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Sample records for 15d-pgj2 mediates repression

  1. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) mediates repression of TNF-{alpha} by decreasing levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 at its promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Engdahl, Ryan . E-mail: rengdahl@temple.edu; Monroy, M. Alexandra; Daly, John M.

    2007-07-20

    Prostaglandin metabolite 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is known to inhibit a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as being a ligand for nuclear receptor PPAR{gamma}. We investigated the ability of 15d-PGJ2 to inhibit TNF-{alpha} gene expression through mechanisms that involve histone modification. Pretreatment with 15d-PGJ2 (10 {mu}M) inhibited LPS-stimulated TNF-{alpha} mRNA in THP-1 monocytes or PMA-differentiated cells to nearly basal levels. A specific PPAR{gamma} ligand, GW1929, failed to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} mRNA expression nor did a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662, alter the repression of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in LPS-stimulated cells pretreated with 15d-PGJ2 suggesting a PPAR{gamma}-independent inhibition of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in THP-1 cells. Transfection studies with a reporter construct and subsequent treatment with 15d-PGJ2 demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of the TNF-{alpha} promoter. Additional studies demonstrated that inhibition of histone deacetylases with trichostatin A (TSA) or overexpression of histone acetyltransferase CBP could overcome 15d-PGJ2-mediated repression of the TNF-{alpha} promoter, suggesting that an important mechanism whereby 15d-PGJ2 suppresses a cytokine is through factors that regulate histone modifications. To examine the endogenous TNF-{alpha} promoter, chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP) were performed. ChIP assays demonstrated that LPS stimulation induced an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation at the TNF-{alpha} promoter, which was reduced in cells pretreated with 15d-PGJ2. These results highlight the ability of acetylation and deacetylation factors to affect the TNF-{alpha} promoter and demonstrate that an additional important mechanism whereby 15d-PGJ2 mediates TNF-{alpha} transcriptional repression by altering levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 at its promoter.

  2. Activation of the MAPK/Akt/Nrf2-Egr1/HO-1-GCLc axis protects MG-63 osteosarcoma cells against 15d-PGJ2-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Koyani, Chintan N.; Kitz, Kerstin; Rossmann, Christine; Bernhart, Eva; Huber, Evelyn; Trummer, Christopher; Windischhofer, Werner; Sattler, Wolfgang; Malle, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts to improve treatment modalities for osteosarcoma (OS), patient survival remains poor mainly due to pro-survival pathways in OS cells. Among others, prostaglandins (PGs) are the potent regulators of bone homoeostasis and OS pathophysiology. Therefore, the present study aimed to elucidate the impact of 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2, a stable PGD2 degradation product) on cell death/cell survival pathways in p53-deficient MG-63 OS cells. Our findings show that 15d-PGJ2 induces generation of reactive oxygen species that promote p38 MAPK activation and subsequent Akt phosphorylation. This pathway induced nuclear expression of Nrf2 and Egr1, and increased transcription of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLc), catalysing the first step in GSH synthesis. Silencing of Nrf2, Egr1 and HO-1 significantly elevated 15d-PGJ2-mediated reduction of cellular metabolic activity. Activation of cell survival genes including HO-1 and GCLc inhibited 15d-PGJ2-induced cleavage of pro-caspase-3 and PARP. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining showed an increase in early/late apoptotic cells in response to 15d-PGJ2. The observed 15d-PGJ2-mediated signalling events are independent of PGD2 receptors (DP1 and DP2) and PPARγ. In addition, the electrophilic carbon atom C9 is a prerequisite for the observed activity of 15d-PGJ2. The present data show that the intracellular redox imbalance acted as a node and triggered both death and survival pathways in response to 15d-PGJ2. Pharmacological or genetic interference of the pro-survival pathway, the p38 MAPK/Akt/Nrf2-Egr1/HO-1-GCLc axis, sensitizes MG-63 cells towards 15d-PGJ2-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26801686

  3. Activation of the MAPK/Akt/Nrf2-Egr1/HO-1-GCLc axis protects MG-63 osteosarcoma cells against 15d-PGJ2-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Koyani, Chintan N; Kitz, Kerstin; Rossmann, Christine; Bernhart, Eva; Huber, Evelyn; Trummer, Christopher; Windischhofer, Werner; Sattler, Wolfgang; Malle, Ernst

    2016-03-15

    Despite considerable efforts to improve treatment modalities for osteosarcoma (OS), patient survival remains poor mainly due to pro-survival pathways in OS cells. Among others, prostaglandins (PGs) are the potent regulators of bone homoeostasis and OS pathophysiology. Therefore, the present study aimed to elucidate the impact of 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2, a stable PGD2 degradation product) on cell death/cell survival pathways in p53-deficient MG-63 OS cells. Our findings show that 15d-PGJ2 induces generation of reactive oxygen species that promote p38 MAPK activation and subsequent Akt phosphorylation. This pathway induced nuclear expression of Nrf2 and Egr1, and increased transcription of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLc), catalysing the first step in GSH synthesis. Silencing of Nrf2, Egr1 and HO-1 significantly elevated 15d-PGJ2-mediated reduction of cellular metabolic activity. Activation of cell survival genes including HO-1 and GCLc inhibited 15d-PGJ2-induced cleavage of pro-caspase-3 and PARP. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining showed an increase in early/late apoptotic cells in response to 15d-PGJ2. The observed 15d-PGJ2-mediated signalling events are independent of PGD2 receptors (DP1 and DP2) and PPARγ. In addition, the electrophilic carbon atom C9 is a prerequisite for the observed activity of 15d-PGJ2. The present data show that the intracellular redox imbalance acted as a node and triggered both death and survival pathways in response to 15d-PGJ2. Pharmacological or genetic interference of the pro-survival pathway, the p38 MAPK/Akt/Nrf2-Egr1/HO-1-GCLc axis, sensitizes MG-63 cells towards 15d-PGJ2-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26801686

  4. Autocrine secretion of 15d-PGJ2 mediates simvastatin-induced apoptotic burst in human metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wasinger, Christine; Künzl, Martin; Minichsdorfer, Christoph; Höller, Christoph; Zellner, Maria; Hohenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite new therapeutic approaches, metastatic melanomas still have a poor prognosis. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and exert anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions. We have recently shown that simvastatin triggers an apoptotic burst in human metastatic melanoma cells by the synthesis of an autocrine factor. Experimental Approach The current in vitro study was performed in human metastatic melanoma cell lines (A375, 518a2) and primary human melanocytes and melanoma cells. The secretome of simvastatin-stressed cells was analysed with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and MS. The signalling pathways involved were analysed at the protein and mRNA level using pharmacological approaches and siRNA technology. Key Results Simvastatin was shown to activate a stress cascade, leading to the synthesis of 15-deoxy-12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), in a p38- and COX-2-dependent manner. Significant concentrations of 15d-PGJ2 were reached in the medium of melanoma cells, which were sufficient to activate caspase 8 and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Inhibition of lipocalin-type PGD synthase, a key enzyme for 15d-PGJ2 synthesis, abolished the apoptotic effect of simvastatin. Moreover, 15d-PGJ2 was shown to bind to the fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5), which was up-regulated and predominantly detected in the secretome of simvastatin-stressed cells. Knockdown of FABP5 abolished simvastatin-induced activation of PPAR-γ and amplified the apoptotic response. Conclusions and Implications We characterized simvastatin-induced activation of the 15d-PGJ2/FABP5 signalling cascades, which triggered an apoptotic burst in melanoma cells but did not affect primary human melanocytes. These data support the rationale for the pharmacological targeting of 15d-PGJ2 in metastatic melanoma. PMID:25091578

  5. The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 inhibits the NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Nolan K.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic protein complexes that respond to diverse danger signals by activating caspase-1. The sensor components of the inflammasome, often proteins of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) family, detect stress, danger stimuli, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We report that the eicosanoid 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) and related cyclopentenone prostaglandins inhibit caspase-1 activation by the NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes. This inhibition was independent of 15d-PGJ2’s well characterized role as a peroxisome proliferator receptor-γ agonist, its activation of NRF2, or its anti-inflammatory function as an inhibitor of NF-κB. Instead, 15d-PGJ2 prevents the autoproteolytic activation of caspase-1 and the maturation of IL-1β through induction of a cellular state inhibitory to caspase-1 proteolytic function. The eicosanoid does not directly modify or inactivate the caspase-1 enzyme. Rather, inhibition is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. In a mouse peritonitis model of gout, using monosodium urate crystals to activate NLRP3,15d-PGJ2 caused a significant inhibition of cell recruitment and associated IL-1β release. Furthermore, in a murine anthrax infection model, 15d-PGJ2 reversed anthrax lethal toxin-mediated NLRP1-dependent resistance. The findings reported in this work suggest a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins through inhibition of caspase-1 and the inflammasome. PMID:25681332

  6. The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 inhibits the NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Nolan K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2015-03-15

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic protein complexes that respond to diverse danger signals by activating caspase-1. The sensor components of the inflammasome, often proteins of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) family, detect stress, danger stimuli, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We report that the eicosanoid 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) and related cyclopentenone PGs inhibit caspase-1 activation by the NLR family leucine-rich repeat protein (NLRP)1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes. This inhibition was independent of the well-characterized role of 15d-PGJ2 as a peroxisome proliferator receptor-γ agonist, its activation of NF erythroid 2-related factor 2, or its anti-inflammatory function as an inhibitor of NF-κB. Instead, 15d-PGJ2 prevents the autoproteolytic activation of caspase-1 and the maturation of IL-1β through induction of a cellular state inhibitory to caspase-1 proteolytic function. The eicosanoid does not directly modify or inactivate the caspase-1 enzyme. Rather, inhibition is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. In a mouse peritonitis model of gout, using monosodium urate crystals to activate NLRP3, 15d-PGJ2 caused a significant inhibition of cell recruitment and associated IL-1β release. Furthermore, in a murine anthrax infection model, 15d-PGJ2 reversed anthrax lethal toxin-mediated NLRP1-dependent resistance. The findings reported in this study suggest a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory properties of the cyclopentenone PGs through inhibition of caspase-1 and the inflammasome. PMID:25681332

  7. 15d-PGJ2-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Physicochemical Characterization and Evaluation of Pharmacological Effects on Inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Nathalie Ferreira Silva; de Macedo, Cristina Gomes; Bonfante, Ricardo; Abdalla, Henrique Ballassini; da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; Pasquoto, Tatiane; de Lima, Renata; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, has physiological properties including pronounced anti-inflammatory activity, though it binds strongly to serum albumin. The use of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can improve therapeutic properties increasing drug efficiency and availability. 15d-PGJ2-SLN was therefore developed and investigated in terms of its immunomodulatory potential. 15d-PGJ2-SLN and unloaded SLN were physicochemically characterized and experiments in vivo were performed. Animals were pretreated with 15d-PGJ2-SLN at concentrations of 3, 10 or 30 μg·kg-1 before inflammatory stimulus with carrageenan (Cg), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or mBSA (immune response). Interleukins (IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-17) levels were also evaluated in exudates. The 15d-PGJ2-SLN system showed good colloidal parameters and encapsulation efficiency of 96%. The results showed that the formulation was stable for up to 120 days with low hemolytic effects. The 15d-PGJ2-SLN formulation was able to reduce neutrophil migration in three inflammation models tested using low concentrations of 15d-PGJ2. Additionally, 15d-PGJ2-SLN increased IL-10 levels and reduced IL-1β as well as IL-17 in peritoneal fluid. The new 15d-PGJ2-SLN formulation highlights perspectives of a potent anti-inflammatory system using low concentrations of 15d-PGJ2. PMID:27575486

  8. Elimination of the biphasic pharmacodynamics of 15d-PGJ2 by controlling its release from a nanoemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Saed; Kajimoto, Kazuaki; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-01-01

    15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) has a dual action of stimulating anti-inflammation and anti-proliferation when exogenously administered at high doses. However, at lower doses, it can be toxic inducing opposite actions, ie, stimulation of both inflammation and cell proliferation. This biphasic phenomenon of 15d-PGJ2 is believed to be due to its multitarget behavior. In this study, we provide a strategy for controlling such biphasic pharmacodynamics by separating its dual actions while retaining the beneficial one by using a nanoemulsion (NE). The 15d-PGJ2 was encapsulated in the NE composed of triolein/distearoyl phosphatidylcholine/Tween 80 at a high encapsulation ratio (>83%). Furthermore, NE enhanced drug retention by slowing down its release rate, which was, unconventionally, inversely dependent on the total surface area of the NE system. Next, focusing on the biphasic effect on cell proliferation, we found that the 15d-PGJ2-loaded slow-release NE showed only a dose-dependent inhibition of the viability of a mouse macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, although a fast-release NE as well as free 15d-PGJ2 exerted a biphasic effect. The observed slow-release kinetics are believed to be responsible for elimination of the biphasic pharmacodynamics of 15d-PGJ2 mainly for two reasons: 1) a high proportion of 15d-PGJ2 that is retained in the NE was delivered to the cytosol, where proapoptotic targets are located and 2) 15d-PGJ2 was able to bypass cell membrane-associated targets that lead to the induction of cellular proliferation. Collectively, our strategy of eliminating the 15d-PGJ2-induced biphasic pharmacodynamics was based on the delivery of 15d-PGJ2 to its desired site of action, excluding undesired sites, on a subcellular level. PMID:27354798

  9. 15d-PGJ2-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: Physicochemical Characterization and Evaluation of Pharmacological Effects on Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Camila Morais Gonçalves; Pasquoto, Tatiane; de Lima, Renata; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, has physiological properties including pronounced anti-inflammatory activity, though it binds strongly to serum albumin. The use of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can improve therapeutic properties increasing drug efficiency and availability. 15d-PGJ2-SLN was therefore developed and investigated in terms of its immunomodulatory potential. 15d-PGJ2-SLN and unloaded SLN were physicochemically characterized and experiments in vivo were performed. Animals were pretreated with 15d-PGJ2-SLN at concentrations of 3, 10 or 30 μg·kg-1 before inflammatory stimulus with carrageenan (Cg), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or mBSA (immune response). Interleukins (IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-17) levels were also evaluated in exudates. The 15d-PGJ2-SLN system showed good colloidal parameters and encapsulation efficiency of 96%. The results showed that the formulation was stable for up to 120 days with low hemolytic effects. The 15d-PGJ2-SLN formulation was able to reduce neutrophil migration in three inflammation models tested using low concentrations of 15d-PGJ2. Additionally, 15d-PGJ2-SLN increased IL-10 levels and reduced IL-1β as well as IL-17 in peritoneal fluid. The new 15d-PGJ2-SLN formulation highlights perspectives of a potent anti-inflammatory system using low concentrations of 15d-PGJ2. PMID:27575486

  10. The anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 and its nuclear receptor PPARgamma are decreased in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gras, Isabel; Pérez-Nievas, Beatriz G; García-Bueno, Borja; Madrigal, José L M; Andrés-Esteban, Eva; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás; Rubio, Gabriel; Leza, Juan C

    2011-05-01

    A number of findings suggest that inflammation plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Taking into account a physiological balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, we measured the plasma levels of cyclooxygenase-derived mediators and other key pro- and anti-inflammatory transcription factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Forty healthy subjects and 46 treated chronic schizophrenic patients with an acutely exacerbated condition who met DSM-IV criteria were included. COX by-products prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 15d-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) plasma levels were measured by EIA. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as well as nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB) activity in nuclear extracts from PBMC and expression of its inhibitory subunit IκBα in cytosolic extracts were determined using ELISA-based kits. Schizophrenic patients showed higher plasma levels of pro-inflammatory PGE2 than age-matched controls (p=0.043). On the contrary, levels of anti-inflammatory 15-d-PGJ2 were lower (p=0.004), correlating with a lower expression of its nuclear target, PPARγ in nuclear extracts from PBMC (p=0.001). Although no changes in NFκB activity were observed between patients and healthy controls, the expression of its inhibitory protein IκBα was lower in the patients compared to the controls (p=0.027). These findings suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a systemic imbalance in the plasma levels of pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory prostaglandins in favor of the former. Furthermore, the expression and activity of anti-inflammatory PPARγ are diminished in PBMC, which indicates a state of inflammation and blunted anti-inflammatory counterbalancing mechanisms at systemic level in these patients. PMID:21334179

  11. 15d-PGJ2 and rosiglitazone suppress Janus kinase-STAT inflammatory signaling through induction of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3 in glia.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Park, Soo Young; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo

    2003-04-25

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonists are now emerging as therapeutic drugs for various inflammatory diseases. However, their molecular mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. Here we report a novel mechanism that underlies the PPAR-gamma agonist-mediated suppression of brain inflammation. We show that 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and rosiglitazone reduce the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 as well as Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK2 in activated astrocytes and microglia. The PPAR-gamma agonist-mediated reduction in phosphorylation leads to the suppression of JAK-STAT-dependent inflammatory responses. The effects of 15d-PGJ(2) and rosiglitazone are not mediated by activation of PPAR-gamma. 15d-PGJ(2) and rosiglitazone rapidly induce the transcription of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 and 3, which in turn inhibit JAK activity in activated glial cells. In addition, Src homology 2 domain-containing protein phosphatase 2 (SHP2), another negative regulator of JAK activity, is also involved in their anti-inflammatory action. Our data suggest that 15d-PGJ(2) and rosiglitazone suppress the initiation of JAK-STAT inflammatory signaling independently of PPAR-gamma, thus attenuating brain inflammation. PMID:12584205

  12. Mitochondrial remodeling following fission inhibition by 15d-PGJ2 involves molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Rekha; Mishra, Nandita; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical inhibition of fission protein Drp1 leads to mitochondrial fusion. {yields} Increased fusion stimulates molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. {yields} Proteolysis of larger isoforms, new synthesis and ubiquitination of OPA1 occur. {yields} Loss of mitochondrial tubular rigidity and disorganization of cristae. {yields} Generation of large swollen dysfunctional mitochondria. -- Abstract: We showed earlier that 15 deoxy {Delta}{sup 12,14} prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inactivates Drp1 and induces mitochondrial fusion . However, prolonged incubation of cells with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in remodeling of fused mitochondria into large swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structure. While initial fusion of mitochondria by 15d-PGJ2 required the presence of both outer (Mfn1 and Mfn2) and inner (OPA1) mitochondrial membrane fusion proteins, later mitochondrial changes involved increased degradation of the fusion protein OPA1 and ubiquitination of newly synthesized OPA1 along with decreased expression of Mfn1 and Mfn2, which likely contributed to the loss of tubular rigidity, disorganization of cristae, and formation of large swollen degenerated dysfunctional mitochondria. Similar to inhibition of Drp1 by 15d-PGJ2, decreased expression of fission protein Drp1 by siRNA also resulted in the loss of fusion proteins. Prevention of 15d-PGJ2 induced mitochondrial elongation by thiol antioxidants prevented not only loss of OPA1 isoforms but also its ubiquitination. These findings provide novel insights into unforeseen complexity of molecular events that modulate mitochondrial plasticity.

  13. Proteome Analysis Identified the PPARγ Ligand 15d-PGJ2 as a Novel Drug Inhibiting Melanoma Progression and Interfering with Tumor-Stroma Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Paulitschke, Verena; Gruber, Silke; Hofstätter, Elisabeth; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Klepeisz, Philipp; Schicher, Nikolaus; Jonak, Constanze; Petzelbauer, Peter; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gerner, Christopher; Kunstfeld, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been originally thought to be restricted to lipid metabolism or glucose homeostasis. Recently, evidence is growing that PPARγ ligands have inhibitory effects on tumor growth. To shed light on the potential therapeutic effects on melanoma we tested a panel of PPAR agonists on their ability to block tumor proliferation in vitro. Whereas ciglitazone, troglitazone and WY14643 showed moderate effects on proliferation, 15d-PGJ2 displayed profound anti-tumor activity on four different melanoma cell lines tested. Additionally, 15d-PGJ2 inhibited proliferation of tumor-associated fibroblasts and tube formation of endothelial cells. 15d-PGJ2 induced the tumor suppressor gene p21, a G2/M arrest and inhibited tumor cell migration. Shot gun proteome analysis in addition to 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation of A375 melanoma cells suggested that 15d-PGJ2 might exert its effects via modification and/or downregulation of Hsp-90 (heat shock protein 90) and several chaperones. Applying the recently established CPL/MUW database with a panel of defined classification signatures, we demonstrated a regulation of proteins involved in metastasis, transport or protein synthesis including paxillin, angio-associated migratory cell protein or matrix metalloproteinase-2 as confirmed by zymography. Our data revealed for the first time a profound effect of the single compound 15d-PGJ2 on melanoma cells in addition to the tumor-associated microenvironment suggesting synergistic therapeutic efficiency. PMID:23049949

  14. Proteome analysis identified the PPARγ ligand 15d-PGJ2 as a novel drug inhibiting melanoma progression and interfering with tumor-stroma interaction.

    PubMed

    Paulitschke, Verena; Gruber, Silke; Hofstätter, Elisabeth; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Klepeisz, Philipp; Schicher, Nikolaus; Jonak, Constanze; Petzelbauer, Peter; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gerner, Christopher; Kunstfeld, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been originally thought to be restricted to lipid metabolism or glucose homeostasis. Recently, evidence is growing that PPARγ ligands have inhibitory effects on tumor growth. To shed light on the potential therapeutic effects on melanoma we tested a panel of PPAR agonists on their ability to block tumor proliferation in vitro. Whereas ciglitazone, troglitazone and WY14643 showed moderate effects on proliferation, 15d-PGJ2 displayed profound anti-tumor activity on four different melanoma cell lines tested. Additionally, 15d-PGJ2 inhibited proliferation of tumor-associated fibroblasts and tube formation of endothelial cells. 15d-PGJ2 induced the tumor suppressor gene p21, a G(2)/M arrest and inhibited tumor cell migration. Shot gun proteome analysis in addition to 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation of A375 melanoma cells suggested that 15d-PGJ2 might exert its effects via modification and/or downregulation of Hsp-90 (heat shock protein 90) and several chaperones. Applying the recently established CPL/MUW database with a panel of defined classification signatures, we demonstrated a regulation of proteins involved in metastasis, transport or protein synthesis including paxillin, angio-associated migratory cell protein or matrix metalloproteinase-2 as confirmed by zymography. Our data revealed for the first time a profound effect of the single compound 15d-PGJ2 on melanoma cells in addition to the tumor-associated microenvironment suggesting synergistic therapeutic efficiency. PMID:23049949

  15. The low molecular weight fraction of human serum albumin upregulates production of 15d-PGJ2 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory W; Rael, Leonard T; Hausburg, Melissa; Frederick, Elizabeth D; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta; Carrick, Matthew M; Bar-Or, David

    2016-05-13

    Activation of the innate immune system involves a series of events designed to counteract the initial insult followed by the clearance of debris and promotion of healing. Aberrant regulation can lead to systemic inflammatory response syndrome, multiple organ failure, and chronic inflammation. A better understanding of the innate immune response may help manage complications while allowing for proper immune progression. In this study, the ability of several classes of anti-inflammatory drugs to affect LPS-induced cytokine and prostaglandin release from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was evaluated. PBMC were cultured in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX), ibuprofen (IBU), and the low molecular weight fraction of 5% albumin (LMWF5A) followed by stimulation with LPS. After 24 h, TNFα, PGE2, and 15d-PGJ2 release was determined by ELISA. Distinct immunomodulation patterns emerged following LPS stimulation of PBMC in the presence of said compounds. DEX, a steroid with strong immunosuppressive properties, reduced TNFα, PGE2, and 15d-PGJ2 release. IBU caused significant reduction in prostaglandin release while TNFα release was unchanged. An emerging biologic with known anti-inflammatory properties, LMWF5A, significantly reduced TNFα release while enhancing PGE2 and 15d-PGJ2 release. Incubating LMWF5A together with IBU negated this observed increased prostaglandin release without affecting the suppression of TNFα release. Additionally, LMWF5A caused an increase in COX-2 transcription and translation. LMWF5A exhibited a unique immune modulation pattern in PBMC, disparate from steroid or NSAID administration. This enhancement of prostaglandin release (specifically 15d-PGJ2), in conjunction with a decrease in TNFα release, suggests a switch that favors resolution and decreased inflammation. PMID:27095392

  16. Total Synthesis of Prostaglandin 15d-PGJ(2) and Investigation of its Effect on the Secretion of IL-6 and IL-12.

    PubMed

    Egger, Julian; Fischer, Stefan; Bretscher, Peter; Freigang, Stefan; Kopf, Manfred; Carreira, Erick M

    2015-09-01

    An efficient synthesis of 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2, 1) is reported. The route described allows for diversification of the parent structure to prepare seven analogues of 1 in which the positioning of electrophilic sites is varied. These analogues were tested in SAR studies for their ability to reduce the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. It was shown that the endocyclic enone is crucial for the bioactivity investigated and that the conjugated ω-side chain serves in a reinforcing manner. PMID:26301727

  17. The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3)-mediated prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) metabolism in keloids.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Alon; Newsome, Austin; Thekkudan, Theresa; Frazier, Robert; Katdare, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Keloids are progressively expanding scars, mostly prevalent in individuals of African descent. Previous data identified increased mast cell number and activation state in keloids suggesting a role in disease progression. The major eicosanoid secreted by mast cells is prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a relatively unstable pro-inflammatory mediator which can be spontaneously converted to 15-deoxy-(Delta12,14)-prostaglandin J2(15d-PGJ2) or enzymatically metabolized to 9α,11β-PGF2 by aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3). In this work, we investigated the possible role of PGD2 and its metabolites in keloids using CRL1762 keloid fibroblasts (KF) and immunohistochemical staining. Our data suggested approximately 3-fold increase of tryptase-positive mast cell count in keloids compared with normal skin. Furthermore, AKR1C3 was overexpressed in the fibrotic area of keloids while relatively weak staining detected in normal skin. Metabolism of PGD2 to 9α,11β-PGF2 by both, KF and normal fibroblasts, was dependent on AKR1C3 as this reaction was attenuated in the presence of the AKR1C3 inhibitor, 2'-hydroxyflavanone, or in cells with decreased AKR1C3 expression. 15d-PGJ2, but not the other tested PGs, inhibited KF proliferation, attenuated KF-mediated collagen gel contraction and increased caspase-3 activation. In addition, treatment with 15d-PGJ2 activated P38-MAPK, induced reactive oxygen species and upregulated superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1). Finally, inhibition of P38-MAPK further augmented 15d-PGJ2-induced caspase-3 cleavage and attenuated its effect on SOD-1 transcription. This work suggests that localized dual inhibition of AKR1C3 and P38-MAPK may inhibit keloid progression. Inhibiting AKR1C3 activity may generate oxidative environment due to redirection of PGD2 metabolism towards 15d-PGJ2 while inhibition of P38-MAPK will sensitize keloid cells to ROS-induced apoptosis. PMID:26308156

  18. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization. PMID:26507581

  19. Molecular mechanisms of COUP-TF-mediated transcriptional repression: evidence for transrepression and active repression.

    PubMed Central

    Leng, X; Cooney, A J; Tsai, S Y; Tsai, M J

    1996-01-01

    COUP-TF, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been proposed to play a key role in regulating organogenesis, neurogenesis, and cellular differentiation during embryonic development. Since heterodimierization is a common theme within the nuclear receptor superfamily and has been demonstrated to modulate transcriptional properties of heterodimeric partners via allosteric interactions, we have devised a strategy to examine the silencing function of COUP-TF in a heterodimeric context. We find that the intrinsic active repression function of COUP-TF is not affected by heterodimerization. Moreover, COUP-TF can transrepress the ligand-dependent activation of its heterodimeric partners without its own DNA binding site. Using receptor deletion mutants in transfection assays, we show that the region necessary for COUP-TF silencing function is not sufficient for its transrepression activity. Furthermore, our studies indicate that in addition to its active repression function, COUP-TF can repress several different types of activator-dependent transactivation. However, this active repression function of COUP-TF may be differentially regulated by some other activator(s). These studies provide new insights into the molecular mechanism(s) of COUP-TF-mediated repression. PMID:8628300

  20. MicroRNA-mediated repression of nonsense mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya; Lin, Jimin; Xu, Beiying; Hu, Sida; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Ligang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have established important roles for microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating gene expression. Here, we report that miRNAs also serve as a surveillance system to repress the expression of nonsense mRNAs that may produce harmful truncated proteins. Upon recognition of the premature termination codon by the translating ribosome, the downstream portion of the coding region of an mRNA is redefined as part of the 3′ untranslated region; as a result, the miRNA-responsive elements embedded in this region can be detected by miRNAs, triggering accelerated mRNA deadenylation and translational inhibition. We demonstrate that naturally occurring cancer-causing APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) nonsense mutants which escape nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) are repressed by miRNA-mediated surveillance. In addition, we show that miRNA-mediated surveillance and exon–exon junction complex-mediated NMD are not mutually exclusive and act additively to enhance the repressive activity. Therefore, we have uncovered a new role for miRNAs in repressing nonsense mutant mRNAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03032.001 PMID:25107276

  1. SMRT isoforms mediate repression and anti-repression of nuclear receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J D; Umesono, K; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression represents an important component in the regulation of cell differentiation and oncogenesis mediated by nuclear hormone receptors. Hormones act to relieve repression, thus allowing receptors to function as transcriptional activators. The transcriptional corepressor SMRT was identified as a silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors. SMRT is highly related to another corepressor, N-CoR, suggesting the existence of a new family of receptor-interacting proteins. We demonstrate that SMRT is a ubiquitous nuclear protein that interacts with unliganded receptor heterodimers in mammalian cells. Furthermore, expression of the receptor-interacting domain of SMRT acts as an antirepressor, suggesting the potential importance of splicing variants as modulators of thyroid hormone and retinoic acid signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755515

  2. Modes of TAL effector-mediated repression

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jeannette; Gossen, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Engineered transcription activator-like effectors, or TALEs, have emerged as a new class of designer DNA-binding proteins. Their DNA recognition sites can be specified with great flexibility. When fused to appropriate transcriptional regulatory domains, they can serve as designer transcription factors, modulating the activity of targeted promoters. We created tet operator (tetO)-specific TALEs (tetTALEs), with an identical DNA-binding site as the Tet repressor (TetR) and the TetR-based transcription factors that are extensively used in eukaryotic transcriptional control systems. Different constellations of tetTALEs and tetO modified chromosomal transcription units were analyzed for their efficacy in mammalian cells. We find that tetTALE-silencers can entirely abrogate expression from the strong human EF1α promoter when binding upstream of the transcriptional control sequence. Remarkably, the DNA-binding domain of tetTALE alone can effectively counteract trans-activation mediated by the potent tettrans-activator and also directly interfere with RNA polymerase II transcription initiation from the strong CMV promoter. Our results demonstrate that TALEs can act as highly versatile tools in genetic engineering, serving as trans-activators, trans-silencers and also competitive repressors. PMID:25389273

  3. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2 Inhibits Homing of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Triggered by Chronic Liver Injury via Redox Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Jia, Shuangshuang; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Le; Yang, Lin; Wang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have capacity to migrate to the damaged liver and contribute to fibrogenesis in chronic liver diseases. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), an endogenous ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), is considered a new inhibitor of cell migration. However, the actions of 15d-PGJ2 on BMSC migration remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of 15d-PGJ2 on the migration of BMSCs using a mouse model of chronic liver fibrosis and primary mouse BMSCs. Our results demonstrated that in vivo, 15d-PGJ2 administration inhibited the homing of BMSCs to injured liver by flow cytometric analysis and, in vitro, 15d-PGJ2 suppressed primary BMSC migration in a dose-dependent manner determined by Boyden chamber assay. Furthermore, the repressive effect of 15d-PGJ2 was blocked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor, but not PPARγ antagonist, and action of 15d-PGJ2 was not reproduced by PPARγ synthetic ligands. In addition, 15d-PGJ2 triggered a significant ROS production and cytoskeletal remodeling in BMSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that 15d-PGJ2 plays a crucial role in homing of BMSCs to the injured liver dependent on ROS production, independently of PPARγ, which may represent a new strategy in the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26457076

  4. 15-Deoxy-delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 biphasically regulates the proliferation of mouse hippocampal neural progenitor cells by modulating the redox state.

    PubMed

    Katura, Takashi; Moriya, Takahiro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2010-04-01

    The activity of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is regulated by various humoral factors. Although prostaglandin (PG) D(2) is known to mediate various physiological brain functions such as sleep, its actions on NPCs have not been fully understood. In the process of investigating the effects of PGD(2) on NPCs, we found that 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)), an endogenous metabolite of PGD(2), exhibits a novel regulation of the proliferation of NPCs derived from mouse hippocampus. 15d-PGJ(2) showed biphasic effects on epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation of NPCs; facilitation at low concentrations ( approximately 0.3 muM) and suppression at higher concentrations (0.5-10 microM) in vitro. 2-Chloro-5-nitrobenzanilide (GW9662), an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, known to be a molecular target for 15d-PGJ(2), failed to abolish the effects of 15d-PGJ(2). 9,10-dihydro-15d-PGJ(2) (CAY10410), a structural analog of 15d-PGJ(2) lacking the electrophilic carbon in the cyclopentenone ring, did not show 15d-PGJ(2)-like actions. Treatment with 15d-PGJ(2) increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and decreased endogenous GSH levels. Furthermore, supplementation with a membrane-permeable analog of glutathione, GSH ethyl ester (2 mM), diminished the biphasic effects of 15d-PGJ(2). Finally, cell division in the dentate gyrus of postnatal mice was increased by injection of low-dose (1 ng i.c.v.) 15d-PGJ(2) and suppressed by high-dose (30 ng) 15d-PGJ(2). These results suggest that 15d-PGJ(2) regulates the proliferation of NPCs via its electrophilic nature, which enables covalent binding to molecules such as GSH. PMID:20086036

  5. Resveratrol-Mediated Repression and Reversion of Prostatic Myofibroblast Phenoconversion

    PubMed Central

    Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Moore, Bethany B.; Macoska, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in berries, peanuts, grapes, and red wine, inhibits oxidation, inflammation, and cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in multiple cell types and or animal models. It represses collagen deposition in the vasculature, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and esophagus in animal models and may have some utility as an anti-fibrotic. Recent studies have shown that increased collagen deposition and tissue stiffness in the peri-urethral area of the prostate are associated with lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and urinary obstructive symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine whether Resveratrol might be useful to inhibit or revert TGFβ- and/or CXCL12-mediated myofibroblast phenoconversion of prostate fibroblasts in vitro, and therefore whether the use of anti-fibrotic therapeutics might be efficacious for the treatment of LUTD. Methods Primary prostate and lung tissues were explanted and fibroblast monolayers expanded in vitro. Primary and N1 immortalized prostate stromal fibroblasts, as well as primary fibroblasts cultured from a normal lung and one affected by idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) for comparison, were grown in serum–free defined media supplemented with vehicle, TGFβ or CXCL12, pre- or post-treatment with Resveratrol, and were evaluated using immunofluorescence for alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and collagen I (COL1) protein expression and assessed for cell proliferation, apoptosis, and COL1 and EGR1 transcript expression. Results This study showed that low concentrations of Resveratrol (≤50 μM) had no effect on N1 or primary prostate fibroblast cell proliferation, apoptosis, or COL1 or EGR1 gene transcription but repressed and reversed myofibroblast phenoconversion. As expected, these same effects were observed for IPF lung fibroblasts though higher levels of Resveratrol (≥100uM) were required. Taken together, these data suggest that, like lung fibroblasts, prostate fibroblast to

  6. BRCA1-mediated repression of select X chromosome genes.

    PubMed

    Jazaeri, Amir A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti VR; Aprelikova, Olga; Nuber, Ulrike A; Sotiriou, Christos; Liu, Edison T; Ropers, H Hilger; Yee, Cindy J; Boyd, Jeff; Barrett, J Carl

    2004-09-21

    Recently BRCA1 has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression from the X chromosome. In this study the influence of BRCA1 on expression of X chromosome genes was investigated. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to compare the expression levels of X chromosome genes in 18 BRCA1-associated ovarian cancers to those of the 13 "BRCA1-like" and 14 "BRCA2-like" sporadic tumors (as defined by previously reported expression profiling). Significance was determined using parametric statistics with P < 0.005 as a cutoff. Forty of 178 total X-chromosome transcripts were differentially expressed between the BRCA1-associated tumors and sporadic cancers with a BRCA2-like molecular profile. Thirty of these 40 genes showed higher mean expression in the BRCA1-associated samples including all 11 transcripts that mapped to Xp11. In contrast, four of 178 total X chromosome transcripts showed significant differential expression between BRCA1-associated and sporadic tumors with a BRCA1-like molecular profile. All four mapped to Xp11 and showed higher mean expression in BRCA1-associated tumors. Re-expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cell resulted in the repression of 21 transcripts. Eleven of the 21 (54.5%) transcripts mapped to Xp11. However, there was no significant overlap between these Xp11 genes and those found to be differentially expressed between BRCA1-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer samples. These results demonstrate that BRCA1 mediates the repression of several X chromosome genes, many of which map to the Xp11 locus. PMID:15383145

  7. HES-Mediated Repression of Pten in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Han Ting; Vazquez, Raymarie Gomez; Wang, Kun; Campbell, Richard; Milledge, Gaolin Zheng; Walthall, Walter W.; Johnson, Casonya M.

    2015-01-01

    The hairy/enhancer-of-split (HES) group of transcription factors controls embryonic development, often by acting downstream of the Notch signaling pathway; however, little is known about postembryonic roles of these proteins. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the six proteins that make up the REF-1 family are considered to be HES orthologs that act in both Notch-dependent and Notch-independent pathways to regulate embryonic events. To further our understanding of how the REF-1 family works to coordinate postembryonic cellular events, we performed a functional characterization of the REF-1 family member, HLH-25. We show that, after embryogenesis, hlh-25 expression persists throughout every developmental stage, including dauer, into adulthood. Like animals that carry loss-of-function alleles in genes required for normal cell-cycle progression, the phenotypes of hlh-25 animals include reduced brood size, unfertilized oocytes, and abnormal gonad morphology. Using gene expression microarray, we show that the HLH-25 transcriptional network correlates with the phenotypes of hlh-25 animals and that the C. elegans Pten ortholog, daf-18, is one major hub in the network. Finally, we show that HLH-25 regulates C. elegans lifespan and dauer recovery, which correlates with a role in the transcriptional repression of daf-18 activity. Collectively, these data provide the first genetic evidence that HLH-25 may be a functional ortholog of mammalian HES1, which represses PTEN activity in mice and human cells. PMID:26438299

  8. The MOX promoter in Hansenula polymorpha is ultrasensitive to glucose-mediated carbon catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Dusny, Christian; Schmid, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Redesigning biology towards specific purposes requires a functional understanding of genetic circuits. We present a quantitative in-depth study on the regulation of the methanol-specific MOX promoter system (PMOX) at the single-cell level. We investigated PMOX regulation in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula (Ogataea) polymorpha with respect to glucose-mediated carbon catabolite repression. This promoter system is particularly delicate as the glucose as carbon and energy source in turn represses MOX promoter activity. Decoupling single cells from population activity revealed a hitherto underrated ultrasensitivity of the MOX promoter to glucose repression. Environmental control with single-cell technologies enabled quantitative insights into the balance between activation and repression of PMOX with respect to extracellular glucose concentrations. While population-based studies suggested full MOX promoter derepression at extracellular glucose concentrations of ∼1 g L(-1), we showed that glucose-mediated catabolite repression already occurs at concentrations as low as 5 × 10(-4) g L(-1) These findings demonstrate the importance of uncoupling single cells from populations for understanding the mechanisms of promoter regulation in a quantitative manner. PMID:27527102

  9. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tusar T; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2016-02-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box-like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  10. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Tusar T.; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box–like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  11. Histone methyltransferase Ash1L mediates activity-dependent repression of neurexin-1α

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Τao; Liang, Chen; Li, Dongdong; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Sanxiong; Gao, Guanjun; Guan, Ji-Song

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription is critical for the regulation of long-term synaptic plasticity and plastic rewiring in the brain. Here, we report that the transcription of neurexin1α (nrxn1α), a presynaptic adhesion molecule for synaptic formation, is regulated by transient neuronal activation. We showed that 10 minutes of firing at 50 Hz in neurons repressed the expression of nrxn1α for 24 hours in a primary cortical neuron culture through a transcriptional repression mechanism. By performing a screening assay using a synthetic zinc finger protein (ZFP) to pull down the proteins enriched near the nrxn1α promoter region in vivo, we identified that Ash1L, a histone methyltransferase, is enriched in the nrxn1α promoter. Neuronal activity triggered binding of Ash1L to the promoter and enriched the histone marker H3K36me2 at the nrxn1α promoter region. Knockout of Ash1L in mice completely abolished the activity-dependent repression of nrxn1α. Taken together, our results reveal that a novel process of activity-dependent transcriptional repression exists in neurons and that Ash1L mediates the long-term repression of nrxn1α, thus implicating an important role for epigenetic modification in brain functioning. PMID:27229316

  12. FOG-1 recruits the NuRD repressor complex to mediate transcriptional repression by GATA-1

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Nakazawa, Minako; Chen, Ying-Yu; Kori, Rajashree; Vakoc, Christopher R; Rakowski, Carrie; Blobel, Gerd A

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA-1 and its cofactor FOG-1 coordinate erythroid cell maturation by activating erythroid-specific genes and repressing genes associated with the undifferentiated state. Here we show that FOG-1 binds to the NuRD corepressor complex in vitro and in vivo. The interaction is mediated by a small conserved domain at the extreme N-terminus of FOG-1 that is necessary and sufficient for NuRD binding. This domain defines a novel repression module found in diverse transcriptional repressors. NuRD is present at GATA-1/FOG-1-repressed genes in erythroid cells in vivo. Point mutations near the N-terminus of FOG-1 that abrogate NuRD binding block gene repression by FOG-1. Finally, the ability of GATA-1 to repress transcription was impaired in erythroid cells expressing mutant forms of FOG-1 that are defective for NuRD binding. Together, these studies show that FOG-1 and likely other FOG-like proteins are corepressors that link GATA factors to histone deacetylation and nucleosome remodeling. PMID:15920470

  13. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  14. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen U; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Burby, Peter E; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA. PMID:25144371

  15. Wnt-Mediated Repression via Bipartite DNA Recognition by TCF in the Drosophila Hematopoietic System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen U.; Blauwkamp, Timothy A.; Burby, Peter E.; Cadigan, Ken M.

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA. PMID:25144371

  16. Reduced expression of ribosomal proteins relieves microRNA-mediated repression.

    PubMed

    Janas, Maja M; Wang, Eric; Love, Tara; Harris, Abigail S; Stevenson, Kristen; Semmelmann, Karlheinz; Shaffer, Jonathan M; Chen, Po-Hao; Doench, John G; Yerramilli, Subrahmanyam V B K; Neuberg, Donna S; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Housman, David E; Burge, Christopher B; Novina, Carl D

    2012-04-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate physiological and pathological processes by inducing posttranscriptional repression of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) via incompletely understood mechanisms. To discover factors required for human miRNA activity, we performed an RNAi screen using a reporter cell line of miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. We report that reduced expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) dissociated miRNA complexes from target mRNAs, leading to increased polysome association, translation, and stability of miRNA-targeted mRNAs relative to untargeted mRNAs. RNA sequencing of polysomes indicated substantial overlap in sets of genes exhibiting increased or decreased polysomal association after Argonaute or RPG knockdowns, suggesting similarity in affected pathways. miRNA profiling of monosomes and polysomes demonstrated that miRNAs cosediment with ribosomes. RPG knockdowns decreased miRNAs in monosomes and increased their target mRNAs in polysomes. Our data show that most miRNAs repress translation and that the levels of RPGs modulate miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. PMID:22541556

  17. FLC-mediated flowering repression is positively regulated by sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hak Soo

    2014-01-01

    Flowering locus C (FLC), a floral repressor, is a critical factor for the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase. Here, the mechanisms regulating the activity and stability of the FLC protein were investigated. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and in vitro pull-down analyses showed that FLC interacts with the E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase AtSIZ1, suggesting that AtSIZ1 is an E3 SUMO ligase for FLC. In vitro sumoylation assays showed that FLC is modified by SUMO in the presence of SUMO-activating enzyme E1 and conjugating enzyme E2, but its sumoylation is inhibited by AtSIZ1. In transgenic plants, inducible AtSIZ1 overexpression led to an increase in the concentration of FLC and delayed the post-translational decay of FLC, indicating that AtSIZ1 stabilizes FLC through direct binding. Also, the flowering time in mutant FLC (K154R, a mutation of the sumoylation site)-overexpressing plants was comparable with that in the wild type, whereas flowering was considerably delayed in FLC-overexpressing plants, supporting the notion that sumoylation is an important mechanism for FLC function. The data indicate that the sumoylation of FLC is critical for its role in the control of flowering time and that AtSIZ1 positively regulates FLC-mediated floral suppression. PMID:24218331

  18. Biosynthesis of 15-deoxy-delta12,14-PGJ2 and the ligation of PPARgamma.

    PubMed

    Bell-Parikh, L Chastine; Ide, Tomomi; Lawson, John A; McNamara, Peter; Reilly, Muredach; FitzGerald, Garret A

    2003-09-01

    15-deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) has been identified as an endogenous ligand for PPARgamma, inducing adipogenesis in vitro. Additional roles for this molecule in the propagation and resolution of inflammation, ligation of NF-kappaB, and mediation of apoptosis have been proposed. However, quantitative, physiochemical evidence for the formation of 15d-PGJ2 in vivo is lacking. We report that 15d-PGJ2 is detectable using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry at low picomolar concentrations in the medium of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. However, despite induction of COX-2, production of PGs, including 15d-PGJ2, does not increase during adipocyte differentiation, a process unaltered by COX inhibition. 15d-PGJ2 is detectable as a minor product of COX-2 in human urine. However, its biosynthesis is unaltered during or after COX activation in vivo by LPS. Furthermore, the biosynthesis of 15d-PGJ2 is not augmented in the joint fluid of patients with arthritis, nor is its urinary excretion increased in patients with diabetes or obesity. 15d-PGJ2 is not the endogenous mediator of PPARgamma-dependent adipocyte activation and is unaltered in clinical settings in which PPARgamma activation has been implicated. PMID:12975479

  19. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  20. Catabolite repression in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 is mediated by CcpA.

    PubMed Central

    Monedero, V; Gosalbes, M J; Pérez-Martínez, G

    1997-01-01

    The chromosomal ccpA gene from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 has been cloned and sequenced. It encodes the CcpA protein, a central catabolite regulator belonging to the LacI-GalR family of bacterial repressors, and shows 54% identity with CcpA proteins from Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus megaterium. The L. casei ccpA gene was able to complement a B. subtilis ccpA mutant. An L. casei ccpA mutant showed increased doubling times and a relief of the catabolite repression of some enzymatic activities, such as N-acetylglucosaminidase and phospho-beta-galactosidase. Detailed analysis of CcpA activity was performed by using the promoter region of the L. casei chromosomal lacTEGF operon which is subject to catabolite repression and contains a catabolite responsive element (cre) consensus sequence. Deletion of this cre site or the presence of the ccpA mutation abolished the catabolite repression of a lacp::gusA fusion. These data support the role of CcpA as a common regulatory element mediating catabolite repression in low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria. PMID:9352913

  1. Insights into GATA-1 Mediated Gene Activation versus Repression via Genome-wide Chromatin Occupancy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming; Riva, Laura; Xie, Huafeng; Schindler, Yocheved; Moran, Tyler B.; Cheng, Yong; Yu, Duonan; Hardison, Ross; Weiss, Mitchell J; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor GATA-1 is required for terminal erythroid maturation and functions as an activator or repressor depending on gene context. Yet its in vivo site selectivity and ability to distinguish between activated versus repressed genes remain incompletely understood. In this study, we performed GATA-1 ChIP-seq in erythroid cells and compared it to GATA-1 induced gene expression changes. Bound and differentially expressed genes contain a greater number of GATA binding motifs, a higher frequency of palindromic GATA sites, and closer occupancy to the transcriptional start site versus non-differentially expressed genes. Moreover, we show that the transcription factor Zbtb7a occupies GATA-1 bound regions of some direct GATA-1 target genes, that the presence of SCL/TAL1 helps distinguish transcriptional activation versus repression, and that Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is involved in epigenetic silencing of a subset of GATA-1 repressed genes. These data provide insights into GATA-1 mediated gene regulation in vivo. PMID:19941827

  2. Probes of chromatin accessibility in the Drosophila bithorax complex respond differently to Polycomb-mediated repression.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, K; Bender, W

    1996-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of genes are required for maintenance of the repressed state of the homeotic genes in Drosophila. There are similarities between the PcG repression and mating-type silencing in yeast or heterochromatic position effect in Drosophila, which suggest that PcG repression may involve a highly compacted chromatin structure. To test for such a structure, heterologous DNA- binding proteins were used as probes for DNA accessibility in Drosophila embryos. Binding sites for the yeast transcriptional activator GAL4 and for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase were inserted into the bithorax (bx) regulatory region of the endogenous Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene, which is regulated by the PcG. Ubiquitously expressed GAL4 protein directs transcription through its binding sites only in the posterior segments where the bx region is active. The block to GAL4 activation in the more anterior segments is dependent on Polycomb (Pc) function. In contrast, T7 RNA polymerase can transcribe from its target promoter in all segments of the embryo. Thus, Pc-mediated repression blocks activated polymerase II transcription, but does not simply exclude all proteins. Images PMID:8599940

  3. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 Induces Apoptosis and Upregulates SOCS3 in Human Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-da-Silva, Carlos Antônio; Reis, Carolina Fernandes; Vecchi, Lara; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Sperandio, Marcelo; Matias Colombo, Bruna França; Alves, Patrícia Terra; Ward, Laura Sterian; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is a natural ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and a potential mediator of apoptosis in cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of 15d-PGJ2 in human thyroid papillary carcinoma cells (TPC-1) using different doses of 15d-PGJ2 (0.6 to 20 μM) to determine IC50 (9.3 μM) via the MTT assay. The supernatant culture medium of the TPC-1 cells that was treated either with 15d-PGJ2 or with vehicle (control) for 24 hours was assessed for IL-6 secretion via CBA assay. RT-qPCR was used to evaluate mRNA expression of IL-6, SOCS1, SOCS3, and STAT3. TPC-1 cells treated with 15d-PGJ2 decreased the secretion and expression of IL-6 and STAT3, while it increased SOCS1 and SOCS3. Overall, we demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 downregulated IL-6 signaling pathway and led TPC-1 cells into apoptosis. In conclusion, 15d-PGJ2 shows the potential to become a new therapeutic approach for thyroid tumors. PMID:27190500

  4. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  5. Hypoxia-derived oxidative stress mediates epigenetic repression of PKCɛ gene in foetal rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Andrew J.; Xiao, Daliao; Xiong, Fuxia; Dixon, Brandon; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-01-01

    Aims Hypoxia causes protein kinase C epsilon (PKCɛ) gene repression in foetal hearts, resulting in heightened cardiac susceptibility to ischaemic injury in offspring. We tested the hypothesis that hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate hypoxia-induced PKCɛ gene repression. Methods and results Hypoxia induced in vivo to pregnant rats, ex vivo to isolated foetal rat hearts, and in vitro in the rat embryonic ventricular myocyte cell line H9c2 resulted in a comparable decrease in PKCɛ protein and mRNA abundance in foetal hearts and H9c2 cells, which was associated with a significant increase in CpG methylation of the SP1-binding sites at the PKCɛ promoter. In H9c2 cells and foetal hearts, hypoxia caused nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α, which was inhibited by 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzylindazole and 2-methoxy estradiol. The HIF-1α inhibitors had no significant effect on hypoxia-induced PKCɛ mRNA repression. Hypoxia produced a time-dependent increase in ROS production in H9c2 cells and foetal hearts that was blocked by ROS scavengers N-acetyl-cysteine or tempol. In accordance, N-acetyl-cysteine and tempol, but not apocynin, inhibited the hypoxic effect and restored PKCɛ protein and mRNA expression to the control values in foetal hearts and H9c2 cells. The ROS scavengers blocked hypoxia-induced CpG methylation of the SP1-binding sites, restored SP1 binding to the PKCɛ promoter, and abrogated the hypoxia-induced increase in the susceptibility of the heart to ischaemic injury in offspring. Conclusions The results demonstrate that hypoxia induces epigenetic repression of the PKCɛ gene through a NADPH oxidase-independent ROS-mediated pathway in the foetal heart, leading to heightened heart vulnerability to ischaemic injury in offspring. PMID:22139554

  6. Brg1 Is Required for Cdx2-Mediated Repression of Oct4 Expression in Mouse Blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Sengupta, Satyaki; Magnani, Luca; Wilson, Catherine A.; Henry, R. William; Knott, Jason G.

    2010-01-01

    During blastocyst formation the segregation of the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm is governed by the mutually antagonistic effects of the transcription factors Oct4 and Cdx2. Evidence indicates that suppression of Oct4 expression in the trophectoderm is mediated by Cdx2. Nonetheless, the underlying epigenetic modifiers required for Cdx2-dependent repression of Oct4 are largely unknown. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein Brg1 is required for Cdx2-mediated repression of Oct4 expression in mouse blastocysts. By employing a combination of RNA interference (RNAi) and gene expression analysis we found that both Brg1 Knockdown (KD) and Cdx2 KD blastocysts exhibit widespread expression of Oct4 in the trophectoderm. Interestingly, in Brg1 KD blastocysts and Cdx2 KD blastocysts, the expression of Cdx2 and Brg1 is unchanged, respectively. To address whether Brg1 cooperates with Cdx2 to repress Oct4 transcription in the developing trophectoderm, we utilized preimplantation embryos, trophoblast stem (TS) cells and Cdx2-inducible embryonic stem (ES) cells as model systems. We found that: (1) combined knockdown (KD) of Brg1 and Cdx2 levels in blastocysts resulted in increased levels of Oct4 transcripts compared to KD of Brg1 or Cdx2 alone, (2) endogenous Brg1 co-immunoprecipitated with Cdx2 in TS cell extracts, (3) in blastocysts Brg1 and Cdx2 co-localize in trophectoderm nuclei and (4) in Cdx2-induced ES cells Brg1 and Cdx2 are recruited to the Oct4 promoter. Lastly, to determine how Brg1 may induce epigenetic silencing of the Oct4 gene, we evaluated CpG methylation at the Oct4 promoter in the trophectoderm of Brg1 KD blastocysts. This analysis revealed that Brg1-dependent repression of Oct4 expression is independent of DNA methylation at the blastocyst stage. In toto, these results demonstrate that Brg1 cooperates with Cdx2 to repress Oct4 expression in the developing trophectoderm to ensure normal development. PMID:20485553

  7. Malondialdehyde inhibits an AMPK-mediated nuclear translocation and repression activity of ALDH2 in transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ji-Woong; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Sung-Chun; Ha, Moon-Kyung; Song, Kye-Yong; Youn, Hong-Duk; Park, Sang Chul

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ALDH2 is an MDA-modified protein in old rat kidney tissues. {yields} AMPK associates with ALDH2 and triggers the nuclear localization of ALDH2. {yields} ALDH2 serves as a general transcriptional repressor by associating with HDACs. {yields} MDA inhibits the AMPK-mediated translocation of ALDH2 and its repression activity. -- Abstract: Aging process results from deleterious damages by reactive oxygen species, in particular, various metabolic aldehydes. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is one of metabolic enzymes detoxifying various aldehydes under oxidative conditions. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in controlling metabolic process. However, little was known about the relationship of ALDH2 with AMPK under oxidative conditions. Here, we, by using MDA-specific monoclonal antibody, screened the tissues of young and old rats for MDA-modified proteins and identified an ALDH2 as a prominent MDA-modified protein band in the old rat kidney tissue. ALDH2 associates with AMPK and is phosphorylated by AMPK. In addition, AICAR, an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase, induces the nuclear translocation of ALDH2. ALDH2 in nucleus is involved in general transcription repression by association with histone deacetylases. Furthermore, MDA modification inhibited the translocation of ALDH2 and the association with AMPK, and ultimately led to de-repression of transcription in the reporter system analysis. In this study, we have demonstrated that ALDH2 acts as a transcriptional repressor in response to AMPK activation, and MDA modifies ALDH2 and inhibits repressive activity of ALDH2 in general transcription. We thus suggest that increasing amount of MDA during aging process may interrupt the nuclear function of ALDH2, modulated by AMPK.

  8. Evolution of VRN2/Ghd7-Like Genes in Vernalization-Mediated Repression of Grass Flowering.

    PubMed

    Woods, Daniel P; McKeown, Meghan A; Dong, Yinxin; Preston, Jill C; Amasino, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Flowering of many plant species is coordinated with seasonal environmental cues such as temperature and photoperiod. Vernalization provides competence to flower after prolonged cold exposure, and a vernalization requirement prevents flowering from occurring prior to winter. In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), three genes VRN1, VRN2, and FT form a regulatory loop that regulates the initiation of flowering. Prior to cold exposure, VRN2 represses FT. During cold, VRN1 expression increases, resulting in the repression of VRN2, which in turn allows activation of FT during long days to induce flowering. Here, we test whether the circuitry of this regulatory loop is conserved across Pooideae, consistent with their niche transition from the tropics to the temperate zone. Our phylogenetic analyses of VRN2-like genes reveal a duplication event occurred before the diversification of the grasses that gave rise to a CO9 and VRN2/Ghd7 clade and support orthology between wheat/barley VRN2 and rice (Oryza sativa) Ghd7 Our Brachypodium distachyon VRN1 and VRN2 knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrate functional conservation of grass VRN1 and VRN2 in the promotion and repression of flowering, respectively. However, expression analyses in a range of pooids demonstrate that the cold repression of VRN2 is unique to core Pooideae such as wheat and barley. Furthermore, VRN1 knockdown in B. distachyon demonstrates that the VRN1-mediated suppression of VRN2 is not conserved. Thus, the VRN1-VRN2 feature of the regulatory loop appears to have evolved late in the diversification of temperate grasses. PMID:26848096

  9. DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Chung; Go, Young Sam

    2014-01-01

    The aerial parts of plants are covered with a cuticular wax layer, which is the first barrier between a plant and its environment. Although cuticular wax deposition increases more in the light than in the dark, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cuticular wax biosynthesis. Recently DEWAX (Decrease Wax Biosynthesis) encoding an AP2/ERF transcription factor was found to be preferentially expressed in the epidermis and induced by darkness. Wax analysis of the dewax knockout mutant, wild type, and DEWAX overexpression lines (OX) indicates that DEWAX is a negative regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis. DEWAX represses the expression of wax biosynthetic genes CER1, LACS2, ACLA2, and ECR via direct interaction with their promoters. Cuticular wax biosynthesis is negatively regulated twice a day by the expression of DEWAX; throughout the night and another for stomata closing. Taken together, it is evident that DEWAX-mediated negative regulation of the wax biosynthetic genes plays role in determining the total wax loads produced in Arabidopsis during daily dark and light cycles. In addition, significantly higher levels of DEWAX transcripts in leaves than stems suggest that DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression might be involved in the organ-specific regulation of total wax amounts on plant surfaces. PMID:25763625

  10. Trbp regulates heart function through miRNA-mediated Sox6 repression

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Chen, Jinghai; Wang, Yanqun; Kataoka, Masaharu; Ma, Lixin; Zhou, Pingzhu; Hu, Xiaoyun; Lin, Zhiqiang; Nie, Mao; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Pu, William T; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is associated with altered expression of genes encoding contractile proteins. Here we show that Trbp (Tarbp2), an RNA binding protein, is required for normal heart function. Cardiac-specific inactivation of Trbp (TrbpcKO) caused progressive cardiomyopathy and lethal heart failure. Trbp loss of function resulted in upregulation of Sox6, repression of genes encoding normal cardiac slow-twitch myofiber proteins, and pathologically increased expression of skeletal fast-twitch myofiber genes. Remarkably, knockdown of Sox6 fully rescued the Trbp mutant phenotype, whereas Sox6 overexpression phenocopied the TrbpcKO phenotype. Trbp inactivation was mechanistically linked to Sox6 upregulation through altered processing of miR-208a, which is a direct inhibitor of Sox6. Transgenic overexpression of miR-208a sufficiently repressed Sox6, restored the balance of fast- and slow- twitch myofiber gene expression, and rescued cardiac function in TrbpcKO mice. Together, our studies reveal a novel Trbp-mediated microRNA processing mechanism in regulating a linear genetic cascade essential for normal heart function. PMID:26029872

  11. Sequestration and Inhibition of Daxx-Mediated Transcriptional Repression by PML

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Leo, Christopher; Zhu, Jiang; Wu, Xiaoyang; O'Neil, Jennifer; Park, Eun-Ju; Chen, J. Don

    2000-01-01

    PML fuses with retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) in the t(15;17) translocation that causes acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In addition to localizing diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm, PML mainly resides in discrete nuclear structures known as PML oncogenic domains (PODs), which are disrupted in APL and spinocellular ataxia cells. We isolated the Fas-binding protein Daxx as a PML-interacting protein in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses reveal that Daxx is a nuclear protein that interacts and colocalizes with PML in the PODs. Reporter gene assay shows that Daxx drastically represses basal transcription, likely by recruiting histone deacetylases. PML, but not its oncogenic fusion PML-RARα, inhibits the repressor function of Daxx. In addition, SUMO-1 modification of PML is required for sequestration of Daxx to the PODs and for efficient inhibition of Daxx-mediated transcriptional repression. Consistently, Daxx is found at condensed chromatin in cells that lack PML. These data suggest that Daxx is a novel nuclear protein bearing transcriptional repressor activity that may be regulated by interaction with PML. PMID:10669754

  12. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Elvenes, Julianne; Thomassen, Ernst Ivan Simon; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  13. Pax6 Represses Androgen Receptor-Mediated Transactivation by Inhibiting Recruitment of the Coactivator SPBP

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Kaino, Katrine; Sjøttem, Eva; Johansen, Terje

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:21935435

  14. 15d-prostaglandin J2 enhancement of nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth is blocked by the chemoattractant receptor- homologous molecule expressed on T-helper type 2 cells (CRTH2) antagonist CAY10471 in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Michiyoshi; Shibata, Norihiro; Shintani, Norihito; Haba, Ryota; Hayata, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Baba, Akemichi

    2010-01-01

    The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T-helper type 2 cells (CRTH2) is the most recently identified prostaglandin (PG) receptor for both PGD(2) and 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)). We examined the mechanism by which 15d-PGJ(2) enhances nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. CAY10471 (CRTH2 antagonist) inhibited both the neurite-promotion and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation induced by 15d-PGJ(2). In contrast, 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD(2 )(DK-PGD(2)) (selective CRTH2 agonist) stimulated its phosphorylation but failed to produce neurite-promoting effects. These suggest, for the first time, the action of 15d-PGJ(2) is mediated by CRTH2, although the CRTH2 activation alone is insufficient for the underlying action. PMID:20424389

  15. Functional Association between Eyegone and HP1a Mediates wingless Transcriptional Repression during Development

    PubMed Central

    Salvany, Lara; Requena, David

    2012-01-01

    The eyegone (eyg) gene encodes Eyg, a transcription factor of the Pax family with multiple roles during Drosophila development. Although Eyg has been shown to act as a repressor, nothing is known about the mechanism by which it represses its target genes. Here, we show that Eyg forms a protein complex with heterochromatin protein 1a (HP1a). Both proteins bind to the same chromatin regions on polytene chromosomes and act cooperatively to suppress variegation and mediate gene silencing. In addition, Eyg binds to a wingless (wg) enhancer region, recruiting HP1a to assemble a closed, heterochromatin-like conformation that represses transcription of the wg gene. We describe here the evidence that suggests that Eyg, encoded by eyegone (eyg), represses wingless (wg) during eye development by association with HP1a. We show that Eyg forms a protein complex with HP1a and both proteins colocalize on salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Using position effect variegation (PEV) experiments, we demonstrated that eyg has a dose-dependent effect on heterochromatin gene silencing and identified a genetic interaction with HP1a in this process. We further demonstrated that HP1a binds to the same wg enhancer element as Eyg. DNase I sensitivity assays indicated that this enhancer region has a closed heterochromatin-like conformation, which becomes open in eyg mutants. In these mutants, much less HP1a binds to the wg enhancer region, as shown by ChIP experiments. Furthermore, as previously described for Eyg, a reduction in the amount of HP1a in the eye imaginal disc derepresses wg. Together, our results suggest a model in which Eyg specifically binds to the wg enhancer region, recruiting HP1a to that site. The recruitment of HP1a prevents transcription by favoring a closed, heterochromatin-like structure. Thus, for the first time, we show that HP1a plays a direct role in the repression of a developmentally regulated gene, wg, during Drosophila eye development. PMID:22547675

  16. Targeting 15d-Prostaglandin J2 to Hepatic Stellate Cells: Two Options Evaluated

    PubMed Central

    Hagens, Werner I.; Mattos, Adriana; Greupink, Rick; de Jager-Krikken, Alie; Reker-Smit, Catharina; van Loenen-Weemaes, AnneMiek; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Poelstra, Klaas

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Delivery of apoptosis-inducing compounds to hepatic stellate cells (HSC) may be an effective strategy to reverse liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the selective targeting of the apoptosis-inducing drug 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) with two different HSC-carriers: human serum albumin modified with the sugar mannose-6-phosphate (M6PHSA) or albumin modified with PDGF-receptor recognizing peptides (pPBHSA). Methods and Results After chemical conjugation of 15dPGJ2 to the carriers, the constructs displayed pharmacological activity and specific receptor-mediated binding to HSC in vitro. Unlike 15dPGJ2-pPBHSA, the cellular binding of 15dPGJ2-M6PHSA was reduced by a scavenger receptor antagonist. In vivo, both conjugates rapidly accumulated in fibrotic livers. Intrahepatic analysis revealed that 15dPGJ2-M6PHSA mainly accumulated in HSC, and to a lesser extent in Kupffer cells. 15dPGJ2-pPBHSA also predominantly accumulated in HSC with additional uptake in hepatocytes. Assessment of target receptors in human cirrhotic livers revealed that M6P/IGFII-receptor expression was present in fibrotic areas. PDGF-β receptor expression was abundantly expressed on human fibroblasts. Conclusions These studies show that 15dPGJ2 coupled to either M6PHSA or pPBHSA is specifically taken up by HSC and is highly effective within these cells. Both carriers differ with respect to receptor specificity, leading to differences in intrahepatic distribution. Nevertheless, both carriers can be used to deliver the apoptosis-inducing drug 15dPGJ2 to HSC in vivo. PMID:17245650

  17. GLI3-dependent repression of DR4 mediates hedgehog antagonism of TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kurita, S; Mott, J L; Almada, L L; Bronk, S F; Werneburg, N W; Sun, S-Y; Roberts, L R; Fernandez-Zapico, M E; Gores, G J

    2010-08-26

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its cognate receptors death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), preferentially in malignant cells. However, many malignant cells remain resistant to TRAIL cytotoxicity by poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, using cholangiocarcinoma cells, as a model for TRAIL resistance, we identified a role for the oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh)-GLI pathway in the regulation of TRAIL cytotoxicity. Blockade of Hh using pharmacological and genetic tools sensitizes the cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Restoration of apoptosis sensitivity coincided with upregulation of DR4 expression, while expression of other death effector proteins remained unaltered. Knockdown of DR4 mimics Hh-mediated resistance to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Hh regulates the expression of DR4 by modulating the activity of its promoter. Luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation and expression assays show that the transcription factor GLI3 binds to the DR4 promoter and Hh requires an intact GLI3-repression activity to silence DR4 expression. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeted knockdown of GLI3, but not GLI1 or GLI2, restores DR4 expression and TRAIL sensitivity, indicating that the Hh effect is exclusively mediated by this transcription factor. In conclusion, these data provide evidence of a regulatory mechanism, which modulates TRAIL signaling in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic approaches for TRAIL-resistant neoplasms. PMID:20562908

  18. GLI3-dependent repression of DR4 mediates hedgehog antagonism of TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, S; Mott, JL; Almada, LL; Bronk, SF; Werneburg, NW; Sun, S-Y; Roberts, LR; Fernandez-Zapico, ME; Gores, GJ

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its cognate receptors death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), preferentially in malignant cells. However, many malignant cells remain resistant to TRAIL cytotoxicity by poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, using cholangiocarcinoma cells, as a model for TRAIL resistance, we identified a role for the oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh)-GLI pathway in the regulation of TRAIL cytotoxicity. Blockade of Hh using pharmacological and genetic tools sensitizes the cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Restoration of apoptosis sensitivity coincided with upregulation of DR4 expression, while expression of other death effector proteins remained unaltered. Knockdown of DR4 mimics Hh-mediated resistance to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Hh regulates the expression of DR4 by modulating the activity of its promoter. Luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation and expression assays show that the transcription factor GLI3 binds to the DR4 promoter and Hh requires an intact GLI3-repression activity to silence DR4 expression. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeted knockdown of GLI3, but not GLI1 or GLI2, restores DR4 expression and TRAIL sensitivity, indicating that the Hh effect is exclusively mediated by this transcription factor. In conclusion, these data provide evidence of a regulatory mechanism, which modulates TRAIL signaling in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic approaches for TRAIL-resistant neoplasms. PMID:20562908

  19. miRNA-mediated auxin signalling repression during Vat-mediated aphid resistance in Cucumis melo.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Sampurna; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Thompson, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Resistance to Aphis gossypii in melon is attributed to the presence of the single dominant R gene virus aphid transmission (Vat), which is biologically expressed as antibiosis, antixenosis and tolerance. However, the mechanism of resistance is poorly understood at the molecular level. Aphid-induced transcriptional changes, including differentially expressed miRNA profiles that correspond to resistance interaction have been reported in melon. The potential regulatory roles of miRNAs in Vat-mediated aphid resistance were further revealed by identifying the specific miRNA degradation targets. A total of 70 miRNA:target pairs, including 28 novel miRNA:target pairs, for the differentially expressed miRNAs were identified: 11 were associated with phytohormone regulation, including six miRNAs that potentially regulate auxin interactions. A model for a redundant regulatory system of miRNA-mediated auxin insensitivity is proposed that incorporates auxin perception, auxin modification and auxin-regulated transcription. Chemically inhibiting the transport inhibitor response-1 (TIR-1) auxin receptor in susceptible melon tissues provides in vivo support for the model of auxin-mediated impacts on A. gossypii resistance. PMID:26437210

  20. Modulation of p53-mediated transcriptional repression and apoptosis by the adenovirus E1B 19K protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, P; Chiou, S K; Rao, L; White, E

    1995-01-01

    BRK cell lines that stably express adenovirus E1A and a murine temperature-sensitive p53 undergo apoptosis when p53 assumes the wild-type conformation. Expression of the E1B 19,000-molecular-weight (19K) protein rescues cells from this p53-mediated apoptosis and diverts cells to a growth-arrested state. As p53 likely functions as a tumor suppressor by regulating transcription, the ability of the E1B 19K protein to regulate p53-mediated transactivation and transcriptional repression was investigated. In promoter-reporter assays the E1B 19K did not block p53-mediated transactivation but did alleviate p53-mediated transcriptional repression. E1B 19K expression permitted efficient transcriptional activation of the p21/WAF-1/cip-1 mRNA by p53, consistent with maintenance of the growth arrest function of p53. The E1B 19K protein is thereby unique among DNA virus-transforming proteins that target p53 for inactivation in that it selectively modulates the transcriptional properties of p53. The E1B 19K protein also rescued cells from apoptosis induced by inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis. This suggests that cell death may result from the inhibition of expression of survival factors which function to maintain cell viability. p53 may induce apoptosis through generalized transcriptional repression. In turn, the E1B 19K protein may prevent p53-mediated apoptosis by alleviating p53-mediated transcriptional repression. PMID:7823921

  1. Cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways in the arachidonic acid-induced inflammatory response in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Mateu, A; Ramudo, L; Manso, M A; De Dios, I

    2015-12-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is generally associated with inflammation in different settings. We assess the molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response exerted by AA on pancreatic acini as an approach to acute pancreatitis (AP). Celecoxib (COX-2 inhibitor), TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor) and 15d-PGJ2 (PPARγ agonist) were used to ascertain the signaling pathways. In addition, we examine the effects of TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 on AP induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO). To carry out in vitro studies, acini were isolated from pancreas of control rats. Generation of PGE2 and TXB2, activation of pro-inflammatory pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, and JAK/STAT3) and overexpression of CCL2 and P-selectin was found in AA-treated acini. In addition, AA up-regulated TLR4 and down-regulated PPARγ expression. Celecoxib prevented the up-regulation of CCL2 and P-selectin but did not show any effect on the AA-mediated changes in TLR4 and PPARγ expression. TAK-242, reduced the generation of AA metabolites and repressed both the cascade of pro-inflammatory events which led to CCL2 and P-selectin overexpression as well as the AA-induced PPARγ down-regulation. Thus, TLR4 acts as upstream activating pro-inflammatory and inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways. 15d-PGJ2 down-regulated TLR4 expression and hence prevented the synthesis of AA metabolites and the inflammatory response mediated by them. Reciprocal negative cross-talk between TLR4 and PPARγ pathways is evidenced. In vivo experiments showed that TAK-242 and 15d-PGJ2 treatments reduced the inflammatory response in BPDO-induced AP. We conclude that through TLR4-dependent mechanisms, AA up-regulated CCL2 and P-selectin in pancreatic acini, partly mediated by the generation of PGE2 and TXB2, which activated pro-inflammatory pathways, but also directly by down-regulating PPARγ expression with anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro and in vivo studies support the role of TLR4 in AP and the use of TLR4 inhibitors and

  2. CRISPR-ERA: a comprehensive design tool for CRISPR-mediated gene editing, repression and activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Honglei; Wei, Zheng; Dominguez, Antonia; Li, Yanda; Wang, Xiaowo; Qi, Lei S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The CRISPR/Cas9 system was recently developed as a powerful and flexible technology for targeted genome engineering, including genome editing (altering the genetic sequence) and gene regulation (without altering the genetic sequence). These applications require the design of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that are efficient and specific. However, this remains challenging, as it requires the consideration of many criteria. Several sgRNA design tools have been developed for gene editing, but currently there is no tool for the design of sgRNAs for gene regulation. With accumulating experimental data on the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene editing and regulation, we implement a comprehensive computational tool based on a set of sgRNA design rules summarized from these published reports. We report a genome-wide sgRNA design tool and provide an online website for predicting sgRNAs that are efficient and specific. We name the tool CRISPR-ERA, for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-mediated editing, repression, and activation (ERA). Availability and implementation: http://CRISPR-ERA.stanford.edu. Contact: stanley.qi@stanford.edu or xwwang@tsinghua.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26209430

  3. Hepatocyte-Ductal Transdifferentiation Is Mediated by Reciprocal Repression of SOX9 and C/EBPα

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Kathy E.; Thowfeequ, Shifaan; Li, Wan-Chun; Eberhard, Daniel; Dutton, James R.; Slack, Jonathan M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Primary hepatocytes rapidly dedifferentiate when cultured in vitro. We have studied the mechanism of hepatocyte dedifferentiation by using two culture media: one that maintains hepatocytes in a differentiated state and another that allows dedifferentiation. We show that dedifferentiation involves partial transformation of hepatocytes into cells that resemble biliary epithelial cells. Lineage labeling and time-lapse filming confirm that the dedifferentiated cells are derived from hepatocytes and not from contaminating ductal or fibroblastic cells in the original culture. Furthermore, we establish that the conversion of hepatocytes to biliary-like cells is regulated by mutual antagonism of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) and SOX9, which have opposing effects on the expression of hepatocyte and ductal genes. Thus, hepatocyte dedifferentiation induces the biliary gene expression program by alleviating C/EBPα-mediated repression of Sox9. We propose that reciprocal antagonism of C/EBPα and SOX9 also operates in the formation of hepatocytes and biliary ducts from hepatoblasts during normal embryonic development. These data demonstrate that reprogramming of differentiated cells can be used to model the acquisition and maintenance of cell fate in vivo. PMID:25153359

  4. New protein kinase and protein phosphatase families mediate signal transduction in bacterial catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Galinier, A; Kravanja, M; Engelmann, R; Hengstenberg, W; Kilhoffer, M C; Deutscher, J; Haiech, J

    1998-02-17

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is the prototype of a signal transduction mechanism. In enteric bacteria, cAMP was considered to be the second messenger in CCR by playing a role reminiscent of its actions in eukaryotic cells. However, recent results suggest that CCR in Escherichia coli is mediated mainly by an inducer exclusion mechanism. In many Gram-positive bacteria, CCR is triggered by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, which activates HPr kinase, presumed to be one of the most ancient serine protein kinases. We here report cloning of the Bacillus subtilis hprK and hprP genes and characterization of the encoded HPr kinase and P-Ser-HPr phosphatase. P-Ser-HPr phosphatase forms a new family of phosphatases together with bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatase, yeast glycerol-3-phosphatase, and 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase whereas HPr kinase represents a new family of protein kinases on its own. It does not contain the domain structure typical for eukaryotic protein kinases. Although up to now the HPr modifying/demodifying enzymes were thought to exist only in Gram-positive bacteria, a sequence comparison revealed that they also are present in several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. PMID:9465101

  5. Human involucrin promoter mediates repression-resistant and compartment-specific LEKTI expression.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Semenova, Ekaterina; Larcher, Fernando; Del Rio, Marcela; Harper, John I; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2012-01-01

    Gene-modified skin grafts, produced through gene transfer to human keratinocyte stem cells, offer the possibility of therapeutic benefit for inherited skin diseases. We have previously described efficient lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer to keratinocyte stem cells and the generation of human skin grafts for the inherited skin disease, Netherton syndrome, which arises due to mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 (SPINK5). Vectors incorporating an internal murine retroviral-derived promoter [spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV)] in combination with a codon-optimized SPINK5 transgene supported high levels of reconstitution and robust correction of skin architecture. Subsequent longer-term experiments have uncovered unanticipated silencing phenomena, with loss of SPINK5 gene expression over time. The inadvertent introduction of CpG sites during codon optimization appears to have rendered vectors susceptible to silencing due to methylation across the promoter-transgene boundary. Substitution of the methylation-susceptible SFFV promoter with a 572-bp minimal human involucrin promoter (INVOp), which encodes very few CpG sites, prevented repression of the SPINK5 transgene and resulted in durable and highly compartment-specific reconstitution of lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI) in human skin grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We conclude that skin grafts modified with lentiviral vectors encoding INVOp offer a suitable platform for therapeutic gene therapy in Netherton syndrome, and our experience highlights unanticipated effects of transgene codon optimization. PMID:21895535

  6. Repressed PKCδ activation in glycodelin-expressing cells mediates resistance to phorbol ester and TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Hautala, Laura C; Koistinen, Riitta; Koistinen, Hannu

    2016-10-01

    Glycodelin is a glycoprotein mainly expressed in well-differentiated epithelial cells in reproductive tissues. In normal secretory endometrium, the expression of glycodelin is abundant and regulated by progesterone. In hormone-related cancers glycodelin expression is associated with well-differentiated tumors. We have previously found that glycodelin drives epithelial differentiation of HEC-1B endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, resulting in reduced tumor growth in a preclinical mouse model. Here we show that glycodelin-transfected HEC-1B cells have repressed protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) activation, likely due to downregulation of PDK1, and are resistant to phenotypic change and enhanced migration induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In control cells, which do not express glycodelin, the effects of PMA were abolished by using PKCδ and PDK1 inhibitors, and knockdown of PKCδ, MEK1 and 2, or ERK1 and 2 by siRNAs. Similarly, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced phenotypic change was only seen in control cells, not in glycodelin-producing cells, and it was mediated by PKCδ. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that PKCδ, via MAPK pathway, is involved in the glycodelin-driven cell differentiation rendering the cells resistant to stimulation by PMA and TGFβ. PMID:27373413

  7. Phosphotransferase system-mediated glucose uptake is repressed in phosphoglucoisomerase-deficient Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Steffen N; Petrov, Dimitar P; Hagmann, Christian T; Henrich, Alexander; Krämer, Reinhard; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wendisch, Volker F; Seibold, Gerd M

    2013-04-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is particularly known for its industrial application in the production of amino acids. Amino acid overproduction comes along with a high NADPH demand, which is covered mainly by the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). In previous studies, the complete redirection of the carbon flux toward the PPP by chromosomal inactivation of the pgi gene, encoding the phosphoglucoisomerase, has been applied for the improvement of C. glutamicum amino acid production strains, but this was accompanied by severe negative effects on the growth characteristics. To investigate these effects in a genetically defined background, we deleted the pgi gene in the type strain C. glutamicum ATCC 13032. The resulting strain, C. glutamicum Δpgi, lacked detectable phosphoglucoisomerase activity and grew poorly with glucose as the sole substrate. Apart from the already reported inhibition of the PPP by NADPH accumulation, we detected a drastic reduction of the phosphotransferase system (PTS)-mediated glucose uptake in C. glutamicum Δpgi. Furthermore, Northern blot analyses revealed that expression of ptsG, which encodes the glucose-specific EII permease of the PTS, was abolished in this mutant. Applying our findings, we optimized l-lysine production in the model strain C. glutamicum DM1729 by deletion of pgi and overexpression of plasmid-encoded ptsG. l-Lysine yields and productivity with C. glutamicum Δpgi(pBB1-ptsG) were significantly higher than those with C. glutamicum Δpgi(pBB1). These results show that ptsG overexpression is required to overcome the repressed activity of PTS-mediated glucose uptake in pgi-deficient C. glutamicum strains, thus enabling efficient as well as fast l-lysine production. PMID:23396334

  8. Different mechanisms contribute to the E2-mediated transcriptional repression of human papillomavirus type 18 viral oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Demeret, C; Desaintes, C; Yaniv, M; Thierry, F

    1997-12-01

    Transcription of the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 oncogenes is repressed by the viral E2 protein. In C33 cells, we have previously shown that of the four E2 binding sites (E2 BS) present in the HPV18 long control region (LCR), only the binding site adjacent to the TATA box (E2 BS 1) was involved in E2-mediated repression. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this phenomenon was conserved in other cell lines. We first showed that all three E2 BS proximal to the P105 promoter were required for full repression of its activity in HeLa and HaCaT cells. Repression by E2 at E2 BS 2 occurred through the displacement of Sp1. Second, a truncated E2 product, lacking the N-terminal transactivation domain, repressed transcription more efficiently than the full-length protein. Repression was abolished when the N-terminal domain of E2 was replaced by the activation domain of VP16. The VP16-E2 chimeric protein could activate transcription from an LCR mutated in its TATA box. DNA-protein binding studies showed that E2 associates with its four binding sites in the LCR with similar affinities. However, challenge of such complexes with excess binding sites demonstrated that interaction with E2 BS 4 was the most stable while interaction with E2 BS 1 was the least stable. Furthermore, complexes with the full-length E2 were less stable than those formed with the N-terminally truncated protein. PMID:9371593

  9. 15-deoxy prostaglandin J2, the nonenzymatic metabolite of prostaglandin D2, induces apoptosis in keratinocytes of human hair follicles: a possible explanation for prostaglandin D2-mediated inhibition of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun Woo; Kang, Yoo Ri; Kwack, Mi Hee; Sung, Young Kwan

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and its nonenzymatic metabolite, 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15-dPGJ2), inhibit in vitro growth of explanted human hair follicles and inhibit hair growth in mice through the GPR44 (DP2). However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we first investigated the expression of DP2 in human hair follicles and in cultured follicular cells. We found that DP2 is strongly expressed in the outer root sheath (ORS) cells and weakly expressed in the dermal papilla (DP) cells. We observed slight growth stimulation when ORS and DP cells were treated with PGD2. We also observed slight growth stimulation when DP and ORS cells were treated with low concentrations (0.5 and 1 μM) of 15-dPGJ2. However, 5 μM 15-dPGJ2 inhibited the viability and caused apoptosis of both cell types. Exposure of cultured human hair follicles to 15-dPGJ2 resulted in significant apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes. Altogether, our data provide an evidence that 15-dPGJ2 promotes apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes and provide rationale for developing remedies for the prevention and treatment of hair loss based on DP2 antagonism. PMID:27185495

  10. Recruitment of histone methyltransferase G9a mediates transcriptional repression of Fgf21 gene by E4BP4 protein.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Buelow, Katie; Guha, Anirvan; Arthurs, Blake; Brady, Hugh J M; Yin, Lei

    2013-02-22

    The liver responds to fasting-refeeding cycles by reprogramming expression of metabolic genes. Fasting potently induces one of the key hepatic hormones, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), to promote lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis, whereas refeeding suppresses its expression. We previously reported that the basic leucine zipper transcription factor E4BP4 (E4 binding protein 4) represses Fgf21 expression and disrupts its circadian oscillations in cultured hepatocytes. However, the epigenetic mechanism for E4BP4-dependent suppression of Fgf21 has not yet been addressed. Here we present evidence that histone methyltransferase G9a mediates E4BP4-dependent repression of Fgf21 during refeeding by promoting repressive histone modification. We find that Fgf21 expression is up-regulated in E4bp4 knock-out mouse liver. We demonstrate that the G9a-specific inhibitor BIX01294 abolishes suppression of the Fgf21 promoter activity by E4BP4, whereas overexpression of E4bp4 leads to increased levels of dimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) around the Fgf21 promoter region. Furthermore, we also show that E4BP4 interacts with G9a, and knockdown of G9a blocks repression of Fgf21 promoter activity and expression in cells overexpressing E4bp4. A G9a mutant lacking catalytic activity, due to deletion of the SET domain, fails to inhibit the Fgf21 promoter activity. Importantly, acute hepatic knockdown by adenoviral shRNA targeting G9a abolishes Fgf21 repression by refeeding, concomitant with decreased levels of H3K9me2 around the Fgf21 promoter region. In summary, we show that G9a mediates E4BP4-dependent suppression of hepatic Fgf21 by enhancing histone methylation (H3K9me2) of the Fgf21 promoter. PMID:23283977

  11. The gap protein knirps mediates both quenching and direct repression in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, D N; Gray, S; Barolo, S; Zhou, J; Levine, M

    1996-01-01

    Transcriptional repression is essential for establishing localized patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis. Several mechanisms of repression have been proposed, including competition, quenching and direct repression of the transcription complex. Previous studies suggest that the knirps orphan receptor (kni) may repress transcription via competition, and exclude the binding of the bicoid (bcd) activator to an overlapping site in a target promoter. Here we present evidence that kni can quench, or locally inhibit, upstream activators within a heterologous enhancer in transgenic embryos. The range of kni repression is approximately 50-100 bp, so that neighboring enhancers in a modular promoter are free to interact with the transcription complex (enhancer autonomy). However, kni can also repress the transcription complex when bound in promoter-proximal regions. In this position, kni functions as a dominant repressor and blocks multiple enhancers in a modular promoter. Our studies suggest that short-range repression represents a flexible form of gene regulation, exhibiting enhancer- or promoter-specific effects depending on the location of repressor binding sites. Images PMID:8670869

  12. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. PMID:26715664

  13. Sustained translational repression by eIF2α–P mediates prion neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Julie A.; Radford, Helois; Peretti, Diego; Steinert, Joern R.; Verity, Nicholas; Martin, Maria Guerra; Halliday, Mark; Morgan, Jason; Dinsdale, David; Ortori, Catherine A.; Barrett, David A.; Tsaytler, Pavel; Bertolotti, Anne; Willis, Anne E.; Bushell, Martin; Mallucci, Giovanna R.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to neuronal death in neurodegenerative disease are poorly understood. Many of these disorders, including Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD) and prion diseases, are associated with the accumulation of misfolded disease-specific proteins. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a protective cellular mechanism triggered by rising levels of misfolded proteins. One arm of this pathway results in the transient shutdown of protein translation, through phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor, eIF2α. UPR activation and/or increased eIF2α–P levels are seen in patients with AD, PD and prion disease 1-4, but how this links to neurodegeneration is unknown. Here we show that accumulation of prion protein (PrP) during prion replication causes persistent translational repression of global protein synthesis by eIF2α–P, associated with synaptic failure and neuronal loss in prion-diseased mice. Further, we show that promoting translational recovery in hippocampi of prion-infected mice is neuroprotective. Over-expression of GADD34, a specific eIF2α–P phosphatase, as well as reduction of PrP levels by lentivirally-mediated RNAi, reduced eIF2α–P levels. As a result, both approaches restored vital translation rates during prion disease, rescuing synaptic deficits and neuronal loss, and thereby significantly increasing survival. In contrast, salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2α-P dephosphorylation5 increased eIF2α-P levels, exacerbating neurotoxicity and significantly reducing survival in prion diseased mice. Given the prevalence of protein misfolding and UPR activation in several neurodegenerative diseases, our results suggest that manipulation of common pathways such as translational control, rather than disease-specific approaches, may lead to new therapies preventing synaptic failure and neuronal loss across the spectrum of these disorders. PMID:22622579

  14. 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 inhibits macrophage colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Michelle M C; Antunes, L Caetano M; Gill, Navkiran; Russell, Shannon L; Shames, Stephanie R; Finlay, B Brett

    2013-01-01

    15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is an anti-inflammatory downstream product of the cyclooxygenase enzymes. It has been implicated to play a protective role in a variety of inflammatory mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, neural damage, and myocardial infarctions. Here we show that 15d-PGJ2 also plays a role in Salmonella infection. Salmonella enterica Typhimurium is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is able to survive and replicate inside phagocytic immune cells, allowing for bacterial dissemination to systemic sites. Salmonella species cause a wide range of morbidity and mortality due to gastroenteritis and typhoid fever. Previously we have shown that in mouse models of typhoid fever, Salmonella infection causes a major perturbation in the prostaglandin pathway. Specifically, we saw that 15d-PGJ2 production was significantly increased in both liver and feces. In this work we show that 15d-PGJ2 production is also significantly increased in macrophages infected with Salmonella. Furthermore, we show that the addition of 15d-PGJ2 to Salmonella infected RAW264.7, J774, and bone marrow derived macrophages is sufficient to significantly reduce bacterial colonization. We also show evidence that 15d-PGJ2 is reducing bacterial uptake by macrophages. 15d-PGJ2 reduces the inflammatory response of these infected macrophages, as evidenced by a reduction in the production of cytokines and reactive nitrogen species. The inflammatory response of the macrophage is important for full Salmonella virulence, as it can give the bacteria cues for virulence. The reduction in bacterial colonization is independent of the expression of Salmonella virulence genes SPI1 and SPI2, and is independent of the 15d-PGJ2 ligand PPAR-γ. 15d-PGJ2 also causes an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation in infected macrophages. In conclusion, we show here that 15d-PGJ2 mediates the outcome of bacterial infection, a previously unidentified role for this

  15. GATA4 mediates gene repression in the mature mouse small intestine through interactions with Friend of GATA (FOG) cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Beuling, Eva; Bosse, Tjalling; aan de Kerk, Daniel J.; Piaseckyj, Christina M.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Katz, Samuel G.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Grand, Richard J.; Krasinski, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    GATA4, a transcription factor expressed in the proximal small intestine but not in the distal ileum, maintains proximal-distal distinctions by multiple processes involving gene repression, gene activation, and cell fate determination. Friend of GATA (FOG) is an evolutionarily conserved family of cofactors whose members physically associate with GATA factors and mediate GATA-regulated repression in multiple tissues. Using a novel, inducible, intestine-specific Gata4 knock-in model in mice, in which wild-type GATA4 is specifically inactivated in the small intestine, but a GATA4 mutant that does not bind FOG cofactors (GATA4ki) continues to be expressed, we found that ileal-specific genes were significantly induced in the proximal small intestine (P<0.01); in contrast, genes restricted to proximal small intestine and cell lineage markers were unaffected, indicating that GATA4-FOG interactions contribute specifically to the repression function of GATA4 within this organ. Fog1 mRNA displayed a proximal-distal pattern that parallels that of Gata4, and FOG1 protein was co-expressed with GATA4 in intestinal epithelial cells, implicating FOG1 as the likely mediator of GATA4 function in the small intestine. Our data are the first to indicate FOG function and expression in the mammalian small intestine. PMID:18692040

  16. The DDX6-4E-T interaction mediates translational repression and P-body assembly.

    PubMed

    Kamenska, Anastasiia; Simpson, Clare; Vindry, Caroline; Broomhead, Helen; Bénard, Marianne; Ernoult-Lange, Michèle; Lee, Benjamin P; Harries, Lorna W; Weil, Dominique; Standart, Nancy

    2016-07-27

    4E-Transporter binds eIF4E via its consensus sequence YXXXXLΦ, shared with eIF4G, and is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein found enriched in P-(rocessing) bodies. 4E-T inhibits general protein synthesis by reducing available eIF4E levels. Recently, we showed that 4E-T bound to mRNA however represses its translation in an eIF4E-independent manner, and contributes to silencing of mRNAs targeted by miRNAs. Here, we address further the mechanism of translational repression by 4E-T by first identifying and delineating the interacting sites of its major partners by mass spectrometry and western blotting, including DDX6, UNR, unrip, PAT1B, LSM14A and CNOT4. Furthermore, we document novel binding between 4E-T partners including UNR-CNOT4 and unrip-LSM14A, altogether suggesting 4E-T nucleates a complex network of RNA-binding protein interactions. In functional assays, we demonstrate that joint deletion of two short conserved motifs that bind UNR and DDX6 relieves repression of 4E-T-bound mRNA, in part reliant on the 4E-T-DDX6-CNOT1 axis. We also show that the DDX6-4E-T interaction mediates miRNA-dependent translational repression and de novo P-body assembly, implying that translational repression and formation of new P-bodies are coupled processes. Altogether these findings considerably extend our understanding of the role of 4E-T in gene regulation, important in development and neurogenesis. PMID:27342281

  17. Dual role of Med12 in PRC1-dependent gene repression and ncRNA-mediated transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Thaleia; Kaymak, Aysegül; Sayols, Sergi; Richly, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Mediator is considered an enhancer of RNA-Polymerase II dependent transcription but its function and regulation in pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) remains unresolved. One means of controlling the function of Mediator is provided by the binding of the Cdk8 module (Med12, Cdk8, Ccnc and Med13) to the core Mediator. Here we report that Med12 operates together with PRC1 to silence key developmental genes in pluripotency. At the molecular level, while PRC1 represses genes it is also required to assemble ncRNA containing Med12-Mediator complexes. In the course of cellular differentiation the H2A ubiquitin binding protein Zrf1 abrogates PRC1-Med12 binding and facilitates the association of Cdk8 with Mediator. This remodeling of Mediator-associated protein complexes converts Mediator from a transcriptional repressor to a transcriptional enhancer, which then mediates ncRNA-dependent activation of Polycomb target genes. Altogether, our data reveal how the interplay of PRC1, ncRNA and Mediator complexes controls pluripotency and cellular differentiation. PMID:27096886

  18. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains. PMID:25791004

  19. Transcriptional repression of the testis-specific histone H1t gene mediated by an element upstream of the H1/AC box.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Steven A; Grimes, Sidney R

    2003-04-10

    The testis-specific histone H1t gene is transcribed exclusively in primary spermatocytes and may be important for chromatin structure, transcription, and DNA repair during this stage of spermatogenesis. Transcriptional repression of the gene in other cell types is mediated in part by specific proximal and distal promoter elements and in some cell types by methylation of CpG dinucleotides within the promoter. Our laboratory identified a distal promoter element located between 948 and 780 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site and another laboratory identified a GC-rich region between the TATA box and transcription initiation site that contribute to repression. In this article we address transcriptional repression of the histone H1t gene by an element within the proximal promoter. We report discovery of an element designated H1t promoter repressor element (RE) located between -130 and -106 bp that contributes to repression. The findings support the hypothesis that multiple mechanisms are involved in transcriptional repression of the H1t gene. Transcriptional repression mediated by the RE element in NIH 3T3 cells appears to differ significantly from the mechanism mediated by the GC-rich region. Furthermore, binding proteins that form the RE complex are not present in rat testis where the gene is actively transcribed. Our findings provide a molecular basis for histone H1t gene repression. PMID:12711397

  20. JAZ8 Lacks a Canonical Degron and Has an EAR Motif That Mediates Transcriptional Repression of Jasmonate Responses in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Shyu, Christine; Figueroa, Pablo; DePew, Cody L.; Cooke, Thomas F.; Sheard, Laura B.; Moreno, Javier E.; Katsir, Leron; Zheng, Ning; Browse, John; Howe, Gregg A.

    2012-01-01

    The lipid-derived hormone jasmonoyl-l-Ile (JA-Ile) initiates large-scale changes in gene expression by stabilizing the interaction of JASMONATE ZIM domain (JAZ) repressors with the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1), which results in JAZ degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Recent structural studies show that the JAZ1 degradation signal (degron) includes a short conserved LPIAR motif that seals JA-Ile in its binding pocket at the COI1-JAZ interface. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana JAZ8 lacks this motif and thus is unable to associate strongly with COI1 in the presence of JA-Ile. As a consequence, JAZ8 is stabilized against jasmonate (JA)-mediated degradation and, when ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis, represses JA-regulated growth and defense responses. These findings indicate that sequence variation in a hypervariable region of the degron affects JAZ stability and JA-regulated physiological responses. We also show that JAZ8-mediated repression depends on an LxLxL-type EAR (for ERF-associated amphiphilic repression) motif at the JAZ8 N terminus that binds the corepressor TOPLESS and represses transcriptional activation. JAZ8-mediated repression does not require the ZIM domain, which, in other JAZ proteins, recruits TOPLESS through the EAR motif–containing adaptor protein NINJA. These findings show that EAR repression domains in a subgroup of JAZ proteins repress gene expression through direct recruitment of corepressors to cognate transcription factors. PMID:22327740

  1. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-dependent repression of myogenic differentiation is relieved by its caspase-mediated cleavage.

    PubMed

    de la Vega, Laureano; Hornung, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Milanovic, Maja; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2013-06-01

    Differentiation of skeletal muscle cells is accompanied by drastic changes in gene expression programs that depend on activation and repression of genes at defined time points. Here we identify the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a corepressor that inhibits myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent gene expression in undifferentiated myoblasts. Downregulation of HIPK2 expression by shRNAs results in elevated expression of muscle-specific genes, whereas overexpression of the kinase dampens transcription of these genes. HIPK2 is constitutively associated with a multi-protein complex containing histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC4 that serves to silence MEF2C-dependent transcription in undifferentiated myoblasts. HIPK2 interferes with gene expression on phosphorylation and HDAC3-dependent deacetylation of MEF2C. Ongoing muscle differentiation is accompanied by elevated caspase activity, which results in caspase-mediated cleavage of HIPK2 following aspartic acids 916 and 977 and the generation of a C-terminally truncated HIPK2 protein. The short form of the kinase loses its affinity to the repressive multi-protein complex and its ability to bind HDAC3 and HDAC4, thus alleviating its repressive function for expression of muscle genes. This study identifies HIPK2 as a further protein that determines the threshold and kinetics of gene expression in proliferating myoblasts and during the initial steps of myogenesis. PMID:23620283

  2. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-dependent repression of myogenic differentiation is relieved by its caspase-mediated cleavage

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Laureano; Hornung, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Milanovic, Maja; Schmitz, M. Lienhard

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of skeletal muscle cells is accompanied by drastic changes in gene expression programs that depend on activation and repression of genes at defined time points. Here we identify the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a corepressor that inhibits myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2)-dependent gene expression in undifferentiated myoblasts. Downregulation of HIPK2 expression by shRNAs results in elevated expression of muscle-specific genes, whereas overexpression of the kinase dampens transcription of these genes. HIPK2 is constitutively associated with a multi-protein complex containing histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC4 that serves to silence MEF2C-dependent transcription in undifferentiated myoblasts. HIPK2 interferes with gene expression on phosphorylation and HDAC3-dependent deacetylation of MEF2C. Ongoing muscle differentiation is accompanied by elevated caspase activity, which results in caspase-mediated cleavage of HIPK2 following aspartic acids 916 and 977 and the generation of a C-terminally truncated HIPK2 protein. The short form of the kinase loses its affinity to the repressive multi-protein complex and its ability to bind HDAC3 and HDAC4, thus alleviating its repressive function for expression of muscle genes. This study identifies HIPK2 as a further protein that determines the threshold and kinetics of gene expression in proliferating myoblasts and during the initial steps of myogenesis. PMID:23620283

  3. FER-1, an enhancer of the ferritin H gene and a target of E1A-mediated transcriptional repression.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Y; Akebi, N; Lam, T K; Nakabeppu, Y; Torti, S V; Torti, F M

    1995-01-01

    Ferritin, the major intracellular iron storage protein of eucaryotic cells, is regulated during inflammation and malignancy. We previously reported that transcription of the H subunit of ferritin (ferritin H) is negatively regulated by the adenovirus E1A oncogene in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts (Y. Tsuji, E. Kwak, T. Saika, S. V. Torti, and F. M. Torti, J. Biol. Chem. 268:7270-7275, 1993). To elucidate the mechanism of transcriptional repression of the ferritin H gene by E1A, a series of deletions in the 5' flanking region of the mouse ferritin H gene were constructed, fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, and transiently cotransfected into NIH 3T3 cells with an E1A expression plasmid. The results indicate that the E1A-responsive region is located approximately 4.1 kb 5' to the transcription initiation site of the ferritin H gene. Further analyses revealed that a 37-bp region, termed FER-1, is the target of E1A-mediated repression. This region also serves as an enhancer, augmenting ferritin H transcription independently of position and orientation. FER-1 was dissected into two component elements, i.e., a 22-bp dyad symmetry element and a 7-bp AP1-like sequence. Insertion of these DNA sequences into a ferritin H-CAT chimeric gene lacking an E1A-responsive region indicated that (i) the 22-bp dyad symmetry sequence by itself has no enhancer activity, (ii) the AP1-like sequence has moderate enhancer activity which is repressed by E1A, and (iii) the combination of the dyad symmetry element and the AP1-like sequence is required for maximal enhancer activity and repression by E1A. Gel retardation assays and cotransfection experiments with c-fos and c-jun expression vectors suggested that members of the Fos and Jun families bind to the AP1-like element of FER-1 and contribute to its regulation. In addition, gel retardation assays showed that E1A reduces the ability of nuclear proteins to bind to the AP1-like sequence without affecting the levels of

  4. Evolution of VRN2/Ghd7-Like Genes in Vernalization-Mediated Repression of Grass Flowering1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Meghan A.

    2016-01-01

    Flowering of many plant species is coordinated with seasonal environmental cues such as temperature and photoperiod. Vernalization provides competence to flower after prolonged cold exposure, and a vernalization requirement prevents flowering from occurring prior to winter. In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), three genes VRN1, VRN2, and FT form a regulatory loop that regulates the initiation of flowering. Prior to cold exposure, VRN2 represses FT. During cold, VRN1 expression increases, resulting in the repression of VRN2, which in turn allows activation of FT during long days to induce flowering. Here, we test whether the circuitry of this regulatory loop is conserved across Pooideae, consistent with their niche transition from the tropics to the temperate zone. Our phylogenetic analyses of VRN2-like genes reveal a duplication event occurred before the diversification of the grasses that gave rise to a CO9 and VRN2/Ghd7 clade and support orthology between wheat/barley VRN2 and rice (Oryza sativa) Ghd7. Our Brachypodium distachyon VRN1 and VRN2 knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrate functional conservation of grass VRN1 and VRN2 in the promotion and repression of flowering, respectively. However, expression analyses in a range of pooids demonstrate that the cold repression of VRN2 is unique to core Pooideae such as wheat and barley. Furthermore, VRN1 knockdown in B. distachyon demonstrates that the VRN1-mediated suppression of VRN2 is not conserved. Thus, the VRN1-VRN2 feature of the regulatory loop appears to have evolved late in the diversification of temperate grasses. PMID:26848096

  5. CcpA-mediated repression of Clostridium difficile toxin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2011-02-01

    The presence of glucose or other rapidly metabolizable carbon sources in the bacterial growth medium strongly represses Clostridium difficile toxin synthesis independently of strain origin. In Gram-positive bacteria, carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is generally regarded as a regulatory mechanism that responds to carbohydrate availability. In the C. difficile genome all elements involved in CCR are present. To elucidate in vivo the role of CCR in C. difficile toxin synthesis, we used the ClosTron gene knockout system to construct mutants of strain JIR8094 that were unable to produce the major components of the CCR signal transduction pathway: the phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins (Enzyme I and HPr), the HPr kinase/phosphorylase (HprK/P) and the catabolite control protein A, CcpA. Inactivation of the ptsI, ptsH and ccpA genes resulted in derepression of toxin gene expression in the presence of glucose, whereas repression of toxin production was still observed in the hprK mutant, indicating that uptake of glucose is required for repression but that phosphorylation of HPr by HprK is not. C. difficile CcpA was found to bind to the regulatory regions of the tcdA and tcdB genes but not through a consensus cre site motif. Moreover in vivo and in vitro results confirmed that HPr-Ser45-P does not stimulate CcpA-dependent binding to DNA targets. However, fructose-1,6-biphosphate (FBP) alone did increase CcpA binding affinity in the absence of HPr-Ser45-P. These results showed that CcpA represses toxin expression in response to PTS sugar availability, thus linking carbon source utilization to virulence gene expression in C. difficile. PMID:21299645

  6. Identification of a prostaglandin D2 metabolite as a neuritogenesis enhancer targeting the TRPV1 ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Takahiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiro; Matsubara, Yui; Inuzuka, Emi; Nakashima, Fumie; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kozai, Daisuke; Mori, Yasuo; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play important roles in allergic inflammation by secreting various mediators. In the present study, based on the finding that the medium conditioned by activated RBL-2H3 mast cells enhanced the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis of PC12 cells, we attempted to isolate an active compound from the mast cell conditioned culture medium. Our experiment identified 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), one of the PGD2 metabolites, as a potential enhancer of neuritogenesis. 15d-PGJ2 strongly enhanced the neuritogenesis elicited by a low-concentration of NGF that alone was insufficient to induce the neuronal differentiation. This 15d-PGJ2 effect was exerted in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but independently of the NGF receptor TrkA. Importantly, 15d-PGJ2 activated the transient receptor potential vanilloid-type 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel, leading to the Ca2+ influx. In addition, we observed that (i) NGF promoted the insertion of TRPV1 into the cell surface membrane and (ii) 15d-PGJ2 covalently bound to TRPV1. These findings suggest that the NGF/15d-PGJ2-induced neuritogenesis may be regulated by two sets of mechanisms, one for the translocation of TRPV1 into the cell surface by NGF and one for the activation of TRPV1 by 15d-PGJ2. Thus, there is most likely a link between allergic inflammation and activation of the neuronal differentiation. PMID:26879669

  7. CRISPathBrick: Modular Combinatorial Assembly of Type II-A CRISPR Arrays for dCas9-Mediated Multiplex Transcriptional Repression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cress, Brady F; Toparlak, Ö Duhan; Guleria, Sanjay; Lebovich, Matthew; Stieglitz, Jessica T; Englaender, Jacob A; Jones, J Andrew; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2015-09-18

    Programmable control over an addressable global regulator would enable simultaneous repression of multiple genes and would have tremendous impact on the field of synthetic biology. It has recently been established that CRISPR/Cas systems can be engineered to repress gene transcription at nearly any desired location in a sequence-specific manner, but there remain only a handful of applications described to date. In this work, we report development of a vector possessing a CRISPathBrick feature, enabling rapid modular assembly of natural type II-A CRISPR arrays capable of simultaneously repressing multiple target genes in Escherichia coli. Iterative incorporation of spacers into this CRISPathBrick feature facilitates the combinatorial construction of arrays, from a small number of DNA parts, which can be utilized to generate a suite of complex phenotypes corresponding to an encoded genetic program. We show that CRISPathBrick can be used to tune expression of plasmid-based genes and repress chromosomal targets in probiotic, virulent, and commonly engineered E. coli strains. Furthermore, we describe development of pCRISPReporter, a fluorescent reporter plasmid utilized to quantify dCas9-mediated repression from endogenous promoters. Finally, we demonstrate that dCas9-mediated repression can be harnessed to assess the effect of downregulating both novel and computationally predicted metabolic engineering targets, improving the yield of a heterologous phytochemical through repression of endogenous genes. These tools provide a platform for rapid evaluation of multiplex metabolic engineering interventions. PMID:25822415

  8. The Zinc Finger and C-terminal Domains of MTA Proteins are Required for FOG-2 Mediated Transcriptional Repression via the NuRD Complex

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Andrea E.; Bassett, Brett J.; Samant, Sadhana A.; Hong, Wei; Blobel, Gerd A.; Svensson, Eric C.

    2008-01-01

    FOG-2 is a transcriptional co-regulator that is required for cardiac morphogenesis as mice deficient in this factor die during mid-gestation of cardiac malformations. FOG-2 interacts with GATA4 to attenuate GATA4-dependent gene expression. The first 12 amino acids of FOG-2 (the FOG Repression Motif) are necessary to mediate this repression. To determine the mechanism by which the FOG Repression Motif functions, we identified 7 polypeptides from rat cardiac nuclear extracts that co-purified with a GST-FOG-2 fusion protein. All proteins identified are members of the NuRD nucleosome-remodeling complex. Using in vitro binding and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that Metastasis-Associated proteins (MTA)-1, 2 and 3 and Retinoblastoma binding proteins RbAp46 and RbAp48 interact with FOG-2, but not with a mutant form of FOG-2 that is unable to repress transcription. Further, we define a novel domain located in the C-terminal portion of MTA-1 that mediates the FOG-2/MTA-1 interaction. We also demonstrate that knockdown of MTA protein expression dramatically impairs the ability of FOG-2 to repress GATA4 activity. Finally, we show that the zinc finger domain of MTA-1 is required for FOG-2 mediated transcriptional repression and that this domain interacts with RbAp46 and RbAp48 subunits of the NuRD complex. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of FOG-2/MTA/RbAp interactions for FOG-2 mediated transcriptional repression and further define the molecular interactions between the FOG Repression Motif and the NuRD complex. PMID:18067919

  9. Trichoderma reesei CRE1-mediated Carbon Catabolite Repression in Re-sponse to Sophorose Through RNA Sequencing Analysis.

    PubMed

    Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; de Paula, Renato Graciano; Castro, Lílian Dos Santos; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Persinoti, Gabriela Felix; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2016-04-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) mediated by CRE1 in Trichoderma reesei emerged as a mechanism by which the fungus could adapt to new environments. In the presence of readily available carbon sources such as glucose, the fungus activates this mechanism and inhibits the production of cellulolytic complex enzymes to avoid unnecessary energy expenditure. CCR has been well described for the growth of T. reesei in cellulose and glucose, however, little is known about this process when the carbon source is sophorose, one of the most potent inducers of cellulase production. Thus, we performed high-throughput RNA sequencing to better understand CCR during cellulase formation in the presence of sophorose, by comparing the mutant ∆cre1 with its parental strain, QM9414. Of the 9129 genes present in the genome of T. reesei, 184 were upregulated and 344 downregulated in the mutant strain ∆cre1 compared to QM9414. Genes belonging to the CAZy database, and those encoding transcription factors and transporters are among the gene classes that were repressed by CRE1 in the presence of sophorose; most were possible indirectly regulated by CRE1. We also observed that CRE1 activity is carbon-dependent. A recent study from our group showed that in cellulose, CRE1 repress different groups of genes when compared to sophorose. CCR differences between these carbon sources may be due to the release of cellodextrins in the cellulose polymer, resulting in different targets of CRE1 in both carbon sources. These results contribute to a better understanding of CRE1-mediated CCR in T. reesei when glucose comes from a potent inducer of cellulase production such as sophorose, which could prove useful in improving cellulase production by the biotechnology sector. PMID:27226768

  10. Cyclic Di-GMP-Mediated Repression of Swarming Motility by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Requires the MotAB Stator

    PubMed Central

    Kuchma, S. L.; Delalez, N. J.; Filkins, L. M.; Snavely, E. A.; Armitage, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) plays a critical role in the regulation of motility. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, c-di-GMP inversely controls biofilm formation and surface swarming motility, with high levels of this dinucleotide signal stimulating biofilm formation and repressing swarming. P. aeruginosa encodes two stator complexes, MotAB and MotCD, that participate in the function of its single polar flagellum. Here we show that the repression of swarming motility requires a functional MotAB stator complex. Mutating the motAB genes restores swarming motility to a strain with artificially elevated levels of c-di-GMP as well as stimulates swarming in the wild-type strain, while overexpression of MotA from a plasmid represses swarming motility. Using point mutations in MotA and the FliG rotor protein of the motor supports the conclusion that MotA-FliG interactions are critical for c-di-GMP-mediated swarming inhibition. Finally, we show that high c-di-GMP levels affect the localization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotD fusion, indicating a mechanism whereby this second messenger has an impact on MotCD function. We propose that when c-di-GMP level is high, the MotAB stator can displace MotCD from the motor, thereby affecting motor function. Our data suggest a newly identified means of c-di-GMP-mediated control of surface motility, perhaps conserved among Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and other organisms that encode two stator systems. PMID:25349157

  11. Phosphoribulokinase mediates nitrogenase-induced carbon dioxide fixation gene repression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Ryan M; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-11-01

    In many organisms there is a balance between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. These observations extend to the nitrogen-fixing, nonsulfur purple bacteria, which have the classic family of P(II) regulators that coordinate signals of carbon and nitrogen status to regulate nitrogen metabolism. Curiously, these organisms also possess a reverse mechanism to regulate carbon metabolism based on cellular nitrogen status. In this work, studies in Rhodobacter sphaeroides firmly established that the activity of the enzyme that catalyses nitrogen fixation, nitrogenase, induces a signal that leads to repression of genes encoding enzymes of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) CO2 fixation pathway. Additionally, genetic and metabolomic experiments revealed that NADH-activated phosphoribulokinase is an intermediate in the signalling pathway. Thus, nitrogenase activity appears to be linked to cbb gene repression through phosphoribulokinase. PMID:26306848

  12. Spalt-mediated dve repression is a critical regulatory motif and coordinates with Iroquois complex in Drosophila vein formation.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Seiko; Hasegawa, Aya; Nakagoshi, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    Veins are longitudinal cuticular structures that maintain shape of the wing. Drosophila melanogaster has six longitudinal veins (L1-L6) and two cross veins. The Zn-finger transcription factors of Spalt-complex (Sal) are required for positioning of the L2 and L5, and the homeodomain transcription factors of Iroquois complex (Iro-C) are required for formation of the L3 and L5 veins. The homeodomain transcriptional repressor Defective proventriculus (Dve) is uniformly expressed in the wing pouch of the larval imaginal disc. However, dve mutant wings showed loss of the L2 and L5, but not of the L3 and L4 veins. Temporal dve knockdown experiments indicate that the Dve activity is required for vein formation from late third larval instar to the prepupal stage. In the prepupal wing, Dve expression becomes nearly complementary to that of Sal through the Sal-mediated dve repression. Furthermore, coexpression of Dve and Iro-C relieved of Sal-mediated repression is required for the L5 formation in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between Sal, Dve, and Iro-C in wing vein specification is quite similar to that in ommatidial cell-type specification. Our results provide information about the conserved function of dve regulatory motifs in cell differentiation. PMID:27349585

  13. Blue light-mediated transcriptional activation and repression of gene expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Premkumar; Devarajan, Kavya; Chua, Tze Kwang; Zhang, Hanzhong; Gunawan, Erry; Poh, Chueh Loo

    2016-08-19

    Light-regulated modules offer unprecedented new ways to control cellular behavior in precise spatial and temporal resolution. The availability of such tools may dramatically accelerate the progression of synthetic biology applications. Nonetheless, current optogenetic toolbox of prokaryotes has potential issues such as lack of rapid and switchable control, less portable, low dynamic expression and limited parts. To address these shortcomings, we have engineered a novel bidirectional promoter system for Escherichia coli that can be induced or repressed rapidly and reversibly using the blue light dependent DNA-binding protein EL222. We demonstrated that by modulating the dosage of light pulses or intensity we could control the level of gene expression precisely. We show that both light-inducible and repressible system can function in parallel with high spatial precision in a single cell and can be switched stably between ON- and OFF-states by repetitive pulses of blue light. In addition, the light-inducible and repressible expression kinetics were quantitatively analysed using a mathematical model. We further apply the system, for the first time, to optogenetically synchronize two receiver cells performing different logic behaviors over time using blue light as a molecular clock signal. Overall, our modular approach layers a transformative platform for next-generation light-controllable synthetic biology systems in prokaryotes. PMID:27353329

  14. A Conserved Upstream Open Reading Frame Mediates Sucrose-Induced Repression of TranslationW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Anika; Elzinga, Nico; Wobbes, Barry; Smeekens, Sjef

    2004-01-01

    Sugars have been shown to regulate transcription of numerous genes in plants. Sucrose controls translation of the group S basic region leucine zipper (bZIP)-type transcription factor ATB2/AtbZIP11 (Rook et al., 1998a). This control requires the unusually long 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the gene. Point mutations and deletions of the 5′UTR have uncovered the sequences involved. A highly conserved upstream open reading frame (uORF) coding for 42 amino acids is essential for the repression mechanism. It is conserved in 5′UTRs of bZIP transcription factors from other Arabidopsis thaliana genes and many other plants. ATB2/AtbZIP11 is normally expressed in association with vascular tissues. Ectopic expression of a 5′UTR construct shows that the sucrose repression system is functional in all tissues. AtbZIP2 is another Arabidopsis bZIP transcription factor gene harboring the conserved uORF, which is regulated similarly via sucrose-induced repression of translation. This suggests a general function of the conserved uORF in sucrose-controlled regulation of expression. Our findings imply the operation of a sucrose-sensing pathway that controls translation of several plant bZIP transcription factor genes harboring the conserved uORF in their 5′UTRs. Target genes of such transcription factors will then be regulated in sucrose-dependent way. PMID:15208401

  15. Epigenetic regulation of puberty via Zinc finger protein-mediated transcriptional repression

    PubMed Central

    Lomniczi, Alejandro; Wright, Hollis; Castellano, Juan Manuel; Matagne, Valerie; Toro, Carlos A.; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2015-01-01

    In primates, puberty is unleashed by increased GnRH release from the hypothalamus following an interval of juvenile quiescence. GWAS implicates Zinc finger (ZNF) genes in timing human puberty. Here we show that hypothalamic expression of several ZNFs decreased in agonadal male monkeys in association with the pubertal reactivation of gonadotropin secretion. Expression of two of these ZNFs, GATAD1 and ZNF573, also decreases in peripubertal female monkeys. However, only GATAD1 abundance increases when gonadotropin secretion is suppressed during late infancy. Targeted delivery of GATAD1 or ZNF573 to the rat hypothalamus delays puberty by impairing the transition of a transcriptional network from an immature repressive epigenetic configuration to one of activation. GATAD1 represses transcription of two key puberty-related genes, KISS1 and TAC3, directly, and reduces the activating histone mark H3K4me2 at each promoter via recruitment of histone demethylase KDM1A. We conclude that GATAD1 epitomizes a subset of ZNFs involved in epigenetic repression of primate puberty. PMID:26671628

  16. Estrogen receptor α can selectively repress dioxin receptor-mediated gene expression by targeting DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maud; Laflamme, Liette; Gaudreau, Luc

    2013-09-01

    Selective inhibitory crosstalk has been known to occur within the signaling pathways of the dioxin (AhR) and estrogen (ERα) receptors. More specifically, ERα represses a cytochrome P450-encoding gene (CYP1A1) that converts cellular estradiol into a metabolite that inhibits the cell cycle, while it has no effect on a P450-encoding gene (CYP1B1) that converts estrodiol into a genotoxic product. Here we show that ERα represses CYP1A1 by targeting the Dnmt3B DNA methyltransferase and concomitant DNA methylation of the promoter. We also find that histone H2A.Z can positively contribute to CYP1A1 gene expression, and its presence at that gene is inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Taken together, our results provide a framework for how ERα can repress transcription, and how that impinges on the production of an enzyme that generates genotoxic estradiol metabolites, and potential breast cancer progression. Finally, our results reveal a new mechanism for how H2A.Z can positively influence gene expression, which is by potentially competing with DNA methylation events in breast cancer cells. PMID:23828038

  17. Estrogen receptor α can selectively repress dioxin receptor-mediated gene expression by targeting DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Maud; Laflamme, Liette; Gaudreau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Selective inhibitory crosstalk has been known to occur within the signaling pathways of the dioxin (AhR) and estrogen (ERα) receptors. More specifically, ERα represses a cytochrome P450-encoding gene (CYP1A1) that converts cellular estradiol into a metabolite that inhibits the cell cycle, while it has no effect on a P450-encoding gene (CYP1B1) that converts estrodiol into a genotoxic product. Here we show that ERα represses CYP1A1 by targeting the Dnmt3B DNA methyltransferase and concomitant DNA methylation of the promoter. We also find that histone H2A.Z can positively contribute to CYP1A1 gene expression, and its presence at that gene is inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Taken together, our results provide a framework for how ERα can repress transcription, and how that impinges on the production of an enzyme that generates genotoxic estradiol metabolites, and potential breast cancer progression. Finally, our results reveal a new mechanism for how H2A.Z can positively influence gene expression, which is by potentially competing with DNA methylation events in breast cancer cells. PMID:23828038

  18. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT-mediated

  19. c-Fos mediates repression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter by fibroblast growth factor-19 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ayantika; Chen, Frank; Banerjee, Swati; Xu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19), a bile acid-responsive enterokine, is secreted by the ileum and regulates a variety of metabolic processes. These studies examined the signal transduction pathways operant in FGF-19-mediated repression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). Responses to FGF-19 were assessed in Caco-2 and CT-26 cells and in mice where c-fos was conditionally silenced in the intestine by a cre-lox strategy. FGF-19 treatment of Caco-2 cells or wild-type mice led to a significant reduction in ASBT protein expression and enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signaling kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Fos, and c-Jun. FGF-19 treatment of Caco-2 cells led to a reduction in activity of the human ASBT promoter and this repression could be blocked by treatment with a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) inhibitor or by silencing jun kinase 1, jun kinase 2, c-fos, or c-jun. Site directed mutagenesis of a c-fos binding element in the ASBT promoter blocked FGF-19-mediated repression in luciferase reporter constructs. ASBT promoter activity was repressed by FGF-19 in CT-26 cells and this repression could be reduced by MEK1/2 inhibition or silencing c-fos. FGF-19-mediated repression of ASBT protein expression was abrogated in mice where c-fos was conditionally silenced in the intestine. In contrast, ASBT was repressed in the c-Fos expressing gallbladders of the same mice. The studies demonstrate that FGF-19 represses the expression of ASBT in the ileum and gallbladder via a signal transduction pathway involving MEK1/2, ERK1/2, JNK1, JNK2, and c-Fos. PMID:24309182

  20. MTF-1-Mediated Repression of the Zinc Transporter Zip10 Is Alleviated by Zinc Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Lichten, Louis A.; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Guo, Liang; Embury, Jennifer; Cousins, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of cellular zinc uptake is a key process in the overall mechanism governing mammalian zinc homeostasis and how zinc participates in cellular functions. We analyzed the zinc transporters of the Zip family in both the brain and liver of zinc-deficient animals and found a large, significant increase in Zip10 expression. Additionally, Zip10 expression decreased in response to zinc repletion. Moreover, isolated mouse hepatocytes, AML12 hepatocytes, and Neuro 2A cells also respond differentially to zinc availability in vitro. Measurement of Zip10 hnRNA and actinomycin D inhibition studies indicate that Zip10 was transcriptionally regulated by zinc deficiency. Through luciferase promoter constructs and ChIP analysis, binding of MTF-1 to a metal response element located 17 bp downstream of the transcription start site was shown to be necessary for zinc-induced repression of Zip10. Furthermore, zinc-activated MTF-1 causes down-regulation of Zip10 transcription by physically blocking Pol II movement through the gene. Lastly, ZIP10 is localized to the plasma membrane of hepatocytes and neuro 2A cells. Collectively, these results reveal a novel repressive role for MTF-1 in the regulation of the Zip10 zinc transporter expression by pausing Pol II transcription. ZIP10 may have roles in control of zinc homeostasis in specific sites particularly those of the brain and liver. Within that context ZIP10 may act as an important survival mechanism during periods of zinc inadequacy. PMID:21738690

  1. Autophagy-regulating TP53INP2 mediates muscle wasting and is repressed in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sala, David; Ivanova, Saška; Plana, Natàlia; Ribas, Vicent; Duran, Jordi; Bach, Daniel; Turkseven, Saadet; Laville, Martine; Vidal, Hubert; Karczewska-Kupczewska, Monika; Kowalska, Irina; Straczkowski, Marek; Testar, Xavier; Palacín, Manuel; Sandri, Marco; Serrano, Antonio L.; Zorzano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A precise balance between protein degradation and synthesis is essential to preserve skeletal muscle mass. Here, we found that TP53INP2, a homolog of the Drosophila melanogaster DOR protein that regulates autophagy in cellular models, has a direct impact on skeletal muscle mass in vivo. Using different transgenic mouse models, we demonstrated that muscle-specific overexpression of Tp53inp2 reduced muscle mass, while deletion of Tp53inp2 resulted in muscle hypertrophy. TP53INP2 activated basal autophagy in skeletal muscle and sustained p62-independent autophagic degradation of ubiquitinated proteins. Animals with muscle-specific overexpression of Tp53inp2 exhibited enhanced muscle wasting in streptozotocin-induced diabetes that was dependent on autophagy; however, TP53INP2 ablation mitigated experimental diabetes-associated muscle loss. The overexpression or absence of TP53INP2 did not affect muscle wasting in response to denervation, a condition in which autophagy is blocked, further indicating that TP53INP2 alters muscle mass by activating autophagy. Moreover, TP53INP2 expression was markedly repressed in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes and in murine models of diabetes. Our results indicate that TP53INP2 negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass through activation of autophagy. Furthermore, we propose that TP53INP2 repression is part of an adaptive mechanism aimed at preserving muscle mass under conditions in which insulin action is deficient. PMID:24713655

  2. Receptor interconversion model of hormone action. 3. Estrogen receptor mediated repression of reporter gene activity in A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Nag, A; Park, I; Krust, A; Smith, R G

    1990-03-20

    The chicken estrogen receptor exists in three interconvertible forms, two of which bind estradiol with high affinity and one which lacks the capacity to bind estradiol. Interconversion is regulated by reactions involving ATP/Mg2+. By cotransfecting into A431 cells estrogen receptor cDNA in an expression vector together with the pA2 (-821/-87) tk-CAT vitellogenin construct, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity can be regulated either by selection of ligand or by modifying phosphorylation reactions in the recipient cells. In the presence of estrogen receptors, constitutive expression of CAT activity is inhibited in three situations: (i) in the absence of an estrogenic ligand; (ii) in the presence of an anti-estrogen; and (iii) in the presence of an estrogenic ligand together with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Estrogen receptor mediated repression of constitutive CAT activity is not observed with the pA2 (-331/-87) tk-CAT construct, indicating that DNA sequences required for repression are located between -821 and -331 base pairs upstream of the transcription initiation site. PMID:2346742

  3. BCL6 induces EMT by promoting the ZEB1-mediated transcription repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Mei; Sun, Wei; Hua, Fang; Xie, Jing; Lin, Heng; Zhou, Dan-Dan; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2015-09-01

    B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), a transcriptional repressor, is involved in the development and progression of breast cancers with uncertain mechanism. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential effect and mechanism of BCL6 in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a critical cellular process for controlling the development and progression of breast cancers. We found that BCL6 promoted invasion, migration and growth by stimulating EMT in breast cancer cells. BCL6 induced EMT by enhancing the expression of transcriptional repressor ZEB1 which bound to the E-cadherin promoter and repressing the E-cadherin transcription. Deletion of ZEB1 protected against the pro-EMT roles of BCL6 by restoring the expression of E-cadherin in these cells. Moreover, inhibition of BCL6 with BCL6 inhibitor 79-6 suppressed these functions of BCL6 in breast cancer cells. These findings indicate that BCL6 promotes EMT via enhancing the ZEB1-mediated transcriptional repression of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells. Targeting BCL6 has therapeutic potential against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:26049022

  4. Structural basis for the Nanos-mediated recruitment of the CCR4–NOT complex and translational repression

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Dipankar; Raisch, Tobias; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Jonas, Stefanie; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding proteins of the Nanos family play an essential role in germ cell development and survival in a wide range of metazoan species. They function by suppressing the expression of target mRNAs through the recruitment of effector complexes, which include the CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex. Here, we show that the three human Nanos paralogs (Nanos1–3) interact with the CNOT1 C-terminal domain and determine the structural basis for the specific molecular recognition. Nanos1–3 bind CNOT1 through a short CNOT1-interacting motif (NIM) that is conserved in all vertebrates and some invertebrate species. The crystal structure of the human Nanos1 NIM peptide bound to CNOT1 reveals that the peptide opens a conserved hydrophobic pocket on the CNOT1 surface by inserting conserved aromatic residues. The substitutions of these aromatic residues in the Nanos1–3 NIMs abolish binding to CNOT1 and abrogate the ability of the proteins to repress translation. Our findings provide the structural basis for the recruitment of the CCR4–NOT complex by vertebrate Nanos, indicate that the NIMs are the major determinants of the translational repression mediated by Nanos, and identify the CCR4–NOT complex as the main effector complex for Nanos function. PMID:24736845

  5. mRNA Targeting to Endoplasmic Reticulum Precedes Ago Protein Interaction and MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Translation Repression in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Bahnisikha; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) binds to the 3′-UTR of its target mRNAs to repress protein synthesis. Extensive research was done to understand the mechanism of miRNA-mediated repression in animal cells. Considering the progress in understanding the mechanism, information about the subcellular sites of miRNA-mediated repression is surprisingly limited. In this study, using an inducible expression system for an miRNA target message, we have delineated how a target mRNA passes through polysome association and Ago2 interaction steps on rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before the miRNA-mediated repression sets in. From this study, de novo formed target mRNA localization to the ER-bound polysomes manifested as the earliest event, which is followed by Ago2 micro-ribonucleoprotein binding, and translation repression of target message. Compartmentalization of this process to rough ER membrane ensures enrichment of miRNA-targeted messages and micro-ribonucleoprotein components on ER upon reaching a steady state. PMID:26304123

  6. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    PubMed

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA. PMID:23688550

  7. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing; Gu, Jianxin

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  8. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

    PubMed

    Perdigoto, Carolina N; Dauber, Katherine L; Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J; Zhao, Dejian; Zheng, Deyou; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  9. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J.; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J.; Zhao, Dejian; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  10. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4−CD8− thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4−CD8− cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  11. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2.

    PubMed

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4(-)CD8(-) thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4(-)CD8(-) cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  12. Velvet-mediated repression of β-glucan synthesis in Aspergillus nidulans spores

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Soo; Man Yu, Yeong; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Jae Maeng, Pil; Chang Kim, Sun; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Beta-glucans are a heterologous group of fibrous glucose polymers that are a major constituent of cell walls in Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes fungi. Synthesis of β (1,3)- and (1,6)-glucans is coordinated with fungal cell growth and development, thus, is under tight genetic regulation. Here, we report that β-glucan synthesis in both asexual and sexual spores is turned off by the NF-kB like fungal regulators VosA and VelB in Aspergillus nidulans. Our genetic and genomic analyses have revealed that both VosA and VelB are necessary for proper down-regulation of cell wall biosynthetic genes including those associated with β-glucan synthesis in both types of spores. The deletion of vosA or velB results in elevated accumulation of β-glucan in asexual spores. Double mutant analyses indicate that VosA and VelB play an inter-dependent role in repressing β-glucan synthesis in asexual spores. In vivo chromatin immuno-precipitation analysis shows that both VelB and VosA bind to the promoter region of the β-glucan synthase gene fksA in asexual spores. Similarly, VosA is required for proper repression of β-glucan synthesis in sexual spores. In summary, the VosA-VelB hetero-complex is a key regulatory unit tightly controlling proper levels of β-glucan synthesis in asexual and sexual spores. PMID:25960370

  13. Velvet-mediated repression of β-glucan synthesis in Aspergillus nidulans spores.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Yeong Man; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Maeng, Pil Jae; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Beta-glucans are a heterologous group of fibrous glucose polymers that are a major constituent of cell walls in Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes fungi. Synthesis of β (1,3)- and (1,6)-glucans is coordinated with fungal cell growth and development, thus, is under tight genetic regulation. Here, we report that β-glucan synthesis in both asexual and sexual spores is turned off by the NF-kB like fungal regulators VosA and VelB in Aspergillus nidulans. Our genetic and genomic analyses have revealed that both VosA and VelB are necessary for proper down-regulation of cell wall biosynthetic genes including those associated with β-glucan synthesis in both types of spores. The deletion of vosA or velB results in elevated accumulation of β-glucan in asexual spores. Double mutant analyses indicate that VosA and VelB play an inter-dependent role in repressing β-glucan synthesis in asexual spores. In vivo chromatin immuno-precipitation analysis shows that both VelB and VosA bind to the promoter region of the β-glucan synthase gene fksA in asexual spores. Similarly, VosA is required for proper repression of β-glucan synthesis in sexual spores. In summary, the VosA-VelB hetero-complex is a key regulatory unit tightly controlling proper levels of β-glucan synthesis in asexual and sexual spores. PMID:25960370

  14. An Intronic Flk1 Enhancer Directs Arterial-Specific Expression via RBPJ-Mediated Venous Repression

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Philipp W.; Sacilotto, Natalia; Nornes, Svanhild; Neal, Alice; Thomas, Max O.; Liu, Ke; Preece, Chris; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Davies, Benjamin; Bou-Gharios, George

    2016-01-01

    Objective— The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor Flk1 is essential for vascular development, but the signaling and transcriptional pathways by which its expression is regulated in endothelial cells remain unclear. Although previous studies have identified 2 Flk1 regulatory enhancers, these are dispensable for Flk1 expression, indicating that additional enhancers contribute to Flk1 regulation in endothelial cells. In the present study, we sought to identify Flk1 enhancers contributing to expression in endothelial cells. Approach and Results— A region of the 10th intron of the Flk1 gene (Flk1in10) was identified as a putative enhancer and tested in mouse and zebrafish transgenic models. This region robustly directed reporter gene expression in arterial endothelial cells. Using a combination of targeted mutagenesis of transcription factor–binding sites and gene silencing of transcription factors, we found that Gata and Ets factors are required for Flk1in10 enhancer activity in all endothelial cells. Furthermore, we showed that activity of the Flk1in10 enhancer is restricted to arteries through repression of gene expression in venous endothelial cells by the Notch pathway transcriptional regulator Rbpj. Conclusions— This study demonstrates a novel mechanism of arterial–venous identity acquisition, indicates a direct link between the Notch and VEGF signaling pathways, and illustrates how cis-regulatory diversity permits differential expression outcomes from a limited repertoire of transcriptional regulators. PMID:27079877

  15. PTP1B triggers integrin-mediated repression of myosin activity and modulates cell contractility

    PubMed Central

    González Wusener, Ana E.; González, Ángela; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell contractility and migration by integrins depends on precise regulation of protein tyrosine kinase and Rho-family GTPase activities in specific spatiotemporal patterns. Here we show that protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B cooperates with β3 integrin to activate the Src/FAK signalling pathway which represses RhoA-myosin-dependent contractility. Using PTP1B null (KO) cells and PTP1B reconstituted (WT) cells, we determined that some early steps following cell adhesion to fibronectin and vitronectin occurred robustly in WT cells, including aggregation of β3 integrins and adaptor proteins, and activation of Src/FAK-dependent signalling at small puncta in a lamellipodium. However, these events were significantly impaired in KO cells. We established that cytoskeletal strain and cell contractility was highly enhanced at the periphery of KO cells compared to WT cells. Inhibition of the Src/FAK signalling pathway or expression of constitutive active RhoA in WT cells induced a KO cell phenotype. Conversely, expression of constitutive active Src or myosin inhibition in KO cells restored the WT phenotype. We propose that this novel function of PTP1B stimulates permissive conditions for adhesion and lamellipodium assembly at the protruding edge during cell spreading and migration. PMID:26700725

  16. Repression of DNA-binding dependent glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Muzikar, Katy A.; Nickols, Nicholas G.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) affects the transcription of genes involved in diverse processes, including energy metabolism and the immune response, through DNA-binding dependent and independent mechanisms. The DNA-binding dependent mechanism occurs by direct binding of GR to glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at regulatory regions of target genes. The DNA-binding independent mechanism involves binding of GR to transcription factors and coactivators that, in turn, contact DNA. A small molecule that competes with GR for binding to GREs could be expected to affect the DNA-dependent pathway selectively by interfering with the protein-DNA interface. We show that a DNA-binding polyamide that targets the consensus GRE sequence binds the glucocorticoid-induced zipper (GILZ) GRE, inhibits expression of GILZ and several other known GR target genes, and reduces GR occupancy at the GILZ promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of the effects of this polyamide on a set of glucocorticoid-induced and -repressed genes could help to elucidate the mechanism of GR regulation for these genes. PMID:19805343

  17. EphrinB2 repression through ZEB2 mediates tumour invasion and anti-angiogenic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Depner, C.; zum Buttel, H.; Böğürcü, N.; Cuesta, A. M.; Aburto, M. R.; Seidel, S.; Finkelmeier, F.; Foss, F.; Hofmann, J.; Kaulich, K.; Barbus, S.; Segarra, M.; Reifenberger, G.; Garvalov, B. K.; Acker, T.; Acker-Palmer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse invasion of the surrounding brain parenchyma is a major obstacle in the treatment of gliomas with various therapeutics, including anti-angiogenic agents. Here we identify the epi-/genetic and microenvironmental downregulation of ephrinB2 as a crucial step that promotes tumour invasion by abrogation of repulsive signals. We demonstrate that ephrinB2 is downregulated in human gliomas as a consequence of promoter hypermethylation and gene deletion. Consistently, genetic deletion of ephrinB2 in a murine high-grade glioma model increases invasion. Importantly, ephrinB2 gene silencing is complemented by a hypoxia-induced transcriptional repression. Mechanistically, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α induces the EMT repressor ZEB2, which directly downregulates ephrinB2 through promoter binding to enhance tumour invasiveness. This mechanism is activated following anti-angiogenic treatment of gliomas and is efficiently blocked by disrupting ZEB2 activity. Taken together, our results identify ZEB2 as an attractive therapeutic target to inhibit tumour invasion and counteract tumour resistance mechanisms induced by anti-angiogenic treatment strategies. PMID:27470974

  18. COX5B Regulates MAVS-mediated Antiviral Signaling through Interaction with ATG5 and Repressing ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xuanli; Sun, Liwei; Tang, Tie-shan; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2012-01-01

    Innate antiviral immunity is the first line of the host defense system that rapidly detects invading viruses. Mitochondria function as platforms for innate antiviral signal transduction in mammals through the adaptor protein, MAVS. Excessive activation of MAVS-mediated antiviral signaling leads to dysfunction of mitochondria and cell apoptosis that likely causes the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. However, the mechanism of how MAVS is regulated at mitochondria remains unknown. Here we show that the Cytochrome c Oxidase (CcO) complex subunit COX5B physically interacts with MAVS and negatively regulates the MAVS-mediated antiviral pathway. Mechanistically, we find that while activation of MAVS leads to increased ROS production and COX5B expression, COX5B down-regulated MAVS signaling by repressing ROS production. Importantly, our study reveals that COX5B coordinates with the autophagy pathway to control MAVS aggregation, thereby balancing the antiviral signaling activity. Thus, our study provides novel insights into the link between mitochondrial electron transport system and the autophagy pathway in regulating innate antiviral immunity. PMID:23308066

  19. NFATc1 Mediates HDAC-Dependent Transcriptional Repression of Osteocalcin Expression During Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Min-Kyung; Yeo, Hyeonju; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that the in vivo and in vitro suppression of Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells (NFAT) signaling increases osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. To investigate the mechanism by which NFATc1 regulates osteoblast differentiation, we established an osteoblast cell line that overexpresses a constitutively active NFATc1 (ca-NFATc1). The activation of NFATc1 significantly inhibits osteoblast differentiation and function, demonstrated by inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization as well as a decrease in gene expression of early and late markers of osteoblast differentiation such as osterix and osteocalcin, respectively. By focusing on the specific role of NFATc1 during late differentiation, we discovered that the inhibition of osteocalcin gene expression by NFATc1 was associated with a repression of the osteocalcin promoter activity, and a decrease in TCF/LEF transactivation. Also, overexpression of NFATc1 completely blocked the decrease in total histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity during osteoblast differentiation and prevented the hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Mechanistically, we show by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay that the overexpression of NFATc1 sustains the binding of HDAC3 on the proximal region of the osteocalcin promoter, resulting in complete hypoacetylation of histones H3 and H4 when compared to GFP-expressing osteoblasts. In contrast, the inhibition of NFATc1 nuclear translocation either by cyclosporin or by using primary mouse osteoblasts with deleted calcineurin b1 prevents HDAC3 from associating with the proximal regulatory site of the osteocalcin promoter. These preliminary results suggest that NFATc1 acts as a transcriptional co-repressor of osteocalcin promoter possibly in an HDAC-dependent manner. PMID:19463978

  20. Acute TNF-induced repression of cell identity genes is mediated by NFκB-directed redistribution of cofactors from super-enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne; Nielsen, Ronni; Madsen, Jesper Grud Skat; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in low-grade adipose tissue inflammation and development of insulin resistance during obesity. In this context, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) is directly involved and required for the acute activation of the inflammatory gene program. Here, we show that the major transactivating subunit of NFκB, v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), is also required for acute TNF-induced suppression of adipocyte genes. Notably, this repression does not involve RELA binding to the associated enhancers but rather loss of cofactors and enhancer RNA (eRNA) selectively from high-occupancy sites within super-enhancers. Based on these data, we have developed models that, with high accuracy, predict which enhancers and genes are repressed by TNF in adipocytes. We show that these models are applicable to other cell types where TNF represses genes associated with super-enhancers in a highly cell-type–specific manner. Our results propose a novel paradigm for NFκB-mediated repression, whereby NFκB selectively redistributes cofactors from high-occupancy enhancers, thereby specifically repressing super-enhancer-associated cell identity genes. PMID:26113076

  1. Acute TNF-induced repression of cell identity genes is mediated by NFκB-directed redistribution of cofactors from super-enhancers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne; Nielsen, Ronni; Madsen, Jesper Grud Skat; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in low-grade adipose tissue inflammation and development of insulin resistance during obesity. In this context, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) is directly involved and required for the acute activation of the inflammatory gene program. Here, we show that the major transactivating subunit of NFκB, v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), is also required for acute TNF-induced suppression of adipocyte genes. Notably, this repression does not involve RELA binding to the associated enhancers but rather loss of cofactors and enhancer RNA (eRNA) selectively from high-occupancy sites within super-enhancers. Based on these data, we have developed models that, with high accuracy, predict which enhancers and genes are repressed by TNF in adipocytes. We show that these models are applicable to other cell types where TNF represses genes associated with super-enhancers in a highly cell-type-specific manner. Our results propose a novel paradigm for NFκB-mediated repression, whereby NFκB selectively redistributes cofactors from high-occupancy enhancers, thereby specifically repressing super-enhancer-associated cell identity genes. PMID:26113076

  2. Net, a negative Ras-switchable TCF, contains a second inhibition domain, the CID, that mediates repression through interactions with CtBP and de-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Criqui-Filipe, P; Ducret, C; Maira, S M; Wasylyk, B

    1999-06-15

    Signalling cascades are integrated at the transcriptional level by the interplay between factors such as the ternary complex factors (TCFs) that interact with serum response factor (SRF) and the serum response element (SRE) of the fos promoter. Net is a negative TCF that is switched to a positive regulator by the Ras signal. To understand the mechanisms of repression by Net, we used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify factors that interact with its inhibitory domain. We isolated mCtBP1, the murine homologue of huCtBP1, a factor implicated in negative regulation of transformation by E1A plus Ras. We show that mCtBP1 interacts strongly with Net both in vitro and in vivo. The CtBP interaction domain of Net, the CID, mediates repression independently of the previously identified negative element, the NID. The CID inhibits by recruiting the co-repressor mCtBP1. The CID and mCtBP1 need to use de-acetylase activity for repression, whereas the NID apparently represses by other mechanisms. Finally, we provide evidence that CtBP and de-acetylation repress the c-fos SRE in low serum when it is inactive, but not in high serum when it is active. These results provide insights into the cross-talk between pathways that inhibit and stimulate transformation at the level of Net, a regulator of gene expression. PMID:10369679

  3. Region-Specific Activation of oskar mRNA Translation by Inhibition of Bruno-Mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Goheun; Pai, Chin-I; Sato, Keiji; Person, Maria D.; Nakamura, Akira; Macdonald, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    A complex program of translational repression, mRNA localization, and translational activation ensures that Oskar (Osk) protein accumulates only at the posterior pole of the Drosophila oocyte. Inappropriate expression of Osk disrupts embryonic axial patterning, and is lethal. A key factor in translational repression is Bruno (Bru), which binds to regulatory elements in the osk mRNA 3′ UTR. After posterior localization of osk mRNA, repression by Bru must be alleviated. Here we describe an in vivo assay system to monitor the spatial pattern of Bru-dependent repression, separate from the full complexity of osk regulation. This assay reveals a form of translational activation—region-specific activation—which acts regionally in the oocyte, is not mechanistically coupled to mRNA localization, and functions by inhibiting repression by Bru. We also show that Bru dimerizes and identify mutations that disrupt this interaction to test its role in vivo. Loss of dimerization does not disrupt repression, as might have been expected from an existing model for the mechanism of repression. However, loss of dimerization does impair regional activation of translation, suggesting that dimerization may constrain, not promote, repression. Our work provides new insight into the question of how localized mRNAs become translationally active, showing that repression of osk mRNA is locally inactivated by a mechanism acting independent of mRNA localization. PMID:25723530

  4. FIAT represses ATF4-mediated transcription to regulate bone mass in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vionnie W C; Ambartsoumian, Gourgen; Verlinden, Lieve; Moir, Janet M; Prud'homme, Josée; Gauthier, Claude; Roughley, Peter J; St-Arnaud, René

    2005-05-23

    We report the characterization of factor inhibiting activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-mediated transcription (FIAT), a leucine zipper nuclear protein. FIAT interacted with ATF4 to inhibit binding of ATF4 to DNA and block ATF4-mediated transcription of the osteocalcin gene in vitro. Transgenic mice overexpressing FIAT in osteoblasts also had reduced osteocalcin gene expression and decreased bone mineral density, bone volume, mineralized volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, and decreased rigidity of long bones. Mineral homeostasis, osteoclast number and activity, and osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis were unchanged in transgenics. Expression of osteoblastic differentiation markers was largely unaffected and type I collagen synthesis was unchanged. Mineral apposition rate was reduced in transgenic mice, suggesting that the lowered bone mass was due to a decline in osteoblast activity. This cell-autonomous decrease in osteoblast activity was confirmed by measuring reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures. These results show that FIAT regulates bone mass accrual and establish FIAT as a novel transcriptional regulator of osteoblastic function. PMID:15911876

  5. Role of the hinge region of glucocorticoid receptor for HEXIM1-mediated transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Sano, Motoaki; Ohnuma, Kei; Iwata, Satoshi; Hosono, Osamu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Morimoto, Chikao

    2008-06-20

    We previously reported that HEXIM1 (hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1), which suppresses transcription elongation via sequestration of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) using 7SK RNA as a scaffold, directly associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to suppress glucocorticoid-inducible gene activation. Here, we revealed that the hinge region of GR is essential for its interaction with HEXIM1, and that oxosteroid receptors including GR show sequence homology in their hinge region and interact with HEXIM1, whereas the other members of nuclear receptors do not. We also showed that HEXIM1 suppresses GR-mediated transcription in two ways: sequestration of P-TEFb by HEXIM1 and direct interaction between GR and HEXIM1. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}-dependent gene expression is negatively modulated by HEXIM1 solely via sequestration of P-TEFb. We, therefore, conclude that HEXIM1 may act as a gene-selective transcriptional regulator via direct interaction with certain transcriptional regulators including GR and contribute to fine-tuning of, for example, glucocorticoid-mediated biological responses.

  6. Nanos-mediated repression of hid protects larval sensory neurons after a global switch in sensitivity to apoptotic signals.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Balpreet; Plaza-Jennings, Amara; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-06-15

    Dendritic arbor morphology is a key determinant of neuronal function. Once established, dendrite branching patterns must be maintained as the animal develops to ensure receptive field coverage. The translational repressors Nanos (Nos) and Pumilio (Pum) are required to maintain dendrite growth and branching of Drosophila larval class IV dendritic arborization (da) neurons, but their specific regulatory role remains unknown. We show that Nos-Pum-mediated repression of the pro-apoptotic gene head involution defective (hid) is required to maintain a balance of dendritic growth and retraction in class IV da neurons and that upregulation of hid results in decreased branching because of an increase in caspase activity. The temporal requirement for nos correlates with an ecdysone-triggered switch in sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli that occurs during the mid-L3 transition. We find that hid is required during pupariation for caspase-dependent pruning of class IV da neurons and that Nos and Pum delay pruning. Together, these results suggest that Nos and Pum provide a crucial neuroprotective regulatory layer to ensure that neurons behave appropriately in response to developmental cues. PMID:27256879

  7. Tumor suppressor SMAR1 mediates cyclin D1 repression by recruitment of the SIN3/histone deacetylase 1 complex.

    PubMed

    Rampalli, Shravanti; Pavithra, L; Bhatt, Altaf; Kundu, Tapas K; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2005-10-01

    Matrix attachment region binding proteins have been shown to play an important role in gene regulation by altering chromatin in a stage- and tissue-specific manner. Our previous studies report that SMAR1, a matrix-associated protein, regresses B16-F1-induced tumors in mice. Here we show SMAR1 targets the cyclin D1 promoter, a gene product whose dysregulation is attributed to breast malignancies. Our studies reveal that SMAR1 represses cyclin D1 gene expression, which can be reversed by small interfering RNA specific to SMAR1. We demonstrate that SMAR1 interacts with histone deacetylation complex 1, SIN3, and pocket retinoblastomas to form a multiprotein repressor complex. This interaction is mediated by the SMAR1(160-350) domain. Our data suggest SMAR1 recruits a repressor complex to the cyclin D1 promoter that results in deacetylation of chromatin at that locus, which spreads to a distance of at least the 5 kb studied upstream of the cyclin D1 promoter. Interestingly, we find that the high induction of cyclin D1 in breast cancer cell lines can be correlated to the decreased levels of SMAR1 in these lines. Our results establish the molecular mechanism exhibited by SMAR1 to regulate cyclin D1 by modification of chromatin. PMID:16166625

  8. Nuclear Matrix protein SMAR1 represses HIV-1 LTR mediated transcription through chromatin remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenath, Kadreppa; Pavithra, Lakshminarasimhan; Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Surajit; Dash, Prasanta K.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-04-25

    Nuclear Matrix and MARs have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of host as well as viral genes but their precise role in HIV-1 transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that > 98% of HIV sequences contain consensus MAR element in their promoter. We show that SMAR1 binds to the LTR MAR and reinforces transcriptional silencing by tethering the LTR MAR to nuclear matrix. SMAR1 associated HDAC1-mSin3 corepressor complex is dislodged from the LTR upon cellular activation by PMA/TNFalpha leading to an increase in the acetylation and a reduction in the trimethylation of histones, associated with the recruitment of RNA Polymerase II on the LTR. Overexpression of SMAR1 lead to reduction in LTR mediated transcription, both in a Tat dependent and independent manner, resulting in a decreased virion production. These results demonstrate the role of SMAR1 in regulating viral transcription by alternative compartmentalization of LTR between the nuclear matrix and chromatin.

  9. Enteric glia modulate epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation through 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2

    PubMed Central

    Bach-Ngohou, Kalyane; Mahé, Maxime M; Aubert, Philippe; Abdo, Hind; Boni, Sébastien; Bourreille, Arnaud; Denis, Marc G; Lardeux, Bernard; Neunlist, Michel; Masson, Damien

    2010-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) and its major component, enteric glial cells (EGCs), have recently been identified as a major regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier functions. Indeed, EGCs inhibit intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and increase barrier resistance and IEC adhesion via the release of EGC-derived soluble factors. Interestingly, EGC regulation of intestinal epithelial barrier functions is reminiscent of previously reported peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-dependent functional effects. In this context, the present study aimed at identifying whether EGC could synthesize and release the main PPARγ ligand, 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), and regulate IEC functions such as proliferation and differentiation via a PPARγ dependent pathway. First, we demonstrated that the lipocalin but not the haematopoetic form for prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), the enzyme responsible of 15dPGJ2 synthesis, was expressed in EGCs of the human submucosal plexus and of the subepithelium, as well as in rat primary culture of ENS and EGC lines. Next, 15dPGJ2 was identified in EGC supernatants of various EGC lines. 15dPGJ2 reproduced EGC inhibitory effects upon IEC proliferation, and inhibition of lipocalin PGDS expression by shRNA abrogated these effects. Furthermore, EGCs induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ in IEC, and both EGC and 15dPGJ2 effects upon IEC proliferation were prevented by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Finally, EGC induced differentiation-related gene expression in IEC through a PPARγ-dependent pathway. Our results identified 15dPGJ2 as a novel glial-derived mediator involved in the control of IEC proliferation/differentiation through activation of PPARγ. They also suggest that alterations of glial PGDS expression may modify intestinal epithelial barrier functions and be involved in the development of pathologies such as cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:20478974

  10. Complementary Quantitative Proteomics Reveals that Transcription Factor AP-4 Mediates E-box-dependent Complex Formation for Transcriptional Repression of HDM2*

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Wei-Chi; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Hsin-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factor activating enhancer-binding protein 4 (AP-4) is a basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box elements. AP-4 has received increasing attention for its regulatory role in cell growth and development, including transcriptional repression of the human homolog of murine double minute 2 (HDM2), an important oncoprotein controlling cell growth and survival, by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that AP-4 binds to an E-box located in the HDM2-P2 promoter and represses HDM2 transcription in a p53-independent manner. Incremental truncations of AP-4 revealed that the C-terminal Gln/Pro-rich domain was essential for transcriptional repression of HDM2. To further delineate the molecular mechanism(s) of AP-4 transcriptional control and its potential implications, we used DNA-affinity purification followed by complementary quantitative proteomics, cICAT and iTRAQ labeling methods, to identify a previously unknown E-box-bound AP-4 protein complex containing 75 putative components. The two labeling methods complementarily quantified differentially AP-4-enriched proteins, including the most significant recruitment of DNA damage response proteins, followed by transcription factors, transcriptional repressors/corepressors, and histone-modifying proteins. Specific interaction of AP-4 with CCCTC binding factor, stimulatory protein 1, and histone deacetylase 1 (an AP-4 corepressor) was validated using AP-4 truncation mutants. Importantly, inclusion of trichostatin A did not alleviate AP-4-mediated repression of HDM2 transcription, suggesting a previously unidentified histone deacetylase-independent repression mechanism. In contrast, the complementary quantitative proteomics study suggested that transcription repression occurs via coordination of AP-4 with other transcription factors, histone methyltransferases, and/or a nucleosome remodeling SWI·SNF complex. In addition to previously known functions of AP-4, our data suggest that AP-4 participates in

  11. Repression of hypoxia-inducible factor α signaling by Set7-mediated methylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Chen, Zhu; Xu, Chenxi; Leng, Xiaoqian; Cao, Hong; Ouyang, Gang; Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-05-26

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α are the main regulators of cellular responses to hypoxia. Post-translational modifications of HIF-1α and 2α are necessary to modulate their functions. The methylation of non-histone proteins by Set7, an SET domain-containing lysine methyltransferase, is a novel regulatory mechanism to control cell protein function in response to various cellular stresses. In this study, we show that Set7 methylates HIF-1α at lysine 32 and HIF-2α at lysine K29; this methylation inhibits the expression of HIF-1α/2α targets by impairing the occupancy of HIF-α on hypoxia response element of HIF target gene promoter. Set7-null fibroblasts and the cells with shRNA-knocked down Set7 exhibit upregulated HIF target genes. Set7 inhibitor blocks HIF-1α/2α methylation to enhance HIF target gene expression. Set7-null fibroblasts and the cells with shRNA-knocked down Set7 or inhibition of Set7 by the inhibitor subjected to hypoxia display an increased glucose uptake and intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels. These findings define a novel modification of HIF-1α/2α and demonstrate that Set7-medited lysine methylation negatively regulates HIF-α transcriptional activity and HIF-1α-mediated glucose homeostasis. PMID:25897119

  12. Arabidopsis AINTEGUMENTA mediates salt tolerance by trans-repressing SCABP8.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lai-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Bo; Yao, Shun-Qiao; Liu, Aizhong

    2015-08-01

    The Arabidopsis AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) gene, which encodes an APETALA2 (AP2)-like transcription factor, controls plant organ cell number and organ size throughout shoot development. ANT is thus a key factor in the development of plant shoots. Here, we have found that ANT plays an essential role in conferring salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. ant-knockout mutants presented a salt-tolerant phenotype, whereas transgenic plants expressing ANT under the 35S promoter (35S:ANT) exhibited more sensitive phenotypes under high salt stress. Further analysis indicated that ANT functions mainly in the shoot response to salt toxicity. Target gene analysis revealed that ANT bound to the promoter of SOS3-LIKE CALCIUM BINDING PROTEIN 8 (SCABP8), which encodes a putative Ca(2+) sensor, thereby inhibiting expression of SCABP8 (also known as CBL10). It has been reported that the salt sensitivity of scabp8 is more prominent in shoot tissues. Genetic experiments indicated that the mutation of SCABP8 suppresses the ant-knockout salt-tolerant phenotype, implying that ANT functions as a negative transcriptional regulator of SCABP8 upon salt stress. Taken together, the above results reveal that ANT is a novel regulator of salt stress and that ANT binds to the SCABP8 promoter, mediating salt tolerance. PMID:26054800

  13. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wei; Li, Jinru; Wang, Bo; Chen, Linfeng; Niu, Wenyan; Yao, Zhi; Baniahmad, Aria

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TR{beta}1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TR{beta}1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TR{beta}1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TR{beta}1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  14. HtrA3 is regulated by 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 independently of PPAR{gamma} in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Theoleyre, Sandrine; Mottier, Stephanie; Masson, Damien; Denis, Marc G.

    2010-04-09

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) ligands have been shown to possess anti-proliferative effects in many types of cancer. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), the targets involved in these effects are not known. In this study, we demonstrated that, in CCRCC cell lines, the endogenous PPAR{gamma} ligand 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) induces the expression, both at the mRNA and the protein levels, of the HtrA3 gene. This gene belongs to the High-Temperature Requirement Factor A family of serine proteases that repress signaling by TGF-{beta} family members and inhibit cell migration. Rosiglitazone or ciglitazone, synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonists, did not induce HtrA3 expression, and the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 did not prevent 15dPGJ2 induction, suggesting that the up-regulation of HtrA3 by 15dPGJ2 is independent of PPAR{gamma}. The MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 dramatically repressed HtrA3 induction. Altogether, these data indicate that 15dPGJ2 is able to stimulate the expression of HtrA3 through an indirect mechanism involving the MEK/ERK pathway but independent of PPAR{gamma}. Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of HtrA3, a potential tumor suppressor gene.

  15. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-08-01

    In patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIP(U) (box) domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53's DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5' UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP-BACE1-p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  16. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-01-01

    In patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIPUbox domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53’s DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5′ UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP–BACE1–p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  17. Sp1 mediates repression of the resistin gene by PPAR{gamma} agonists in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.S.; Choi, H.H.; Cho, Y.M.; Lee, H.K.; Park, K.S. . E-mail: kspark@snu.ac.kr

    2006-09-15

    Resistin is an adipokine related to obesity and insulin resistance. Expression of the resistin gene is repressed by the treatment of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonists, thiazolidinediones (TZDs). In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which TZDs inhibit the resistin gene expression. Resistin gene expression was decreased by TZD in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was abolished after treatment of cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor). TZD could not repress the expression of the resistin gene in the presence of mithramycin A (an Sp1 binding inhibitor). Sp1 binding site of the resistin promoter (-122/-114 bp) was necessary for the repression. Further investigation of the effect of TZDs on the modification of Sp1 showed that the level of O-glycosylation of Sp1 was decreased in this process. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} activation represses the expression of the resistin gene by modulating Sp1 activity.

  18. Hormone-induced repression of genes requires BRG1-mediated H1.2 deposition at target promoters.

    PubMed

    Nacht, Ana Silvina; Pohl, Andy; Zaurin, Roser; Soronellas, Daniel; Quilez, Javier; Sharma, Priyanka; Wright, Roni H; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P

    2016-08-15

    Eukaryotic gene regulation is associated with changes in chromatin compaction that modulate access to DNA regulatory sequences relevant for transcriptional activation or repression. Although much is known about the mechanism of chromatin remodeling in hormonal gene activation, how repression is accomplished is much less understood. Here we report that in breast cancer cells, ligand-activated progesterone receptor (PR) is directly recruited to transcriptionally repressed genes involved in cell proliferation along with the kinases ERK1/2 and MSK1. PR recruits BRG1 associated with the HP1γ-LSD1 complex repressor complex, which is further anchored via binding of HP1γ to the H3K9me3 signal deposited by SUV39H2. In contrast to what is observed during gene activation, only BRG1 and not the BAF complex is recruited to repressed promoters, likely due to local enrichment of the pioneer factor FOXA1. BRG1 participates in gene repression by interacting with H1.2, facilitating its deposition and stabilizing nucleosome positioning around the transcription start site. Our results uncover a mechanism of hormone-dependent transcriptional repression and a novel role for BRG1 in progestin regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:27390128

  19. Zinc-fingers and homeoboxes 1 (ZHX1) binds DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3B to enhance DNMT3B-mediated transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Hak; Park, Jinah; Choi, Moon-Chang; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Yeonjoo; Lee, Ju-Hee; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Tae-You; E-mail: kimty@snu.ac.kr

    2007-04-06

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 3B is a de novo DNMT that represses transcription independent of DNMT activity. In order to gain a better insight into DNMT3B-mediated transcriptional repression, we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis using DNMT3B as a bait. Of the various binding candidates, ZHX1, a member of zinc-finger and homeobox protein, was found to interact with DNMT3B in vivo and in vitro. N-terminal PWWP domain of DNMT3B was required for its interaction with homeobox motifs of ZHX1. ZHX1 contains nuclear localization signal at C-terminal homeobox motif, and both ZHX1 and DNMT3B were co-localized in nucleus. Furthermore, we found that ZHX1 enhanced the transcriptional repression mediated by DNMT3B when DNMT3B is directly targeted to DNA. These results showed for First the direct linkage between DNMT and zinc-fingers homeoboxes protein, leading to enhanced gene silencing by DNMT3B.

  20. Fbw7 Repression by Hes5 Creates a Feedback Loop That Modulates Notch-Mediated Intestinal and Neural Stem Cell Fate Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Tendeng, Christian; Clurman, Bruce E.; Lewis, Julian; Behrens, Axel

    2013-01-01

    FBW7 is a crucial component of an SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligase, which mediates degradation of an array of different target proteins. The Fbw7 locus comprises three different isoforms, each with its own promoter and each suspected to have a distinct set of substrates. Most FBW7 targets have important functions in developmental processes and oncogenesis, including Notch proteins, which are functionally important substrates of SCF(Fbw7). Notch signalling controls a plethora of cell differentiation decisions in a wide range of species. A prominent role of this signalling pathway is that of mediating lateral inhibition, a process where exchange of signals that repress Notch ligand production amplifies initial differences in Notch activation levels between neighbouring cells, resulting in unequal cell differentiation decisions. Here we show that the downstream Notch signalling effector HES5 directly represses transcription of the E3 ligase Fbw7β, thereby directly bearing on the process of lateral inhibition. Fbw7Δ/+ heterozygous mice showed haploinsufficiency for Notch degradation causing impaired intestinal progenitor cell and neural stem cell differentiation. Notably, concomitant inactivation of Hes5 rescued both phenotypes and restored normal stem cell differentiation potential. In silico modelling suggests that the NICD/HES5/FBW7β positive feedback loop underlies Fbw7 haploinsufficiency. Thus repression of Fbw7β transcription by Notch signalling is an essential mechanism that is coupled to and required for the correct specification of cell fates induced by lateral inhibition. PMID:23776410

  1. Unliganded progesterone receptor-mediated targeting of an RNA-containing repressive complex silences a subset of hormone-inducible genes

    PubMed Central

    Vicent, Guillermo Pablo; Nacht, A. Silvina; Zaurin, Roser; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Soronellas, Daniel; Le Dily, Francois; Reyes, Diana; Beato, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    A close chromatin conformation precludes gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Genes activated by external cues have to overcome this repressive state by locally changing chromatin structure to a more open state. Although much is known about hormonal gene activation, how basal repression of regulated genes is targeted to the correct sites throughout the genome is not well understood. Here we report that in breast cancer cells, the unliganded progesterone receptor (PR) binds genomic sites and targets a repressive complex containing HP1γ (heterochromatin protein 1γ), LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1), HDAC1/2, CoREST (corepressor for REST [RE1 {neuronal repressor element 1} silencing transcription factor]), KDM5B, and the RNA SRA (steroid receptor RNA activator) to 20% of hormone-inducible genes, keeping these genes silenced prior to hormone treatment. The complex is anchored via binding of HP1γ to H3K9me3 (histone H3 tails trimethylated on Lys 9). SRA interacts with PR, HP1γ, and LSD1, and its depletion compromises the loading of the repressive complex to target chromatin-promoting aberrant gene derepression. Upon hormonal treatment, the HP1γ–LSD1 complex is displaced from these constitutively poorly expressed genes as a result of rapid phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser 10 mediated by MSK1, which is recruited to the target sites by the activated PR. Displacement of the repressive complex enables the loading of coactivators needed for chromatin remodeling and activation of this set of genes, including genes involved in apoptosis and cell proliferation. These results highlight the importance of the unliganded PR in hormonal regulation of breast cancer cells. PMID:23699411

  2. PTHrP(1-34)-mediated repression of the PHEX gene in osteoblastic cells involves the transcriptional repressor E4BP4.

    PubMed

    Pellicelli, Martin; Taheri, Maryam; St-Louis, Mathieu; Bériault, Véronique; Desgroseillers, Luc; Boileau, Guy; Moreau, Alain

    2012-06-01

    PHosphate-regulating gene with homology to Endopeptidase on the X chromosome (PHEX) has been identified as the gene mutated in X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) syndrome, the most prevalent form of rickets in humans. The predominant expression of PHEX in bones and teeth, and the defective mineralization of these tissues in XLH patients indicate that PHEX is an important regulator of mineralization. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) are known to regulate the expression of numerous genes in osteoblastic cells through activation of the protein kinase A pathway, including repression of PHEX. PTH also activates the transcriptional repressor E4BP4 through the same pathway, suggesting that PTH or PTHrP-mediated repression of PHEX expression could involve E4BP4. To evaluate this possibility, we treated UMR-106 osteoblastic cells with PTHrP(1-34), and used RT-PCR and immunoblotting to analyze PHEX and E4BP4 expression. E4BP4 mRNA and protein levels were rapidly increased in cells treated with PTHrP(1-34), with a concomitant decrease in PHEX expression. This downregulation of PHEX could be reproduced by overexpression of E4BP4. Moreover, PTHrP(1-34)-mediated PHEX repression was blocked when cells were transfected with a siRNA targeting E4BP4 mRNA. Finally, DNA pull-down and luciferase assays showed that two E4BP4 response elements located in PHEX promoter were functional. These results underline the important role of E4BP4 in osteoblastic cells and further define the repression mechanism of PHEX gene by PTHrP(1-34). PMID:21826652

  3. Beyond the classic eicosanoids: Peripherally-acting oxygenated metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids mediate pain associated with tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Haim; Singer, Pierre; Ariel, Amiram

    2016-08-01

    Pain is a complex sensation that may be protective or cause undue suffering and loss of function, depending on the circumstances. Peripheral nociceptor neurons (PNs) innervate most tissues, and express ion channels, nocisensors, which depolarize the cell in response to intense stimuli and numerous substances. Inflamed tissues manifest inflammatory hyperalgesia in which the threshold for pain and the response to painful stimuli are decreased and increased, respectively. Constituents of the inflammatory milieu sensitize PNs, thereby contributing to hyperalgesia. Polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo enzymatic and free radical-mediated oxygenation into an array of bioactive metabolites, oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids (oxy-PUFAs), including the classic eicosanoids. Oxy-PUFA production is enhanced during inflammation. Pioneering studies by Vane and colleagues from the early 1970s first implicated classic eicosanoids in the pain associated with inflammation. Here, we review the production and action of oxy-PUFAs that are not classic eicosanoids, but nevertheless are produced in injured/ inflamed tissues and activate or sensitize PNs. In general, oxy-PUFAs that sensitize PNs may do so directly, by activation of nocisensors, ion channels or GPCRs expressed on the surface of PNs, or indirectly, by increasing the production of inflammatory mediators that activate or sensitize PNs. We focus on oxy-PUFAs that act directly on PNs. Specifically, we discuss the role of arachidonic acid-derived 12S-HpETE, HNE, ONE, PGA2, iso-PGA2 and 15d-PGJ2, 5,6-and 8,9-EET, PGE2-G and 8R,15S-diHETE, as well as the linoleic acid-derived 9-and 13-HODE in inducing acute nocifensive behavior and/or inflammatory hyperalgesia in rodents. The nocisensors TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPA1, and putative Gαs-type GPCRs are the PN targets of these oxy-PUFAs. PMID:27067460

  4. NuRD mediates activating and repressive functions of GATA-1 and FOG-1 during blood development

    PubMed Central

    Miccio, Annarita; Wang, Yuhuan; Hong, Wei; Gregory, Gregory D; Wang, Hongxin; Yu, Xiang; Choi, John K; Shelat, Suresh; Tong, Wei; Poncz, Mortimer; Blobel, Gerd A

    2010-01-01

    GATA transcription factors interact with FOG proteins to regulate tissue development by activating and repressing transcription. FOG-1 (ZFPM1), a co-factor for the haematopoietic factor GATA-1, binds to the NuRD co-repressor complex through a conserved N-terminal motif. Surprisingly, we detected NuRD components at both repressed and active GATA-1/FOG-1 target genes in vivo. In addition, while NuRD is required for transcriptional repression in certain contexts, we show a direct requirement of NuRD also for FOG-1-dependent transcriptional activation. Mice in which the FOG-1/NuRD interaction is disrupted display defects similar to germline mutations in the Gata1 and Fog1 genes, including anaemia and macrothrombocytopaenia. Gene expression analysis in primary mutant erythroid cells and megakaryocytes (MKs) revealed an essential function for NuRD during both the repression and activation of select GATA-1/FOG-1 target genes. These results show that NuRD is a critical co-factor for FOG-1 and underscore the versatile use of NuRD by lineage-specific transcription factors to activate and repress gene transcription in the appropriate cellular and genetic context. PMID:19927129

  5. FMRP regulates miR196a-mediated repression of HOXB8 via interaction with the AGO2 MID domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Li-rong; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2014-07-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the loss of expression of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a selective RNA-binding protein that negatively regulates mRNA substrates. FMRP can regulate the translation via the cross-talk with the miRNA machinery, but the functional association among FMRP, miRNAs and mutual target mRNAs has rarely been studied. In this research, we find that HOXB8 mRNA is a target of FMRP associated with miR-196a-induced silencing, and discover that phosphorylation of FMRP promotes the miR-196a-mediated repression of HOXB8 without affecting the interaction between FMRP and mRNA. We further identify that the FMRP-binding site involved in the miR-196a-mediated repression of HOXB8 locates in the downstream neighbourhood of the miR-196a recognition element in the 3'UTR of HOXB8. Importantly, we reveal that FMRP faces toward the MID domain of AGO2 and interacts with a specific binding pocket (coordination with T544, K533 and K570) in the domain. Our research might provide new insights into both the cross-talk between FMRP and miRNA-mediated regulation of mRNA translation and the molecular pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:24727796

  6. The catenin p120{sup ctn} inhibits Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the {beta}-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Christopher M.; Kelly, Kevin F.; O'Kelly, Ita; Graham, Monica; Crawford, Howard C.; Daniel, Juliet M. . E-mail: danielj@mcmaster.ca

    2005-05-01

    The POZ-zinc finger transcription factor Kaiso was first identified as a specific binding partner for the Armadillo catenin and cell adhesion cofactor, p120{sup ctn}. Kaiso is a unique POZ protein with bi-modal DNA-binding properties; it associates with a sequence-specific DNA consensus Kaiso binding site (KBS) or methylated CpG dinucleotides, and regulates transcription of artificial promoters containing either site. Interestingly, the promoter of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin possesses two conserved copies of the KBS, which suggested that Kaiso might regulate matrilysin expression. In this study, we demonstrate using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that Kaiso associates with the matrilysin promoter in vivo. Minimal promoter assays further confirmed that Kaiso specifically repressed transcription of the matrilysin promoter; mutation of the KBS element or RNAi-mediated depletion of Kaiso abrogated this effect. More importantly, Kaiso blocked {beta}-catenin-mediated activation of the matrilysin promoter. Consistent with our previous findings, both Kaiso-DNA binding and Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the matrilysin promoter were inhibited by overexpression of wild-type p120{sup ctn}, but not by a p120{sup ctn} mutant exhibiting impaired nuclear import. Collectively, our data establish Kaiso as a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of the matrilysin promoter, and suggest that p120{sup ctn} and {beta}-catenin act in a synergistic manner, via distinct mechanisms, to activate matrilysin expression.

  7. Small molecule/ML327 mediated transcriptional de-repression of E-cadherin and inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    An, Hanbing; Stoops, Sydney L.; Deane, Natasha G.; Zhu, Jing; Zi, Jinghuan; Weaver, Connie; Waterson, Alex G.; Zijlstra, Andries; Lindsley, Craig W.; Beauchamp, Robert Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional repression of E-cadherin is a hallmark of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Understanding the mechanisms underlying E-cadherin repression during EMT may provide insights into the development of novel targeted therapeutics for cancer. Here, we report on the chemical probe, ML327, which de-represses E-cadherin transcription, partially reverses EMT, and inhibits cancer cell invasiveness and tumor cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Induction of E-cadherin mRNA expression by ML327 treatment does not require de novo protein synthesis. RNA sequencing analysis revealed that ML327 treatment significantly alters expression of over 2,500 genes within three hours in the presence of the translational inhibitor, cycloheximide. Network analysis reveals Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) as the most significant upstream transcriptional regulator of multiple genes whose expressions were altered by ML327 treatment. Further, small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of HNF4α markedly attenuates the E-cadherin expression response to ML327. In summary, ML327 represents a valuable tool to understand mechanisms of EMT and may provide the basis for a novel targeted therapeutic strategy for carcinomas. PMID:26082441

  8. Interferon-γ Induces Major Histocompatibility Class II Transactivator (CIITA) That Mediates Collagen Repression and Major Histocompatibility Class II Activation by Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Butticè, Giovanna; Miller, Janice; Wang, Lin; Smith, Barbara D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis is responsible for plaque instability through alterations in extracellular matrix. Previously, we demonstrated that major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) transactivator (CIITA) in a complex with regulatory factor for X box 5 (RFX5) is a crucial protein mediating interferon (IFN)-γ–induced repression of collagen type I gene transcription in fibroblasts. This article demonstrates that, in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), IFN-γ dramatically increases the expression of CIITA isoforms III and IV, with no increase in expression of CIITA isoform I. Expression of CIITA III and IV correlates with decreased collagen type I and increased MHC II gene expression. Exogenous expression of CIITA I, III, and IV, in transiently transfected SMCs, represses collagen type I promoters (COL1A1 and COL1A2) and activates MHC II promoter. Levels of CIITA and RFX5 increase in the nucleus of cells treated with IFN-γ. Moreover, simvastatin lowers the IFN-γ–induced expression of RFX5 and MHC II in addition to repressing collagen expression. However, simvastatin does not block the IFN-γ–induced expression of CIITA III and IV, suggesting a CIITA-independent mechanism. This first demonstration that RFX5 and CIITA isoforms are expressed in SMCs after IFN-γ stimulation suggest that CIITA could be a key factor in plaque stability in atherosclerosis. PMID:16439692

  9. Stromelysin-3 induction and interstitial collagenase repression by retinoic acid. Therapeutical implication of receptor-selective retinoids dissociating transactivation and AP-1-mediated transrepression.

    PubMed

    Guérin, E; Ludwig, M G; Basset, P; Anglard, P

    1997-04-25

    Human stromelysin-3 and interstitial collagenase are matrix metalloproteinases whose expression by stromal cells in several types of carcinomas has been associated with cancer progression. We compared here the regulation of the expression of both proteinases by retinoids in human fibroblasts. Physiological concentrations of retinoic acid were found to simultaneously induce stromelysin-3 and repress interstitial collagenase. In both cases, the involvement of a transcriptional mechanism was supported by run-on assays. Furthermore, in transient transfection experiments, the activity of the stromelysin-3 promoter was induced by retinoic acid through endogenous receptors acting on a DR1 retinoic acid-responsive element. The ligand-dependent activation of the receptors was also investigated by using selective synthetic retinoids, and we demonstrated that retinoic acid-retinoid X receptor heterodimers were the most potent functional units controlling both stromelysin-3 induction and interstitial collagenase repression. However, specific retinoids dissociating the transactivation and the AP-1-mediated transrepression functions of the receptors were found to repress interstitial collagenase without inducing stromelysin-3. These findings indicate that such retinoids may represent efficient inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase expression in the treatment of human carcinomas. PMID:9111003

  10. Dot1a-AF9 Complex Mediates Histone H3 Lys-79 Hypermethylation and Repression of ENaCα in an Aldosterone-sensitive Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenzheng; Xia, Xuefeng; Reisenauer, Mary Rose; Hemenway, Charles S.; Kone, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone is a major regulator of epithelial Na+ absorption and acts in large part through induction of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) gene in the renal collecting duct. We previously identified Dot1a as an aldosterone early repressed gene and a repressor of ENaCα transcription through mediating histone H3 Lys-79 methylation associated with the ENaCα promoter. Here, we report a novel aldosterone-signaling network involving AF9, Dot1a, and ENaCα. AF9 and Dot1a interact in vitro and in vivo as evidenced in multiple assays and colocalize in the nuclei of mIMCD3 renal collecting duct cells. Overexpression of AF9 results in hypermethylation of histone H3 Lys-79 at the endogenous ENaCα promoter at most, but not all subregions examined, repression of endogenous ENaCα mRNA expression and acts synergistically with Dot1a to inhibit ENaCα promoter-luciferase constructs. In contrast, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of AF9 causes the opposite effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal that overexpressed FLAG-AF9, endogenous AF9, and Dot1a are each associated with the ENaCα promoter. Aldosterone negatively regulates AF9 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Thus, Dot1a-AF9 modulates histone H3 Lys-79 methylation at the ENaCα promoter and represses ENaCα transcription in an aldosterone-sensitive manner. This mechanism appears to be more broadly applicable to other aldosterone-regulated genes because overexpression of AF9 alone or in combination with Dot1a inhibited mRNA levels of three other known aldosterone-inducible genes in mIMCD3 cells. PMID:16636056

  11. Analysis of Bacillus subtilis hut operon expression indicates that histidine-dependent induction is mediated primarily by transcriptional antitermination and that amino acid repression is mediated by two mechanisms: regulation of transcription initiation and inhibition of histidine transport.

    PubMed Central

    Wray, L V; Fisher, S H

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis hut operon is induced by histidine and subject to regulation by carbon catabolite repression and amino acid repression. A set of hut-lacZ transcriptional fusions was constructed and used to identify the cis-acting sites required for histidine induction and amino acid repression. Histidine induction was found to be primarily mediated by transcriptional antitermination at a palindromic sequence located immediately downstream of the first structural gene in the hut operon, hutP. High levels of histidine induction were observed only in hut-lacZ fusions which contained this palindromic sequence. The hutC1 mutation, which results in constitutive expression of the hut operon, was sequenced and found to contain a GC to TA transversion located within the stem-loop structure. Transcription of hut DNA in vitro revealed that the palindromic structure functions as a transcriptional terminator with wild-type hut DNA but not with hutC1 DNA. Two sites were found to be involved in amino acid repression of hut expression: (i) an operator, hutOA, which lies downstream of the hut promoter, and (ii) the hut terminator. The rate of [14C]histidine uptake in amino acid-grown cells was sixfold lower than that seen in cells grown without amino acids. Thus, inhibition of histidine transport in amino acid-grown cells indirectly regulates hut expression by interfering with histidine induction at the hut terminator. Images PMID:8071225

  12. Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1 mediates repression of the MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) type IV promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Hudson, John A.; Bolick, Sophia C.; Wright, Kenneth L.; Piskurich, Janet F.

    2006-01-01

    MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), a co-activator that controls MHC class II (MHC II) transcription, functions as the master regulator of MHC II expression. Persistent activity of the CIITA type III promoter (pIII), one of the four potential promoters of this gene, is responsible for constitutive expression of MHC II by B lymphocytes. In addition, IFN-γ induces expression of CIITA in these cells through the type IV promoter (pIV). Positive regulatory domain 1-binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), called B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) in mice, represses the expression of CIITA pIII in plasma and multiple myeloma cells. To investigate regulation of CIITA pIV expression by PRDI-BF1 in the B lymphocyte lineage, protein/DNA binding studies, and functional promoter analyses were performed. PRDI-BF1 bound to the IRF-E site in CIITA pIV. Ectopic expression of either PRDI-BF1 or Blimp-1 repressed this promoter in B lymphocytes. In vitro binding and functional analyses of CIITA pIV demonstrated that the IFN regulatory factor-element (IRF-E) is the target of this repression. In vivo genomic footprint analysis demonstrated protein binding at the IRF-E site of CIITA pIV in U266 myeloma cells, which express PRDI-BF1. PRDI-BF1β, a truncated form of PRDI-BF1 that is co-expressed in myeloma cells, also bound to the IRF-E site and repressed CIITA pIV. These findings demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to silencing expression of CIITA pIII in B lymphocytes, PRDI-BF1 is capable of binding and suppressing CIITA pIV. PMID:16765445

  13. MeCP2-Mediated Transcription Repression in the Basolateral Amygdala May Underlie Heightened Anxiety in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Megumi; Autry, Anita E.; Covington, Herb E.; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Using viral-mediated basolateral amygdala (BLA)-specific deletion of Mecp2 in mice, we show that intact Mecp2 function is required for normal anxiety behavior as well as some types of learning and memory. To examine whether these behavioral deficits are the result of impaired transcriptional repression, because Mecp2 is believed to act as a transcriptional repressor in complex with histone deacetylases (HDACs), we infused a HDAC inhibitor chronically into the BLA of wild-type mice. We found that HDAC inhibition produces behavioral deficits similar to those observed after the deletion of Mecp2 in the BLA. These results suggest a key role for Mecp2 as a transcriptional repressor in the BLA in mediating behavioral features of RTT. PMID:19339616

  14. Myc Inhibits p27-Induced Erythroid Differentiation of Leukemia Cells by Repressing Erythroid Master Genes without Reversing p27-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Juan C.; Ferrándiz, Nuria; Bretones, Gabriel; Torrano, Verónica; Blanco, Rosa; Richard, Carlos; O'Connell, Brenda; Sedivy, John; Delgado, M. Dolores; León, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of differentiation has been proposed as an important mechanism for Myc-induced tumorigenesis, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. We have established a genetically defined differentiation model in human leukemia K562 cells by conditional expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 (inducible by Zn2+) and Myc (activatable by 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen). Induction of p27 resulted in erythroid differentiation, accompanied by Cdk inhibition and G1 arrest. Interestingly, activation of Myc inhibited p27-mediated erythroid differentiation without affecting p27-mediated proliferation arrest. Microarray-based gene expression indicated that, in the presence of p27, Myc blocked the upregulation of several erythroid-cell-specific genes, including NFE2, JUNB, and GATA1 (transcription factors with a pivotal role in erythropoiesis). Moreover, Myc also blocked the upregulation of Mad1, a transcriptional antagonist of Myc that is able to induce erythroid differentiation. Cotransfection experiments demonstrated that Myc-mediated inhibition of differentiation is partly dependent on the repression of Mad1 and GATA1. In conclusion, this model demonstrates that Myc-mediated inhibition of differentiation depends on the regulation of a specific gene program, whereas it is independent of p27-mediated cell cycle arrest. Our results support the hypothesis that differentiation inhibition is an important Myc tumorigenic mechanism that is independent of cell proliferation. PMID:18838534

  15. Myc inhibits p27-induced erythroid differentiation of leukemia cells by repressing erythroid master genes without reversing p27-mediated cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Juan C; Ferrándiz, Nuria; Bretones, Gabriel; Torrano, Verónica; Blanco, Rosa; Richard, Carlos; O'Connell, Brenda; Sedivy, John; Delgado, M Dolores; León, Javier

    2008-12-01

    Inhibition of differentiation has been proposed as an important mechanism for Myc-induced tumorigenesis, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. We have established a genetically defined differentiation model in human leukemia K562 cells by conditional expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 (inducible by Zn(2+)) and Myc (activatable by 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen). Induction of p27 resulted in erythroid differentiation, accompanied by Cdk inhibition and G(1) arrest. Interestingly, activation of Myc inhibited p27-mediated erythroid differentiation without affecting p27-mediated proliferation arrest. Microarray-based gene expression indicated that, in the presence of p27, Myc blocked the upregulation of several erythroid-cell-specific genes, including NFE2, JUNB, and GATA1 (transcription factors with a pivotal role in erythropoiesis). Moreover, Myc also blocked the upregulation of Mad1, a transcriptional antagonist of Myc that is able to induce erythroid differentiation. Cotransfection experiments demonstrated that Myc-mediated inhibition of differentiation is partly dependent on the repression of Mad1 and GATA1. In conclusion, this model demonstrates that Myc-mediated inhibition of differentiation depends on the regulation of a specific gene program, whereas it is independent of p27-mediated cell cycle arrest. Our results support the hypothesis that differentiation inhibition is an important Myc tumorigenic mechanism that is independent of cell proliferation. PMID:18838534

  16. RflM mediates target specificity of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system for transcriptional repression of flagellar synthesis in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Caroline; Singer, Hanna M; Grabisch, Eva; Codutti, Luca; Carlomagno, Teresa; Scrima, Andrea; Erhardt, Marc

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial flagellum enables directed movement of Salmonella enterica towards favorable conditions in liquid environments. Regulation of flagellar synthesis is tightly controlled by various environmental signals at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The flagellar master regulator FlhD4 C2 resides on top of the flagellar transcriptional hierarchy and is under autogenous control by FlhD4 C2 -dependent activation of the repressor rflM. The inhibitory activity of RflM depends on the presence of RcsB, the response regulator of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system. In this study, we elucidated the molecular mechanism of RflM-dependent repression of flhDC. We show that RcsB and RflM form a heterodimer that coordinately represses flhDC transcription independent of RcsB phosphorylation. RcsB-RflM complex binds to a RcsB box downstream the P1 transcriptional start site of the flhDC promoter with increased affinity compared to RcsB in the absence of RflM. We propose that RflM stabilizes binding of unphosphorylated RcsB to the flhDC promoter in absence of environmental cues. Thus, RflM is a novel auxiliary regulatory protein that mediates target specificity of RcsB for flhDC repression. The cooperative action of the RcsB-RflM repressor complex allows Salmonella to fine-tune initiation of flagellar gene expression and adds another level to the complex regulation of flagellar synthesis. PMID:27206164

  17. Role of GlnR in Acid-Mediated Repression of Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Glutamine and Glutamate Metabolism in Streptococcus mutans▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chen , Pei-Min; Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Yu, Sung-Liang; Sher, Singh; Lai, Chern-Hsiung; Chia, Jean-San

    2010-01-01

    The acid tolerance response (ATR) is one of the major virulence traits of Streptococcus mutans. In this study, the role of GlnR in acid-mediated gene repression that affects the adaptive ATR in S. mutans was investigated. Using a whole-genome microarray and in silico analyses, we demonstrated that GlnR and the GlnR box (ATGTNAN7TNACAT) were involved in the transcriptional repression of clusters of genes encoding proteins involved in glutamine and glutamate metabolism under acidic challenge. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the coordinated regulation of the GlnR regulon occurred 5 min after acid treatment and that prolonged acid exposure (30 min) resulted in further reduction in expression. A lower level but consistent reduction in response to acidic pH was also observed in chemostat-grown cells, confirming the negative regulation of GlnR. The repression by GlnR through the GlnR box in response to acidic pH was further confirmed in the citBZC operon, containing genes encoding the first three enzymes in the glutamine/glutamate biosynthesis pathway. The survival rate of the GlnR-deficient mutant at pH 2.8 was more than 10-fold lower than that in the wild-type strain 45 min after acid treatment, suggesting that the GlnR regulon participates in S. mutans ATR. It is hypothesized that downregulation of the synthesis of the amino acid precursors in response to acid challenge would promote citrate metabolism to pyruvate, with the consumption of H+ and potential ATP synthesis. Such regulation will ensure an optimal acid adaption in S. mutans. PMID:20173059

  18. HESX1- and TCF3-mediated repression of Wnt/β-catenin targets is required for normal development of the anterior forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Andoniadou, Cynthia L.; Signore, Massimo; Young, Rodrigo M.; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Wilson, Stephen W.; Fuchs, Elaine; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an essential role during regionalisation of the vertebrate neural plate and its inhibition in the most anterior neural ectoderm is required for normal forebrain development. Hesx1 is a conserved vertebrate-specific transcription factor that is required for forebrain development in Xenopus, mice and humans. Mouse embryos deficient for Hesx1 exhibit a variable degree of forebrain defects, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that injection of a hesx1 morpholino into a ‘sensitised’ zygotic headless (tcf3) mutant background leads to severe forebrain and eye defects, suggesting an interaction between Hesx1 and the Wnt pathway during zebrafish forebrain development. Consistent with a requirement for Wnt signalling repression, we highlight a synergistic gene dosage-dependent interaction between Hesx1 and Tcf3, a transcriptional repressor of Wnt target genes, to maintain anterior forebrain identity during mouse embryogenesis. In addition, we reveal that Tcf3 is essential within the neural ectoderm to maintain anterior character and that its interaction with Hesx1 ensures the repression of Wnt targets in the developing forebrain. By employing a conditional loss-of-function approach in mouse, we demonstrate that deletion of β-catenin, and concomitant reduction of Wnt signalling in the developing anterior forebrain of Hesx1-deficient embryos, leads to a significant rescue of the forebrain defects. Finally, transcriptional profiling of anterior forebrain precursors from mouse embryos expressing eGFP from the Hesx1 locus provides molecular evidence supporting a novel function of Hesx1 in mediating repression of Wnt/β-catenin target activation in the developing forebrain. PMID:22007134

  19. Akt1-mediated Gata3 phosphorylation controls the repression of IFNγ in memory-type Th2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Endo, Yusuke; Kato, Miki; Shinoda, Kenta; Suzuki, Akane; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cells produce Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, but repress Th1 cytokine IFNγ. Recent studies have revealed various distinct memory-type Th2 cell subsets, one of which produces a substantial amount of IFNγ in addition to Th2 cytokines, however it remains unclear precisely how these Th2 cells produce IFNγ. We herein show that phosphorylation of Gata3 at Ser308, Thr315 and Ser316 induces dissociation of a histone deacetylase Hdac2 from the Gata3/Chd4 repressive complex in Th2 cells. We also identify Akt1 as a Gata3-phosphorylating kinase, and the activation of Akt1 induces derepression of Tbx21 and Ifng expression in Th2 cells. Moreover, T-bet-dependent IFNγ expression in IFNγ-producing memory Th2 cells appears to be controlled by the phosphorylation status of Gata3 in human and murine systems. Thus, this study highlights the molecular basis for posttranslational modifications of Gata3 that control the regulation of IFNγ expression in memory Th2 cells. PMID:27053161

  20. Akt1-mediated Gata3 phosphorylation controls the repression of IFNγ in memory-type Th2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Endo, Yusuke; Kato, Miki; Shinoda, Kenta; Suzuki, Akane; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cells produce Th2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, but repress Th1 cytokine IFNγ. Recent studies have revealed various distinct memory-type Th2 cell subsets, one of which produces a substantial amount of IFNγ in addition to Th2 cytokines, however it remains unclear precisely how these Th2 cells produce IFNγ. We herein show that phosphorylation of Gata3 at Ser308, Thr315 and Ser316 induces dissociation of a histone deacetylase Hdac2 from the Gata3/Chd4 repressive complex in Th2 cells. We also identify Akt1 as a Gata3-phosphorylating kinase, and the activation of Akt1 induces derepression of Tbx21 and Ifng expression in Th2 cells. Moreover, T-bet-dependent IFNγ expression in IFNγ-producing memory Th2 cells appears to be controlled by the phosphorylation status of Gata3 in human and murine systems. Thus, this study highlights the molecular basis for posttranslational modifications of Gata3 that control the regulation of IFNγ expression in memory Th2 cells. PMID:27053161

  1. Pro Isomerization in MLL1 PHD3-Bromo Cassette Connects H3K4me Readout to CyP33 and HDAC-Mediated Repression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhanxin; Song, Jikui; Milne, Thomas A.; Wang, Gang G.; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2010-09-13

    The MLL1 gene is a frequent target for recurrent chromosomal translocations, resulting in transformation of hematopoietic precursors into leukemia stem cells. Here, we report on structure-function studies that elucidate molecular events in MLL1 binding of histone H3K4me3/2 marks and recruitment of the cyclophilin CyP33. CyP33 contains a PPIase and a RRM domain and regulates MLL1 function through HDAC recruitment. We find that the PPIase domain of CyP33 regulates the conformation of MLL1 through proline isomerization within the PHD3-Bromo linker, thereby disrupting the PHD3-Bromo interface and facilitating binding of the MLL1-PHD3 domain to the CyP33-RRM domain. H3K4me3/2 and CyP33-RRM target different surfaces of MLL1-PHD3 and can bind simultaneously to form a ternary complex. Furthermore, the MLL1-CyP33 interaction is required for repression of HOXA9 and HOXC8 genes in vivo. Our results highlight the role of PHD3-Bromo cassette as a regulatory platform, orchestrating MLL1 binding of H3K4me3/2 marks and cyclophilin-mediated repression through HDAC recruitment.

  2. Specific contacts of the −35 region of the galP1 promoter by RNA polymerase inhibit GalR-mediated DNA looping repression

    PubMed Central

    Csiszovszki, Zsolt; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Le, Phuoc; Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2012-01-01

    The P1 promoter of the galactose operon in Escherichia coli is one of the best studied examples of ‘extended −10’ promoters. Recognition of the P1 promoter does not require specific contacts between RNA polymerase and its poor −35 element. To investigate whether specific recognition of the −35 element would affect the regulation of P1 by GalR, we mutagenized the −35 element of P1, isolated variants of the −35 element and studied the regulation of the mutant promoters by in vitro transcription assays and by mathematical modeling. The results show that the GalR-mediated DNA loop is less efficient in repressing P1 transcription when RNA polymerase binds to the −10 and −35 elements concomitantly. Our results suggest that promoters that lack specific −35 element recognition allow decoupling of local chromosome structure from transcription initiation. PMID:22941635

  3. Specific contacts of the -35 region of the galP1 promoter by RNA polymerase inhibit GalR-mediated DNA looping repression.

    PubMed

    Csiszovszki, Zsolt; Lewis, Dale E A; Le, Phuoc; Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2012-11-01

    The P1 promoter of the galactose operon in Escherichia coli is one of the best studied examples of 'extended -10' promoters. Recognition of the P1 promoter does not require specific contacts between RNA polymerase and its poor -35 element. To investigate whether specific recognition of the -35 element would affect the regulation of P1 by GalR, we mutagenized the -35 element of P1, isolated variants of the -35 element and studied the regulation of the mutant promoters by in vitro transcription assays and by mathematical modeling. The results show that the GalR-mediated DNA loop is less efficient in repressing P1 transcription when RNA polymerase binds to the -10 and -35 elements concomitantly. Our results suggest that promoters that lack specific -35 element recognition allow decoupling of local chromosome structure from transcription initiation. PMID:22941635

  4. Activated Nrf2 Interacts with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Protein LANA-1 and Host Protein KAP1 To Mediate Global Lytic Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Gjyshi, Olsi; Roy, Arunava; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. We have previously shown that KSHV utilizes the host transcription factor Nrf2 to aid in infection of endothelial cells and oncogenesis. Here, we investigate the role of Nrf2 in PEL and PEL-derived cell lines and show that KSHV latency induces Nrf2 protein levels and transcriptional activity through the COX-2/PGE2/EP4/PKCζ axis. Next-generation sequencing of KSHV transcripts in the PEL-derived BCBL-1 cell line revealed that knockdown of this activated Nrf2 results in global elevation of lytic genes. Nrf2 inhibition by the chemical brusatol also induces lytic gene expression. Both Nrf2 knockdown and brusatol-mediated inhibition induced KSHV lytic reactivation in BCBL-1 cells. In a series of follow-up experiments, we characterized the mechanism of Nrf2-mediated regulation of KSHV lytic repression during latency. Biochemical assays showed that Nrf2 interacted with KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA-1) and the host transcriptional repressor KAP1, which together have been shown to repress lytic gene expression. Promoter studies showed that although Nrf2 alone induces the open reading frame 50 (ORF50) promoter, its association with LANA-1 and KAP1 abrogates this effect. Interestingly, LANA-1 is crucial for efficient KAP1/Nrf2 association, while Nrf2 is essential for LANA-1 and KAP1 recruitment to the ORF50 promoter and its repression. Overall, these results suggest that activated Nrf2, LANA-1, and KAP1 assemble on the ORF50 promoter in a temporal fashion. Initially, Nrf2 binds to and activates the ORF50 promoter during early de novo infection, an effect that is exploited during latency by LANA-1-mediated recruitment of the host transcriptional repressor KAP1 on Nrf2. Cell death assays further showed that Nrf2 and KAP1 knockdown induce significant cell death in PEL cell lines

  5. miR-146b-5p mediates p16-dependent repression of IL-6 and suppresses paracrine procarcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Mysoon M.; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence support the critical roles of active stromal fibroblasts in breast cancer development and spread. However, the mediators and the mechanisms of regulation are still not well defined. We have shown here that the tumor suppressor p16INK4A protein inhibits the pro-carcinogenic effects of breast stromal fibroblasts through repressing the expression/secretion of IL-6. Indeed, p16INK4A suppresses IL-6 at the mRNA and protein levels. This effect is mediated trough miR-146b-5p, which inhibits IL-6 expression through a specific sequence at the IL-6 3′UTR. In addition, we present clear evidence that miR-146b-5p inhibition is sufficient to transactivate breast stromal fibroblasts, which promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition in breast cancer cells in a paracrine manner. By contrast, ectopic expression of miR-146b-5p in active fibroblasts abrogated their pro-carcinogenic effects. The physiological importance of miR-146b-5p inhibition was revealed by showing that the levels of pre-miR-146b-5p as well as its mature form are reduced in cancer-associated fibroblasts as compared with their normal adjacent counterparts from cancer-free tissues isolated from the same patients. Interestingly, treatment of active breast stromal fibroblasts with curcumin increased the level of the p16INK4A coding CDKN2A mRNA and miR-146b-5p and suppressed IL-6, which confirms the repressive effect of these two tumor suppressor molecules on IL-6, and shows the possible “normalization” of cancer-related active fibroblasts. These results show that miR-146b-5p has non-cell-autonomous tumor suppressor function through inhibition of IL-6, suggesting that targeting this microRNA in breast stromal fibroblasts could be of great therapeutic value. PMID:26338965

  6. Pronephric tubule morphogenesis in zebrafish depends on Mnx mediated repression of irx1b within the intermediate mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Ott, Elisabeth; Wendik, Björn; Srivastava, Monika; Pacho, Frederic; Töchterle, Sonja; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor MNX1 are the major cause of dominantly inherited sacral agenesis. Studies in model organisms revealed conserved mnx gene requirements in neuronal and pancreatic development while Mnx activities that could explain the caudal mesoderm specific agenesis phenotype remain elusive. Here we use the zebrafish pronephros as a simple yet genetically conserved model for kidney formation to uncover a novel role of Mnx factors in nephron morphogenesis. Pronephros formation can formally be divided in four stages, the specification of nephric mesoderm from the intermediate mesoderm (IM), growth and epithelialisation, segmentation and formation of the glomerular capillary tuft. Two of the three mnx genes in zebrafish are dynamically transcribed in caudal IM in a time window that proceeds segmentation. We show that expression of one mnx gene, mnx2b, is restricted to the pronephric lineage and that mnx2b knock-down causes proximal pronephric tubule dilation and impaired pronephric excretion. Using expression profiling of embryos transgenic for conditional activation and repression of Mnx regulated genes, we further identified irx1b as a direct target of Mnx factors. Consistent with a repression of irx1b by Mnx factors, the transcripts of irx1b and mnx genes are found in mutual exclusive regions in the IM, and blocking of Mnx functions results in a caudal expansion of the IM-specific irx1b expression. Finally, we find that knock-down of irx1b is sufficient to rescue proximal pronephric tubule dilation and impaired nephron function in mnx-morpholino injected embryos. Our data revealed a first caudal mesoderm specific requirement of Mnx factors in a non-human system and they demonstrate that Mnx-dependent restriction of IM-specific irx1b activation is required for the morphogenesis and function of the zebrafish pronephros. PMID:26472045

  7. Benzoate Mediates Repression of C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in “Aromatoleum aromaticum” EbN1

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Kathleen; Grundmann, Olav; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Eberlein, Christian; Boll, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Diauxic growth was observed in anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate-adapted cells of “Aromatoleum aromaticum” EbN1 due to preferred benzoate utilization from a substrate mixture of a C4-dicarboxylate (succinate, fumarate, or malate) and benzoate. Differential protein profiles (two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis [2D DIGE]) revealed dynamic changes in abundance for proteins involved in anaerobic benzoate catabolism and C4-dicarboxylate uptake. In the first active growth phase, benzoate utilization was paralleled by maximal abundance of proteins involved in anaerobic benzoate degradation (e.g., benzoyl-coenzyme A [CoA] reductase) and minimal abundance of DctP (EbA4158), the periplasmic binding protein of a predicted C4-dicarboxylate tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter (DctPQM). The opposite was observed during subsequent succinate utilization in the second active growth phase. The increased dctP (respectively, dctPQM) transcript and DctP protein abundance following benzoate depletion suggests that repression of C4-dicarboxylate uptake seems to be a main determinant for the observed diauxie. PMID:22081395

  8. CovS simultaneously activates and inhibits the CovR-mediated repression of distinct subsets of group A Streptococcus virulence factor-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Jeanette; Perez, Nataly; Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Liu, Zhuyun; Shelburne, Samuel A; Musser, James M; Sumby, Paul

    2009-08-01

    To colonize and cause disease at distinct anatomical sites, bacterial pathogens must tailor gene expression in a microenvironment-specific manner. The molecular mechanisms that control the ability of the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) to transition between infection sites have yet to be fully elucidated. A key regulator of GAS virulence gene expression is the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system (also known as CsrR-CsrS). covR and covS mutant strains arise spontaneously during invasive infections and, in in vivo models of infection, rapidly become dominant. Here, we compared wild-type GAS with covR, covS, and covRS isogenic mutant strains to investigate the heterogeneity in the types of natural mutations that occur in covR and covS and the phenotypic consequences of covR or covS mutation. We found that the response regulator CovR retains some regulatory function in the absence of CovS and that CovS modulates CovR to significantly enhance repression of one group of genes (e.g., the speA, hasA, and ska genes) while it reduces repression of a second group of genes (e.g., the speB, grab, and spd3 genes). We also found that different in vivo-induced covR mutations can lead to strikingly different transcriptomes. While covS mutant strains show increased virulence in several invasive models of infection, we determined that these mutants are significantly outcompeted by wild-type GAS during growth in human saliva, an ex vivo model of upper respiratory tract infection. We propose that CovS-mediated regulation of CovR activity plays an important role in the ability of GAS to cycle between pharyngeal and invasive infections. PMID:19451242

  9. Characterization of Cellulase Secretion and Cre1-Mediated Carbon Source Repression in the Potential Lignocellulose-Degrading Strain Trichoderma asperellum T-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Lin, Hui; Shen, Qi; Fan, Xiaoping; Bai, Naling; Zhao, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma asperellum, a traditional bio-control species, was demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for lignocellulose degradation in this work. Comparing to the representatively industrial strain of Trichoderma reeseiQM6a, T. asperellum T-1 showed more robust growth, stronger spore production, faster secretion of lignocellulose-decomposing enzymes and better pH tolerance. The reducing sugar released by strain T-1 on the second day of fermentation was 87% higher than that of strain QM6a, although the maximum reducing sugar yield and the cellulase production persistence of the strain T-1 were lower. Our experiment found that the cellulase secretion was strongly inhibited by glucose, suggesting the existence of carbon source repression pathway in T. asperellum T-1. The inhibiting effect was enhanced with an increase in glucose concentration and was closely related to mycelium growth. SDS-PAGE and secondary mass-spectrum identification confirmed that the expression of endo-1,4-β-xylanase I in T. asperellum T-1 was down-regulated when glucose was added. The factor Cre1, which plays an important role in the down-regulation of the endo-1,4-β-xylanase I gene, was investigated by bioinformatics methods. The protein structure of Cre1, analyzed using multiple protein sequence alignment, indicates the existence of the Zn-fingers domain. Then, the binding sites of Cre1 on the endo-1,4-β-xylanase I gene promoter were further elucidated. This study is the first report about Cre1-mediated carbon repression in the bio-control strain T. asperellum T-1. All of the above results provided good references for better understanding T. asperellum T-1 and improving its application for lignocellulose degradation. PMID:25741694

  10. CovS Simultaneously Activates and Inhibits the CovR-Mediated Repression of Distinct Subsets of Group A Streptococcus Virulence Factor-Encoding Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Jeanette; Perez, Nataly; Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Liu, Zhuyun; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Musser, James M.; Sumby, Paul

    2009-01-01

    To colonize and cause disease at distinct anatomical sites, bacterial pathogens must tailor gene expression in a microenvironment-specific manner. The molecular mechanisms that control the ability of the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) to transition between infection sites have yet to be fully elucidated. A key regulator of GAS virulence gene expression is the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system (also known as CsrR-CsrS). covR and covS mutant strains arise spontaneously during invasive infections and, in in vivo models of infection, rapidly become dominant. Here, we compared wild-type GAS with covR, covS, and covRS isogenic mutant strains to investigate the heterogeneity in the types of natural mutations that occur in covR and covS and the phenotypic consequences of covR or covS mutation. We found that the response regulator CovR retains some regulatory function in the absence of CovS and that CovS modulates CovR to significantly enhance repression of one group of genes (e.g., the speA, hasA, and ska genes) while it reduces repression of a second group of genes (e.g., the speB, grab, and spd3 genes). We also found that different in vivo-induced covR mutations can lead to strikingly different transcriptomes. While covS mutant strains show increased virulence in several invasive models of infection, we determined that these mutants are significantly outcompeted by wild-type GAS during growth in human saliva, an ex vivo model of upper respiratory tract infection. We propose that CovS-mediated regulation of CovR activity plays an important role in the ability of GAS to cycle between pharyngeal and invasive infections. PMID:19451242

  11. The Zinc Finger Transcription Factor ZXDC Activates CCL2 Gene Expression by Opposing BCL6-mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Jon E.; Fontes, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The zinc finger X-linked duplicated (ZXD) family of transcription factors has been implicated in regulating transcription of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in antigen presenting cells; roles beyond this function are not yet known. The expression of one gene in this family, ZXD family zinc finger C (ZXDC), is enriched in myeloid lineages and therefore we hypothesized that ZXDC may regulate myeloid-specific gene expression. Here we demonstrate that ZXDC regulates genes involved in myeloid cell differentiation and inflammation. Overexpression of the larger isoform of ZXDC, ZXDC1, activates expression of monocyte-specific markers of differentiation and synergizes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (which causes differentiation) in the human leukemic monoblast cell line U937. To identify additional gene targets of ZXDC1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed multiple inflammatory gene clusters regulated by ZXDC1. Using a combination of approaches we show that ZXDC1 activates transcription of a gene within one of the regulated clusters, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2; monocyte chemoattractant protein 1; MCP1) via a previously defined distal regulatory element. Further, ZXDC1-dependent up-regulation of the gene involves eviction of the transcriptional repressor B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 (BCL6), a factor known to be important in resolving inflammatory responses, from this region of the promoter. Collectively, our data show that ZXDC1 is a regulator in the process of myeloid function and that ZXDC1 is responsible for Ccl2 gene de-repression by BCL6. PMID:23954399

  12. TRIM28 Is an E3 Ligase for ARF-Mediated NPM1/B23 SUMOylation That Represses Centrosome Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Shu Hui; Itahana, Yoko; Alagu, Jennifer; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Lee, Sang Hyun; Tang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor ARF enhances the SUMOylation of target proteins; however, the physiological function of ARF-mediated SUMOylation has been unclear due to the lack of a known, associated E3 SUMO ligase. Here we uncover TRIM28/KAP1 as a novel ARF-binding protein and SUMO E3 ligase for NPM1/B23. ARF and TRIM28 cooperate to SUMOylate NPM1, a nucleolar protein that regulates centrosome duplication and genomic stability. ARF-mediated SUMOylation of NPM1 was attenuated by TRIM28 depletion and enhanced by TRIM28 overexpression. Coexpression of ARF and TRIM28 promoted NPM1 centrosomal localization by enhancing its SUMOylation and suppressed centrosome amplification; these functions required the E3 ligase activity of TRIM28. Conversely, depletion of ARF or TRIM28 increased centrosome amplification. ARF also counteracted oncogenic Ras-induced centrosome amplification. Centrosome amplification is often induced by oncogenic insults, leading to genomic instability. However, the mechanisms employed by tumor suppressors to protect the genome are poorly understood. Our findings suggest a novel role for ARF in maintaining genome integrity by facilitating TRIM28-mediated SUMOylation of NPM1, thus preventing centrosome amplification. PMID:26055329

  13. HuR represses Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity by promoting cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Inae; Hur, Jung; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Wnt signaling as well as β-catenin overexpression enhance HuR cytoplasmic export. • HuR overexpression promotes cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin from the perinuclear fraction. • Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity is repressesed by HuR. - Abstract: β-Catenin is the key transcriptional activator of canonical Wnt signaling in the nucleus; thus, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin is a critical step for expressing target genes. β-Catenin accumulates in the nucleus of cancer cells where it activates oncogenic target genes. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein that regulates multiple post-transcriptional processes including RNA stability. Thus, cytoplasmic HuR protein may be involved in tumorigenesis by stabilizing oncogenic transcripts, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we observed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling induced export of the HuR protein, whereas HuR overexpression promoted accumulation of the β-catenin protein in the cytoplasm. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in the nucleus was reduced by overexpressing HuR. These results suggest novel and uncharacterized cytoplasmic β-catenin functions related to HuR-mediated RNA metabolism in cancer cells.

  14. Salvianolic acid A preconditioning confers protection against concanavalin A-induced liver injury through SIRT1-mediated repression of p66shc in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yan; Zhai, Xiaohan; Lin, Musen; Chen, Zhao; Tian, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Dongyan; Ma, Xiaochi; Lv, Li; Yao, Jihong

    2013-11-15

    Salvianolic acid A (SalA) is a phenolic carboxylic acid derivative extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza. It has many biological and pharmaceutical activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SalA on concanavalin A (ConA)-induced acute hepatic injury in Kunming mice and to explore the role of SIRT1 in such an effect. The results showed that in vivo pretreatment with SalA significantly reduced ConA-induced elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities and decreased levels of the hepatotoxic cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Moreover, the SalA pretreatment ameliorated the increases in NF-κB and in cleaved caspase-3 caused by ConA exposure. Whereas, the pretreatment completely reversed expression of the B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL). More importantly, the SalA pretreatment significantly increased the expression of SIRT1, a NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, which was known to attenuate acute hypoxia damage and metabolic liver diseases. In our study, the increase in SIRT1 was closely associated with down-regulation of the p66 isoform (p66shc) of growth factor adapter Shc at both protein and mRNA levels. In HepG2 cell culture, SalA pretreatment increased SIRT1 expression in a time and dose-dependent manner and such an increase was abrogated by siRNA knockdown of SIRT1. Additionally, inhibition of SIRT1 significantly reversed the decreased expression of p66shc, and attenuated SalA-induced p66shc down-regulation. Collectively, the present study indicated that SalA may be a potent activator of SIRT and that SalA can alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis through SIRT1-mediated repression of the p66shc pathway. - Highlights: • We report for the first time that SalA protects against ConA-induced hepatitis. • We find that SalA is a potential activator of SIRT1. • SalA's protection against hepatitis involves SIRT1-mediated repression of p66shc.

  15. Deacetylase inhibitors repress STAT5-mediated transcription by interfering with bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein function

    PubMed Central

    Pinz, Sophia; Unser, Samy; Buob, Dominik; Fischer, Philipp; Jobst, Belinda; Rascle, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT5 is essential for the regulation of proliferation and survival genes. Its activity is tightly regulated through cytokine signaling and is often upregulated in cancer. We showed previously that the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) inhibits STAT5-mediated transcription by preventing recruitment of the transcriptional machinery at a step following STAT5 binding to DNA. The mechanism and factors involved in this inhibition remain unknown. We now show that deacetylase inhibitors do not target STAT5 acetylation, as we initially hypothesized. Instead, they induce a rapid increase in global histone acetylation apparently resulting in the delocalization of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein Brd2 and of the Brd2-associated factor TBP to hyperacetylated chromatin. Treatment with the BET inhibitor (+)-JQ1 inhibited expression of STAT5 target genes, supporting a role of BET proteins in the regulation of STAT5 activity. Accordingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Brd2 is associated with the transcriptionally active STAT5 target gene Cis and is displaced upon TSA treatment. Our data therefore indicate that Brd2 is required for the proper recruitment of the transcriptional machinery at STAT5 target genes and that deacetylase inhibitors suppress STAT5-mediated transcription by interfering with Brd2 function. PMID:25769527

  16. Small Molecule, NSC95397, Inhibits the CtBP1-Protein Partner Interaction and CtBP1-Mediated Transcriptional Repression.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Melanie A; Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Krueger, Aaron B; King, Rebecca; Griner, Lesley Mathews; Hu, Xin; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J; Zhang, Qinghong; Ferrer, Marc; Zhao, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Carboxyl-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is a transcriptional corepressor that suppresses multiple proapoptotic and epithelial genes. CtBP is overexpressed in many human cancers, and its overexpression increases stem cell-like features, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer cell survival. Knockdown of CtBP also increases apoptosis independent of p53 in cell culture. Therefore, targeting CtBP with small molecules that disrupt its interaction with transcription factor partners may be an effective cancer therapy. To elicit its corepressing effect, CtBP binds to a conserved peptide motif in each transcription factor partner. We developed an AlphaScreen high-throughput screening assay to monitor the interaction between CtBP and E1A (which mimics the interaction between CtBP and its transcriptional partners). We screened the LOPAC library of 1280 bioactive compounds and identified NSC95397, which inhibits the CtBP-E1A interaction (IC50 = 2.9 µM). The inhibitory activity of NSC95397 was confirmed using two secondary assays and a counterscreen. NSC95397 also behaved as a weak substrate of CtBP dehydrogenase activity and did not inhibit another dehydrogenase, lactase dehydrogenase. Finally, NSC95397 was able to disrupt CtBP-mediated transcriptional repression of a target gene. These studies present a new possibility for the development of a therapeutic agent targeting tumors through disrupting the CtBP transcriptional complex. PMID:25477201

  17. CD151-α3β1 integrin complexes suppress ovarian tumor growth by repressing slug-mediated EMT and canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Lauren A; Hoff, John T; Lefringhouse, Jason; Zhang, Michael; Jia, Changhe; Liu, Zeyi; Erfani, Sonia; Jin, Hongyan; Xu, Mei; She, Qing-Bai; van Nagell, John R; Wang, Chi; Chen, Li; Plattner, Rina; Kaetzel, David M; Luo, Jia; Lu, Michael; West, Dava; Liu, Chunming; Ueland, Fred R; Drapkin, Ronny; Zhou, Binhua P; Yang, Xiuwei H

    2014-12-15

    Human ovarian cancer is diagnosed in the late, metastatic stages but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We report a surprising functional link between CD151-α3β1 integrin complexes and the malignancy of serous-type ovarian cancer. Analyses of clinical specimens indicate that CD151 expression is significantly reduced or diminished in 90% of metastatic lesions, while it remains detectable in 58% of primary tumors. These observations suggest a putative tumor-suppressing role of CD151 in ovarian cancer. Indeed, our analyses show that knocking down CD151 or α3 integrin enhances tumor cell proliferation, growth and ascites production in nude mice. These changes are accompanied by impaired cell-cell contacts and aberrant expression of E-cadherin, Mucin 5AC and fibronectin, largely reminiscent of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like change. Importantly, Slug, a master regulator of EMT, is markedly elevated. Knocking down Slug partially restores CD151-α3β1 integrin complex-dependent suppression of cell proliferation. Moreover, disruption of these adhesion protein complexes is accompanied by a concomitant activation of canonical Wnt signaling, including elevated levels of β-catenin and Axin-2 as well as resistance to the inhibition in β-catenin-dependent transcriptional complexes. Together, our study demonstrates that CD151-α3β1 integrin complexes regulate ovarian tumor growth by repressing Slug-mediated EMT and Wnt signaling. PMID:25356755

  18. CD151-α3β1 integrin complexes suppress ovarian tumor growth by repressing slug-mediated EMT and canonical Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Michael; Jia, Changhe; Liu, Zeyi; Erfani, Sonia; Jin, Hongyan; Xu, Mei; She, Qing-Bai; van Nagell, John R.; Wang, Chi; Chen, Li; Plattner, Rina; Kaetzel, David M.; Luo, Jia; Lu, Michael; West, Dava; Liu, Chunming; Ueland, Fred R.; Drapkin, Ronny; Zhou, Binhua P.; Yang, Xiuwei H.

    2014-01-01

    Human ovarian cancer is diagnosed in the late, metastatic stages but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We report a surprising functional link between CD151-α3β1 integrin complexes and the malignancy of serous-type ovarian cancer. Analyses of clinical specimens indicate that CD151 expression is significantly reduced or diminished in 90% of metastatic lesions, while it remains detectable in 58% of primary tumors. These observations suggest a putative tumor-suppressing role of CD151 in ovarian cancer. Indeed, our analyses show that knocking down CD151 or α3 integrin enhances tumor cell proliferation, growth and ascites production in nude mice. These changes are accompanied by impaired cell-cell contacts and aberrant expression of E-cadherin, Mucin 5AC and fibronectin, largely reminiscent of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like change. Importantly, Slug, a master regulator of EMT, is markedly elevated. Knocking down Slug partially restores CD151-α3β1 integrin complex-dependent suppression of cell proliferation. Moreover, disruption of these adhesion protein complexes is accompanied by a concomitant activation of canonical Wnt signaling, including elevated levels of β-catenin and Axin-2 as well as resistance to the inhibition in β-catenin-dependent transcriptional complexes. Together, our study demonstrates that CD151-α3β1 integrin complexes regulate ovarian tumor growth by repressing Slug-mediated EMT and Wnt signaling. PMID:25356755

  19. Mutational Analysis of AREA, a Transcriptional Activator Mediating Nitrogen Metabolite Repression in Aspergillus nidulans and a Member of the “Streetwise” GATA Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Arst, Herbert N.

    1998-01-01

    Summary: The transcriptional activator AREA is a member of the GATA family of transcription factors and mediates nitrogen metabolite repression in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The nutritional versatility of A. nidulans and its amenability to classical and reverse genetic manipulations make the AREA DNA binding domain (DBD) a useful model for analyzing GATA family DBDs, particularly as structures of two AREA-DNA complexes have been determined. The 109 extant mutant forms of the AREA DBD surveyed here constitute one of the highest totals of eukaryotic transcription factor DBD mutants, are discussed in light of the roles of individual residues, and are compared to corresponding mutant sequence changes in other fungal GATA factor DBDs. Other topics include delineation of the DBD using both homology and mutational truncation, use of frameshift reversion to detect regions of tolerance to mutational change, the finding that duplication of the DBD can apparently enhance AREA function, and use of the AREA system to analyze a vertebrate GATA factor DBD. Some major points to emerge from work on the AREA DBD are (i) tolerance to sequence change (with retention of function) is surprisingly great, (ii) mutational changes in a transcription factor can have widely differing, even opposing, effects on expression of different structural genes so that monitoring expression of one or even several structural genes can be insufficient and possibly misleading, and (iii) a mutational change altering local hydrophobic packing and DNA binding target specificity can markedly influence the behavior of mutational changes elsewhere in the DBD. PMID:9729601

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Represses Liver X Receptor-mediated ABCA1 Expression and Cholesterol Efflux in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Elina; Hussein, Maryem A; Savas, Jeffery N; Ouimet, Mireille; Barrett, Tessa J; Leone, Sarah; Yates, John R; Moore, Kathryn J; Fisher, Edward A; Garabedian, Michael J

    2016-05-20

    Liver X receptors (LXR) are oxysterol-activated nuclear receptors that play a central role in reverse cholesterol transport through up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) that mediate cellular cholesterol efflux. Mouse models of atherosclerosis exhibit reduced atherosclerosis and enhanced regression of established plaques upon LXR activation. However, the coregulatory factors that affect LXR-dependent gene activation in macrophages remain to be elucidated. To identify novel regulators of LXR that modulate its activity, we used affinity purification and mass spectrometry to analyze nuclear LXRα complexes and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as an LXR-associated factor. In fact, PARP-1 interacted with both LXRα and LXRβ. Both depletion of PARP-1 and inhibition of PARP-1 activity augmented LXR ligand-induced ABCA1 expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage line and primary bone marrow-derived macrophages but did not affect LXR-dependent expression of other target genes, ABCG1 and SREBP-1c. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed PARP-1 recruitment at the LXR response element in the promoter of the ABCA1 gene. Further, we demonstrated that LXR is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated by PARP-1, a potential mechanism by which PARP-1 influences LXR function. Importantly, the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide enhanced macrophage ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to the lipid-poor apolipoprotein AI. These findings shed light on the important role of PARP-1 on LXR-regulated lipid homeostasis. Understanding the interplay between PARP-1 and LXR may provide insights into developing novel therapeutics for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27026705

  1. Invasive filamentous growth of Candida albicans is promoted by Czf1p-dependent relief of Efg1p-mediated repression.

    PubMed Central

    Giusani, Angela D; Vinces, Marcelo; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2002-01-01

    Filamentation of Candida albicans occurs in response to many environmental cues. During growth within matrix, Efg1p represses filamentation and Czf1p relieves this repression. We propose that Czf1p interacts with Efg1p, altering its function. The complex regulation of filamentation may reflect the versatility of C. albicans as a pathogen. PMID:11973327

  2. The 4E-BP Caf20p Mediates Both eIF4E-Dependent and Independent Repression of Translation

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Lydia M.; Talavera, David; Kershaw, Christopher J.; Mohammad-Qureshi, Sarah S.; Costello, Joseph L.; Rowe, William; Sims, Paul F. G.; Grant, Christopher M.; Hubbard, Simon J.; Ashe, Mark P.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    2015-01-01

    Translation initiation factor eIF4E mediates mRNA selection for protein synthesis via the mRNA 5’cap. A family of binding proteins, termed the 4E-BPs, interact with eIF4E to hinder ribosome recruitment. Mechanisms underlying mRNA specificity for 4E-BP control remain poorly understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae 4E-BPs, Caf20p and Eap1p, each regulate an overlapping set of mRNAs. We undertook global approaches to identify protein and RNA partners of both 4E-BPs by immunoprecipitation of tagged proteins combined with mass spectrometry or next-generation sequencing. Unexpectedly, mass spectrometry indicated that the 4E-BPs associate with many ribosomal proteins. 80S ribosome and polysome association was independently confirmed and was not dependent upon interaction with eIF4E, as mutated forms of both Caf20p and Eap1p with disrupted eIF4E-binding motifs retain ribosome interaction. Whole-cell proteomics revealed Caf20p mutations cause both up and down-regulation of proteins and that many changes were independent of the 4E-binding motif. Investigations into Caf20p mRNA targets by immunoprecipitation followed by RNA sequencing revealed a strong association between Caf20p and mRNAs involved in transcription and cell cycle processes, consistent with observed cell cycle phenotypes of mutant strains. A core set of over 500 Caf20p-interacting mRNAs comprised of both eIF4E-dependent (75%) and eIF4E-independent targets (25%), which differ in sequence attributes. eIF4E-independent mRNAs share a 3’ UTR motif. Caf20p binds all tested motif-containing 3’ UTRs. Caf20p and the 3’UTR combine to influence ERS1 mRNA polysome association consistent with Caf20p contributing to translational control. Finally ERS1 3’UTR confers Caf20-dependent repression of expression to a heterologous reporter gene. Taken together, these data reveal conserved features of eIF4E-dependent Caf20p mRNA targets and uncover a novel eIF4E-independent mode of Caf20p binding to mRNAs that extends the

  3. The Drosophila esc and E(z) Proteins Are Direct Partners in Polycomb Group-Mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clark A.; Ng, Joyce; Peterson, Aidan J.; Morgan, Kelly; Simon, Jeffrey; Jones, Richard S.

    1998-01-01

    The extra sex combs (esc) and Enhancer of zeste [E(z)] proteins are members of the Drosophila Polycomb group (Pc-G) of transcriptional repressors. Here we present evidence for direct physical interaction between the esc and E(z) proteins using yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays. In addition, coimmunoprecipitation from embryo extracts demonstrates association of esc and E(z) in vivo. We have delimited the esc-binding domain of E(z) to an N-terminal 33-amino-acid region. Furthermore, we demonstrate that site-directed mutations in the esc protein previously shown to impair esc function in vivo disrupt esc-E(z) interactions in vitro. We also show an in vitro interaction between the heed and EZH1 proteins, which are human homologs of esc and E(z), respectively. These results suggest that the esc-E(z) molecular partnership has been conserved in evolution. Previous studies suggested that esc is primarily involved in the early stages of Pc-G-mediated silencing during embryogenesis. However, E(z) is continuously required in order to maintain chromosome binding by other Pc-G proteins. In light of these earlier observations and the molecular data presented here, we discuss how esc-E(z) protein complexes may contribute to transcriptional silencing by the Pc-G. PMID:9566901

  4. TNF-mediated inflammation represses GATA1 and activates p38 MAP kinase in RPS19-deficient hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Bibikova, Elena; Youn, Min-Young; Danilova, Nadia; Ono-Uruga, Yukako; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Ochoa, Rachel; Narla, Anupama; Glader, Bertil; Lin, Shuo; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2014-12-11

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited disorder characterized by defects in erythropoiesis, congenital abnormalities, and predisposition to cancer. Approximately 25% of DBA patients have a mutation in RPS19, which encodes a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Upregulation of p53 contributes to the pathogenesis of DBA, but the link between ribosomal protein mutations and erythropoietic defects is not well understood. We found that RPS19 deficiency in hematopoietic progenitor cells leads to decreased GATA1 expression in the erythroid progenitor population and p53-dependent upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in nonerythroid cells. The decrease in GATA1 expression was mediated, at least in part, by activation of p38 MAPK in erythroid cells and rescued by inhibition of TNF-α or p53. The anemia phenotype in rps19-deficient zebrafish was reversed by treatment with the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept. Our data reveal that RPS19 deficiency leads to inflammation, p53-dependent increase in TNF-α, activation of p38 MAPK, and decreased GATA1 expression, suggesting a novel mechanism for the erythroid defects observed in DBA. PMID:25270909

  5. cIAP2 represses IKKα/β-mediated activation of MDM2 to prevent p53 degradation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Rosanna; Niu, Min Ying; Pratt, M A Christine

    2012-11-01

    Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAP1 and cIAP2) function to prevent apoptosis and are often overexpressed in various cancers. However, mutations in cIAP1/2 can activate the alternative NFκB pathway through IκBα-kinase-α (IKKα) and are associated with hematopoetic malignancies. In the current study, we found that knockdown of cIAP2 in human mammary epithelial cells resulted in activation of MDM2 through increased SUMOylation and profound reduction of the pool of MDM2 not phosphorylated at Ser166. cIAP2 siRNA markedly decreased p53 levels, which were rescued by addition of the MDM2 inhibitor, Nutlin3a. An IAP antagonist, which induces cIAP degradation, transiently increased MDM2 mRNA. Simultaneous transfection of siRNA for cIAP2 and IKKα reduced MDM2 protein, while expression of a kinase-dead IKKβ strongly increased non-Ser166 P-MDM2. Inhibition of either IKKα or -β partially rescued p53 levels, while concomitant IKKα/β inhibition fully rescued p53 after cIAP2 knockdown. Surprisingly, IKKα knockdown alone increased SUMO-MDM2, suggesting that in the absence of activation, IKKα can prevent MDM2 SUMOylation. cIAP2 knockdown disrupted the interaction between the MDM2 SUMO ligase, PIAS1 and IKKα. Partial knockdown of cIAP2 cooperated with (V12) H-ras-transfected mammary epithelial cells to enhance colony formation. In summary, our data identify a novel role for cIAP2 in maintaining wild-type p53 levels by preventing both an NFκB-mediated increase and IKKα/-β-dependent transcriptional and post-translational modifications of MDM2. Thus, mutations or reductions in cIAP2 could contribute to cancer promotion, in part, through downregulation of p53. PMID:23032264

  6. Evolutionarily conserved repressive activity of WOX proteins mediates leaf blade outgrowth and floral organ development in plants

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Niu, Lifang; McHale, Neil A.; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Tadege, Million

    2013-01-01

    The WUSCHEL related homeobox (WOX) genes play key roles in stem cell maintenance, embryonic patterning, and lateral organ development. WOX genes have been categorized into three clades—ancient, intermediate, and modern/WUS—based on phylogenetic analysis, but a functional basis for this classification has not been established. Using the classical bladeless lam1 mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris as a genetic tool, we examined the function of the Medicago truncatula WOX gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), in controlling leaf blade outgrowth. STF and LAM1 are functional orthologs. We found that the introduction of mutations into the WUS-box of STF (STFm1) reduces its ability to complement the lam1 mutant. Fusion of an exogenous repressor domain to STFm1 restores complementation, whereas fusion of an exogenous activator domain to STFm1 enhances the narrow leaf phenotype. These results indicate that transcriptional repressor activity mediated by the WUS-box of STF acts to promote blade outgrowth. With the exception of WOX7, the WUS-box is conserved in the modern clade WOX genes, but is not found in members of the intermediate or ancient clades. Consistent with this, all members of the modern clade except WOX7 can complement the lam1 mutant when expressed using the STF promoter, but members of the intermediate and ancient clades cannot. Furthermore, we found that fusion of either the WUS-box or an exogenous repressor domain to WOX7 or to members of intermediate and ancient WOX clades results in a gain-of-function ability to complement lam1 blade outgrowth. These results suggest that modern clade WOX genes have evolved for repressor activity through acquisition of the WUS-box. PMID:23248305

  7. The DNA gyrase inhibitors, nalidixic acid and oxolinic acid, prevent iron-mediated repression of catechol siderophore synthesis in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Page, W J; Patrick, J

    1988-01-01

    Low concentrations of nalidixic acid and oxolinic acid that were just inhibitory to Azotobacter vinelandii growth promoted the production of the catechol siderophores azotochelin and aminochelin, in the presence of normally repressive concentrations of Fe3+. There was a limited effect on the pyoverdin siderophore, azotobactin, where low concentrations of Fe3+ were rendered less repressive, but the repression by higher concentrations of Fe3+ was normal. These drugs did not induce high-molecular-mass iron-repressible outer-membrane proteins and similar effects on the regulation of catechol siderophore synthesis were not produced by novobiocin, coumermycin, or ethidium bromide. The timing of nalidixic acid and Fe3+ addition to iron-limited cells was critical. Nalidixic acid had to be added before iron-repression of catechol siderophore synthesis and before the onset of iron-sufficient growth. Continued production of the catechol siderophores, however, was not due to interference with normal iron uptake. These data indicated that nalidixic acid prevented normal iron-repression of catechol siderophore synthesis but could not reverse iron repression once it had occurred. The possible roles of DNA gyrase activity in the regulation of catechol siderophore synthesis is discussed. PMID:2856355

  8. The c-rel protooncogene product represses NF-kappa B p65-mediated transcriptional activation of the long terminal repeat of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Doerre, S; Sista, P; Sun, S C; Ballard, D W; Greene, W C

    1993-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and the 5' regulatory region of the gene encoding the interleukin 2 receptor alpha subunit (IL-2R alpha) share functional kappa B enhancer elements involved in the regulation of these inducible transcription units during T-cell activation. These kappa B enhancer elements are recognized by a structurally related family of interactive proteins that includes p50, p65, and the product of the c-rel protooncogene (c-Rel). Recent biochemical studies have shown that p65 and p50 form the prototypical NF-kappa B complex, which is rapidly translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus during T-cell activation. This intracellular signaling complex potently stimulates kappa B-directed transcription from either the HIV-1 LTR or the IL-2R alpha promoter via the strong transactivation domain present in p65. We now demonstrate that nuclear expression of human c-Rel, which is induced by either phorbol ester or tumor necrosis factor alpha with delayed kinetics relative to p65, markedly represses p65-mediated activation of these transcription units. These inhibitory effects of c-Rel correlate with its DNA-binding activity but not with its ability to heterodimerize with p50, suggesting that c-Rel inhibition involves competition with p50/p65 for occupancy of the kappa B enhancer element. Together, these findings suggest that one function of c-Rel is as a physiologic repressor of the HIV-1 LTR and IL-2R alpha promoters, serving to efficiently counter the strong transcriptional activating effects of p65. Images PMID:8430069

  9. Repression of the interleukin-6 promoter by estrogen receptor is mediated by NF-kappa B and C/EBP beta.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, B; Yang, M X

    1995-01-01

    Bone metabolism is regulated by a balance between bone resorption caused by osteoclasts and bone formation caused by osteoblasts. This balance is disturbed in postmenopausal women as a result of lower serum estrogen levels. Estrogen, which is used in hormone replacement therapy to prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis, downregulates expression of the interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene in osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells. IL-6 is directly involved in bone resorption by activating immature osteoclasts. We show here that NF-kappa B and C/EBP beta are important regulators of IL-6 gene expression in human osteoblasts. Importantly, the IL-6 promoter is inhibited by estrogen in the absence of a functional estrogen receptor (ER) binding site. This inhibition is mediated by the transcription factors NF-kappa B and C/EBP beta. Evidence is presented for a direct interaction between these two factors and ER. We characterized the protein sequence requirements for this association in vitro and in vivo. The physical and functional interaction depends in part on the DNA binding domain and region D of ER and on the Rel homology domain of NF-kappa B and the bZIP region of C/EBP beta. The cross-coupling between ER, NF-kappa B, and C/EBP beta also results in reduced activity of promoters with ER binding sites. We further show that the mechanism of IL-6 gene repression by estrogen is clearly different from that of activation of promoters with ER binding sites. Therefore, drugs that separate the transactivation and transrepression functions of ER will be very helpful for treatment of osteoporosis without causing undesirable side effects. PMID:7651415

  10. Isolation of a Novel Family of C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins Implicated in Transcriptional Repression Mediated by Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor (COUP-TF) Orphan Nuclear Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Avram, Dorina; Fields, Andrew; Top, Karen Pretty On; Nevrivy, Daniel J.; Ishmael, Jane E.; Leid, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Two novel and related C2H2 zinc finger proteins that are highly expressed in the brain, CTIP1 and CTIP2 (COUP TF-interacting proteins 1 and 2, respectively), were isolated and shown to interact with all members of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors. The interaction of CTIP1 with ARP1 was studied in detail, and CTIP1 was found to harbor two independent ARP1 interaction domains, ID1 and ID2, whereas the putative AF-2 of ARP1 was required for interaction with CTIP1. CTIP1, which exhibited a punctate staining pattern within the nucleus of transfected cells, recruited cotransfected ARP1 to these foci and potentiated ARP1-mediated transcriptional repression of a reporter construct. However, transcriptional repression mediated by ARP1 acting through CTIP1 did not appear to involve recruitment of a trichostatin A-sensitive histone deacetylase(s) to the template, suggesting that this repression pathway may be distinct from that utilized by several other nuclear receptors. PMID:10744719

  11. Repression: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Repression was considered by Freud as a key mechanism for everyone, especially for normals and neurotics. His Repression paper, written in 1915, was psychoanalytically definitive. Of course, much had been written before and even more was written after. Anna Freud's book The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence included repression and was published by…

  12. The octamer/mu E4 region of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer mediates gene repression in myeloma x T-lymphoma hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L; Lieberman, S; Eckhardt, L A

    1993-01-01

    We have shown previously that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer acts as a repressor of gene transcription in hybrids between immunoglobulin-producing myelomas and a T-lymphoma line. We have now mapped this repressive activity to a 51-bp enhancer subfragment which contains the octamer and mu E4 protein-binding motifs. Even a single copy of this subfragment will repress gene expression in hybrid cells. Mutational analyses of the repressor fragment suggest that in non-B cells, a strong transcriptional repressor(s) functions through the same motifs important for gene activation in B cells. Changes in chromatin structure that accompany reporter gene repression suggest a general mechanism for prohibiting immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus activation in inappropriate cell types. Images PMID:8497268

  13. HIGH NITROGEN INSENSITIVE 9 (HNI9)-mediated systemic repression of root NO3− uptake is associated with changes in histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Widiez, Thomas; El Kafafi, El Sayed; Girin, Thomas; Berr, Alexandre; Ruffel, Sandrine; Krouk, Gabriel; Vayssières, Alice; Shen, Wen-Hui; Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Gojon, Alain; Lepetit, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In plants, root nitrate uptake systems are under systemic feedback repression by the N satiety of the whole organism, thus adjusting the N acquisition capacity to the N demand for growth; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We previously isolated the Arabidopsis high nitrogen-insensitive 9-1 (hni9-1) mutant, impaired in the systemic feedback repression of the root nitrate transporter NRT2.1 by high N supply. Here, we show that HNI9 encodes Arabidopsis INTERACT WITH SPT6 (AtIWS1), an evolutionary conserved component of the RNA polymerase II complex. HNI9/AtIWS1 acts in roots to repress NRT2.1 transcription in response to high N supply. At a genomic level, HNI9/AtIWS1 is shown to play a broader role in N signaling by regulating several hundred N-responsive genes in roots. Repression of NRT2.1 transcription by high N supply is associated with an HNI9/AtIWS1-dependent increase in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation at the NRT2.1 locus. Our findings highlight the hypothesis that posttranslational chromatin modifications control nutrient acquisition in plants. PMID:21788519

  14. Studies in mice, hamsters, and rats demonstrate that repression of hepatic apoA-I expression by taurocholic acid in mice is not mediated by the farnesoid-X-receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gardès, Christophe; Blum, Denise; Bleicher, Konrad; Chaput, Evelyne; Ebeling, Martin; Hartman, Peter; Handschin, Corinne; Richter, Hans; Benson, G. Martin

    2011-01-01

    It is claimed that apoA-I expression is repressed in mice by cholic acid (CA) and its taurine conjugate, taurocholic acid (TCA) via farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation. We measured apoA-I expression in mice, hamsters, and rats treated with highly potent and selective synthetic FXR agonists or with TCA. All of the synthetic agonists bound to FXR with high affinity in a scintillation proximity assay. However, TCA did not compete with the radioligand up to the highest concentration used (100 μM). The C-site regulatory region of apoA-I, through which FXR has been reported to regulate its expression, is completely conserved across the species investigated. In both male and female human apoA-I-transgenic mice, we reproduced the previously reported strong inhibition of human apoA-I expression upon treatment with the typical supraphysiological dose of TCA used in such studies. However, in contrast to some previous reports, TCA did not repress murine apoA-I expression in the same mice. Also, more-potent and -selective FXR agonists did not affect human or murine apoA-I expression in this model. In LDL receptor-deficient mice and Golden Syrian hamsters, selective FXR agonists did not affect apoA-I expression, whereas in Wistar rats, some even increased apoA-I expression. In conclusion, selective FXR agonists do not repress apoA-I expression in rodents. Repression of human apoA-I expression by TCA in transgenic mice is probably mediated through FXR-independent mechanisms. PMID:21464203

  15. Multiple mechanisms of transcriptional repression by YY1.

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, K M; Shi, Y

    1997-01-01

    The four C-terminal GLI-Krüppel type zinc fingers of YY1 have been identified as a transcriptional repression domain. Previous reports have proposed DNA-bending and activator-quenching mechanisms for this zinc finger-mediated repression. In addition, previous work indicated that p300 and CBP might be involved in YY1-mediated repression. We have analyzed these possible models for the zinc finger-mediated repression. The role of each zinc finger in the repression and DNA-binding functions was determined by using a structure-and-function approach. We show that zinc finger 2 of YY1 plays a central role in both DNA binding and transcriptional repression. However, a survey of a panel of YY1 mutants indicates that these two functions can be separated, which argues against the DNA-bending model for repression. We show that the physical interaction between YY1 and p300, a coactivator for CREB, is not sufficient for repression of CREB-mediated transcription. Our studies indicate that YY1 functions as an activator-specific repressor. Repression of CTF-1-directed transcription may be accomplished through direct physical interaction between YY1 and this activator. In contrast, physical interaction is not necessary for YY1 to repress Sp1- and CREB-mediated transcription. Rather, the repression likely reflects an ability of YY1 to interfere with communication between these activators and their targets within the general transcription machinery. Taken together, our results suggest that YY1 employs multiple mechanisms to achieve activator-specific repression. PMID:9199306

  16. The Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor MYC2 Directly Represses PLETHORA Expression during Jasmonate-Mediated Modulation of the Root Stem Cell Niche in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Sun, Jiaqiang; Zhai, Qingzhe; Zhou, Wenkun; Qi, Linlin; Xu, Li; Wang, Bao; Chen, Rong; Jiang, Hongling; Qi, Jing; Li, Xugang; Palme, Klaus; Li, Chuanyou

    2011-01-01

    The root stem cell niche, which in the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem is an area of four mitotically inactive quiescent cells (QCs) and the surrounding mitotically active stem cells, is critical for root development and growth. We report here that during jasmonate-induced inhibition of primary root growth, jasmonate reduces root meristem activity and leads to irregular QC division and columella stem cell differentiation. Consistently, jasmonate reduces the expression levels of the AP2-domain transcription factors PLETHORA1 (PLT1) and PLT2, which form a developmentally instructive protein gradient and mediate auxin-induced regulation of stem cell niche maintenance. Not surprisingly, the effects of jasmonate on root stem cell niche maintenance and PLT expression require the functioning of MYC2/JASMONATE INSENSITIVE1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that involves versatile aspects of jasmonate-regulated gene expression. Gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that MYC2 directly binds the promoters of PLT1 and PLT2 and represses their expression. We propose that MYC2-mediated repression of PLT expression integrates jasmonate action into the auxin pathway in regulating root meristem activity and stem cell niche maintenance. This study illustrates a molecular framework for jasmonate-induced inhibition of root growth through interaction with the growth regulator auxin. PMID:21954460

  17. Repression of G1/S Transcription Is Mediated via Interaction of the GTB Motifs of Nrm1 and Whi5 with Swi6

    PubMed Central

    Travesa, Anna; Kalashnikova, Tatyana I.; de Bruin, Robertus A. M.; Cass, Sarah Rose; Chahwan, Charly; Lee, David E.; Lowndes, Noel F.

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, G1/S transcription factors MBF and SBF regulate a large family of genes important for entry to the cell cycle and DNA replication and repair. Their regulation is crucial for cell viability, and it is conserved throughout evolution. MBF and SBF consist of a common component, Swi6, and a DNA-specific binding protein, Mbp1 and Swi4, respectively. Transcriptional repressors bind to and regulate the activity of both transcription factors. Whi5 binds to SBF and represses its activity at the beginning of the G1 phase to prevent early activation. Nrm1 binds to MBF to repress transcription as cells progress through S phase. Here, we describe a protein motif, the GTB motif (for G1/S transcription factor binding), in Nrm1 and Whi5 that is required to bind to the transcription factors. We also identify a region of the carboxy terminus of Swi6 that is required for Nrm1 and Whi5 binding to their target transcription factors and show that mutation of this region overrides the repression of MBF- and SBF-regulated genes by Nrm1 and Whi5. Finally, we show that the GTB motif is the core of a functional module that is necessary and sufficient for targeting of the transcription factors by their cognate repressors. PMID:23382076

  18. A cis-acting element in the promoter of human ether à go-go 1 potassium channel gene mediates repression by calcitriol in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cázares-Ordoñez, V; González-Duarte, R J; Díaz, L; Ishizawa, M; Uno, S; Ortíz, V; Ordoñez-Sánchez, M L; Makishima, M; Larrea, F; Avila, E

    2015-02-01

    The human ether à go-go 1 potassium channel (hEAG1) is required for cell cycle progression and proliferation of cancer cells. Inhibitors of hEAG1 activity and expression represent potential therapeutic drugs in cancer. Previously, we have shown that hEAG1 expression is downregulated by calcitriol in a variety of cancer cells. Herein, we provided evidence on the regulatory mechanism involved in such repressive effect in cells derived from human cervical cancer. Our results indicate that repression by calcitriol occurs at the transcriptional level and involves a functional negative vitamin D response element (nVDRE) E-box type in the hEAG1 promoter. The described mechanism in this work implies that a protein complex formed by the vitamin D receptor-interacting repressor, the vitamin D receptor, the retinoid X receptor, and the Williams syndrome transcription factor interact with the nVDRE in the hEAG1 promoter in the absence of ligand. Interestingly, all of these transcription factors except the vitamin D receptor-interacting repressor are displaced from hEAG1 promoter in the presence of calcitriol. Our results provide novel mechanistic insights into calcitriol mode of action in repressing hEAG1 gene expression. PMID:25495694

  19. CRISPR/dCas9-mediated Transcriptional Inhibition Ameliorates the Epigenetic Dysregulation at D4Z4 and Represses DUX4-fl in FSH Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Charis L; Jones, Takako I; Jones, Peter L

    2016-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent myopathies, affecting males and females of all ages. Both forms of the disease are linked by epigenetic derepression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array at chromosome 4q35, leading to aberrant expression of D4Z4-encoded RNAs in skeletal muscle. Production of full-length DUX4 (DUX4-fl) mRNA from the derepressed D4Z4 array results in misexpression of DUX4-FL protein and its transcriptional targets, and apoptosis, ultimately leading to accumulated muscle pathology. Returning the chromatin at the FSHD locus to its nonpathogenic, epigenetically repressed state would simultaneously affect all D4Z4 RNAs, inhibiting downstream pathogenic pathways, and is thus an attractive therapeutic strategy. Advances in CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing make it possible to target epigenetic modifiers to an endogenous disease locus, although reports to date have focused on more typical genomic regions. Here, we demonstrate that a CRISPR/dCas9 transcriptional inhibitor can be specifically targeted to the highly repetitive FSHD macrosatellite array and alter the chromatin to repress expression of DUX4-fl in primary FSHD myocytes. These results implicate the promoter and exon 1 of DUX4 as potential therapeutic targets and demonstrate the utility of CRISPR technology for correction of the epigenetic dysregulation in FSHD. PMID:26527377

  20. The cell density-dependent expression of stewartan exopolysaccharide in Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii is a function of EsaR-mediated repression of the rcsA gene.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Timothy D; Carlier, Aurelien L; Koutsoudis, Maria D; von Bodman, Susanne B

    2005-04-01

    The LuxR-type quorum-sensing transcription factor EsaR functions as a repressor of exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis in the phytopathogenic bacterium Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii. The cell density-dependent expression of EPS is critical for Stewart's wilt disease development. Strains deficient in the synthesis of a diffusible acyl-homoserine lactone inducer remain repressed for EPS synthesis and are consequently avirulent. In contrast, disruption of the esaR gene leads to hypermucoidy and attenuated disease development. Ligand-free EsaR functions as a negative autoregulator of the esaR gene and responds to exogenous acyl-homoserine lactone for derepression. The focus of this study was to define the mechanism by which EsaR governs the expression of the cps locus, which encodes functions required for stewartan EPS synthesis and membrane translocation. Genetic and biochemical studies show that EsaR directly represses the transcription of the rcsA gene. RcsA encodes an essential coactivator for RcsA/RcsB-mediated transcriptional activation of cps genes. In vitro assays identify an EsaR DNA binding site within the rcsA promoter that is reasonably well conserved with the previously described esaR box. We also describe that RcsA positively controls its own expression. Interestingly, promoter proximal genes within the cps cluster are significantly more acyl-homoserine lactone responsive than genes located towards the middle or 3' end of the gene cluster. We will discuss a possible role of EsaR-mediated quorum sensing in the differential expression of the cps operon. PMID:15773989

  1. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Fabiana; Vu, Ly P.; Themeli, Maria; Kriks, Sonja; Hoya-Arias, Ruben; Khanin, Raya; Hricik, Todd; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Papapetrou, Eirini P.; Levine, Ross L.; Studer, Lorenz; Sadelain, Michel; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia. PMID:25754204

  2. MOZ-mediated repression of p16(INK) (4) (a) is critical for the self-renewal of neural and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Perez-Campo, Flor M; Costa, Guilherme; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Stifani, Stefano; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Although inhibition of p16(INK4a) expression is critical to preserve the proliferative capacity of stem cells, the molecular mechanisms responsible for silencing p16(INK4a) expression remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (MOZ) controls the proliferation of both hematopoietic and neural stem cells by modulating the transcriptional repression of p16(INK4a) . In the absence of the HAT activity of MOZ, expression of p16(INK4a) is upregulated in progenitor and stem cells, inducing an early entrance into replicative senescence. Genetic deletion of p16(INK4a) reverses the proliferative defect in both Moz(HAT) (-) (/) (-) hematopoietic and neural progenitors. Our results suggest a critical requirement for MOZ HAT activity to silence p16(INK4a) expression and to protect stem cells from early entrance into replicative senescence. PMID:24307508

  3. SPROUTY-2 represses the epithelial phenotype of colon carcinoma cells via upregulation of ZEB1 mediated by ETS1 and miR-200/miR-150.

    PubMed

    Barbáchano, A; Fernández-Barral, A; Pereira, F; Segura, M F; Ordóñez-Morán, P; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, E; González-Sancho, J M; Hanniford, D; Martínez, N; Costales-Carrera, A; Real, F X; Pálmer, H G; Rojas, J M; Hernando, E; Muñoz, A

    2016-06-01

    SPROUTY-2 (SPRY2) is a modulator of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling with receptor- and cell type-dependent inhibitory or enhancing effects. Studies on the action of SPRY2 in major cancers are conflicting and its role remains unclear. Here we have dissected SPRY2 action in human colon cancer. Global transcriptomic analyses show that SPRY2 downregulates genes encoding tight junction proteins such as claudin-7 and occludin and other cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix adhesion molecules in human SW480-ADH colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, SPRY2 represses LLGL2/HUGL2, PATJ1/INADL and ST14, main regulators of the polarized epithelial phenotype, and ESRP1, an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inhibitor. A key action of SPRY2 is the upregulation of the major EMT inducer ZEB1, as these effects are reversed by ZEB1 knock-down by means of RNA interference. Consistently, we found an inverse correlation between the expression level of claudin-7 and those of SPRY2 and ZEB1 in human colon tumors. Mechanistically, ZEB1 upregulation by SPRY2 results from the combined induction of ETS1 transcription factor and the repression of microRNAs (miR-200 family, miR-150) that target ZEB1 RNA. Moreover, SPRY2 increased AKT activation by epidermal growth factor, whereas AKT and also Src inhibition reduced the induction of ZEB1. Altogether, these data suggest that AKT and Src are implicated in SPRY2 action. Collectively, these results show a tumorigenic role of SPRY2 in colon cancer that is based on the dysregulation of tight junction and epithelial polarity master genes via upregulation of ZEB1. The dissection of the mechanism of action of SPRY2 in colon cancer cells is important to understand the upregulation of this gene in a subset of patients with this neoplasia that have poor prognosis. PMID:26455323

  4. Yeast carbon catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Gancedo, J M

    1998-06-01

    Glucose and related sugars repress the transcription of genes encoding enzymes required for the utilization of alternative carbon sources; some of these genes are also repressed by other sugars such as galactose, and the process is known as catabolite repression. The different sugars produce signals which modify the conformation of certain proteins that, in turn, directly or through a regulatory cascade affect the expression of the genes subject to catabolite repression. These genes are not all controlled by a single set of regulatory proteins, but there are different circuits of repression for different groups of genes. However, the protein kinase Snf1/Cat1 is shared by the various circuits and is therefore a central element in the regulatory process. Snf1 is not operative in the presence of glucose, and preliminary evidence suggests that Snf1 is in a dephosphorylated state under these conditions. However, the enzymes that phosphorylate and dephosphorylate Snf1 have not been identified, and it is not known how the presence of glucose may affect their activity. What has been established is that Snf1 remains active in mutants lacking either the proteins Grr1/Cat80 or Hxk2 or the Glc7 complex, which functions as a protein phosphatase. One of the main roles of Snf1 is to relieve repression by the Mig1 complex, but it is also required for the operation of transcription factors such as Adr1 and possibly other factors that are still unidentified. Although our knowledge of catabolite repression is still very incomplete, it is possible in certain cases to propose a partial model of the way in which the different elements involved in catabolite repression may be integrated. PMID:9618445

  5. Kicking against the PRCs – A Domesticated Transposase Antagonises Silencing Mediated by Polycomb Group Proteins and Is an Accessory Component of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Pumi; Mora-García, Santiago; de Leau, Erica; Thornton, Harry; de Alves, Flavia Lima; Rapsilber, Juri; Yang, Suxin; James, Geo Velikkakam; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Finnegan, E. Jean; Turck, Franziska; Goodrich, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) genes play crucial roles in development by regulating expression of homeotic and other genes controlling cell fate. Both groups catalyse modifications of chromatin, particularly histone methylation, leading to epigenetic changes that affect gene activity. The trxG antagonizes the function of PcG genes by activating PcG target genes, and consequently trxG mutants suppress PcG mutant phenotypes. We previously identified the ANTAGONIST OF LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (ALP1) gene as a genetic suppressor of mutants in the Arabidopsis PcG gene LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). Here, we show that ALP1 interacts genetically with several other PcG and trxG components and that it antagonizes PcG silencing. Transcriptional profiling reveals that when PcG activity is compromised numerous target genes are hyper-activated in seedlings and that in most cases this requires ALP1. Furthermore, when PcG activity is present ALP1 is needed for full activation of several floral homeotic genes that are repressed by the PcG. Strikingly, ALP1 does not encode a known chromatin protein but rather a protein related to PIF/Harbinger class transposases. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ALP1 is broadly conserved in land plants and likely lost transposase activity and acquired a novel function during angiosperm evolution. Consistent with this, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP-MS) show that ALP1 associates, in vivo, with core components of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 (PRC2), a widely conserved PcG protein complex which functions as a H3K27me3 histone methyltransferase. Furthermore, in reciprocal pulldowns using the histone methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF), we identify not only ALP1 and the core PRC2 components but also plant-specific accessory components including EMBRYONIC FLOWER 1 (EMF1), a transcriptional repressor previously associated with PRC1-like complexes. Taken together our data suggest that ALP1 inhibits Pc

  6. E2F/Rb Family Proteins Mediate Interferon Induced Repression of Adenovirus Immediate Early Transcription to Promote Persistent Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yueting; Stamminger, Thomas; Hearing, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that have pleiotropic effects and play important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. IFNs have broad antiviral properties and function by different mechanisms. IFNs fail to inhibit wild-type Adenovirus (Ad) replication in established cancer cell lines. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IFNs on Ad replication in normal human cells. Our data demonstrate that both IFNα and IFNγ blocked wild-type Ad5 replication in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC) and TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDF-TERT). IFNs inhibited the replication of divergent adenoviruses. The inhibition of Ad5 replication by IFNα and IFNγ is the consequence of repression of transcription of the E1A immediate early gene product. Both IFNα and IFNγ impede the association of the transactivator GABP with the E1A enhancer region during the early phase of infection. The repression of E1A expression by IFNs requires a conserved E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer, and IFNs increased the enrichment of the E2F-associated pocket proteins, Rb and p107, at the E1A enhancer in vivo. PD0332991 (Pabociclib), a specific CDK4/6 inhibitor, dephosphoryles pocket proteins to promote their interaction with E2Fs and inhibited wild-type Ad5 replication dependent on the conserved E2F binding site. Consistent with this result, expression of the small E1A oncoprotein, which abrogates E2F/pocket protein interactions, rescued Ad replication in the presence of IFNα or IFNγ. Finally, we established a persistent Ad infection model in vitro and demonstrated that IFNγ suppresses productive Ad replication in a manner dependent on the E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer. This is the first study that probes the molecular basis of persistent adenovirus infection and reveals a novel mechanism by which adenoviruses utilize IFN signaling to suppress lytic virus replication and to promote persistent infection. PMID:26809031

  7. E2F/Rb Family Proteins Mediate Interferon Induced Repression of Adenovirus Immediate Early Transcription to Promote Persistent Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueting; Stamminger, Thomas; Hearing, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that have pleiotropic effects and play important roles in innate and adaptive immunity. IFNs have broad antiviral properties and function by different mechanisms. IFNs fail to inhibit wild-type Adenovirus (Ad) replication in established cancer cell lines. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IFNs on Ad replication in normal human cells. Our data demonstrate that both IFNα and IFNγ blocked wild-type Ad5 replication in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC) and TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDF-TERT). IFNs inhibited the replication of divergent adenoviruses. The inhibition of Ad5 replication by IFNα and IFNγ is the consequence of repression of transcription of the E1A immediate early gene product. Both IFNα and IFNγ impede the association of the transactivator GABP with the E1A enhancer region during the early phase of infection. The repression of E1A expression by IFNs requires a conserved E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer, and IFNs increased the enrichment of the E2F-associated pocket proteins, Rb and p107, at the E1A enhancer in vivo. PD0332991 (Pabociclib), a specific CDK4/6 inhibitor, dephosphoryles pocket proteins to promote their interaction with E2Fs and inhibited wild-type Ad5 replication dependent on the conserved E2F binding site. Consistent with this result, expression of the small E1A oncoprotein, which abrogates E2F/pocket protein interactions, rescued Ad replication in the presence of IFNα or IFNγ. Finally, we established a persistent Ad infection model in vitro and demonstrated that IFNγ suppresses productive Ad replication in a manner dependent on the E2F binding site in the E1A enhancer. This is the first study that probes the molecular basis of persistent adenovirus infection and reveals a novel mechanism by which adenoviruses utilize IFN signaling to suppress lytic virus replication and to promote persistent infection. PMID:26809031

  8. VdCYC8, Encoding CYC8 Glucose Repression Mediator Protein, Is Required for Microsclerotia Formation and Full Virulence in Verticillium dahliae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Fang; Liu, Yi-Jie; Feng, Zi-Li; Feng, Hong-Jie; Klosterman, Steven J.; Zhou, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Li-Hong; Shi, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, He-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae is the primary causal agent for Verticillium wilt disease on a diverse array of economically important crops, including cotton. In previous research, we obtained the low-pathogenicity mutant T286 from the T-DNA insertional mutant library of the highly virulent isolate Vd080 derived from cotton. In this study, the target disrupted gene VdCYC8 was identified by TAIL-PCR, encoding a homolog of CYC8 proteins involved in glucose repression. The deletion mutant ΔCYC8 exhibited several developmental deficiencies, including reduced microsclerotia formation, reduced sporulation, and slower growth. Moreover, compared with the wild type strain Vd080, the pathogenicity of strain ΔCYC8 was significantly decreased on cotton seedlings. However, the complementary mutants ΔCYC8-C led to restoration of the wild type phenotype or near wild type levels of virulence on cotton. Interestingly, pathogenicity of the strains was correlated with VdCYC8 gene expression levels in complemented mutants. Gene expression analyses in the wild type strain Vd080, the ΔCYC8-45 strain, and complemented strain ΔCYC8-C26 indicated that VdCYC8 regulates the transcription levels of several genes in V. dahliae that have roles in melanin and production. PMID:26633180

  9. Zeste maintains repression of Ubx transgenes: Support for a new model of polycomb repression

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Man-Wook; Laney, Jeffrey D.; Jeon, Sang-Hack; Ali, Janann; Biggin, Mark D.

    2001-09-01

    During late embryogenesis, the expression domains of homeotic genes are maintained by two groups of ubiquitously expressed regulators: the Polycomb repressors and the Trithorax activators. It is not known how the activities of the two maintenance systems are initially targeted to the correct genes. Zeste and GAGA are sequence specific DNA binding proteins previously shown to be Trithorax group activators of the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx). Here we demonstrate that Zeste and GAGA DNA binding sites at the proximal promoter are also required to maintain, but not to initiate, repression of Ubx. Further, the repression mediated by Zeste DNA binding site is abolished in zeste null embryos. These data imply that Zeste and probably GAGA mediate Polycomb repression. We present a model in which the dual transcriptional activities of Zeste and GAGA are an essential component of the mechanism that chooses which maintenance system is to be targeted to a given promoter.

  10. Dicer1 imparts essential survival cues in Notch-driven T-ALL via miR-21-mediated tumor suppressor Pdcd4 repression.

    PubMed

    Junker, Fabian; Chabloz, Antoine; Koch, Ute; Radtke, Freddy

    2015-08-20

    The modulatory function of individual microRNAs (miRNAs) in Notch-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) has recently been established. Although protumorigenic and tumor-suppressive miRNAs are implicated in disease onset in murine models of Notch-driven T-cell leukemia, whether Dicer1-processed miRNAs are essential for Notch-driven T-ALL is currently unknown. Here we used conditional and inducible genetic loss-of-function approaches to test whether the development and maintenance of Notch-driven T-ALL was dependent on Dicer1 function. Mice with specific inactivation of both Dicer1 alleles in the T-cell lineage did not develop Notch-driven T-ALL. In contrast, loss of 1 functional Dicer1 allele did not significantly perturb T-ALL onset and tumor progression. Inducible inactivation of Dicer1 in early stage polyclonal T-ALL cells was sufficient to abrogate T-ALL progression in leukemic mice, whereas late-stage monoclonal T-ALL cells were counterselected against loss of Dicer1. Lineage-tracing experiments revealed that Dicer1 deficiency led to the induction of apoptosis in T-ALL cells, whereas cell cycle progression remained unaltered. Through microarray-based miRNA profiling, we identified miR-21 as a previously unrecognized miRNA deregulated in both mouse and human T-ALL. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-21 regulates T-ALL cell survival via repression of the tumor suppressor Pdcd4. PMID:25979949

  11. E2F mediates cell cycle-dependent transcriptional repression in vivo by recruitment of an HDAC1/mSin3B corepressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Rayman, Joseph B.; Takahashi, Yasuhiko; Indjeian, Vahan B.; Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen; Catchpole, Steven; Watson, Roger J.; te Riele, Hein; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2002-01-01

    Despite biochemical and genetic data suggesting that E2F and pRB (pocket protein) families regulate transcription via chromatin-modifying factors, the precise mechanisms underlying gene regulation by these protein families have not yet been defined in a physiological setting. In this study, we have investigated promoter occupancy in wild-type and pocket protein-deficient primary cells. We show that corepressor complexes consisting of histone deacetylase (HDAC1) and mSin3B were specifically recruited to endogenous E2F-regulated promoters in quiescent cells. These complexes dissociated from promoters once cells reached late G1, coincident with gene activation. Interestingly, recruitment of HDAC1 complexes to promoters depended absolutely on p107 and p130, and required an intact E2F-binding site. In contrast, mSin3B recruitment to certain promoters did not require p107 or p130, suggesting that recruitment of this corepressor can occur via E2F-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Remarkably, loss of pRB had no effect on HDAC1 or mSin3B recruitment. p107/p130 deficiency triggered a dramatic loss of E2F4 nuclear localization as well as transcriptional derepression, which is suggested by nucleosome mapping studies to be the result of localized hyperacetylation of nucleosomes proximal to E2F-binding sites. Taken together, these findings show that p130 escorts E2F4 into the nucleus and, together with corepressor complexes that contain mSin3B and/or HDAC1, directly represses transcription from target genes as cells withdraw from the cell cycle. PMID:11959842

  12. Nerve Injury Diminishes Opioid Analgesia through Lysine Methyltransferase-mediated Transcriptional Repression of μ-Opioid Receptors in Primary Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Chen, Shao-Rui; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-15

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR, encoded by Oprm1) agonists are the mainstay analgesics for treating moderate to severe pain. Nerve injury causes down-regulation of MORs in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and diminishes the opioid effect on neuropathic pain. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the diminished MOR expression caused by nerve injury are not clear. G9a (encoded by Ehmt2), a histone 3 at lysine 9 methyltransferase, is a key chromatin regulator responsible for gene silencing. In this study, we determined the role of G9a in diminished MOR expression and opioid analgesic effects in animal models of neuropathic pain. We found that nerve injury in rats induced a long-lasting reduction in the expression level of MORs in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Nerve injury consistently increased the enrichment of the G9a product histone 3 at lysine 9 dimethylation in the promoter of Oprm1 in the DRG. G9a inhibition or siRNA knockdown fully reversed MOR expression in the injured DRG and potentiated the morphine effect on pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In mice lacking Ehmt2 in DRG neurons, nerve injury failed to reduce the expression level of MORs and the morphine effect. In addition, G9a inhibition or Ehmt2 knockout in DRG neurons normalized nerve injury-induced reduction in the inhibitory effect of the opioid on synaptic glutamate release from primary afferent nerves. Our findings indicate that G9a contributes critically to transcriptional repression of MORs in primary sensory neurons in neuropathic pain. G9a inhibitors may be used to enhance the opioid analgesic effect in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26917724

  13. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Mediate Single-Stranded DNA Recognition and Acta2 Repression by Purine-Rich Element-Binding Protein B.

    PubMed

    Rumora, Amy E; Ferris, Lauren A; Wheeler, Tamar R; Kelm, Robert J

    2016-05-17

    Myofibroblast differentiation is characterized by an increased level of expression of cytoskeletal smooth muscle α-actin. In human and murine fibroblasts, the gene encoding smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors that either activate or repress the 5' promoter-enhancer in response to environmental cues signaling tissue repair and remodeling. Purine-rich element-binding protein B (Purβ) suppresses the expression of Acta2 by cooperatively interacting with the sense strand of a 5' polypurine sequence containing an inverted MCAT cis element required for gene activation. In this study, we evaluated the chemical basis of nucleoprotein complex formation between the Purβ repressor and the purine-rich strand of the MCAT element in the mouse Acta2 promoter. Quantitative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding assays conducted in the presence of increasing concentrations of monovalent salt or anionic detergent suggested that the assembly of a high-affinity nucleoprotein complex is driven by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Consistent with the results of pH titration analysis, site-directed mutagenesis revealed several basic amino acid residues in the intermolecular (R267) and intramolecular (K82 and R159) subdomains that are essential for Purβ transcriptional repressor function in Acta2 promoter-reporter assays. In keeping with their diminished Acta2 repressor activity in fibroblasts, purified Purβ variants containing an R267A mutation exhibited reduced binding affinity for purine-rich ssDNA. Moreover, certain double and triple-point mutants were also defective in binding to the Acta2 corepressor protein, Y-box-binding protein 1. Collectively, these findings establish the repertoire of noncovalent interactions that account for the unique structural and functional properties of Purβ. PMID:27064749

  14. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W. Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26556724

  15. Six3-mediated auto repression and eye development requires its interaction with members of the Groucho-related family of co-repressors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changqi C; Dyer, Michael A; Uchikawa, Masanori; Kondoh, Hisato; Lagutin, Oleg V; Oliver, Guillermo

    2002-06-01

    Recent findings suggest that Six3, a member of the evolutionarily conserved So/Six homeodomain family, plays an important role in vertebrate visual system development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which this function is accomplished. Although several members of the So/Six gene family interact with members of the eyes absent (Eya) gene family and function as transcriptional activators, Six3 does not interact with any known member of the Eya family. Here, we report that Grg4 and Grg5, mouse counterparts of the Drosophila transcriptional co-repressor Groucho, interact with mouse Six3 and its closely related member Six6, which may also be involved in vertebrate eye development. The specificity of the interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of Six3 and Grg4 complexes from cell lines. We also show that the interaction between Six3 and Grg5 requires the Q domain of Grg5 and a conserved phenylalanine residue present in an eh1-like motif located in the Six domain of Six3. The pattern of Grg5 expression in the mouse ventral forebrain and developing optic vesicles overlapped that previously reported for Six3 and Six6. Using PCR, we identified a specific DNA motif that is bound by Six3 and we demonstrated that Six3 acts as a potent transcriptional repressor upon its interaction with Groucho-related members. We also demonstrated that this interaction is required for Six3 auto repression. The biological significance of this interaction in the retina and lens was assessed by overexpression experiments using either wild type full-length Six3 cDNA or a mutated form of this gene in which the interaction with Groucho proteins was disrupted. Overexpression of wild type Six3 by in vivo retroviral infection of newborn rat retinae led to an altered photoreceptor phenotype, while the in ovo electroporation of chicken embryos resulted in failure of lens placode invagination and production of delta-crystallin-negative cells within the placode. These

  16. Racism and Surplus Repression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Explores the relationship between Herbert Marcuse's theory of "surplus repression" and Freud's theory of the "unconscious" with respect to latent, hidden, covert, or subliminal aspects of racism in the United States. Argues that unconscious racism, manifested in evasion/avoidance, acting out/projection, and attempted justification, perpetuates…

  17. MafG Sumoylation Is Required for Active Transcriptional Repression

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hozumi; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Miyoshi, Chika; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Saitoh, Hisato; Francastel, Claire; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    A straightforward mechanism for eliciting transcriptional repression would be to simply block the DNA binding site for activators. Such passive repression is often mediated by transcription factors that lack an intrinsic repressor activity. MafG is a bidirectional regulator of transcription, a repressor in its homodimeric state but an activator when heterodimerized with p45. Here, we report that MafG is conjugated to SUMO-2/3 in vivo. To clarify the possible physiological role(s) for sumoylation in regulating MafG activity, we evaluated mutant and wild-type MafG in transgenic mice and cultured cells. Whereas sumoylation-deficient MafG activated p45-dependent transcription normally and did not affect heterodimer activity, repression by the sumoylation-deficient MafG mutant was severely compromised in vivo. Furthermore, the SUMO-dependent repression activity of MafG was sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibition. Thus, repression by MafG is not achieved through simple passive repression by competing for the activator binding site but requires sumoylation, which then mediates transcriptional repression through recruitment of a repressor complex containing histone deacetylase activity. PMID:16738329

  18. bIgG time for large eaters: monocytes and macrophages as effector and target cells of antibody-mediated immune activation and repression.

    PubMed

    Gordan, Sina; Biburger, Markus; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-11-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system consists of a great variety of cell subsets localized throughout the body in immunological and non-immunological tissues. While one of their prime tasks is to detect, phagocytose, and kill intruding microorganisms, they are also involved in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune tolerance toward self through removal of dying cells. Furthermore, monocytes and macrophages have been recognized to play a critical role for mediating immunoglobulin G (IgG)-dependent effector functions, including target cell depletion, tissue inflammation, and immunomodulation. For this, monocyte and macrophage populations are equipped with a complex set of Fc-receptors, enabling them to directly interact with pro- or anti-inflammatory IgG preparations. In this review, we will summarize the most recent findings, supporting a central role of monocytes and macrophages for pro- and anti-inflammatory IgG activity. PMID:26497512

  19. CDK6-mediated repression of CD25 is required for induction and maintenance of Notch1- induced T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Nilamani; Sheng, Jinghao; Hu, Jamie K.; Li, Wei; Zhou, Wenhui; Lee, Gene; Tsichlis, Nicolaos; Pathak, Aparna; Brown, Nelson; Deshpande, Amit; Luo, Chi; Hu, Guo-fu; Hinds, Philip W.; Van Etten, Richard A.; Hu, Miaofen G.

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a high-risk subset of acute leukemia, characterized by frequent activation of Notch1 or AKT signaling, where new_therapeutic approaches are needed. We showed previously that Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) is required for thymic lymphoblastic lymphoma induced by activated AKT. Here, we show CDK6 is required for initiation and maintenance of Notch-induced T-ALL. In a mouse retroviral model, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells lacking CDK6 protein or expressing kinase-inactive (K43M) CDK6 are resistant to induction of T-ALL by activated Notch, whereas those expressing INK4-insensitive (R31C) CDK6 are permissive. Pharmacologic inhibition of CDK6 kinase induces CD25 and RUNX1 expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in mouse and human T-ALL. Ablation of Cd25 in a K43M background restores Notch-induced T-leukemogenesis, with disease that is resistant to CDK6 inhibitors in vivo. These data support a model whereby CDK6-mediated suppression of CD25 is required for initiation of T-ALL by activated Notch1, and CD25 induction mediates the therapeutic response to CDK6 inhibition in established T-ALL. These results both validate CDK6 as a molecular target for therapy of this subset of T-ALL and suggest that CD25 expression could serve as a biomarker for responsiveness of T-ALL to CDK4/6 inhibitor therapy. PMID:26707936

  20. CDK6-mediated repression of CD25 is required for induction and maintenance of Notch1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jena, N; Sheng, J; Hu, J K; Li, W; Zhou, W; Lee, G; Tsichlis, N; Pathak, A; Brown, N; Deshpande, A; Luo, C; Hu, G F; Hinds, P W; Van Etten, R A; Hu, M G

    2016-05-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a high-risk subset of acute leukemia, characterized by frequent activation of Notch1 or AKT signaling, where new therapeutic approaches are needed. We showed previously that cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) is required for thymic lymphoblastic lymphoma induced by activated AKT. Here, we show CDK6 is required for initiation and maintenance of Notch-induced T-ALL. In a mouse retroviral model, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells lacking CDK6 protein or expressing kinase-inactive (K43M) CDK6 are resistant to induction of T-ALL by activated Notch, whereas those expressing INK4-insensitive (R31C) CDK6 are permissive. Pharmacologic inhibition of CDK6 kinase induces CD25 and RUNX1 expression, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in mouse and human T-ALL. Ablation of Cd25 in a K43M background restores Notch-induced T leukemogenesis, with disease that is resistant to CDK6 inhibitors in vivo. These data support a model whereby CDK6-mediated suppression of CD25 is required for initiation of T-ALL by activated Notch1, and CD25 induction mediates the therapeutic response to CDK6 inhibition in established T-ALL. These results both validate CDK6 as a molecular target for therapy of this subset of T-ALL and suggest that CD25 expression could serve as a biomarker for responsiveness of T-ALL to CDK4/6 inhibitor therapy. PMID:26707936

  1. PPARγ Represses Apolipoprotein A-I Gene but Impedes TNFα-Mediated ApoA-I Downregulation in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Shavva, Vladimir S; Mogilenko, Denis A; Bogomolova, Alexandra M; Nikitin, Artemy A; Dizhe, Ella B; Efremov, Alexander M; Oleinikova, Galina N; Perevozchikov, Andrej P; Orlov, Sergey V

    2016-09-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is the main anti-atherogenic component of human high-density lipoproteins (HDL). ApoA-I gene expression is regulated by several nuclear receptors, which are the sensors for metabolic changes during development of cardiovascular diseases. Activation of nuclear receptor PPARγ has been shown to impact lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Here, we have shown that synthetic PPARγ agonist GW1929 decreases both ApoA-I mRNA and protein levels in HepG2 cells and the effect of GW1929 on apoA-I gene transcription depends on PPARγ. PPARγ binds to the sites A and C within the hepatic enhancer of apoA-I gene and the negative regulation of apoA-I gene transcription by PPARγ appears to be realized via the site C (-134 to -119). Ligand activation of PPARγ leads to an increase of LXRβ and a decrease of PPARα binding to the apoA-I gene hepatic enhancer in HepG2 cells. GW1929 abolishes the TNFα-mediated decrease of ApoA-I mRNA expression in both HepG2 and Caco-2 cells but does not block TNFα-mediated inhibition of ApoA-I protein secretion by HepG2 cells. These data demonstrate that complex of PPARγ with GW1929 is a negative regulator involved in the control of ApoA-I expression and secretion in human hepatocyte- and enterocyte-like cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2010-2022, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26813964

  2. RNA Interference-Mediated Repression of MtCCD1 in Mycorrhizal Roots of Medicago truncatula Causes Accumulation of C27 Apocarotenoids, Shedding Light on the Functional Role of CCD11[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Daniela S.; Schliemann, Willibald; Schmidt, Jürgen; Strack, Dieter; Walter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Tailoring carotenoids by plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) generates various bioactive apocarotenoids. Recombinant CCD1 has been shown to catalyze symmetrical cleavage of C40 carotenoid substrates at 9,10 and 9′,10′ positions. The actual substrate(s) of the enzyme in planta, however, is still unknown. In this study, we have carried out RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated repression of a Medicago truncatula CCD1 gene in hairy roots colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. As a consequence, the normal AM-mediated accumulation of apocarotenoids (C13 cyclohexenone and C14 mycorradicin derivatives) was differentially modified. Mycorradicin derivatives were strongly reduced to 3% to 6% of the controls, while the cyclohexenone derivatives were only reduced to 30% to 47%. Concomitantly, a yellow-orange color appeared in RNAi roots. Based on ultraviolet light spectra and mass spectrometry analyses, the new compounds are C27 apocarotenoic acid derivatives. These metabolic alterations did not lead to major changes in molecular markers of the AM symbiosis, although a moderate shift to more degenerating arbuscules was observed in RNAi roots. The unexpected outcome of the RNAi approach suggests C27 apocarotenoids as the major substrates of CCD1 in mycorrhizal root cells. Moreover, literature data implicate C27 apocarotenoid cleavage as the general functional role of CCD1 in planta. A revised scheme of plant carotenoid cleavage in two consecutive steps is proposed, in which CCD1 catalyzes only the second step in the cytosol (C27 → C14 + C13), while the first step (C40 → C27 + C13) may be catalyzed by CCD7 and/or CCD4 inside plastids. PMID:18790999

  3. Pharmacological targeting of IDO-mediated tolerance for treating autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Penberthy, W Todd

    2007-04-01

    established mechanisms of necrosis. Chronic elevation of TNFalpha leading to necrotic events by NAD depletion in autoimmune disease likely occurs via combination of persistent IDO activation and iNOS-peroxynitrate activation of PARP1 both of which deplete NAD. Pharmacological doses of NAD precursors repeatedly provide dramatic therapeutic benefit for rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, colitis, other autoimmune diseases, and schizophrenia in either the clinic or animal models. Collectively these observations support the idea that autoimmune disease may in part be considered as localized pellagra manifesting symptoms particular to the inflamed target tissues. Thus pharmacological doses of NAD precursors (nicotinic acid/niacin, nicotinamide/niacinamide, or nicotinamide riboside) should be considered as potentially essential to the therapeutic success of any IDO-inducing regimen for treating autoimmune diseases. Distinct among the NAD precursors, nicotinic acid specifically activates the g-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) GPR109a to produce the IDO-inducing tolerogenic prostaglandins PGE(2) and PGD(2). Next, PGD(2) is converted to the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin, 15d-PGJ(2). These prostaglandins exert potent anti-inflammatory activities through endogenous signaling mechanisms involving the GPCRs EP2, EP4, and DP1 along with PPARgamma respectively. Nicotinamide prevents type 1 diabetes and ameliorates multiple sclerosis in animal models, while nothing is known about the therapeutic potential of nicotinamide riboside. Alternatively the direct targeting of the non-redox NAD-dependent proteins using resveratrol to activate SIRT1 or PJ34 in order to inhibit PARP1 and prevent autoimmune pathogenesis are also given consideration. PMID:17430113

  4. NFκB p50-CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ)-mediated Transcriptional Repression of MicroRNA let-7i following Microbial Infection*

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Steven P.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Trussoni, Christy E.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Chen, Xian-Ming; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs, central players of numerous cellular processes, regulate mRNA stability or translational efficiency. Although these molecular events are established, the mechanisms regulating microRNA function and expression remain largely unknown. The microRNA let-7i regulates Toll-like receptor 4 expression. Here, we identify a novel transcriptional mechanism induced by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum and Gram(−) bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediating let-7i promoter silencing in human biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes). Using cultured cholangiocytes, we show that microbial stimulus decreased let-7i expression, and promoter activity. Analysis of the mechanism revealed that microbial infection promotes the formation of a NFκB p50-C/EBPβ silencer complex in the regulatory sequence. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP) demonstrated that the repressor complex binds to the let-7i promoter following microbial stimulus and promotes histone-H3 deacetylation. Our results provide a novel mechanism of transcriptional regulation of cholangiocyte let-7i expression following microbial insult, a process with potential implications for epithelial innate immune responses in general. PMID:19903813

  5. Abscisic Acid-Induced Resistance against the Brown Spot Pathogen Cochliobolus miyabeanus in Rice Involves MAP Kinase-Mediated Repression of Ethylene Signaling1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Yang, Yinong; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Höfte, Monica

    2010-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in an array of plant processes, including the regulation of gene expression during adaptive responses to various environmental cues. Apart from its well-established role in abiotic stress adaptation, emerging evidence indicates that ABA is also prominently involved in the regulation and integration of pathogen defense responses. Here, we demonstrate that exogenously administered ABA enhances basal resistance of rice (Oryza sativa) against the brown spot-causing ascomycete Cochliobolus miyabeanus. Microscopic analysis of early infection events in control and ABA-treated plants revealed that this ABA-inducible resistance (ABA-IR) is based on restriction of fungal progression in the mesophyll. We also show that ABA-IR does not rely on boosted expression of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid -, or callose-dependent resistance mechanisms but, instead, requires a functional Gα-protein. In addition, several lines of evidence are presented suggesting that ABA steers its positive effect on brown spot resistance through antagonistic cross talk with the ethylene (ET) response pathway. Exogenous ethephon application enhances susceptibility, whereas genetic disruption of ET signaling renders plants less vulnerable to C. miyabeanus attack, thereby inducing a level of resistance similar to that observed on ABA-treated wild-type plants. Moreover, ABA treatment alleviates C. miyabeanus-induced activation of the ET reporter gene EBP89, while derepression of pathogen-triggered EBP89 transcription via RNA interference-mediated knockdown of OsMPK5, an ABA-primed mitogen-activated protein kinase gene, compromises ABA-IR. Collectively, these data favor a model whereby exogenous ABA enhances resistance against C. miyabeanus at least in part by suppressing pathogen-induced ET action in an OsMPK5-dependent manner. PMID:20130100

  6. Saikosaponin-D reduces cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by repressing ROS-mediated activation of MAPK and NF-κB signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaobin; Dang, Chengxue; Kang, Huafeng; Dai, Zhijun; Lin, Shuai; Guan, Haitao; Liu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Xijing; Hui, Wentao

    2015-09-01

    The nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin (DDP) severely limits the clinical efficacy of this widely used anticancer agent. The observed nephrotoxicity may be the result of DDP-induced inflammation and apoptosis. Saikosaponin-D (SSD), a triterpenoid saponin, has numerous pharmacological properties. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether and how SSD protected against DDP-induced nephrotoxicity. Non-cytotoxic levels of SSD significantly increased the viability rate, improved the nuclear morphology, and attenuated the caspase-3 activation and programmed apoptosis of DDP-treated HK-2 cells. In addition, SSD treatment markedly inhibited the release of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), as well as the production of nitric oxide and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by these cells. More importantly, SSD effectively blocked the DDP-induced activation of NF-κB, P38, JNK, and MAPKs. Furthermore, we found that U0126 (a specific inhibitor of MAPKs) strongly inhibited the IKK/IκB/NF-κB-dependent release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS gene expression. Finally, we demonstrated that SSD decreased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and that the specific ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) markedly inhibited the DDP-induced activation of MAPK and phosphorylation of the downstream signal NF-κB, which in turn reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine release and iNOS gene expression. Our results suggest that the SSD-mediated alleviation of DDP-induced nephrotoxicity was due to uncoupling of the ROS, P38, and JNK/NF-κB signalling pathways. PMID:26118633

  7. Glycerol-3-Phosphate-Induced Catabolite Repression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Tanja; Postma, Pieter; Schütz, Alexandra; Völker, Uwe; Boos, Winfried

    2002-01-01

    The formation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) in cells growing on TB causes catabolite repression, as shown by the reduction in malT expression. For this repression to occur, the general proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS), in particular EIIAGlc, as well as the adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP-catabolite activator protein system, have to be present. We followed the level of EIIAGlc phosphorylation after the addition of glycerol or G3P. In contrast to glucose, which causes a dramatic shift to the dephosphorylated form, glycerol or G3P only slightly increased the amount of dephosphorylated EIIAGlc. Isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside-induced overexpression of EIIAGlc did not prevent repression by G3P, excluding the possibility that G3P-mediated catabolite repression is due to the formation of unphosphorylated EIIAGlc. A mutant carrying a C-terminally truncated adenylate cyclase was no longer subject to G3P-mediated repression. We conclude that the stimulation of adenylate cyclase by phosphorylated EIIAGlc is controlled by G3P and other phosphorylated sugars such as d-glucose-6-phosphate and is the basis for catabolite repression by non-PTS compounds. Further metabolism of these compounds is not necessary for repression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to obtain an overview of proteins that are subject to catabolite repression by glycerol. Some of the prominently repressed proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Among these were periplasmic binding proteins (glutamine and oligopeptide binding protein, for example), enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, aldehyde dehydrogenase, Dps (a stress-induced DNA binding protein), and d-tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase. PMID:12003946

  8. High Expression of Rab-like 3 (Rabl3) is Associated with Poor Survival of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer via Repression of MAPK8/9/10-Mediated Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Sun, Jian; Luo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rab-like 3 (Rabl3) is a member of the Rab subfamily of small GTPases which are involved in controlling proliferation and vesicular trafficking. Recent studies suggest that Rab proteins might play a critical role in regulating cancer cell survival, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a bioinformatics analysis to examine the correlation between the expression level of Rabl3 and survival of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in three independent cohorts containing 484 patients. The function of Rabl3 was examined in NSCLC cell line A549 in vitro. Following Rabl3 knockdown, cells were stained with propidium iodine (PI) and Annexin V, followed by flow cytometry analysis (FACS) for cell death and autophagy induction. The activity of the MAPK signaling pathway was assessed by Western blotting of different MAPK phosphorylations, and modulated with different chemical inhibitors. RESULTS High expression of Rabl3 was significantly correlated with poor survival in all three independent NSCLC cohorts. In line with this result, Rabl3 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cell lines as compared with normal lung fibroblast cell lines. Knockdown of Rabl3 in lung cancer cells significantly enhanced cell death accompanied with autophagy induction, as evidenced by an increased level of autophagy marker LC3-II. Interestingly, Rabl3 knockdown was associated with enhanced activation of MAPK8/9/10 but not MAPK11/12/13/14. Treatment of MAPK8/9/10-specific inhibitor SP600125, but not MAPK11/12/13/14-specific inhibitor SB203580, largely abolished Rabl3 knockdown-induced LC3-I/LC3-II conversion and autophagic cell death. CONCLUSIONS Together, these results suggest that high expression of Rabl3 might inhibit cell death in NSCLCs via repression of MAPK8/9/10-mediated autophagy. PMID:27164297

  9. Transcription of Liver X Receptor Is Down-Regulated by 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-Prostaglandin J2 through Oxidative Stress in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Gonzalo; Reyes, María Edith; Santa-María, Consuelo; Ramírez, Remedios; Geniz, Isabel; Jiménez, Juan; Martín-Nieto, José; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They play important roles in controlling cholesterol homeostasis and as regulators of inflammatory gene expression and innate immunity, by blunting the induction of classical pro-inflammatory genes. However, opposite data have also been reported on the consequences of LXR activation by oxysterols, resulting in the specific production of potent pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The effect of the inflammatory state on the expression of LXRs has not been studied in human cells, and constitutes the main aim of the present work. Our data show that when human neutrophils are triggered with synthetic ligands, the synthesis of LXRα mRNA became activated together with transcription of the LXR target genes ABCA1, ABCG1 and SREBP1c. An inflammatory mediator, 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), hindered T0901317-promoted induction of LXRα mRNA expression together with transcription of its target genes in both neutrophils and human macrophages. This down-regulatory effect was dependent on the release of reactive oxygen species elicited by 15dPGJ2, since it was enhanced by pro-oxidant treatment and reversed by antioxidants, and was also mediated by ERK1/2 activation. Present data also support that the 15dPGJ2-induced serine phosphorylation of the LXRα molecule is mediated by ERK1/2. These results allow to postulate that down-regulation of LXR cellular levels by pro-inflammatory stimuli might be involved in the development of different vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:23115616

  10. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  11. An Alternative Transcript of the FOG-2 Gene Encodes a FOG-2 Isoform lacking the FOG Repression Motif

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Rodney M.; Remo, Benjamin F.; Svensson, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    The FOG family of transcriptional co-factors is composed of two members in mammals: FOG-1 and FOG-2. Both have been shown to bind to GATA factors and function as transcriptional co-repressors in specific cell and promoter contexts. We have previously defined a novel repression domain localized to the N-terminus of each FOG family member, the FOG Repression Motif, which is necessary for FOG-mediated transcriptional repression. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of a novel isoform of FOG-2 lacking the FOG Repression Motif. In contrast to full-length FOG-2, this isoform is expressed predominately in the embryonic and adult heart. It can bind GATA4 avidly, but is unable to repress GATA4-mediated activation of cardiac-restricted gene promoters. Together, these results suggest that FOG-2 repressive activity may be modulated by the generation of isoforms of FOG-2 lacking the FOG repression motif. PMID:17445768

  12. Involvement of a putative cyclic amp receptor protein (CRP)-like binding sequence and a CRP-like protein in glucose-mediated catabolite repression of thn genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2012-08-01

    Glucose catabolite repression of tetralin catabolic genes in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB was shown to be exerted by a protein homologous to transcriptional regulators of the cyclic AMP receptor (CRP)-FNR family. The protein was detected bound to putative CRP-like boxes localized at the promoters of the thnA1 and thnS genes. PMID:22636000

  13. Technique Selectively Represses Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters December 3, 2012 Technique Selectively Represses Immune System Myelin (green) encases and protects nerve fibers (brown). A new technique prevents the immune system from attacking myelin in a mouse model of ...

  14. Antimycotics suppress the Malassezia extract-induced production of CXC chemokine ligand 10 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hau, Carren S; Kanda, Naoko; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2014-02-01

    Malassezia, a lipophilic yeast, exacerbates atopic dermatitis. Malassezia products can penetrate the disintegrated stratum corneum and encounter subcorneal keratinocytes in the skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Type 1 helper T (Th1) cells infiltrate chronic lesions with atopic dermatitis, and antimycotic agents improve its symptoms. We aimed to identify Malassezia-induced chemokines in keratinocytes and examine whether antimycotics suppressed this induction. Normal human keratinocytes were incubated with a Malassezia restricta extract and antimycotics. Chemokine expression was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 activity was examined by luciferase assays. The tyrosine-phosphorylation of STAT1 was analyzed by western blotting. The M. restricta extract increased the mRNA and protein expression of Th1-attracting CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)10 and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation in keratinocytes, which was suppressed by a Janus kinase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine suppressed M. restricta extract-induced CXCL10 mRNA and protein expression and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation. These effects were similarly induced by 15-deoxy-Δ-(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ), a prostaglandin D2 metabolite. Antimycotics increased the release of 15d-PGJ2 from keratinocytes. The antimycotic-induced suppression of CXCL10 production and STAT1 activity was counteracted by a lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine may suppress the M. restricta-induced production of CXCL10 by inhibiting STAT1 through an increase in 15d-PGJ2 production in keratinocytes. These antimycotics may block the Th1-mediated inflammation triggered by Malassezia in the chronic phase of atopic dermatitis. PMID

  15. Aldo-keto Reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) is overexpressed in skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and affects SCC growth via prostaglandin metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mantel, Alon; Carpenter-Mendini, Amanda; VanBuskirk, JoAnne; Pentland, Alice P.

    2014-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) is an enzyme involved in metabolizing prostaglandins (PGs) and sex hormones. It metabolizes PGD2 to 9α11β-PGF2, diverting the spontaneous conversion of PGD2 to the PPARγ agonist, 15-Deoxy-Delta-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2). AKR1C3 is overexpressed in various malignancies, suggesting a tumor promoting function. This work investigates AKR1C3 expression in human non-melanoma skin cancers, revealing overexpression in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Effects of AKR1C3 overexpression were then evaluated using 3 SCC cell lines. AKR1C3 was detected in all SCC cell lines and its expression was upregulated in response to its substrate, PGD2. Although attenuating AKR1C3 expression in SCC cells by siRNA did not affect growth, treatment with PGD2 and its dehydration metabolite, 15d-PGJ2, decreased SCC proliferation in a PPARγ-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone profoundly inhibited SCC proliferation. Finally, we generated an SCC cell line that stably overexpressed AKR1C3 (SCC-AKR1C3). SCC-AKR1C3 metabolized PGD2 to 9α11β-PGF2 12 fold faster than the parent cell line and was protected from the anti-proliferative effect mediated by PGD2. This work suggests that PGD2 and its metabolite 15d-PGJ2 attenuate SCC proliferation in a PPARγ-dependent manner, therefore activation of PPARγ by agonists such as Pioglitazone may benefit those at high risk of SCC. PMID:24917395

  16. The Functions of MicroRNAs: mRNA Decay and Translational Repression.

    PubMed

    Iwakawa, Hiro-oki; Tomari, Yukihide

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small noncoding RNAs, which regulate complementary mRNAs by inducing translational repression and mRNA decay. Although this dual repression system seems to operate in both animals and plants, genetic and biochemical studies suggest that the mechanism underlying the miRNA-mediated silencing is different in the two kingdoms. Here, we review the recent progress in our understanding of how miRNAs mediate translational repression and mRNA decay, and discuss the contributions of the two silencing modes to the overall silencing effect in both kingdoms. PMID:26437588

  17. Androgen Receptor Repression of GnRH Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Brayman, Melissa J.; Pepa, Patricia A.; Berdy, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in androgen levels lead to reproductive defects in both males and females, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, anovulation, and infertility. Androgens have been shown to down-regulate GnRH mRNA levels through an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent mechanism. Here, we investigate how androgen regulates expression from the GnRH regulatory region in the GT1-7 cell line, a model of GnRH neurons. A synthetic androgen, R1881, repressed transcription from the GnRH promoter (GnRH-P) in an AR-dependent manner, and liganded AR associated with the chromatin at the GnRH-P in live GT1-7 cells. The three known octamer-binding transcription factor-1 (Oct-1) binding sites in GnRH-P were required for AR-mediated repression, although other sequences were also involved. Although a multimer of the consensus Oct-1 binding site was not repressed, a multimer of the cluster of Oct-1, Pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor (Pbx)/Prep, and NK2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2.1) binding sites, found at −106/−91 in GnRH-P, was sufficient for repression. In fact, overexpression of any of these factors disrupted the androgen response, indicating that a balance of factors in this tripartite complex is required for AR repression. AR bound to this region in EMSA, indicating a direct interaction of AR with DNA or with other transcription factors bound to GnRH-P at this sequence. Collectively, our data demonstrate that GnRH transcription is repressed by AR via multiple sequences in GnRH-P, including three Oct-1 binding sites, and that this repression requires the complex interaction of several transcription factors. PMID:22074952

  18. Novel TCF-binding sites specify transcriptional repression by Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Chang, Mikyung V; Cadigan, Ken M

    2008-05-21

    Both transcriptional activation and repression have essential functions in maintaining proper spatial and temporal control of gene expression. Although Wnt signalling is often associated with gene activation, we have identified several directly repressed targets of Wnt signalling in Drosophila. Here, we explore how individual Wnt target genes are specified for signal-induced activation or repression. Similar to activation, repression required binding of Armadillo (Arm) to the N terminus of TCF. However, TCF/Arm mediated repression by binding to DNA motifs that are markedly different from typical TCF-binding sites. Conversion of the novel motifs to standard TCF-binding sites reversed the mode of regulation, resulting in Wnt-mediated activation instead of repression. A mutant form of Arm defective in activation was still functional for repression, indicating that distinct domains of the protein are required for each activity. This study suggests that the sequence of TCF-binding sites allosterically regulates the TCF/Arm complex to effect either transcriptional activation or repression. PMID:18418383

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors: The Epigenetic Therapeutics That Repress Hypoxia-Inducible Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyang; Sang, Nianli

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been actively explored as a new generation of chemotherapeutics for cancers, generally known as epigenetic therapeutics. Recent findings indicate that several types of HDACIs repress angiogenesis, a process essential for tumor metabolism and progression. Accumulating evidence supports that this repression is mediated by disrupting the function of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1, HIF-2, and collectively, HIF), which are the master regulators of angiogenesis and cellular adaptation to hypoxia. Since HIF also regulate glucose metabolism, cell survival, microenvironment remodeling, and other alterations commonly required for tumor progression, they are considered as novel targets for cancer chemotherapy. Though the precise biochemical mechanism underlying the HDACI-triggered repression of HIF function remains unclear, potential cellular factors that may link the inhibition of deacetylase activity to the repression of HIF function have been proposed. Here we review published data that inhibitors of type I/II HDACs repress HIF function by either reducing functional HIF-1α levels, or repressing HIF-α transactivation activity. In addition, underlying mechanisms and potential proteins involved in the repression will be discussed. A thorough understanding of HDACI-induced repression of HIF function may facilitate the development of future therapies to either repress or promote angiogenesis for cancer or chronic ischemic disorders, respectively. PMID:21151670

  20. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  1. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  2. The unified theory of repression.

    PubMed

    Erdelyi, Matthew Hugh

    2006-10-01

    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). "Repression" was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. Freud adapted repression to the defensive inhibition of "unbearable" mental contents. Substantial experimental literatures on attentional biases, thought avoidance, interference, and intentional forgetting exist, the oldest prototype being the work of Ebbinghaus, who showed that intentional avoidance of memories results in their progressive forgetting over time. It has now become clear, as clinicians had claimed, that the inaccessible materials are often available and emerge indirectly (e.g., procedurally, implicitly). It is also now established that the Ebbinghaus retention function can be partly reversed, with resulting increases of conscious memory over time (hypermnesia). Freud's clinical experience revealed early on that exclusion from consciousness was effected not just by simple repression (inhibition) but also by a variety of distorting techniques, some deployed to degrade latent contents (denial), all eventually subsumed under the rubric of defense mechanisms ("repression in the widest sense"). Freudian and Bartlettian distortions are essentially the same, even in name, except for motive (cognitive vs. emotional), and experimentally induced false memories and other "memory illusions" are laboratory analogs of self-induced distortions. PMID:17156548

  3. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rennoll, Sherri A; Konsavage, Wesley M; Yochum, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24299953

  4. ATRX represses alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    PubMed

    Napier, Christine E; Huschtscha, Lily I; Harvey, Adam; Bower, Kylie; Noble, Jane R; Hendrickson, Eric A; Reddel, Roger R

    2015-06-30

    The unlimited proliferation of cancer cells requires a mechanism to prevent telomere shortening. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is an homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation used in tumors, including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcoma subtypes, and glial brain tumors. Mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex have been reported in tumors and cell lines that use the ALT mechanism, suggesting that ATRX may be an ALT repressor. We show here that knockout or knockdown of ATRX in mortal cells or immortal telomerase-positive cells is insufficient to activate ALT. Notably, however, in SV40-transformed mortal fibroblasts ATRX loss results in either a significant increase in the proportion of cell lines activating ALT (instead of telomerase) or in a significant decrease in the time prior to ALT activation. These data indicate that loss of ATRX function cooperates with one or more as-yet unidentified genetic or epigenetic alterations to activate ALT. Moreover, transient ATRX expression in ALT-positive/ATRX-negative cells represses ALT activity. These data provide the first direct, functional evidence that ATRX represses ALT. PMID:26001292

  5. Functional dissection of the global repressor Tup1 in yeast: dominant role of the C-terminal repression domain.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhizhou; Varanasi, Ushasri; Trumbly, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Tup1, in association with Cyc8 (Ssn6), functions as a general repressor of transcription. Tup1 and Cyc8 are required for repression of diverse families of genes coordinately controlled by glucose repression, mating type, and other mechanisms. This repression is mediated by recruitment of the Cyc8-Tup1 complex to target promoters by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. We created a library of XhoI linker insertions and internal in-frame deletion mutations within the TUP1 coding region. Insertion mutations outside of the WD domains were wild type, while insertions within the WD domains induced mutant phenotypes with differential effects on the target genes SUC2, MFA2, RNR2, and HEM13. Deletion mutations confirmed previous findings of two separate repression domains in the N and C termini. The cumulative data suggest that the C-terminal repression domain, located near the first WD repeat, plays the dominant role in repression. Although the N-terminal repression domain is sufficient for partial repression, deletion of this region does not compromise repression. Surprisingly, deletion of the majority of the histone-binding domain of Tup1 also does not significantly reduce repression. The N-terminal region containing potential alpha-helical coiled coils is required for Tup1 oligomerization and association with Cyc8. Association with Cyc8 is required for repression of SUC2, HEM13, and RNR2 but not MFA2 and STE2. PMID:12136003

  6. Pharmacological Repression of PPARγ Promotes Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, David P.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Boregowda, Siddaraju V.; Asteian, Alice; Hughes, Travis S.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A.; Khan, Tanya M.; Novick, Scott J.; Park, HaJeung; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Phinney, Donald G.; Bruning, John B.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is the master regulator of adipogenesis and the pharmacological target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of insulin sensitizers. Activation of PPARγ by TZDs promotes adipogenesis at the expense of osteoblast formation, contributing to their associated adverse effects on bone. Recently we reported the development of PPARγ antagonist SR1664, designed to block the obesity induced phosphorylation of serine 273 (S273) in the absence of classical agonism, to derive insulin sensitizing efficacy with improved therapeutic index. Here we identify the structural mechanism by which SR1664 actively antagonizes PPARγ, and extend these findings to develop the inverse agonist SR2595. Treatment of isolated bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with SR2595 promotes induction of osteogenic differentiation. Together these results identify the structural determinants of ligand mediated PPARγ repression, and suggest a therapeutic approach to promote bone formation. PMID:26068133

  7. Rule of Repression in Chile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This report on the current condition of the Mapuche Indians of Chile is edited from a document on the "Situation of Human Rights in Chile" and details the repressive and inhumane treatment of the largest indigenous ethnic minority in the country. (Author/RTS)

  8. Osa-containing Brahma chromatin remodeling complexes are required for the repression of Wingless target genes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Russell T.; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2000-01-01

    The Wingless signaling pathway directs many developmental processes in Drosophila by regulating the expression of specific downstream target genes. We report here that the product of the trithorax group gene osa is required to repress such genes in the absence of the Wingless signal. The Wingless-regulated genes nubbin, Distal-less, and decapentaplegic and a minimal enhancer from the Ultrabithorax gene are misexpressed in osa mutants and repressed by ectopic Osa. Osa-mediated repression occurs downstream of the up-regulation of Armadillo but is sensitive both to the relative levels of activating Armadillo/Pangolin and repressing Groucho/Pangolin complexes present and to the responsiveness of the promoter to Wingless. Osa functions as a component of the Brahma chromatin-remodeling complex; other components of this complex are likewise required to repress Wingless target genes. These results suggest that altering the conformation of chromatin is an important mechanism by which Wingless signaling activates gene expression. PMID:11124806

  9. Conserved intron elements repress splicing of a neuron-specific c-src exon in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R C; Black, D L

    1995-01-01

    The neuron-specific N1 exon of the mouse c-src transcript is normally skipped in nonneuronal cells. In this study, we examined the sequence requirements for the exclusion of this exon in nonneuronal HeLa cell nuclear extracts. We found that the repression of the N1 exon is mediated by specific intron sequences that flank the N1 exon. Mutagenesis experiments identified conserved CUCUCU elements within these intron regions that are required for the repression of N1 splicing. The addition of an RNA competitor containing the upstream regulatory sequence to the HeLa extract induced splicing of the intron downstream of N1, indicating that the competitor sequence binds to splicing repressor proteins. The similarities between this mechanism for src splicing repression and the repression of other regulated exons point to a common role of exon-spanning interactions in splicing repression. PMID:7565790

  10. Repression of CIITA by the Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta is independent of its dimerization and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Balan, Nicolae; Osborn, Kay; Sinclair, Alison J

    2016-03-01

    Repression of the cellular CIITA gene is part of the immune evasion strategy of the γherpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during its lytic replication cycle in B-cells. In part, this is mediated through downregulation of MHC class II gene expression via the targeted repression of CIITA, the cellular master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. This repression is achieved through a reduction in CIITA promoter activity, initiated by the EBV transcription and replication factor, Zta (BZLF1, EB1, ZEBRA). Zta is the earliest gene expressed during the lytic replication cycle. Zta interacts with sequence-specific elements in promoters, enhancers and the replication origin (ZREs), and also modulates gene expression through interaction with cellular transcription factors and co-activators. Here, we explore the requirements for Zta-mediated repression of the CIITA promoter. We find that repression by Zta is specific for the CIITA promoter and can be achieved in the absence of other EBV genes. Surprisingly, we find that the dimerization region of Zta is not required to mediate repression. This contrasts with an obligate requirement of this region to correctly orientate the DNA contact regions of Zta to mediate activation of gene expression through ZREs. Additional support for the model that Zta represses the CIITA promoter without direct DNA binding comes from promoter mapping that shows that repression does not require the presence of a ZRE in the CIITA promoter. PMID:26653871