods were used to evaluate the effects of substrate preheating on the surface quality, microstructure, composition, hardness distribution, and mechanical properties of as-built thin-wall parts. The experimental results primarily agree with the theoretical analysis and numerical model, which indicates that in terms of the varied thermo-mechanical coupled field, the investigated microstructure and properties of formed components depend considerably on the initial temperature of the substrate, so the LMDS process can be effectively adjusted and controlled by means of substrate preheating.

  1. Temperature-insensitive fiber Bragg grating displacement sensor based on a thin-wall ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Sicong; Dong, Xiaopeng; Lai, Bowen

    2016-08-01

    The study on strain distribution of a thin-wall ring is presented and a bandwidth-demodulated displacement sensor based on a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is proposed. The FBG is glued onto the inner surface of a spring steel ring, and it is found that its bandwidth is linearly changed with the displacement variation of the top point of the ring due to the ring-compression-induced gradient strain. The PD output responses of different grating lengths to the same dimension of the ring are investigated. Experimental results show that the high sensitivity and accuracy of 0.567 nm mm-1 and ±0.04 mm using 10 mm grating is achieved within a displacement range of 0-3.5 mm. The designed structure has a higher 3dB-bandwidth tuning ratio of 0.057 nm mm-2. A temperature stability better than ±0.02 mm over the temperature range from 0 to 60 °C is demonstrated.

  2. Experiments on self-excited oscillation in a thin-walled collapsible tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hai-Jun; Jia, Lai-Bing; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Self-excited oscillation in a collapsible tube is an important phenomenon in physiology. An experimental approach on self-excited oscillation in a thin-walled collapsible tube is developed by using a high transmittance and low Young's modulus silicone rubber tube. The elastic tube is manufactured by the method of centrifugal casting in our laboratory. An optical method for recording the evolution of the cross-sectional areas at a certain position along the longitudinal direction of the tube is developed based on the technology of refractive index matching. With the transparent tube, the tube law is measured under the static no-flow condition. The cross section at the middle position of the tube transfers from a quasi-circular configuration to an ellipse, and then to a dumbell-shape as the chamber pressure is increased. During the self-excited oscillation, two periodic self-excited oscillating states and one transitional oscillating state are identified. They all belong to the LU mode. These different oscillating states are related to the initial cross-sectional shape of the tube caused by the difference of the downstream transmural pressure.

  3. The influence of triggers geometry upon the stiffness of cylindrical thin walled tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soica, Adrian; Radu, Gheorghe N.

    2014-06-01

    Today's automobile manufacturers are increasingly using lightweight materials to reduce weight; these include plastics, composites, aluminium, magnesium alloys, and also new types of high strength steels. Many of these materials have limited strength or ductility, therefore in many cases the rupture being serious consequences during crashes, underscore Picketta et al. in their studies. Automotive structures must deform plastically in a short period of time, a few milliseconds, to absorb the crash energy in a controllable manner. It must be light and enable economically mass-production [1]. FE models rapidly gained acceptance among engineers. Many other factors facilitated the development of vehicle models by shell finite elements since most of the geometry of the structural surfaces was already on computer graphic files. Kee Poong Kim and Hoon Huh emphasize that the crashworthiness of each vehicle part needs to be evaluated at the initial stage of design for good performance of an assembled vehicle. As the dynamic behaviour of structural members is different from the static one, the crashworthiness of the vehicle structures has to be assessed by impact analysis. The paper analyzes the influence of trigger geometry upon the compression of thin-walled cylindrical tubes. Simulations performed on a simple model showed the dependence between triggers area and deformation times as well as the maximum deformations obtained for various speeds at which the simulations ware carried out. Likewise, the geometry of trigger leads to different results.

  4. Fracture Toughness Measurements and Assessment of Thin Walled Conduit Alloys in a Cicc Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-01

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  5. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THIN WALLED CONDUIT ALLOYS IN A CICC APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-03

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  6. Impact of assembly on signal detection from thin-wall rotors of micro-gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Liu, Xiaowei; Wang, Bi; Zhang, Haifeng

    2014-03-01

    The assembly of sealed hollow rotors, a key component in achieving liquid-levitated micro-gyroscopes, represents a significant challenge. The rotor is a thin-wall cylinder composed of materials that are only 100-μm thick. Furnace soldering and hand soldering are used to join the work pieces, but produce defects evident from deformations and surface roughness. Modeling and experiments show that the deformation is related to the temperature during assembly and the mode by which heat is applied to the components. Temperature affects the deformation through thermal stress and air pressure on the rotor, but the mode of heating creates a big difference. Surface deformation of the rotor alters the detecting capacitance and introduces uncertainty in detection sensitivity of the gyroscope. Experiments show that at 220°C, furnace soldering of rotors causes a great decrease in detection sensitivity, leading to a relative uncertainty of nearly 40%. In contrast, hand soldering leads to a relative uncertainty of about 5%. Spot heating of the rotor during assembly is much better than total heating as less thermal stress is generated and the air pressure difference is almost eliminated. Lowering the temperature is helpful to as long as the connection is sufficiently strengthened.

  7. An ultra-thin-walled solenoid for the CELSIUS/WASA experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruber, R. J. M. Y.; Blom, M.; Calén, H.; Fridén, C.-J.; Larsson, A.; Norman, G.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamaoka, H.; Makida, Y.; Kimura, N.; Tanaka, K.; Iida, M.; Ohhata, H.; Hirabayashi, H.; Takasu, N.; Nawrot, A.

    2003-05-01

    An ultra-thin-walled superconducting warm bore solenoid has been developed for the WASA detector set-up at the CELSIUS accelerator of the The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL), Sweden. It gives a central magnetic field up to 1.3 T, and can be operated in persistent mode. The total thickness of the superconducting coil is 9 mm with an inner diameter of 554 mm and an energy-to-cold-mass ratio of 6 kJ/ kg. The total wall thickness is a record low 0.18 in units of the radiation length ( X0) including the material of the cryostat. The solenoid has been successfully operated in combination with the WASA detector set-up since 1998. The solenoid has a coil split in two parts with a central gap of 40 mm for a tube guiding small frozen hydrogen target pellets into the accelerator beam. The solenoid is fixed by glass-fibre supports. It has a vacuum vessel with 1 mm thick corrugated walls of aluminium and it has high-purity aluminium strips in axial direction to improve heat conduction. The solenoid is enclosed by an iron yoke which shields the detector readout electronics from the magnetic field. A diagnostics, control and safety system has been developed for the solenoid itself and for the associated cryogenics.

  8. Modeling of Fillets in Thin-Walled Structures for Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seugling, Richard M.; Brown, Andrew M.; Rodrigue, Pete (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Relatively new developments in manufacturing methods have made it possible to produce machined parts with a wall thickness of less than 0.010". While the parts are being machined. Fillets of relatively large radius to thickness ratios are created by the milling tool. This paper discusses an accurate new technique for finite-element modeling of fillets for dynamic and stiffness analysis using efficient plate elements rather than more computationally intensive, high density solid meshes, A simple filleted cantilever beam of 0.040" thickness, 1.6" length, 1" depth, and 0.250" radius in the corner was modeled using both solid elements and several different plate element geometries. The finite element results were then compared with static and modal testing of a machined sample. The highest-scoring plate element technique uses a bridge of elements that is constructed through the tangent point of the Fillet radius such that the thickness of the element matches tile volume of the fillet. This model produces errors of less than 4.6 percent for static loading and less than 7.4 percent for modal analysis. This simple plate element technique will prove critical for efficient, timely, and accurate dynamic analysis of complex thin-walled structures.

  9. Space-deployed, thin-walled enclosure for a cryogenically-cooled high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Allison K.

    The interaction of magnetic fields generated by large superconducting coils has multiple applications in space, including actuation of spacecraft or spacecraft components, wireless power transfer, and shielding of spacecraft from radiation and high energy particles. These applications require coils with major diameters as large as 20 meters and a thermal management system to maintain the superconducting material of the coil below its critical temperature. Since a rigid thermal management system, such as a heat pipe, is unsuitable for compact stowage inside a 5 meter payload fairing, a thin-walled thermal enclosure is proposed. A 1.85 meter diameter test article consisting of a bladder layer for containing chilled nitrogen vapor, a restraint layer, and multilayer insulation was tested in a custom toroidal vacuum chamber. The material properties found during laboratory testing are used to predict the performance of the test article in low Earth orbit. Deployment motion of the same test article was measured using a motion capture system and the results are used to predict the deployment in space. A 20 meter major diameter and coil current of 6.7 MA is selected as a point design case. This design point represents a single coil in a high energy particle shielding system. Sizing of the thermal and structural components of the enclosure is completed. The thermal and deployment performance is predicted.

  10. The Pack Method for Compressive Tests of Thin Specimens of Materials Used in Thin-Wall Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, C S; Tuckerman, L B

    1939-01-01

    The strength of modern lightweight thin-wall structures is generally limited by the strength of the compression members. An adequate design of these members requires a knowledge of the compressive stress-strain graph of the thin-wall material. The "pack" method was developed at the National Bureau of Standards with the support of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to make possible a determination of compressive stress-strain graphs for such material. In the pack test an odd number of specimens are assembled into a relatively stable pack, like a "pack of cards." Additional lateral stability is obtained from lateral supports between the external sheet faces of the pack and outside reactions. The tests seems adequate for many problems in structural research.

  11. Static and free-vibrational response of semi-circular graphite-epoxy frames with thin-walled open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. Scott; Johnson, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and free vibrational response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semi-circular with a radius of three feet, and one specimen has an I cross section and the other has a channel cross section. The flexibility influence coefficients were measured in static tests for loads applied at midspan with the ends of the specimens clamped. Natural frequencies and modes were determined from vibrational tests for free and clamped end conditions. The experimental data is used to evaluate a new finite element which was developed specifically for the analysis of curved, thin-walled structures. The formulation of the element is based on a Vlasov-type, thin-walled, curved beam theory. The predictions from the finite element program generally correlated well with the experimental data for the symmetric I-specimen. Discrepancies in some of the data were found to be due to flexibility in the clamped end conditions. With respect to the data for the channel specimen, the correlation was less satisfactory. The finite element analysis predicted the out-of-plane response of the channel specimen reasonably well, but large discrepancies occurred between the predicted in-plane response and the experimental data. The analysis predicted a much more compliant in-plane response than was observed in the experiments.

  12. A study on plastic wrinkling in thin-walled tube bending via an energy-based wrinkling prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H; Yang, H; Zhan, M

    2009-04-01

    Thin-walled tube bending is an advanced technology for producing precision bent tube parts in aerospace, aviation and automobiles, etc. With increasing demands of bending tubes with a larger tube diameter and a smaller bending radius, wrinkling instability is a critical issue to be solved urgently for improving the bending limit and forming quality in this process. In this study, by using the energy principle, combined with analytical and finite element (FE) numerical methods, an energy-based wrinkling prediction model for thin-walled tube bending is developed. A segment shell model is proposed to consider the critical wrinkling region, which captures the deformation features of the tube bending process. The dissipation energy created by the reaction forces at the tube-dies interface for restraining the compressive instability is also included in the prediction model, which can be numerically calculated via FE simulation. The validation of the model is performed and its physical significance is evaluated from various aspects. Then the plastic wrinkling behaviors in thin-walled tube bending are addressed. From the energy viewpoint, the effect of the basic parameters including the geometrical and material parameters on the onset of wrinkling is identified. In particular, the influence of multi-tools constraints such as clearance and friction at various interfaces on the wrinkling instability is obtained. The study provides instructive understanding of the plastic wrinkling instability and the model may be suitable for the wrinkling prediction of a doubly-curved shell in the complex forming process with contact conditions.

  13. Flow analysis and validation of numerical modelling for a thin walled high pressure die casting using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Savage, Gary; Ha, Joseph; Prakash, Mahesh

    2014-09-01

    High pressure die casting (HPDC) is an important process for high throughput manufacturing of complex shaped metallic components. The flow involves significant fragmentation and spray formation as the high pressure liquid jets into the die from the gate system. An important class of die cast components is one with large areas of thin walls. An example of this is the chassis of the laptop computer. Computational modelling provides an opportunity to both better understand the filling process and to optimize the runner, gates, flash overs and venting systems for the die. SPH has previously been found to be very suitable for predicting HPDC for bulkier automotive components. The modelling challenges arising from the very thin sections and the many flow paths in a laptop chassis require careful validation. A water analogue experiment is used to validate the predictions of the SPH model for this representative thin walled casting. SPH predictions are used to understand and characterise the filling process. Finally, comparison of flow lines visible in an etched finished casting with the high speed flow paths in the final filled SPH model show very strong agreement. Together these demonstrate that such an SPH model is able to capture substantial detail from both the water analogue system and the actual casting process and is very suitable for simulating these types of complex thin walled castings.

  14. Evaluation of advanced automatic PET segmentation methods using nonspherical thin-wall inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Berthon, B. Marshall, C.; Evans, M.; Spezi, E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The use of positron emission tomography (PET) within radiotherapy treatment planning requires the availability of reliable and accurate segmentation tools. PET automatic segmentation (PET-AS) methods have been recommended for the delineation of tumors, but there is still a lack of thorough validation and cross-comparison of such methods using clinically relevant data. In particular, studies validating PET segmentation tools mainly use phantoms with thick plastic walls inserts of simple spherical geometry and have not specifically investigated the effect of the target object geometry on the delineation accuracy. Our work therefore aimed at generating clinically realistic data using nonspherical thin-wall plastic inserts, for the evaluation and comparison of a set of eight promising PET-AS approaches. Methods: Sixteen nonspherical inserts were manufactured with a plastic wall of 0.18 mm and scanned within a custom plastic phantom. These included ellipsoids and toroids derived with different volumes, as well as tubes, pear- and drop-shaped inserts with different aspect ratios. A set of six spheres of volumes ranging from 0.5 to 102 ml was used for a baseline study. A selection of eight PET-AS methods, written in house, was applied to the images obtained. The methods represented promising segmentation approaches such as adaptive iterative thresholding, region-growing, clustering and gradient-based schemes. The delineation accuracy was measured in terms of overlap with the computed tomography reference contour, using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and error in dimensions. Results: The delineation accuracy was lower for nonspherical inserts than for spheres of the same volume in 88% cases. Slice-by-slice gradient-based methods, showed particularly lower DSC for tori (DSC < 0.5), caused by a failure to recover the object geometry. The region-growing method reached high levels of accuracy for most inserts (DSC > 0.76 except for tori) but showed the largest

  15. Status of Joining Thin Sheet and Thin Wall Tubes of 14YWT

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, David T.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2015-09-18

    Beginning this fiscal year, the FCRD research project initiated an investigation on joining thin sections of the advanced ODS 14YWT ferritic alloy. Friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated as a method to join thin plate and tubing of 14YWT since it is a solid state joining method that has been shown in past studies to be a promising method for joining plates of ODS alloys, such as 14YWT. However, this study will attempt to be the first to demonstrate if FSW can successfully join thin plates and thin wall tubing of 14YWT. In the first FSW attempt, a 1.06 cm thick plate of 14YWT (SM13 heat) was successfully rolled at 1000ºC to the target thickness of 0.1 cm with no edge cracking. This achievement is a highlight since previous attempts to roll 14YWT plates have resulted in extensive cracking. For the FSW run, a pin tool being developed by the ORNL FSW Process Development effort was used. The first FSW run successfully produced a bead-on-plate weld in the 0.1 cm thick plate. The quality of the weld zone appears very good with no evidence of large defects such as cavities. The microstructural characterization study of the bead-on-plate weld zone has been initiated to compare the results of the microstructure analysis with those obtained in the reference microstructural analysis of the 14YWT (SM13 heat) that showed ultra-fine grain size of 0.43 μm and a high number density of ~2-5 nm sizes oxygen-enriched nanoclusters.

  16. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  17. Mount Protects Thin-Walled Glass or Ceramic Tubes from Large Thermal and Vibration Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amato, Michael; Schmidt, Stephen; Marsh. James; Dahya, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The design allows for the low-stress mounting of fragile objects, like thin walled glass, by using particular ways of compensating, isolating, or releasing the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) differences between the mounted object and the mount itself. This mount profile is lower than true full kinematic mounting. Also, this approach enables accurate positioning of the component for electrical and optical interfaces. It avoids the higher and unpredictable stress issues that often result from potting the object. The mount has been built and tested to space-flight specifications, and has been used for fiber-optic, optical, and electrical interfaces for a spaceflight mission. This mount design is often metal and is slightly larger than the object to be mounted. The objects are optical or optical/electrical, and optical and/or electrical interfaces are required from the top and bottom. This requires the mount to be open at both ends, and for the object s position to be controlled. Thin inside inserts at the top and bottom contact the housing at defined lips, or edges, and hold the fragile object in the mount. The inserts can be customized to mimic the outer surface of the object, which further reduces stress. The inserts have the opposite CTE of the housing material, partially compensating for the CTE difference that causes thermal stress. A spring washer is inserted at one end to compensate for more CTE difference and to hold the object against the location edge of the mount for any optical position requirements. The spring also ensures that any fiber-optic or optic interface, which often requires some pressure to ensure a good interface, does not overstress the fragile object. The insert thickness, material, and spring washer size can be traded against each other to optimize the mount and stresses for various thermal and vibration load ranges and other mounting requirements. The alternate design uses two separate, unique features to reduce stress and hold the

  18. Prevalence and histopathological finding of thin-walled and thick-walled Sarcocysts in slaughtered cattle of Karaj abattoir, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nourollahi-Fard, Saeid R; Kheirandish, Reza; Sattari, Saeid

    2015-06-01

    Sarcocystosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Sarcocystis spp. with obligatory two host life cycle generally alternating between an herbivorous intermediate host and a carnivorous definitive host. Some species of this coccidian parasite can cause considerable morbidity and mortality in cattle. The present study was set to investigate the prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. and type of cyst wall in slaughtered cattle of Karaj abattoir, Iran. For this purpose 125 cattle (88 males and 37 females) were investigated for the presence of macroscopic and microscopic Sarcocystis cysts in muscular tissues. No macroscopic Sarcocystis cysts were found in any of the samples. In light microscopy, 121 out of 125 cattle (96.8 %) had thin-walled cysts of Sarcocystis cruzi, while 43 out of them (34.4 %) had thick-walled Sarcocystis cyst. In this survey, the most infected tissue was esophagus and heart and the less was diaphragm. Thin-walled cysts (S. cruzi) mostly found in heart and skeletal muscle showed the less. However, thick-walled cyst (S. hominis or S. hirsuta) mostly were detected in diaphragm, heart muscle showed no thick-walled cyst. No significant relation was observed between age and sex and the rate of infection. The results showed that Sarcocystis cyst is prevalent in cattle in the North part of Iran and the evaluation of infection potential can be useful when considering control programs. PMID:26064016

  19. Exact dynamic stiffness matrix of non-symmetric thin-walled curved beams subjected to initial axial force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam-Il, Kim; Moon-Young, Kim

    2005-06-01

    An improved numerical method to exactly evaluate the dynamic element stiffness matrix is proposed for the spatially coupled free vibration analysis of non-symmetric thin-walled curved beams subjected to uniform axial force. For this purpose, firstly equations of motion, boundary conditions and force-deformation relations are rigorously derived from the total potential energy for a curved beam element. Next systems of linear algebraic equations with non-symmetric matrices are constructed by introducing 14 displacement parameters and transforming the fourth-order simultaneous differential equations into the first-order simultaneous equations. And then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are numerically evaluated via eigensolutions and the exact 14×14 element stiffness matrix is determined using force-deformation relations. In order to demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of this study, the spatially coupled natural frequencies of non-symmetric thin-walled curved beams subjected to uniform compressive and tensile forces are evaluated and compared with analytical and finite element solutions using Hermitian curved beam elements or ABAQUS's shell element. In addition, some results by the parametric study are reported.

  20. Oxidation Behavior of a V-4Cr-4Ti Alloy During the Commercial Processing of Thin-Wall Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Young, Conrad M.

    2007-08-01

    The determination of the thermal and irradiation creep properties of V-4Cr-4Ti using the pressurized tube technique requires a supply of 4.57mm outside diameter tubing with a wall thickness of 0.250mm. Because of the high solubility and rapid mobility of oxygen in this material, maintaining the desired chemical and microstructural characteristics of the alloy during the fabrication of thin wall tubing presents a difficult technological challenge. In 1995, the US fusion program procured some 6 meters of tubing, using the US heat No.832665, utilizing commercial vendors [1].This effort, (Batch A), met with mixed success since a large fraction of the tubing developed cracks at both surfaces and during processing, the carbon concentration increased from 80 to 300wppm, oxygen increased from 310 to 700wppm, while nitrogen remained fairly constant. During the intermediate annealing cycles at 1000C for this batch the furnace vacuum was maintained in the 10-4 torr. range. In an effort to control oxygen pick-up during the intermediate annealing heat treatments, further processing of thin-wall tubing has been undertaken utilizing vacuum conditions in the 10-5 torr regime and in the 10-7 torr regime.

  1. Tunneling from a Minkowski vacuum to an AdS vacuum: A new thin-wall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Ali; Paban, Sonia; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2016-07-01

    Using numerical and analytic methods, we study quantum tunneling from a Minkowski false vacuum to an anti-de Sitter true vacuum. Scanning the parameter space of theories with quartic and nonpolynomial potentials, we find that for any given potential tunneling is completely quenched if gravitational effects are made sufficiently strong. For potentials where ɛ , the energy density difference between the vacua, is small compared to the barrier height, this occurs in the thin-wall regime studied by Coleman and De Luccia. However, we find that other potentials, possibly with ɛ much greater than the barrier height, produce a new type of thin-wall bounce when gravitational effects become strong. We show that the critical curve that bounds the region in parameter space where the false vacuum is stable can be found by a computationally simple overshoot/undershoot argument. We discuss the treatment of boundary terms in the bounce calculation and show that, with proper regularization, one obtains an identical finite result for the tunneling exponent regardless of whether or not these are included. Finally, we briefly discuss the extension of our results to transitions between anti-de Sitter vacua.

  2. Influences of deposition strategies and oblique angle on properties of AISI316L stainless steel oblique thin-walled part by direct laser fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlin; Deng, Dewei; Qi, Meng; Zhang, Hongchao

    2016-06-01

    Direct laser fabrication (DLF) developed from laser cladding and rapid prototyping technique has been widely used to fabricate thin-walled parts exhibiting more functions without expending weight and size. Oblique thin-walled parts accompanied with inhomogeneous mechanical properties are common in application. In the present study, a series of AISI316L stainless steel oblique thin-walled parts are successfully produced by DLF, in addition, deposition strategies, microstructure, and mechanical property of the oblique thin-walled parts are investigated. The results show that parallel deposition way is more valuable to fabricate oblique thin-walled part than oblique deposition way, because of the more remarkable properties. The hardness of high side initially increases until the distance to the substrate reaches about 25 mm, and then decreases with the increase of the deposition height. Oblique angle has a positive effect on the tensile property but a negative effect on microstructure, hardness and elongation due to the more tempering time. The maximum average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are presented 744.3 MPa and 13.5% when the angle between tensile loading direction and horizontal direction is 45° and 90°, respectively.

  3. Proof test criteria for thin-walled 2219 aluminum pressure vessels. Volume 1: Program summary and data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to investigate the crack growth behavior of deep surface flaws in 2219 aluminum. The program included tests of uniaxially loaded surface flaw and center crack panels at temperatures ranging from 20K (-423 F) to ambient. The tests were conducted on both the base metal and as-welded weld metal material. The program was designed to provide data on the mechanisms of failure by ligament penetration, and the residual cyclic life, after proof-testing, of a vessel which has been subjected to incipient penetration by the proof test. The results were compared and analyzed with previously developed data to develop guidelines for the proof testing of thin walled 2219 pressure vessels.

  4. Optimizing the qusai-static folding and deploying of thin-walled tube flexure hinges with double slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Deng, Zongquan; Liu, Rongqiang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Hongwei

    2014-03-01

    The thin-walled tube flexure(TWTF) hinges have important potential application value in the deployment mechanisms of satellite and solar array, but the optimal design of the TWTF hinges haven't been completely solved, which restricts their applications. An optimal design method for the qusai-static folding and deploying of TWTF hinges with double slots is presented based on the response surface theory. Firstly, the full factorial method is employed to design of the experiments. Then, the finite element models of the TWTF hinges with double slots are constructed to simulate the qusai-static folding and deploying non-linear analysis. What's more, the mathematical model of the TWTF flexure hinge quasi-static folding and deploying properties are derived by the response surface method. Considering of small mass and high stability, the peak moment of quasi-static folding and deploying as well as the lightless are set as the objectives to get the optimal performances. The relative errors of the objectives between the optimal design results and the FE analysis results are less than 7%, which demonstrates the precision of the surrogate models. Lastly, the parameter study shows that both the slots length and the slots width both have significant effects to the peak moment of quasi-static folding and deploying of TWTF hinges with double slots. However, the maximum Mises stress of quasi-static folding is more sensitive to the slots length than the slots width. The proposed research can be applied to optimize other thin-walled flexure hinges under quasi-static folding and deploying, which is of great importance to design of flexure hinges with high stability and low stress.

  5. Ball tonometry: a rapid, nondestructive method for measuring cell turgor pressure in thin-walled plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lintilhac, P. M.; Wei, C.; Tanguay, J. J.; Outwater, J. O.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we describe a new method for the determination of turgor pressures in living plant cells. Based on the treatment of growing plant cells as thin-walled pressure vessels, we find that pressures can be accurately determined by observing and measuring the area of the contact patch formed when a spherical glass probe is lowered onto the cell surface with a known force. Within the limits we have described, we can show that the load (determined by precalibration of the device) divided by the projected area of the contact patch (determined by video microscopy) provides a direct, rapid, and accurate measure of the internal turgor pressure of the cell. We demonstrate, by parallel measurements with the pressure probe, that our method yields pressure data that are consistent with those from the pressure probe. Also, by incubating target tissues in stepped concentrations of mannitol to incrementally reduce the turgor pressure, we show that the pressures measured by tonometry accurately reflect the predicted changes from the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. The advantages of this new method over the pressure probe are considerable, however, in that we can move rapidly from cell to cell, taking measurements every 20 s. In addition, the nondestructive nature of the method means that we can return to the same cell repeatedly for periodic pressure measurements. The limitations of the method lie in the fact that it is suitable only for superficial cells that are directly accessible to the probe and to cells that are relatively thin walled and not heavily decorated with surface features. It is also not suitable for measuring pressures in flaccid cells.

  6. Influence of measuring algorithm on shape accuracy in the compensating turning of high gradient thin-wall parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Guilin; Zhu, Dengchao; Li, Shengyi

    2015-02-01

    In order to meet the requirement of aerodynamics, the infrared domes or windows with conformal and thin-wall structure becomes the development trend of high-speed aircrafts in the future. But these parts usually have low stiffness, the cutting force will change along with the axial position, and it is very difficult to meet the requirement of shape accuracy by single machining. Therefore, on-machine measurement and compensating turning are used to control the shape errors caused by the fluctuation of cutting force and the change of stiffness. In this paper, on the basis of ultra precision diamond lathe, a contact measuring system with five DOFs is developed to achieve on-machine measurement of conformal thin-wall parts with high accuracy. According to high gradient surface, the optimizing algorithm is designed on the distribution of measuring points by using the data screening method. The influence rule of sampling frequency is analyzed on measuring errors, the best sampling frequency is found out based on planning algorithm, the effect of environmental factors and the fitting errors are controlled within lower range, and the measuring accuracy of conformal dome is greatly improved in the process of on-machine measurement. According to MgF2 conformal dome with high gradient, the compensating turning is implemented by using the designed on-machine measuring algorithm. The shape error is less than PV 0.8μm, greatly superior compared with PV 3μm before compensating turning, which verifies the correctness of measuring algorithm.

  7. Deformation mechanisms and impact attenuation characteristics of thin-walled collapsible air chambers used in head protection.

    PubMed

    Lamb, L; Hoshizaki, T B

    2009-11-01

    Head injuries are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, many resulting from sporting activities. There is a constant need in the head protection industry for improved methods to manage impacts and to reduce the risk of mild and severe head injuries. Contemporary head protection primarily consists of foam with several inherent disadvantages, including a limited ability to provide effective energy absorption under both low and high impact velocities. Recently, thin-walled collapsible chambers were engineered to address this problem and have been implemented into sport helmets. The chambers consist of four engineering elements which define their dynamic performance: geometry, air volume, material, and venting system. This research analysed the contribution of air flow through an orifice to the chamber's management of impact energy. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the chamber's vent diameter and material stiffness on peak force and venting rate during an impact. Two material stiffnesses (thermoplastic polyurethane 45D and thermoplastic polyurethane 90A) and five vent diameters (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm) were tested at three inbound velocities (1.3 m/s, 2.3 m/s, and 3.0 m/s). Each chamber was impacted ten times using a monorail drop system. Analysis of the results revealed that the material stiffness, vent diameter, and inbound velocity all had a significant effect on peak force and venting rate (p < 0.001). Under low inbound velocities the largest vent diameters transmitted a lower force than the smallest vent, while this relationship reversed at high inbound velocities. Under low velocities the air flowrate was negatively correlated and the flow duration was positively correlated to the peak force. Under high velocities, the air flowrate was positively correlated and the duration was negatively correlated to the peak force. This suggested that, under low velocities, chambers performed optimally when air was dissipated

  8. Long-Term Creep of a Thin-Walled Inconel 718 Stirling Power-Convertor Heater Head Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Randy R.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy and NASA have identified Stirling power convertors as candidate power supply systems for long-duration, deep-space science missions. A key element for qualifying the flight hardware is a long-term durability assessment for critical hot section components of the power convertor. One such critical component is the power convertor heater head. The heater head is a high-temperature pressure vessel that transfers heat to the working gas medium of the convertor, which is typically helium. An efficient heater head design is the result of balancing the divergent requirements of thin walls for increased heat transfer versus thick walls to lower the wall stresses and thus improve creep resistance and durability. In the current design, the heater head is fabricated from the Ni-base superalloy Inconel 718 (IN 718, Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV). Although IN 718 is a mature alloy system (patented in 1962), there is little long-term (>50,000-hr) creep data available for thin-specimen geometries. Since thin-section properties tend to be inferior to thicker samples, it is necessary to generate creep data using specimens with the same geometry as the actual flight hardware. Therefore, one facet of the overall durability assessment program involves generating relatively short-term creep data using thin specimens at the design temperature of 649 C (1200 F).

  9. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Felner, I; Zeides, F; Katz, N; Gazi, Š; Chromik, Š; Dobrovolskiy, O V; Sachser, R; Huth, M

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode. PMID:27143621

  10. Design and validation of the mounting structure for BETTII balloon-based telescope with thin-walled optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Stephen; Dow, Tom; Garrard, Ken; Sohn, Alex; Fixsen, Dale; Rinehart, Stephen; Mentzell, Eric; Veach, Todd; Rizzo, Maxime; Dhabal, Arnab

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) system is designed to study the infrared emissions from star formation and active galactic nuclei through a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer located on a balloon at an altitude of 37 km. The BETTII external optics include a pair of identical beam-reducing, four-mirror telescopes, each with a 522-mm aperture, nonrotationally symmetric primary mirror. These telescopes were designed and assembled at the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Consortium and are composed entirely of thin-walled aluminum components. The mounting structure is designed to be light weight and stiff to reduce thermal equilibration time in the rarified air at the edge of space and to maintain robust alignment of the optical elements. The mounts also prevent deformation of the large optical elements via custom-built kinematic Kelvin couplings and fixed-load clamps; the maximum form error of the optical surfaces are 300 nm RMS. This work details the design of the thin mirrors and mounting structure as well as validation of the mount assembly process, mount stiffness, and the kinematic couplings.

  11. Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  12. Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  13. Atom formation processes in the presence of ammonium thiocyanate in a thin-wall tungsten tube atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kiyohisa; Mizuno, Takayuki

    Processes of atom formation of Ag, Al, As, Bi, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr and Te in the presence of ammonium thiocyanate in a thin-wall tungsten tube atomizer are described. It was found from a thermodynamic approach that AI, Bi, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ni and Te formed complexes with ammonium thiocyanate and are atomized through the sulfides in argon-hydrogen atmosphere. Atom formation processess for the other elements are different.

  14. Synthesis and Enhanced Field-Emission of Thin-Walled, Open-Ended, and Well-Aligned N-Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the quartz slides were synthesized by using acetonitrile as carbon sources. As-obtained products possess large thin-walled index (TWI, defined as the ratio of inner diameter and wall thickness of a CNT). The effect of temperature on the growth of CNTs using acetonitrile as the carbon source was also investigated. It is found that the diameter, the TWI of CNTs increase and the Fe encapsulation in CNTs decreases as the growth temperature rises in the range of 780–860°C. When the growth temperature is kept at 860°C, CNTs with TWI = 6.2 can be obtained. It was found that the filed-emission properties became better as CNT growth temperatures increased from 780 to 860°C. The lowest turn-on and threshold field was 0.27 and 0.49 V/μm, respectively. And the best field-enhancement factors reached 1.09 × 105, which is significantly improved about an order of magnitude compared with previous reports. In this study, about 30 × 50 mm2 free-standing film of thin-walled open-ended well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes was also prepared. The free-standing film can be transferred easily to other substrates, which would promote their applications in different fields. PMID:20672122

  15. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsindlekht, M. I.; Genkin, V. M.; Felner, I.; Zeides, F.; Katz, N.; Gazi, Š.; Chromik, Š.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Sachser, R.; Huth, M.

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above 0.66{{T}\\text{c}} and 0.78{{T}\\text{c}} the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode.

  16. Predicting the Influence of Pore Characteristics on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Casting Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die casting Mg materials on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM50 and AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope to obtain the overall information on the pore characteristics. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructures with different pore sizes, pore volume fractions and pore size distributions. Pores are explicitly represented in the synthetic microstructures and meshed out for the subsequent finite element analysis. In the finite element analysis, an intrinsic critical strain value is used for the Mg matrix material, beyond which work-hardening is no longer permissible. With no artificial failure criterion prescribed, ductility levels are predicted for the various microstructures in the form of strain localization. Mesh size effect study is also conducted, from which a mesh size dependent critical strain curve is determined. A concept of scalability of pore size effects is then presented and examined with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve. The results in this study show that, for the regions with lower pore size and lower volume fraction, the ductility generally decreases as the pore size and pore volume fraction increase whereas, for the regions with larger pore size and larger pore volume fraction, other factors such as the mean distance between the pores begin to have some substantial influence on the ductility. The results also indicate that the pore size effects may be scalable for the models with good-representative pore shape and distribution with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve.

  17. Time-domain solution for transient dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanming; Liu, Hanlong; Chu, Jian; Cheng, Ke

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of stress waves in a large-diameter pipe pile for low strain dynamic testing cannot be explained properly by traditional 1D wave theories. A new computational model is established to obtain a wave equation that can describe the dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile to a transient point load during a low strain integrity test. An analytical solution in the time domain is deduced using the separation of variables and variation of constant methods. The validity of this new solution is verified by an existing analytical solution under free boundary conditions. The results of this time domain solution are also compared with the results of a frequency domain solution and field test data. The comparisons indicate that the new solution agrees well with the results of previous solutions. Parametric studies using the new solution with reference to a case study are also carried out. The results show that the mode number affects the accuracy of the dynamic response. A mode number greater than 10 is required to enable the calculated dynamic responses to be independent of the mode number. The dynamic response is also greatly affected by soil properties. The larger the side resistance, the smaller the displacement response and the smaller the reflected velocity wave crest. The displacement increases as the stress waves propagate along the pile when the pile shaft is free. The incident waves of displacement and velocity responses of the pile are not the same among different points in the circumferential direction on the pile top. However, the arrival time and peak value of the pile tip reflected waves are almost the same among different points on the pile top.

  18. The fabrication of thin-walled steel alloys through the gas carburization of reduced metal oxide extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerully, Laura B.

    Investigations of the production of thin-walled steel alloys through the reduction and subsequent gas carburization of structures made from metal oxide powders were performed. Batch compositions, as well as the heat treatment parameters necessary for the formation of structures with the compositions of 4140 and 316 steel without carbon, were determined through the use of thermogravimetric analysis, dilatometric measurements, and microstructural investigation. Parameters for the high temperature carburization of thin tape of 250-300 mum thickness, as well as hollow metal spheres with 4140 composition, in a CO/CO2 atmosphere were determined using thermodynamic data and experimental work. The research has shown that the amount of carbon in the walls of the structures can be controlled and uniform carbon contents across the cross-sections can be achieved in less than 30 minutes. Heat treatments for carburized samples of 4140 composition were carried out using oil quench and salt bath furnaces. Mechanical property testing of heat-treated samples was carried out using Vickers microhardness testing, resulting in values similar to conventionally produced 4140 steel. Compression testing of carburized 4140 spheres was also performed, showing that crush strength of the spheres has been significantly improved through the carburization process. Studies on the decarburization behavior of similar alloys under various conditions were also performed in order to aid in the prediction of the microstructural behavior of samples during carburization and subsequent heat treatment. Low temperature gas carburization of structures with 316 steel composition without carbon, has also been performed. Hardness variations present through the cross-section of the part after carburization suggest some transfer of carbon, though contents are not as high as anticipated. Suggestions for future work in this area are presented. The results of these investigations yield a novel method for the

  19. Effect of Viscosity Measurement Method to Simulate High Pressure Die Casting of Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Alloy Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B. W.; Li, L. X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, L. Q.; Xu, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, a rotating cylinder viscometer (RCV) was adopted to measure the viscosity of AlSi10MnMg aluminum alloy. The results show that the measured viscosity is much higher than previously reported viscosity of aluminum alloys measured by oscillation vessel viscometer. The viscosity measured by RCV was introduced into the simulation of the filling progress of high pressure die casting (HPDC) for thin-walled castings of aluminum alloy (TWCA). The simulated results match well with the experimental results indicating that the RCV is the most appropriate to use for simulations of HPDC for TWCA.

  20. Real-Time Deflection Monitoring for Milling of a Thin-Walled Workpiece by Using PVDF Thin-Film Sensors with a Cantilevered Beam as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Liu, Dongsheng; Luo, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Thin-walled workpieces, such as aero-engine blisks and casings, are usually made of hard-to-cut materials. The wall thickness is very small and it is easy to deflect during milling process under dynamic cutting forces, leading to inaccurate workpiece dimensions and poor surface integrity. To understand the workpiece deflection behavior in a machining process, a new real-time nonintrusive method for deflection monitoring is presented, and a detailed analysis of workpiece deflection for different machining stages of the whole machining process is discussed. The thin-film polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor is attached to the non-machining surface of the workpiece to copy the deflection excited by the dynamic cutting force. The relationship between the input deflection and the output voltage of the monitoring system is calibrated by testing. Monitored workpiece deflection results show that the workpiece experiences obvious vibration during the cutter entering the workpiece stage, and vibration during the machining process can be easily tracked by monitoring the deflection of the workpiece. During the cutter exiting the workpiece stage, the workpiece experiences forced vibration firstly, and free vibration exists until the amplitude reduces to zero after the cutter exits the workpiece. Machining results confirmed the suitability of the deflection monitoring system for machining thin-walled workpieces with the application of PVDF sensors. PMID:27626424

  1. Dynamic Response and Signal to Noise Ratio Investigation of NIR-FBG Dynamic Sensing System for Monitoring Thin- walled Composite Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, Z. M.; Epaarachchi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Optical fiber systems for dynamic response measurement become an attractive study nowadays especially in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This work presents the investigation of an optical fiber sensor system utilizing Near Infra-Red Fiber Bragg Grating (NIR-FBG) sensor for SHM of a thin-walled composite structure. In this study, a comparison between the experimental result and simulation study using finite element analysis has been presented. By comparing both results, the FBG dynamic sensing system was shown to have an excellent capability in acquiring dynamic response due to flexural wave propagations. In the meantime, a signal to noise ratio (SNR) study was also performed to several FBG dynamic sensor systems; particularly to see the comparison between NIR-FBG sensor and 1550 nm FBG sensor. Furthermore, with a proper configuration, an NIR-FBG system was proved to have better performance than the 1550 nm based FBG sensor.

  2. Full-scale experimental and numerical study about structural behaviour of a thin-walled cold-formed steel building affected by ground settlements due to land subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. A.; Hernández, L. A.; Hernández, M.; Pacheco, J.; Zermeño, M. E.; Salinas, R.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence due to ground water withdrawal is a problem in many places around the world (Poland, 1984). This causes differential ground settlements that affect masonry structures, because these structural materials do not exhibit an adequate performance beyond a certain level of angular distortion. This work presents the experimental and numerical results about a study regarding the performance of a full-scale thin-walled cold-formed steel building affected by ground differential settlements due to land subsidence. The experimental stage consisted in the construction of a test-building to be subjected to differential settlements in laboratory. The numerical stage consisted in performing a numerical non-linear static pull-down analysis simulating the differential ground settlements of the test-building. The results show that the structural performance of the tested building was very suitable in terms of ductility.

  3. Experimental studies of effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on vibration characteristics of thin-wall circular cylinders partly filled with liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of tilt and structural asymmetry on the vibration characteristics of partly liquid-filled thin-wall cylinders were experimentally studied. It was found that tilting the longitudinal axis of a partly filled axisymmetric cylinder from the vertical could markedly reduce its resonant frequencies and change significantly the shape of the circumferential modes. For the minimum frequency modes, vibratory motion occurred only on that side of the cylinder where the liquid was deepest. An empirical equation was derived that gives the equivalent liquid depth of an untilted cylinder having the same minimum resonant frequency as a tilted, partly filled cylinder. Circumferential mode shapes of an untilted asymmetric cylinder were similar to those of the tilted, partly filled axisymmetric cylinder. Vibratory motion in the minimum frequency modes occurred in most instances only on the side of minimum thickness. Correlation between test data and results from a reformulated NASTRAN hydroelastic analysis was excellent.

  4. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  5. Analysis of thin-walled cylindrical composite shell structures subject to axial and bending loads: Concept development, analytical modeling and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadev, Sthanu

    Continued research and development efforts devoted in recent years have generated novel avenues towards the advancement of efficient and effective, slender laminated fiber-reinforced composite members. Numerous studies have focused on the modeling and response characterization of composite structures with particular relevance to thin-walled cylindrical composite shells. This class of shell configurations is being actively explored to fully determine their mechanical efficacy as primary aerospace structural members. The proposed research is targeted towards formulating a composite shell theory based prognosis methodology that entails an elaborate analysis and investigation of thin-walled cylindrical shell type laminated composite configurations that are highly desirable in increasing number of mechanical and aerospace applications. The prime motivation to adopt this theory arises from its superior ability to generate simple yet viable closed-form analytical solution procedure to numerous geometrically intense, inherent curvature possessing composite structures. This analytical evaluative routine offers to acquire a first-hand insight on the primary mechanical characteristics that essentially govern the behavior of slender composite shells under typical static loading conditions. Current work exposes the robustness of this mathematical framework via demonstrating its potential towards the prediction of structural properties such as axial stiffness and bending stiffness respectively. Longitudinal ply-stress computations are investigated upon deriving the global stiffness matrix model for composite cylindrical tubes with circular cross-sections. Additionally, this work employs a finite element based numerical technique to substantiate the analytical results reported for cylindrically shaped circular composite tubes. Furthermore, this concept development is extended to the study of thin-walled, open cross-sectioned, curved laminated shells that are geometrically

  6. Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of the cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team`s principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation.

  7. A Study On Critical Thinning In Thin-walled Tube Bending Of Al-Alloy 5052O Via Coupled Ductile Fracture Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Yang He; Zhan Mei

    2010-06-15

    Thin-walled tube bending(TWTB) method of Al-alloy tube has attracted wide applications in aerospace, aviation and automobile,etc. While, under in-plane double tensile stress states at the extrados of bending tube, the over-thinning induced ductile fracture is one dominant defect in Al-alloy tube bending. The main objective of this study is to predict the critical wall-thinning of Al-alloy tube bending by coupling two ductile fracture criteria(DFCs) into FE simulation. The DFCs include Continuum Damage Mechanics(CDM)-based model and GTN porous model. Through the uniaxial tensile test of the curved specimen, the basic material properties of the Al-alloy 5052O tube is obtained; via the inverse problem solution, the damage parameters of both the two fracture criteria are interatively determined. Thus the application study of the above DFCs in the TWTB is performed, and the more reasonable one is selected to obtain the critical thinning of Al-alloy tube in bending. The virtual damage initiation and evolution (when and where the ductile fracture occurs) in TWTB are investigated, and the fracture mechanisms of the voided Al-alloy tube in tube bending are consequently discussed.

  8. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoyinu, Yemi; Griffin, John A.

    2014-03-31

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (≤ 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  9. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Garrett J.; Thompson, Scott M.; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  10. Data indicating temperature response of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Garrett J; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(™)) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti-6Al-4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  11. Static and dynamic finite rotation FE-analysis of thin-walled structures with piezoelectric sensor and actuator patches or layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Schmidt, R.

    2014-09-01

    This paper deals with static and dynamic analysis of thin-walled structures with integrated piezoelectric layers as sensors and actuators in the geometrically nonlinear range of deformations. A variational formulation is derived by using the Reissner-Mindlin first-order shear deformation (FOSD) hypothesis and full geometrically nonlinear strain-displacement relations accounting for finite rotations. The finite rotations are treated by Rodriguez parameterization. In order to enhance the accuracy of a four-node shell element, a combination of an assumed natural strain (ANS) method for the shear strains, an enhanced assumed strain (EAS) method for the membrane strains and an enhanced assumed gradient (EAG) method for the electric field are employed. The present shell element has five mechanical degrees of freedom (DOFs) and three electrical DOFs per node. The Newton-Raphson method for static analysis and the Newmark method for dynamic analysis are used to perform linear and nonlinear simulations. In comparison to the results obtained by simplified nonlinear models reported in the existing literature, the finite-element simulations performed in this paper show the importance of the present model, precisely for structures undergoing finite deformations and rotations.

  12. A prospective randomised trial comparing insertion success rate and incidence of catheterisation-related complications for subclavian venous catheterisation using a thin-walled introducer needle or a catheter-over-needle technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, B G; Lim, Y J; Jeon, Y T; Hwang, J W; Kim, H C; Choi, Y H; Park, H P

    2016-09-01

    In clinical practice, both a thin-walled introducer needle and catheter-over-needle technique can be used to allow insertion of a guidewire during central venous catheterisation using the Seldinger technique. We compared the incidence of catheterisation-related complications (arterial puncture, haemothorax, pneumothorax, haematoma and catheter tip malposition) and insertion success rate for these two techniques in patients requiring right-sided subclavian central venous catheterisation. A total of 414 patients requiring infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation were randomly allocated to either a thin-walled introducer needle (needle group, n = 208) or catheter-over-needle technique (catheter group, n = 206). The catheterisation-related complication rate was lower in the needle group compared with the catheter group (5.8% vs. 15.5%; p = 0.001). Overall insertion success rates were similar (97.1% and 92.7% in the needle and catheter groups respectively; p = 0.046), although the first-pass success rate was higher in the needle group (62.0% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). We recommend the use of a thin-walled introducer needle technique for right-sided infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation. PMID:27396474

  13. Thin-walled SnO₂ nanotubes functionalized with Pt and Au catalysts via the protein templating route and their selective detection of acetone and hydrogen sulfide molecules.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sang-Joon; Choi, Seon-Jin; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Hakim, Meggie; Rothschild, Avner; Kim, Il-Doo

    2015-10-21

    Bio-inspired Pt (∼2 nm) and Au (∼2.7 nm) catalysts encapsulated by a protein shell, i.e., Pt-apoferritin (Pt@AF) and Au-apoferriten (Au@AF), were synthesized via the hollow protein nanocage (apoferritin) templating route and directly functionalized on the interior and exterior walls of electrospun SnO2 nanotubes (NTs) during controlled single-nozzle electrospinning followed by high temperature calcination with heating rate control. Fast crystallization of the exterior shell and outward diffusion of the interior Sn precursors and crystallites result in the continued growth of a tubular wall, which is related to rapid heating driven Ostwald-ripening behavior. Very importantly, the Pt and Au nanoparticles (NPs) were immobilized onto thin-walled SnO2 NTs with a diameter of ∼350 nm and a shell thickness of ∼40 nm without any aggregation of catalysts due to high dispersibility, which originated from repulsive electrostatic (Coulombic) forces acting on the surface charged protein shells, leading to an enhanced catalytic effect and outstanding gas sensing properties. Pt-loaded SnO2 NTs exhibited superior acetone response (R(air)/R(gas) = 92 at 5 ppm) compared to pure SnO2 NFs (R(air)/R(gas) = 4.8 at 5 ppm) and SnO2 NTs (Rair/Rgas = 11 at 5 ppm) while Au-loaded SnO2 NTs showed a high response when exposed to hydrogen sulfide (R(air)/R(gas) = 34 at 5 ppm), offering selective gas detection with minimal cross-sensitivity against other interfering gases such as NH3, CO, NO, C6H5CH3, and C5H12. Our results provide a new insight into facile, cost-effective, and highly dispersible catalyst loading on the interior and exterior walls of hollow metal oxide NTs via simple electrospinning as a potential breath analyzer. PMID:26395290

  14. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  15. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  16. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  17. Depleted uranium disposal options.

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B. M.; Ranek, N. L.; Goldberg, M.; Avci, H. I.

    2000-04-01

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been produced in the United States since the 1940s as part of both the military program and the civilian nuclear energy program. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the agency responsible for managing most of the depleted UF{sub 6} that has been produced in the United States. The total quantity of depleted UF{sub 6} that DOE has to or will have to manage is approximately 700,000 Mg. Studies have been conducted to evaluate the various alternatives for managing this material. This paper evaluates and summarizes the alternative of disposal as low-level waste (LLW). Results of the analysis indicate that UF{sub 6} needs to be converted to a more stable form, such as U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, before disposal as LLW. Estimates of the environmental impacts of disposal in a dry environment are within the currently applicable standards and regulations. Of the currently operating LLW disposal facilities, available information indicates that either of two DOE facilities--the Hanford Site or the Nevada Test Site--or a commercial facility--Envirocare of Utah--would be able to dispose of up to the entire DOE inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}.

  18. Revisiting Antarctic Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Tritscher, Ines; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic ozone depletion is known for almost three decades and it has been well settled that it is caused by chlorine catalysed ozone depletion inside the polar vortex. However, there are still some details, which need to be clarified. In particular, there is a current debate on the relative importance of liquid aerosol and crystalline NAT and ice particles for chlorine activation. Particles have a threefold impact on polar chlorine chemistry, temporary removal of HNO3 from the gas-phase (uptake), permanent removal of HNO3 from the atmosphere (denitrification), and chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions. We have performed simulations with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) employing a recently developed algorithm for saturation-dependent NAT nucleation for the Antarctic winters 2011 and 2012. The simulation results are compared with different satellite observations. With the help of these simulations, we investigate the role of the different processes responsible for chlorine activation and ozone depletion. Especially the sensitivity with respect to the particle type has been investigated. If temperatures are artificially forced to only allow cold binary liquid aerosol, the simulation still shows significant chlorine activation and ozone depletion. The results of the 3-D Chemical Transport Model CLaMS simulations differ from purely Lagrangian longtime trajectory box model simulations which indicates the importance of mixing processes.

  19. An Investigation on Axial Deformation Behavior of Thin-Wall Unfilled and Filled Tube with Aluminum Alloy (Al-Si7Mg) Foam Reinforced with SiC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaraswamidhas, L. A.; Rajak, Dipen Kumar; Das, S.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is to produce superior quality aluminum alloy foam with low relative density and higher resistance against compression deformation. This investigation has studied crash energy capacities of unfilled and filled aluminum alloy foams in mild steel tubes. The foam has been prepared by the melt route process with an addition of 5wt.% silicon carbide particles. The fabricated aluminum alloy foams were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Material Pro analyzer. It was observed that the foam-filled tubes could absorb more energy as compared to the unfilled tubes before reaching the complete densification point. Also, the aluminum alloy foams had better energy absorption capacity during the crash or impact loading. This article demonstrates the excellent ability of aluminum alloy foam application in the field where there is a need to absorb crash energy. It is to be noted that the amount of energy absorption will be greater for low-density foam filled in thin-wall rectangular section tubes. We have seen an increasing trend in the application of aluminum foams inside the thin-wall mild steel tubes for maximum energy absorption.

  20. Ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Fleming, Eric L.; Newman, Paul A.; Li, Feng; Mlawer, Eli; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Bailey, Roshelle

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase considerably in the coming decades. Chemistry climate model simulations forced by current projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere increasingly through 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs increase tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, thereby enhancing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and modifying the atmospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to HFC-related atmospheric change in 2050; its effects are comparable to the combined impacts of HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 0.39 × 10-3 to 30.0 × 10-3, approximately 100 times larger than previous ODP estimates which were based solely on chemical effects.

  1. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  2. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  3. Ozone Depletion by Hydrofluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Mlawer, E. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Bailey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are second-generation replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other substances that caused the 'ozone hole'. Atmospheric concentrations of HFCs are projected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Coupled chemistry-climate simulations forced by these projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere in 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs modulate atmospheric temperature, thereby changing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and enhancing the stratospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Sensitivity simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to atmospheric change in 2050, as compared with HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation and dynamics, for a likely 2050 climate, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 4.3x10-4 to 3.5x10-2; previously HFCs were assumed to have negligible ODPs since these species lack chlorine or bromine atoms. The ozone impacts of HFCs are further investigated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The GEOSCCM is a three-dimensional, fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. Sensitivity simulations in which CO2, CFC-11 and HCFC-22 are enhanced individually are used as proxies for the atmospheric response to the HFC concentrations expected by the mid-21st century. Sensitivity simulations provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of these greenhouse gases on global total ozone, and can be used to assess their effects on the recovery of Antarctic ozone.

  4. 12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLDS. DEPLETED URANIUM CASTING OPERATIONS CEASED IN 1988. (11/14/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. Depleted Uranium in Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Croff, A.G.

    1997-12-31

    For uranium to be useful in most fission nuclear reactors, it must be enriched (i.e. the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased). Therefore, depleted uranium (DU)-uranium which has less than naturally occurring concentrations of 235U-is a co-product of the enrichment process. Four to six tons of DU exist for every ton of fresh light water reactor fuel. There were 407,006 MgU 407,000 metric tons (t) of DU stored on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as of July 1993. If this DU were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and emplaced in a near surface disposal facility, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. However, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that near surface disposal of large quantities of DU tails is not appropriate. Thus, there is the possibility that disposition via disposal will be in a deep geological repository. One alternative that may significantly reduce the cost of DU disposition is to use it beneficially. In fact, DOE has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large scale uses of DU and to encourage its reuse. Several beneficial uses, many of which involve applications in the repository per se or in managing the wastes to go into the repository, are discussed in this report.

  6. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    PubMed Central

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed. PMID:20195447

  7. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  9. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent. PMID:25275517

  10. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  11. Thin-walled SnO2 nanotubes functionalized with Pt and Au catalysts via the protein templating route and their selective detection of acetone and hydrogen sulfide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sang-Joon; Choi, Seon-Jin; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Hakim, Meggie; Rothschild, Avner; Kim, Il-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Bio-inspired Pt (~2 nm) and Au (~2.7 nm) catalysts encapsulated by a protein shell, i.e., Pt-apoferritin (Pt@AF) and Au-apoferriten (Au@AF), were synthesized via the hollow protein nanocage (apoferritin) templating route and directly functionalized on the interior and exterior walls of electrospun SnO2 nanotubes (NTs) during controlled single-nozzle electrospinning followed by high temperature calcination with heating rate control. Fast crystallization of the exterior shell and outward diffusion of the interior Sn precursors and crystallites result in the continued growth of a tubular wall, which is related to rapid heating driven Ostwald-ripening behavior. Very importantly, the Pt and Au nanoparticles (NPs) were immobilized onto thin-walled SnO2 NTs with a diameter of ~350 nm and a shell thickness of ~40 nm without any aggregation of catalysts due to high dispersibility, which originated from repulsive electrostatic (Coulombic) forces acting on the surface charged protein shells, leading to an enhanced catalytic effect and outstanding gas sensing properties. Pt-loaded SnO2 NTs exhibited superior acetone response (Rair/Rgas = 92 at 5 ppm) compared to pure SnO2 NFs (Rair/Rgas = 4.8 at 5 ppm) and SnO2 NTs (Rair/Rgas = 11 at 5 ppm) while Au-loaded SnO2 NTs showed a high response when exposed to hydrogen sulfide (Rair/Rgas = 34 at 5 ppm), offering selective gas detection with minimal cross-sensitivity against other interfering gases such as NH3, CO, NO, C6H5CH3, and C5H12. Our results provide a new insight into facile, cost-effective, and highly dispersible catalyst loading on the interior and exterior walls of hollow metal oxide NTs via simple electrospinning as a potential breath analyzer.Bio-inspired Pt (~2 nm) and Au (~2.7 nm) catalysts encapsulated by a protein shell, i.e., Pt-apoferritin (Pt@AF) and Au-apoferriten (Au@AF), were synthesized via the hollow protein nanocage (apoferritin) templating route and directly functionalized on the interior and exterior walls

  12. Depletable externalities and Pigouvian taxation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.M. III

    1984-06-01

    In their book Baumol and Oates (The Theory of Environmental Policy: Externalities, Public Outlays, and the Quality of Life; Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ (1975).) argue that whether an externality is depletable (private) or undepletable (public) is the key characteristic in determining the optimal pricing pattern. They argue that unlike the undepletable case a negative depletable externality requires not only a charge or tax on the generator of the externality but a payment or compensation to the victim in order to achieve Pareto optimality. It is shown that the key characteristic determining whether compensation of victims is required for efficiency is not the depletability of the externality but whether the victim can costlessly control or limit the amount of the damaging substance received. 6 references.

  13. Fully depleted back illuminated CCD

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

  14. Computation of Thin-Walled Prismatic Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasov, V. Z.

    1949-01-01

    We consider a prismatic shell consisting of a finite number of narrow rectangular plates and having in the cross-section a finite number of closed contours (fig. 1(a)). We shall assume that the rectangular plates composing the shell are rigidly joined so that there is no motion of any kind of one plate relative to the others meeting at a given connecting line. The position of a point on the middle prismatic surface is considered to be defined by the coordinate z, the distance to a certain initial cross-section z = O, end the coordinate s determining its position on the contour of the cross-section.

  15. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  16. Reliability Analysis of Brittle, Thin Walled Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan A Salem and Lynn Powers

    2007-02-09

    One emerging application for ceramics is diesel particulate filters being used order to meet EPA regulations going into effect in 2008. Diesel particulates are known to be carcinogenic and thus need to be minimized. Current systems use filters made from ceramics such as mullite and corderite. The filters are brittle and must operate at very high temperatures during a burn out cycle used to remove the soot buildup. Thus the filters are subjected to thermal shock stresses and life time reliability analysis is required. NASA GRC has developed reliability based design methods and test methods for such applications, such as CARES/Life and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C1499 “Standard Test Method for Equibiaxial Strength of Ceramics.”

  17. Expander for Thin-Wall Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pessin, R.

    1983-01-01

    Tool locally expands small-diameter tubes. Tube expander locally expands and deforms tube: Compressive lateral stress induced in elastomeric sleeve by squeezing axially between two metal tool parts. Adaptable to situations in which tube must have small bulge for mechanical support or flow control.

  18. DOPAMINE DEPLETION SLOWS RETINAL TRANSMISSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In male hooded rats, depletion of norepinephrine and dopamine by a-methyl-paratyrosine (AMT) significantly increased the latencies of early peaks in flash-evoked potentials recorded from the visual cortex, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic tract. These effects were not produc...

  19. SCISAT to study ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The Canadian Space Agency's SCISAT satellite began its mission to study the depletion of the ozone layer, following a successful launch on 12 August.The goal for the atmospheric chemistry experiment, which is SCISAT's mission, is to improve the scientific understanding of the complex chemical changes occurring in the upper atmosphere, particularly in the far north, according to Canada's Minister of Industry, Allan Rock.

  20. Intensive production of hybrid catfish-14 tons per acre in earthen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of record high feed prices (averaging over $400/ton during the past five years) and a flood of cheap imports being dumped on the country, the U.S. farm-raised catfish industry has remained viable by increasing production intensity while decreasing FCRs (food conversion ratios). Two technica...

  1. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  2. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  3. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  4. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  5. The effect of wall depletion and hydrodynamic interactions on stress-gradient-induced polymer migration.

    PubMed

    Rezvantalab, Hossein; Zhu, Guorui; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-07-21

    We generalize our recent continuum theory for the stress-gradient-induced migration of polymers [Zhu et al., J. Rheol., 2016, 60, 327-343] by incorporating the effect of solid boundaries on concentration variations. For a model flow in a channel with periodic slip wall velocity, which can in principle be produced by an electric field in the presence of a sinusoidal wall charge, we obtain theoretical results for the steady-state distribution of dilute solutions of polymer dumbbells using a systematic perturbation analysis in Weissenberg number Wi. We find that the presence of a thin wall depletion zone changes the lowest order solution from second to first in Wi and drastically affects the concentration field far from the depletion layer, due both to a coupling of the second derivative of the velocity field to the concentration gradient, and to convection of the polymer-depleted fluid in this layer into the bulk of the fluid. Additional effects induced by wall hydrodynamic interaction (HI) are assessed by incorporating polymer flux from the wall-HI migration theory of Ma and Graham into our continuum theory. We establish the range of validity of our theory by comparing the theoretical results with Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations: excellent agreement is achieved for relatively small molecules, while the theory breaks down when the Gradient number Gd is greater than 0.5, where Gd is the ratio of polymer coil size to the length scale over which the velocity gradient changes. The BD simulations are also extended to the case of long Hookean chains with numbers of springs per chain ranging from 1 to 32, where it is found that for fixed Gd and Wi, the results are nearly identical, showing that all important phenomena are captured by a simple dumbbell model, thus supporting the continuum theory which was derived for the case of dumbbells. In addition, the Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRD) method is employed to evaluate the role of HI on the migration pattern, producing

  6. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In three studies, we assessed individual differences in depletion sensitivity, and demonstrate that depletion sensitivity moderates ego-depletion effects. The Depletion Sensitivity Scale (DSS) was employed to assess depletion sensitivity. Study 1 employs the DSS to demonstrate that individual differences in sensitivity to ego-depletion exist. Study 2 shows moderate correlations of depletion sensitivity with related self-control concepts, indicating that these scales measure conceptually distinct constructs. Study 3 demonstrates that depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect. Specifically, participants who are sensitive to depletion performed worse on a second self-control task, indicating a stronger ego-depletion effect, compared to participants less sensitive to depletion. PMID:25009523

  7. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  8. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion - Comparison with previous year depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15 percent during September 1988, compared to nearly 50 percent during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30-60 deg S. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  9. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion: Comparison with previous year depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Stolarski, R.S.; Krueger, A.J. )

    1989-05-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15% during September 1988 compared to nearly 50% during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30{degree}-60{degree}S. The standard deviation also correlates with the QBO cycling of the tropical winds. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  10. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  11. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  12. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.; Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  13. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  14. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated.

  15. Concentrations of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents trends in global concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) from 1992 to 2009. This trend is an important environmental issue, because ODSs can deplete the atmosphere's ability to shield the Earth from harmful ultraviolet rays.

  16. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  17. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  18. A parallel algorithm for implicit depletant simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Jens; Karas, Andrew S.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-11-01

    We present an algorithm to simulate the many-body depletion interaction between anisotropic colloids in an implicit way, integrating out the degrees of freedom of the depletants, which we treat as an ideal gas. Because the depletant particles are statistically independent and the depletion interaction is short-ranged, depletants are randomly inserted in parallel into the excluded volume surrounding a single translated and/or rotated colloid. A configurational bias scheme is used to enhance the acceptance rate. The method is validated and benchmarked both on multi-core processors and graphics processing units for the case of hard spheres, hemispheres, and discoids. With depletants, we report novel cluster phases in which hemispheres first assemble into spheres, which then form ordered hcp/fcc lattices. The method is significantly faster than any method without cluster moves and that tracks depletants explicitly, for systems of colloid packing fraction ϕc < 0.50, and additionally enables simulation of the fluid-solid transition.

  19. Possible ozone depletions following nuclear explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Turco, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of depletion of the ozone layer ensuing after delivery of strategic nuclear warheads (5000 and 10,000 Mton) due to production of nitrogen oxides is theoretically assessed. Strong depletions are calculated for 16-km and 26-km altitudes, peaking 1-2 months after detonation and lasting for three years, while a significant depletion at 36 km would peak after one year. Assuming the explosions occur between 30 and 70 deg N, these effects should be much more pronounced in this region than over the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. It is concluded that Hampson's concern on this matter (1974) is well-founded.-

  20. Depleted uranium disposition study -- Supplement, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.W.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Weapons and Materials Planning has requested a supplemental study to update the recent Depleted Uranium Disposition report. This supplemental study addresses new disposition alternatives and changes in status.

  1. A definition of depletion of fish stocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John

    1949-01-01

    Attention was focused on the need of a common and better understanding of the term depletion as applied to the fisheries in order to eliminate if possible the existing inexactness of thought on the subject. Depletion has been confused at various times with at least ten different ideas associated with it but which, as has has heen pointed out, are not synonymous at all. In defining depletion we must recognize that the term represents a condition and must not he confounded with the cause (overfishing) that leads to this condition or with the symptoms that identify it. Depletion was defined as a reduction, through overfishing, in the level of abundance of the exploitable segment of a stock that prevents the realization of the maximum productive capacity.

  2. Silicon Depletion in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, U.; Parvathi, V. S.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.; Murthy, J.; Sofia, U. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report interstellar silicon (Si) depletion and dust-phase column densities of Si along 131 Galactic sight lines using archival observations. The data were corrected for differences in the assumed oscillator strength. This is a much larger sample than previous studies but confirms the majority of results, which state that the depletion of Si is correlated with the average density of hydrogen along the line of sight (< n({{H}})> ) as well as the fraction of hydrogen in molecular form (f(H2)). We also find that the linear part of the extinction curve is independent of Si depletion. Si depletion is correlated with the bump strength (c3/RV) and the FUV curvature (c4/RV) suggesting that silicon plays a significant role in both the 2175 Å bump and the FUV rise.

  3. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  4. Exhaustible Resource Depletion: A Modified Graphical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisato, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Presents a graphical analysis of the exhaustible resource depletion problem. Applies Hotelling's "r percent rule" as a new approach that operates in an "N"-period context. Includes two figures illustrating the approach. (CFR)

  5. Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

  6. A new definition of maternal depletion syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Winkvist, A; Rasmussen, K M; Habicht, J P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although the term "maternal depletion syndrome" has been commonly used to explain poor maternal and infant health, whether such a syndrome actually exists remains unclear. This uncertainty may be due to the lack of a clear definition of the syndrome and the absence of theoretical frameworks that account for the many factors related to reproductive nutrition. METHODS. We propose a new definition of maternal depletion syndrome within a framework that accounts for potential confounding factors. RESULTS. Our conceptual framework distinguishes between childbearing pattern and inadequate diet as causes of poor maternal health; hence, our definition of maternal depletion syndrome has both biological and practical meaning. The new definition is based on overall change in maternal nutritional status over one reproductive cycle in relation to possible depletion and repletion phases and in relation to initial nutritional status. CONCLUSIONS. The empirical application of this approach should permit the testing of the existence of maternal depletion syndrome in the developing world, and the distinction between populations where family planning will alleviate maternal depletion and those in which an improved diet is also necessary. PMID:1566948

  7. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; Fennis, Bob M; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose weight on snack purchase behavior were explored. Participants included in the study were instructed to report every snack they bought over the course of one week. The dependent variables were the number of healthy and unhealthy snacks purchased. The results of the present study demonstrate that depletion sensitivity predicts the amount of unhealthy (but not healthy) snacks bought. The more sensitive people are to depletion, the more unhealthy snacks they buy. Moreover, there was some tentative evidence that this relation is more pronounced for people with a weak as opposed to a strong goal to lose weight, suggesting that a strong goal to lose weight may function as a motivational buffer against self-control failures. All in all, these findings provide evidence for the external validity of depletion sensitivity and the relevance of this construct in the domain of eating behavior. PMID:26321417

  8. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  9. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  10. The modality effect of ego depletion: Auditory task modality reduces ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    An initial act of self-control that impairs subsequent acts of self-control is called ego depletion. The ego depletion phenomenon has been observed consistently. The modality effect refers to the effect of the presentation modality on the processing of stimuli. The modality effect was also robustly found in a large body of research. However, no study to date has examined the modality effects of ego depletion. This issue was addressed in the current study. In Experiment 1, after all participants completed a handgrip task, one group's participants completed a visual attention regulation task and the other group's participants completed an auditory attention regulation task, and then all participants again completed a handgrip task. The ego depletion phenomenon was observed in both the visual and the auditory attention regulation task. Moreover, participants who completed the visual task performed worse on the handgrip task than participants who completed the auditory task, which indicated that there was high ego depletion in the visual task condition. In Experiment 2, participants completed an initial task that either did or did not deplete self-control resources, and then they completed a second visual or auditory attention control task. The results indicated that depleted participants performed better on the auditory attention control task than the visual attention control task. These findings suggest that altering task modality may reduce ego depletion. PMID:27241617

  11. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  12. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-11-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of Arkansas have developed a conceptual understanding of energy and of electromagnetism, including the electromagnetic spectrum, I devote a lecture (and a textbook section) to ozone depletion and another lecture (and section) to global warming. Humankind came together in 1986 and quickly solved, to the extent that humans can solve it, ozone depletion. We could do the same with global warming, but we haven't and as yet there's no sign that we will. The parallel between the ozone and global warming cases, and the difference in outcomes, are striking and instructive.

  13. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  14. “When the going gets tough, who keeps going?” Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In three studies, we assessed individual differences in depletion sensitivity, and demonstrate that depletion sensitivity moderates ego-depletion effects. The Depletion Sensitivity Scale (DSS) was employed to assess depletion sensitivity. Study 1 employs the DSS to demonstrate that individual differences in sensitivity to ego-depletion exist. Study 2 shows moderate correlations of depletion sensitivity with related self-control concepts, indicating that these scales measure conceptually distinct constructs. Study 3 demonstrates that depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect. Specifically, participants who are sensitive to depletion performed worse on a second self-control task, indicating a stronger ego-depletion effect, compared to participants less sensitive to depletion. PMID:25009523

  15. NON-OZONE DEPLETING MOBILE HEAT PUMP

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the growing environmental and logistical burden posed by continued use of Class I ozone depleting chemicals (ODCs), this co-funded Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and United States Air Force (USAF) Science and Technology project sought t...

  16. Platelet depletion and severity of streptococcal endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Lawrence; Miller, Todd; Herndon, Betty; Diez, Ireneo; Dew, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of thrombocytopenia in streptococcal endocarditis using an animal model. DESIGN: A model of human septic endocarditis was established in rats (polyethylene catheters across the aortic valve and administration of Streptococcus sanguis, 5×107 colony forming units [cfu] intravenous). Thrombocytopenia at four levels was produced by antiplatelet serum. Secondary methods of producing thrombocytopenia were also evaluated. At sacrifice (96 h after platelet depletion and 72 h after infection), vegetations were removed, weighed, diluted, plated and counted. Potential mechanisms of the dose-response relationship between vegetation density and platelet count were evaluated. SETTING: Controlled research laboratory experiments. POPULATION STUDIED: Animal models of streptococcal endocarditis. MAIN RESULTS: The bacterial density of the aortic valve vegetations significantly increased as the platelet count decreased (P=0.0007). In severely thrombocytopenic animals (two-dose antiplatelet serum), data suggest increased vegetation embolism. Platelet depletion, which was minimal with chemical methods, was produced most effectively by antithrombocyte serum. Platelet surfaces in endocarditis were found to express elevated CD62p proteins (72.7% endocarditis, 34.7% control). Platelet protein fractions were evaluated in vitro by both streptocidal (P=0.19) and phagocytosis-stimulating assays. Platelet presence in mature aortic valve vegetations averaged only about 2%. CONCLUSIONS: In platelet depletion experiments using a rat model, a dose-response relationship of peripheral circulating platelet depletion to aortic valve vegetation density was found. The mechanism relating thrombocytopenia to endocarditis severity remains unresolved. PMID:22346555

  17. Direct Visualization of an Impurity Depletion Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan Ma; Thomas, Bill R.

    2000-01-01

    When a crystal incorporates more impurity per unit of its volume than the impurity concentration in solution, the solution in vicinity of the growing crystal is depleted with respect to the impurity I,2. With a stagnant solution, e. g. in microgravity or gels, an impurity depletion zone expands as the crystal grows and results in greater purity in most of the outer portion of the crystal than in the core. Crystallization in gel provides an opportunity to mimic microgravity conditions and visualize the impurity depletion zone. Colorless, transparent apoferritin (M congruent to 450 KDa) crystals were grown in the presence of red holoferritin dimer as a microheterogeneous impurity (M congruent to 900 KDa) within agarose gel by counterdiffusion with Cd(2+) precipitant. Preferential trapping of dimers, (distribution coefficient K = 4 (exp 1,2)) results in weaker red color around the crystals grown in the left tube in the figure as compared to the control middle tube without crystals. The left and the middle tubes contain colored ferritin dimers, the right tube contains colored trimers. The meniscus in the left tube separate gel (below) and liquid solution containing Cd(2+) (above). Similar solutions, though without precipitants, were present on top of the middle and right tube allowing diffusion of dimers and trimers. The area of weaker color intensity around crystals directly demonstrates overlapped impurity depletion zones.

  18. ATMOSPHERIC BENZENE DEPLETION BY SOIL MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous benzene was rapidly depleted in exposure chambers containing viable soils and plants. When separate components of the system were analyzed, no benzene was detected in soils, plants, or water. Soil microorganisms were shown to be responsible for metabolizing benzene, yield...

  19. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  20. Dissolution Treatment of Depleted Uranium Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gates-Anderson, D D; Laue, C A; Fitch, T E

    2004-02-09

    Researchers at LLNL have developed a 3-stage process that converts pyrophoric depleted uranium metal turnings to a solidified final product that can be transported to and buried at a permitted land disposal site. The three process stages are: (1) pretreatment; (2) dissolution; and (3) solidification. Each stage was developed following extensive experimentation. This report presents the results of their experimental studies.

  1. Demonstration of jackhammer incorporating depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, L E; Hoard, R W; Carter, D L; Saculla, M D; Wilson, G V

    2000-04-01

    The United States Government currently has an abundance of depleted uranium (DU). This surplus of about 1 billion pounds is the result of an enrichment process using gaseous diffusion to produce enriched and depleted uranium. The enriched uranium has been used primarily for either nuclear weapons for the military or nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry. Most of the depleted uranium remains at the enrichment process plants in the form of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}). The Department of Energy (DOE) recently began a study to identify possible commercial applications for the surplus material. One of these potential applications is to use the DU in high-density strikers/hammers in pneumatically driven tools, such as jack hammers and piledrivers to improve their impulse performance. The use of DU could potentially increase tunneling velocity and excavation into target materials with improved efficiency. This report describes the efforts undertaken to analyze the particulars of using DU in two specific striking applications: the jackhammer and chipper tool.

  2. How Depleted is the MORB mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Hart, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the degree of mantle depletion of highly incompatible elements is critically important for assessing Earth's internal heat production and Urey number. Current views of the degree of MORB source depletion are dominated by Salters and Stracke (2004), and Workman and Hart (2005). The first is based on an assessment of average MORB compositions, whereas the second considers trace element data of oceanic peridotites. Both require an independent determination of one absolute concentration, Lu (Salters & Stracke), or Nd (Workman & Hart). Both use parent-daughter ratios Lu/Hf, Sm/Nd, and Rb/Sr calculated from MORB isotopes combined with continental-crust extraction models, as well as "canonical" trace element ratios, to boot-strap the full range of trace element abundances. We show that the single most important factor in determining the ultimate degree of incompatible element depletion in the MORB source lies in the assumptions about the timing of continent extraction, exemplified by continuous extraction versus simple two-stage models. Continued crust extraction generates additional, recent mantle depletion, without affecting the isotopic composition of the residual mantle significantly. Previous emphasis on chemical compositions of MORB and/or peridotites has tended to obscure this. We will explore the effect of different continent extraction models on the degree of U, Th, and K depletion in the MORB source. Given the uncertainties of the two most popular models, the uncertainties of U and Th in DMM are at least ±50%, and this impacts the constraints on the terrestrial Urey ratio. Salters, F.J.M. and Stracke, A., 2004, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 5, Q05004. Workman, R.K. and Hart, S.R., 2005, EPSL 231, 53-72.

  3. A worldwide view of groundwater depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, L. P.; Wada, Y.; van Kempen, C.; Reckman, J. W.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decades, global water demand has increased two-fold due to increasing population, expanding irrigated area and economic development. Globally such demand can be met by surface water availability (i.e., water in rivers, lakes and reservoirs) but regional variations are large and the absence of sufficient rainfall and run-off increasingly encourages the use of groundwater resources, particularly in the (semi-)arid regions of the world. Excessive abstraction for irrigation frequently leads to overexploitation, i.e. if groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge over extensive areas and prolonged times, persistent groundwater depletion may occur. Observations and various regional studies have revealed that groundwater depletion is a substantial issue in regions such as Northwest India, Northeast Pakistan, Central USA, Northeast China and Iran. Here we provide a global overview of groundwater depletion from the year 1960 to 2000 at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree by assessing groundwater recharge with the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and subtracting estimates of groundwater abstraction obtained from IGRAC-GGIS database. PCR-GLOBWB was forced by the CRU climate dataset downscaled to daily time steps using ERA40 re-analysis data. PCR-GLOBWB simulates daily global groundwater recharge (0.5 degree) while considering sub-grid variability of each grid cell (e.g., short and tall vegetation, different soil types, fraction of saturated soil). Country statistics of groundwater abstraction were downscaled to 0.5 degree by using water demand (i.e., agriculture, industry and domestic) as a proxy. To limit problems related to increased capture of discharge and increased recharge due to groundwater pumping, we restricted our analysis to sub-humid to arid areas. The uncertainty in the resulting estimates was assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis of 100 realizations of groundwater recharge and 100 realizations of groundwater abstraction

  4. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  5. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-10-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated. Air ingress did not cause any temperature surge when the uranium was fully hydrided, but created a temperature peak of 200 {degree}C when the uranium was dehydrided. Accumulation of non-reactive gases such as argon and moisture in the air blocked further air ingress. Only a flow-through type of air ingress could damage the vessel. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  7. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  8. Copenhagen delegates advance phaseout of ozone depleters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-12-09

    As expected, delegates at the United Nations Ozone Layer Conference in Copenhagen sped up ozone depleter phaseouts from the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1990 London amendments. The changes bring the worldwide production phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone depleters in developed countries in line with U.S. and European plans announced earlier this year. Adjustments to the protocol, which are binding on the signatories, change the phaseout for CFC, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform production and consumption to January 1, 1996 from 2000. The 75% reduction of 1986 levels from CFCs by January 1, 1994 is a compromise between European pressure for an 85% cut and the US goal of 70%. Halon production is to end January 1, 1994, as anticipated. Developing countries continue to have a 10-year grace period. Friends of the Earth ozone campaign director Liz Cook counters that the phaseout dates were scheduled with concern for the chemical industry, not for the ozone layer.

  9. Altitude latitude mapping of plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Liu, J.; Sinha, H.; Banerje, S.

    2007-12-01

    Plasma depletions, if generated at the geomagnetic equator, are expected to appear in the all sky images as dark bands extending pole ward. The all sky observations conducted from Kavalur (12.5¢ªN, 78.8¢ªE; 4.6¢ªN, geomagnetic), INDIA, but showed dark patches in 630.0 nm entering the imager field of view (FOV) from the northern edge in the post-sunset period. These patches gradually extended towards equator and became fully extended dark bands in the North-South direction by midnight. The series of such images appeared to be the airglow signatures of irregularities that are probably generated at off-equatorial latitudes and mapped to the lower or equatorial latitudes. Similar features were observed in several nights. This appearance of depletions as dark patches from the northern edge of the FOV is explained in this work

  10. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, T.R.

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  11. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  12. Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, G.

    1984-06-01

    Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

    2014-12-02

    A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

  14. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations. PMID:16857031

  15. Record Arctic ozone depletion could occur again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    In the winter of 2010-2011, ozone levels above the Arctic declined to record lows, creating the first Arctic ozone hole, similar to the well-known Antarctic ozone hole. Scientists believe the ozone depletion was due partly to unusually cold temperatures in the stratosphere above the Arctic, as colder stratospheric temperatures make ozone-destroying chemicals such as chlorine more active. As global climate change continues, the Arctic stratosphere is expected to get colder, but levels of ozone-destroying chemicals should decline, as emissions of these chemicals were banned by the Montreal Protocol. To try to learn more about Arctic ozone dynamics and determine whether the Arctic ozone hole is likely to recur, Sinnhuber et al. looked at satellite observations of temperature, ozone, water vapor, and chemicals that affect ozone in the Arctic atmosphere. They also used a model to determine how sensitive ozone levels are to stratospheric temperatures and chemistry. They found that their model accurately reproduced measured conditions. Their model suggests that stratospheric temperatures 1°C lower than in the 2010-2011 winter would result in locally nearly complete ozone depletion in the Arctic lower stratosphere with current levels of chemicals. A 10% reduction in ozone-depleting chemicals would be offset by a 1°C decrease in stratospheric temperatures.

  16. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  17. Antarctic springtime depletion of atmospheric mercury.

    PubMed

    Ebinghaus, Ralf; Kock, Hans H; Temme, Christian; Einax, Jürgen W; Lowe, Astrid G; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P; Schroeder, William H

    2002-03-15

    Unlike other heavy metals that are inherently associated with atmospheric aerosols, mercury in ambient air exists predominantly in the gaseous elemental form. Because of its prolonged atmospheric residence time, elemental mercury vapor is distributed on a global scale. Recently, Canadian researchers have discovered that total gaseous mercury levels in the lower tropospheric boundary layer in the Canadian Arctic are often significantly depleted during the months after polar sunrise. A possible explanation may involve oxidation of elemental mercury, followed by adsorption and deposition of the oxidized form, leading to an increased input of atmospheric mercury into the Arctic ecosystem. Here we present the first continuous high-time-resolution measurements of total gaseous mercury in the Antarctic covering a 12-month period between January 2000 and January 2001 at the German Antarctic research station Neumayer (70 degrees 39' S, 8 degrees 15' W). We report that mercury depletion events also occur in the Antarctic after polar sunrise and compare our measurements with a data setfrom Alert, Nunavut, Canada. We also present indications that BrO radicals and ozone play a key role in the boundary-layer chemistry during springtime mercury depletion events in the Antarctic troposphere. PMID:11944675

  18. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...,” and “minerals,” see paragraph (d) of § 1.611-1. (b) Denial of percentage depletion in case of oil and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  19. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...,” and “minerals,” see paragraph (d) of § 1.611-1. (b) Denial of percentage depletion in case of oil and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  20. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...,” and “minerals,” see paragraph (d) of § 1.611-1. (b) Denial of percentage depletion in case of oil and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  1. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  2. 26 CFR 1.642(e)-1 - Depreciation and depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation and depletion. 1.642(e)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(e)-1 Depreciation and depletion. An estate or trust is allowed the deductions for depreciation and depletion, but only to the extent...

  3. [Mitochondrial disease and mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes].

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chang-Huang

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondria is an intracellular double membrane-bound structure and it can provide energy for intracellular metabolism. The metabolism includes Krebs cycle, beta-oxidation and lipid synthesis. The density of mitochondria is different in various tissues dependent upon the demands of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial diseases can occur by defects either in mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA. Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoding for 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 mRNAs that are translated in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial genetic diseases are most resulted from defects in the mtDNA which may be point mutations, deletions, or mitochondrial DNA depletion. These patterns of inheritance in mitochondrial diseases include sporadic, maternally inherited, or of Mendelian inheritance. Mitochondrial DNA depletion is caused by defects in the nuclear genes that are responsible for maintenance of integrity of mtDNA or deoxyribonucelotide pools and mtDNA biogenesis. The mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS) includes the following categories: progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), predominant myopathy, mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), sensory-ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) and hepato-encephalopathy. The most common tissues or organs involved in MDS and related disorders include the brain, liver and muscles. These involved genes are divided into two groups including 1) DNA polymerase gamma (POLG, POLG2) and Twinkle genes whose products function directly at the mtDNA replication fork, and 2) adenine nucleotide translocator 1, thymidine phosphorylase, thymidine kinase 2, deoxyguanosine kinase, ADP-forming succinyl-CoA synthetase ligase, MPV17 whose products supply the mitochondria with deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pools needed for mtDNA replication, and possible mutation in the RRM2B gene. The development has provided new information about the importance of the biosynthetic pathway of the nucleotides for mtDNA replication

  4. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zagula, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

  5. Modelling CO depletion in starless cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, Jonathan M. C.

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the observational detection of molecular depletion in star-forming dark clouds. In many cases the data is of very high quality and what was once considered a rather hypothetical process is now almost universally accepted as a (the) major cause of the presence of emission 'holes' in molecular maps of dense cores. However, the interpretation of the data can be severely undermined by uncertainties in the physics and chemistry. This is particularly true in the case of general molecular studies of active star-forming regions. For these objects there exist strong degeneracies between various chemical effects (gas-phase time-dependencies, desorption processes and efficiencies, ionization rates etc.) and poorly constrained physics (most particularly in the assumed kinematics and evolutionary history). Whilst these problems result in unacceptable ambiguities in the case of evolved sources, we can make significant progress for young, near-static cores and using molecular species with simple chemistries. A considerable set of constraints on the free parameters is now provided by the extensive sub-millimetre continuum and infra-red absorption studies of starless cores. These observations give us good descriptions of the temperature and density profiles in these sources. Moreover CO is to a large extent chemically inert, so that any decline of abundance at high densities can (primarily) be interpreted as being a consequence of freeze-out. Thus there are only two major free parameters:- the net depletion/desorption rate and the chemical age of the source. In this study CO abundance profiles are calculated as a function of time for cores whose temperature and density profiles have already been determined. The results are corrected for excitation effects and converted to synthetic maps, assuming typical single-dish beam parameters and source characteristics. A strong correlation with existing depletion maps is found and strong

  6. Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Aballay, A; Sarrouf, M N; Colombo, M I; Stahl, P D; Mayorga, L S

    1995-01-01

    Fusion among endosomes is an important step for transport and sorting of internalized macromolecules. Working in a cell-free system, we previously reported that endosome fusion requires cytosol and ATP, and is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Fusion is regulated by monomeric and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. We now report that fusion can proceed at very low Ca2+ concentrations, i.e. < 30 nM. Moreover, fusion is not affected when intravesicular Ca2+ is depleted by preincubation of vesicles with calcium ionophores (5 microM ionomycin or A23187) in the presence of calcium chelators (5 mM EGTA or 60 mM EDTA). The results indicate that fusion can proceed at extremely low concentrations of intravesicular and extravesicular Ca2+. However, BAPTA [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid], a relatively specific Ca2+ chelator, inhibits fusion. BAPTA binds other metals besides Ca2+. We present evidence that BAPTA inhibition is due not to Ca2+ chelation but to Zn2+ depletion. TPEN [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine], another metal-ion chelator with low affinity for Ca2+, also inhibited fusion. TPEN- and BAPTA-inhibited fusions were restored by addition of Zn2+. Zn(2+)-dependent fusion presents the same characteristics as control fusion. In intact cells, TPEN inhibited transport along the endocytic pathway. The results indicate that Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion, suggesting that this ion is necessary for the function of one or more factors involved in the fusion process. Images Figure 1 PMID:8554539

  7. SVARTSENGI FIELD PRODUCTION DATA AND DEPLETION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Thorhallsson, O.S.

    1985-01-22

    There have been two major high-temperature geothermal field developments in Iceland in the last decade; Krafla in the north-east, and Svartsengi in the south-west. These and other geothermal developments have recently been reported by Palmason et al. The Krafla field will not be discussed here, but details about the field are available in Stefansson and the power plant in Eliasson et al. Several reservoir engineering studies of the Krafla field have been published. The Svartsengi field is one of several fields on the Reykjanes Peninsula in south-west Iceland. About 15 km west of Svartsengi, on the tip of the Peninsula, the Reykjanes field is now under development, primarily for seawater chemicals production. The recently drilled Eldvorp field is located in line between these two fields, about 5 km west of Svartsengi. There are also several fields to the east of Svartsengi, at 15-20 km distance. The Svartsengi, Eldvorp, and Reykjanes fields exist in the same tectonic-volcanic environment, and are surrounded by similar geohydrological conditions, as discussed by Georgsson; see also Gudmundsson et al. and Franzson. Optimum development of these and other fields on the Reykjanes Peninsula, requires an understanding of their depletion behavior with time; that is, how the reservoir pressure falls with production. While recognizing that no two geothermal fields are alike, we also realize that an understanding of the depletion behavior of Svartsengi, for example, may prove useful in the development of other similar and nearby fields. The main purpose of this paper is to report our depletion analysis of the Svartsengi field using lumped-parameter and water influx modeling: we also report the field's production history.

  8. Simulation of polar ozone depletion: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Susan; Kinnison, Doug; Bandoro, Justin; Garcia, Rolando

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate polar ozone depletion chemistry using the specified dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model for the year 2011. We find that total ozone depletion in both hemispheres is dependent on cold temperatures (below 192 K) and associated heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric cloud particles. Reactions limited to warmer temperatures above 192 K, or on binary liquid aerosols, yield little modeled polar ozone depletion in either hemisphere. An imposed factor of three enhancement in stratospheric sulfate increases ozone loss by up to 20 Dobson unit (DU) in the Antarctic and 15 DU in the Arctic in this model. Such enhanced sulfate loads are similar to those observed following recent relatively small volcanic eruptions since 2005 and imply impacts on the search for polar ozone recovery. Ozone losses are strongly sensitive to temperature, with a test case cooler by 2 K producing as much as 30 DU additional ozone loss in the Antarctic and 40 DU in the Arctic. A new finding of this paper is the use of the temporal behavior and variability of ClONO2 and HCl as indicators of the efficacy of heterogeneous chemistry. Transport of ClONO2 from the southern subpolar regions near 55-65°S to higher latitudes near 65-75°S provides a flux of NOx from more sunlit latitudes to the edge of the vortex and is important for ozone loss in this model. Comparisons between modeled and observed total column and profile ozone perturbations, ClONO2 abundances, and the rate of change of HCl bolster confidence in these conclusions.

  9. Rhenium Disulfide Depletion-Load Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, Connor; Corbet, Chris; Rai, Amritesh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-03-01

    Many semiconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) materials have been effectively used to create Field-Effect Transistor (FET) devices but have yet to be used in logic designs. We constructed a depletion-load voltage inverter using ultrathin layers of Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2) as the semiconducting channel. This ReS2 inverter was fabricated on a single micromechanically-exfoliated flake of ReS2. Electron beam lithography and physical vapor deposition were used to construct Cr/Au electrical contacts, an Alumina top-gate dielectric, and metal top-gate electrodes. By using both low (Aluminum) and high (Palladium) work-function metals as two separate top-gates on a single ReS2 flake, we create a dual-gated depletion mode (D-mode) and enhancement mode (E-mode) FETs in series. Both FETs displayed current saturation in the output characteristics as a result of the FET ``pinch-off'' mechanism and On/Off current ratios of 105. Field-effect mobilities of 23 and 17 cm2V-1s-1 and subthreshold swings of 97 and 551 mV/decade were calculated for the E-mode and D-mode FETs, respectively. With a supply voltage of 1V, at low/negative input voltages the inverter output was at a high logic state of 900 mV. Conversely with high/positive input voltages, the inverter output was at a low logic state of 500 mV. The inversion of the input signal demonstrates the potential for using ReS2 in future integrated circuit designs and the versatility of depletion-load logic devices for TMD research. NRI SWAN Center and ARL STTR Program.

  10. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  11. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  12. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  13. Ozone depletion: implications for the veterinarian.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, K E

    1978-09-15

    Man has inadvertently modified the stratosphere. There is a good possibility that the ozone layer is being depleted by the use of jet aircraft (SST), chlorofluoromethane propellants, and nitrogen fertilizers. Under unpolluted conditions, the production of ozone equals its destruction. By man's intervention, however, the destruction may exceed the production. The potential outcome is increased intensity of solar ultraviolet (280-400 nm) radiation and penetration to the earth's surface of previously absorbed wavelengths below about 280 nm. The increased ultraviolet radiation would increase the likelihood of skin cancer in man and ocular squamous cell carcinoma in cattle. The climate also might be modified, possibly in an undesirable way. PMID:568617

  14. Correlation between cosmic rays and ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q-B

    2009-03-20

    This Letter reports reliable satellite data in the period of 1980-2007 covering two full 11-yr cosmic ray (CR) cycles, clearly showing the correlation between CRs and ozone depletion, especially the polar ozone loss (hole) over Antarctica. The results provide strong evidence of the physical mechanism that the CR-driven electron-induced reaction of halogenated molecules plays the dominant role in causing the ozone hole. Moreover, this mechanism predicts one of the severest ozone losses in 2008-2009 and probably another large hole around 2019-2020, according to the 11-yr CR cycle. PMID:19392251

  15. Mesospheric ionization and O2 1Delta(g) depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, K. A.; Solomon, S.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of O2 1Delta(g) emission during solar proton events reveal large depletions below 80 and near 90 km. The lower-altitude depletions are believed to be due to odd hydrogen production and associated depletion of ozone, but the mechanism producing the depletion near 90 km has not yet been established. In this paper, it is proposed that an exothermic charge exchange reaction between O2(+) and O2 1Delta(g) is likely to be responsible for these high-altitude depletions. In particular, it is shown that the vertical structure of the observed change in airglow emission is consistent with this mechanism.

  16. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W. |; Haydon, P.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  17. A critical comparison of ionospheric depletion chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A. )

    1987-05-01

    Six chemicals, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}, CF{sub 3}BR, and Ni(CO){sub 4}, are considered as ionospheric modification agents. Each of these species reacts in the F region to produce localized plasma depletions. The first three interact with O{sup +} and yield polyatomic ions which dissociatively recombine with electrons to give neutrals. The last three dissociatively attach electrons to produce heavy negative ions which become mutually neutralized by reactions with O{sup +}. The effectiveness of these chemicals depends on the amount which goes into the vapor state upon release. Thermodynamic calculations show that H{sub 2}O has the lowest vapor yield of about 20% from a heated, pressurized tank. Over 60% of the other substances should be vented in gaseous form. Based on estimates of plasma density reduction and airglow stimulation, nickel carbonyl is the most efficient of the six species for modifying the nighttime ionosphere. During the daytime, CF{sub 3}BR and SF{sub 6} provide the largest depletions.

  18. Convective Polymer Depletion on Pair Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tai-Hsi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tuinier, Remco

    2011-11-01

    Understanding transport, reaction, aggregation, and viscoelastic properties of colloid-polymer mixture is of great importance in food, biomedical, and pharmaceutical sciences. In non-adsorbing polymer solutions, colloidal particles tend to aggregate due to the depletion-induced osmotic or entropic force. Our early development for the relative mobility of pair particles assumed that polymer reorganization around the particles is much faster than particle's diffusive time, so that the coupling of diffusive and convective effects can be neglected. Here we present a nonequilibrium two-fluid (polymer and solvent) model to resolve the convective depletion effect. The theoretical framework is based on ground state approximation and accounts for the coupling of fluid flow and polymer transport to better describe pair particle interactions. The momentum and polymer transport, chemical potential, and local viscosity and osmotic pressure are simultaneously solved by numerical approximation. This investigation is essential for predicting the demixing kinetics in the pairwise regime for colloid-polymer mixtures. This work is supported by NSF CMMI 0952646.

  19. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  20. A critical comparison of ionospheric depletion chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1987-05-01

    Six chemicals, H2, H2O, CO2, SF6, CF3Br, and Ni(CO)4, are considered as ionospheric modification agents. Each of these species reacts in the F region to produce localized plasma depletions. The first three interact with O(+) and yield polyatomic ions which dissociatively recombine with electrons to give neutrals. The last three dissociatively attach electrons to produce heavy negative ions which become mutually neutralized by reactions with O(+). The effectiveness of these chemicals depends on the amount which goes into the vapor state upon release. Thermodynamic calculations show that H2O has the lowest vapor yield of about 20 percent from a heated, pressurized tank. Over 60 percent of the other substances should be vented in gaseous form. Based on estimates of plasma density reduction and airglow stimulation, nickel carbonyl is the most efficient of the six species for modifying the nighttime ionosphere. During the daytime, CF3Br and SF6 provide the largest depletions.

  1. Stratospheric ozone depletion and animal health.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S J

    1992-08-01

    There is an increasing concern over ozone depletion and its effects on the environment and human health. However, the increase in ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) that would result from significant losses of ozone is also potentially harmful to animals. Any increase in disease in domestic species would not only have serious animal welfare implications but may also be economically important. The diseases which are likely to increase if ozone depletion continues include the squamous cell carcinomas of the exposed, non-pigmented areas of cats, cattle, sheep and horses. Uberreiter's syndrome in dogs is also associated with exposure to UV-B and may be expected to increase, as may the severity of conditions such as infectious keratoconjunctivitis (New Forest eye) in cattle. Aquaculture systems in which fish often have little or no protection by shading may also be at risk. Cataracts and skin lesions have been associated with the exposure of farmed fish to ultraviolet radiation and have resulted in significant losses. PMID:1529513

  2. Local crippling of thin-walled graphite-epoxy stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonanni, David L.; Johnson, Eric R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Results from an experimental and analytical study of the local buckling, postbuckling, and crippling (failure) behavior of channel, zee, and I- and J-section stiffeners made of AS4/3502 graphite-epoxy unidirectional tape are presented. Thirty-six specimens were tested in axial compression. Experimental results indicate the existence of a number of damage initiation modes, all of which involve either delamination in some part of the specimen or local material strength failure in a corner of the specimen. The flange width-to-thickness ratio is found to influence the mode of damage initiation. The inner corner radius strongly affects the crippling stress for the I- and J-section specimens, but was not found to have a significant effect on the crippling stress of channels and zees. Geometrically nonlinear analyses of five specimens were performed with the STAGS general purpose computer code. Correlation between analytical and experimental results is excellent through buckling, but agreement degrades in postbuckling. The discrepancies in postbuckling are attributed to neglect of transverse shearing deformations in the analysis and development of damage in the specimens. Hashin's compressive fiber mode failure criterion correlates reasonably well with the first major damage event in a first ply failure analysis.

  3. Thermal postbuckling of thin-walled composite stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    A study is made of the thermal postbuckling response of composite stiffeners subjected to prescribed edge displacement and a temperature rise. The flanges and web of the stiffeners are modeled by using two-dimensional plate finite elements. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. A reduction method is used in conjunction with mixed finite element models for determining the postbuckling response of the stiffeners. Sensitivity derivatives are evaluated and used to study the effects of variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the stiffeners on their postbuckling response characteristics. Numerical studies are presented for anisotropic stiffeners with Zee and channel sections.

  4. Production of Thin Walled Mo Tubing using FBCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Usov, Igor Olegovich

    2015-06-02

    The goal of this report is to demonstrate our progress towards producing free standing Mo tubing with length up to 12” and wall thickness of 250 µm. Fabrication conditions corresponding to growth of fine grain and high purity Mo material were chosen based on previous work. We focused our effort on execution of prolonged deposition processes and optimization of the FBCVD set up. Our results demonstrated that 12” long Mo tubing can be fabricated by our process. At this point the 12” tube fractured in the middle and resulted in two pieces. Further improvement in one of the fabrication steps will eliminate this drawback. We were not able to produce a tube with 250 µm wall thickness so far. The deposition rate was intentionally kept low (5-6 µm/hr) to form material with fine grain microstructure. Therefore a ~50 hour long deposition run is required to achieve such a wall thickness value, which is quite challenging for the current manually operated FBCVD apparatus. Automation of the set-up is now underway to overcome this problem.

  5. Formation of thin walled ceramic solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Claar, Terry D.; Busch, Donald E.; Picciolo, John J.

    1989-01-01

    To reduce thermal stress and improve bonding in a high temperature monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), intermediate layers are provided between the SOFC's electrodes and electrolyte which are of different compositions. The intermediate layers are comprised of a blend of some of the materials used in the electrode and electrolyte compositions. Particle size is controlled to reduce problems involving differential shrinkage rates of the various layers when the entire structure is fired at a single temperature, while pore formers are provided in the electrolyte layers to be removed during firing for the formation of desired pores in the electrode layers. Each layer includes a binder in the form of a thermosetting acrylic which during initial processing is cured to provide a self-supporting structure with the ceramic components in the green state. A self-supporting corrugated structure is thus formed prior to firing, which the organic components of the binder and plasticizer removed during firing to provide a high strength, high temperature resistant ceramic structure of low weight and density.

  6. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Thacker, Louis H.; Fine, H. Alan

    1993-01-01

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head 18 to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum Within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A packet production line model is also described.

  7. Laser Welding Of Contoured Thin-Wall Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Lyle B.; Oleksiak, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    Superalloy parts joined with less distortion. Carbon dioxide laser beam directed by optics in numerically controlled robot arm welds shell-type turbopump housings having complicated shapes. 5-kW laser, following single programmed three-dimensional pass, produces high-quality, full-penetration weld pass in age-hardenable nickel superalloy. Operator easily programs robot by using teaching pendant to track weld joint and keeps laser focused on workpiece while following contour of shell. Shells welded in rapid succession, with minimal change in setup for each.

  8. Leakproof Swaged Joints in Thin-Wall Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckenberg, F. H.; Crockett, L. K.; Snyder, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Tubular inserts reinforce joints, reducing incidence of leaks. In new swaging technique, tubular inserts placed inside ends of both tubes to be joined. Made from thicker-wall tubing with outside diameter that matches inside diameter of thin tubing swaged, inserts support tube ends at joint. They ensure more uniform contact between swage fitting and tubing. New swaging technique developed for Al/Ti/V-alloy hydraulic supply lines.

  9. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1995-04-18

    An instrument is disclosed for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head. 4 figs.

  10. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

    1993-10-05

    An instrument is described for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A packet production line model is also described. 3 figures.

  11. Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Thacker, Louis H.; Fine, H. Alan

    1995-01-01

    An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head.

  12. Disturbance amplification in boundary layers over thin wall films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sandeep; Page, Jacob; Zaki, Tamer A.

    2016-02-01

    In single-fluid boundary layers, streaks can amplify at sub-critical Reynolds numbers and initiate early transition to turbulence. Introducing a wall film of different viscosities can appreciably alter the stability of the base flow and, in particular, the transient growth of the perturbation streaks. The formalism of seminorms is used to identify optimal disturbances which maximize the kinetic energy in the two-fluid flow. An examination of optimal growth over a range of viscosity ratios of the film relative to the outer flow reveals three distinct regimes of amplification, each associated with a particular combination of the eigenfunctions. In order to elucidate the underlying amplification mechanisms, a model problem is formulated: An initial value problem is solved using an eigenfunction expansion and is used to compute the evolution of pairs of eigenfunctions. By appropriately selecting the pair, the initial value problem qualitatively reproduces the temporal evolution of the optimal disturbance, and provides an unambiguous explanation of the dynamics. Two regimes of transient growth are attributed to the evolution of the interface mode along with free-stream vortical modes; the third regime is due to the evolution of the interface and a discrete mode. The results demonstrate that a lower-viscosity film can effectively reduce the efficacy of the lift-up mechanism and, as a result, transient growth of disturbances. However, another mechanism of amplification of wall-normal vorticity arises due to the deformation of the two-fluid interface and becomes dominant below a critical viscosity ratio.

  13. Friction Stir Welded Thin Wall Cryogenic Tank Skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, David M.; Takeshita, Jennifer A.; Holguin, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A cryogenic propellant tank is the common element of trans-planetary transportation systems, in-space storage depots, lunar landers, in-space habitats/laboratories, ascent/descent, and launch vehicles. Lockheed Martin's (LM) cryogenic tank approach integrates Friction Stir Welding (FSW) with thin-gage aluminum monocoque structural design, common spin formed FSW domes and variable tank lengths to tailor the cryogenic tank from smaller stages, such as landers or ascent/descent stages, to very large on-orbit or In Space Resource Utilization (ISRU) storage systems. Thin gage corrosion resistant steel (CRES) construction combined with normal fusion welding as used on LM's Centaur has already been demonstrated to provide the highest cryogenic tank mass fraction (~.90) for large scale, cryogenic propellant storage. However, current fusion welding technology is limited by the alloys that are considered weldable and typically achieves only 50% of the parent material ultimate strength at the weld joint. Preliminary LM technology development indicates that in certain aluminum alloys, the FSW joint retains up to 100% of the parent material ultimate strength at LH2 temperatures. Combining FSW and aluminum monocoque tank design would create a large scale cryogenic tank with a mass fraction in excess of the current industry standard and therefore is ideal for affordable, reliable, high capacity propellant storage required for all facets of space exploration.

  14. Microfabrics in depleted mantle plaeotransform (New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Christian; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Von Der Handt, Anette

    2016-04-01

    The New Caledonia ophiolite contains several wrench zones that have been interpreted as paleotransforms. These transform-ridge systems developed at the transition between ridge development and intra-oceanic subduction that resulted in depleted mantle (about 18 % melt according to olivine Mg# - spinel Cr#). The most prominent is the Bogota Peninsula paleotransform, a 10 km wide shear zone in which strain localizes in the 2 km wide Ouassé mylonite zone. This strain gradient is associated with microstructure and microfabric evolution that informs the relationship between hydration and strain in mantle mylonite. Olivine recrystallized grain size varies from about 1 mm to about 0.2 mm toward the mylonite zone. The strain gradient is also demonstrated by increasing deformation of orthopyroxene (opx) grains that become elongate porphyroclasts in the mylonite zone. Orthopyroxene geothermometry reveals T ~ 1050-1000 C (Ca-opx) and 950-850 C (Cr-Al-opx) in the least deformed rocks. In the mylonite zone a wider range of T is recorded, with minima reaching 850 C (Ca-opx) and 750 C (Cr-Al-opx). Electron microprobe analysis also detects the presence of 20-200 micron interstitial, high-temperature amphibole (pargasite), with modal abundance increasing in the mylonite zone; this suggests that high-temperature pervasive fluid flow may have played a role in strain localization and mylonitization. Olivine crystallographic fabrics include A-type and E-type, the latter possibly reflecting hydration of shear zone tectonites. E-type fabrics are present in both mylonite and less deformed rocks, and appear to be more common in rocks with olivine grain size < 400 microns. A correlation between E-type fabrics and amphibole mode is being investigated. The shear zone protolith was depleted mantle in which the ridge-transform system was permeated by fluids. These fluids initially originated at the subduction interface, but during the transform evolution, ocean water likely permeated the shear

  15. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  16. Health effects of embedded depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    McClain, David E; Benson, Kimberly A; Dalton, Tom K; Ejnik, John; Emond, Christy A; Hodge, Shelly J; Kalinich, John F; Landauer, Michael R; Livengood, David R; Miller, Alexandra C; Pellmar, Terry C; Stewart, Michael D; Villa, Vilmar; Xu, Jiaquan

    2002-02-01

    The health effects of embedded fragments of depleted uranium (DU) are being investigated to determine whether current surgical fragment-removal policies are appropriate for this metal. The authors studied rodents implanted with DU pellets as well as cultured human cells exposed to DU compounds. Results indicate that uranium from implanted DU fragments distributes to tissues distant from implantation sites, including bone, kidney, muscle, and liver. Despite levels of uranium in kidney that would be nephrotoxic after acute exposure, no histological or functional kidney toxicity was observed with embedded DU, indicating that the kidney adapts when exposed chronically. Nonetheless, further studies of the long-term health impact are needed. DU is mutagenic and transforms human osteoblastic cells into a tumorigenic phenotype. It alters neurophysiological parameters in rat hippocampus, crosses the placental barrier, and enters fetal tissue. Preliminary data also indicate decreased rodent litter size when animals are bred 6 months or longer after DU implantation. PMID:11873491

  17. Vacancy Formation Enthalpy in Polycrystalline Depleted Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, K. R.; Lynn, K. G.; Weber, M. H.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy was performed as a function of temperature and beam energy on polycrystalline depleted uranium (DU) foil. Samples were run with varying heat profiles all starting at room temperature. While collecting Doppler-Broadening data, the temperature of the sample was cycled several times. The first heat cycle shows an increasing S-parameter near temperatures of 400K to 500K much lower than the first phase transition of 941K indicating increasing vacancies possibly due to oxygen diffusion from the bulk to the surface. Vacancy formation enthalpies were calculated fitting a model to the data to be 1.6± 0.16 eV. Results are compared to previous work [3,4].

  18. Policies on global warming and ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Green, B.

    1987-04-01

    The recent discovery of a dramatic seasonal drop in the amount of ozone over Antarctica has catalyzed concern for protection of stratospheric ozone, the layer of gas that shields the entire planet from excess ultraviolet radiation. Conservative scientific models predict about a 5% reduction in the amount of global ozone by the middle of the next century, with large local variations. The predicted global warming from increased emissions of greenhouse gases will also have differing effects on local climate and weather conditions and consequently on agriculture. Although numerous uncertainties are associated with both ozone depletion and a global warming, there is a consensus that world leaders need to address the problems. The US Congress is now beginning to take note of the task. In this article, one representative outlines some perceptions of the problems and the policy options available to Congress.

  19. Tylosin depletion from edible pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Prats, C; El Korchi, G; Francesch, R; Arboix, M; Pérez, B

    2002-12-01

    The depletion of tylosin from edible pig tissues was studied following 5 days of intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 10 mg/kg of tylosin to 16 crossbreed pigs. Animals were slaughtered at intervals after treatment and samples of muscle, kidney, liver, skin+fat, and injection site were collected and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seven days after the completion of treatment, the concentration of tylosin in kidney, skin+fat, and at the injection site was higher than the European Union maximal residue limit (MRL) of 100 microg/kg. Tylosin residues in all tissues were below the quantification limit (50 microg/kg) at 10 and 14 days post-treatment. PMID:12443694

  20. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  1. Using depletion to control colloidal crystal assemblies of hard cuboctahedra.

    PubMed

    Karas, Andrew S; Glaser, Jens; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2016-06-21

    Depletion interactions arise from entropic forces, and their ability to induce aggregation and even ordering of colloidal particles through self-assembly is well established, especially for spherical colloids. We vary the size and concentration of penetrable hard sphere depletants in a system of cuboctahedra, and we show how depletion changes the preferential facet alignment of the colloids and thereby selects different crystal structures. Moreover, we explain the cuboctahedra phase behavior using perturbative free energy calculations. We find that cuboctahedra can form a stable simple cubic phase, and, remarkably, that the stability of this phase can be rationalized only by considering the effects of both the colloid and depletant entropy. We corroborate our results by analyzing how the depletant concentration and size affect the emergent directional entropic forces and hence the effective particle shape. We propose the use of depletants as a means of easily changing the effective shape of self-assembling anisotropic colloids. PMID:27194463

  2. Elemental Depletions in the Magellanic Clouds and the Evolution of Depletions with Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan; Fox, Andrew; Friedman, Scott D.; Dwek, Eli; Galliano, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the composition of gas and dust in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) using UV absorption spectroscopy. We measure P ii and Fe ii along 84 spatially distributed sightlines toward the MCs using archival Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer observations. For 16 of those sightlines, we also measure Si ii, Cr ii, and Zn ii from new Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations. We analyze these spectra using a new spectral line analysis technique based on a semi-parametric Voigt profile model. We have combined these measurements with H i and H2 column densities and reference stellar abundances from the literature to derive gas-phase abundances, depletions, and gas-to-dust ratios (GDRs). Of our 84 P and 16 Zn measurements, 80 and 13, respectively, are depleted by more than 0.1 dex, suggesting that P and Zn abundances are not accurate metallicity indicators at and above the metallicity of the SMC. Si, Cr, and Fe are systematically less depleted in the SMC than in the Milky Way (MW) or LMC. The minimum Si depletion in the SMC is consistent with zero. We find GDR ranges of 190-565 in the LMC and 480-2100 in the SMC, which is broadly consistent with GDRs from the literature. These ranges represent actual location to location variation and are evidence of dust destruction and/or growth in the diffuse neutral phase of the interstellar medium. Where they overlap in metallicity, the gas-phase abundances of the MW, LMC, and SMC and damped Lyα systems evolve similarly with metallicity.

  3. Regret causes ego-depletion and finding benefits in the regrettable events alleviates ego-depletion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fang; Xu, Yan; Hong, Ying-Yi; Jiang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that experiencing regret would result in ego-depletion, while finding benefits (i.e., "silver linings") in the regret-eliciting events counteracted the ego-depletion effect. Using a modified gambling paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and a retrospective method (Experiments 3 and 5), five experiments were conducted to induce regret. Results revealed that experiencing regret undermined performance on subsequent tasks, including a paper-and-pencil calculation task (Experiment 1), a Stroop task (Experiment 2), and a mental arithmetic task (Experiment 3). Furthermore, finding benefits in the regret-eliciting events improved subsequent performance (Experiments 4 and 5), and this improvement was mediated by participants' perceived vitality (Experiment 4). This study extended the depletion model of self-regulation by considering emotions with self-conscious components (in our case, regret). Moreover, it provided a comprehensive understanding of how people felt and performed after experiencing regret and after finding benefits in the events that caused the regret. PMID:24940811

  4. Podocyte Depletion in Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su Q.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Kershaw, David; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    The proximate genetic cause of both Thin GBM and Alport Syndrome (AS) is abnormal α3, 4 and 5 collagen IV chains resulting in abnormal glomerular basement membrane (GBM) structure/function. We previously reported that podocyte detachment rate measured in urine is increased in AS, suggesting that podocyte depletion could play a role in causing progressive loss of kidney function. To test this hypothesis podometric parameters were measured in 26 kidney biopsies from 21 patients aged 2–17 years with a clinic-pathologic diagnosis including both classic Alport Syndrome with thin and thick GBM segments and lamellated lamina densa [n = 15] and Thin GBM cases [n = 6]. Protocol biopsies from deceased donor kidneys were used as age-matched controls. Podocyte depletion was present in AS biopsies prior to detectable histologic abnormalities. No abnormality was detected by light microscopy at <30% podocyte depletion, minor pathologic changes (mesangial expansion and adhesions to Bowman’s capsule) were present at 30–50% podocyte depletion, and FSGS was progressively present above 50% podocyte depletion. eGFR did not change measurably until >70% podocyte depletion. Low level proteinuria was an early event at about 25% podocyte depletion and increased in proportion to podocyte depletion. These quantitative data parallel those from model systems where podocyte depletion is the causative event. This result supports a hypothesis that in AS podocyte adherence to the GBM is defective resulting in accelerated podocyte detachment causing progressive podocyte depletion leading to FSGS-like pathologic changes and eventual End Stage Kidney Disease. Early intervention to reduce podocyte depletion is projected to prolong kidney survival in AS. PMID:27192434

  5. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for a large group of inherited metabolic disorders most of which are due to a dysfunctional mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and, consequently, deficient energy production. MRC function depends on the coordinated expression of both nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes. Thus, mitochondrial diseases can be caused by genetic defects in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome, or in the cross-talk between the two. This impaired cross-talk gives rise to so-called nuclear-mitochondrial intergenomic communication disorders, which result in loss or instability of the mitochondrial genome and, in turn, impaired maintenance of qualitative and quantitative mtDNA integrity. In children, most MRC disorders are associated with nuclear gene defects rather than alterations in the mtDNA itself. The mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes (MDSs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders with an autosomal recessive pattern of transmission that have onset in infancy or early childhood and are characterized by a reduced number of copies of mtDNA in affected tissues and organs. The MDSs can be divided into least four clinical presentations: hepatocerebral, myopathic, encephalomyopathic and neurogastrointestinal. The focus of this review is to offer an overview of these syndromes, listing the clinical phenotypes, together with their relative frequency, mutational spectrum, and possible insights for improving diagnostic strategies. PMID:24708634

  6. Recovery of Depleted Uranium Fragments from Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, C.P.; Alecksen, T.J.; Heronimus, R.S.; Simonds, M.H.; Farrar, D.R.; Baker, K.R.; Miller, M.L.

    2008-07-01

    A cost-effective method was demonstrated for recovering depleted uranium (DU) fragments from soil. A compacted clean soil pad was prepared adjacent to a pile of soil containing DU fragments. Soil from the contaminated pile was placed on the pad in three-inch lifts using conventional construction equipment. Each lift was scanned with an automatic scanning system consisting of an array of radiation detectors coupled to a detector positioning system. The data were downloaded into ArcGIS for data presentation. Areas of the pad exhibiting scaler counts above the decision level were identified as likely locations of DU fragments. The coordinates of these locations were downloaded into a PDA that was wirelessly connected to the positioning system. The PDA guided technicians to the locations where hand-held trowels and shovels were used to remove the fragments. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and the new data patched into the data base to replace the original data. This new data set along with soil sample results served as final status survey data. (authors)

  7. Ozone depletion: 20 Years after the alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-15

    Scientific curiosity in 1973 led to the challenge of determining the ultimate atmospheric fate of the chlorofluoromethanes, CFC-11 (CCl[sub 3]F) and CFC-12 (CCl[sub 2]F[sub 2]), whose presence at measurable levels in surface air had been detected only two years earlier. In retrospect, the decision to pursue the chemistry of CFC molecules to their final destruction and beyond foreordained an unusual outcome because CFCs are chemically inert and easily survive under almost all natural conditions. By midsummer 1994, the world is well on its way in transition to a CFC-free economy, although not yet to a CFC-free atmosphere. The rates of increase in atmospheric concentration for the three major CFCs (CFC-11, -12, and -113) have all slowed markedly in response to the restrictions of the revised Montreal protocol. Because of their long lifetimes, however, significant but gradually diminishing quantities of CFCs will remain in the atmosphere throughout the 21st century. Atomic chlorine will continue to be released into the stratosphere as long as CFCs persist, and ozone depletion will follow. The existence of the Montreal protocol and the agreement among industrial, governmental, and university scientists on its wisdom offers considerable promise for the handling of future global environmental problems.

  8. Research on mitigation of stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y. )

    1994-08-01

    Chlorine atoms released from CFCs by solar Ultraviolet (UV) radiation and from natural sources, are effective catalytic agents for the destruction of stratospheric ozone. Research into large-scale mitigation methods is based on charging the chlorine radical, converting it into negative ions of low reactivity. Generation of charges-and subsequent removal of chlorine ions by atmospheric platforms and electromagnetic waves are described. This method is generally applicable to all halogens. This research is guided by the principle that the solution should be as non-intrusive environmentally as possible; i.e. no chemicals are to be injected. The large-scale mitigation requires the process to be energy efficient and to utilize energy sources already present in the atmosphere. Because of the wide variety of remediation concepts, each is being tested using a combination of laboratory and field experiments together with computer modeling. The first laboratory demonstration of ozone depletion and subsequent recovery due to charge injection is presented. [copyright][ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  9. Tylosin depletion in edible tissues of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Montesissa, C; De Liguoro, M; Santi, A; Capolongo, F; Biancotto, G

    1999-10-01

    The depletion of tylosin residues in edible turkey tissues was followed after 3 days of administration of tylosin tartrate at 500 mg l-1 in drinking water, to 30 turkeys. Immediately after the end of the treatment (day 0) and at day 1, 3, 5 and 10 of withdrawal, six turkeys (three males and three females) per time were sacrificed and samples of edible tissues were collected. Tissue homogenates were extracted, purified and analysed by HPLC according to a method previously published for the analysis of tylosin residues in pig tissues. In all tissues, tylosin residues were already below the detection limits of 50 micrograms kg-1 at time zero. However, in several samples of tissues (skin + fat, liver, kidney, muscle), from the six turkeys sacrificed at that time, one peak corresponding to an unknown tylosin equivalent was detected at measurable concentrations. The identification of this unknown compound was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis of the extracts from incurred samples. The mass fragmentation of the compound was consistent with the structure of tylosin D (the alcoholic derivative of tylosin A), the major metabolite of tylosin previously recovered and identified in tissues and/or excreta from treated chickens, cattle and pigs. PMID:10755131

  10. LINKAGE BETWEEN CLIMATE CHANGE AND STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two primary areas link the issue of stratospheric ozone depletion to global climate change: atmospheric processes and ecological processes. tmospheric processes establish a linkage through the dual roles of certain trace gases in promoting global warming and in depleting the ozon...

  11. Influence of Roller Burnishing Parameters on Depletion of Plasticity Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenstein, V. Yu; Petrenko, K. P.

    2016-04-01

    Roller burnishing process considerably increases surface quality and service life of machine parts. Efficiency of roller burnishing rises greatly when technological inheritance (TI) is taken into account. Research results of degree of plasticity reserve depletion (DPRD) while roller burnishing are presented. Results obtained made it possible to establish mechanisms of strain accumulation and plasticity reserve depletion according to roller burnishing parameters.

  12. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1 Section 1.613-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion;...

  13. 26 CFR 1.613-1 - Percentage depletion; general rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Percentage depletion; general rule. 1.613-1 Section 1.613-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.613-1 Percentage depletion; general rule. (a) In general. In the case of a...

  14. Auto-aligning stimulated emission depletion microscope using adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Travis J.; Kromann, Emil B.; Burke, Daniel; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides diffraction-unlimited resolution in fluorescence microscopy. Imaging at the nanoscale, however, requires precise alignment of the depletion and excitation laser foci of the STED microscope. We demonstrate here that adaptive optics can be implemented to automatically align STED and confocal images with a precision of 4.3 ± 2.3 nm. PMID:23722769

  15. Optimal Allocation of Sampling Effort in Depletion Surveys

    EPA Science Inventory

    We consider the problem of designing a depletion or removal survey as part of estimating animal abundance for populations with imperfect capture or detection rates. In a depletion survey, animals are captured from a given area, counted, and withheld from the population. This proc...

  16. BENZENE VAPOR DEPLETION IN THE PRESENCE OF PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three plant species, Eichhornia crassipes in a nutrient hydroponic culture Beta vulgaris saccharifera, and Beta vulgaris cicla in soil and in water cultures, were found to deplete benzene from the air. Following benzene depletion, plant tissues were extracted and no benzene was d...

  17. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquais, J. M.; Poret, F.; le Doze, R.; Ricaud, J. L.; Monterrin, A.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2003-06-01

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK).

  18. Ozone depletion during solar proton events in solar cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Jackman, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    Ozone profile data from the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet Instrument on Nimbus 7 from 1979 to the present and clear cases of ozone destruction associated with five sudden proton events (SPEs) on June 7, 1979, August 21, 1979, October 13-14, 1981, July 13, 1982, and December 8, 1982 are found. During the SPE on July 13, 1982, the largest of this solar cycle, no depletion at all at 45 km is observed, but there is a 15 percent ozone depletion at 50 km increasing to 27 percent at 55 km, all at a solar zenith angle of 85 deg. A strong variation of the observed depletion with solar zenith angle is found, with maximum depletion occurring at the largest zenith angles (near 85 deg) decreasing to near zero for angles below about 70 deg. The observed depletion is short lived, disappearing within hours of the end of the SPE.

  19. Charged micelle depletion attraction and interfacial colloidal phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Iracki, Tara D; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; Eichmann, Shannon L; Bevan, Michael A

    2010-12-21

    Ensemble total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) is used to directly measure the evolution of colloid-surface depletion attraction with increasing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration near the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Measured potentials are well described by a modified Asakura-Oosawa (AO) depletion potential in addition to electrostatic and van der Waals contributions. The modified AO potential includes effects of electrostatic interactions between micelles and surfaces via effective depletant dimensions in an excluded volume term and partitioning in an osmotic pressure term. Directly measured colloid-surface depletion potentials are used in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to capture video microscopy (VM) measurements of micelle-mediated quasi-two-dimensional phase behavior including fluid, crystal, and gel microstructures. Our findings provide information to develop more rigorous and analytically simple models of depletion attraction in charged micellar systems. PMID:21077612

  20. Ionogram range/time plots, satellite traces and optical depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Kenneth; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Wilkinson, Phil

    2012-07-01

    Range/time plots derived from 5 minute ionograms have a variety of uses including finding TIDs, following major height variations in the F2 ionosphere and tracking the movement of low latitude electron depletions as verified by co-incident observations by optical methods. This paper investigates these applications with particular emphasis on following optical depletions via ionosonde as observed at Darwin, Australia. Similar additional range/time plots are also discussed from Vanimo and Port Moresby in New Guinea and Tennant Creek and Townsville in Australia. While much theoretical work has been expended on explaining the development of equatorial bubble/depletions, current work highlights the apparently strong development of depletions at times of year when the pre-sunset height rise and following fall is minimal in contrast to current conventional thinking. In contrast, depletions are not observed at Australian equatorial longitudes when the pre- and post- sunset height variations are greatest in magnitude and consistency.

  1. The timing and mechanism of depletion in Lewisian granulites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, A. S.; Onions, R. K.; Ohara, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Large Ion Lithophile (LIL) depletion in Lewisian granulites is discussed. Severe depletions in U, Th, and other LIL have been well documented in Lewisan mafic and felsic gneisses, but new Pb isotopic analyses show little or no depletion in lithologies with high solidus temperatures, such as peridotite. This suggests that LIL transport in this terrane took place by removal of partial melts rather than by pervasive flooding with externally derived CO2. The Pb and Nd isotopic data gathered on these rocks show that the depletion and granulite metamorphism are distinct events about 250 Ma apart. Both fluid inclusions and cation exchange geothermometers date from the later metamorphic event and therefore have little bearing on the depletion event, suggesting a note of caution for interpretations of other granulite terranes.

  2. Ozone Depletion Potential of CH3Br

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Scott, Courtney; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.

    1998-01-01

    The ozone depletion potential (ODP) of methyl bromide (CH3Br) can be determined by combining the model-calculated bromine efficiency factor (BEF) for CH3Br and its atmospheric lifetime. This paper examines how changes in several key kinetic data affect BEF. The key reactions highlighted in this study include the reaction of BrO + H02, the absorption cross section of HOBr, the absorption cross section and the photolysis products of BrON02, and the heterogeneous conversion of BrON02 to HOBR and HN03 on aerosol particles. By combining the calculated BEF with the latest estimate of 0.7 year for the atmospheric lifetime of CH3Br, the likely value of ODP for CH3Br is 0.39. The model-calculated concentration of HBr (approximately 0.3 pptv) in the lower stratosphere is substantially smaller than the reported measured value of about I pptv. Recent publications suggested models can reproduce the measured value if one assumes a yield for HBr from the reaction of BrO + OH or from the reaction of BrO + H02. Although the DeAlore et al. evaluation concluded any substantial yield of HBr from BrO + HO2 is unlikely, for completeness, we calculate the effects of these assumed yields on BEF for CH3Br. Our calculations show that the effects are minimal: practically no impact for an assumed 1.3% yield of HBr from BrO + OH and 10% smaller for an assumed 0.6% yield from BrO + H02.

  3. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  4. Observations of TEC Depletions in South and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.; Pradipta, R.

    2014-12-01

    TEC values gathered with several networks of GPS receivers, which operated in South and Central America and the Caribbean region between 2010 and 2013, have been used to investigate the characteristics and morphology of TEC depletions that develop at these locations. In South America the TEC depletions are associated with low-latitude plasma bubbles. In Central America and the Caribbean region, we found that TEC depletions that occur during magnetically active conditions (Kp > 5o), persist for very long periods and sometimes remain even during afternoon hours. During quiet magnetic conditions, TEC depletions occur around the June solstice in Central America and during the December solstice in the Southern part of South America. We have also studied possible links between mid-latitude depletions and the formation of plasma bubbles at low latitudes. In addition, TEC measurements from North America have been utilized to determine the poleward extension of the mid-latitude depletions. These depletions do not appear to be related to auroral plasma processes or to storm enhanced densities (SED). We are studying the possibility that their initiation process is associated with the disturbance dynamo or the prompt penetrating electric field that develop during storm conditions.

  5. Protein disulfide isomerase mediates glutathione depletion-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazushi; Fukui, Masayuki; Zhu, Bao-Ting

    2016-08-26

    Glutathione depletion is a distinct cause underlying many forms of pathogenesis associated with oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Earlier studies showed that glutamate-induced glutathione depletion in immortalized murine HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ultimately cell death, but the precise mechanism underlying these processes is not clear. Here we show that during the induction of glutathione depletion, nitric oxide (NO) accumulation precedes ROS accumulation. While neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in untreated HT22 cells exists mostly as a monomer, glutathione depletion results in increased formation of the dimer nNOS, accompanied by increases in the catalytic activity. We identified that nNOS dimerization is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Inhibition of PDI's isomerase activity effectively abrogates glutathione depletion-induced conversion of monomer nNOS into dimer nNOS, accumulation of NO and ROS, and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we found that PDI is present in untreated cells in an inactive S-nitrosylated form, which becomes activated following glutathione depletion via S-denitrosylation. These results reveal a novel role for PDI in mediating glutathione depletion-induced oxidative cytotoxicity, as well as its role as a valuable therapeutic target for protection against oxidative cytotoxicity. PMID:27317486

  6. Adjoint simulation of stream depletion due to aquifer pumping.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Griebling, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    If an aquifer is hydraulically connected to an adjacent stream, a pumping well operating in the aquifer will draw some water from aquifer storage and some water from the stream, causing stream depletion. Several analytical, semi-analytical, and numerical approaches have been developed to estimate stream depletion due to pumping. These approaches are effective if the well location is known. If a new well is to be installed, it may be desirable to install the well at a location where stream depletion is minimal. If several possible locations are considered for the location of a new well, stream depletion would have to be estimated for all possible well locations, which can be computationally inefficient. The adjoint approach for estimating stream depletion is a more efficient alternative because with one simulation of the adjoint model, stream depletion can be estimated for pumping at a well at any location. We derive the adjoint equations for a coupled system with a confined aquifer, an overlying unconfined aquifer, and a river that is hydraulically connected to the unconfined aquifer. We assume that the stage in the river is known, and is independent of the stream depletion, consistent with the assumptions of the MODFLOW river package. We describe how the adjoint equations can be solved using MODFLOW. In an illustrative example, we show that for this scenario, the adjoint approach is as accurate as standard forward numerical simulation methods, and requires substantially less computational effort. PMID:22182421

  7. CO depletion in ATLASGAL-selected high-mass clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Brand, J.; Csengeri, T.; Fontani, F.; Walmsley, C. M.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Beuther, H.; Schuller, F.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    In the low-mass regime, it is found that the gas-phase abundances of C-bearing molecules in cold starless cores rapidly decrease with increasing density. Here the molecules tend to stick to the grains, forming ice mantles. We study CO depletion in the TOP100 sample of the ATLASGAL survey, and investigate its correlation with evolutionary stage and with the physical parameters of the sources. We use low-J emission lines of CO isotopologues and the dust continuum emission to infer the depletion factor fD. RATRAN one-dimensional models were also used to determine fD and to investigate the presence of depletion above a density threshold. The isotopic ratios and optical depth were derived with a Bayesian approach. We find a significant number of clumps with a large CO depletion, up to ˜20. Larger values are found for colder clumps, thus for earlier evolutionary phases. For massive clumps in the earliest stages of evolution we estimate the radius of the region where CO depletion is important to be a few tenths of a pc. CO depletion in high-mass clumps seems to behave as in the low-mass regime, with less evolved clumps showing larger values for the depletion than their more evolved counterparts, and increasing for denser sources.

  8. Long-term groundwater depletion in the United States.

    PubMed

    Konikow, Leonard F

    2015-01-01

    The volume of groundwater stored in the subsurface in the United States decreased by almost 1000 km3 during 1900-2008. The aquifer systems with the three largest volumes of storage depletion include the High Plains aquifer, the Mississippi Embayment section of the Gulf Coastal Plain aquifer system, and the Central Valley of California. Depletion rates accelerated during 1945-1960, averaging 13.6 km3/year during the last half of the century, and after 2000 increased again to about 24 km3/year. Depletion intensity is a new parameter, introduced here, to provide a more consistent basis for comparing storage depletion problems among various aquifers by factoring in time and areal extent of the aquifer. During 2001-2008, the Central Valley of California had the largest depletion intensity. Groundwater depletion in the United States can explain 1.4% of observed sea-level rise during the 108-year study period and 2.1% during 2001-2008. Groundwater depletion must be confronted on local and regional scales to help reduce demand (primarily in irrigated agriculture) and/or increase supply. PMID:25510437

  9. Masting in whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) depletes stored nutrients.

    PubMed

    Sala, Anna; Hopping, Kelly; McIntire, Eliot J B; Delzon, Sylvain; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2012-10-01

    • In masting trees, synchronized, heavy reproductive events are thought to deplete stored resources and to impose a replenishment period before subsequent masting. However, direct evidence of resource depletion in wild, masting trees is very rare. Here, we examined the timing and magnitude (local vs individual-level) of stored nutrient depletion after a heavy mast event in Pinus albicaulis. • In 2005, the mast year, we compared seasonal changes in leaf and sapwood nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and leaf photosynthetic rates in cone-bearing branches, branches that never produced cones, and branches with experimentally removed cones. We also compared nutrient concentrations in cone branches and branches that had never had cones between 2005 and 2006, and measured tree ring width and new shoot growth during 2005. • During the mast year, N or P depletion occurred only in tissue fractions of reproductive branches, where photosynthetic rates were reduced. However, by the end of the following year, nutrients were depleted in all branches, indicating individual-level resource depletion. New shoot and radial growth were not affected by masting. • We provide direct evidence that mast events in wild trees deplete stored nutrients. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating reproductive costs over time and at the individual level. PMID:22889129

  10. A Multilab Preregistered Replication of the Ego-Depletion Effect.

    PubMed

    Hagger, Martin S; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D

    2016-07-01

    Good self-control has been linked to adaptive outcomes such as better health, cohesive personal relationships, success in the workplace and at school, and less susceptibility to crime and addictions. In contrast, self-control failure is linked to maladaptive outcomes. Understanding the mechanisms by which self-control predicts behavior may assist in promoting better regulation and outcomes. A popular approach to understanding self-control is the strength or resource depletion model. Self-control is conceptualized as a limited resource that becomes depleted after a period of exertion resulting in self-control failure. The model has typically been tested using a sequential-task experimental paradigm, in which people completing an initial self-control task have reduced self-control capacity and poorer performance on a subsequent task, a state known as ego depletion Although a meta-analysis of ego-depletion experiments found a medium-sized effect, subsequent meta-analyses have questioned the size and existence of the effect and identified instances of possible bias. The analyses served as a catalyst for the current Registered Replication Report of the ego-depletion effect. Multiple laboratories (k = 23, total N = 2,141) conducted replications of a standardized ego-depletion protocol based on a sequential-task paradigm by Sripada et al. Meta-analysis of the studies revealed that the size of the ego-depletion effect was small with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) that encompassed zero (d = 0.04, 95% CI [-0.07, 0.15]. We discuss implications of the findings for the ego-depletion effect and the resource depletion model of self-control. PMID:27474142

  11. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  12. Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Kai D.

    2007-07-01

    During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete

  13. Stimulated Emission Depletion Lithography with Mercapto-Functional Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface reactive nanostructures were fabricated using stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography. The functionalization of the nanostructures was realized by copolymerization of a bifunctional metal oxo cluster in the presence of a triacrylate monomer. Ligands of the cluster surface cross-link to the monomer during the lithographic process, whereas unreacted mercapto functionalized ligands are transferred to the polymer and remain reactive after polymer formation of the surface of the nanostructure. The depletion efficiency in dependence of the cluster loading was investigated and full depletion of the STED effect was observed with a cluster loading exceeding 4 wt %. A feature size by λ/11 was achieved by using a donut-shaped depletion beam. The reactivity of the mercapto groups on the surface of the nanostructure was tested by incubation with mercapto-reactive fluorophores. PMID:26816204

  14. In situ observations of bifurcation of equatorial ionospheric plasma depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Aggson, T.L.; Pfaff, R.F.; Maynard, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    Vector electric field measurements from the San Marco D satellite are utilized to investigate the bifurcation of ionospheric plasma depletions (sometimes called {open_quotes}bubbles{close_quotes}) associated with nightside equatorial spread F. These depletions are identified by enhanced upward ExB convection in depleted plasma density channels in the nighttime equatorial ionosphere. The in situ determination of the bifurcation process is based on dc electric field measurements of the bipolar variation in the zonal flow, westward and eastward, as the eastbound satellite crosses isolated signatures of updrafting plasma depletion regions. The authors also present data in which more complicated regions of zonal velocity variations appear as the possible result of multiple bifurcations of updrafting equatorial plasma bubbles. 10 refs., 7 fig.

  15. Stimulated Emission Depletion Lithography with Mercapto-Functional Polymers.

    PubMed

    Buchegger, Bianca; Kreutzer, Johannes; Plochberger, Birgit; Wollhofen, Richard; Sivun, Dmitry; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Schütz, Gerhard J; Schubert, Ulrich; Klar, Thomas A

    2016-02-23

    Surface reactive nanostructures were fabricated using stimulated emission depletion (STED) lithography. The functionalization of the nanostructures was realized by copolymerization of a bifunctional metal oxo cluster in the presence of a triacrylate monomer. Ligands of the cluster surface cross-link to the monomer during the lithographic process, whereas unreacted mercapto functionalized ligands are transferred to the polymer and remain reactive after polymer formation of the surface of the nanostructure. The depletion efficiency in dependence of the cluster loading was investigated and full depletion of the STED effect was observed with a cluster loading exceeding 4 wt %. A feature size by λ/11 was achieved by using a donut-shaped depletion beam. The reactivity of the mercapto groups on the surface of the nanostructure was tested by incubation with mercapto-reactive fluorophores. PMID:26816204

  16. STRATOSPHERIC OZONE DEPLETION: A FOCUS ON EPA'S RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September of 1987 the United States, along with 26 other countries, signed a landmark treaty to limit and subsequently, through revisions, phase out the production of all significant ozone depleting substances. Many researchers suspected that these chemicals, especially chl...

  17. Optical depletion spectroscopy for probing evaporatively cooled OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Matthew; Wu, Hao; Stuhl, Benjamin; Reens, David; Yeo, Mark; Ye, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements provide a sensitive probe for the detection of molecular species. However, the broad linewidth of the pulsed lasers used for molecular excitation obscures spectral information useful for determination of molecule temperature. This limitation can be overcome by the use of a second, narrowband source of radiation that can deplete a subset of the molecules detected using PLIF, and a high resolution depletion spectrum can be obtained. In the past, we have demonstrated the use of microwave depletion spectroscopy to measure magnetically trapped, evaporatively cooled OH temperatures in the range of 5-50 mK. The lower limit of 5 mK is set by the details of the microwave transition. Here we present temperature measurements of trapped OH using an optical depletion technique, which is in principle capable of probing temperatures as low as 50 microkelvin. We acknowledge funding from the NSF Physics Frontier Center, NIST, DOE, and the AFOSR MURI on Cold Molecules.

  18. Accelerated reabsorption in the proximal tubule produced by volume depletion

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Weinman, Edward J.; Kashgarian, Michael; Hayslett, John P.

    1971-01-01

    The renal response to chronic depletion of extracellular volume was examined using the techniques of micropuncture. Depletion of salt and water was produced by administration of furosemide to rats maintained on a sodium-free diet. There was a marked fall in body weight, plasma volume, and glomerular filtration rate. The intrinsic reabsorptive capacity of the proximal tubule, measured by the split-droplet technique, was greatly enhanced. The acceleration of proximal fluid reabsorption could not be accounted for by changes in filtration rate, tubular geometry, or aldosterone secretion. The half-time of droplet reabsorption in the distal tubule was not altered by sodium depletion. An increase in the reabsorption of fluid in the proximal tubule, as demonstrated directly in the present experiments, provides an explanation for a variety of clinical phenomena associated with volume depletion. Images PMID:5090054

  19. Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

    2014-04-01

    A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

  20. 10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT AND MOLD IN FOUNDRY. (11/11/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. Fluorescence depletion properties of insulin–gold nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Fu; Liu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Wei-Kuan; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chou, Pi-Tai; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin–gold nanoclusters exhibit outstanding biocompatibility, photostability, and fluorescence quantum efficiency. However, they have never been used in superresolution microscopy, which requires nonlinear switching or saturation of fluorescence. Here we examine the fluorescence and stimulated emission depletion properties of gold nanoclusters. Their bleaching rate is very slow, demonstrating superior photostability. Surprisingly, however, the best depletion efficiency is less than 70%, whereas the depletion intensity requirement is much higher than the expectation from a simple two-level model. Fluorescence lifetime measurement revealed two distinct lifetime components, which indicate intersystem and reverse intersystem crossing during excitation. Based on population dynamic calculation, excellent agreement of the maximal depletion efficiency is found. Our work not only features the first examination of STED with metallic clusters, but also reveals the significance of molecular transition dynamics when considering a STED labeling. PMID:26309767

  2. Lithium Depletion in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Jensen, E. L.; Reaser, B. E.

    2006-12-01

    We present a study of lithium depletion in twelve late-type pre-main-sequence stars in the coeval Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG). The age of this group ( 12 Myr) is well constrained because all of the stars in the sample have Hipparcos distances. We have determined Li abundances for these K and M stars using equivalent width measurements of the 6707.8 Angstrom Li I line from new high-resolution, high-S/N echelle spectra, and we compare these abundances to models of pre-main-sequence Li depletion by Baraffe et al. (1998), D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1997, 1998), and Siess, Dufour, & Forestini (2000). Significantly more lithium depletion is observed in the sample than is predicted for a group of this age. In particular, the discrepancy between the predicted and the observed lithium abundances increases with decreasing effective temperature, suggesting a problem with theories describing pre-main-sequence lithium depletion. Our data indicate that M stars deplete lithium more rapidly than predicted, which could make M-type post-T-Tauri stars difficult to identify. In addition, we compare our results to the work of Song, Bessell, & Zuckerman (2002) on HIP 112312. In contrast to that work, we did not observe the lithium depletion boundary of the BPMG; none of the three M4.5 stars in the sample showed evidence of lithium (log N(Li) < -0.5), indicating a lithium depletion boundary later than M4.5, further underscoring the gap between age estimates from lithium depletion and those from theoretical evolutionary tracks. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307830.

  3. Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, M.; Castaneda, N.; Greengard, T. |; Hull, C.; Barbour, D.; Quapp, W.J.

    1998-07-01

    The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization.

  4. Inositol Depletion Restores Vesicle Transport in Yeast Phospholipid Flippase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Kanako; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Sakai, Shota; Mioka, Tetsuo; Sano, Takamitsu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, type 4 P-type ATPases function as phospholipid flippases, which translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Flippases function in the formation of transport vesicles, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we isolate an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, ART5, as a multicopy suppressor of the growth and endocytic recycling defects of flippase mutants in budding yeast. Consistent with a previous report that Art5p downregulates the inositol transporter Itr1p by endocytosis, we found that flippase mutations were also suppressed by the disruption of ITR1, as well as by depletion of inositol from the culture medium. Interestingly, inositol depletion suppressed the defects in all five flippase mutants. Inositol depletion also partially restored the formation of secretory vesicles in a flippase mutant. Inositol depletion caused changes in lipid composition, including a decrease in phosphatidylinositol and an increase in phosphatidylserine. A reduction in phosphatidylinositol levels caused by partially depleting the phosphatidylinositol synthase Pis1p also suppressed a flippase mutation. These results suggest that inositol depletion changes the lipid composition of the endosomal/TGN membranes, which results in vesicle formation from these membranes in the absence of flippases. PMID:25781026

  5. Depletion optimization of lumped burnable poisons in pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kodah, Z.H.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques were developed to construct a set of basic poison depletion curves which deplete in a monotonical manner. These curves were combined to match a required optimized depletion profile by utilizing either linear or non-linear programming methods. Three computer codes, LEOPARD, XSDRN, and EXTERMINATOR-2 were used in the analyses. A depletion routine was developed and incorporated into the XSDRN code to allow the depletion of fuel, fission products, and burnable poisons. The Three Mile Island Unit-1 reactor core was used in this work as a typical PWR core. Two fundamental burnable poison rod designs were studied. They are a solid cylindrical poison rod and an annular cylindrical poison rod with water filling the central region.These two designs have either a uniform mixture of burnable poisons or lumped spheroids of burnable poisons in the poison region. Boron and gadolinium are the two burnable poisons which were investigated in this project. Thermal self-shielding factor calculations for solid and annular poison rods were conducted. Also expressions for overall thermal self-shielding factors for one or more than one size group of poison spheroids inside solid and annular poison rods were derived and studied. Poison spheroids deplete at a slower rate than the poison mixture because each spheroid exhibits some self-shielding effects of its own. The larger the spheroid, the higher the self-shielding effects due to the increase in poison concentration.

  6. Measurement of depletion-induced force in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilitski, Fiodar; Ward, Andrew; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-03-01

    Microtubule (MT) bundles formed in the presence of non-adsorbing polymers - poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) or Dextran - are widely used in experimental active matter systems. However, many properties of such MT bundles have not been studied experimentally. In this work, we combine optical trapping techniques with an umbrella sampling method in order to measure the depletion force acting on individual microtubule in the axial direction within the bundle. We find depletion force is independent of bundle overlap length and measure its magnitude to be on the order of tens of kB/T μm. We explore the dependence of the depletion force on concentration of depletant (PEG 20K) as well as K+ ions (necessary for screening electrostatic repulsion between MT filaments). We also verify additivity of depletion interaction and confirm that force is increased by a factor of two for three-MT bundles. Additionally, our experimental technique allows us to probe interactions between MTs within the bundle. Experimental data suggests that filaments in the bundle interact only hydrodynamically when depletant concentrations are low enough; however, we observe onset of solid-like friction when osmotic pressure is increased above a certain threshold.

  7. Arginine depletion increases susceptibility to serious infections in preterm newborns

    PubMed Central

    Badurdeen, Shiraz; Mulongo, Musa; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm newborns are highly susceptible to bacterial infections. This susceptibility is regarded as being due to immaturity of multiple pathways of the immune system. However, it is unclear whether a mechanism that unifies these different, suppressed pathways exists. Here, we argue that the immune vulnerability of the preterm neonate is critically related to arginine depletion. Arginine, a “conditionally essential” amino acid, is depleted in acute catabolic states, including sepsis. Its metabolism is highly compartmentalized and regulated, including by arginase-mediated hydrolysis. Recent data suggest that arginase II-mediated arginine depletion is essential for the innate immune suppression that occurs in newborn models of bacterial challenge, impairing pathways critical for the immune response. Evidence that arginine depletion mediates protection from immune activation during first gut colonization suggests a regulatory role in controlling gut-derived pathogens. Clinical studies show that plasma arginine is depleted during sepsis. In keeping with animal studies, small clinical trials of L-arginine supplementation have shown benefit in reducing necrotizing enterocolitis in premature neonates. We propose a novel, broader hypothesis that arginine depletion during bacterial challenge is a key factor limiting the neonate's ability to mount an adequate immune response, contributing to the increased susceptibility to infections, particularly with respect to gut-derived sepsis. PMID:25360828

  8. Genetics Home Reference: MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description MPV17 -related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is an inherited disorder that can ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form Enable Javascript to view ... Open All Close All Description TK2 -related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form ( TK2 -MDS) is an ...

  10. Ego depletion decreases trust in economic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Sarah E.; Baumeister, Roy F.; Vohs, Kathleen D.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments tested the effects of ego depletion on economic decision making. Participants completed a task either requiring self-control or not. Then participants learned about the trust game, in which senders are given an initial allocation of $10 to split between themselves and another person, the receiver. The receiver receives triple the amount given and can send any, all, or none of the tripled money back to the sender. Participants were assigned the role of the sender and decided how to split the initial allocation. Giving less money, and therefore not trusting the receiver, is the safe, less risky response. Participants who had exerted self-control and were depleted gave the receiver less money than those in the non-depletion condition (Experiment 1). This effect was replicated and moderated in two additional experiments. Depletion again led to lower amounts given (less trust), but primarily among participants who were told they would never meet the receiver (Experiment 2) or who were given no information about how similar they were to the receiver (Experiment 3). Amounts given did not differ for depleted and non-depleted participants who either expected to meet the receiver (Experiment 2) or were led to believe that they were very similar to the receiver (Experiment 3). Decreased trust among depleted participants was strongest among neurotics. These results imply that self-control facilitates behavioral trust, especially when no other cues signal decreased social risk in trusting, such as if an actual or possible relationship with the receiver were suggested. PMID:25013237

  11. Coordinated airborne and satellite measurements of equatorial plasma depletions

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.J.; Brinton, H.C.; Buchau, J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in December 1979 to investigate the structure of plasma depletions in the low latitude, nightime ionosphere. The measurements included all sky imaging photometer (ASIP), ionosonde and amplitude scintillation observations from the AFGL Airborne Ionospheric Observatory (AIO), and in situ ion density measurements from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-E) Bennett Ion Mass Spectrometer (BIMS). The AIO performed two flights along the Ascension Island (-18/sup 0/ MLAT) magnetic meridian: one in the southern hemisphere and one near the Ascension conjugate point in the northern hemisphere. During these flights, measurements from the AE-E satellite at 434 km altitude are compared with simultaneous remote ionospheric measurements from the AIO. Density biteouts of approximately one order of magnitude in the dominant ion O/sup +/, were mapped to lower altitudes along magnetic field lines for comparison with 6300-A and 7774-A O I airglow depletions. Because of the different airglow production mechanisms (dissociative recombination of O/sup +//sub 2/ for 6300 A and radiative recombination of O/sup +/ for 7774 A) the 6300-A depletions reflect plasma depletions near the bottomside of the F layer, while those at 7774 A are located near the peak of the layer. The O/sup +/ biteouts map directly into the 7774-A airglow depletions in the same hemisphere and also when traced into the opposite hemisphere, which indicates magnetic flux tube alignment over north-south distances of approx.2220 km. The 6300-A (bottomside) depletions are wider in longitude than the 7774-A (F-peak) depletions near the equatorward edge of the Appleton anomaly. This difference in topside and bottomside structure is used to infer large-scale structure near the anomaly and to relate this to structure, commonly observed near the magnetic equator by the ALTAIR radar.

  12. Effective delivery of chemotherapeutic nanoparticles by depleting host Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Yamada, Keiichi; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Ryoko; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-15

    Although chemotherapeutic nanoparticles would confer various advantages, the majority of administrated nanoparticles are known to be spoiled by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Intending to more effectively deliver therapeutic nanoparticles to target regions in vivo, host RES, especially Kupffer cells in the liver, have been depleted ahead of drug administration. To demonstrate this hypothesis, clodronate liposomes were preinjected into BALB/c nude mice for depletion of Kupffer cells 2 days before, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) at the doses of 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg was administered. As a result, doxorubicin accumulation in the liver was decreased from 36 to 26% injected dose/organ by the Kupffer cells depletion, and consequently, the plasma concentration of doxorubicin was significantly enhanced threefold (from 11 to 33 μg/mL) on day 1 at 1.25 mg/kg-dose group. Doxorubicin accumulation in the tumor was increased from 0.78 to 3.0 μg/g-tissue on day 3, and tumor growth inhibition by Doxil was significantly boosted (tumor volumes from 751 to 482 mm(3) on day 24) by the Kupffer cells depletion. In conclusion, Kupffer cells depletion by clodronate liposomes enhanced the plasma concentration and antitumor effects of Doxil, and would be widely applicable for various clinical cancer chemotherapies using nanoparticles. PMID:22362271

  13. Stream depletion in alluvial valleys using the SDF semianalytical model.

    PubMed

    Miller, Calvin D; Durnford, Deanna; Halstead, Mary R; Altenhofen, Jon; Flory, Val

    2007-01-01

    A semianalytical method commonly used for quantifying stream depletion caused by ground water pumping was reviewed for applicability in narrow alluvial aquifers. This stream depletion factor (SDF) method is based on the analytic Glover model, but uses a numerical model-derived input parameter, called the SDF, to partly account for mathematically nonideal conditions such as variable transmissivity and nearby aquifer boundaries. Using the SDF can improve and simplify depletion estimates. However, the method's approximations introduce error that increases with proximity to the impermeable aquifer boundary. This article reviews the history of the method and its assumptions. New stream depletion response curves are presented as functions of well position within bounded aquifers. A simple modification to modeled SDF values is proposed that allows the impermeable boundary to be accounted for with image wells, but without overaccounting for boundary effects that are already reflected in modeled SDFs. It is shown that SDFs for locations closer to the river than to the aquifer boundary do not reflect impermeable-boundary effects, and thus need no modification, and boundary effects in the other portion of the aquifer follow a predictable removable pattern. This method is verified by comparing response curves using modified SDFs with response curves from an extensively calibrated numerical model of a managed ground water recharge site. The modification improves SDF-based stream depletion estimates in bounded aquifers while still benefiting from the additional information contained in SDF maps and retaining their value as standardized references for water rights administration. PMID:17600582

  14. Reentrant phase transitions from depletion: colloidal crystals to flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Laderman, Bezia; Sacanna, Stefano; Chaikin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Conventional depletion is supposed to be temperature independent. However, we find that many typical colloid-depletion systems show remarkable phenomena as temperature is varied. 1 μm polystyrene spheres in water are known to form colloidal crystals when PEO is added as a depletant. When this system is heated the crystal melts at a first critical temperature T1 ~ 60 C , and then at higher temperature T2 ~ 70 C the colloids flocculate. We argue that a weak temperature-dependent interaction between polymer and colloid is responsible for the observed phenomena: crystals form when the colloid-polymer interaction is repulsive, flocculation occurs when the interaction is attractive, and melting occurs in between when both phases are frustrated. The melted phase occurs due to an unexpected cancelation when combining both entropic and enthalpic attractions. We propose a simple statistical model to map out the observed transitions and fill the theoretical gap between the two established scenarios for colloid-polymer systems, namely depletion and flocculation. We have seen the same temperature dependent phenomena for TPM, PS and silica spheres with PEO and dextran as depletants. Our discovery provides a fundamental understanding of the polymer-colloid system and opens new possibilities for colloidal self-assembly and temperature-controlled viscoelastic materials.

  15. Antarctic winter mercury and ozone depletion events over sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerentorp Mastromonaco, M.; Gårdfeldt, K.; Jourdain, B.; Abrahamsson, K.; Granfors, A.; Ahnoff, M.; Dommergue, A.; Méjean, G.; Jacobi, H.-W.

    2016-03-01

    During atmospheric mercury and ozone depletion events in the springtime in polar regions gaseous elemental mercury and ozone undergo rapid declines. Mercury is quickly transformed into oxidation products, which are subsequently removed by deposition. Here we show that such events also occur during Antarctic winter over sea ice areas, leading to additional deposition of mercury. Over four months in the Weddell Sea we measured gaseous elemental, oxidized, and particulate-bound mercury, as well as ozone in the troposphere and total and elemental mercury concentrations in snow, demonstrating a series of depletion and deposition events between July and September. The winter depletions in July were characterized by stronger correlations between mercury and ozone and larger formation of particulate-bound mercury in air compared to later spring events. It appears that light at large solar zenith angles is sufficient to initiate the photolytic formation of halogen radicals. We also propose a dark mechanism that could explain observed events in air masses coming from dark regions. Br2 that could be the main actor in dark conditions was possibly formed in high concentrations in the marine boundary layer in the dark. These high concentrations may also have caused the formation of high concentrations of CHBr3 and CH2I2 in the top layers of the Antarctic sea ice observed during winter. These new findings show that the extent of depletion events is larger than previously believed and that winter depletions result in additional deposition of mercury that could be transferred to marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

  16. Dynamics of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute depletion

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Echeverry, Stefania; Shi, Xiang Qun; Yang, Mu; Yang, Qiu Zi; Wang, Guan Yun Frances; Chambon, Julien; Wu, Yi Chen; Fu, Kai Yuan; De Koninck, Yves; Zhang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding on the function of microglia has been revolutionized in the recent 20 years. However, the process of maintaining microglia homeostasis has not been fully understood. In this study, we dissected the features of spinal microglia repopulation following an acute partial depletion. By injecting intrathecally Mac-1-saporin, a microglia selective immunotoxin, we ablated 50% microglia in the spinal cord of naive mice. Spinal microglia repopulated rapidly and local homeostasis was re-established within 14 days post-depletion. Mac-1-saporin treatment resulted in microglia cell proliferation and circulating monocyte infiltration. The latter is indeed part of an acute, transient inflammatory reaction that follows cell depletion, and was characterized by an increase in the expression of inflammatory molecules and by the breakdown of the blood spinal cord barrier. During this period, microglia formed cell clusters and exhibited a M1-like phenotype. MCP-1/CCR2 signaling was essential in promoting this depletion associated spinal inflammatory reaction. Interestingly, ruling out MCP-1-mediated secondary inflammation, including blocking recruitment of monocyte-derived microglia, did not affect depletion-triggered microglia repopulation. Our results also demonstrated that newly generated microglia kept their responsiveness to peripheral nerve injury and their contribution to injury-associated neuropathic pain was not significantly altered. PMID:26961247

  17. The effect of uncomplicated potassium depletion on urine acidification

    PubMed Central

    Tannen, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Studies were performed on normal human subjects to determine the effects of potassium depletion on urine acidification. Depletion was induced by ingestion of a low potassium diet either alone or in combination with a potassium-binding resin, and the response of each subject to an acute ammonium chloride load in the potassium-depleted state was compared to his normal response. Urine pH was significantly higher during potassium deficiency if sufficient potassium depletion had been induced. No differences in blood acid-base parameters, urinary flow rate, or urinary fixed buffer excretion rate were found to account for this change; however, the increase in urine pH was accompanied by a concomitant increase in net acid and ammonium excretion. It is proposed that these changes during potassium depletion reflect an increase in ammonia diffusion into the urine, presumably as a result of increased renal ammonia production. In addition, it is speculated that changes in ammonia metabolism may be a physiologic control mechanism for potassium conservation. PMID:5443182

  18. About ozone depletion in stratosphere over Brazil in last decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Inácio M.; Imai, Takeshi; Seguchi, Tomio

    The depletion of stratospheric ozone, resulting from the emission of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has become a major issue since 1980. The decrease in stratospheric ozone over the polar regions has been pronounced at the South Pole than at the North Pole. In mid-latitude and equatorial regions, ozone depletion becomes less important; it depends on seasonal effects and on the characteristics of a particular region. The detailed mechanism by which the polar ozone holes form is different from that for the mid-latitude thinning, but the most important process in both trends is the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine and bromine. The main source of these halogen atoms in the stratosphere is photodissociation of CFC compounds, commonly called freons, and of bromofluorocarbon compounds known as halons. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere after being emitted at the surface. Both ozone depletion mechanisms strengthened as emissions of CFCs and halons increased [1]. Measurements of stratospheric ozone carried out on several locations in Brazil and on the South Pole in the last decade (1996-2005), using detectors placed on ground, stratospheric balloons and Earth Probe TOMS satellites, are presented here. Detailed series analysis from 1980 up to the present describes a mean ozone depletion of 4[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone/depletion.

  19. Global Depletion of Groundwater Resources: Past and Future Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; de Graaf, I. E. M.; Van Beek, L. P.; Wada, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, about 17% of the crops are irrigated, yet irrigation accounts for 40% of the global food production. As more than 40% of irrigation water comes from groundwater, groundwater abstraction rates are large and exceed natural recharge rates in many regions of the world, thus leading to groundwater depletion. In this paper we provide an overview of recent research on global groundwater depletion. We start with presenting various estimates of global groundwater depletion, both from flux based as well as volume based methods. We also present estimates of the contribution of non-renewable groundwater to irrigation water consumption and how this contribution developed during the last 50 years. Next, using a flux based method, we provide projections of groundwater depletion for the coming century under various socio-economic and climate scenarios. As groundwater depletion contributes to sea-level rise, we also provide estimates of this contribution from the past as well as for future scenarios. Finally, we show recent results of groundwater level changes and change in river flow as a result of global groundwater abstractions as obtained from a global groundwater flow model.

  20. ALEPH2 - A general purpose Monte Carlo depletion code

    SciTech Connect

    Stankovskiy, A.; Van Den Eynde, G.; Baeten, P.; Trakas, C.; Demy, P. M.; Villatte, L.

    2012-07-01

    The Monte-Carlo burn-up code ALEPH is being developed at SCK-CEN since 2004. A previous version of the code implemented the coupling between the Monte Carlo transport (any version of MCNP or MCNPX) and the ' deterministic' depletion code ORIGEN-2.2 but had important deficiencies in nuclear data treatment and limitations inherent to ORIGEN-2.2. A new version of the code, ALEPH2, has several unique features making it outstanding among other depletion codes. The most important feature is full data consistency between steady-state Monte Carlo and time-dependent depletion calculations. The last generation general-purpose nuclear data libraries (JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII and JENDL-4) are fully implemented, including special purpose activation, spontaneous fission, fission product yield and radioactive decay data. The built-in depletion algorithm allows to eliminate the uncertainties associated with obtaining the time-dependent nuclide concentrations. A predictor-corrector mechanism, calculation of nuclear heating, calculation of decay heat, decay neutron sources are available as well. The validation of the code on the results of REBUS experimental program has been performed. The ALEPH2 has shown better agreement with measured data than other depletion codes. (authors)

  1. Resource depletion does not influence prospective memory in college students

    PubMed Central

    Talley Shelton, Jill; Cahill, Michael J.; Mullet, Hillary G.; Scullin, Michael K.; Einstein, Gilles O.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment designed to investigate the potential influence of prior acts of self-control on subsequent prospective memory performance. College undergraduates (n = 146) performed either a cognitively depleting initial task (e.g., mostly incongruent Stroop task) or a less resource-consuming version of that task (e.g., all congruent Stroop task). Subsequently, participants completed a prospective memory task that required attentionally demanding monitoring processes. The results demonstrated that prior acts of self-control do not impair the ability to execute a future intention in college-aged adults. We conceptually replicated these results in three additional depletion and prospective memory experiments. This research extends a growing number of studies demonstrating the boundary conditions of the resource depletion effect in cognitive tasks. PMID:24021851

  2. Tunable depletion potentials driven by shape variation of surfactant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratale, Matthew D.; Still, Tim; Matyas, Caitlin; Davidson, Zoey S.; Lobel, Samuel; Collings, Peter J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    Depletion interaction potentials between micron-sized colloidal particles are induced by nanometer-scale surfactant micelles composed of hexaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12E6 ), and they are measured by video microscopy. The strength and range of the depletion interaction is revealed to arise from variations in shape anisotropy of the surfactant micelles. This shape anisotropy increases with increasing sample temperature. By fitting the colloidal interaction potentials to theoretical models, we extract micelle length and shape anisotropy as a function of temperature. This work introduces shape anisotropy tuning as a means to control interparticle interactions in colloidal suspensions, and it shows how the interparticle depletion potentials of micron-scale objects can be employed to probe the shape and size of surrounding macromolecules at the nanoscale.

  3. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

  4. Effect of Shim Arm Depletion in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. H.; Brown N.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-02-22

    The cadmium shim arms in the NBSR undergo burnup during reactor operation and hence, require periodic replacement. Presently, the shim arms are replaced after every 25 cycles to guarantee they can maintain sufficient shutdown margin. Two prior reports document the expected change in the 113Cd distribution because of the shim arm depletion. One set of calculations was for the present high-enriched uranium fuel and the other for the low-enriched uranium fuel when it was in the COMP7 configuration (7 inch fuel length vs. the present 11 inch length). The depleted 113Cd distributions calculated for these cores were applied to the current design for an equilibrium low-enriched uranium core. This report details the predicted effects, if any, of shim arm depletion on the shim arm worth, the shutdown margin, power distributions and kinetics parameters.

  5. International aspects of restrictions of ozone-depleting substances

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.C.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes international efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Also included in this report is a discussion of activities in other countries to meet restrictions in the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. Finally, there is a brief presentation of trade and international competitiveness issues relating to the transition to alternatives for the regulated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. The stratosphere knows no international borders. Just as the impact of reduced stratospheric ozone will be felt internationally, so protection of the ozone layer is properly an international effort. Unilateral action, even by a country that produces and used large quantities of ozone-depleting substances, will not remedy the problem of ozone depletion if other countries do not follow suit. 32 refs., 7 tabs.

  6. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-09-10

    A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

  7. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1998-11-03

    A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

  8. Resource depletion does not influence prospective memory in college students.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jill Talley; Cahill, Michael J; Mullet, Hillary G; Scullin, Michael K; Einstein, Gilles O; McDaniel, Mark A

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports an experiment designed to investigate the potential influence of prior acts of self-control on subsequent prospective memory performance. College undergraduates (n=146) performed either a cognitively depleting initial task (e.g., mostly incongruent Stroop task) or a less resource-consuming version of that task (e.g., all congruent Stroop task). Subsequently, participants completed a prospective memory task that required attentionally demanding monitoring processes. The results demonstrated that prior acts of self-control do not impair the ability to execute a future intention in college-aged adults. We conceptually replicated these results in three additional depletion and prospective memory experiments. This research extends a growing number of studies demonstrating the boundary conditions of the resource depletion effect in cognitive tasks. PMID:24021851

  9. Observations of ozone depletion associated with solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, R. D.; Jackman, C. H.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Ozone profiles from the solar proton events (SPE) of January and September 1971 and August 1972 were obtained after the backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) measured radiances were corrected for the direct effects of protons on the instrument. The SPE of August 1972 produced an ozone depletion of 15% at 42 km that persisted for one month in both northern and southern polar regions. This long recovery time indicates that NO(x) was produced in a quantity sufficient to alter the ozone chemistry. The two SPE in 1971 were of moderate size, but produced ozone depletions of 10-30% at 50 km with a 36 hour recovery time. This rapid recovery is consistent with the assumption that HO(x) is responsible for altering the ozone chemistry (Weeks et al., 1972). The magnitude of the observed depletion, however, exceeds that predicted by the chemical models.

  10. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate

    PubMed Central

    Kira, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom–atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom–atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies. PMID:25767044

  11. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, D. Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-24

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction.

  12. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  13. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate.

    PubMed

    Kira, M

    2015-01-01

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom-atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom-atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies. PMID:25767044

  14. Radiosensitization of mouse skin by oxygen and depletion of glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.; Joiner, M.; Joiner, B.

    1995-09-30

    To determine the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and shape of the oxygen sensitization curve of mouse foot skin, the extent to which glutathione (GSH) depletion radiosensitized skin, and the dependence of such sensitization on the ambient oxygen tension. Carbogen caused the greatest radiosensitization of skin, with a reproducible enhancement of 2.2 relative to the anoxic response. The OER of 2.2 is lower than other reports for mouse skin. This may indicate that the extremes of oxygenation were not produced, although there was no direct evidence for this. Depletion of GSH caused minimal radiosensitization when skin was irradiated under anoxic or well-oxygenated conditions. Radiosensitization by GSH depletion was maximal at intermediate oxygen tensions of 10-21% O{sub 2} in the ambient gas. Increasing the extent of GSH depletion led to increasing radiosensitization, with sensitization enhancement ratios of 1.2 and 1.1, respectively, for extensive and intermediated levels of GSH depletion. In mice exposed to 100% O{sub 2}, a significant component of skin radiosensitivity was due to diffusion of oxygen directly through the skin. Pentobarbitone anesthesia radiosensitized skin in mice exposed to 100% O{sub 2} by a factor of 1.2, but did not further sensitize skin in mice exposed to carbogen. Glutathione levels and the local oxygen tension at the time of irradiation were important determinants of mouse foot skin radiosensitivity. The extent to which GSH levels altered the radiosensitivity of skin was critically dependent on the local oxygen tension. These results have significant implications for potential clinical applications of GSH depletion. 53 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Ozone depletion. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning studies of atmospheric chemistry and modeling of ozone depletion in Antarctica, and the consequences of the depletion on ultraviolet radiation levels. The studies involve chemical reactions in the atmosphere, including temperature dynamics, possible changes in solar insolation, and effects of pollution from nitrogen, chloroflourocarbons, carbon dioxide, and methane. The studies involve references to observations of the ozonosphere and modeling of interactions worldwide, together with data on the sources of the natural and man-made pollutants. (Contains a minimum of 173 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Characterization of a Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, T.; Havranek, M.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Marinas, C.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    New monolithic pixel detectors integrating CMOS electronics and sensor on the same silicon substrate are currently explored for particle tracking in future HEP experiments, most notably at the LHC . The innovative concept of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) is based on high resistive silicon bulk material enabling full substrate depletion and the application of an electrical drift field for fast charge collection, while retaining full CMOS capability for the electronics. The technology (150 nm) used offers quadruple wells and allows to implement the pixel electronics with independently isolated N- and PMOS transistors. Results of initial studies on the charge collection and sensor performance are presented.

  17. 26 CFR 1.612-1 - Basis for allowance of cost depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... included in the basis for cost depletion of oil and gas property the amounts of capitalized drilling and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Basis for allowance of cost depletion. 1.612-1... depletion. (a) In general. The basis upon which the deduction for cost depletion under section 611 is to...

  18. 26 CFR 1.612-1 - Basis for allowance of cost depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... included in the basis for cost depletion of oil and gas property the amounts of capitalized drilling and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Basis for allowance of cost depletion. 1.612-1... depletion. (a) In general. The basis upon which the deduction for cost depletion under section 611 is to...

  19. 26 CFR 1.612-1 - Basis for allowance of cost depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... included in the basis for cost depletion of oil and gas property the amounts of capitalized drilling and... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Basis for allowance of cost depletion. 1.612-1... depletion. (a) In general. The basis upon which the deduction for cost depletion under section 611 is to...

  20. Brain creatine depletion: guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (improving with creatine supplementation).

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, V; Bianchi, M C; Tosetti, M; Carducci, C; Cerquiglini, C A; Cioni, G; Antonozzi, I

    2000-11-14

    The authors describe an Italian child with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, neurologic regression, movement disorders, and epilepsy during the first year of life. Brain MRI showed pallidal and periaqueductal alterations. In vivo 1H-MRS showed brain creatine depletion. The assessment of guanidinoacetic acid concentration in biologic fluids confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical, biochemical, and neuroradiologic improvement followed creatine supplementation. PMID:11087795

  1. Identifying water mass depletion in northern Iraq observed by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, G.; Olsthoorn, T. N.; Al-Manmi, D. A. M. A.; Schrama, E. J. O.; Smidt, E. H.

    2015-03-01

    Observations acquired by Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission indicate a mass loss of 146 ± 6 mm equivalent water height (EWH) in northern Iraq between 2007 and 2009. These data are used as an independent validation of lake mass variations and a rainfall-runoff model, which is based on local geology and climate conditions. Model inputs are precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) observations, and climatic parameters from Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (GLDAS) model parameters. The model is calibrated with observed river discharge and includes a representation of the karstified aquifers in the region to improve model realism. Lake mass variations were derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in combination with satellite altimetry and some in situ data. Our rainfall-runoff model confirms that northern Iraq suffered a drought between 2007 and 2009 and captures the annual cycle and longer trend of the observed GRACE data. The total mass depletion seen by GRACE between 2007 and 2009 is mainly explained by a lake mass depletion of 75 ± 3 mm EWH and a natural groundwater depletion of 39 ± 8 mm EWH. Our findings indicate that anthropogenic groundwater extraction has a minor influence in this region, while a decline in lake mass and natural depletion of groundwater play a key role.

  2. DURABILITY OF DEPLETED URANIUM AGGREGATES (DUAGG) IN DUCRETE SHIELDING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, Catherine H.; Dole, Leslie R.

    2003-02-27

    The depleted uranium (DU) inventory in the United States exceeds 500,000 metric tonnes. To evaluate the possibilities for reuse of this stockpile of DU, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has created a research and development program to address the disposition of its DU(1). One potential use for this stockpile material is in the fabrication of nuclear shielding casks for the storage, transport, and disposal of spent nuclear fuels. The use of the DU-based shielding would reduce the size and weight of the casks while allowing a level of protection from neutrons and gamma rays comparable to that afforded by steel and concrete. DUAGG (depleted uranium aggregate) is formed of depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2) sintered with a synthetic-basalt-based binder. This study was designed to investigate possible deleterious reactions that could occur between the cement paste and the DUAGG. After 13 months of exposure to a cement pore solution, no deleterious expansive mineral phases were observed to form either with the DUO2 or with the simulated-basalt sintering phases. In the early stages of these exposure tests, Oak Ridge National Laboratory preliminary results confirm that the surface reactions of this aggregate proceed more slowly than expected. This finding may indicate that DUAGG/DUCRETE (depleted uranium concrete) casks could have service lives sufficient to meet the projected needs of DOE and the commercial nuclear power industry.

  3. Fully depleted, thick, monolithic CMOS pixels with high quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A.; Stefanov, K.; Johnston, N.; Holland, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Centre for Electronic Imaging (CEI) has an active programme of evaluating and designing Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors with high quantum efficiency, for applications in near-infrared and X-ray photon detection. This paper describes the performance characterisation of CMOS devices made on a high resistivity 50 μ m thick p-type substrate with a particular focus on determining the depletion depth and the quantum efficiency. The test devices contain 8 × 8 pixel arrays using CCD-style charge collection, which are manufactured in a low voltage CMOS process by ESPROS Photonics Corporation (EPC). Measurements include determining under which operating conditions the devices become fully depleted. By projecting a spot using a microscope optic and a LED and biasing the devices over a range of voltages, the depletion depth will change, causing the amount of charge collected in the projected spot to change. We determine if the device is fully depleted by measuring the signal collected from the projected spot. The analysis of spot size and shape is still under development.

  4. Seasonal oxygen depletion in the North Sea, a review.

    PubMed

    Topcu, H D; Brockmann, U H

    2015-10-15

    Seasonal mean oxygen depletion in offshore and coastal North Sea bottom waters was shown to range between 0.9 and 1.8 mg/L, corresponding to 95-83% saturation, between July and October over a 30-year assessment period (1980-2010). The magnitude of oxygen depletion was controlled by thermal stratification, modulated by water depth and nitrogen availability. Analyses were based on about 19,000 combined data sets. Eutrophication problem areas were identified mainly in coastal waters by oxygen minima, the lower 10th percentile of oxygen concentrations, and deviations of oxygen depletion from correlated stratification values. Connections between oxygen consumption and nitrogen sources and conversion, including denitrification, were indicated by correlations. Mean oxygen consumption reflected a minimum seasonal turnover of 3.1 g N/m(2) in the south-eastern North Sea, including denitrification of 1 g N/m(2). Oxygen depletion was underestimated in shallow coastal waters due to repeated erosion of stratification as indicated by local high variability. PMID:26234616

  5. Initial PVO evidence of electron depletion signatures downstream of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Hartle, R. E.; Perez-De-tejada, H.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    This first analysis of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer electron measurements obtained in early 1992 during teh PVO entry phase of the mission indicates the presence downstream from the terminator of a depletion or 'bite out' of energetic ionosheath electrons similar to that observed on Mariner 10. There is more than one possible explanation for this energetic electron depletion. If it is due to atmospheric scattering, the electrons traveling along draped magnetic flux tubes that thread through the Venus neutral atmosphere would lose energy from impact ionization with oxygen. The cross-section for such electron impact ionization of oxygen has a peak near 100 eV, and it remains high above this energy, so atmospheric loss could provde a natural process for electrons at these energies to be selectively removed. In this case, our results are consistent with the Kar et al. (1994) study of PVO atmospheric entry ion mass spectrometer data, which indicates that electron impact plays a significant role in maintaining the nightside ionosphere. Although it is appealing to interpret the energetic electron depletion in terms of direct atmospheric scattering, alternatively it could result from strong draping which connects the depletion region magnetically to the weak downstream bow shock and thereby reduces the electron source strength.

  6. Initial PVO Evidence of Electron Depletion Signatures Downstream of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Hartle, R. E.; Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    This first analysis of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer electron measurements obtained in early 1992 during the PVO entry phase of the mission indicates the presence downstream from the terminator of a depletion or "bite out" of energetic ionosheath electrons similar to that observed on Mariner 10. There is more than one possible explanation for this energetic electron depletion. If it is due to atmospheric scattering, the electrons traveling along draped magnetic flux tubes that thread through the Venus neutral atmosphere would lose energy from impact ionization with oxygen. The cross-section for such electron impact ionization of oxygen has a peak near 100 eV, and it remains high above this energy, so atmospheric loss could provide a natural process for electrons at these energies to be selectively removed. In this case, our results are consistent with the Kar et al. (1994) study of PVO atmospheric entry ion mass spectrometer data which indicates that electron impact plays a significant role in maintaining the nightside ionosphere. Although it is appealing to interpret the energetic electron depletion in terms of direct atmospheric scattering, alternatively it could result from strong draping which connects the depletion region magnetically to the weak downstream bow shock and thereby reduces the electron source strength.

  7. Depletion studies of two contrasting D-2 reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Gillund, G.N.; Patel, C.

    1980-01-01

    The Nisku B and G pools are 2 W. Pembina D-2 pools with contrasting reservoir properties. Average porosity, permeability, and maximum thickness are 5%, 130 md, and 95 m; and 16.4%, 7100 md and 19 m, respectively. The results of the depletion model studies of waterflooding and miscible flooding and some of the problems that occurred during these studies are reviewed.

  8. Abrupt Depletion Layer Approximation for the Metal Insulator Semiconductor Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    Determines the excess surface change carrier density, surface potential, and relative capacitance of a metal insulator semiconductor diode as a function of the gate voltage, using the precise questions and the equations derived with the abrupt depletion layer approximation. (Author/GA)

  9. Theory of colloid depletion stabilization by unattached and adsorbed polymers.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A N; Shvets, A A

    2015-12-01

    The polymer-induced forces between colloidal particles in a semidilute or concentrated polymer solution are considered theoretically. This study is focussed on the case of partially adsorbing colloidal surfaces involving some attractive centers able to trap polymer segments. In the presence of free polymers the particles are covered by self-assembled fluffy layers whose structure is elucidated. It is shown that the free-polymer-induced interaction between the particles is repulsive at distances exceeding the polymer correlation length, and that this depletion repulsion can be strongly enhanced due to the presence of fluffy layers. This enhanced depletion stabilization mechanism (which works in tandem with a more short-range steric repulsion of fluffy layers) can serve on its own to stabilize colloidal dispersions. More generally, we identify three main polymer-induced interaction mechanisms: depletion repulsion, depletion attraction, and steric repulsion. Their competition is analyzed both numerically and analytically based on an asymptotically rigorous mean-field theory. It is shown that colloid stabilization can be achieved by simply increasing the molecular weight of polymer additives, or by changing their concentration. PMID:26400677

  10. Spearfishing to depletion: evidence from temperate reef fishes in Chile.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Natalio; Gelcich, L Stefan; Vásquez, Julio A; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Unreliable and data-poor marine fishery landings can lead to a lack of regulatory action in fisheries management. Here we use official Chilean landing reports and non-conventional indicators, such as fishers' perceptions and spearfishing competition results, to provide evidence of reef fishes depletions caused by unregulated spearfishing. Results show that the three largest and most emblematic reef fishes targeted mainly by spearfishers (> 98% of landings) [Graus nigra (vieja negra), Semicossyphus darwini (sheephead or pejeperro), and Medialuna ancietae (acha)] show signs of depletion in terms of abundance and size and that overall the catches of reef fishes have shifted from large carnivore species toward smaller-sized omnivore and herbivore species. Information from two snorkeling speargun world championships (1971 and 2004, Iquique, Chile) and from fishers' perceptions shows the mean size of reef fish to be declining. Although the ecological consequences of reef fish depletion are not fully understood in Chile, evidence of spearfishing depleting temperate reef fishes must be explicitly included in policy debates. This would involve bans or strong restrictions on the use of SCUBA and hookah diving gear for spearfishing, and minimum size limits. It may also involve academic and policy discussions regarding conservation and fisheries management synergies within networks of no-take and territorial user-rights fisheries areas, as a strategy for the sustainable management of temperate and tropical reef fisheries. PMID:20945755

  11. Depletion analysis of the UMLRR reactor core using MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odera, Dim Udochukwu

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron flux and temporal nuclide inventory in reactor physics calculations is necessary for a variety of application in nuclear engineering such as criticality safety, safeguards, and spent fuel storage. The Monte Carlo N- Particle (MCNP6) code with integrated buildup depletion code (CINDER90) provides a high-fidelity tool that can be used to perform 3D, full core simulation to evaluate fissile material utilization, and nuclide inventory calculations as a function of burnup. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) reactor has been modeled with the deterministic based code, VENTURE and with an older version of MCNP (MCNP5). The MIT developed MCODE (MCNP ORIGEN DEPLETION CODE) was used previously to perform some limited depletion calculations. This work chronicles the use of MCNP6, released in June 2013, to perform coupled neutronics and depletion calculation. The results are compared to previously benchmarked results. Furthermore, the code is used to determine the ratio of fission products 134Cs and 137Cs (burnup indicators), and the resultant ratio is compared to the burnup of the UMLRR.

  12. Computation of rate and volume of stream depletion by wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, C.T.

    1968-01-01

    When field conditions approach certain assumed conditions, the depletion in flow of a nearby stream caused by pumping a well can be calculated readily by using dimensionless curves and tables. Computations can be made of (1) the rate of stream depletion at any time during the pumping period or the following nonpumping period, (2) the volume of water induced from the stream during any period, pumping or non-pumping, and (3) the effects, both in rate and volume of stream depletion, of any selected pattern of intermittent pumping. Sample computations illustrate the use of the curves and tables. An example shows that intermittent pumping may have a pattern of stream depletion not greatly different from a pattern for steady pumping of an equal volume. The residual effects of pumping, that is, effects after pumping stops, on streamflow may often be greater than the effects during the pumping period. Adequate advance planning that includes consideration of residual effects thus is essential to effective management of a stream-aquifer system.

  13. 9. VIEW OF FOUNDRY FURNACE, DEPLETED URANIUM INGOTS, BERYLLIUM INGOTS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF FOUNDRY FURNACE, DEPLETED URANIUM INGOTS, BERYLLIUM INGOTS, AND ALUMINUM SHAPES WERE PRODUCED IN THE FOUNDRY. (10/30/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Decaying equatorial F region plasma depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Kelley, M. C.

    1997-09-01

    We analyze plasma density data from the AE-E satellite to determine how F region irregularities decay. This satellite had a low inclination orbit that was ultimately circular at an altitude of 434 km. It frequently observed plasma depletions in the postsunset regime during spread F conditions, sometimes along a trajectory affording a ``horizontal cut'' perspective through the field-aligned irregularities. On one occasion, the satellite passed through nearly the same region of depleted flux tubes on sequential orbits. Data from these orbits imply that the irregularities decay at a constant rate over a broad range of horizontal scale sizes. We introduce a statistical model of the intermediate-scale (10 km-100 m) plasma irregularities and use it to infer a value for the perpendicular ambipolar diffusion coefficient from the measured decay rate. The value we estimate (2m2/s) is close to the expected classical value. The uniform decay rate and the quasi-universal nature of the intermediate-scale spectra hint that the irregularities themselves maintain a characteristic shape as they decay. High-resolution satellite density measurements show that irregularities have the form of kilometer-scale quasi-periodic depletions. We propose a one-dimensional, nonlinear model of the collisional interchange instability which admits a closed-form, steady state solution predicting the shape of the depletions. Computer simulations of the model produce kilometer-scale waves that resemble the in situ observations.

  15. Stored mafic/ultramafic crust and early Archean mantle depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Clement G.; Patchett, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Both early and late Archean rocks from greenstone belts and felsic gneiss complexes exhibit positive epsilon(Nd) values of +1 to +5 by 3.5 Ga, demonstrating that a depleted mantle reservoir existed very early. The amount of preserved pre-3.0 Ga continental crust cannot explain such high epsilon values in the depleted residue unless the volume of residual mantle was very small: a layer less than 70 km thick by 3.0 Ga. Repeated and exclusive sampling of such a thin layer, especially in forming the felsic gneiss complexes, is implausible. Extraction of enough continental crust to deplete the early mantle and its destructive recycling before 3.0 Ga ago requires another implausibility, that the sites of crustal generation of recycling were substantially distinct. In contrast, formation of mafic or ultramafic crust analogous to present-day oceanic crust was continuous from very early times. Recycled subducted oceanic lithosphere is a likely contributor to present-day hotspot magmas, and forms a reservoir at least comparable in volume to continental crust. Subduction of an early mafic/ultramafic oceanic crust and temporary storage rather than immediate mixing back into undifferentiated mantle may be responsible for the depletion and high epsilon(Nd) values of the Archean upper mantle.

  16. Depleting methyl bromide residues in soil by reaction with bases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite generally being considered the most effective soil fumigant, methyl bromide (MeBr) use is being phased out because its emissions from soil can lead to stratospheric ozone depletion. However, a large amount is still currently used due to Critical Use Exemptions. As strategies for reducing the...

  17. Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A penicillin G procaine residue depletion study was conducted in heavy sows to estimate the pre-slaughter withdrawal periods necessary to clear penicillin from kidney and muscle. Heavy sows (n = 126) were treated with penicillin G procaine at a 5x dose (33,000 IU/kg) for 3 consecutive days by intra...

  18. EFFECTS OF STRATOSPHERE OZONE DEPLETION ON AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV-Bradiation (290-320 nm) leaching aquatic environments is likely to increase over the next few decades. vailable information suggests that UV-B radiation can have a variety of deleterious effects on marine and freshwater ecosystems....

  19. A method to estimate groundwater depletion from confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Neuzil, C.E.

    2007-01-01

    Although depletion of storage in low-permeability confining layers is the source of much of the groundwater produced from many confined aquifer systems, it is all too frequently overlooked or ignored. This makes effective management of groundwater resources difficult by masking how much water has been derived from storage and, in some cases, the total amount of water that has been extracted from an aquifer system. Analyzing confining layer storage is viewed as troublesome because of the additional computational burden and because the hydraulic properties of confining layers are poorly known. In this paper we propose a simplified method for computing estimates of confining layer depletion, as well as procedures for approximating confining layer hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss) using geologic information. The latter makes the technique useful in developing countries and other settings where minimal data are available or when scoping calculations are needed. As such, our approach may be helpful for estimating the global transfer of groundwater to surface water. A test of the method on a synthetic system suggests that the computational errors will generally be small. Larger errors will probably result from inaccuracy in confining layer property estimates, but these may be no greater than errors in more sophisticated analyses. The technique is demonstrated by application to two aquifer systems: the Dakota artesian aquifer system in South Dakota and the coastal plain aquifer system in Virginia. In both cases, depletion from confining layers was substantially larger than depletion from the aquifers.

  20. 11. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT. THE METALS WERE PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF DEPLETED URANIUM INGOT. THE METALS WERE PLACED IN CRUCIBLES, LOADED INTO ONE OF EIGHT INDUCTION FURNACES AND MELTED IN A VACUUM ATMOSPHERE. (11/11/57) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. Identifying water mass depletion in Northern Iraq observed by GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, G.; Olsthoorn, T. N.; Al-Manmi, D. A. M. A.; Schrama, E. J. O.; Smidt, E. H.

    2014-10-01

    Observations acquired by Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission indicate a mass loss of 31 ± 3 km3 or 130 ± 14 mm in Northern Iraq between 2007 and 2009. This data is used as an independent validation of a hydrologic model of the region including lake mass variations. We developed a rainfall-runoff model for five tributaries of the Tigris River, based on local geology and climate conditions. Model inputs are precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) observations, and potential evaporation from GLDAS model parameters. Our model includes a representation of the karstified aquifers that cause large natural groundwater variations in this region. Observed river discharges were used to calibrate our model. In order to get the total mass variations, we corrected for lake mass variations derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in combination with satellite altimetry and some in-situ data. Our rainfall-runoff model confirms that Northern Iraq suffered a drought between 2007 and 2009 and is consistent with the mass loss observed by GRACE over that period. Also, GRACE observed the annual cycle predicted by the rainfall-runoff model. The total mass depletion seen by GRACE between 2007 and 2009 is mainly explained by a lake mass depletion of 74 ± 4 mm and a natural groundwater depletion of 37 ± 6 mm. Our findings indicate that man-made groundwater extraction has a minor influence in this region while depletion of lake mass and geology play a key role.

  2. Fully depleted back-illuminated p-channel CCD development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, Chris J.; Bercovitz, John H.; Groom, Donald E.; Holland, Stephen E.; Kadel, Richard W.; Karcher, Armin; Kolbe, William F.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Palaio, Nicholas P.; Prasad, Val; Turko, Bojan T.; Wang, Guobin

    2003-07-08

    An overview of CCD development efforts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is presented. Operation of fully-depleted, back-illuminated CCD's fabricated on high resistivity silicon is described, along with results on the use of such CCD's at ground-based observatories. Radiation damage and point-spread function measurements are described, as well as discussion of CCD fabrication technologies.

  3. Ozone depletion, related UVB changes and increased skin cancer incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, R. P.

    1998-03-01

    Stratospheric ozone at middle latitudes shows a seasonal variation of about +/-20%, a quasi-biennial oscillation of 1-10% range and a long-term variation in which the level was almost steady up to about 1979 and declined thereafter to the present day by about 10%. These variations are expected to be reflected in solar UVB observed at the ground, but in an opposite direction. Thus UVB should have had a long-term increase of about 10-20%, which should cause an increase in skin cancer incidence of about 20-40%. Skin cancer incidence has increased all over the world, e.g. about 90% in USA during 1974-1990. It is popularly believed that this increase in skin cancer incidence is related to the recent ozone depletion. This seems to be incorrect, for two reasons. Firstly, the observed skin cancer increase is too large (90%) compared with the expected value (40%) from ozone depletion. Secondly, cancer does not develop immediately after exposure to solar UVB. The sunburns may occur within hours; but cancer development and detection may take years, even decades. Hence the observed skin cancer increase since 1974 (no data available for earlier periods) must have occurred due to exposure to solar UVB in the 1950s and 1960s, when there was no ozone depletion. Thus, the skin cancer increase must be attributed to harmful solar UVB levels existing even in the 1960s, accentuated later not by ozone depletion (which started only much later, by 1979) but by other causes, such as a longer human life span, better screening, increasing tendencies of sunbathing at beaches, etc., in affluent societies. On the other hand, the recent ozone depletion and the associated UVB increases will certainly take their toll; only that the effects will not be noticed now but years or decades from now. The concern for the future expressed in the Montreal Protocol for reducing ozone depletion by controlling CFC production is certainly justified, especially because increased UVB is harmful to animal and

  4. Global Storm-Time Depletion of the Outer Electron Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Millan, R. M.; Kress, B. T.; Fennell, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (≳0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where its magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity electron intensities in the belt can vary by orders of magnitude at different spatial and temporal scale. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the depletions: fully adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere due to pitch-angle scattering by plasma waves (e.g., EMIC and whistler waves), and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the magnetopause losses to the rapid depletion of the outer belt observed at the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during the main phase of March 17, 2013 storm. The intensities of > 1 MeV electrons were depleted by more that an order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the belt in less than 6 hours after the sudden storm commencement. For the analysis we used three-dimensional test-particle simulations of global evolution of the outer belt in the Tsyganenko-Sitnov (TS07D) magnetic field model with the inductive electric field. The comparison of the simulation results with electron measurements from the MagEIS experiment shows that the magnetopause losses in the model accounts for most of the observed depletion. The individual electron motion the process is non-adiabatic; the third invariant is violated by global variations of the inner magnetospheric fields caused by the magnetopause compressions and the buildup of ring current, while the second invariant is violated at drift orbit bifurcations. The analysis shows that the observed deep depletion of radiation belt intensities is enabled by the change in the global configuration of magnetic

  5. Enhanced Monte-Carlo-Linked Depletion Capabilities in MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Hendricks, John S.; Anghaie, Samim

    2006-07-01

    As advanced reactor concepts challenge the accuracy of current modeling technologies, a higher-fidelity depletion calculation is necessary to model time-dependent core reactivity properly for accurate cycle length and safety margin determinations. The recent integration of CINDER90 into the MCNPX Monte Carlo radiation transport code provides a completely self-contained Monte-Carlo-linked depletion capability. Two advances have been made in the latest MCNPX capability based on problems observed in pre-released versions: continuous energy collision density tracking and proper fission yield selection. Pre-released versions of the MCNPX depletion code calculated the reaction rates for (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,p), (n,a), and (n,?) by matching the MCNPX steady-state 63-group flux with 63-group cross sections inherent in the CINDER90 library and then collapsing to one-group collision densities for the depletion calculation. This procedure led to inaccuracies due to the miscalculation of the reaction rates resulting from the collapsed multi-group approach. The current version of MCNPX eliminates this problem by using collapsed one-group collision densities generated from continuous energy reaction rates determined during the MCNPX steady-state calculation. MCNPX also now explicitly determines the proper fission yield to be used by the CINDER90 code for the depletion calculation. The CINDER90 code offers a thermal, fast, and high-energy fission yield for each fissile isotope contained in the CINDER90 data file. MCNPX determines which fission yield to use for a specified problem by calculating the integral fission rate for the defined energy boundaries (thermal, fast, and high energy), determining which energy range contains the majority of fissions, and then selecting the appropriate fission yield for the energy range containing the majority of fissions. The MCNPX depletion capability enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code

  6. Mercury depletion events over Antarctic and Arctic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerentorp Mastromonaco, M. G.; Gardfeldt, K.; Wangberg, I.; Jourdain, B.; Dommergue, A.; Kuronen, P.; Pirrone, N.; Jacobi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant and in its elemental form it is spread by air to remote areas far away from point sources. In Antarctic and Arctic regions the airborne mercury may be oxidized, followed by deposition of the metal on land and sea surfaces. It is previously known that during early spring in these regions, processes involving halogen radical photochemistry induce an oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) in air. This phenomenon is known as an atmospheric mercury depletion event (AMDE) and is characterized by sudden and remarkable decreases in GEM that occurs within hours or days. All or most part of the GEM in air is transformed into gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate mercury (HgP). Equivalent ozone depletion events (ODE) do also occur in Antarctic and Arctic regions and the halogen radical photolytic processes involved for AMDEs and ODEs are interrelated. During two oceanographic campaigns at the Weddell Sea onboard RV Polarstern, ANTXXIX/6 (130608-130812) and ANTXXIX/7 (130814-131016), continuous measurements of GEM, GOM and HgP in air were performed using the Tekran mercury speciation system 1130/35. This is the first time such long time series of GEM-, GOM- and HgP data has been achieved over water in the Antarctic during winter and spring. Several mercury depletion events were detected as early as in the middle of July and are correlated and verified with ozone measurements onboard the ship. The observed depletion events were characterised by sudden major decreases in both GEM and ozone concentrations and highly elevated values of HgP. A depletion event is a local phenomenon but evidences show that traces of such events can be detected far away from its origin. During a spring campaign at the Pallas-Matorova station in northern Finland (68o00'N, 24o14'E), GEM, GOM and HgP were measured during three weeks in April 2012 using the Tekran mercury speciation system 1130/35. Traces of remote AMDEs were observed by sudden decreases of GEM

  7. Calcium depletion in a Southeastern United States forest ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, T.G.; Hooper, R.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Aulenbach, Brent T.; Cappellato, R.; Blum, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    Forest soil Ca depletion through leaching and vegetation uptake may threaten long-term sustainability of forest productivity in the southeastern USA. This study was conducted to assess Ca pools and fluxes in a representative southern Piedmont forest to determine the soil Ca depletion rate. Soil Ca storage, Ca inputs in atmospheric deposition, and outputs in soil leaching and vegetation uptake were investigated at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed (PMRW) near Atlanta, GA. Average annual outputs of 12.3 kg ha-1 yr-1 in uptake into merchantable wood and 2.71 kg ha-1 yr-1 soil leaching exceeded inputs in atmospheric deposition of 2.24 kg ha-1 yr-1. The annual rate of Ca uptake into merchantable wood exceeds soil leaching losses by a factor of more than five. The potential for primary mineral weathering to provide a substantial amount of Ca inputs is low. Estimates of Ca replenishment through mineral weathering in the surface 1 m of soil and saprolite was estimated to be 0.12 kg ha-1 yr-1. The weathering rate in saprolite and partially weathered bedrock below the surface 1 m is similarly quite low because mineral Ca is largely depleted. The soil Ca depletion rate at PMRW is estimated to be 12.7 kg ha-1 yr-1. At PMRW and similar hardwood-dominated forests in the Piedmont physiographic province, Ca depletion will probably reduce soil reserves to less than the requirement for a merchantable forest stand in ???80 yr. This assessment and comparable analyses at other southeastern USA forest sites suggests that there is a strong potential for a regional problem in forest nutrition in the long term.Forest soil Ca depletion through leaching and vegetation uptake may threaten long-term sustainability of forest productivity in the southeastern USA. This study was conducted to assess Ca pools and fluxes in a representative southern Piedmont forest to determine the soil Ca depletion rate. Soil Ca storage, Ca inputs in atmospheric deposition, and outputs in soil leaching and

  8. Fundamental differences between Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Haskins, Jessica; Ivy, Diane J; Min, Flora

    2014-04-29

    Antarctic ozone depletion is associated with enhanced chlorine from anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry under cold conditions. The deep Antarctic "hole" contrasts with the generally weaker depletions observed in the warmer Arctic. An unusually cold Arctic stratospheric season occurred in 2011, raising the question of how the Arctic ozone chemistry in that year compares with others. We show that the averaged depletions near 20 km across the cold part of each pole are deeper in Antarctica than in the Arctic for all years, although 2011 Arctic values do rival those seen in less-depleted years in Antarctica. We focus not only on averages but also on extremes, to address whether or not Arctic ozone depletion can be as extreme as that observed in the Antarctic. This information provides unique insights into the contrasts between Arctic and Antarctic ozone chemistry. We show that extreme Antarctic ozone minima fall to or below 0.1 parts per million by volume (ppmv) at 18 and 20 km (about 70 and 50 mbar) whereas the lowest Arctic ozone values are about 0.5 ppmv at these altitudes. At a higher altitude of 24 km (30-mbar level), no Arctic data below about 2 ppmv have been observed, including in 2011, in contrast to values more than an order of magnitude lower in Antarctica. The data show that the lowest ozone values are associated with temperatures below -80 °C to -85 °C depending upon altitude, and are closely associated with reduced gaseous nitric acid concentrations due to uptake and/or sedimentation in polar stratospheric cloud particles. PMID:24733920

  9. Iron depletion enhances the effect of sorafenib in hepatocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Urano, Shinichi; Ohara, Toshiaki; Noma, Kazuhiro; Katsube, Ryoichi; Ninomiya, Takayuki; Tomono, Yasuko; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Fumiaki; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Matsukawa, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2016-06-01

    ABSTACT Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is known to have a poor prognosis. Sorafenib, a molecular targeted drug, is most commonly used for HCC treatment. However, its effect on HCC is limited in clinical use and therefore new strategies regarding sorafenib treatment are required. Iron overload is known to be associated with progression of chronic hepatitis and increased risk of HCC. We previously reported that iron depletion inhibited cancer cell proliferation and conversely induced angiogenesis. Indeed iron depletion therapy including iron chelator needs to be combined with anti-angiogenic drug for its anti-cancer effect. Since sorafenib has an anti-angiogenic effect by its inhibitory targeting VEGFR, we hypothesized that sorafenib could complement the anti-cancer effect of iron depletion. We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between the efficacy of sorafenib and serum iron-related markers in clinical HCC patients. In clinical cases, overall survival was prolonged in total iron binding capacity (TIBC) high- and ferritin low-patients. This result suggested that the low iron-pooled patients, who could have a potential of more angiogenic properties in/around HCC tumors, could be adequate for sorafenib treatment. We determined the effect of sorafenib (Nexavar®) and/or deferasirox (EXJADE®) on cancer cell viability, and on cell signaling of human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 and HLE cells. Both iron depletion by deferasirox and sorafenib revealed insufficient cytotoxic effect by each monotherapy, however, on the basis of increased angiogenesis by iron depletion, the addition of deferasirox enhanced anti-proliferative effect of sorafenib. Deferasirox was confirmed to increase vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion into cellular supernatants by ELISA analysis. In in vivo study sorafenib combined with deferasirox also enhanced sorafenib-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that sorafenib combined with deferasirox could be a novel combination

  10. Studies on Mechanisms of Hypocalcemia of Magnesium Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Chilumula R.; Coburn, Jack W.; Hartenbower, David L.; Friedler, Robert M.; Brickman, Arnold S.; Massry, Shaul G.; Jowsey, Jenifer

    1973-01-01

    Studies were carried out to evaluate the mechanism of hypocalcemia in magnesium depletion. Day old chicks fed a magnesium deficient diet developed marked hypocalcemia, with a direct relation between serum calcium (y) and magnesium (x): y = 2.68 x + 4.24, r = 0.84 (both in mg/100 ml). Injections of parathyroid extract that increased serum calcium 2-3 mg/100 ml in normals had no effect in Mg-depleted birds. Very large dietary supplements of calcium or vitamin D3 increased mean serum calcium only from 5.3 to 7.7 and 7.8 mg/100 ml, respectively, while a normal magnesium diet for 3 days increased calcium from 5.3 to 9.9 mg/100 ml despite absence of dietary calcium. Intestinal calcium transport, studied in vitro, and the calcium concentration of the carcass was significantly increased in magnesium-depleted chicks, making it unlikely that reduced intestinal absorption of calcium caused the hypocalcemia. In magnesium-deficient chicks, the bone content of magnesium was decreased by 74%, the calcium content was unchanged, and the cortical thickness of bone was markedly increased. After 3 days of magnesium-repletion, cortical thickness was reduced with increased endosteal resorption. There was an increase in unmineralized osteoid tissue in the magnesium-depleted chicks. Parathyroid gland size and histology did not differ in magnesium-depleted and control birds. The results suggest that hypocalcemia develops due to altered equilibrium of calcium between extracellular fluid and bone, favoring increased net movement into the latter. Failure of parathyroid gland function could also exist, and unresponsiveness to parathyroid hormone (PTH) may also contribute to the hypocalcemia. However, failure of PTH action is probably due to the presence of excess osteoid tissue rather than a primary event leading to hypocalcemia. Images PMID:4750437

  11. Fundamental differences between Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Susan; Haskins, Jessica; Ivy, Diane J.; Min, Flora

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic ozone depletion is associated with enhanced chlorine from anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry under cold conditions. The deep Antarctic “hole” contrasts with the generally weaker depletions observed in the warmer Arctic. An unusually cold Arctic stratospheric season occurred in 2011, raising the question of how the Arctic ozone chemistry in that year compares with others. We show that the averaged depletions near 20 km across the cold part of each pole are deeper in Antarctica than in the Arctic for all years, although 2011 Arctic values do rival those seen in less-depleted years in Antarctica. We focus not only on averages but also on extremes, to address whether or not Arctic ozone depletion can be as extreme as that observed in the Antarctic. This information provides unique insights into the contrasts between Arctic and Antarctic ozone chemistry. We show that extreme Antarctic ozone minima fall to or below 0.1 parts per million by volume (ppmv) at 18 and 20 km (about 70 and 50 mbar) whereas the lowest Arctic ozone values are about 0.5 ppmv at these altitudes. At a higher altitude of 24 km (30-mbar level), no Arctic data below about 2 ppmv have been observed, including in 2011, in contrast to values more than an order of magnitude lower in Antarctica. The data show that the lowest ozone values are associated with temperatures below −80 °C to −85 °C depending upon altitude, and are closely associated with reduced gaseous nitric acid concentrations due to uptake and/or sedimentation in polar stratospheric cloud particles. PMID:24733920

  12. Mouse liver protein sulfhydryl depletion after acetaminophen exposure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Shi, Qiang; Roberts, Dean W; Hinson, Jack A; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Davis, Kelly; Salminen, William F

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is the leading cause of acute liver failure in many countries. This study determined the extent of liver protein sulfhydryl depletion not only in whole liver homogenate but also in the zonal pattern of sulfhydryl depletion within the liver lobule. A single oral gavage dose of 150 or 300 mg/kg APAP in B6C3F1 mice produced increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, and glutathione depletion in a dose-dependent manner. Free protein sulfhydryls were measured in liver protein homogenates by labeling with maleimide linked to a near infrared fluorescent dye followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Global protein sulfhydryl levels were decreased significantly (48.4%) starting at 1 hour after the APAP dose and maintained at this reduced level through 24 hours. To visualize the specific hepatocytes that had reduced protein sulfhydryl levels, frozen liver sections were labeled with maleimide linked to horseradish peroxidase. The centrilobular areas exhibited dramatic decreases in free protein sulfhydryls while the periportal regions were essentially spared. These protein sulfhydryl-depleted regions correlated with areas exhibiting histopathologic injury and APAP binding to protein. The majority of protein sulfhydryl depletion was due to reversible oxidation since the global- and lobule-specific effects were essentially reversed when the samples were reduced with tris(2-carboxyethy)phosphine before maleimide labeling. These temporal and zonal pattern changes in protein sulfhydryl oxidation shed new light on the importance that changes in protein redox status might play in the pathogenesis of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:23093024

  13. Oceanic bromoform emissions weighted by their ozone depletion potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Ziska, F.; Pisso, I.; Quack, B.; Velders, G. J. M.; Yang, X.; Krüger, K.

    2015-12-01

    At present, anthropogenic halogens and oceanic emissions of very short-lived substances (VSLSs) both contribute to the observed stratospheric ozone depletion. Emissions of the long-lived anthropogenic halogens have been reduced and are currently declining, whereas emissions of the biogenic VSLSs are expected to increase in future climate due to anthropogenic activities affecting oceanic production and emissions. Here, we introduce a new approach for assessing the impact of oceanic halocarbons on stratospheric ozone by calculating their ozone depletion potential (ODP)-weighted emissions. Seasonally and spatially dependent, global distributions are derived within a case-study framework for CHBr3 for the period 1999-2006. At present, ODP-weighted emissions of CHBr3 amount up to 50 % of ODP-weighted anthropogenic emissions of CFC-11 and to 9 % of all long-lived ozone depleting halogens. The ODP-weighted emissions are large where strong oceanic emissions coincide with high-reaching convective activity and show pronounced peaks at the Equator and the coasts with largest contributions from the Maritime Continent and western Pacific Ocean. Variations of tropical convective activity lead to seasonal shifts in the spatial distribution of the trajectory-derived ODP with the updraught mass flux, used as a proxy for trajectory-derived ODP, explaining 71 % of the variance of the ODP distribution. Future climate projections based on the RCP 8.5 scenario suggest a 31 % increase of the ODP-weighted CHBr3 emissions by 2100 compared to present values. This increase is related to a larger convective updraught mass flux in the upper troposphere and increasing emissions in a future climate. However, at the same time, it is reduced by less effective bromine-related ozone depletion due to declining stratospheric chlorine concentrations. The comparison of the ODP-weighted emissions of short- and long-lived halocarbons provides a new concept for assessing the overall impact of oceanic

  14. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: The source material for advanced shielding systems

    SciTech Connect

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.; Cooley, C.R.

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability problem in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. DOE is evaluating several options for the disposition of this UF{sub 6}, including continued storage, disposal, and recycle into a product. Based on studies conducted to date, the most feasible recycle option for the depleted uranium is shielding in low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or vitrified high-level waste containers. Estimates for the cost of disposal, using existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion depending on factors such as the disposal site and the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Advanced technologies can reduce these costs, but UF{sub 6} disposal still represents large future costs. This paper describes an application for depleted uranium in which depleted uranium hexafluoride is converted into an oxide and then into a heavy aggregate. The heavy uranium aggregate is combined with conventional concrete materials to form an ultra high density concrete, DUCRETE, weighing more than 400 lb/ft{sup 3}. DUCRETE can be used as shielding in spent nuclear fuel/high-level waste casks at a cost comparable to the lower of the disposal cost estimates. Consequently, the case can be made that DUCRETE shielded casks are an alternative to disposal. In this case, a beneficial long term solution is attained for much less than the combined cost of independently providing shielded casks and disposing of the depleted uranium. Furthermore, if disposal is avoided, the political problems associated with selection of a disposal location are also avoided. Other studies have also shown cost benefits for low level waste shielded disposal containers.

  15. The influence of ego depletion on sprint start performance in athletes without track and field experience

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Chris; Persaud, Brittany N.; Oudejans, Raôul R. D.; Bertrams, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We tested the assumption that ego depletion would affect the sprint start in a sample of N = 38 athletes without track and field experience in an experiment by applying a mixed between- (depletion vs. non-depletion) within- (T1: before manipulation of ego depletion vs. T2: after manipulation of ego depletion) subjects design. We assumed that ego depletion would increase the possibility for a false start, as regulating the impulse to initiate the sprinting movement too soon before the starting signal requires self-control. In line with our assumption, we found a significant interaction as there was only a significant increase in the number of false starts from T1 to T2 for the depletion group while this was not the case for the non-depletion group. We conclude that ego depletion has a detrimental influence on the sprint start in athletes without track and field experience. PMID:26347678

  16. CRDIAC: Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Control

    SciTech Connect

    Steven K. Logan

    2012-08-01

    When modeling the behavior of a nuclear reactor over time, it is important to understand how the isotopes in the reactor will change, or transmute, over that time. This is especially important in the reactor fuel itself. Many nuclear physics modeling codes model how particles interact in the system, but do not model this over time. Thus, another code is used in conjunction with the nuclear physics code to accomplish this. In our code, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) codes and the Multi Reactor Transmutation Analysis Utility (MRTAU) were chosen as the codes to use. In this way, MCNP would produce the reaction rates in the different isotopes present and MRTAU would use cross sections generated from these reaction rates to determine how the mass of each isotope is lost or gained. Between these two codes, the information must be altered and edited for use. For this, a Python 2.7 script was developed to aid the user in getting the information in the correct forms. This newly developed methodology was called the Coupled Reactor Depletion Instrument with Automated Controls (CRDIAC). As is the case in any newly developed methodology for modeling of physical phenomena, CRDIAC needed to be verified against similar methodology and validated against data taken from an experiment, in our case AFIP-3. AFIP-3 was a reduced enrichment plate type fuel tested in the ATR. We verified our methodology against the MCNP Coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) method and validated our work against the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) data. When compared to MCWO, the difference in concentration of U-235 throughout Cycle 144A was about 1%. When compared to the PIE data, the average bias for end of life U-235 concentration was about 2%. These results from CRDIAC therefore agree with the MCWO and PIE data, validating and verifying CRDIAC. CRDIAC provides an alternative to using ORIGEN-based methodology, which is useful because CRDIAC's depletion code, MRTAU, uses every available isotope in its depletion

  17. Offsetting Streamflow Depletion from Well Pumpage by Capture of Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konikow, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that groundwater pumpage must be balanced by a loss of water elsewhere. This loss comes primarily from storage depletion at early times and increasingly from capture at later times. Capture includes some combination of increases in recharge to the aquifer and decreases in discharge from the aquifer induced by the pumpage. Most capture is manifested as streamflow depletion (e.g., through induced infiltration and/or reductions in baseflow). However, decreasing evapotransirative discharge from an aquifer would constitute a type of capture that does not affect streamflow. In his classic 1940 paper Theis recommends that wells be placed in areas where groundwater "is being lost by evaporation or transpiration by non-productive vegetation," thereby utilizing this "lost" water with a minimal lowering of the water table. This study uses numerical simulation of a hypothetical unconfined stream-aquifer system in an arid climate, where streamflow depletion is typically a major concern, to assess how capture of evapotranspiration (ET) can influence the sources of water for a pumping well when the ET losses are directly affected by spatial and temporal changes in the depth to the water table. Consequently, streamflow depletion for a given pumping rate can be affected by capture of ET and how that varies with well location and the history of development and drawdown. We assume the standard MODFLOW linear model for changes in groundwater ET as the water table declines to a specified extinction depth. In one scenario in which about half the recharge to the aquifer is lost to ET under predevelopment conditions, the percentage of well discharge balanced by decreased ET changed from 1.1% after one year to 18% after 200 years of simulated pumpage. The actual ET rate decreased from 5,372 m3/d under predevelopment conditions to 5,001 m3/d after 200 years of development (a 7% reduction in total ET losses). At this same time, 77% of pumpage is derived from streamflow

  18. Evaluating groundwater depletion as computed by a global water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Carina; Doell, Petra; Mueller Schmied, Hannes; Portmann, Felix

    2013-04-01

    When groundwater abstraction occurs faster than its replenishment over a long time and in a large area, the result is an overexploitation or depletion of groundwater. The problem is aggravated in areas where a growing population relies on freshwater resources for an intensive irrigation agriculture that is meant to guarantee food security. Especially in semi-arid and arid regions, the dominant use for groundwater is irrigation, reaching more than 95% of total water use. Therefore, the hot spots for groundwater depletion are the world's major irrigation areas like the central United States, north-western India and north China. Groundwater depletion presents a major threat to securing agricultural productivity and domestic water supply in these parts of the world. Besides, the environmental consequences that accompany the abstraction of groundwater are severe. Within the scientific community there is a common understanding that high-quality data on globally existing groundwater resources are deficient. In order to allow a sustainable management of the world's available groundwater resources, especially in areas under current water stress, the quantification of groundwater depletion is of high importance. WaterGAP (Water - Global Assessment and Prognosis) is a global model of water availability and water use which can serve to estimate the impact of groundwater and surface water withdrawals on groundwater storage. The new WaterGAP version 2.2a was modified to allow for an improved analysis of groundwater storage changes in semi-arid and arid regions. Now, groundwater recharge from surface water bodies is simulated in semi-arid and arid areas. Estimation of net groundwater abstractions was modified with respect of irrigation water use efficiency for groundwater and return flow fractions. In addition, irrigation consumptive use has been set to 70% of optimal irrigation consumptive use, assuming deficit irrigation to prevail in these parts of the world. Based on time

  19. The follicle-deplete mouse ovary produces androgen.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Loretta P; Devine, Patrick J; Dyer, Cheryl A; Hoyer, Patricia B

    2004-07-01

    The follicle-depleted postmenopausal ovary is enriched in interstitial cells that produce androgens. This study was designed to cause follicle depletion in mice using the industrial chemical, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), and characterize the steroidogenic capacity of cells in the residual ovarian tissue. From a dose-finding study, the optimal daily concentration of VCD was determined to be 160 mg/kg. Female B6C3F(1) immature mice were treated daily with vehicle control or VCD (160 mg kg(-1) day(-1), 15 days, i.p.). Ovaries were removed and processed for histological evaluation. On Day 15 following onset of treatment, primordial follicles were depleted and primary follicles were reduced to about 10% of controls. On Day 46, primary follicles were depleted and secondary and antral follicles were reduced to 0.7% and 2.6% of control, respectively. Seventy-five percent of treated mice displayed disruptions in estrous cyclicity. All treated mice were in persistent diestrus (acyclic) by Day 58. Plasma FSH levels were increased (P < 0.05) relative to controls on Day 37 and had plateaued by Day 100. Relative to age-matched cyclic controls, by Day 127, the significant differences in VCD-treated mice included reduced ovarian and uterine weights, elevated plasma LH and FSH, and reduced plasma progesterone and androstenedione. Furthermore, plasma 17beta-estradiol levels were nondetectable. Unlike controls, immunostaining for LH receptor, and the high density lipoprotein receptor (SR-BI), was diffuse in ovarian sections from VCD-treated animals. Ovaries from Day 120 control and VCD-treated animals were dissociated and dispersed cells were placed in culture. Cultured cells from ovaries of VCD-treated animals produced less LH-stimulated progesterone than control cells. Androstenedione production was nondetectable in cells from cyclic control animals. Conversely, cells from VCD-treated animals produced androstenedione that was doubled in the presence of insulin and LH (1 and

  20. Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion the Environment and Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. M.; Dash, Nutan Ku; Pradhan, Arjyadhara; Mishra, Sthita Prajna

    2012-09-01

    Ozone depletion results in greater amounts of UV-B radiation that had an impact on terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical systems. Biogeochemical cycles were the complex interactions of physical, chemical, geological and biological processes that control the transport and transformation of substances in the natural environment and therefore the conditions that humans experience in Earth's system. The increased UV-B radiation impinging on terrestrial and aquatic systems, due to ozone depletion, results in changes in the trace gas exchange between the continents, oceans and the atmosphere. This had result in complex alterations to atmospheric chemistry, the global elemental cycles such as the carbon cycle, and had an impact on the survival and health of all organisms on Earth, including humans.

  1. Mass depletion: A new parameter for quantitative jet modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, A.; Putschke, J.

    2016-05-01

    We propose an extension to classify jet modification in heavy-ion collisions by including the jet mass along with its energy. The mass of a jet, as measured by jet reconstruction algorithms, is constrained by the jet's virtuality, which in turn has a considerable effect on such observables as the fragmentation function and jet shape observables. The leading parton, propagating through a dense medium, experiences substantial virtuality (or mass) depletion along with energy loss. Meaningful comparisons between surviving jets and jets produced in p -p collisions require mass depletion to be taken into account. Using a vacuum event generator, we show the close relationship between the actual jet mass and that after applying a jet reconstruction algorithm. Using an in-medium event generator, we demonstrate the clear difference between the mass of a surviving parton exiting a dense medium and a parton with a similar energy formed in a hard scattering event. Effects of this difference on jet observables are discussed.

  2. Lower hybrid wave phenomena associated with density depletions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyler, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid description of lower hybrid, whistler and magnetosonic waves is applied to study wave phenomena near the lower hybrid resonance associated with plasma density depletions. The goal is to understand the nature of lower hybrid cavitons and spikelets often associated with transverse ion acceleration events in the auroral ionosphere. Three-dimensional simulations show the ponderomotive force leads to the formation of a density cavity (caviton) in which lower hybrid wave energy is concentrated (spikelet) resulting in a three-dimensional collapse of the configuration. Plasma density depletions of the order of a few percent are shown to greatly modify the homogeneous linear properties of lower hybrid waves and account for many of the observed features of lower hybrid spikelets.

  3. Neutrophil depletion delays wound repair in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Okawa, Yayoi; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important clinical problems in caring for elderly patients is treatment of pressure ulcers. One component of normal wound healing is the generation of an inflammatory reaction, which is characterized by the sequential infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Neutrophils migrate early in the wound healing process. In aged C57BL/6 mice, wound healing is relatively inefficient. We examined the effects of neutrophil numbers on wound healing in both young and aged mice. We found that the depletion of neutrophils by anti-Gr-1 antibody dramatically delayed wound healing in aged mice. The depletion of neutrophils in young mice had less effect on the kinetics of wound healing. Intravenous G-CSF injection increased the migration of neutrophils to the wound site. While the rate of wound repair did not change significantly in young mice following G-CSF injection, it increased significantly in old mice. PMID:19424869

  4. Effect of temperature coupling on ozone depletion prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Butler, D. M.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of chlorine perturbations on both the temperature and the ozone distribution in the stratosphere have been studied using a simplified radiative-photochemical model. The model solves the hydrostatic equation for total density in a self-consistent manner as the temperature is changed. Radiative coupling is found to have a significant effect on both the thermal structure and the ozone distribution, particularly in the 35-50-km region. By increasing the ClX mixing ratio by 5.0 ppbv, the temperature in this region is decreased by 5 to 10 K with a slight increase below 30 km. The local ozone depletion around 40 km due to added ClX is smaller compared with the estimate made by keeping the temperature fixed to the ambient condition. However, the integrated effect of radiative coupling is to increase the calculated column ozone depletion by 15% to 25% in this model.

  5. Visualization of stratospheric ozone depletion and the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct analysis of spacecraft observations of stratospheric ozone yields information about the morphology of annual austral depletion. Visual correlation of ozone with other atmospheric data illustrates the diurnal dynamics of the polar vortex and contributions from the upper troposphere, including the formation and breakup of the depletion region each spring. These data require care in their presentation to minimize the introduction of visualization artifacts that are erroneously interpreted as data features. Non geographically registered data of differing mesh structures can be visually correlated via cartographic warping of base geometries without interpolation. Because this approach is independent of the realization technique, it provides a framework for experimenting with many visualization strategies. This methodology preserves the fidelity of the original data sets in a coordinate system suitable for three-dimensional, dynamic examination of atmospheric phenomena.

  6. Currents through Hv1 channels deplete protons in their vicinity

    PubMed Central

    De-la-Rosa, Víctor; Suárez-Delgado, Esteban; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.

    2016-01-01

    Proton channels have evolved to provide a pH regulatory mechanism, affording the extrusion of protons from the cytoplasm at all membrane potentials. Previous evidence has suggested that channel-mediated acid extrusion could significantly change the local concentration of protons in the vicinity of the channel. In this work, we directly measure the proton depletion caused by activation of Hv1 proton channels using patch-clamp fluorometry recordings from channels labeled with the Venus fluorescent protein at intracellular domains. The fluorescence of the Venus protein is very sensitive to pH, thus behaving as a genetically encoded sensor of local pH. Eliciting outward proton currents increases the fluorescence intensity of Venus. This dequenching is related to the magnitude of the current and not to channel gating and is dependent on the pH gradient. Our results provide direct evidence of local proton depletion caused by flux through the proton-selective channel. PMID:26809792

  7. Currents through Hv1 channels deplete protons in their vicinity.

    PubMed

    De-la-Rosa, Víctor; Suárez-Delgado, Esteban; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Islas, León D

    2016-02-01

    Proton channels have evolved to provide a pH regulatory mechanism, affording the extrusion of protons from the cytoplasm at all membrane potentials. Previous evidence has suggested that channel-mediated acid extrusion could significantly change the local concentration of protons in the vicinity of the channel. In this work, we directly measure the proton depletion caused by activation of Hv1 proton channels using patch-clamp fluorometry recordings from channels labeled with the Venus fluorescent protein at intracellular domains. The fluorescence of the Venus protein is very sensitive to pH, thus behaving as a genetically encoded sensor of local pH. Eliciting outward proton currents increases the fluorescence intensity of Venus. This dequenching is related to the magnitude of the current and not to channel gating and is dependent on the pH gradient. Our results provide direct evidence of local proton depletion caused by flux through the proton-selective channel. PMID:26809792

  8. Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Darcie D; Cerreta, Ellen K; Gray, Ill, George T

    2009-01-01

    Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

  9. High pressure elasticity and thermal properties of depleted uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, M. K.; Velisavljevic, N.

    2016-04-01

    Studies of the phase diagram of uranium have revealed a wealth of high pressure and temperature phases. Under ambient conditions the crystal structure is well defined up to 100 gigapascals (GPa), but very little information on thermal conduction or elasticity is available over this same range. This work has applied ultrasonic interferometry to determine the elasticity, mechanical, and thermal properties of depleted uranium to 4.5 GPa. Results show general strengthening with applied load, including an overall increase in acoustic thermal conductivity. Further implications are discussed within. This work presents the first high pressure studies of the elasticity and thermal properties of depleted uranium metal and the first real-world application of a previously developed containment system for making such measurements.

  10. Copper-triazole interaction and coolant inhibitor depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Fritz, P.O.; Pellet, R.J.; Taylor, S.A.; Van de Ven, P.

    1999-08-01

    To a large extent, the depletion of tolyltriazole (TTZ) observed in several field tests may be attributed to the formation of a protective copper-triazole layer. Laboratory aging studies, shown to correlate with field experience, reveal that copper-TTZ layer formation depletes coolant TTZ levels in a fashion analogous to changes observed in the field. XPS and TPD-MS characterization of the complex formed indicates a strong chemical bond between copper and the adsorbed TTZ which can be desorbed thermally only at elevated temperatures. Electrochemical polarization experiments indicate that the layer provides good copper protection even when TTZ is absent from the coolant phase. Examination of copper cooling system components obtained after extensive field use reveals the presence of a similar protective layer.

  11. Do antidepressants cause folic acid depletion? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, K.A.; Jamjoom, S.; Donaldson, D.; Dickerson, J.W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of tricyclic antidepressants is common; folic acid depletion is a potential consequence adversely affecting the mental state. In a pilot study prior to research in the community, serum and red cell folate and serum vitamin B 12 levels were measured in the following elderly psychiatric inpatients: 14 controls (patients not receiving any drugs with known antifolate activity), 11 receiving tricyclic antidepressants, 13 receiving antipsychotics (phenothiazines) and four receiving an anticonvulsant (carbamazepine). Patients on prolonged treatment with carbamazepine or phenothiazine drugs had lower concentrations of folate in serum and erythrocytes compared with controls; the decrease was statistically significant for the effect of phenothiazines on serum folate levels. Tricyclic antidepressants, which are in widespread use in the community, did not cause folate depletion during the first two years of treatment. PMID:3204543

  12. Nuclear structure and depletion of nuclear isomers using electron linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J. J.; Litz, M. S.; Henriquez, S. L.; Burns, D. A.; Netherton, K. A.; Pereira, N. R.; Karamian, S. A.

    2013-04-19

    Long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) have proven important to understanding nuclear structure. With some isomers having half-lives of decades or longer, and intrinsic energy densities reaching 10{sup 12} J/kg, they have also been suggested for a wide range of applications. The ability to effectively transfer a population of nuclei from an isomer to shorter-lived levels will determine the feasibility of any applications. Here is described a first demonstration of the induced depletion of a population of the 438 year isomer of {sup 108}Ag to its 2.38 min ground state, using 6 MeV bremsstrahlung from a modified medical electron linac. The experiment suggests refinements to be implemented in the future and how a similar approach might be applied to study induced depletion of the 1200 year isomer of {sup 166}Ho.

  13. Modeling of the dispersion of depleted uranium aerosol.

    PubMed

    Mitsakou, C; Eleftheriadis, K; Housiadas, C; Lazaridis, M

    2003-04-01

    Depleted uranium is a low-cost radioactive material that, in addition to other applications, is used by the military in kinetic energy weapons against armored vehicles. During the Gulf and Balkan conflicts concern has been raised about the potential health hazards arising from the toxic and radioactive material released. The aerosol produced during impact and combustion of depleted uranium munitions can potentially contaminate wide areas around the impact sites or can be inhaled by civilians and military personnel. Attempts to estimate the extent and magnitude of the dispersion were until now performed by complex modeling tools employing unclear assumptions and input parameters of high uncertainty. An analytical puff model accommodating diffusion with simultaneous deposition is developed, which can provide a reasonable estimation of the dispersion of the released depleted uranium aerosol. Furthermore, the period of the exposure for a given point downwind from the release can be estimated (as opposed to when using a plume model). The main result is that the depleted uranium mass is deposited very close to the release point. The deposition flux at a couple of kilometers from the release point is more than one order of magnitude lower than the one a few meters near the release point. The effects due to uncertainties in the key input variables are addressed. The most influential parameters are found to be atmospheric stability, height of release, and wind speed, whereas aerosol size distribution is less significant. The output from the analytical model developed was tested against the numerical model RPM-AERO. Results display satisfactory agreement between the two models. PMID:12705453

  14. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Samantha A.; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C.; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E. Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Objective Kidney involvement affects 40–60% of patients with lupus and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, “off target” effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. Methods In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. Results We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, or serum urea seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with LN. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Conclusions Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  15. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy to study amyloid fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahou, Pierre; Curry, Nathan; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele; Kaminski, Clemens

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation of misfolded proteins is a characteristic hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. The ability to observe these aggregation processes and the corresponding structures formed in vitro or in situ is therefore a key requirement to understand the molecular mechanisms of these diseases. We report here on the implementation and application of Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy to visualize the formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro.

  16. Ozone depletion at temperature warmer than TNAT in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommereau, J.; Goutail, F.; Pazmino, A.; Lefevre, F.; Pitts, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    The unprecedented ozone destruction in the Arctic vortex in 2011 that extended until the end of March offers a unique opportunity for testing the relationship between temperature, responsible for heterogeneous chlorine activation on PSCs and aerosols and the amplitude of ozone loss. Indeed, as shown by the total ozone evolution in the vortex during that winter from the SAOZ network compared to passive ozone simulations from the REPROBUS CTM, most of the total 39% total ozone depletion occurred after mid-February at a rate of near 0.8% /day when relatively low temperatures were still present in the Arctic. The evolution of ozone depletion is shown to fully match that of the cumulative area of temperatures below the chlorine activation threshold weighted by vortex sunlight illumination, assuming, as shown by Drlda and Mueller (2010), that chlorine activation occurs at 195 K at the 475 K level. However, if instead, the total integrated backscatter for combined liquid aerosols/PSCs inside the vortex reported by CALIPSO or the cumulated PSC surface at 191 K aligned to STS threshold are used, PSCs are seen to disappear in early March, that is three weeks before the end of ozone depletion. The suggestion is thus that chlorine activation takes place at temperature significantly warmer than that of NAT or STS PSC formation, on binary aerosol, still present and accounted for in the integrated backscatter, but of smaller surface area. The same analyses applied to all past winters since 1994 confirms the ozone depletion at relatively warm temperature in the absence of PSC. The mechanism involved is explored by a variety of model simulations, including or not, liquid binary aerosols, NAT and STS.

  17. Huntington's disease: effect of cysteamine, a somatostatin-depleting agent.

    PubMed

    Shults, C; Steardo, L; Barone, P; Mohr, E; Juncos, J; Serrati, C; Fedio, P; Tamminga, C A; Chase, T N

    1986-08-01

    Somatostatin levels in the basal ganglia are elevated in Huntington's disease. A controlled therapeutic trial of the somatostatin-depleting agent, cysteamine, was therefore conducted in five patients, including one with the rigid-akinetic form. Maximum tolerated dosage for 2 weeks produced no consistent change in extrapyramidal or dementia scores. Somatostatin concentrations were not significantly altered in plasma or CSF. Growth hormone levels, on the other hand, more than doubled, suggesting a functionally significant decrease in central somatostatin levels. PMID:2874527

  18. Mechanisms of enhanced taurine release under Ca2+ depletion.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2005-10-01

    The sulfur-containing amino acid taurine is an inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain of mammals, as well as a key substance in the regulation of cell volumes. The effect of Ca(2+) on extracellular taurine concentrations is of special interest in the context of the regulatory mechanisms of taurine release. The aim of this study was to characterize the basal release of taurine in Ca(2+)-free medium using in vivo microdialysis of the striatum of anesthetized rats. Perfusion of Ca(2+)-free medium via a microdialysis probe evoked a sustained release of taurine (up to 180 % compared to the basal levels). The Ca(2+) chelator EGTA (1mM) potentiated Ca(2+) depletion-evoked taurine release. The substitution of CaCl(2) by choline chloride did not alter the observed effect. Ca(2+)-free solution did not significantly evoke release of taurine from tissue loaded with the competitive inhibitor of taurine transporter guanidinoethanesulfonate (1mM), suggesting that in Ca(2+) depletion taurine is released by the transporter operating in the outward direction. The volume-sensitive chloride channel blocker diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (1mM) did not attenuate the taurine release evoked by Ca(2+) depletion. The non-specific blocker of voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels NiCl(2) (0.65 mM) enhanced taurine release in the presence of Ca(2+). CdCl(2) (0.25 mM) had no effect under these conditions. However, both CdCl(2) and NiCl(2) attenuated the effect of Ca(2+)-free medium on the release of taurine. The data obtained imply the involvement of both decreased influx of Ca(2+) and increased non-specific influx of Na(+) through voltage-sensitive calcium channels in the regulation of transporter-mediated taurine release in Ca(2+) depletion. PMID:15982785

  19. Gamma-ray line intensities for depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the gamma-ray line intensities from depleted uranium allowed us to determine which of two conflicting previous experiments was correct. For the 1001-keV line we obtain a branching ratio of 0.834 +- 0.007, in good agreement with one of the previous experiments. A table compares our intensities for several lines with those obtained in previous experiments. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Response: Depletion and degradation are not the same

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    This article responses to the Case against Environmental Taxes for Sustainable Forestry. The author points out that in the previous article the implications of continuity of ownership and associate responsibilities are obscured by not clearly distinguishing timber-related depletion costs from nontimber environmental costs. Because the environmental effects of tropical logging are externalities, some type of public policy is neccessary to ensure that private actions coincide with socially optimal behavior. Environmental taxes may not be the only policy action available though.

  1. Chronic sodium depletion increases myocardial calcium content in normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rossi, G; Bond, M; Fouad-Tarazi, F M

    1989-03-01

    Increased myocardial contractility was found in the perfused heart isolated from sodium depleted Sprague-Dawley rats. Previously, it was reported that in vitro exposure of different cardiac preparations to low Na+ buffers was associated with both an increased contractility and an increased Ca2+ content in the cells. Therefore, this study was designed to examine increases in ventricular Ca2+ content in the hearts of chronically sodium depleted rats. Two groups of 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were studied. One group (n = 5) received furosemide (5 mg/kg/day IP for 4 days), a low Na+ diet and distilled drinking water for 6 weeks (low sodium plus diuretics group = LSD). The other group (n = 5) received the same low Na+ diet, but 0.5% NaCl was supplemented in drinking water (regular sodium group = RS). Body weight and blood pressure were measured weekly during the dietary period in all rats. At the end of the 6 weeks, heart weight as well as water and electrolyte contents of the heart were measured in all animals. Results showed that both body weight and heart weight were significantly lower in LSD than in RS. Moreover, ventricular Na+ content was reduced while ventricular Ca2+ content was doubled in LSD compared to RS (8.2 +/- 0.2 units vs. 9.2 +/- 0.3 units, p less than .05 and 0.45 +/- 0.13 units vs. 0.23 +/- 0.01 units, p less than .01, respectively). We conclude that in vivo sodium depletion induces an increase in ventricular calcium content; this increased myocardial calcium may be related to the increased in vitro cardiac contractility observed after chronic in vivo sodium depletion, but its distribution between intracellular and extracellular compartments needs to be determined. PMID:2923136

  2. Depletion-induced structure and dynamics in bimodal colloidal suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, M.; Sandy, A. R.; Narayanan, S.

    2011-05-03

    Combined small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy studies of moderately concentrated bimodal hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in the fluid phase show that depletion-induced demixing introduces spatially heterogeneous dynamics with two distinct time scales. The adhesive nature, as well as the mobility, of the large particles is determined by the level of interaction within the monomodal domains. This interaction is driven by osmotic forces, which are governed by the relative concentration of the constituents.

  3. A search for relativistic electron induced stratospheric ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Possible ozone changes at 1 mb associated with the time variation and precipitation of relativistic electrons are investigated by examining the NIMBUS 7 SBUV ozone data set and corresponding temperatures derived from NMC data. No ozone depletion was observed in high-latitude summer when temperature fluctuations are small. In winter more variation in ozone occurs, but large temperature changes make it difficult to identify specific ozone decreases as being the result of relativistic electron precipitation.

  4. 1,2,3-D Diffusion Depletion Multi-Group

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-04-20

    CITATION is designed to solve problems using the finite difference representation of neutron diffusion theory, treating up to three space dimensions with arbitrary group to group scattering. X-y-z, theta-r-z, hexagonal z, and triagonal z geometries may be treated. Depletion problems may be solved and fuel managed for multi-cycle analysis. Extensive first order perturbation results may be obtained given microscopic data and nuclide concentrations. Statics problems may be solved and perturbation results obtained with microscopic data.

  5. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-02-01

    Kidney involvement affects 40-60% of patients with lupus, and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, "off target" effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, and BUN seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with lupus nephritis. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  6. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) depleted uranium waste boxes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-08-27

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) allows the one-time shipment of ten metal boxes and one wooden box containing depleted uranium material from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the burial grounds in the 200 West Area for disposal. This SEP provides the analyses and operational controls necessary to demonstrate that the shipment will be safe for the onsite worker and the public.

  7. Heterogeneous reactions important in atmospheric ozone depletion: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Hynes, James T

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical studies of the mechanisms of several heterogeneous reactions involving ClONO(2), H(2)O, HCl, HBr, and H(2)SO(4) important in atmospheric ozone depletion are described, focused primarily on reactions on aqueous aerosol surfaces. Among the insights obtained is the active chemical participation of the surface water molecules in several of these reactions. The general methodology adopted allows reduction of these complex chemical problems to meaningful model systems amenable to quantum chemical calculations. PMID:16489736

  8. Spatial Characteristics of Plasma Depletion Layer using Multiple Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türk Katircioglu, Filiz; Angelopoulos, V.; Sibeck, David; Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    The plasma depletion layer (PDL) is observed occasionally with Themis B and Themis D spacecraft on dayside magnetosheath between the years 2007-2009. PDL characterizes itself with decreased density and increased magnetic field and its presence depends on the IMF and solar wind conditions. It is mostly known to occur under northward IMF conditions. When the IMF and solar wind conditions favor, the layer occurs just in front of the magnetopause. From the single satellite observations, it is very hard to determine the region because of the difficulties arising from the interaction between the magnetosheath field and flow and Earth's dipole field at the magnetopause boundary under certain IMF and solar wind plasma conditions. In this study, we use multiple Themis observations to understand the spatial differentiation of plasma depletion layer. The high resolution plasma and magnetic field data from multiple Themis spacecraft allow us to determine the spatial extend of the depletion layer and help us to understand its spatial variations. Initial results show that PDL is clearly determined at the subsolar region of the magnetopause with a sharp increase in magnetic field within a narrow zone. We also detect PDL along the flanks of the magnetopause as well as above the equatorial plane. In this presentation, we will show examples of PDL from different regions of the magnetopause boundary and discuss their occurrence and formation mechanisms.

  9. Alignment of gold nanorods by angular photothermal depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Adam B.; Chow, Timothy T. Y.; Chon, James W. M.

    2014-02-24

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a high degree of alignment can be imposed upon randomly oriented gold nanorod films by angular photothermal depletion with linearly polarized laser irradiation. The photothermal reshaping of gold nanorods is observed to follow quadratic melting model rather than the threshold melting model, which distorts the angular and spectral hole created on 2D distribution map of nanorods to be an open crater shape. We have accounted these observations to the alignment procedures and demonstrated good agreement between experiment and simulations. The use of multiple laser depletion wavelengths allowed alignment criteria over a large range of aspect ratios, achieving 80% of the rods in the target angular range. We extend the technique to demonstrate post-alignment in a multilayer of randomly oriented gold nanorod films, with arbitrary control of alignment shown across the layers. Photothermal angular depletion alignment of gold nanorods is a simple, promising post-alignment method for creating future 3D or multilayer plasmonic nanorod based devices and structures.

  10. Ionospheric heating, upwelling, and depletions in auroral current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Semeter, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    This research investigates aspects of ionospheric dynamics relevant to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in auroral arc current systems. Auroral electric fields and particle precipitation deposit energy in the ionosphere, often resulting in enhanced ion or electron temperatures. This heating has a wide variety of consequences for the ionosphere. High ion temperatures alter chemical balance in the lower F-region, resulting in conversion to a molecular ion plasma, faster recombination, and plasma depletions. Pressure enhancements resulting from both ion and electron heating are capable of generating intense ion upflows. Ion upflow and depletion processes redistribute and structure the auroral plasma in ways that are likely of consequence to wave coupling of the magnetosphere and ionosphere. These implications are examined through the use of a fluid-kinetic model of the auroral ionosphere and new incoherent scatter radar data analysis techniques. Results indicate that enhanced recombination of molecular ions in auroral downward current regions may work in concert with well-known electrodynamic depletion processes, in the F-region ionosphere. Furthermore, ionospheric upflows in auroral upward and downward current regions may be quite different in terms of intensity and types of upflowing ions.

  11. [Biomedical and economic consequences of stratosphere ozone depletion].

    PubMed

    Strzhizhovskiĭ, A D

    1998-01-01

    Information on possible human health-changes associated with stratosphere ozone depletion and amplification factor (% increase of the stick rate by 1% decrease of ozone) values for acute (erythema, keratitis, cataract, immunosuppression) and chronic (skin cancer, cataract) effects of natural UV-radiation was analysed. Amplification factor (AF) values for acute UV-effects increase with degree of ozone depletion. For degrees less than 12.5% they are independent of latitude and equal to 1.9 for erythema, 1.3-1.5 for keratitis, 1.7-2.3 for cataract and 0.9-1.1 for immunosuppression. AF values for incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer are independent of age, higher in males than females, and higher for squamous cell carcinoma, than for basal cell carcinoma. Their optimal estimations for whites equal to 2.7 for basal cell and 4.6 for squamous cell carcinoma. AF values for incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma range between 1 and 2, for melanoma mortality--between 0.3 and 2. AF values for incidence of cataract range between 0.3 and 1.2 with optimal estimations between 0.6 and 0.8. Prognosis of non-melanoma skin cancer and cataract incidences, melanoma mortality and economic loss for different scenarios of stratosphere ozone depletion are presented. PMID:9633627

  12. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  13. Structurally Resolved Abundances and Depletions in the Rho OPH Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seab, C.

    1995-07-01

    The mechanism that determines the pattern of depletion ofelements in the interstellar medium has been a problem for along time. It is clear that some of the most refractoryelements such as Si, Fe, and Mg, are heavily depleted onto theinterstellar grains. On the other hand, some elements such asS and Zn are normally either undepleted or very lightlydepleted. The difference between the two cases is notunderstood. We propose to address this question with adetailed study of the depletion patterns in the Rho Ophiuchicloud. This study is strongly based on a combination of thecapabilities of two modern instruments: the GHRS for high-resolution UV data, and the Ultra High Resolution Facility(UHRF) of the AAT. This instrument has been used to obtain NaI line profiles in the Rho Oph cloud with a resolution ofR=1,000,000. The combination of these two types of data willbe used to resolve the velocity structure of the elementdepletions in the cloud.

  14. Accounting for Depletion of Oil and Gas Resources in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, Jamal Jafari, Yaghoob

    2012-12-15

    Since oil and gas are non-renewable resources, it is important to identify the extent to which they have been depleted. Such information will contribute to the formulation and evaluation of appropriate sustainable development policies. This paper provides an assessment of the changes in the availability of oil and gas resources in Malaysia by first compiling the physical balance sheet for the period 2000-2007, and then assessing the monetary balance sheets for the said resource by using the Net Present Value method. Our findings show serious reduction in the value of oil reserves from 2001 to 2005, due to changes in crude oil prices, and thereafter the depletion rates decreased. In the context of sustainable development planning, albeit in the weak sustainability sense, it will be important to ascertain if sufficient reinvestments of the estimated resource rents in related or alternative capitals are being attempted by Malaysia. For the study period, the cumulative resource rents were to the tune of RM61 billion. Through a depletion or resource rents policy, the estimated quantum may guide the identification of a reinvestment threshold (after considering needed capital investment for future development of the industry) in light of ensuring the future productive capacity of the economy at the time when the resource is exhausted.

  15. Ionization and elemental depletion in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladilo, G.; Centurion, M.

    1990-07-01

    The behavior of the elemental depletions in the ISM along lines of sight with a very low value of the average hydrogen density is examined. A simple model in the frame of the McKee-Ostriker (1977) theory has been used to estimate the line-of-sight filling factors as a function of n-bar for those interstellar phases in which a significant degree of ionization is expected. The results show that a substantial fraction of ionized gas outside classical H II regions may well be present along the line of sight when n-bar is less than about 0.1/cu cm. If this effect is neglected, the chemical abundances relative to hydrogen can be overestimated up to 0.5 dex in logarithm, and the depletions underestimated by the same amount. A recent IUE survey of interstellar abundances has been reanalyzed, and it is found that for all the elements investigated the slope of the correlation D(app)-log n-bar is steeper in the low-density range. This disagrees with recent models for elemental depletions.

  16. Inhomogeneous depletion of oxygen ions in metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vykhodets, Vladimir B.; Jarvis, Emily A. A.; Kurennykh, Tatiana E.; Beketov, Igor V.; Obukhov, Sviatoslav I.; Samatov, Oleg M.; Medvedev, Anatoly I.; Davletshin, Andrey E.; Whyte, Travis H.

    2016-02-01

    Zirconia and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have multiple uses, including catalysis, fuel cells, dental applications, and thermal coatings. We employ nuclear reaction analysis to determine elemental composition of YSZ nanoparticles synthesized by laser evaporation including 18O studies to distinguish between oxide and adsorbed oxygen content as a function of surface area. We see dramatic deviation from stoichiometry that can be traced to loss of oxygen from the oxide near the surface of these nanopowders. Density functional calculations are coupled with these experimental studies to explore the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric surfaces achieved through depletion of oxygen. Our results show oxygen-depleted surfaces present under oxygen potentials where stoichiometric, oxygen-terminated surfaces would be favored thermodynamically for crystalline systems. Oxygen depletion at nanopowder surfaces can create effective two-dimensional surface metallic states while maintaining stoichiometry in the underlying nanoparticle core. This insight into nanopowder surfaces applies to dissimilar oxides of aluminum and zirconium indicating synthesis conditions may be more influential than the inherent oxide properties and displaying need for distinct models for nanopowders of these important engineering materials where surface chemistry dominates performance.

  17. Follicle Depletion Provides a Permissive Environment for Ovarian Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Cai, Kathy Qi; Smith, Elizabeth R; Yeasky, Toni M; Moore, Robert; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Godwin, Andrew K; Hamilton, Thomas C; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2016-09-15

    We modeled the etiology of postmenopausal biology on ovarian cancer risk using germ cell-deficient white-spotting variant (Wv) mice, incorporating oncogenic mutations. Ovarian cancer incidence is highest in peri- and postmenopausal women, and epidemiological studies have established the impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk. Menopause as a result of ovarian follicle depletion is thought to contribute to higher cancer risk. As a consequence of follicle depletion, female Wv mice develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis frequently found in postmenopausal human ovaries. Lineage tracing using MISR2-Cre indicated that the tubular adenomas that developed in Wv mice were largely derived from the MISR2 lineage, which marked only a fraction of ovarian surface and oviduct epithelial cells in wild-type tissues. Deletion of p27, either heterozygous or homozygous, was able to convert the benign tubular adenomas into more proliferative tumors. Restricted deletion of p53 in Wv/Wv mice by either intrabursal injection of adenoviral Cre or inclusion of the MISR2-Cre transgene also resulted in augmented tumor growth. This finding suggests that follicle depletion provides a permissive ovarian environment for oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells, presenting a mechanism for the increased ovarian cancer risk in postmenopausal women. PMID:27354067

  18. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J. Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0°C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm-3 yr-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  19. Depletion calculations for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R. T.; Newell, D. L.

    1997-12-08

    Depletion calculations have been performed for the McClellan reactor history from January 1990 through August 1996. A database has been generated for continuing use by operations personnel which contains the isotopic inventory for all fuel elements and fuel-followed control rods maintained at McClellan. The calculations are based on the three-dimensional diffusion theory code REBUS-3 which is available through the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). Burnup-dependent cross-sections were developed at zero power temperatures and full power temperatures using the WIMS code (also available through RSICC). WIMS is based on discretized transport theory to calculate the neutron flux as a function of energy and position in a one-dimensional cell. Based on the initial depletion calculations, a method was developed to allow operations personnel to perform depletion calculations and update the database with a minimal amount of effort. Depletion estimates and calculations can be performed by simply entering the core loading configuration, the position of the control rods at the start and end of cycle, the reactor power level, the duration of the reactor cycle, and the time since the last reactor cycle. The depletion and buildup of isotopes of interest (heavy metal isotopes, erbium isotopes, and fission product poisons) are calculated for all fuel elements and fuel-followed control rods in the MNRC inventory. The reactivity loss from burnup and buildup of fission product poisons and the peak xenon buildup after shutdown are also calculated. The reactivity loss from going from cold zero power to hot full power can also be calculated by using the temperature-dependent, burnup-dependent cross-sections. By calculating all of these reactivity effects, operations personnel are able to estimate the total excess reactivity necessary to run the reactor for the given cycle. This method has also been used to estimate the worth of individual control rods. Using this

  20. Ozone depletion and climate change: impacts on UV radiation.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R L; Aucamp, P J; Bais, A F; Björn, L O; Ilyas, M; Madronich, S

    2011-02-01

    The Montreal Protocol is working, but it will take several decades for ozone to return to 1980 levels. The atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are decreasing, and ozone column amounts are no longer decreasing. Mid-latitude ozone is expected to return to 1980 levels before mid-century, slightly earlier than predicted previously. However, the recovery rate will be slower at high latitudes. Springtime ozone depletion is expected to continue to occur at polar latitudes, especially in Antarctica, in the next few decades. Because of the success of the Protocol, increases in UV-B radiation have been small outside regions affected by the Antarctic ozone hole, and have been difficult to detect. There is a large variability in UV-B radiation due to factors other than ozone, such as clouds and aerosols. There are few long-term measurements available to confirm the increases that would have occurred as a result of ozone depletion. At mid-latitudes UV-B irradiances are currently only slightly greater than in 1980 (increases less than ~5%), but increases have been substantial at high and polar latitudes where ozone depletion has been larger. Without the Montreal Protocol, peak values of sunburning UV radiation could have been tripled by 2065 at mid-northern latitudes. This would have had serious consequences for the environment and for human health. There are strong interactions between ozone depletion and changes in climate induced by increasing greenhouse gases (GHGs). Ozone depletion affects climate, and climate change affects ozone. The successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol has had a marked effect on climate change. The calculated reduction in radiative forcing due to the phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) far exceeds that from the measures taken under the Kyoto protocol for the reduction of GHGs. Thus the phase-out of CFCs is currently tending to counteract the increases in surface temperature due to increased GHGs. The amount of

  1. VESTA 2.1.5 - Monte Carlo Depletion Interface Code; AURORA 1.0.0 - Depletion Analysis Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    HAECK, WIM

    2013-03-21

    Version 01 RSICC is authorized to distribute VESTA 2.1.5 for research and education purposes only. Requesters from NEA Data Bank member countries are advised to order VESTA 2.1.5 from the NEA Data Bank. Non-commercial and non-profit users from other OECD member countries (specifically Canada and the United States) may order VESTA 2.1.5 from RSICC. Users from non-OECD member countries and all commercial requesters are advised to contact the IRSN. VESTA is a Monte Carlo depletion interface code that is currently under development at IRSN (France). From its inception, VESTA is intended to be a “generic” interface code so that it will ultimately be capable of using any Monte-Carlo code or depletion module and that can be completely tailored to the user’s needs on practically all aspects of the code. For the current version, VESTA allows for the use of any version of MCNP(X) as the transport module and ORIGEN 2.2 or the built in PHOENIX module as the depletion module. A short overview of the main features of this version of the code is detailed in the Abstract.

  2. Ly6G-mediated depletion of neutrophils is dependent on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Kevin W; Dekitani, Ken; Nielsen, Travis B; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Spellberg, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils is commonly used to study neutropenia. However, the mechanisms by which antibodies deplete neutrophils have not been well defined. We noticed that mice deficient in complement and macrophages had blunted neutrophil depletion in response to anti-Ly6G monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment. In vitro, exposure of murine neutrophils to anti-Ly6G MAb in the presence of plasma did not result in significant depletion of cells, either in the presence or absence of complement. In vivo, anti-Ly6G-mediated neutrophil depletion was abrogated following macrophage depletion, but not complement depletion, indicating a requirement for macrophages to induce neutropenia by this method. These results inform the use and limitations of anti-Ly6G antibody as an experimental tool for depleting neutrophils in various immunological settings. PMID:26870635

  3. 26 CFR 1.611-1 - Allowance of deduction for depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Allowance of deduction for depletion. 1.611-1 Section 1.611-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.611-1 Allowance of deduction for depletion. (a) Depletion of mines, oil and gas...

  4. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  5. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  6. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  7. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  8. 48 CFR 211.271 - Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... class I ozone-depleting substances. 211.271 Section 211.271 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 211.271 Elimination of use of class I ozone-depleting substances. See subpart 223.8 for restrictions on contracting for ozone-depleting substances....

  9. 26 CFR 1.1502-44 - Percentage depletion for independent producers and royalty owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sum of the percentage depletion deductions for the taxable year for all oil or gas property owned by... an oil or gas property (other than a gas property with respect to which the depletion allowance for... the maximum allowable percentage depletion deduction among oil and gas properties. Thus, if, after...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1502-44 - Percentage depletion for independent producers and royalty owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sum of the percentage depletion deductions for the taxable year for all oil or gas property owned by... an oil or gas property (other than a gas property with respect to which the depletion allowance for... the maximum allowable percentage depletion deduction among oil and gas properties. Thus, if, after...

  11. 26 CFR 1.612-3 - Depletion; treatment of bonus and advanced royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Depletion; treatment of bonus and advanced... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.612-3 Depletion; treatment... the payee as a cost depletion deduction in respect of the bonus an amount equal to that proportion...

  12. 26 CFR 1.612-3 - Depletion; treatment of bonus and advanced royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Depletion; treatment of bonus and advanced... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.612-3 Depletion; treatment... the payee as a cost depletion deduction in respect of the bonus an amount equal to that proportion...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1502-44 - Percentage depletion for independent producers and royalty owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sum of the percentage depletion deductions for the taxable year for all oil or gas property owned by... an oil or gas property (other than a gas property with respect to which the depletion allowance for... the maximum allowable percentage depletion deduction among oil and gas properties. Thus, if, after...

  14. 26 CFR 1.612-3 - Depletion; treatment of bonus and advanced royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Depletion; treatment of bonus and advanced... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.612-3 Depletion; treatment... the payee as a cost depletion deduction in respect of the bonus an amount equal to that proportion...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1502-44 - Percentage depletion for independent producers and royalty owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sum of the percentage depletion deductions for the taxable year for all oil or gas property owned by... an oil or gas property (other than a gas property with respect to which the depletion allowance for... the maximum allowable percentage depletion deduction among oil and gas properties. Thus, if, after...

  16. 26 CFR 52.4681-1 - Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...)) for the calendar year in which the sale or use occurs; and (iii) The ozone-depletion factor... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting... to ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Taxes imposed. Sections 4681 and 4682 impose the following...

  17. 26 CFR 52.4681-1 - Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...)) for the calendar year in which the sale or use occurs; and (iii) The ozone-depletion factor... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting... to ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Taxes imposed. Sections 4681 and 4682 impose the following...

  18. 26 CFR 52.4681-1 - Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting... to ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Taxes imposed. Sections 4681 and 4682 impose the following taxes with respect to ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs): (1) Tax on ODCs. Section 4681(a)(1) imposes a tax...

  19. 26 CFR 52.4681-1 - Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Taxes imposed with respect to ozone-depleting... to ozone-depleting chemicals. (a) Taxes imposed. Sections 4681 and 4682 impose the following taxes with respect to ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs): (1) Tax on ODCs. Section 4681(a)(1) imposes a tax...

  20. 26 CFR 1.611-1 - Allowance of deduction for depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Allowance of deduction for depletion. 1.611-1 Section 1.611-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.611-1 Allowance of deduction for depletion. (a) Depletion of mines, oil and gas...

  1. 26 CFR 1.611-1 - Allowance of deduction for depletion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.611-1 Allowance of deduction for depletion. (a) Depletion of mines, oil and gas wells, other natural deposits, and timber—(1) In general... of the property. In the case of other exhaustible natural resources the allowance for depletion...

  2. Estimation of stream depletion using values of capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldenkov, Mikhail; Filimonova, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Compensation pumping is used to alleviate deficiencies in streamflow discharge during dry seasons. Short-term groundwater pumping can use aquifer storage instead of catchment-zone water until the drawdown reaches the edge of the stream. Stream-aquifer interactions are the key component of the hydrologic budgets and estimation of stream depletion has top-priority when evaluating the effectiveness of application of seasonal compensation pumping. Numerous analytical equations have been developed to assess the influence of groundwater pumping on nearby streams (C.V. Theis, R.E. Glover, C.G. Balmer, M.S. Hantush, C.T. Jenkins, B. Hunt, J. Bredehoeft, V.A. Zlotnik, E.L. Minkin, N.N. Lapshin, F.M. Bochever and other researchers). R.B. Wallace and Y. Darama obtained solution for cyclic conditions groundwater pumping. Numerical model approaches used in difficult hydrogeological conditions. It is offered to estimate stream depletion by seasonal pumping using values of capacitance (complex, dimensionless parameter of an aquifer system that defines the delayed effect on steamflow when there is groundwater pumping). Capacitance (C) is determined by the following equation: ( ) L* C = f( °---) , TS-Δt where S and T are the aquifer specific yield (or storage coefficient for a confined aquifer) and transmissivity, respectively; Δt is the pumping time inside one cycle, L* is the summarizing distance between the compensation well and stream edge; in some cases it can involve a function of the stream leakance and vertical leakance of the impermeable layer. Three typical hydraulic cases of compensation pumping were classified depending on their capacitance structure (i.e. the relationship between surface water and groundwater): (a) perfect hydraulic connection between the stream and aquifer; (b) imperfect hydraulic connection between the stream and aquifer; and (c) essentially imperfect hydraulic connection between the stream and the underlying confined aquifer. The form of

  3. Assessment of Volume Depletion in Children with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The degree of volume depletion in severe malaria is currently unknown, although knowledge of fluid compartment volumes can guide therapy. To assist management of severely ill children, and to test the hypothesis that volume changes in fluid compartments reflect disease severity, we measured body compartment volumes in Gabonese children with malaria. Methods and Findings Total body water volume (TBW) and extracellular water volume (ECW) were estimated in children with severe or moderate malaria and in convalescence by tracer dilution with heavy water and bromide, respectively. Intracellular water volume (ICW) was derived from these parameters. Bioelectrical impedance analysis estimates of TBW and ECW were calibrated against dilution methods, and bioelectrical impedance analysis measurements were taken daily until discharge. Sixteen children had severe and 19 moderate malaria. Severe childhood malaria was associated with depletion of TBW (mean [SD] of 37 [33] ml/kg, or 6.7% [6.0%]) relative to measurement at discharge. This is defined as mild dehydration in other conditions. ECW measurements were normal on admission in children with severe malaria and did not rise in the first few days of admission. Volumes in different compartments (TBW, ECW, and ICW) were not related to hyperlactataemia or other clinical and laboratory markers of disease severity. Moderate malaria was not associated with a depletion of TBW. Conclusions Significant hypovolaemia does not exacerbate complications of severe or moderate malaria. As rapid rehydration of children with malaria may have risks, we suggest that fluid replacement regimens should aim to correct fluid losses over 12–24 h. PMID:15526044

  4. Satellite-based estimates of groundwater depletion in India.

    PubMed

    Rodell, Matthew; Velicogna, Isabella; Famiglietti, James S

    2009-08-20

    Groundwater is a primary source of fresh water in many parts of the world. Some regions are becoming overly dependent on it, consuming groundwater faster than it is naturally replenished and causing water tables to decline unremittingly. Indirect evidence suggests that this is the case in northwest India, but there has been no regional assessment of the rate of groundwater depletion. Here we use terrestrial water storage-change observations from the NASA Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellites and simulated soil-water variations from a data-integrating hydrological modelling system to show that groundwater is being depleted at a mean rate of 4.0 +/- 1.0 cm yr(-1) equivalent height of water (17.7 +/- 4.5 km(3) yr(-1)) over the Indian states of Rajasthan, Punjab and Haryana (including Delhi). During our study period of August 2002 to October 2008, groundwater depletion was equivalent to a net loss of 109 km(3) of water, which is double the capacity of India's largest surface-water reservoir. Annual rainfall was close to normal throughout the period and we demonstrate that the other terrestrial water storage components (soil moisture, surface waters, snow, glaciers and biomass) did not contribute significantly to the observed decline in total water levels. Although our observational record is brief, the available evidence suggests that unsustainable consumption of groundwater for irrigation and other anthropogenic uses is likely to be the cause. If measures are not taken soon to ensure sustainable groundwater usage, the consequences for the 114,000,000 residents of the region may include a reduction of agricultural output and shortages of potable water, leading to extensive socioeconomic stresses. PMID:19675570

  5. Complement depletion aggravates Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia and septic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sakiniene, E; Bremell, T; Tarkowski, A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of the complement system in Staphylococcus aureus arthritis and septicaemia. The murine model of haematogenously acquired septic arthritis was used, injecting intravenously toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), producing S. aureus LS-1. Complement was depleted using cobra venom factor (CVF). Evaluation of arthritis was performed clinically and histopathologically. In addition, the effect of complement depletion on the phagocytic activity of leucocytes was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Six days after inoculation of S. aureus the prevalence of arthritis in decomplemented mice was three-fold higher than that in controls (91% versus 25%). The clinical severity of arthritis at the end of the experiment, expressed as arthritic index, was 7.3 and 1.9, respectively. These findings were confirmed by histological index of synovitis as well as of cartilage and/or bone destruction being significantly higher in decomplemented mice than in controls (9.8 ± 1.7 versus 4.9 ± 1.2, P < 0.05; and 7.9 ± 1.7 versus 3.0 ± 0.9, P < 0.05, respectively). Also, the septicaemia-induced mortality was clearly higher in decomplemented mice compared with the controls. CVF treatment significantly reduced in vivo polymorphonuclear cell-dependent inflammation induced by subcutaneous injection of olive oil and mirroring the capacity of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNC) to migrate and/or extravasate. Besides, the decomplementation procedure significantly impaired phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leucocytes in vitro, since the number of phagocytes being able to ingest bacteria decreased by 50% when the cells were maintained in decomplemented serum compared with those in intact serum. The conclusion is that complement depletion aggravates the clinical course of S. aureus arthritis and septicaemia, possibly by a combination of decreased migration/extravasation of PMNC and an impairment of phagocytosis. PMID:9933426

  6. On the depletion of HCl in the Antarctic polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Tobias; Kinnison, Douglas; Garcia, Rolando; Madronich, Sasha; Solomon, Susan; von Hobe, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling are used to constrain the mechanisms that deplete gas-phase HCl in the Antarctic vortex. Our analysis shows that current formulations of heterogeneous chlorine activation cannot explain the observed loss of gas-phase HCl in SD-WACCM. Uncertainties in photochemistry, transport and initial conditions are investigated, and it is shown that ClONO2 formed after photolysis of condensed-phase nitrate increases the loss of HCl through heterogeneous chemistry, especially in the sunlit edge of the vortex. This process eventually produces sufficient NOx to completely deplete gas-phase HCl but this occurs too late compared to observations. Our results suggest that the more likely primary mechanism for decreases in gas-phase HCl from the beginning of the polar night until about the middle of July is active partitioning between the gas and condensed phase. Since the HCl taken up into particles is quickly released upon warming, it does not represent irreversible loss of chlorine, only temporary removal from the gas-phase. With HCl dissolved in STS particles, the associated decrease in gas-phase HCl is not an indicator of chlorine activation. The solubility of HCl in STS is highly sensitive to water vapor and temperature, such that accurate simulation of both is necessary to reproduce the observed depletion of gas-phase HCl. With the reference setup of SD-WACCM hardly any HCl is simulated to be sequestered in STS. A negative offset has to be applied to model temperatures to achieve significant partitioning of HCl into the condensed phase. While our results imply substantial changes in chlorine partitioning during the polar night, the ozone loss is insensitive to them.

  7. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence. PMID:26208522

  8. The relationship between skin cancers, solar radiation and ozone depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Moan, J.; Dahlback, A.

    1992-01-01

    During the period 1957-1984 the annual age-adjusted incidence rate of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) increased by 350% for men and 440% for women in Norway. The annual exposure to carcinogenic sunlight in Norway, calculated by use of measured ozone levels, showed no increasing trend during the same period. Thus, ozone depletion is not a cause of the increasing trend of the incidence rates of skin cancers. The incidence rates of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increase with decreasing latitude in Norway. The same is true for CMM in Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Our data were used to estimate the implications of a future ozone depletion for the incidence rates of skin cancer: a 10% ozone depletion was found to give rise to a 16-18% increase in the incidence rate of SCC (men and women), a 19% increase in the incidence rate of CMM for men and a 32% increase in the incidence rate of CMM for women. The difference between the numbers for men and women is almost significant and may be related to a different intermittent exposure pattern to sunlight of the two sexes. The increasing trend in the incidence rates of CMM is strongest for the trunk and lower extremities of women, followed by that for the trunk of men. The increasing incidence rates of skin cancers as well as the changing pattern of incidence on different parts of the body is most likely due to changing habits of sun exposure. Comparisons of relative densities of CMM, SCC, LMM and SCC falling per unit area of skin at different parts of the body indicate that sun exposure is the main cause of these cancer forms although other unknown factors may play significant roles as well. For the population as a whole sun exposure during vacations to sunny countries has so far been of minor importance in skin cancer induction. PMID:1616864

  9. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-C.; Kao, Y.-C.; Chang, T-J.; Wong, M.-L. . E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2005-08-26

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.

  10. Microstructure of depleted uranium under uniaxial strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Embury, J.D.; Kelly, A.; Thissell, W.R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Hixson, R.H.

    1997-09-01

    Uranium samples of two different purities were used for spall strength measurements. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material (38 ppM carbon) and from material containing 280 ppM C. Experimental conditions were chosen to effectively arrest the microstructural damage at two places in the development to full spall separation. Samples were soft recovered and characterized with respect to the microstructure and the form of damage. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level, stress state, and sample purity. This information is used in developing a model to predict the mode of fracture.

  11. Implementation, verification, and application of multicycle depletion perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Burns, T.J.; Williams, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    Several application-oriented features of generalized depletion perturbation theory (DPT) are analyzed from the viewpoint of the reactor designer. The detailed theory is first reduced to some new terminology necessary for an adequate understanding of DPT. Using this terminology, the main features and computational accuracy of this new technique are illustrated through representative DPT calculations utilizing a CDS-type heterogeneous reactor model. Several examples are presented that indicate the potential of DPT methods as an alternate computational tool for certain types of reactor physics analyses.

  12. Depletion effect of oxide semiconductor analyzed by Hall effects.

    PubMed

    Oh, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    This letter discusses the tunneling behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) analyzed through the observation of its Hall effects. The properties of the a-IGZO changed from those of a majority carrier to those of a minority carrier after the annealing process as a result of the electron-hole recombination due to the thermal activation energy and the formation of a depletion layer with a high-potential Schottky barrier. Therefore, the diffusion current of these minority charge carriers caused ambipolar transfer characteristics, a tunneling behavior, in the metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistor. PMID:25971008

  13. Fuel-Cycle of 'CANDLE' Burnup with Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi, Sekimoto

    2006-07-01

    A new reactor burnup strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move upward (or downward) along its core axis. This burnup strategy can derive many merits, especially from safety point of view. The change of excess reactivity along burnup is theoretically zero, and the core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed along burnup. Application of this burnup strategy to neutron rich fast reactors makes excellent performances. Only natural or depleted uranium is required for the replacing fuels. About 40 % of natural or depleted uranium undergoes fission without the conventional reprocessing and enrichment. If the LWR produced energy of X Joules, the CANDLE reactor can produce about 50 X Joules from the depleted uranium left at the enrichment facility for the LWR fuel. If we can say LWRs have produced energy sufficient for full 20 years, we can produce the energy for 1000 years by using the CANDLE reactors with depleted uranium. We need not mine any uranium ore, and do not need reprocessing facility. The burnup of spent fuel becomes 10 times. Therefore, the spent fuel amount per produced energy is also reduced to one-tenth. The equilibrium core contains a lot of instable materials such as higher actinides and fission products, the enough amounts of which can not be obtained easily. The construction of the initial core is a difficult problem. However, by using enriched uranium substituted for actinides in the equilibrium core, we can construct the initial core whose power profile is similar to the equilibrium one and will reach the equilibrium state without any big change during transient. At present we do not have any material standing for such a high burnup. However, the CANDLE burnup can be realized by employing

  14. Consistent cosmic microwave background spectra from quantum depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto; Kühnel, Florian; Orlandi, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    Following a new quantum cosmological model proposed by Dvali and Gomez, we quantitatively investigate possible modifications to the Hubble parameter and following corrections to the cosmic microwave background spectrum. In this model, scalar and tensor perturbations are generated by the quantum depletion of the background inflaton and graviton condensate respectively. We show how the inflaton mass affects the power spectra and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. Masses approaching the Planck scale would lead to strong deviations, while standard spectra are recovered for an inflaton mass much smaller than the Planck mass.

  15. Dystroglycan depletion inhibits the functions of differentiated HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zárate, Alma Delia; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Winder, Steve J; Cerecedo, Doris

    2014-06-01

    Dystroglycan has recently been characterized in blood tissue cells, as part of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex but to date nothing is known of its role in the differentiation process of neutrophils. We have investigated the role of dystroglycan in the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL-60 differentiated to neutrophils. Depletion of dystroglycan by RNAi resulted in altered morphology and reduced properties of differentiated HL-60 cells, including chemotaxis, respiratory burst, phagocytic activities and expression of markers of differentiation. These findings strongly implicate dystroglycan as a key membrane adhesion protein involved in the differentiation process in HL-60 cells. PMID:24792180

  16. Human Health Effects of Ozone Depletion From Stratospheric Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents EPA's initial response to NASA's request to advise on potential environmental policy issues associated with the future development of supersonic flight technologies. Consistent with the scope of the study to which NASA and EPA agreed, EPA has evaluated only the environmental concerns related to the stratospheric ozone impacts of a hypothetical HSCT fleet, although recent research indicates that a fleet of HSCT is predicted to contribute to climate warming as well. This report also briefly describes the international and domestic institutional frameworks established to address stratospheric ozone depletion, as well as those established to control pollution from aircraft engine exhaust emissions.

  17. High temperature spice modeling of partially depleted SOI MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, M.A.; Osman, A.A.

    1996-03-01

    Several partially depleted SOI N- and P-mosfets with dimensions ranging from W/L=30/10 to 15/3 were characterized from room temperature up to 300 C. The devices exhibited a well defined and sharp zero temperature coefficient biasing point up to 573 K in both linear and saturation regions. Simulation of the I-V characteristics using a temperature dependent SOI SPICE were in excellent agreement with measurements. Additionally, measured ZTC points agreed favorably with the predicted ZTC points using expressions derived from the temperature dependent SOI model for the ZTC {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Interstellar abundance and depletion studies along Galactic sightlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, U.; Murthy, Jayant; Sofia, Ulysses

    2016-07-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has enhanced our understanding many aspects of interstellar medium of our galaxy. The wavelength coverage of FUSE and HST is of great astrophysical importance. We use FUSE and HST data for interstellar abundances studies of some important atomic species, such as sulphur and silicon. We report the newly derived column densities by measuring the equivalent widths of several ultraviolet absorption lines. Comparisons of observed depletions and grain properties with existing dust models will be discussed.

  19. Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

  20. Crosshole geotomography in a partially depleted reservoir. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    Specific project objectives are to: characterize downhole seismic sources; show the applicability of crosswell tomography as a tool for reservoir characterization in depleted reservoirs; use crosswell methodology to make attenuation estimates; use crosswell methods for lithology prediction and fluid detection; and combine crosswell methods with VSP and high-resolution 3-D surface seismic methods to characterize lithology. Major recent accomplishments include: production of a P-wave velocity tomogram which successfully imaged a 20 ft thick sandstone in a shallow clastic oil field; development and implementation of software for all stages of tomographic reconstruction; attenuation study in a shallow clastic reservoir; and Vp/Vs analysis in a carbonate reservoir.

  1. 1992 ozone depletion: A response to the Pinatubo eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This article focuses on the debate about whether or not the Mount Pinatubo eruption affected the springtime Antarctica ozone hole. By September 1992 the ozone hole was larger and growing at a faster pace than in previous years. However, confounding factors include an abrupt shift in the position of the polar vortex, disparity between data sets from satellite and balloon data, increasingly significant ozone loses at lower altitude and increase in depletion above 25 meters. Volcanic aerosols probably contributed but the extent still is unresolved.

  2. The Influence of Chronic Ego Depletion on Goal Adherence: An Experience Sampling Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligang; Tao, Ting; Fan, Chunlei; Gao, Wenbin; Wei, Chuguang

    2015-01-01

    Although ego depletion effects have been widely observed in experiments in which participants perform consecutive self-control tasks, the process of ego depletion remains poorly understood. Using the strength model of self-control, we hypothesized that chronic ego depletion adversely affects goal adherence and that mental effort and motivation are involved in the process of ego depletion. In this study, 203 students reported their daily performance, mental effort, and motivation with respect to goal directed behavior across a 3-week time period. People with high levels of chronic ego depletion were less successful in goal adherence than those with less chronic ego depletion. Although daily effort devoted to goal adherence increased with chronic ego depletion, motivation to adhere to goals was not affected. Participants with high levels of chronic ego depletion showed a stronger positive association between mental effort and performance, but chronic ego depletion did not play a regulatory role in the effect of motivation on performance. Chronic ego depletion increased the likelihood of behavior regulation failure, suggesting that it is difficult for people in an ego-depletion state to adhere to goals. We integrate our results with the findings of previous studies and discuss possible theoretical implications. PMID:26562839

  3. Radiological air quality in a depleted uranium storage vault

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, T.; Cucchiara, A.L.

    1999-03-01

    The radiological air quality of two storage vaults, one with depleted uranium (DU) and one without, was evaluated and compared. The intent of the study was to determine if the presence of stored DU would significantly contribute to the gaseous/airborne radiation level compared to natural background. Both vaults are constructed out of concrete and are dimensionally similar. The vaults are located on the first floor of the same building. Neither vault has air supply or air exhaust. The doors to both vaults remained closed during the evaluation period, except for brief and infrequent access by the operational group. One vault contained 700 KG of depleted uranium, and the other vault contained documents inside of file cabinets. Radon detectors and giraffe air samplers were used to gather data on the quantity of gaseous/airborne radionuclides in both vaults. The results of this study indicated that there was no significant difference in the quantity of gaseous/airborne radionuclides in the two vaults. This paper gives a discussion of the effects of the stored DU on the air quality, and poses several theories supporting the results.

  4. Ozone Depletion Potentials of HCFC-123 and HCFC-124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riepe, E. L.; Patten, K. O.; Wuebbles, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Montreal Protocol has phased out most chlorinated and brominated compounds because of their great efficiency in depleting ozone in the stratosphere. Compounds such as CHCl2CF3 (HCFC-123) and CHClFCF3 (HCFC-124) are being used in commercial refrigeration units and have much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than the chlorofluorocarbons they replace. Despite their small resulting Ozone Depletion Potentials (ODPs), these compounds are still currently expected to be eliminated under the existing Protocol, but there remain questions about finding suitable replacements that would not have other environmental effects. The HCFC-123 and HCFC-124 model-calculated atmospheric lifetimes of 1.3 years and 5.8 years are much shorter compared to the 45 years of CCl3F (CFC-11). In this study, we have reevaluated these compounds with an updated version of the UIUC two-dimensional chemical transport model and with the MOZART (version 3) three-dimensional chemical-transport model. The new version of the two-dimensional model gives ODPs of 0.012 and 0.0125 for HCFC-123 and HCFC-124, respectively. The ODP for HCFC-123 agrees well with previously reported values while the ODP for HCFC-124 is much smaller than earlier estimates. These analyses along with those from the three-dimensional modeling studies will be discussed in the presentation.

  5. Numerical study of error propagation in Monte Carlo depletion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, T.; Petrovic, B.

    2012-07-01

    Improving computer technology and the desire to more accurately model the heterogeneity of the nuclear reactor environment have made the use of Monte Carlo depletion codes more attractive in recent years, and feasible (if not practical) even for 3-D depletion simulation. However, in this case statistical uncertainty is combined with error propagating through the calculation from previous steps. In an effort to understand this error propagation, a numerical study was undertaken to model and track individual fuel pins in four 17 x 17 PWR fuel assemblies. By changing the code's initial random number seed, the data produced by a series of 19 replica runs was used to investigate the true and apparent variance in k{sub eff}, pin powers, and number densities of several isotopes. While this study does not intend to develop a predictive model for error propagation, it is hoped that its results can help to identify some common regularities in the behavior of uncertainty in several key parameters. (authors)

  6. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A G; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-02-11

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  7. Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Alberth, David P.

    2009-03-01

    Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Correction factors for the disrupted equilibrium ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92.

  8. Evidence and Mechanisms of Fat Depletion in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ebadi, Maryam; Mazurak, Vera C.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of cancer patients experience wasting characterized by muscle loss with or without fat loss. In human and animal models of cancer, body composition assessment and morphological analysis reveals adipose atrophy and presence of smaller adipocytes. Fat loss is associated with reduced quality of life in cancer patients and shorter survival independent of body mass index. Fat loss occurs in both visceral and subcutaneous depots; however, the pattern of loss has been incompletely characterized. Increased lipolysis and fat oxidation, decreased lipogenesis, impaired lipid depositionand adipogenesis, as well as browning of white adipose tissue may underlie adipose atrophy in cancer. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) produced by the tumor or adipose tissue may also contribute to adipose depletion. Identifying the mechanisms and time course of fat mass changes in cancer may help identify individuals at risk of adipose depletion and define interventions to circumvent wasting. This review outlines current knowledge of fat mass in cancer and illustrates the need for further studies to assess alterations in visceral and subcutaneous adipose depots and possible mechanisms for loss of fat during cancer progression. PMID:25415607

  9. Protein rotational motion in solution measured by polarized fluorescence depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T M; Barisas, B G

    1986-01-01

    A microscope-based system is described for directly measuring protein rotational motion in viscous environments such as cell membranes by polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD). Proteins labeled with fluorophores having a high quantum yield for triplet formation, such as eosin isothiocyanate (EITC), are examined anaerobically in a fluorescence microscope. An acousto-optic modulator generates a several-microsecond pulse of linearly polarized light which produces an orientationally-asymmetric depletion of ground state fluorescence in the sample. When the sample is then probed with light polarized parallel to the excitation pulse, fluorescence recovers over 0-1,000 microseconds as the sum of two exponentials. One exponential corresponds to triplet decay and the other to the rotational relaxation. An exciting pulse perpendicular to the probe beam is then applied. Fluorescence recovery following this pulse is the difference of the same two exponentials. Equations for fluorescence recovery kinetics to be expected in various experimentally significant cases are derived. Least-squares analysis using these equations then permits the triplet lifetime and rotational correlation time to be determined directly from PFD data. Instrumentation for PFD measurements is discussed that permits photobleaching recovery measurements of lateral diffusion coefficients using the same microscope system. With this apparatus, both rotational and translational diffusion coefficients (Dr, Dt) were measured for EITC-labeled bovine serum albumin in glycerol solutions. Values obtained for Dr and Dt are discussed in light of both the PFD models and the experimental system. PMID:3730506

  10. Tyrosine depletion lowers in vivo DOPA synthesis in ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Rodolfo; Kyser, Abby N; Jaskiw, George E

    2012-12-01

    In vivo dopamine synthesis in the medial prefrontal cortex of the rat is sensitive to the availability of tyrosine. Whether other limbic cortical dopamine terminal regions are similarly tyrosine-dependent is not known. In this study we examined the effects of tyrosine depletion on dopamine synthesis and catecholamine levels in the ventral hippocampus. A tyrosine- and phenylalanine-free neutral amino acid mixture was used to lower brain tyrosine levels in rats undergoing in vivo microdialysis. In one group, NSD-1015 was included in perfusate to permit measurement of DOPA levels. In a second group, NSD-1015 was not included in perfusate so that catecholamine levels could be assayed. Tyrosine depletion significantly lowered DOPA levels in the NSD-1015 treated group and lowered DOPAC but not dopamine or noradrenaline levels in the group not exposed to NSD-1015. We conclude that while catecholamine synthesis in the ventral hippocampus declines when tyrosine availability is lowered, under basal conditions, compensatory mechanisms are able to maintain stable extracellular catecholamine levels. PMID:23022716

  11. Ozone-depleting-substance control and phase-out plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J.M.; Brown, M.J.

    1994-07-01

    Title VI of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires regulation of the use and disposal of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) (e.g., Halon, Freon). Several important federal regulations have been promulgated that affect the use of such substances at the Hanford Site. On April 23, 1993, Executive Order (EO) 12843, Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone-Depleting Substances (EPA 1993) was issued for Federal facilities to conform to the new US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations implementing the Clean Air Act of 1963 (CAA), Section 613, as amended. To implement the requirements of Title VI the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), issued a directive to the Hanford Site contractors on May 25, 1994 (Wisness 1994). The directive assigns Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) the lead in coordinating the development of a sitewide comprehensive implementation plan to be drafted by July 29, 1994 and completed by September 30, 1994. The implementation plan will address several areas where immediate compliance action is required. It will identify all current uses of ODSs and inventories, document the remaining useful life of equipment that contains ODS chemicals, provide a phase-out schedule, and provide a strategy that will be implemented consistently by all the Hanford Site contractors. This plan also addresses the critical and required elements of Federal regulations, the EO, and US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance. This plan is intended to establish a sitewide management system to address the clean air requirements.

  12. Probing Dynamical Heterogeneity in Dense Colloidal Suspensions with Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Zachery; Hogan, Gregory; Gratale, Matthew; Yodh, Arjun G.; Habdas, Piotr

    We directly observe the particle dynamics in dense colloidal suspensions. Using depletion attraction, we vary inter particle potential to study the reentrant glass transition. Confocal microscopy and particle tracking allow us to follow particle trajectories over time. By varying inter particle attraction strength for a fixed volume fraction of colloidal suspensions, we observe three qualitatively different states. Mean square displacement and long time diffusion constant vary with the depletant concentration and indicate a glass state for low attraction strengths, ergodic liquid state for moderate attraction strengths, and attractive arrested state for the highest attraction strengths. Variance in the self overlap function gives the four point susceptibility, a measure of dynamical heterogeneity over a range of length scales and lag times. Results show that the lag times corresponding to the most heterogeneous dynamics are longer for arrested states than for fluid states. The length scale that maximizes four point susceptibility across a range of attraction strengths exhibits a reentrant glass behavior similar to that of the long time diffusion constant. Z.B., G.H., and P.H. acknowledge financial support of the NSF RUI-1306990. M.G. and A.G.Y. acknowledge financial support of the NSF Grant DMR-1205463, NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-1120901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  13. Cystamine induces AIF-mediated apoptosis through glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Yup; Lee, Jin-Haeng; Ju, Mi-kyeong; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, Hyo-Jun; Lim, Jisun; Lee, Seungun; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Park, Hyun Ho; Choi, Kihang; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Kim, In-Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Cystamine and its reduced form cysteamine showed protective effects in various models of neurodegenerative disease, including Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Other lines of evidence demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of cysteamine on duodenal mucosa leading to ulcer development. However, the mechanism for cystamine cytotoxicity remains poorly understood. Here, we report a new pathway in which cystamine induces apoptosis by targeting apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). By screening of various cell lines, we observed that cystamine and cysteamine induce cell death in a cell type-specific manner. Comparison between cystamine-sensitive and cystamine-resistant cell lines revealed that cystamine cytotoxicity is not associated with unfolded protein response, reactive oxygen species generation and transglutaminase or caspase activity; rather, it is associated with the ability of cystamine to trigger AIF nuclear translocation. In cystamine-sensitive cells, cystamine suppresses the levels of intracellular glutathione by inhibiting γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase expression that triggers AIF translocation. Conversely, glutathione supplementation completely prevents cystamine-induced AIF translocation and apoptosis. In rats, cysteamine administration induces glutathione depletion and AIF translocation leading to apoptosis of duodenal epithelium. These results indicate that AIF translocation through glutathione depletion is the molecular mechanism of cystamine toxicity, and provide important implications for cystamine in the neurodegenerative disease therapeutics as well as in the regulation of AIF-mediated cell death. PMID:25549939

  14. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause

    PubMed Central

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M.; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S.; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A.G.; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N.; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  15. VERA Core Simulator Methodology for PWR Cycle Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, Brendan; Collins, Benjamin S; Jabaay, Daniel; Kim, Kang Seog; Graham, Aaron; Stimpson, Shane; Wieselquist, William A; Clarno, Kevin T; Palmtag, Scott; Downar, Thomas; Gehin, Jess C

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed and implemented in MPACT for performing high-fidelity pressurized water reactor (PWR) multi-cycle core physics calculations. MPACT is being developed primarily for application within the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) as one of the main components of the VERA Core Simulator, the others being COBRA-TF and ORIGEN. The methods summarized in this paper include a methodology for performing resonance self-shielding and computing macroscopic cross sections, 2-D/1-D transport, nuclide depletion, thermal-hydraulic feedback, and other supporting methods. These methods represent a minimal set needed to simulate high-fidelity models of a realistic nuclear reactor. Results demonstrating this are presented from the simulation of a realistic model of the first cycle of Watts Bar Unit 1. The simulation, which approximates the cycle operation, is observed to be within 50 ppm boron (ppmB) reactivity for all simulated points in the cycle and approximately 15 ppmB for a consistent statepoint. The verification and validation of the PWR cycle depletion capability in MPACT is the focus of two companion papers.

  16. Sweet delusion. Glucose drinks fail to counteract ego depletion.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Eggert, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Initial acts of self-control have repeatedly been shown to reduce individuals' performance on a consecutive self-control task. In addition, sugar containing drinks have been demonstrated to counteract this so-called ego-depletion effect, both when being ingested and when merely being sensed in the oral cavity. However, since the underlying evidence is less compelling than suggested, replications are crucially required. In Experiment 1, 70 participants consumed a drink containing either sugar or a non-caloric sweetener between two administrations of delay-discounting tasks. Experiment 2 (N=115) was designed to unravel the psychological function of oral glucose sensing by manipulating the temporal delay between a glucose mouth rinse and the administration of the consecutive self-control task. Despite applying powerful research designs, no effect of sugar sensing or ingestion on ego depletion could be detected. These findings add to previous challenges of the glucose model of self-control and highlight the need for independent replications. PMID:24389240

  17. Neural correlates of sleepiness induced by catecholamine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Noah; Fromm, Stephen; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Drevets, Wayne C.; Hasler, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Although extensive indirect evidence exists to suggest that the central dopaminergic system plays a significant role in the modulation of arousal, the functional effect of the dopaminergic influence on the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle remains unclear. Thirteen healthy volunteers and 15 unmedicated subjects with a history of major depressive disorder underwent catecholamine depletion (CD) using oral alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. The main outcome measures in both sessions were sleepiness (Stanford-Sleepiness-Scale), cerebral glucose metabolism (positron emission tomography), and serum prolactin concentration. CD consistently induced clinically relevant sleepiness in both groups (p<0.0001). The CD-induced prolactin increase correlated with CD-induced sleepiness (r=0.71, p<0.0001) but not with CD-induced mood and anxiety symptoms (p≥0.2). CD-induced sleepiness correlated with CD-induced increases in metabolism in the medial and orbital frontal cortex, bilateral superior temporal cortex, left insula, cingulate motor area and in the vicinity of the periaqueductal gray. This study suggests that the association between dopamine depletion and sleepiness is independent of the brain reward system and the risk for depression. The visceromotor system, the cingulate motor area, the periaqueductal gray and the caudal hypothalamus may mediate the impact of the dopaminergic system on regulation of wakefulness and sleep. PMID:21872452

  18. Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.; Avci, H.I.; Bradley, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

  19. Satellite surveillance of evaporative depletion across the Indus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiaanssen, Wim G. M.; Ahmad, Mobin-Ud-Din; Chemin, Yann

    2002-12-01

    The irrigated Indus Basin in Pakistan has insufficient water resources to supply all its stakeholders. Information on evaporative depletion across the Basin is an important requirement if the water resources are to be managed efficiently. This paper presents the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) method used to compute actual evapotranspiration for large areas based on public domain National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite data. Computational procedures for retrieving actual evapotranspiration from satellites have been developed over the last 20 years. The current work is among the first applications used to estimate actual evapotranspiration on an annual scale across a vast river basin system with a minimum of ground data. Only sunshine duration and wind speed are required as input data for the remote sensing flux algorithm. The results were validated in the Indus Basin by comparing results from a field-scale transient moisture flow model, in situ Bowen ratio measurements, and residual water balance analyses for an area of 3 million ha. The accuracy of assessing time-integrated actual annual evapotranspiration varied from 0% to 10% on a field scale to 5% at the regional level. Spatiotemporal information on actual evapotranspiration helps to evaluate water distribution and water use between large irrigation project areas. Wide variations in evaporative depletion between project areas and crop types were found. Satellite-based measurements can provide such information and avoid the need to rely on field databases.

  20. PAU, a fully depleted mosaic imager with narrow band filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Serrano, S.

    2014-03-01

    The PAU Survey studies the existence and properties of dark energy from the observations of redshift space distortions and weak lensing magnification from galaxy cross-correlations as main cosmological probes. The PAU Team is building an instrument, PAUCam, equipped with fully depleted CCD detectors, designed to be mounted at the prime focus of the 4.2 m diameter William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma. Simulations indicate that PAUCam at the WHT will be able to image about 2 square degrees per night in 40 narrow-band filters plus six wide-band filters to an AB magnitude depth of i ~ 22.5, providing low-resolution (R ~ 50) photometric spectra for around 30,000 galaxies, 5,000 stars and 1,000 quasars per square degree. Accurate photometric calibration of the PAU data is vital to achieve the survey science goals. This calibration is challenging due to the large and unusual filter set. We outline the data management pipelines being developed for the survey, both for nightly data reduction and co-addition of multiple epochs, with emphasis on the photometric calibration strategies. We also describe the main tests and results in the characterization of our Hamamatsu fully depleted detectors.