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Sample records for 15n nmr spectroscopy

  1. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  2. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  3. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  4. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C, 15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture.

  5. Differentiation of histidine tautomeric states using (15)N selectively filtered (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-08-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional (15)N selectively filtered (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all (13)C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When (15)N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the (13)C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of (13)C, (15)N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  6. Differentiation of Histidine Tautomeric States using 15N Selectively Filtered 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-01-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C,15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  7. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of
    biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene
    (TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvic
    acids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. A
    silylation p...

  8. High Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Investigation of (15)N-Labeled Rosette Nanotubes: Hydrogen Bond Network and Channel-Bound Water.

    PubMed

    Fenniri, Hicham; Tikhomirov, Grigory A; Brouwer, Darren H; Bouatra, Souhaila; El Bakkari, Mounir; Yan, Zhimin; Cho, Jae-Young; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2016-05-18

    (15)N-labeled rosette nanotubes were synthesized and investigated using high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and electron microscopy. The results established the H-bond network involved in the self-assembly of the nanostructure as well as bound water molecules in the nanotube's channel. PMID:27141817

  9. 15N-labeled tRNA. Identification of 4-thiouridine in Escherichia coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 by 1H-15N two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffey, R H; Davis, D R; Yamaizumi, Z; Nishimura, S; Hawkins, B L; Poulter, C D

    1986-09-15

    Uridine is uniquely conserved at position 8 in elongator tRNAs and binds to A14 to form a reversed Hoogsteen base pair which folds the dihydrouridine loop back into the core of the L-shaped molecule. On the basis of 1H NMR studies, Hurd and co-workers (Hurd, R. E., Robillard, G. T., and Reid, B. R. (1977) Biochemistry 16, 2095-2100) concluded that the interaction between positions 8 and 14 is absent in Escherichia coli tRNAs with only 3 base pairs in the dihydrouridine stem. We have taken advantage of the unique 15N chemical shift of N3 in thiouridine to identify 1H and 15N resonances for the imino units of S4U8 and s4U9 in E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2. Model studies with chloroform-soluble derivatives of uridine and 4-thiouridine show that the chemical shifts of the protons in the imino moieties move downfield from 7.9 to 14.4 ppm and from 9.1 to 15.7 ppm, respectively; whereas, the corresponding 15N chemical shifts move downfield from 157.5 to 162.5 ppm and from 175.5 to 180.1 ppm upon hydrogen bonding to 5'-O-acetyl-2',3'-isopropylidene adenosine. The large difference in 15N chemical shifts for U and s4U allows one to unambiguously identify s4U imino resonances by 15N NMR spectroscopy. E. coli tRNASer1 and tRNATyr2 were selectively enriched with 15N at N3 of all uridines and modified uridines. Two-dimensional 1H-15N chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy revealed that both tRNAs have resonances with 1H and 15N chemical shifts characteristic of s4UA pairs. The 1H shift is approximately 1 ppm upfield from the typical s4U8 resonance at 14.8 ppm, presumably as a result of local diamagnetic anisotropies. An additional s4U resonance with 1H and 15N shifts typical of interaction of a bound water or a sugar hydroxyl group with s4U9 was discovered in the spectrum of tRNATyr2. Our NMR results for tRNAs with 3-base pair dihydrouridine stems suggest that these molecules have an U8A14 tertiary interaction similar to that found in tRNAs with 4-base pair dihydrouridine

  10. Characterization of the nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N NMR, and EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, D.K.; Smith, C.A.; Zwick, B.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Conradson, S.D.

    1993-12-01

    Nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) are studied in solutions containing nitrate up to 13 molar (M). Three major nitrato complexes are observed and identified using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) as Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. The possibility that Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 1}{sup 3+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 1+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 1{minus}} are major species in solution is not consistent with these results and an upper limit of 0.10 can be set on the fraction for each of these three nitrate complexes in nitrate containing solutions. Fraction of the three major species in nitric acid over the 1--13 M range were calculated from absorption spectra data. The fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} as a function of nitric acid concentration is in good agreement with the literature, whereas the fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} species differ from previous studies. We have modeled the chemical equilibria up to moderate ionic strength ( < 6 molal) using the specific ion interaction theory (SM. Comparison of our experimental observations to literature stability constants that assume the presence of mononitrate species is poor. Stability constant at zero ionic strength for the dinitrato complex is determined to be log({beta}{sub 2}{sup 0})=3.77 {plus_minus} 0.14 (2{sigma}).

  11. Cerebral glutamine metabolism under hyperammonemia determined in vivo by localized 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cudalbu, Cristina; Lanz, Bernard; Duarte, João MN; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Pilloud, Yves; Mlynárik, Vladimir; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Brain glutamine synthetase (GS) is an integral part of the glutamate–glutamine cycle and occurs in the glial compartment. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allows noninvasive measurements of the concentrations and synthesis rates of metabolites. 15N MRS is an alternative approach to 13C MRS. Incorporation of labeled 15N from ammonia in cerebral glutamine allows to measure several metabolic reactions related to nitrogen metabolism, including the glutamate–glutamine cycle. To measure 15N incorporation into the position 5N of glutamine and position 2N of glutamate and glutamine, we developed a novel 15N pulse sequence to simultaneously detect, for the first time, [5-15N]Gln and [2-15N]Gln+Glu in vivo in the rat brain. In addition, we also measured for the first time in the same experiment localized 1H spectra for a direct measurement of the net glutamine accumulation. Mathematical modeling of 1H and 15N MRS data allowed to reduce the number of assumptions and provided reliable determination of GS (0.30±0.050 μmol/g per minute), apparent neurotransmission (0.26±0.030 μmol/g per minute), glutamate dehydrogenase (0.029±0.002 μmol/g per minute), and net glutamine accumulation (0.033±0.001 μmol/g per minute). These results showed an increase of GS and net glutamine accumulation under hyperammonemia, supporting the concept of their implication in cerebral ammonia detoxification. PMID:22167234

  12. 15N and 1H NMR spectroscopy of the catalytic histidine in chloromethyl ketone-inhibited complexes of serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Tsilikounas, E; Rao, T; Gutheil, W G; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-02-20

    The hemiketal hydroxyl groups in chloromethyl ketone (cmk) complexes of trypsin and chymotrypsin have been reported to ionize to the oxyanion with pK(a) values 2-4 pK(a) units below expectations for such a functional group on the basis of the behavior of the hemiketal carbon atom in 13C NMR spectra [Finucane, M. D., & Malthouse, J. P. G. (1992) Biochem. J. 286, 889-900]. The low pK(a) indicates the enzymes selectively stabilize the oxyanion form of the bound inhibitor, and therefore that cmk complexes may be good models of enzyme-mediated transition-state stabilization. However, the 13C NMR studies could not rule out His57 as the titrating group. Here we report the behavior of the ring 15N atoms of His57 in the Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-cmk complex of alpha-lytic protease. Both N(delta 1) and N(epsilon 2) of His57 respond to an ionization with a pK(a) of approximately 7.5, but His57 itself does not titrate as N(epsilon 2) remains alkylated and N(delta 1) remains bonded to a proton over the entire pH range. The species titrating with a pK(a) of approximately 7.5 must therefore be the hemiketal hydroxyl. The results also show that the 1H NMR signal from the proton in the Asp-His hydrogen bond behaves in a characteristic manner in cmk complexes and can be used diagnostically to confirm that His57 does not titrate and to measure the pK(a) of the hemiketal hydroxyl in cmk-protease complexes without resorting to 15N-labeling. We have used the behavior of this signal to directly confirm that His57 does not titrate in the trypsin and chymotrypsin complexes that were the subjects of the original 13C NMR studies. PMID:8652587

  13. Interaction of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with cytochrome c peroxidase investigated by [15N, 1H] heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Worrall, J A; Kolczak, U; Canters, G W; Ubbink, M

    2001-06-19

    The interaction of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with its physiological redox partner cytochrome c peroxidase has been investigated using heteronuclear NMR techniques. Chemical shift perturbations for both 15N and 1H nuclei arising from the interaction of isotopically enriched 15N cytochrome c with cytochrome c peroxidase have been observed. For the diamagnetic, ferrous cytochrome c, 34 amides are affected by binding, corresponding to residues at the front face of the protein and in agreement with the interface observed in the 1:1 crystal structure of the complex. In contrast, for the paramagnetic, ferric protein, 56 amides are affected, corresponding to residues both at the front and toward the rear of the protein. In addition, the chemical shift perturbations were larger for the ferric protein. Using experimentally observed pseudocontact shifts the magnetic susceptibility tensor of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c in both the free and bound forms has been calculated with HN nuclei as inputs. In contrast to an earlier study, the results indicate that there is no change in the geometry of the magnetic axes for cytochrome c upon binding to cytochrome c peroxidase. This leads us to conclude that the additional effects observed for the ferric protein arise either from a difference in binding mode or from the more flexible overall structure causing a transmittance effect upon binding. PMID:11401551

  14. (15)N NMR studies of a nitrile-modified nucleoside.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Anne T; Gai, Xin Sonia; Buckwalter, Beth L; Fenlon, Edward E; Brewer, Scott H

    2010-12-30

    Nitrile-modified molecules have proven to be excellent probes of local environments in biomolecules via both vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopy. The utility of the nitrile group as a spectroscopic probe has been expanded here to (15)N NMR spectroscopy by selective (15)N incorporation. The (15)N NMR chemical shift (δ((15)N)) of the (15)N-labeled 5-cyano-2'-deoxyuridine (C(15)NdU, 1a) was found to change from 153.47 to 143.80 ppm in going from THF-d(8) to D(2)O. A 0.81 ppm downfield shift was measured upon formation of a hydrogen-bond-mediated heterodimer between 2,6-diheptanamidopyridine and a silyl ether analogue of 1a in chloroform, and the small intrinsic temperature dependence of δ((15)N) of C(15)NdU was measured as a 0.38 ppm downfield shift from 298 to 338 K. The experiments were complemented with density functional theory calculations exploring the effect of solvation on the (15)N NMR chemical shift. PMID:21126044

  15. 15N chemical shift referencing in solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Philippe; Raya, Jésus; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has much advanced during the last decade and provides a multitude of data that can be used for high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules, polymers, inorganic compounds or macromolecules. In some cases the chemical shift referencing has become a limiting factor to the precision of the structure calculations and we have therefore evaluated a number of methods used in proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For (13)C solid-state NMR spectroscopy adamantane is generally accepted as an external standard, but to calibrate the (15)N chemical shift scale several standards are in use. As a consequence the published chemical shift values exhibit considerable differences (up to 22 ppm). In this paper we report the (15)N chemical shift of several commonly used references compounds in order to allow for comparison and recalibration of published data and future work. We show that (15)NH4Cl in its powdered form (at 39.3 ppm with respect to liquid NH3) is a suitable external reference as it produces narrow lines when compared to other reference compounds and at the same time allows for the set-up of cross-polarization NMR experiments. The compound is suitable to calibrate magic angle spinning and static NMR experiments. Finally the temperature variation of (15)NH4Cl chemical shift is reported. PMID:24746715

  16. 15N NMR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the active site of serine proteases: evidence for a moving histidine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W

    1986-11-18

    Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the histidyl residue in the catalytic triad of alpha-lytic protease in the resting enzyme and in the transition-state or tetrahedral intermediate analogue complexes formed with phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate. The 15N shifts indicate that a strong hydrogen bond links the active site histidine and serine residues in the resting enzyme in solution. This result is at odds with interpretations of the X-ray diffraction data of alpha-lytic protease and of other serine proteases, which indicate that the serine and histidine residues are too far apart and not properly aligned for the formation of a hydrogen bond. In addition, the nitrogen-15 shifts demonstrate that protonation of the histidine imidazole ring at low pH in the transition-state or tetrahedral intermediate analogue complexes formed with phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate triggers the disruption of the aspartate-histidine hydrogen bond. These results suggest a catalytic mechanism involving directed movement of the imidazole ring of the active site histidyl residue. PMID:3542033

  17. Secondary Structure, Backbone Dynamics, and Structural Topology of Phospholamban and Its Phosphorylated and Arg9Cys-Mutated Forms in Phospholipid Bilayers Utilizing 13C and 15N Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLB) is a membrane protein that regulates heart muscle relaxation rates via interactions with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA). When PLB is phosphorylated or Arg9Cys (R9C) is mutated, inhibition of SERCA is relieved. 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy is utilized to investigate conformational changes of PLB upon phosphorylation and R9C mutation. 13C=O NMR spectra of the cytoplasmic domain reveal two α-helical structural components with population changes upon phosphorylation and R9C mutation. The appearance of an unstructured component is observed on domain Ib. 15N NMR spectra indicate an increase in backbone dynamics of the cytoplasmic domain. Wild-type PLB (WT-PLB), Ser16-phosphorylated PLB (P-PLB), and R9C-mutated PLB (R9C-PLB) all have a very dynamic domain Ib, and the transmembrane domain has an immobile component. 15N NMR spectra indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of R9C-PLB adopts an orientation similar to P-PLB and shifts away from the membrane surface. Domain Ib (Leu28) of P-PLB and R9C-PLB loses the alignment. The R9C-PLB adopts a conformation similar to P-PLB with a population shift to a more extended and disordered state. The NMR data suggest the more extended and disordered forms of PLB may relate to inhibition relief. PMID:24511878

  18. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  19. Mechanism of the bisphosphatase reaction of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase probed by (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okar, D A; Live, D H; Devany, M H; Lange, A J

    2000-08-15

    The histidines in the bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase were labeled with (15)N, both specifically at N1' and globally, for use in heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR spectroscopic analyses. The histidine-associated (15)N resonances were assigned by correlation to the C2' protons which had been assigned previously [Okar et al., Biochemistry 38, 1999, 4471-79]. Acquisition of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC from a phosphate-free sample demonstrated that the existence of His-258 in the rare N1' tautomeric state is dependent upon occupation of the phosphate binding site filled by the O2 phosphate of the substrate, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, and subsequently, the phosphohistidine intermediate. The phosphohistidine intermediate is characterized by two hydrogen bonds involving the catalytic histidines, His-258 and His-392, which are directly observed at the N1' positions of the imidazole rings. The N1' of phospho-His-258 is protonated ((1)H chemical shift, 14.0 ppm) and hydrogen bonded to the backbone carbonyl of Gly-259. The N1' of cationic His-392 is hydrogen bonded ((1)H chemical shift, 13.5 ppm) to the phosphoryl moiety of the phosphohistidine. The existence of a protonated phospho-His-258 intermediate and the observation of a fairly strong hydrogen bond to the same phosphohistidine implies that hydrolysis of the covalent intermediate proceeds without any requirement for an "activated" water. Using the labeled histidines as probes of the catalytic site mutation of Glu-327 to alanine revealed that, in addition to its function as the proton donor to fructose-6-phosphate during formation of the transient phosphohistidine intermediate at the N3' of His-258, this residue has a significant role in maintaining the structural integrity of the catalytic site. The (1)H-(15)N HSQC data also provide clear evidence that despite being a surface residue, His-446 has a very acidic pK(a), much less than 6.0. On the basis of

  20. Identification of novel hydrazine metabolites by 15N-NMR.

    PubMed

    Preece, N E; Nicholson, J K; Timbrell, J A

    1991-05-01

    15N-NMR has been used to study the metabolism of hydrazine in rats in vivo. Single doses of [15N2]hydrazine (2.0 mmol/kg: 98.6% g atom) were administered to rats and urine collected for 24 hr over ice. A number of metabolites were detected by 15N-NMR analysis of lyophilized urine. Ammonia was detected as a singlet at 0 ppm and unchanged [15N2]hydrazine was present in the urine detectable as a singlet at 32 ppm. Peaks were observed at 107 and 110 ppm which were identified as being due to the hydrazido nitrogen of acetylhydrazine and diacetylhydrazine, respectively. A resonance at 85 ppm was ascribed to carbazic acid, resulting from reaction of hydrazine with carbon dioxide. A singlet detected at 316 ppm was thought to be due to the hydrazono nitrogen of the pyruvate hydrazone. The resonance at 56 ppm was assigned to 15N-enriched urea, this together with the presence of ammonia indicates that the N-N bond of hydrazine is cleaved in vivo, possibly by N-oxidation, and the resultant ammonia is incorporated into urea. A doublet centred at 150 ppm and a singlet at 294 ppm were assigned to a metabolite which results from cyclization of the 2-oxoglutarate hydrazone. Therefore 15N-NMR spectroscopic analysis of urine has yielded significant new information on the metabolism of hydrazine. PMID:2018564

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of 15N NMR protonation shifts.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study revealed that the nature of the upfield (shielding) protonation effect in 15N NMR originates in the change of the contribution of the sp(2)-hybridized nitrogen lone pair on protonation resulting in a marked shielding of nitrogen of about 100 ppm. On the contrary, for amine-type nitrogen, protonation of the nitrogen lone pair results in the deshielding protonation effect of about 25 ppm, so that the total deshielding protonation effect of about 10 ppm is due to the interplay of the contributions of adjacent natural bond orbitals. A versatile computational scheme for the calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of protonated nitrogen species and their neutral precursors is proposed at the density functional theory level taking into account solvent effects within the supermolecule solvation model. PMID:25891386

  2. 15N NMR chemical shifts in papaverine decomposition products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyrski, Andrzej; Girreser, Ulrich; Hermann, Tadeusz

    2013-03-01

    Papaverine can be easily oxidized to papaverinol, papaveraldine and 2,3,9,10-tetramethoxy-12-oxo-12H-indolo[2,1-a]isoquinolinium chloride. On addition of alkali solution the latter compound forms 2-(2-carboxy-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinolinium inner salt. Together with these structures the interesting 13-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3,8,9-tetramethoxy-6a-12a-diazadibenzo[a,g]fluorenylium chloride is discussed, which is formed in the Gadamer-Schulemann reaction of papaverine as a side product. This letter reports the 15N NMR spectra of the above mentioned compounds.

  3. Effect of phosphorylation on hydrogen-bonding interactions of the active site histidine of the phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system determined by sup 15 N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    van Dijk, A.A.; de Lange, L.C.M.; Robillard, G.T. ); Bachovchin, W.W. )

    1990-09-04

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this histidine was examined with {sup 15}N NMR. For this purpose we selectively enriched the histidine imidazole nitrogens with {sup 15}N by supplying an E. coli histidine auxotroph with the amino acid labeled either at the N{delta}1 and N{epsilon}2 positions or at only the N{delta}1 position. {sup 15}N NMR spectra of two synthesized model compound, phosphoimidazole and phosphomethylimidazole, were also recorded. The authors show that, prior to phosphorylation, the protonated His15 N{epsilon}2 is strongly hydrogen bonded, most probably to a carboxylate moiety. The H-bond should strengthen the nucleophilic character of the deprotonated N{delta}1, resulting in a good acceptor for the phosphoryl group. The hydrogen bond to the His15 N{delta}1 breaks upon phosphorylation of the residue. Implications of the H-bond structure for the mechanism of phosphorylation of HPr are discussed.

  4. Effect of phosphorylation on hydrogen-bonding interactions of the active site histidine of the phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, A A; de Lange, L C; Bachovchin, W W; Robillard, G T

    1990-09-01

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this histidine was examined with 15N NMR. For this purpose we selectively enriched the histidine imidazole nitrogens with 15N by supplying an E. coli histidine auxotroph with the amino acid labeled either at the N delta 1 and N epsilon 2 positions or at only the N delta 1 position. 15N NMR spectra of two synthesized model compounds, phosphoimidazole and phosphomethylimidazole, were also recorded. We show that, prior to phosphorylation, the protonated His15 N epsilon 2 is strongly hydrogen bonded, most probably to a carboxylate moiety. The H-bond should strengthen the nucleophilic character of the deprotonated N delta 1, resulting in a good acceptor for the phosphoryl group. The hydrogen bond to the His15 N delta 1 breaks upon phosphorylation of the residue. Implications of the H-bond structure for the mechanism of phosphorylation of HPr are discussed. PMID:2261470

  5. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  6. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [subscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [subscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [subscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in acquiring…

  7. Accessible NMR Experiments Studying the Hydrodynamics of [superscript 15]N-Enriched Ubiquitin at Low Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laura E.; Rovnyak, David

    2007-01-01

    We have recently developed and implemented two experiments in biomolecular NMR for an undergraduate-level biophysical chemistry laboratory with commercially available [superscript 15]N-enriched human ubiquitin. These experiments take advantage of [superscript 15]N direct detection of the NMR signal. The first experiment develops skills in…

  8. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  9. Study of stereospecificity of 1H, 13C, 15N and 77Se shielding constants in the configurational isomers of the selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine by NMR spectroscopy and MP2-GIAO calculations.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Albanov, Alexander I; Levanova, Ekaterina P; Levkovskaya, Galina G

    2011-11-01

    In the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of selenophene-2-carbaldehyde azine, the (1)H-5, (13)C-3 and (13)C-5 signals of the selenophene ring are shifted to higher frequencies, whereas those of the (1)H-1, (13)C-1, (13)C-2 and (13)C-4 are shifted to lower frequencies on going from the EE to ZZ isomer or from the E moiety to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The (15)N chemical shift is significantly larger in the EE isomer relative to the ZZ isomer and in the E moiety relative to the Z moiety of EZ isomer. A very pronounced difference (60-65 mg/g) between the (77)Se resonance positions is revealed in the studied azine isomers, the (77)Se peak being shifted to higher frequencies in the ZZ isomer and in the Z moiety of EZ isomer. The trends in the changes of the measured chemical shifts are reasonably reproduced by the GIAO calculations at the MP2 level of the (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (77)Se shielding constants in the energy-favorable conformation with the syn orientation of both selenophene rings relative to the C = N groups. The NBO analysis suggests that such an arrangement of the selenophene rings may take place because of a higher energy of some intramolecular interactions. PMID:22002712

  10. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schram, J.; Bellama, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two dimensional NMR represents a significant achievement in the continuing effort to increase solution in NMR spectroscopy. This book explains the fundamentals of this new technique and its analytical applications. It presents the necessary information, in pictorial form, for reading the ''2D NMR,'' and enables the practicing chemist to solve problems and run experiments on a commercial spectrometer by using the software provided by the manufacturer.

  11. (15)N NMR spectroscopy unambiguously establishes the coordination mode of the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) in Ru(ii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Battistin, Federica; Balducci, Gabriele; Demitri, Nicola; Iengo, Elisabetta; Milani, Barbara; Alessio, Enzo

    2015-09-21

    We investigated the reactivity of three Ru(ii) precursors -trans,cis,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(dmso-O)2], cis,fac-[RuCl2(dmso-O)(dmso-S)3], and trans-[RuCl2(dmso-S)4] - towards the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) or its parent compound 4-methyl-2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine ligand (mpp), in which a methyl group replaces the carboxylic group on the pyrimidine ring. In principle, both cppH and mpp can originate linkage isomers, depending on how the pyrimidine ring binds to ruthenium through the nitrogen atom ortho (N(o)) or para (N(p)) to the group in position 4. The principal aim of this work was to establish a spectroscopic fingerprint for distinguishing the coordination mode of cppH/mpp also in the absence of an X-ray structural characterization. By virtue of the new complexes described here, together with the others previously reported by us, we successfully recorded {(1)H,(15)N}-HMBC NMR spectra at natural abundance of the (15)N isotope on a consistent number of fully characterized Ru(ii)-cppH/mpp compounds, most of them being stereoisomers and/or linkage isomers. Thus, we found that (15)N NMR chemical shifts unambiguously establish the binding mode of cppH and mpp - either through N(o) or N(p)- and can be conveniently applied also in the absence of the X-ray structure. In fact, coordination of cppH to Ru(ii) induces a marked upfield shift for the resonance of the N atoms directly bound to the metal, with coordination induced shifts (CIS) ranging from ca.-45 to -75 ppm, depending on the complex, whereas the unbound N atom resonates at a frequency similar to that of the free ligand. Similar results were found for the complexes of mpp. This work confirmed our previous finding that cppH has no binding preference, whereas mpp binds exclusively through N(p). Interestingly, the two cppH linkage isomers trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(p))] (5) and trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(o))] (6) were easily obtained in pure form by exploiting their different

  12. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Gupta, Shalabh; Caporini, Marc A; Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Pruski, Marek

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  13. Study of conformations and hydrogen bonds in the configurational isomers of pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy combined with MP2 and DFT calculations and NBO analysis.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Ushakov, Igor A; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Ivanov, Andrei V; Mikhaleva, Al'bina I

    2010-09-01

    The (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies have shown that the E and Z isomers of pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime adopt preferable conformation with the syn orientation of the oxime group with respect to the pyrrole ring. The syn conformation of E and Z isomers of pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde oxime is stabilized by the N-H...N and N-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bonds, respectively. The N-H...N hydrogen bond in the E isomer causes the high-frequency shift of the bridge proton signal by about 1 ppm and increase the (1)J(N, H) coupling by approximately 3 Hz. The bridge proton shows further deshielding and higher increase of the (1)J(N, H) coupling constant due to the strengthening of the N-H...O hydrogen bond in the Z isomer. The MP2 calculations indicate that the syn conformation of E and Z isomers is by approximately 3.5 kcal/mol energetically less favorable than the anti conformation. The calculations of (1)H shielding and (1)J(N, H) coupling in the syn and anti conformations allow the contribution to these constants from the N-H...N and N-H...O hydrogen bondings to be estimated. The NBO analysis suggests that the N-H...N hydrogen bond in the E isomer is a pure electrostatic interaction while the charge transfer from the oxygen lone pair to the antibonding orbital of the N-H bond through the N-H...O hydrogen bond occurs in the Z isomer. PMID:20623827

  14. Enantiodiscrimination by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Salvadori, Piero

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of enantiorecognition processes involves the detection of enantiomeric species as well as the study of chiral discrimination mechanisms. In both fields Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays a fundamental role, providing several tools, based on the use of suitable chiral auxiliaries, for observing distinct signals of enantiomers and for investigating the complexation phenomena involved in enantiodiscrimination processes. PMID:17100610

  15. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  16. Hydrogen Bonds in Crystalline Imidazoles Studied by 15N NMR and ab initio MO Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Masui, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    1999-07-01

    Intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...N in crystals of imidazole and its 4-substituted and 4,5-disubstituted derivatives were studied by 15N CP/MAS NMR and an ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculation. In the 15N CP/MAS NMR spectrum of each of the imidazole derivatives, two peaks due to the two different functional groups, >NH and =N-, were observed. The value of the 15N isotropic chemical shift for each nitrogen atom depends on both the length of the intermolecular hydrogen bond and the kind of the substituent or substituents. It was found that the difference between the experimen-tal chemical shifts of >NH and =N-varies predominantly with the hydrogen bond length but does not show any systematic dependence on the kind of substituent. The ab initio MO calculations suggest that the hydrogen bond formation influences the 15N isotropic chemical shift predominantly, and that the difference between the 15N isotropic chemical shift of >NH and =N-varies linearly with the hydrogen bond length.

  17. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  18. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry. PMID:15625718

  19. 15N-Cholamine – A Smart Isotope Tag for Combining NMR- and MS-Based Metabolite Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tayyari, Fariba; Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Gu, Haiwei; Raftery, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the enhanced resolution and sensitivity offered by chemoselective isotope tags have enabled new and enhanced methods for detecting hundreds of quantifiable metabolites in biofluids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or mass spectrometry. However, the inability to effectively detect the same metabolites using both complementary analytical techniques has hindered the correlation of data derived from the two powerful platforms and thereby the maximization of their combined strengths for applications such as biomarker discovery of the identification of unknown metabolites. With the goal of alleviating this bottleneck, we describe a smart isotope tag, 15N-cholamine, which possesses two important properties: an NMR sensitive isotope, and a permanent charge for MS sensitivity. Using this tag, we demonstrate the detection of carboxyl group containing metabolites in both human serum and urine. By combining the individual strengths of the 15N label and permanent charge, the smart isotope tag facilitates effective detection of the carboxyl-containing metabolome by both analytical methods. This study demonstrates a unique approach to exploit the combined strength of MS and NMR in the field of metabolomics. PMID:23930664

  20. Natural abundance 14N and 15N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veinberg, Stanislav L.; Johnston, Karen E.; Jaroszewicz, Michael J.; Kispal, Brianna M.; Mireault, Christopher R.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W.

    2016-06-08

    14N ultra-wideline (UW), 1H{15N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and 15N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of 14N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. Here, a case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW 14N SSNMR spectra of stationarymore » samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R"NH+ and RR'NH2+) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments.« less

  1. (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR studies on albendazole and cyclodextrin albendazole complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M João G; García, A; Leonardi, D; Salomon, Claudio J; Lamas, M Celina; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-06-01

    (13)C and (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were recorded from albendazole (ABZ) and from ABZ:β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:methyl-β-cyclodextrin, ABZ:hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and ABZ:citrate-β-cyclodextrin, which were prepared by the spray-drying technique. ABZ signals were typical of a crystalline solid for the pure drug and of an amorphous compound obtained from ABZ:cyclodextrin samples. Relevant spectral differences were correlated with chemical interaction between ABZ and cyclodextrins. The number and type of complexes revealed a strong dependence on the cyclodextrin group substituent. Solid-state NMR data were consistent with the presence of stable inclusion complexes. PMID:25843843

  2. Structural peculiarities of configurational isomers of 1-styrylpyrroles according to 1Н, 13С and 15N NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations: electronic and steric hindrance for planar structure.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Andrei V; Ushakov, Igor A; Pavlov, Dmitry V; Schmidt, Elena Yu; Dvorko, Marina Yu

    2013-06-01

    Comparative analysis of the (1)Н and (13)С NMR data for a series of the E and Z-1-styrylpyrroles, E and Z-1-(1-propenyl)pyrroles, 1-vinylpyrroles and styrene suggests that the conjugation between the unsaturated fragments in the former compounds is reduced. This is the result of the mutual influence of the donor p-π and π-π conjugation having opposite directions. According to the NMR data combined with the density functional theory calculations, the Z isomer of 1-styrylpyrrole has essentially a nonplanar structure because of the steric hindrance. However, the E isomer of 1-styrylpyrrole is also an out-of-plane structure despite the absence of a sterical barrier for the planar one. Deviation of the E isomer from the planar structure seems to be caused by an electronic hindrance produced by a mutual influence of the p-π and π-π conjugation. The structure of the E isomer of the 2-substituted 1-styrylpyrroles is similar to that of the 2-substituted 1-vinylpyrroles. The steric effects in the Z isomer of the 2-substituted 1-styrylpyrroles result in the large increase of the dihedral angle between planes of the pyrrole ring and double bond. PMID:23558848

  3. Determination of methyl 13C-15N dipolar couplings in peptides and proteins by three-dimensional and four-dimensional magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, Jonathan J.; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Höfer, Nicole; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2008-02-01

    We describe three- and four-dimensional semiconstant-time transferred echo double resonance (SCT-TEDOR) magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments for the simultaneous measurement of multiple long-range N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings in uniformly C13, N15-enriched peptides and proteins with high resolution and sensitivity. The methods take advantage of C13 spin topologies characteristic of the side-chain methyl groups in amino acids alanine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, threonine, and valine to encode up to three distinct frequencies (N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar coupling, N15 chemical shift, and Cmethyl13 chemical shift) within a single SCT evolution period of initial duration ˜1/JCC1 (where JCC1≈35Hz, is the one-bond Cmethyl13-C13 J-coupling) while concurrently suppressing the modulation of NMR coherences due to C13-C13 and N15-C13 J-couplings and transverse relaxation. The SCT-TEDOR schemes offer several important advantages over previous methods of this type. First, significant (approximately twofold to threefold) gains in experimental sensitivity can be realized for weak N15-Cmethyl13 dipolar couplings (corresponding to structurally interesting, ˜3.5Å or longer, distances) and typical Cmethyl13 transverse relaxation rates. Second, the entire SCT evolution period can be used for Cmethyl13 and/or N15 frequency encoding, leading to increased spectral resolution with minimal additional coherence decay. Third, the experiments are inherently "methyl selective," which results in simplified NMR spectra and obviates the use of frequency-selective pulses or other spectral filtering techniques. Finally, the N15-C13 cross-peak buildup trajectories are purely dipolar in nature (i.e., not influenced by J-couplings or relaxation), which enables the straightforward extraction of N15-Cmethyl13 distances using an analytical model. The SCT-TEDOR experiments are demonstrated on a uniformly C13, N15-labeled peptide, N-acetyl-valine, and a 56

  4. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported. PMID:25451865

  5. Natural abundance (14)N and (15)N solid-state NMR of pharmaceuticals and their polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Veinberg, Stanislav L; Johnston, Karen E; Jaroszewicz, Michael J; Kispal, Brianna M; Mireault, Christopher R; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Schurko, Robert W

    2016-06-29

    (14)N ultra-wideline (UW), (1)H{(15)N} indirectly-detected HETCOR (idHETCOR) and (15)N dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments, in combination with plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (14)N EFG tensors, were utilized to characterize a series of nitrogen-containing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including HCl salts of scopolamine, alprenolol, isoprenaline, acebutolol, dibucaine, nicardipine, and ranitidine. A case study applying these methods for the differentiation of polymorphs of bupivacaine HCl is also presented. All experiments were conducted upon samples with naturally-abundant nitrogen isotopes. For most of the APIs, it was possible to acquire frequency-stepped UW (14)N SSNMR spectra of stationary samples, which display powder patterns corresponding to pseudo-tetrahedral (i.e., RR'R''NH(+) and RR'NH2(+)) or other (i.e., RNH2 and RNO2) nitrogen environments. Directly-excited (14)N NMR spectra were acquired using the WURST-CPMG pulse sequence, which incorporates WURST (wideband, uniform rate, and smooth truncation) pulses and a CPMG (Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill) refocusing protocol. In certain cases, spectra were acquired using (1)H → (14)N broadband cross-polarization, via the BRAIN-CP (broadband adiabatic inversion - cross polarization) pulse sequence. These spectra provide (14)N electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters and orientations that are particularly sensitive to variations in local structure and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. The (1)H{(15)N} idHETCOR spectra, acquired under conditions of fast magic-angle spinning (MAS), used CP transfers to provide (1)H-(15)N chemical shift correlations for all nitrogen environments, except for two sites in acebutolol and nicardipine. One of these two sites (RR'NH2(+) in acebutolol) was successfully detected using the DNP-enhanced (15)N{(1)H} CP/MAS measurement, and one (RNO2 in nicardipine) remained elusive due to the absence of

  6. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples. PMID:26367322

  7. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  8. Catalytic Roles of βLys87 in Tryptophan Synthase: 15N Solid State NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Caulkins, Bethany G.; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4′ for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-15N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. PMID:25688830

  9. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  10. Preparation of 13C and 15N labelled RNAs for heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Nikonowicz, E P; Sirr, A; Legault, P; Jucker, F M; Baer, L M; Pardi, A

    1992-09-11

    A procedure is described for the efficient preparation of isotopically enriched RNAs of defined sequence. Uniformly labelled nucleotide 5'triphosphates (NTPs) were prepared from E.coli grown on 13C and/or 15N isotopically enriched media. These procedures routinely yield 180 mumoles of labelled NTPs per gram of 13C enriched glucose. The labelled NTPs were then used to synthesize RNA oligomers by in vitro transcription. Several 13C and/or 15N labelled RNAs have been synthesized for the sequence r(GGCGCUUGCGUC). Under conditions of high salt or low salt, this RNA forms either a symmetrical duplex with two U.U base pairs or a hairpin containing a CUUG loop respectively. These procedures were used to synthesize uniformly labelled RNAs and a RNA labelled only on the G and C residues. The ability to generate milligram quantities of isotopically labelled RNAs allows application of multi-dimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance experiments that enormously simplify the resonance assignment and solution structure determination of RNAs. Examples of several such heteronuclear NMR experiments are shown. PMID:1383927

  11. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  12. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  13. Chemoselective detection and discrimination of carbonyl-containing compounds in metabolite mixtures by 1H-detected 15N NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Arumugam, Sengodagounder; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Higashi, Richard M.; Laulhé, Sébastien; Nantz, Michael H.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectra of mixtures of metabolites extracted from cells or tissues are extremely complex, reflecting the large number of compounds that are present over a wide range of concentrations. Although multidimensional NMR can greatly improve resolution as well as improve reliability of compound assignments, lower abundance metabolites often remain hidden. We have developed a carbonyl selective aminooxy probe that specifically reacts with free keto and aldehyde functions, but not carboxylates. By incorporating 15N in the aminooxy functional group, 15N-edited NMR was used to select exclusively those metabolites that contain a free carbonyl function while all other metabolites are rejected. Here we demonstrate that the chemical shifts of the aminooxy adducts of ketones and aldehydes are very different, which can be used to discriminate between aldoses and ketoses for example. Utilizing the 2 or 3 bond 15N-1H couplings, the 15N-edited NMR analysis was optimized first with authentic standards and then applied to an extract of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. More than 30 carbonyl containing compounds at NMR detectable levels, 6 of which we have assigned by reference to our database. As the aminooxy probe contains a permanently charged quaternary ammonium group, the adducts are also optimized for detection by mass spectrometry. Thus, this sample preparation technique provides a better link between the two structural determination tools, thereby paving the way to faster and more reliable identification of both known and unknown metabolites directly in crude biological extracts. PMID:25616249

  14. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  15. A closer look at the nitrogen next door: 1H-15N NMR methods for glycosaminoglycan structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beni, Szabolcs; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2012-03-01

    Recently, experimental conditions were presented for the detection of the N-sulfoglucosamine (GlcNS) NHSO3- or sulfamate 1H and 15N NMR resonances of the pharmaceutically and biologically important glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparin in aqueous solution. In the present work, we explore further the applicability of nitrogen-bound proton detection to provide structural information for GAGs. Compared to the detection of 15N chemical shifts of aminosugars through long-range couplings using the IMPACT-HNMBC pulse sequence, the more sensitive two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiments provided additional structural data. The IMPACT-HNMBC experiment remains a powerful tool as demonstrated by the spectrum measured for the unsubstituted amine of 3-O-sulfoglucosamine (GlcN(3S)), which cannot be observed with the 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY experiment due to the fast exchange of the amino group protons with solvent. The 1H-15N HSQC-TOCSY NMR spectrum reported for the mixture of model compounds GlcNS and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) demonstrate the broad utility of this approach. Measurements for the synthetic pentasaccharide drug Arixtra® (Fondaparinux sodium) in aqueous solution illustrate the power of this NMR pulse sequence for structural characterization of highly similar N-sulfoglucosamine residues in GAG-derived oligosaccharides.

  16. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization. PMID:26377206

  17. Effects of ion binding on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k determined by 15N NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Akke, M; Skelton, N J; Kördel, J; Palmer, A G; Chazin, W J

    1993-09-21

    The backbone dynamics of apo- and (Cd2+)1-calbindin D9k have been characterized by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rate constants and steady-state [1H]-15N nuclear Overhauser effects were measured at a magnetic field strength of 11.74 T by two-dimensional, proton-detected heteronuclear NMR experiments using 15N-enriched samples. The relaxation parameters were analyzed using a model-free formalism that characterizes the dynamics of the N-H bond vectors in terms of generalized order parameters and effective correlation times. The data for the apo and (Cd2+)1 states were compared to those for the (Ca2+)2 state [Kördel, J., Skelton, N. J., Akke, M., Palmer, A. G., & Chazin, W. J. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4856-4866] to ascertain the effects on ion ligation on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k. The two binding loops respond differently to ligation by metal ions: high-frequency (10(9)-10(12) s-1) fluctuations of the N-terminal ion-binding loop are not affected by ion binding, whereas residues G57, D58, G59, and E60 in the C-terminal ion-binding loop have significantly lower order parameters in the apo state than in the metal-bound states. The dynamical responses of the four helices to binding of ions are much smaller than that for the C-terminal binding loop, with the strongest effect on helix III, which is located between the linker loop and binding site II. Significant fluctuations on slower time scales also were detected in the unoccupied N-terminal ion-binding loop of the apo and (Cd2+)1 states; the apparent rates were greater for the (Cd2+)1 state. These results on the dynamical response to ion binding in calbindin D9k provide insights into the molecular details of the binding process and qualitative evidence for entropic contributions to the cooperative phenomenon of calcium binding for the pathway in which the ion binds first in the C-terminal site. PMID:8373781

  18. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  19. Application of unsymmetrical indirect covariance NMR methods to the computation of the (13)C <--> (15)N HSQC-IMPEACH and (13)C <--> (15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectra.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary E; Hilton, Bruce D; Irish, Patrick A; Blinov, Kirill A; Williams, Antony J

    2007-10-01

    Utilization of long-range (1)H--(15)N heteronuclear chemical shift correlation has continually grown in importance since the first applications were reported in 1995. More recently, indirect covariance NMR methods have been introduced followed by the development of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing methods. The latter technique has been shown to allow the calculation of hyphenated 2D NMR data matrices from more readily acquired nonhyphenated 2D NMR spectra. We recently reported the use of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing to combine (1)H--(13)C GHSQC and (1)H--(15)N GHMBC long-range spectra to yield a (13)C--(15)N HSQC-HMBC chemical shift correlation spectrum that could not be acquired in a reasonable period of time without resorting to (15)N-labeled molecules. We now report the unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing of (1)H--(13)C GHMBC and (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectra to afford a (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH spectrum that has the potential to span as many as six to eight bonds. Correlations for carbon resonances long-range coupled to a protonated carbon in the (1)H--(13)C HMBC spectrum are transferred via the long-range (1)H--(15)N coupling pathway in the (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectrum to afford a much broader range of correlation possibilities in the (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectrum. The indole alkaloid vincamine is used as a model compound to illustrate the application of the method. PMID:17729230

  20. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  1. (13)C, (15)N CPMAS NMR and GIAO DFT calculations of stereoisomeric oxindole alkaloids from Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wolniak, Michał; Pisklak, Maciej; Gliński, Jan A; Davey, Matthew H; Wawer, Iwona

    2008-11-01

    Oxindole alkaloids, isolated from the bark of Uncaria tomentosa [Willd. ex Schult.] Rubiaceae, are considered to be responsible for the biological activity of this herb. Five pentacyclic and two tetracyclic alkaloids were studied by solid-state NMR and theoretical GIAO DFT methods. The (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded for mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, pteropodine (uncarine C), isopteropodine (uncarine E), speciophylline (uncarine D), rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline. Theoretical GIAO DFT calculations of shielding constants provide arguments for identification of asymmetric centers and proper assignment of NMR spectra. These alkaloids are 7R/7S and 20R/20S stereoisomeric pairs. Based on the (13)C CP MAS chemical shifts the 7S alkaloids (delta C3 70-71ppm) can be easily and conveniently distinguished from 7R (deltaC3 74.5-74.9ppm), also 20R (deltaC20 41.3-41.7ppm) from the 20S (deltaC20 36.3-38.3ppm). The epiallo-type isomer (3R, 20S) of speciophylline is characterized by a larger (15)N MAS chemical shift of N4 (64.6ppm) than the allo-type (3S, 20S) of isopteropodine (deltaN4 53.3ppm). (15)N MAS chemical shifts of N1-H in pentacyclic alkaloids are within 131.9-140.4ppm. PMID:19019638

  2. 15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

  3. A New Tool for NMR Crystallography: Complete (13)C/(15)N Assignment of Organic Molecules at Natural Isotopic Abundance Using DNP-Enhanced Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Märker, Katharina; Pingret, Morgane; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Gasparutto, Didier; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2015-11-01

    NMR crystallography of organic molecules at natural isotopic abundance (NA) strongly relies on the comparison of assigned experimental and computed NMR chemical shifts. However, a broad applicability of this approach is often hampered by the still limited (1)H resolution and/or difficulties in assigning (13)C and (15)N resonances without the use of structure-based chemical shift calculations. As shown here, such difficulties can be overcome by (13)C-(13)C and for the first time (15)N-(13)C correlation experiments, recorded with the help of dynamic nuclear polarization. We present the complete de novo (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment at NA of a self-assembled 2'-deoxyguanosine derivative presenting two different molecules in the asymmetric crystallographic unit cell. This de novo assignment method is exclusively based on aforementioned correlation spectra and is an important addition to the NMR crystallography approach, rendering firstly (1)H assignment straightforward, and being secondly a prerequisite for distance measurements with solid-state NMR. PMID:26485326

  4. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    PubMed

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds. PMID:25614975

  5. An NMR study of the interaction of 15N-labelled bradykinin with an antibody mimic of the bradykinin B2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ottleben, H; Haasemann, M; Ramachandran, R; Görlach, M; Müller-Esterl, W; Brown, L R

    1997-03-01

    An isotope-edited NMR study of the peptide hormone bradykinin (RPPGFSPFR) bound to the Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody against bradykinin (MBK3) is reported. MBK3 was previously shown to provide a binding site model of the B2 bradykinin receptor [Haasemann, M., Buschko, J., Faussner, A., Roscher, A. A., Hoebeke, J., Burch, R. M. & Muller-Esterl, W. (1991) Anti-idiotypic antibodies bearing the internal image of a bradykinin epitope, J. Immunol. 147, 3882-3892]. Bradykinin was obtained in a uniformly 15N-labelled form using recombinant expression of a fusion protein consisting of the glutathione-binding domain of glutathione S-transferase fused to residues 354-375 of the high-molecular-mass kininogen from which bradykinin was released by proteolytic digestion with its natural protease plasma kallikrein. Bradykinin forms a complex with the Fab fragment of MBK3 which exchanges slowly on the NMR time scale. The 15N and 1H resonances of the tightly bound residues of bradykinin show appreciable changes in chemical shift with respect to the free form, while the 15N and 1H linewidths indicate that the hydrodynamic behaviour of bound bradykinin is dominated by the high-molecular-mass Fab fragment. The NMR data indicate that essentially the entire nonapeptide is involved in binding. The kinetics of the ligand-exchange process, together with resonance assignments obtained via exchange spectroscopy. indicate that bradykinin binds to MBK3 only in the all-trans conformation at all three Xaa-Pro amide bonds. NH-NH NOE connectivities suggest that bradykinin is bound in an extended conformation. The spectroscopic data obtained from this study are compared to recently proposed computational models of the conformation of bradykinin bound to the B2 receptor. PMID:9119014

  6. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Thorn, K A; Kennedy, K R

    2002-09-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined. PMID:12322752

  7. Simple, efficient protocol for enzymatic synthesis of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA for heteronuclear NMR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Masse, J E; Bortmann, P; Dieckmann, T; Feigon, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled RNA has greatly facilitated structural studies of RNA oligonucleotides by NMR. Application of similar methodologies for the study of DNA has been limited, primarily due to the lack of adequate methods for sample preparation. Methods for both chemical and enzymatic synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides uniformly labeled with 13C and/or 15N have been published, but have not yet been widely used. We have developed a modified procedure for preparing uniformly 13C,15N-labeled DNA based on enzymatic synthesis using Taq DNA polymerase. The highly efficient protocol results in quantitative polymerization of the template and approximately 80% incorporation of the labeled dNTPs. Procedures for avoiding non-templated addition of nucleotides or for their removal are given. The method has been used to synthesize several DNA oligonucleotides, including two complementary 15 base strands, a 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex and a 12 base oligonucleotide that dimerizes and folds to form a quadruplex. Heteronuclear NMR spectra of the samples illustrate the quality of the labeled DNA obtained by these procedures. PMID:9592146

  8. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  9. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with (15)N solid-state NMR shift tensor data.

    PubMed

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K

    2015-11-21

    The (15)N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated (15)N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2-3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X-Y and X-H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of (15)N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved (1)H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental (15)N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than (13)C tensors due to nitrogen's greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts. PMID:26590548

  10. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  11. Coherence selection in double CP MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Hsien; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tzou, Der-Lii M.

    2008-11-01

    Applications of double cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, via 1H/ 15N and then 15N/ 13C coherence transfers, for 13C coherence selection are demonstrated on a 15N/ 13C-labeled N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) compound. The 15N/ 13C coherence transfer is very sensitive to the settings of the experimental parameters. To resolve explicitly these parameter dependences, we have systematically monitored the 13C{ 15N/ 1H} signal as a function of the rf field strength and the MAS frequency. The data reveal that the zero-quantum coherence transfer, with which the 13C effective rf field is larger than that of the 15N by the spinning frequency, would give better signal sensitivity. We demonstrate in one- and two-dimensional double CP experiments that spectral editing can be achieved by tailoring the experimental parameters, such as the rf field strengths and/or the MAS frequency.

  12. 2D 1H and 3D 1H-15N NMR of zinc-rubredoxins: contributions of the beta-sheet to thermostability.

    PubMed Central

    Richie, K. A.; Teng, Q.; Elkin, C. J.; Kurtz, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Based on 2D 1H-1H and 2D and 3D 1H-15N NMR spectroscopies, complete 1H NMR assignments are reported for zinc-containing Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin (Cp ZnRd). Complete 1H NMR assignments are also reported for a mutated Cp ZnRd, in which residues near the N-terminus, namely, Met 1, Lys 2, and Pro 15, have been changed to their counterparts, (-), Ala and Glu, respectively, in rubredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf Rd). The secondary structure of both wild-type and mutated Cp ZnRds, as determined by NMR methods, is essentially the same. However, the NMR data indicate an extension of the three-stranded beta-sheet in the mutated Cp ZnRd to include the N-terminal Ala residue and Glu 15, as occurs in Pf Rd. The mutated Cp Rd also shows more intense NOE cross peaks, indicating stronger interactions between the strands of the beta-sheet and, in fact, throughout the mutated Rd. However, these stronger interactions do not lead to any significant increase in thermostability, and both the mutated and wild-type Cp Rds are much less thermostable than Pf Rd. These correlations strongly suggest that, contrary to a previous proposal [Blake PR et al., 1992, Protein Sci 1:1508-1521], the thermostabilization mechanism of Pf Rd is not dominated by a unique set of hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interactions involving the N-terminal strand of the beta-sheet. The NMR results also suggest that an overall tighter protein structure does not necessarily lead to increased thermostability. PMID:8732760

  13. Application of 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the determination of the stability of aryl nitrogen mustards.

    PubMed

    Wilman, D E; Palmer, B D; Denny, W A

    1995-06-01

    An excellent correlation has been shown to exist between the 15N NMR chemical shifts of a series of aryl nitrogen mustards and the Hammett constant, sigma, which is much improved by the use of sigma-. These chemical shifts also correlate well with the hydrolysis rates of the compounds in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C and their alkylation of 4-(4'-nitrobenzyl)pyridine under similar conditions. Thus 15N NMR is a straightforward and material-conserving method for estimating the relative stabilities of aryl nitrogen mustards. PMID:7783158

  14. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  15. /sup 15/N and /sup 13/C NMR determination of methionine metabolism in developing soybean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, G.T. III; Garbow, J.R.; Schaefer, J.

    1987-03-01

    The metabolism of D- and L-methionine by immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max, L. cv Elf) grown in culture has been investigated using solid-state /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N nuclear magnetic resonance. D-Methionine is taken up by the cotyledons and converted to an amide, most likely by N-malonylation. About 16% of the L-methionine taken up is incorporated intact into protein, and 25% remains as soluble methionine. Almost two-thirds of the L-methionine that enters the cotyledons is degraded. The largest percentage of this is used in transmethylation of the carboxyl groups of pectin. Methionine is not extensively converted to polyamines. The authors attribute the stimulation of growth of the cotyledons by exogenous methionine to the bypassing of a rate-limiting methyl-transfer step in the synthesis of methionine itself, and subsequently of pectins and proteins.

  16. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  17. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds. PMID:19685922

  18. Qualitative Study of Substituent Effects on NMR 15N and 17O Chemical Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Rubén H.; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Bustamante, Manuel G.; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Melo, Juan I.; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2009-08-01

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-β substituent effects on both 15N and 17O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and σ-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  19. Modern NMR spectroscopy: a guide for chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.K.M.; Hunter, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the authors of Modern NMR Spectroscopy is to bridge the communication gap between the chemist and the spectroscopist. The approach is nonmathematical, descriptive, and pictorial. To illustrate the ideas introduced in the text, the authors provide original spectra obtained specially for this purpose. Examples include spectroscopy of protons, carbon, and less receptive nuclei of interest to inorganic chemists. The authors succeed in making high-resolution NMR spectroscopy comprehensible for the average student or chemist.

  20. 15N NMR study of nitrate ion structure and dynamics in hydrotalcite-like compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hou, X.; James, Kirkpatrick R.; Yu, P.; Moore, D.; Kim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic study of the dynamical and structural behavior of nitrate on the surface and in the interlayer of hydrotalcite-like compounds (15NO3--HT). Spectroscopically resolvable surface-absorbed and interlayer NO3- have dramatically different dynamical characteristics. The interlayer nitrate shows a well defined, temperature independent uniaxial chemical shift anisotropy (CS A) powder pattern. It is rigidly held or perhaps undergoes rotation about its threefold axis at all temperatures between -100 ??C and +80 ??C and relative humidities (R.H.) from 0 to 100% at room temperature. For surface nitrate, however, the dynamical behavior depends substantially on temperature and relative humidity. Analysis of the temperature and R.H. dependences of the peak width yields reorieritational frequencies which increase from essentially 0 at -100 ??C to 2.6 ?? 105 Hz at 60 ??C and an activation energy of 12.6 kJ/mol. For example, for samples at R.H. = 33%, the surface nitrate is isotropically mobile at frequencies greater than 105 Hz at room temperature, but it becomes rigid or only rotates on its threefold axis at -100 ??C. For dry samples and samples heated at 200 ??C (R.H. near 0%), the surface nitrate is not isotropically averaged at room temperature. In contrast to our previous results for 35Cl--containing hydrotalcite (35Cl--HT), no NMR detectable structural phase transition is observed for 15NO3--HT. The mobility of interlayer nitrate in HT is intermediate between that of carbonate and chloride.

  1. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  2. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  3. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  4. Assignment of the sup 1 H and sup 15 N NMR spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gooley, P.R.; Caffrey, M.S.; Cusanovich, M.A.; MacKenzie, N.E. )

    1990-03-06

    The peptide resonances of the {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of ferrocytochrome c{sub 2} from Rhodobacter capsulatus are sequentially assigned by a combination of 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectroscopy, the latter performed on {sup 15}N-enriched protein. Short-range nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data show {alpha}-helices from residues 3-17, 55-65, 69-88, and 103-115. Within the latter two {alpha}-helices, there are three single 3{sub 10} turns, 70-72, 76-78, and 107-109. In addition {alpha}H-NH{sub i+1} and {alpha}H-NH{sub i+2} NOEs indicate that the N-terminal helix (3-17) is distorted. Compared to horse or tuna cytochrome c and cytochrome c{sub 2} of Rhodospirillium rubrum, there is a 6-residue insertion at residues 23-29 in R. capsulatus cytochrome c{sub 2}. The NOE data show that this insertion forms a loop, probably an {Omega} loop. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation experiments are used to follow NH exchange over a period of 40 h. As the 2D spectra are acquired in short time periods (30 min), rates for intermediate exchanging protons can be measured. Comparison of the NH exchange data for the N-terminal helix of cytochrome c{sub 2} of R. capsulatus with the highly homologous horse heart cytochrome c shows that this helix is less stable in cytochrome c{sub 2}.

  5. Catalytic roles of βLys87 in tryptophan synthase: (15)N solid state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Caulkins, Bethany G; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2015-09-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4' for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-¹⁵N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using ¹⁵N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Guest Editors: Andrea Mozzarelli and Loredano Pollegioni. PMID:25688830

  6. Protein Motions and Folding Investigated by NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2002-03-01

    NMR spin relaxation spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for globally characterizing conformational dynamics of proteins in solution. Laboratory frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to overall rotational diffusion and internal motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, while rotating frame relaxation measurements are sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales. The former approach is illustrated by ^15N laboratory-frame relaxation experiments as a function of temperature for the helical subdomain HP36 of the F-actin-binding headpiece domain of chicken villin. The data are analyzed using the model-free formalism to characterize order parameters and effective correlation times for intramolecular motions of individual ^15N sites. The latter approach is illustrated by ^13C Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation measurements for the de novo designed α_2D protein and by ^15N rotating-frame relaxation measurements for the peripheral subunit-binding domain (PSBD) from the dihydrolopoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus. These experiments are used to determine the folding and unfolding kinetic rate constants for the two proteins. The results for HP36, α_2D, and PSBD illustrate the capability of current NMR methods for characterizing dynamic processes on multiple time scales in proteins.

  7. sup 15 N NMR study on cyanide (C sup 15 N sup minus ) complex of cytochrome P-450 sub cam. Effects of d-camphor and putidaredoxin on the iron-ligand structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Iizuka, Tetsutaro ); Makino, Ryu; Ishimura, Yuzuru ); Morishima, Isao )

    1989-11-27

    The cyanide (C{sup 15}N{sup {minus}}) complex of Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P-450 (P-450{sub cam}) exhibited well-resolved and hyperfine-shifted {sup 15}N NMR resonances arising from the iron-bound C{sup 15}N{sup {minus}} at 423 and 500 ppm in the absence and presence of the substrate, d-camphor, respectively. The values were smaller than those for cyanide complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin ({approx} 1000 ppm) but fell into the same range as those for the cyanide complexes of peroxidases ({approx} 500 ppm). The {sup 15}N shift values of P-450{sub cam} were not incompatible with the existence of anionic ligand, such as cysteinyl thiolate anion, at the fifth coordination site of heme iron. The difference in the {sup 15}N chemical shift values between camphor-free and bound enzymes was inferred by the increase in the steric constraint to the Fe-C-N bond upon substrate binding.

  8. Theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR study of enamine-imine tautomerism of 4-trifluoromethyl[b]benzo-1,4-diazepine system.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Rulev, Alexander Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-12-01

    The tautomeric structure of 4-trifluoromethyl[b]benzo-1,4-diazepine system in solution has been evaluated by means of the calculation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts of individual tautomers in comparison with the averaged experimental shifts to show that the enamine-imine equilibrium is entirely shifted toward the imine form. The adequacy of the theoretical level used for the computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts in this case has been verified based on the benchmark calculations in the series of the push-pull and captodative enamines together with related azomethynes, which demonstrated a good to excellent agreement with experiment. PMID:26290420

  9. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Exogenous proline relieves growth inhibition caused by NaCl in petunia cells: Metabolism of L-( sup 15 M)-proline followed by sup 15 N NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Heyser, J.W.; Chacon, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Exogenous proline stimulated the growth of Petunia hybrida cells on 195 mM NaCl 10-fold as compared with cells grown on 195 mM CaCl medium minus proline. L-({sup 15}N)-proline was fed to cells growing on 0 and 195 mM CaCl, and its metabolism was followed by {sup 15}N NMR analysis of cell extracts. Total proline and amino acids were determined by ninhydrin assay. Proline and primary amino acids were easily resolved in NMR spectra and the amount of {sup 15}N-label which remained in proline was determined. Reduced catabolism of proline in cells grown on NaCl was evident. The role of exogenous proline in conferring increased NaCl tolerance in this nonhalophyte will be discussed.

  11. Probing Cancer Cell Metabolism Using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Williams, Debbie S; Tennant, Daniel A; Ludwig, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is now accepted to be at the core of many diseases including cancer. Over the past 20 years, NMR has become a core technology to study these metabolic perturbations in detail. This chapter reviews current NMR-based methods for steady-state metabolism and, in particular, the use of non-radioactive stable isotope-enriched tracers. Opportunities and challenges for each method, such as 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy and (13)C carbon-based NMR spectroscopic methods, are discussed. Ultimately, the combination of NMR and mass spectra as orthogonal technologies are required to compensate for the drawbacks of each technique when used singly are discussed. PMID:27325263

  12. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic additions of fertilizer nitrogen (N) have significantly increased the mole fraction of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the troposphere. Tracking the fate of fertilizer N and its transformation to N2O is important to advance knowledge of greenhouse gas emissions from soils. Transport and transformations are frequently studied using 15N labeling experiments, but instruments capable of continuous measurements of 15N-N2O at the surface of soil have only recently come to the fore. Our primary aim was to quantify emissions of N2O and the fraction of 15N emitted as N2O from an agricultural soil following 15N addition using a mobile Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. We set up a short-term field experiment on a coastal floodplain site near Nowra, New South Wales. We deployed an automated chamber system connected to a multi-pass cell (optical pathlength 24 m) and low resolution FTIR spectrometer to measure fluxes of all N2O isotopologues collected from five 0.25 m2 chambers every three hours. We measured N2O fluxes pre and post-application of 15N-labeled substrate as potassium nitrate (KNO3) or urea [CO(NH2)2] to the soil surface. Root mean square uncertainties for all isotopologue measurements were less than 0.3 nmol mol-1 for 1 minute average concentration measurements, and minimum detectable fluxes for each isotopologue were <0.1 ng N m-2 s-1. Emissions of all N2O isotopologues were evident immediately following 15N addition. Emissions of 14N15NO, 15N14NO and 15N15NO isotopologues subsided within 10 d, but 14N14NO fluxes were evident over the entire experiment. The figure provides an overview of the emissions. Cumulative 15N-N2O fluxes (sum of the three 15N isotopologues) per chamber for the 14 days following 15N addition ranged from 1.5 to 10.3 mg 15N-N2O m-2. The chambers were destructively sampled after 2 weeks and 15N analyzed in soil and plant material using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Approximately 1% (range 0.7 - 1.9%) of the total amount of

  13. Multinuclear 1H, 13C and 15N NMR study of some substituted 2-amino-4-nitropyridines and their N-oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihia, K.; Kolehmainen, E.; Kauppinen, R.; Lorenc, J.; Puszko, A.

    2002-05-01

    1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments based on pulsed field gradient selected PFG 1H,X (X= 13C and 15N) HMQC and HMBC experiments are reported for three 4-nitropyridine N-oxides and four 4-nitropyridines. It was found that an ortho effect of a methyl group inhibits the deshielding effect of the 4-nitro group and that this effect and the so-called back donation is influenced by electronegativity and position of substituents in the multisubstituted pyridine N-oxides. The shielding effect of N-oxide group is most pronounced in the 15N NMR chemical shifts of the studied compounds. This effect is further modified by methylamino, methylnitramino, 5- or 3-methyl and 4-nitro groups. Among them the 4-nitro group exerts the highest influence on the shielding effect of the N-oxide functionality. Experimental 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shifts and GIAO/DFT theoretical calculations are consistent with each other and supported by the reactivity on nucleophilic substitution, the UV spectral and the dipole moment data.

  14. 1H, 13C, 15N and 195Pt NMR studies of Au(III) and Pt(II) chloride organometallics with 2-phenylpyridine.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-11-01

    (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (195)Pt NMR studies of gold(III) and platinum(II) chloride organometallics with N(1),C(2')-chelated, deprotonated 2-phenylpyridine (2ppy*) of the formulae [Au(2ppy*)Cl(2)], trans(N,N)-[Pt(2ppy*)(2ppy)Cl] and trans(S,N)-[Pt(2ppy*)(DMSO-d(6))Cl] (formed in situ upon dissolving [Pt(2ppy*)(micro-Cl)](2) in DMSO-d(6)) were performed. All signals were unambiguously assigned by HMBC/HSQC methods and the respective (1)H, (13)C and (15)N coordination shifts (i.e. differences between chemical shifts of the same atom in the complex and ligand molecules: Delta(1H)(coord) = delta(1H)(complex) - delta(1H)(ligand), Delta(13C)(coord) = delta(13C)(complex) - delta(13C)(ligand), Delta(15N)(coord) = delta(15N)(complex) - delta(15N)(ligand)), as well as (195)Pt chemical shifts and (1)H-(195)Pt coupling constants discussed in relation to the known molecular structures. Characteristic deshielding of nitrogen-adjacent H(6) protons and metallated C(2') atoms as well as significant shielding of coordinated N(1) nitrogens is discussed in respect to a large set of literature NMR data available for related cyclometallated compounds. PMID:19691018

  15. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Epitope mapping by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; Livoti, E; Simonelli, L; Pedotti, M; Moraes, A; Valente, A P; Varani, L

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies play an ever more prominent role in basic research as well as in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Characterizing their epitopes, that is, the region that they recognize on their target molecule, is useful for purposes ranging from molecular biology research to vaccine design and intellectual property protection. Solution NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited to the atomic level characterization of intermolecular interfaces and, as a consequence, to epitope discovery. Here, we illustrate how NMR epitope mapping can be used to rapidly and accurately determine protein antigen epitopes. The basic concept is that differences in the NMR signal of an antigen free or bound by an antibody will identify epitope residues. NMR epitope mapping provides more detailed information than mutagenesis or peptide mapping and can be much more rapid than X-ray crystallography. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed together with practical considerations. PMID:25726811

  17. Simultaneous cross polarization to 13C and 15N with 1H detection at 60 kHz MAS solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe high resolution MAS solid-state NMR experiments that utilize 1H detection with 60 kHz magic angle spinning; simultaneous cross-polarization from 1H to 15N and 13C nuclei; bidirectional cross-polarization between 13C and 15N nuclei; detection of both amide nitrogen and aliphatic carbon 1H; and measurement of both 13C and 15N chemical shifts through multi-dimensional correlation experiments. Three-dimensional experiments correlate amide 1H and alpha 1H selectively with 13C or 15N nuclei in a polypeptide chain. Two separate three-dimensional spectra correlating 1Hα/13Cα/1HN and 1HN/15N/1Hα are recorded simultaneously in a single experiment, demonstrating that a twofold savings in experimental time is potentially achievable. Spectral editing using bidirectional coherence transfer pathways enables simultaneous magnetization transfers between 15N, 13Cα(i) and 13C‧(i-1), facilitating intra- and inter-residue correlations for sequential resonance assignment. Non-uniform sampling is integrated into the experiments, further reducing the length of experimental time.

  18. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  19. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  20. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  1. Evidence of entropy-driven bistability through (15)N NMR analysis of a temperature- and solvent-induced, chiroptical switching polycarbodiimide.

    PubMed

    Reuther, James F; Novak, Bruce M

    2013-12-26

    The thermo- and solvo-driven chiroptical switching process observed in specific polycarbodiimides occurs in a concerted fashion with large deviations in specific optical rotation (OR) and CD Cotton effect as a consequence of varying populations of two distinct polymer conformations. These two conformations are clearly visible in the (15)N NMR and IR spectra of the (15)N-labeled poly((15)N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-octadecylcarbodiimide) (Poly-3) and poly((15)N-(1-naphthyl)-(15)N'-octadecylcarbodiimide) (Poly-5). Using van't Hoff analysis, the enthalpies and entropies of switching (ΔHswitching; ΔSswitching) were calculated for both Poly-3 and Poly-5 using the relative integrations of both peaks in the (15)N NMR spectra at different temperatures to measure the populations of each state. The chiroptical switching (i.e., transitioning from state A to state B) was found to be an endothermic process (positive ΔHswitching) for both Poly-3 and Poly-5 in all solvents studied, meaning the conformation correlating with the downfield chemical shift (ca. 148 ppm, state B) is the higher enthalpy state. The compensating factor behind this phenomenon has been determined to be the large increase in entropy in CHCl3 as a result of the switching. Herein, we propose that the increased entropy in the system is a direct consequence of increased disorder in the solvent as the switching occurs. Specifically, the chloroform solvent molecules are very ordered around the polymer chains due to favorable solvent-polymer interactions, but as the switching occurs, these interactions become less favorable and disorder results. The same level of solvent disorder is not achieved in toluene, causing the chiroptical switching process to occur at higher temperatures. PMID:24313274

  2. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy in a single scan.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-11-01

    Multidimensional NMR has become one of the most widespread spectroscopic tools available to study diverse structural and functional aspects of organic and biomolecules. A main feature of multidimensional NMR is the relatively long acquisition times that these experiments demand. For decades, scientists have been working on a variety of alternatives that would enable NMR to overcome this limitation, and deliver its data in shorter acquisition times. Counting among these methodologies is the so-called ultrafast (UF) NMR approach, which in principle allows one to collect arbitrary multidimensional correlations in a single sub-second transient. By contrast to conventional acquisitions, a main feature of UF NMR is a spatiotemporal manipulation of the spins that imprints the chemical shift and/or J-coupling evolutions being sought, into a spatial pattern. Subsequent gradient-based manipulations enable the reading out of this information and its multidimensional correlation into patterns that are identical to those afforded by conventional techniques. The current review focuses on the fundamental principles of this spatiotemporal UF NMR manipulation, and on a few of the methodological extensions that this form of spectroscopy has undergone during the years. PMID:26249041

  3. Characterizing the Microstructure of Heparin and Heparan Sulfate using N-sulfoglucosamine 1H and 15N NMR Chemical Shift Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Langeslay, Derek J.; Beecher, Consuelo N.; Naggi, Annamaria; Guerrini, Marco; Torri, Giangiacomo; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2014-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) are members of a biologically important group of highly anionic linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Because of their structural complexity, the molecular-level characterization of heparin and HS continues to be a challenge. The work presented herein describes an emerging approach for the analysis of unfractionated and low molecular weight heparins as well as porcine and human-derived HS. This approach utilizes the untapped potential of 15N NMR to characterize these preparations through detection of the NH resonances of N-sulfo-glucosamine residues. The sulfamate group 1H and 15N chemical shifts of six GAG microenvironments were assigned based on the critical comparison of selectively modified heparin derivatives, NMR measurements for a library of heparin-derived oligosaccharide standards, and an in-depth NMR analysis of the low molecular weight heparin enoxaparin through systematic investigation of the chemical exchange properties of NH resonances and residue-specific assignments using the [1H, 15N] HSQC-TOCSY experiment. The sulfamate microenvironments characterized in this study include GlcNS(6S)-UA(2S), ΔUA(2S)-GlcNS(6S), GlcNS(3S)(6S)-UA(2S), GlcNS-UA, GlcNS(6S)-redα, and 1,6-anhydro GlcNS demonstrate the utility of [1H, 15N] HSQC NMR spectra to provide a spectroscopic fingerprint reflecting the composition of intact GAGs and low molecular weight heparin preparations. PMID:23240897

  4. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Quantitation of metabolic compartmentation in hyperammonemic brain by natural abundance 13C-NMR detection of 13C-15N coupling patterns and isotopic shifts.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, A; Gopher, A

    1997-02-01

    In the present study, the removal of cerebral ammonia by glutamine synthetase (GS) and by reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of an amino donor group, was determined in hyperammonemic rabbit brains. The 15N enrichments of brain metabolite alpha-amino and amide positions of glutamine, glutamate, and alanine were determined by the indirect detection of 15N-labeled compounds of the 13C-15N spin coupling patterns of natural abundance 13C-NMR spectra. The 13C-NMR spectra of brain extracts were obtained from rabbits infused with 15NH4Cl with or without intraperitoneal infusion of the GS inhibitor, L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, in a reasonable acquisition time period. When 15NH4Cl was infused, [5-15N]glutamine and [2-15N]glutamine concentrations reached 5.2 mumol/100 mg protein and 3.6 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively, which indicates the relatively high activity of reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate in the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. The low concentration of [2-15N]glutamate, which is about 30% of that of [2-15N]glutamine obtained in this study, suggests that very little glutamine serves as a precursor of neuronal glutamate. When GS was inhibited by L-methionine DL-sulfoximine, a flux of 15NH4+ via the residual activity of GS was accompanied by an apparent increase of [2-15N]glutamate and [15N]alanine concentrations (2.9 mumol/100 mg protein and 1.8 mumol/100 mg protein, respectively). These findings and those obtained from 13C-13C isotopomer analysis (Lapidot and Gopher, 1994b) suggest that astrocytic 2-oxoglutarate is partially utilized (together with an amino group donor) as a precursor for neuronal glutamate in the hyperammonemic brain when GS is inhibited. This process can partly replace GS activity in metabolizing ammonia in the hyperammonemic rabbit brain. PMID:9057821

  6. DFT calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants, chemical shifts and complexation shifts in complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with some nitrogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Benchmark calculations of 15N NMR shielding constants for a set of model complexes of rhodium(II) tetraformate with nine organic ligands using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods have been carried out. The calculations were performed by means of several methods: the non-relativistic, relativistic scalar ZORA, and spin-orbit ZORA approaches at the CGA-PBE/QZ4P theory level, and the GIAO NMR method using the B3PW91 functional with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and the Stuttgart basis set for the Rh atom. The geometry of compounds was optimised either by the same basis set as for the NMR calculations or applying the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G(2d) basis set for C, H, N, O atoms and LANL2DZ for the Rh atom. Computed 15N NMR shielding constants σ were compatible with experimental 15N chemical shifts δ of complexes exhibiting similar structure and fulfil the linear equation δ = aσ + b. The a and b parameters for all data sets have been estimated by means of linear regression analysis. In contrast to the correlation method giving "scaled" chemical shifts, the conversion of shielding constants to chemical shifts with respect to the reference shielding of CH3NO2 provided very inaccurate "raw" δ values. The application of the former to the calculation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δcompl - δlig) reproduced experimental values qualitatively or semi-quantitatively. The non-relativistic B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] theory level reproduced the NMR parameters as good as the more expensive relativistic CGA-PBE//QZ4P ZORA approaches.

  7. Interaction of the replication terminator protein of Bacillus subtilis with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Adam F.; Otting, Gottfried; Folmer, Rutger H.A.; Duggin, Iain G.; Wake, R. Gerry; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A. . E-mail: Jackie.Wilce@med.monash.edu.au

    2005-09-23

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the dimeric 29 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. We have used NMR spectroscopy to probe the changes in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlation spectra of a {sup 15}N-labelled RTP.C110S mutant upon the addition of a 21 base pair symmetrical DNA binding site. Assignment of the {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C,70% {sup 2}H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. Perturbations to {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectra revealed that the N-termini, {alpha}3-helices and several loops are affected by the binding interaction. An analysis of this data in light of the crystallographically determined apo- and DNA-bound forms of RTP.C110S revealed that the NMR spectral perturbations correlate more closely to protein structural changes upon complex formation rather than to interactions at the protein-DNA interface.

  8. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  9. Solution 1H, 15N NMR spectroscopic characterization of substrate-bound, cyanide-inhibited human heme oxygenase: water occupation of the distal cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Syvitski, Ray T; Auclair, Karine; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul; La Mar, Gerd N

    2003-11-01

    A solution NMR spectroscopic study of the cyanide-inhibited, substrate-bound complex of uniformly (15)N-labeled human heme oxygenase, hHO, has led to characterization of the active site with respect to the nature and identity of strong hydrogen bonds and the occupation of ordered water molecules within both the hydrogen bonding network and an aromatic cluster on the distal side. [(1)H-(15)N]-HSQC spectra confirm the functionalities of several key donors in particularly robust H-bonds, and [(1)H-(15)N]HSQC-NOESY spectra lead to the identification of three additional robust H-bonds, as well as the detection of two more relatively strong H-bonds whose identities could not be established. The 3D NMR experiments provided only a modest, but important, extension of assignments because of the loss of key TOCSY cross-peaks due to the line broadening from a dynamic heterogeneity in the active site. Steady-state NOEs upon saturating the water signal locate nine ordered water molecules in the immediate vicinity of the H-bond donors, six of which are readily identified in the crystal structure. The additional three are positioned in available spaces to account for the observed NOEs. (15)N-filtered steady-state NOEs upon saturating the water resonances and (15)N-filtered NOESY spectra demonstrate significant negative NOEs between water molecules and the protons of five aromatic rings. Many of the NOEs can be rationalized by water molecules located in the crystal structure, but strong water NOEs, particularly to the rings of Phe47 and Trp96, demand the presence of at least an additional two immobilized water molecules near these rings. The H-bond network appears to function to order water molecules to provide stabilization for the hydroperoxy intermediate and to serve as a conduit to the active site for the nine protons required per HO turnover. PMID:14583035

  10. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  11. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with {sup 15}N solid-state NMR shift tensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalakewich, Keyton; Eloranta, Harriet; Harper, James K.; Iuliucci, Robbie; Mueller, Karl T.

    2015-11-21

    The {sup 15}N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated {sup 15}N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2–3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X–Y and X–H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of {sup 15}N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved {sup 1}H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental {sup 15}N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than {sup 13}C tensors due to nitrogen’s greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts.

  12. Properties of bridgehead-substituted polycycloalkanes. Synthesis and NMR analysis of /sup 15/N-labeled 1-aminobicycloalkanes and their hydrochlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Della, E.W.; Kasum, B.; Kirkbride, K.P.

    1987-04-29

    NMR analysis of adamantane and four bicycloalkanes substituted at the bridgehead with /sup 15/N-labeled amino and ammonio groups is described. It is found that where most of the one-bond carbon-nitrogen coupling constants are relatively large, those in 1-aminobicyclo (1.1.1)pentane and its hydrochloride are significantly reduced; in fact, in the latter compound one-bond /sup 13/C-/sup 15/N coupling could not even be detected. Values of experimentally determined vicinal couplings were in accord with those expected on the basis of the number of three-bond pathways available for transmission of spin-spin information; INDO calculations, however, suggest that in the more highly strained systems there is a substantial contribution to /sup 3/J(CN) arising from through-space interactions and that these oppose through-bond effects. Large four-bond /sup 15/N-/sup 1/H couplings were found to occur in 1-aminobicyclo(1.1.1)pentane and its hydrochloride; MO calculations indicate that through-space interactions constitute the predominant mechanism contributing to /sup 4/J(/sup 15/N-/sup 1/H), although in this case through-bond and through-space effects reinforce each other. The nitrogen-15 chemical shifts of the amine hydrochlorides were determined, and they appear to occur in random fashion.

  13. Solvation and crystal effects in bilirubin studied by NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, Thierry; Matysik, Jörg; Mark, Franz

    2011-10-27

    The open-chain tetrapyrrole compound bilirubin was investigated in chloroform and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions by liquid-state NMR and as solid by (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to interpret the data, using the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional to optimize geometries and to compute NMR chemical shieldings by the gauge-including atomic orbital method. The dependence of geometries and chemical shieldings on the size of the basis sets was investigated for the reference molecules tetramethylsilane, NH(3), and H(2)O, and for bilirubin as a monomer and in clusters consisting of up to six molecules. In order to assess the intrinsic errors of the B3LYP approximation in calculating NMR shieldings, complete basis set estimates were obtained for the nuclear shielding values of the reference molecules. The experimental liquid-state NMR data of bilirubin are well reproduced by a monomeric bilirubin molecule using the 6-311+G(2d,p) basis set for geometry optimization and for calculating chemical shieldings. To simulate the bilirubin crystal, a hexameric model was required. It was constructed from geometry-optimized monomers using information from the X-ray structure of bilirubin to fix the monomeric entities in space and refined by partial optimization. Combining experimental (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N NMR correlation spectroscopy and density functional theory, almost complete sets of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments were obtained for both liquid and solid states. It is shown that monomeric bilirubin in chloroform solution is formed by 3-vinyl anti conformers, while bilirubin crystals are formed by 3-vinyl syn conformers. This conformational change leads to characteristic differences between the liquid- and solid-state NMR resonances. PMID:21846145

  14. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  15. Global Fold of Human Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor Probed by Solid-State 13C-, 15N-MAS NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Vukoti, Krishna; Lynch, Diane L.; Hurst, Dow P.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The global fold of human cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor in the agonist-bound active state in lipid bilayers was investigated by solid-state 13C- and 15N magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, in combination with chemical-shift prediction from a structural model of the receptor obtained by microsecond-long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Uniformly 13C-, and 15N-labeled CB2 receptor was expressed in milligram quantities by bacterial fermentation, purified, and functionally reconstituted into liposomes. 13C MAS NMR spectra were recorded without sensitivity enhancement for direct comparison of Cα, Cβ, and C=O bands of superimposed resonances with predictions from protein structures generated by MD. The experimental NMR spectra matched the calculated spectra reasonably well indicating agreement of the global fold of the protein between experiment and simulations. In particular, the 13C chemical shift distribution of Cα resonances was shown to be very sensitive to both the primary amino acid sequence and the secondary structure of CB2. Thus the shape of the Cα band can be used as an indicator of CB2 global fold. The prediction from MD simulations indicated that upon receptor activation a rather limited number of amino acid residues, mainly located in the extracellular loop 2 and the second half of intracellular loop 3, change their chemical shifts significantly (≥1.5 ppm for carbons and ≥5.0 ppm for nitrogens). Simulated two-dimensional 13Cα(i)-13C=O(i) and 13C=O(i)-15NH(i+1) dipolar-interaction correlation spectra provide guidance for selective amino-acid labeling and signal assignment schemes to study the molecular mechanism of activation of CB2 by solid-state MAS NMR. PMID:23999926

  16. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  17. The theoretical investigation of solvent effects on the relative stability and 15N NMR shielding of antidepressant heterocyclic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahan, Arezoo; Khojandi, Mahya; Salari, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) and Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) were used for the investigation of solvent polarity and its dielectric constant effects on the relative stability and NMR shielding tensors of antidepressant mirtazapine (MIR). The obtained results indicated that the relative stability in the polar solvents is higher than that in non-polar solvents and the most stable structure was observed in the water at the B3LYP/6-311++G ( d, p) level of theory. Also, natural bond orbital (NBO) interpretation demonstrated that by increase of solvent dielectric constant, negative charge on nitrogen atoms of heterocycles and resonance energy for LP(N10) → σ* and π* delocalization of the structure's azepine ring increase and the highest values of them were observed in water. On the other hand, NMR calculations showed that with an increase in negative charge of nitrogen atoms, isotropic chemical shielding (σiso) around them increase and nitrogen of piperazine ring (N19) has the highest values of negative charge and σiso among nitrogen atoms. NMR calculations also represented that direct solvent effect on nitrogen of pyridine ring (N15) is more than other nitrogens, while its effect on N19 is less than other ones. Based on NMR data and NBO interpretation, it can be deduced that with a decrease in the negative charge on nitrogen atoms, the intramolecular effects on them decrease, while direct solvent effect increases.

  18. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  19. High Resolution 15N NMR of the 225 K Phase Transition of Ammonia Borane (NH3BH3): Mixed Order-Disorder and Displacive Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaydin-Sen, Ozge; Achey, Randall; Dalal, Nar S.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Autrey, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We report high resolution 15N NMR probing of the solid-solid phase transition of 15N-labeled ammonia borane (NH3BH3) around 225 K. Both the 15N isotropic chemical shift, δiso, and the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) exhibited strong anomalies around 225 K. The analysis of T1-1 using the Bloembergen-Purcell and Pound model showed that the motional correlation time, τ, increased from about 1 ps to 100 ps while the corresponding Arrhenius activation energy increased from 6 to 13.4 kJ/mol on going through the transition. The observed strong temperature dependence of δiso was interpreted by an extension of the Bayer model. The time scale of the underlying motion was found to be in a reasonable agreement with the T1-1 data. These results imply that the NH3 rotor motion plays a pivotal role in the transition mechanism, and that the transition is of both order-disorder and displacive type. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  20. Evidence for tautomerism in nucleic acid base pairs. 1H NMR study of 15N labeled tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rüterjans, H; Kaun, E; Hull, W E; Limbach, H H

    1982-01-01

    The imino proton resonances of 15N labeled tRNA appear as asymmetric doublet signals, the asymmetry being dependent on the applied magnetic field strength. Assuming a tautomerism of the type N-H...N not equal to N...H-N in the base pairs the line shapes can be simulated. The most important parameters fitted in the simulation are the rate constants of the proton transfer and the mole fractions of either tautomeric state. The rate constants are of the order of 100s-1 and the mole fractions of the non dominant tautomer about 0.1 depending on the temperature and on the nature of the base pairing. The observations are attributed to a double proton transfer in the base pairs. The unexpectedly slow rates of the double proton transfer process may be connected with a concomitant conformational change of the duplex structure. PMID:7177856

  1. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  2. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  3. Exploring RNA polymerase regulation by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.; Knauer, Stefan H.; Rösch, Paul

    2015-01-01

    RNA synthesis is a central process in all organisms, with RNA polymerase (RNAP) as the key enzyme. Multisubunit RNAPs are evolutionary related and are tightly regulated by a multitude of transcription factors. Although Escherichia coli RNAP has been studied extensively, only little information is available about its dynamics and transient interactions. This information, however, are crucial for the complete understanding of transcription regulation in atomic detail. To study RNAP by NMR spectroscopy we developed a highly efficient procedure for the assembly of active RNAP from separately expressed subunits that allows specific labeling of the individual constituents. We recorded [1H,13C] correlation spectra of isoleucine, leucine, and valine methyl groups of complete RNAP and the separately labeled β’ subunit within reconstituted RNAP. We further produced all RNAP subunits individually, established experiments to determine which RNAP subunit a certain regulator binds to, and identified the β subunit to bind NusE. PMID:26043358

  4. NMR profiling of biomolecules at natural abundance using 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C multiplicity-separated (MS) HSQC spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Freedberg, Darón I.; Keire, David A.

    2015-02-01

    2D NMR 1H-X (X = 15N or 13C) HSQC spectra contain cross-peaks for all XHn moieties. Multiplicity-edited1H-13C HSQC pulse sequences generate opposite signs between peaks of CH2 and CH/CH3 at a cost of lower signal-to-noise due to the 13C T2 relaxation during an additional 1/1JCH period. Such CHn-editing experiments are useful in assignment of chemical shifts and have been successfully applied to small molecules and small proteins (e.g. ubiquitin) dissolved in deuterated solvents where, generally, peak overlap is minimal. By contrast, for larger biomolecules, peak overlap in 2D HSQC spectra is unavoidable and peaks with opposite phases cancel each other out in the edited spectra. However, there is an increasing need for using NMR to profile biomolecules at natural abundance dissolved in water (e.g., protein therapeutics) where NMR experiments beyond 2D are impractical. Therefore, the existing 2D multiplicity-edited HSQC methods must be improved to acquire data on nuclei other than 13C (i.e.15N), to resolve more peaks, to reduce T2 losses and to accommodate water suppression approaches. To meet these needs, a multiplicity-separated1H-X HSQC (MS-HSQC) experiment was developed and tested on 500 and 700 MHz NMR spectrometers equipped with room temperature probes using RNase A (14 kDa) and retroviral capsid (26 kDa) proteins dissolved in 95% H2O/5% D2O. In this pulse sequence, the 1/1JXH editing-period is incorporated into the semi-constant time (semi-CT) X resonance chemical shift evolution period, which increases sensitivity, and importantly, the sum and the difference of the interleaved 1JXH-active and the 1JXH-inactive HSQC experiments yield two separate spectra for XH2 and XH/XH3. Furthermore we demonstrate improved water suppression using triple xyz-gradients instead of the more widely used z-gradient only water-suppression approach.

  5. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  6. Carbon-13, sup 15 N, and sup 31 P NMR studies on 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase from Arthrobacter oxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pust, S.; Vervoort, J.; Decker, K.; Bacher, A.; Mueller, F. )

    1989-01-24

    The interaction between the apoprotein of 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine oxidase from Arthrobacter oxidans and the prosthetic group FAD has been investigated by {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N and {sup 31}P NMR techniques. The FAD prosthetic group was selectively enriched in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopes by adding isotopically labeled riboflavin derivatives to the growth medium of riboflavin-requiring mutant cells. In the oxidized state the chemical shift of the C(7) and C(8) atoms indicates that the xylene moiety of the isoalloxazine ring is embedded in a hydrophobic environment. The binding of the competitive inhibitor, 6-hydroxy-D-nicotine, influences the resonances of the C(4a) and the N(5) atom strongly. It is suggested that these shifts are due to a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the N(5) atom and the inhibitor. On reduction all resonances, except those of the C(10a) and the N(1) atoms, shift upfield, indicating the increased electron density in the ring system. It can unambiguously be concluded from the chemical shift of the N(1) atom that the reduced flavin is anionic. The doublet character of the N(3) and N(5) resonances suggests that bulk water has no access to the active center. The strong downfield shift of the N(1) position indicates that this atom is embedded in a polar environment, but it does not indicate the presence of a positively charged residue. The {sup 31}P NMR spectra show that the resonances of the pyrophosphate group of the bound FAD differ slightly from those of free FAD. Besides the {sup 31}P resonances from FAD, four peaks around 0 ppm are observed that belongs to bound phosphorus residues. The residues are not located close to the isoalloxazine ring.

  7. 15N/14N Ratio Determination in the ISM with Herschel with High Resolution Spectroscopy of Nitrogen Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Bailleux, S.; Wlodarczak, G.; Pirali, O.; Martin-Drumel, M.-A.; Roy, P.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.

    2011-06-01

    The very high resolution of the HIFI instrument (134 kHz-1MHz) on board of Herschel needs very accurate laboratory measurements to detect unambiguously the signature of stable and unstable molecular species. Concerning the pure rotation spectra of new species, and particularly of open shell molecules, the first prediction could be far away and up to few hundred MHz. The 15N/14N ratio is not well measured in the ISM. However, the 15N/14N in the isotopomers is a potential tracer of the formation processes and the possible link with cometary molecules. Recent measurements include the detection of 15NH_2D N15NH+ and 15NH_3. The NH and NH_2 species are the simplest nitrogen radicals and are intermediate products in the NH_3 synthesis. They have been easily detected by Herschel and it therefore is interesting to now search for 15NH and 15NH_2. No spectrocopic data have been reported for these two radicals up to now. We present here the studies with high resolution spectroscopy in the THz range. The high sensitivity and the wide range of Synchrotron (0.6-6 THz) was essential to improve the prediction of the spectra of these two species in order to measure them in Lille (0.6-1 THz) with both a higher accuracy and resolution. The combined studies now give the most accurate predictions. ISM searches on these radicals are in progress in the HERSCHEL spectra. This work is supported by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS) M. Gerin, N. Marcellino, N. Biver, et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 498 (2009) 9. L. Bizzochi, P. Caselli, and L. Dore, Astron. & Astrophys. 510 (2010) L5. D. C. Lis, A. Wooten, M. Gerin and E. Roueff, Astrophys. J. 710 (2010) L49.

  8. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  9. 1H, 15N and 13C assignment of the amyloidogenic protein medin using fast-pulsing NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Davies, H A; Phelan, M M; Madine, J

    2016-04-01

    Thirty-one proteins are known to form extracellular fibrillar amyloid in humans. Molecular information about many of these proteins in their monomeric, intermediate or fibrillar form and how they aggregate and interact to form the insoluble fibrils is sparse. This is because amyloid proteins are notoriously difficult to study in their soluble forms, due to their inherent propensity to aggregate. Using recent developments in fast NMR techniques, band-selective excitation short transient and band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence we have been able to assign a 5 kDa full-length amyloidogenic protein called medin. Medin is the key protein component of the most common form of localised amyloid with a proposed role in aortic aneurysm and dissection. This assignment will now enable the study of the early interactions that could influence initiation and progression of medin aggregation. The chemical shifts have been deposited in the BioMagRes-Bank accession Nos. 25399 and 26576. PMID:26377205

  10. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  11. (1)H NMR assignment corrections and (1)H, (13)C, (15)N NMR coordination shifts structural correlations in Fe(II), Ru(II) and Os(II) cationic complexes with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2010-06-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of iron(II), ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) tris-chelated cationic complexes with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline of the general formula [M(LL)(3)](2+) (M = Fe, Ru, Os; LL = bpy, phen) were performed. Inconsistent literature (1)H signal assignments were corrected. Significant shielding of nitrogen-adjacent protons [H(6) in bpy, H(2) in phen] and metal-bonded nitrogens was observed, being enhanced in the series Ru(II) --> Os(II) --> Fe(II) for (1)H, Fe(II) --> Ru(II) --> Os(II) for (15)N and bpy --> phen for both nuclei. The carbons are deshielded, the effect increasing in the order Ru(II) --> Os(II) --> Fe(II). PMID:20474023

  12. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  13. Selective observation of biologically important 15N-labeled metabolites in isolated rat brain and liver by 1H-detected multiple-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.; Parivar, Farhad

    Four cerebral metabolites of importance in neurotransmission, serotonin, L-tryptophan, L-glutamine, and N-acetyl- L-aspartate, and two hepatic urea-cycle intermediates, citrulline and urea, were found to be observable by 1H- 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum-coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy in aqueous solution at physiological pH and temperature, through the protons spin-coupled to their indole, amide, or ureido nitrogen. Their 1H chemical shifts were well dispersed over a 5-10 ppm region while the 1J 15N- 1H values were 87-99 Hz. For [γ- 15N]glutamine, a 50- to 100-fold increase in sensitivity over direct 15N detection was achieved, in contrast to a 2-fold increase by the polarization-transfer method. In the isolated brain of portacaval-shunted rats, the amide protons of biologically 15N-enriched [γ- 15N]glutamine were observed in 2 min of acquisition, with suppression of proton signals from all other cerebral metabolites. In isolated liver of 15N-enriched control rats, [ 15NIurea protons were observed in 16 min. The HMQC method is likely to be effective for the in vivo study of cerebral and hepatic nitrogen metabolism.

  14. Complete thermodynamic characterization of the multiple protonation equilibria of the aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin: a calorimetric and natural abundance 15N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Christopher M; Pilch, Daniel S

    2006-02-15

    The binding of aminoglycoside antibiotics to a broad range of macromolecular targets is coupled to protonation of one or more of the amino groups that typify this class of drugs. Determining how and to what extent this linkage influences the energetics of the aminoglycoside-macromolecule binding reaction requires a detailed understanding of the thermodynamics associated with the protonation equilibria of the aminoglycoside amino groups. In recognition of this need, a calorimetric- and NMR-based approach for obtaining the requisite thermodynamic information is presented using paromomycin as the model aminoglycoside. Temperature- and pH-dependent 15N NMR studies provide pK(a) values for the five paromomycin amino groups, as well as the temperature dependence of these pK(a) values. These studies also indicate that the observed pK(a) values associated with the free base form of paromomycin are lower in magnitude than the corresponding values associated with the sulfate salt form of the drug. This difference in pK(a) is due to drug interactions with the sulfate counterions at the high drug concentrations (> or = 812 mM) used in the 15N NMR studies. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies conducted at drug concentrations < or = 45 microM reveal that the extent of paromomycin protonation linked to the binding of the drug to its pharmacologically relevant target, the 16 S rRNA A-site, is consistent with the pK(a) values of the free base and not the sulfate salt form of the drug. Temperature- and pH-dependent isothermal titration calorimetry studies yield exothermic enthalpy changes (deltaH) for protonation of the five paromomycin amino groups, as well as positive heat capacity changes (deltaC(p)) for three of the five amino groups. Regarded as a whole, the results presented here represent an important first step toward establishing a thermodynamic database that can be used to predict how aminoglycoside-macromolecule binding energetics will be influenced by conditions such

  15. Mapping Inhibitor Binding Modes on an Active Cysteine Protease via NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H.; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin-L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. We report an auto-induction methodology that provides soluble-cruzain at high yields (> 30 mg per liter in minimal media). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in NMR-based ligand mapping. Using CD and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective 15N-Cys, 15N-His, and 13C-Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verifies that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely covalent, non-covalent, and non-interacting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions in order to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies. PMID:23181936

  16. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  17. Multiplet-separated heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.; Sørensen, O. W.; Ernst, R. R.

    1983-02-01

    Techniques are described for the identification and separation of peaks of different multiplicity in heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The methods are applied to the two-dimensional 13C- 1H shift correlation spectrum of menthol.

  18. 1H/15N HSQC NMR studies of ligand carboxylate group interactions with arginine residues in complexes of brodimoprim analogues and Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Morgan, W D; Birdsall, B; Nieto, P M; Gargaro, A R; Feeney, J

    1999-02-16

    1H and 15N NMR studies have been undertaken on complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) formed with analogues of the antibacterial drug brodimoprim (2,4-diamino-5-(3', 5'-dimethoxy-4'-bromobenzyl)pyrimidine) in order to monitor interactions between carboxylate groups on the ligands and basic residues in the protein. These analogues had been designed by computer modeling with carboxylated alkyl chains introduced at the 3'-O position in order to improve their binding properties by making additional interactions with basic groups in the protein. Specific interactions between ligand carboxylate groups and the conserved Arg57 residue have been detected in studies of 1H/15N HSQC spectra of complexes of DHFR with both the 4-carboxylate and the 4, 6-dicarboxylate brodimoprim analogues. The spectra from both complexes showed four resolved signals for the four NHeta protons of the guanidino group of Arg57, and this is consistent with hindered rotation in the guanidino group resulting from interactions with the 4-carboxylate group in each analogue. In the spectra of each complex, one of the protons from each of the two NH2 groups and both nitrogens are considerably deshielded compared to the shielding values normally observed for such nuclei. This pattern of deshielding is that expected for a symmetrical end-on interaction of the carboxylate oxygens with the NHeta12 and NHeta22 guanidino protons. The differences in the degree of deshielding between the complexes of the two structurally similar brodimoprim analogues and the methotrexate indicates that the shielding is very sensitive to geometry, most probably to hydrogen bond lengths. The 1H/15N HSQC spectrum of the DHFR complex with the brodimoprim-6-carboxylate analogue does not feature any deshielded Arg NHeta protons and this argues against a similar interaction with the Arg57 in this case. It has not proved possible to determine whether the 6-carboxylate in this analogue is interacting directly with

  19. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  20. Fragment-Based Drug Discovery Using NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Harner, Mary J.; Frank, Andreas O.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful tool for fragment-based drug discovery over the last two decades. While NMR has been traditionally used to elucidate the three-dimensional structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules and their interactions, it can also be a very valuable tool for the reliable identification of small molecules that bind to proteins and for hit-to-lead optimization. Here, we describe the use of NMR spectroscopy as a method for fragment-based drug discovery and how to most effectively utilize this approach for discovering novel therapeutics based on our experience. PMID:23686385

  1. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed. PMID:26136394

  2. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  3. Main chain and side chain dynamics of a heme protein: 15N and 2H NMR relaxation studies of R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c2.

    PubMed

    Flynn, P F; Bieber Urbauer, R J; Zhang, H; Lee, A L; Wand, A J

    2001-06-01

    A detailed characterization of the main chain and side chain dynamics in R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) derived from (2)H NMR relaxation of methyl group resonances is presented. (15)N relaxation measurements confirm earlier results indicating that R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibits minor rotational anisotropy in solution. The current study is focused on the use of deuterium relaxation in side chain methyl groups, which has been shown to provide a detailed and accurate measure of internal dynamics. Results obtained indicate that the side chains of ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibit a wide range of motional amplitudes, but are more rigid than generally found in the interior of nonprosthetic group bearing globular proteins. This unusual rigidity is ascribed to the interactions of the protein with the large heme prosthetic group. This observation has significant implications for the potential of the heme-protein interface to modulate the redox properties of the protein and also points to the need for great precision in the design and engineering of heme proteins. PMID:11380250

  4. Amino-acid selective experiments on uniformly 13C and 15N labeled proteins by MAS NMR: Filtering of lysines and arginines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Stefan; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Amino-acid selective magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments can aid the assignment of ambiguous cross-peaks in crowded spectra of solid proteins. In particular for larger proteins, data analysis can be hindered by severe resonance overlap. In such cases, filtering techniques may provide a good alternative to site-specific spin-labeling to obtain unambiguous assignments that can serve as starting points in the assignment procedure. In this paper we present a simple pulse sequence that allows selective excitation of arginine and lysine residues. To achieve this, we make use of a combination of specific cross-polarization for selective excitation [M. Baldus, A.T. Petkova, J. Herzfeld, R.G. Griffin, Cross polarization in the tilted frame: assignment and spectral simplification in heteronuclear spin systems, Mol. Phys. 95 (1998) 1197-1207.] and spin diffusion for transfer along the amino-acid side-chain. The selectivity of the filter is demonstrated with the excitation of lysine and arginine side-chain resonances in a uniformly 13C and 15N labeled protein preparation of the α-spectrin SH3 domain. It is shown that the filter can be applied as a building block in a 13C- 13C lysine-only correlation experiment.

  5. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 15N NMR coordination shifts in palladium and platinum chloride complexes with pyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Szłyk, Edward; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kamieński, Bohdan; Kozerski, Lech; Tousek, Jaromír; Marek, Radek

    2006-02-01

    A series of Pd and Pt chloride complexes with pyridine (py), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), of general formulae trans-/cis-[M(py)2Cl2], [M(py)4]Cl2, trans-/cis-[M(py)2Cl4], [M(bpy)Cl2], [M(bpy)Cl4], [M(phen)Cl2], [M(phen)Cl4], where M = Pd, Pt, was studied by 1H, 195Pt, and 15N NMR. The 90-140 ppm low-frequency 15N coordination shifts are discussed in terms of such structural features of the complexes as the type of platinide metal, oxidation state, coordination sphere geometry and the type of ligand. The results of quantum-chemical NMR calculations were compared with the experimental 15N coordination shifts, well reproducing their magnitude and correlation with the molecular structure. PMID:16392105

  6. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  7. Genetic algorithm optimized triply compensated pulses in NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manu, V. S.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-11-01

    Sensitivity and resolution in NMR experiments are affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities (of both external and RF), errors in pulse calibration, and offset effects due to finite length of RF pulses. To remedy these problems, built-in compensation mechanisms for these experimental imperfections are often necessary. Here, we propose a new family of phase-modulated constant-amplitude broadband pulses with high compensation for RF inhomogeneity and heteronuclear coupling evolution. These pulses were optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), which consists in a global optimization method inspired by Nature's evolutionary processes. The newly designed π and π / 2 pulses belong to the 'type A' (or general rotors) symmetric composite pulses. These GA-optimized pulses are relatively short compared to other general rotors and can be used for excitation and inversion, as well as refocusing pulses in spin-echo experiments. The performance of the GA-optimized pulses was assessed in Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using a crystalline U-13C, 15N NAVL peptide as well as U-13C, 15N microcrystalline ubiquitin. GA optimization of NMR pulse sequences opens a window for improving current experiments and designing new robust pulse sequences.

  8. Genetic algorithm optimized triply compensated pulses in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manu, V S; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-11-01

    Sensitivity and resolution in NMR experiments are affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities (of both external and RF), errors in pulse calibration, and offset effects due to finite length of RF pulses. To remedy these problems, built-in compensation mechanisms for these experimental imperfections are often necessary. Here, we propose a new family of phase-modulated constant-amplitude broadband pulses with high compensation for RF inhomogeneity and heteronuclear coupling evolution. These pulses were optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), which consists in a global optimization method inspired by Nature's evolutionary processes. The newly designed π and π/2 pulses belong to the 'type A' (or general rotors) symmetric composite pulses. These GA-optimized pulses are relatively short compared to other general rotors and can be used for excitation and inversion, as well as refocusing pulses in spin-echo experiments. The performance of the GA-optimized pulses was assessed in Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using a crystalline U-(13)C, (15)N NAVL peptide as well as U-(13)C, (15)N microcrystalline ubiquitin. GA optimization of NMR pulse sequences opens a window for improving current experiments and designing new robust pulse sequences. PMID:26473327

  9. Extension of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy techniques to allosteric proteins: CO- and paramagnetic fluoromet-hemoglobin [beta (15N-valine)].

    PubMed

    Nocek, J M; Huang, K; Hoffman, B M

    2000-03-14

    We present the first steps in applying transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) techniques to the study of allosterism. Each beta-chain of the hemoglobin (Hb) tetramer has 17 valine residues. We have (15)N-labeled the beta-chain Val residues and detected 16 of the 17 (1)H-(15)N correlation peaks for beta-chain Val of the R state CO-Hb structure by using the TROSY technique. Sequence-specific assignments are suggested, based mainly on analysis of the (1)H pseudocontact-shift increments produced by oxidizing the diamagnetic R state HbCO to the paramagnetic R state fluoromet form. When possible, we support these assignments with sequential nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) information obtained from a two-dimensional [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY-TROSY experiment (NOESY, NOE spectroscopy). We have induced further the R-T conformational change by adding the allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate, to the fluoromet-Hb sample. This change induces substantial increments in the (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts, and we discuss the implication of these findings in the context of the tentative sequence assignments. These preliminary results suggest that amide nitrogen and amide proton chemical shifts in a selectively labeled sample are site-specific probes for monitoring the allosteric response of the ensemble-averaged solution structure of Hb. More important, the chemical-shift dispersion obtained is adequate to permit a complete assignment of the backbone (15)N/(13)C resonances upon nonselective labeling. PMID:10716987

  10. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  11. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas; Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23011410

  12. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  13. Aggregation of [Au(CN)4]- anions: examination by crystallography and 15N CP-MAS NMR and the structural factors influencing intermolecular Au···N interactions.

    PubMed

    Geisheimer, Andrew R; Wren, John E C; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Sakai, Ken; Kroeker, Scott; Leznoff, Daniel B

    2011-02-21

    To investigate the factors influencing the formation of intermolecular Au···NC interactions between [Au(CN)(4)](-) units, a series of [cation](n+)[Au(CN)(4)](n) double salts was synthesized, structurally characterized and probed by IR and (15)N{(1)H} CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Thus, [(n)Bu(4)N][Au(CN)(4)], [AsPh(4)][Au(CN)(4)], [N(PPh(3))(2)][Au(CN)(4)], [Co(1,10-phenanthroline)(3)][Au(CN)(4)](2), and [Mn(2,2';6',2''-terpyridine)(2)][Au(CN)(4)](2) show [Au(CN)(4)](-) anions that are well-separated from one another; no Au-Au or Au···NC interactions are present. trans-[Co(1,2-diaminoethane)(2)Cl(2)][Au(CN)(4)] forms a supramolecular structure, where trans-[Co(en)(2)Cl(2)](+) and [Au(CN)(4)](-) ions are found in separate layers connected by Au-CN···H-N hydrogen-bonding; weak Au···NC coordinate bonds complete octahedral Au(III) centers, and support a 2-D (4,4) network motif of [Au(CN)(4)](-)-units. A similar structure-type is formed by [Co(NH(3))(6)][Au(CN)(4)](3)·(H(2)O)(4). In [Ni(1,2-diaminoethane)(3)][Au(CN)(4)](2), intermolecular Au···NC interactions facilitate formation of 1-D chains of [Au(CN)(4)](-) anions in the supramolecular structure, which are separated from one another by [Ni(en)(3)](2+) cations. In [1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-H][Au(CN)(4)], the monoprotonated amine cation forms a hydrogen-bond to the [Au(CN)(4)](-) unit on one side, while coordinating to the axial sites of the gold(III) center through the unprotonated amine on the other, thereby generating a 2-D (4,4) net of cations and anions; an additional, uncoordinated [Au(CN)(4)](-)-unit lies in the central space of each grid. This body of structural data indicates that cations with hydrogen-bonding groups can induce intermolecular Au···NC interactions, while the cationic charge, shape, size, and aromaticity have little effect. While the ν(CN) values are poor indicators of the presence or absence of N-cyano bridging between [Au(CN)(4)](-)-units (partly because of the very low

  14. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  15. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  16. Analysis of experimentally shocked minerals by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Boslough, M.B.

    1994-10-01

    The shock-loading of natural materials by an impact or explosion can result in the formation of modified and altered phases. In order to characterize the resulting material and to evaluate the extent of shock modification, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to examine several experimentally shocked minerals. In three related NMR studies, they have (1) examined shocked clinoptilolite, (2) performed a preliminary analysis of shocked quartz, and (3) reproduced shocked quartz results with detailed spectral deconvolutions, and extended it with NMR analysis of shocked feldspar powders.

  17. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  18. New Views of Functionally Dynamic Proteins by Solution NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kay, Lewis E

    2016-01-29

    In the past several decades solution NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful technique for the study of the structure and dynamics of proteins, providing detailed insights into biomolecular function. Herein, I provide a summary of two important areas of application, focusing on NMR studies of (i) supramolecular systems with aggregate molecular masses in the hundreds of kilodaltons and of (ii) sparsely populated and transiently formed protein states that are thermally accessible from populated ground-state conformers. The critical role of molecular dynamics in function is emphasized, highlighting the utility of the NMR technique in providing such often elusive information. PMID:26707200

  19. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  20. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  1. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  2. Dissolution DNP-NMR spectroscopy using galvinoxyl as a polarizing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumata, Lloyd L.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Malloy, Craig R.; Sherry, A. Dean; van Tol, Johan; Song, Likai; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this work was to test feasibility of using galvinoxyl (2,6-di-tert-butyl-α-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)-p-tolyloxy) as a polarizing agent for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR spectroscopy. We have found that galvinoxyl is reasonably soluble in ethyl acetate, chloroform, or acetone and the solutions formed good glasses when mixed together or with other solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements revealed that galvinoxyl has an ESR linewidth D intermediate between that of carbon-centered free radical trityl OX063 and the nitroxide-based 4-oxo-TEMPO, thus the DNP with galvinoxyl for nuclei with low gyromagnetic ratio γ such as 13C and 15N is expected to proceed predominantly via the thermal mixing process. The optimum radical concentration that would afford the highest 13C nuclear polarization (approximately 6% for [1-13C]ethyl acetate) at 3.35 T and 1.4 K was found to be around 40 mM. After dissolution, large liquid-state NMR enhancements were achieved for a number of 13C and 15N compounds with long spin-lattice relaxation time T1. In addition, the hydrophobic galvinoxyl free radical can be easily filtered out from the dissolution liquid when water is used as the solvent. These results indicate that galvinoxyl can be considered as an easily available free radical polarizing agent for routine dissolution DNP-NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Membrane Interactions of Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 Peptides by Oriented Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Jarbas M.; Verly, Rodrigo M.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Cesar, Amary; Bertani, Philippe; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Phylloseptin-1, -2, and -3 are three members of the family of linear cationic antimicrobial peptides found in tree frogs. The highly homologous peptides encompass 19 amino acids, and only differ in the amino acid composition and charge at the six most carboxy-terminal residues. Here, we investigated how such subtle changes are reflected in their membrane interactions and how these can be correlated to their biological activities. To this end, the three peptides were labeled with stable isotopes, reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers, and their detailed topology determined by a combined approach using 2H and 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Although phylloseptin-2 and -3 adopt perfect in-plane alignments, the tilt angle of phylloseptin-1 deviates by 8° probably to assure a more water exposed localization of the lysine-17 side chain. Furthermore, different azimuthal angles are observed, positioning the amphipathic helices of all three peptides with the charged residues well exposed to the water phase. Interestingly, our studies also reveal that two orientation-dependent 2H quadrupolar splittings from methyl-deuterated alanines and one 15N amide chemical shift are sufficient to unambiguously determine the topology of phylloseptin-1, where quadrupolar splittings close to the maximum impose the most stringent angular restraints. As a result of these studies, a strategy is proposed where the topology of a peptide structure can be determined accurately from the labeling with 15N and 2H isotopes of only a few amino acid residues. PMID:25140425

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  5. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  6. Quantitating Metabolites in Protein Precipitated Serum Using NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative NMR-based metabolite profiling is challenged by the deleterious effects of abundant proteins in the intact blood plasma/serum, which underscores the need for alternative approaches. Protein removal by ultrafiltration using low molecular weight cutoff filters thus represents an important step. However, protein precipitation, an alternative and simple approach for protein removal, lacks detailed quantitative assessment for use in NMR based metabolomics. In this study, we have comprehensively evaluated the performance of protein precipitation using methanol, acetonitrile, perchloric acid, and trichloroacetic acid and ultrafiltration approaches using 1D and 2D NMR, based on the identification and absolute quantitation of 44 human blood metabolites, including a few identified for the first time in the NMR spectra of human serum. We also investigated the use of a “smart isotope tag,” 15N-cholamine for further resolution enhancement, which resulted in the detection of a number of additional metabolites. 1H NMR of both protein precipitated and ultrafiltered serum detected all 44 metabolites with comparable reproducibility (average CV, 3.7% for precipitation; 3.6% for filtration). However, nearly half of the quantified metabolites in ultrafiltered serum exhibited 10–74% lower concentrations; specifically, tryptophan, benzoate, and 2-oxoisocaproate showed much lower concentrations compared to protein precipitated serum. These results indicate that protein precipitation using methanol offers a reliable approach for routine NMR-based metabolomics of human blood serum/plasma and should be considered as an alternative to ultrafiltration. Importantly, protein precipitation, which is commonly used by mass spectrometry (MS), promises avenues for direct comparison and correlation of metabolite data obtained from the two analytical platforms to exploit their combined strength in the metabolomics of blood. PMID:24796490

  7. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  8. Structure and reactivity of lithium amides. /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies and colligative measurements of lithium diphenylamide and lithium diphenylamide-lithium bromide complex solvated by tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    DePue, J.S.; Collum, D.B.

    1988-08-03

    /sup 6/Li, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diphenylamide in THF/hydrocarbon solutions (THF = tetrahydrofuran) detected two different species. /sup 6/Li and /sup 15/N NMR spectroscopic studies of (/sup 6/Li, /sup 15/N)lithium diphenylamide showed the species observed at low THF concentrations to be a cyclic oligomer. Structural analogies provided strong support for a dimer while colligative measurements at 0/degrees/C indicated the dimer to be di- or trisolvated. On the basis of the observed mass action effects, the species appearing at intermediate THF concentrations is assigned as a contact or solvent-separated ion-paired monomer. Lithium diphenylamide forms a 1:1 adduct with lithium bromide at low THF concentrations. A combination of /sup 6/Li-/sup 15/N double labeling studies and colligative measurements supports a trisolvated cyclic mixed dimer structure. Although detailed spectroscopic studies at elevated THF concentrations were precluded by high fluctionality, the similarity of the /sup 13/C chemical shifts of lithium diphenylamide in the presence and absence of lithium bromide provide indirect evidence that the mixed dimer undergoes a THF concentration dependent dissociation to the monomeric amide and free lithium bromide. 24 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with picolines.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Malináková, Katerina; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2009-03-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of gold(III), palladium(II) and platinum(II) chloride complexes with picolines, [Au(PIC)Cl(3)], trans-[Pd(PIC)(2)Cl(2)], trans/cis-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] and [Pt(PIC)(4)]Cl(2), were performed. After complexation, the (1)H and (13)C signals were shifted to higher frequency, whereas the (15)N ones to lower (by ca 80-110 ppm), with respect to the free ligands. The (15)N shielding phenomenon was enhanced in the series [Au(PIC)Cl(3)] < trans-[Pd(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] < cis-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)] < trans-[Pt(PIC)(2)Cl(2)]; it increased following the Pd(II) --> Pt(II) replacement, but decreased upon the trans --> cis-transition. Experimental (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts were compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ + 6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ + 6-31G*. PMID:19097135

  10. Structural correlations for (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR coordination shifts in Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with lutidines and collidine.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2010-06-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of gold(III), palladium(II) and platinum(II) chloride complexes with dimethylpyridines (lutidines: 2,3-lutidine, 2,3lut; 2,4-lutidine, 2,4lut; 3,5-lutidine, 3,5lut; 2,6-lutidine, 2,6lut) and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine (2,4,6-collidine, 2,4,6col) having general formulae [AuLCl(3)], trans-[PdL(2)Cl(2)] and trans-/cis-[PtL(2)Cl(2)] were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta(1H), delta(13C), delta(15N)) reported. The deshielding of protons and carbons, as well as the shielding of nitrogens was observed. The (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR coordination shifts (Delta(1H) (coord), Delta(13C) (coord), Delta(15N) (coord); Delta(coord) = delta(complex) - delta(ligand)) were discussed in relation to some structural features of the title complexes, such as the type of the central atom [Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II)], geometry (trans- or cis-), metal-nitrogen bond lengths and the position of both methyl groups in the pyridine ring system. PMID:20474019

  11. MULTIVARIATE CURVE RESOLUTION OF NMR SPECTROSCOPY METABONOMIC DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sandia National Laboratories is working with the EPA to evaluate and develop mathematical tools for analysis of the collected NMR spectroscopy data. Initially, we have focused on the use of Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) also known as molecular factor analysis (MFA), a tech...

  12. (1)H-, (13)C- and (15)N-NMR assignment of the N-terminal domain of human cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF).

    PubMed

    Latgé, Cristiane; Cabral, Kátia M S; Almeida, Marcius S; Foguel, Débora

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by the death of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Current therapies for PD do not halt the neurodegeneration nor repair the affected neurons. Therefore, search for novel neurotrophic factors (NTF) for midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which could be used in novel therapeutic approaches, is highly wanted. In 2007, a potent NTF for dopaminergic neurons was described as the conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF). Single doses of this protein protect and restore dopaminergic neurons in experimental models of PD. CDNF has two domains; an N-terminal saposin-like domain, which may bind to membranes; and a presumably intrinsically unstructured C-terminal which contains an internal cysteine bridge in a CXXC motif similar to that of thiol/disulphide oxidoreductases and isomerases, and may thus reduce the endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by incorrectly folded proteins. We show for the first time the nuclear magnetic resonance assignment of N-terminal domain of recombinant CDNF (residues 1-105) by solution 2D and 3D NMR spectroscopy. We were able to obtain a nearly complete resonance assignment, which is the first step toward the solution structure determination of this neurotrophic factor. PMID:22528768

  13. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  14. Recovering Invisible Signals by Two-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Samuel F; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Haddou, Baptiste; Charlier, Cyril; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-08-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have benefited tremendously from the steady increase in the strength of magnetic fields. Spectacular improvements in both sensitivity and resolution have enabled the investigation of molecular systems of rising complexity. At very high fields, this progress may be jeopardized by line broadening, which is due to chemical exchange or relaxation by chemical shift anisotropy. In this work, we introduce a two-field NMR spectrometer designed for both excitation and observation of nuclear spins in two distinct magnetic fields in a single experiment. NMR spectra of several small molecules as well as a protein were obtained, with two dimensions acquired at vastly different magnetic fields. Resonances of exchanging groups that are broadened beyond recognition at high field can be sharpened to narrow peaks in the low-field dimension. Two-field NMR spectroscopy enables the measurement of chemical shifts at optimal fields and the study of molecular systems that suffer from internal dynamics, and opens new avenues for NMR spectroscopy at very high magnetic fields. PMID:27417269

  15. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  16. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  17. Silver-109 NMR spectroscopy of inorganic solids.

    PubMed

    Penner, Glenn H; Li, Wenli

    2004-09-01

    In this study the (109)Ag NMR spectra of the following solid inorganic silver-containing compounds were investigated: AgNO(3), AgNO(2), Ag(2)SO(4), Ag(2)SO(3), AgCO(3), Ag(3)PO(4), AgCl, AgBr, AgI, AgSO(3)CH(3), silver p-toluenesulfonate, NaAg(CN)(2), KAg(CN)(2), K(3)Ag(CN)(4), Me(4)NAgCl(2), silver diethylthiocarbamate, silver lactate, silver acetate, silver citrate, and bis[(N,N(1)-di-tert-butylformamidinato)silver(I)]. The magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra of all compounds were obtained. In some cases, when protons were available, the (1)H to (109)Ag cross-polarization (CP) technique was used to enhance the signal and shorten the experimental relaxation delay. It was possible to obtain slow MAS (or CP/MAS) or nonspinning spectra for 10 samples, allowing the determination of the principal components of the (109)Ag chemical shift (CS) tensors. The isotropic chemical shifts and the CS tensors are discussed in light of the available crystal structures. The need for an accepted standard for referencing (109)Ag chemical shifts and the use of AgSO(3)CH(3) as a CP setup sample are also discussed. PMID:15332810

  18. Coupled effect of salt and pH on proteins probed with NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukic, Predrag; O'Meara, Fergal; Hewage, Chandralal; Erik Nielsen, Jens

    2013-07-01

    The coupled effect of ionic strength (50-400 mM) and pH (2-8) on ionization and conformation equilibria of lysozyme was studied using NMR spectroscopy. Observed changes in pKa values of the ionizable groups were found to originate from perturbations in the geometry of hydrogen bonds rather than screening of electric fields. Moreover, at the ionic strengths used here, salt-induced local conformational changes had a dominant effect on chemical shifts measured on 1HN and 15N amide nuclei. Accurate modeling of these localized perturbations in structure-based energy calculations is a necessary prerequisite on the way to complete understanding of any salt-induced processes in proteins.

  19. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  20. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  1. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-01

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54 kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2 times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells. PMID:25965532

  2. Combined ligand-observe 19F and protein-observe 15N,1H-HSQC NMR suggests phenylalanine as the key Δ-somatostatin residue recognized by human protein disulfide isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Kirsty L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Hudson, Paul B.; Williamson, Richard A.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Human protein disulphide isomerase (hPDI) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) based isomerase and folding chaperone. Molecular detail of ligand recognition and specificity of hPDI are poorly understood despite the importance of the hPDI for folding secreted proteins and its implication in diseases including cancer and lateral sclerosis. We report a detailed study of specificity, interaction and dissociation constants (Kd) of the peptide-ligand Δ-somatostatin (AGSKNFFWKTFTSS) binding to hPDI using 19F ligand-observe and 15N,1H-HSQC protein-observe NMR methods. Phe residues in Δ-somatostatin are hypothesised as important for recognition by hPDI therefore, step-wise peptide Phe-to-Ala changes were progressively introduced and shown to raise the Kd from 103 + 47 μM until the point where binding was abolished when all Phe residues were modified to Ala. The largest step-changes in Kd involved the F11A peptide modification which implies the C-terminus of Δ-somatostatin is a prime recognition region. Furthermore, this study also validated the combined use of 19F ligand-observe and complimentary 15N,1H-HSQC titrations to monitor interactions from the protein’s perspective. 19F ligand-observe NMR was ratified as mirroring 15N protein-observe but highlighted the advantage that 19F offers improved Kd precision due to higher spectrum resolution and greater chemical environment sensitivity. PMID:26786784

  3. 103Rh NMR spectroscopy and its application to rhodium chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, Jan Meine; Gaemers, Sander; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2004-09-01

    Rhodium is used for a number of large processes that rely on homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed reactions, for instance rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of alkenes, carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid and hydrodesulfurization of thiophene derivatives (in crude oil). Many laboratory applications in organometallic chemistry and catalysis involve organorhodium chemistry and a wealth of rhodium coordination compounds is known. For these and other areas, 103Rh NMR spectroscopy appears to be a very useful analytical tool. In this review, most of the literature concerning 103Rh NMR spectroscopy published from 1989 up to and including 2003 has been covered. After an introduction to several experimental methods for the detection of the insensitive 103Rh nucleus, a discussion of factors affecting the transition metal chemical shift is given. Computational aspects and calculations of chemical shifts are also briefly addressed. Next, the application of 103Rh NMR in coordination and organometallic chemistry is elaborated in more detail by highlighting recent developments in measurement and interpretation of 103Rh NMR data, in relation to rhodium-assisted reactions and homogeneous catalysis. The dependence of the 103Rh chemical shift on the ligands at rhodium in the first coordination sphere, on the complex geometry, oxidation state, temperature, solvent and concentration is treated. Several classes of compounds and special cases such as chiral rhodium compounds are reviewed. Finally, a section on scalar coupling to rhodium is provided. PMID:15307053

  4. Molecular structure by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, R.

    Two examples are presented of the use of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to solve molecular structure problems. The first is called correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and it allows us to disentangle a complex network of spin-spin couplings. By dispersing the NMR information in two frequency dimensions, it facilitates the analysis of very complex spectra of organic and biochemical molecules, normally too crowded to be tractable. The second application exploits the special properties of multiple-quantum coherence to explore the molecular framework one CC linkage at a time. The natural product panamine is used as a test example; with some supplementary evidence, the structure of this six-ringed heterocyclic molecule is elucidated from the double-quantum filtered two-dimensional spectrum.

  5. Single-sided sensor for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    The unavoidable spatial inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field generated by open sensors has precluded their use for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In fact, this application was deemed impossible because these field variations are usually orders of magnitude larger than those created by the microscopic structure of the molecules to be detected. Recently, chemical shift resolved NMR spectra were observed for the first time outside a portable single-sided magnet by implementing a method that exploits inhomogeneities in the rf field designed to reproduce variations of the static magnetic field [J. Perlo, V. Demas, F. Casanova, C.A. Meriles, J. Reimer, A. Pines, B. Blümich, High-resolution spectroscopy with a portable single-sided sensor, Science 308 (2005) 1279]. In this communication, we describe in detail the magnet system built from permanent magnets as well as the rf coil geometry used to compensate the static field variations.

  6. Ultra-wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-17

    large spectral breadths. We have suggested the term ultra-wideline NMR (UWNMR) spectroscopy to describe this set of methodologies. This Account describes recent developments in pulse sequences and strategies for the efficient acquisition of UWNMR spectra. After an introduction to anisotropically broadened NMR patterns, we give a brief history of methods used to acquire UWNMR spectra. We then discuss new acquisition methodologies, including the acquisition of CPMG echo trains and the application of pulses capable of broadband excitation and refocusing. Finally, we present several applications of UWNMR methods that use these broadband pulses. PMID:23745683

  7. Binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase: 1H and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, S.; Behere, D.V.; Mitra, S. )

    1989-05-30

    The binding of thiocyanate to lactoperoxidase (LPO) has been investigated by 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy. 1H NMR of LPO shows that the major broad heme methyl proton resonance at about 61 ppm is shifted upfield by addition of the thiocyanate, indicating binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme. The pH dependence of line width of 15N resonance of SC15N- in the presence of the enzyme has revealed that the binding of the thiocyanate to the enzyme is facilitated by protonation of an ionizable group (with pKa of 6.4), which is presumably distal histidine. Dissociation constants (KD) of SC15N-/LPO, SC15N-/LPO/I-, and SC15N-/LPO/CN- equilibria have been determined by 15N T1 measurements and found to be 90 +/- 5, 173 +/- 20, and 83 +/- 6 mM, respectively. On the basis of these values of KD, it is suggested that the iodide ion inhibits the binding of the thiocyanate but cyanide ion does not. The thiocyanate is shown to bind at the same site of LPO as iodide does, but the binding is considerably weaker and is away from the ferric ion. The distance of 15N of the bound thiocyanate ion from the iron is determined to be 7.2 +/- 0.2 A from the 15N T1 measurements.

  8. NMR spectroscopy to follow reaction progress in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Butler, Bradley J; Thomas, Donald S; Hook, James M; Harper, Jason B

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand reaction outcomes in ionic liquids, it is crucial to be able to follow the progress of these reactions. This review highlights the advantages of NMR spectroscopy over other analytical techniques in following reaction progress in ionic liquids, particularly addressing the practical aspects of the methodology and highlighting the range of processes that can be readily followed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25287592

  9. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  10. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  11. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of the E. coli peptide deformylase in complex with a natural inhibitor called actinonin.

    PubMed

    Larue, Valéry; Seijo, Bili; Tisne, Carine; Dardel, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    In eubacteria, the formyl group of nascent polypeptides is removed by peptide deformylase protein (PDF). This is the reason why PDF has received special attention in the course of the search for new antibacterial agents. We observed by NMR that actinonin, a natural inhibitor, induced drastic changes in the HSQC spectrum of E. coli PDF. We report here the complete NMR chemical shift assignments of PDF resonances bound to actinonin. PMID:19636969

  12. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  13. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with quinoline, isoquinoline, and 2,2'-biquinoline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2007-12-01

    1H, 13C, and 15N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M=Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with quinolines (L=quinoline-quin, or isoquinoline-isoquin; LL=2,2'-biquinoline-bquin), having the general formulae trans-/cis-[ML2Cl2] and [M(LL)Cl2], were performed and the respective chemical shifts (delta1H, delta13C, delta15N) reported. 1H coordination shifts of various signs and magnitudes (Delta1Hcoord=delta1Hcomplex-delta1Hligand) are discussed in relation to the changes of diamagnetic contribution to the relevant 1H shielding constants. The comparison to the literature data for similar complexes containing auxiliary ligands other than chlorides exhibited a large dependence of delta1H parameters on electron density variations and ring-current effects (inductive and anisotropic phenomena). The influence of deviations from planarity, concerning either MN2Cl2 chromophores or azine ring systems, revealed by the known X-ray structures of [Pd(bquin)Cl2] and [Pt(bquin)Cl2], is discussed in respect to 1H NMR spectra. 15N coordination shifts (Delta15Ncoord=delta15Ncomplex-delta15Nligand) of ca. 78-100 ppm (to lower frequency) are attributed mainly to the decrease of the absolute value of paramagnetic contribution in the relevant 15N shielding constants, this phenomenon being noticeably dependent on the type of a platinide metal and coordination sphere geometry. The absolute magnitude of Delta15Ncoord parameter increased by ca 15 ppm upon Pd(II)-->Pt(II) replacement but decreased by ca. 15 ppm following trans-->cis transition. Experimental 1H, 13C, 15N NMR chemical shifts are compared to those quantum-chemically calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G**//B3LYP/LanL2DZ+6-31G*, both in vacuo and in CHCl3 or DMF solution. PMID:18044805

  14. Absolute calibration of the intramolecular site preference of 15N fractionation in tropospheric N2O by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David W T; Parkes, Stephen D; Haverd, Vanessa; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Wilson, Stephen R

    2009-03-15

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry both as a greenhouse gas and in stratospheric ozone depletion. Isotopic measurements of N(2)O have provided an invaluable insight into understanding its atmospheric sources and sinks. The preference for (15)N fractionation between the central and terminal positions (the "site preference") is particularly valuable because it depends principally on the processes involved in N(2)O production or consumption, rather than the (15)N content of the substrate from which it is formed. Despite the value of measurements of the site preference, there is no internationally recognized standard reference material of accurately known and accepted site preference, and there has been some lack of agreement in published studies aimed at providing such a standard. Previous work has been based on isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS); in this work we provide an absolute calibration for the intramolecular site preference of (15)N fractionation of working standard gases used in our laboratory by a completely independent technique--high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. By reference to this absolute calibration, we determine the site preference for 25 samples of tropospheric N(2)O collected under clean air conditions to be 19.8 per thousand +/- 2.1 per thousand. This result is in agreement with that based on the earlier absolute calibration of Toyoda and Yoshida (Toyoda , S. , and Yoshida , N. Anal. Chem. 1999 , 71, 4711-4718 ) who found an average tropospheric site preference of 18.7 per thousand +/- 2.2 per thousand. We now recommend an interlaboratory exchange of working standard N(2)O gases as the next step to providing an international reference standard. PMID:19231842

  15. Flexible Stoichiometry and Asymmetry of the PIDDosome Core Complex by Heteronuclear NMR Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Lily A.; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Bechara, Chérine; Esposito, Diego; Morgner, Nina; Robinson, Carol V.; Driscoll, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Homotypic death domain (DD)–DD interactions are important in the assembly of oligomeric signaling complexes such as the PIDDosome that acts as a platform for activation of caspase-2-dependent apoptotic signaling. The structure of the PIDDosome core complex exhibits an asymmetric three-layered arrangement containing five PIDD-DDs in one layer, five RAIDD-DDs in a second layer and an additional two RAIDD-DDs. We addressed complex formation between PIDD-DD and RAIDD-DD in solution using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, nanoflow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering. The DDs assemble into complexes displaying molecular masses in the range 130–158 kDa and RAIDD-DD:PIDD-DD stoichiometries of 5:5, 6:5 and 7:5. These data suggest that the crystal structure is representative of only the heaviest species in solution and that two RAIDD-DDs are loosely attached to the 5:5 core. Two-dimensional 1H,15N-NMR experiments exhibited signal loss upon complexation consistent with the formation of high-molecular-weight species. 13C-Methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy measurements of the PIDDosome core exhibit signs of differential line broadening, cross-peak splitting and chemical shift heterogeneity that reflect the presence of non-equivalent sites at interfaces within an asymmetric complex. Experiments using a mutant RAIDD-DD that forms a monodisperse 5:5 complex with PIDD-DD show that the spectroscopic signature derives from the quasi- but non-exact equivalent environments of each DD. Since this characteristic was previously demonstrated for the complex between the DDs of CD95 and FADD, the NMR data for this system are consistent with the formation of a structure homologous to the PIDDosome core. PMID:25528640

  16. Flexible stoichiometry and asymmetry of the PIDDosome core complex by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Lily A; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Bechara, Chérine; Esposito, Diego; Morgner, Nina; Robinson, Carol V; Driscoll, Paul C

    2015-02-27

    Homotypic death domain (DD)-DD interactions are important in the assembly of oligomeric signaling complexes such as the PIDDosome that acts as a platform for activation of caspase-2-dependent apoptotic signaling. The structure of the PIDDosome core complex exhibits an asymmetric three-layered arrangement containing five PIDD-DDs in one layer, five RAIDD-DDs in a second layer and an additional two RAIDD-DDs. We addressed complex formation between PIDD-DD and RAIDD-DD in solution using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, nanoflow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering. The DDs assemble into complexes displaying molecular masses in the range 130-158kDa and RAIDD-DD:PIDD-DD stoichiometries of 5:5, 6:5 and 7:5. These data suggest that the crystal structure is representative of only the heaviest species in solution and that two RAIDD-DDs are loosely attached to the 5:5 core. Two-dimensional (1)H,(15)N-NMR experiments exhibited signal loss upon complexation consistent with the formation of high-molecular-weight species. (13)C-Methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy measurements of the PIDDosome core exhibit signs of differential line broadening, cross-peak splitting and chemical shift heterogeneity that reflect the presence of non-equivalent sites at interfaces within an asymmetric complex. Experiments using a mutant RAIDD-DD that forms a monodisperse 5:5 complex with PIDD-DD show that the spectroscopic signature derives from the quasi- but non-exact equivalent environments of each DD. Since this characteristic was previously demonstrated for the complex between the DDs of CD95 and FADD, the NMR data for this system are consistent with the formation of a structure homologous to the PIDDosome core. PMID:25528640

  17. Advancements in waste water characterization through NMR spectroscopy: review.

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Alexandre e Silva, Lorena M; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2015-09-01

    There are numerous organic pollutants that lead to several types of ecosystem damage and threaten human health. Wastewater treatment plants are responsible for the removal of natural and anthropogenic pollutants from the sewage, and because of this function, they play an important role in the protection of human health and the environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven to be a valuable analytical tool as a result of its versatility in characterizing both overall chemical composition as well as individual species in a wide range of mixtures. In addition, NMR can provide physical information (rigidity, dynamics, etc.) as well as permit in depth quantification. Hyphenation with other techniques such as liquid chromatography, solid phase extraction and mass spectrometry creates unprecedented capabilities for the identification of novel and unknown chemical species. Thus, NMR is widely used in the study of different components of wastewater, such as complex organic matter (fulvic and humic acids), sludge and wastewater. This review article summarizes the NMR spectroscopy methods applied in studies of organic pollutants from wastewater to provide an exhaustive review of the literature as well as a guide for readers interested in this topic. PMID:25280056

  18. NMR spectroscopy of proteins encapsulated in a positively charged surfactant.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Brian G; Liu, Weixia; Peterson, Ronald W; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, large proteins, aggregation-prone proteins, and membrane proteins have been difficult to examine by modern multinuclear and multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy. A major limitation presented by these protein systems is that their slow molecular reorientation compromises many aspects of the more powerful solution NMR methods. Several approaches have emerged to deal with the various spectroscopic difficulties arising from slow molecular reorientation. One of these takes the approach of actively seeking to increase the effective rate of molecular reorientation by encapsulating the protein of interest within the protective shell of a reverse micelle and dissolving the resulting particle in a low viscosity fluid. Since the encapsulation is largely driven by electrostatic interactions, the preparation of samples of acidic proteins suitable for NMR spectroscopy has been problematic owing to the paucity of suitable cationic surfactants. Here, it is shown that the cationic surfactant CTAB may be used to prepare samples of encapsulated anionic proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents. In a more subtle application, it is further shown that this surfactant can be employed to encapsulate a highly basic protein, which is completely denatured upon encapsulation using an anionic surfactant. PMID:15949753

  19. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E.; Williams, John C.; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general solid-state NMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  20. Simulation of selective pulse techniques for localized NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwood, Michael; Schleich, Thomas; Robin Bendall, M.

    The results of a computer simulation investigation delineating the limits of resolution, sensitivity, and accuracy of the depth- resolved suface-coil spectroscopy (DRESS), volume-selective excitation (VSE), and image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) methods for achieving spatially localized NMR spectroscopy are presented. A computer program, which numerically solves the Bloch equations for variable input parameters, is used to simulate the spatial localization afforded by each technique. Because the numerical solution of the Bloch equations describes the behavior of the bulk magnetization with great precision, the simulations provide an objective and realistic means of evaluating the performance of the individual localization schemes and reveal nuances and limitations not discussed in the original experimental papers. The results of this computer simulation study should encourage the optimization of localization methodology for use in specific applications.

  1. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future.

  2. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions.

    PubMed

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future. PMID:26920831

  3. Recombinant Kinase Production and Fragment Screening by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Byeonggu; Ahn, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has rapidly evolved and several drugs or drug candidates developed by FBDD approach are clinically in use or in clinical trials. For example, vemurafenib, a V600E mutated BRAF inhibitor, was developed by utilizing FBDD approach and approved by FDA in 2011. In FBDD, screening of fragments is the starting step for identification of hits and lead generation. Fragment screening usually relies on biophysical techniques by which the protein-bound small molecules can be detected. NMR spectroscopy has been extensively used to study the molecular interaction between the protein and the ligand, and has many advantages in fragment screening over other biophysical techniques. This chapter describes the practical aspects of fragment screening by saturation transfer difference NMR. PMID:26501900

  4. Maximum entropy signal processing in practical NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibisi, Sibusiso; Skilling, John; Brereton, Richard G.; Laue, Ernest D.; Staunton, James

    1984-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is intrinsically insensitive, a frequently serious limitation especially in biochemical applications where sample size is limited and compounds may be too insoluble or unstable for data to be accumulated over long periods. Fourier transform (FT) NMR was developed by Ernst1 to speed up the accumulation of useful data, dramatically improving the quality of spectra obtained in a given observing time by recording the free induction decay (FID) data directly in time, at the cost of requiring numerical processing. Ernst also proposed that more information could be obtained from the spectrum if the FID was multiplied by a suitable apodizing function before being Fourier transformed. For example (see ref. 2), an increase in sensitivity can result from the use of a matched filter1, whereas an increase in resolution can be achieved by the use of gaussian multiplication1,3, application of sine bells4-8 or convolution difference9. These methods are now used routinely in NMR data processing. The maximum entropy method (MEM)10 is theoretically capable of achieving simultaneous enhancement in both respects11, and this has been borne out in practice in other fields where it has been applied. However, this technique requires relatively heavy computation. We describe here the first practical application of MEM to NMR, and we analyse 13C and 1H NMR spectra of 2-vinyl pyridine. Compared with conventional spectra, MEM gives considerable suppression of noise, accompanied by significant resolution enhancement. Multiplets in the 1H spectra are resolved better leading to improved visual clarity.

  5. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  6. 1H, 13C, 195Pt and 15N NMR structural correlations in Pd(II) and Pt(II) chloride complexes with various alkyl and aryl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Tomasz; Pazderski, Leszek; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szłyk, Edward

    2011-02-01

    (1)H, (13)C, (195)Pt and (15)N NMR studies of platinide(II) (M = Pd, Pt) chloride complexes with such alkyl and aryl derivatives of 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline as LL = 6,6'-dimethyl-bpy, 5,5'-dimethyl-bpy, 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-bpy, 2,9-dimethyl-phen, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-phen, 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-phen, having the general [M(LL)Cl(2)] formula were performed and the respective chemical shifts (δ(1H), δ(13C), δ(195Pt), δ(15N)) reported. (1)H high-frequency coordination shifts (Δ(coord)(1H) = δ(complex)(1H)-δ(ligand)(1H)) mostly pronounced for nitrogen-adjacent protons and methyl groups in the nearest adjacency of nitrogen, as well as (15)N low-frequency coordination shifts (Δ(coord)(15H) = δ(complex)(15H)-δ(ligand)(15H)) were discussed in relation to the molecular structures. PMID:21254225

  7. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR coordination shifts in gold(III), cobalt(III), rhodium(III) chloride complexes with pyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Tousek, Jaromír; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Marek, Radek; Szłyk, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Au(III), Co(III) and Rh(III) chloride complexes with pyridine (py), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) of the general formulae [M1LCl3], trans-[M2L4Cl2]+, mer-[M2L3Cl3], [M1(LL)Cl2]+, cis-[M2(LL)2Cl2]+, where M1=Au; M2=Co, Rh; L=py; LL=bpy, phen, were studied by 1H--13C HMBC and 1H--15N HMQC/HSQC. The 1H, 13C and 15N coordination shifts (the latter from ca-78 to ca-107 ppm) are discussed in relation to the type of metal, electron configuration, coordination sphere geometry and the type of ligand. The 13C and 15N chemical shifts were also calculated by quantum-chemical NMR methods, which reproduced well the experimental tendencies concerning the coordination sphere geometry and the ligand type. PMID:17048265

  8. TOCCATA: a customized carbon total correlation spectroscopy NMR metabolomics database.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2012-11-01

    A customized metabolomics NMR database, TOCCATA, is introduced, which uses (13)C chemical shift information for the reliable identification of metabolites, their spin systems, and isomeric states. TOCCATA, whose information was derived from the BMRB and HMDB databases and the literature, currently contains 463 compounds and 801 spin systems, and it can be used through a publicly accessible web server. TOCCATA allows the identification of metabolites in the submillimolar concentration range from (13)C-(13)C total correlation spectroscopy experiments of complex mixtures, which is demonstrated for an Escherichia coli cell lysate, a carbohydrate mixture, and an amino acid mixture, all of which were uniformly (13)C-labeled. PMID:23016498

  9. NMR doesn't lie or how solid-state NMR spectroscopy contributed to a better understanding of the nature and function of soil organic matter (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    for organo-mineral interactions. Since decent solid-state NMR spectra cannot be obtained from graphenic components, the successful acquisition of solid-state 13C and 15N NMR spectra of charcoals challenged the well accepted model of their chemical nature. Application of advanced 2D NMR approaches confirmed the new view of charcoal as a heterogeneous material, the composition of which depends upon the feedstock and charring condition. The respective consequences of this alternative for the understanding of C sequestration are still matter of ongoing debates. Although the sensitivity of 15N for NMR spectroscopy is 50 times lower than that of 13C, first solid-state 15N NMR spectra of soils with natural 15N abundance were already published in the 1990's. They clearly identified peptide-like structures as the main organic N form in unburnt soils. However, in spite of their high contribution to SOM, the role of peptides in soils is far from understood. Considering the new technological developments in the field of NMR spectroscopy, this technique will certainly not stop to contribute to unexpected results.

  10. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts. PMID:24946863

  11. Zwitterionic phosphorylated quinines as chiral solvating agents for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rudzińska-Szostak, Ewa; Górecki, Łukasz; Berlicki, Łukasz; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Mucha, Artur

    2015-10-01

    Because of their unique 3D arrangement, naturally occurring Cinchona alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives have found wide-ranging applications in chiral recognition. Recently, we determined the enantioselective properties of C-9-phosphate mixed triesters of quinine as versatile chiral solvating agents in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the current study, we introduce new zwitterionic members of this class of molecules containing a negatively charged phosphate moiety (i.e., ethyl, n-butyl and phenyl hydrogen quininyl phosphate). An efficient approach for synthesizing these compounds is elaborated, and full characterization, including conformational and autoaggregation phenomena studies, was performed. Therefore, their ability to induce NMR anisochrony of selected enantiomeric substrates (i.e., primarily N-DNB-protected amino acids and their methyl esters) was analyzed compared to uncharged diphenyl quininyl phosphate and its positively charged quaternary ammonium hydrochloride salt. In addition, (1) H and (13) C NMR experiments revealed their enantiodiscrimination potential toward novel analytes, such as secondary amines and nonprotected amino acids. PMID:26415853

  12. 13C NMR spectroscopy applications to brain energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Tiago B.; Valette, Julien; Bouzier-Sore, Anne-Karine

    2013-01-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the method of choice for studying brain metabolism. Indeed, the most convincing data obtained to decipher metabolic exchanges between neurons and astrocytes have been obtained using this technique, thus illustrating its power. It may be difficult for non-specialists, however, to grasp thefull implication of data presented in articles written by spectroscopists. The aim of the review is, therefore, to provide a fundamental understanding of this topic to facilitate the non-specialists in their reading of this literature. In the first part of this review, we present the metabolic fate of 13C-labeled substrates in the brain in a detailed way, including an overview of some general neurochemical principles. We also address and compare the various spectroscopic strategies that can be used to study brain metabolism. Then, we provide an overview of the 13C NMR experiments performed to analyze both intracellular and intercellular metabolic fluxes. More particularly, the role of lactate as a potential energy substrate for neurons is discussed in the light of 13C NMR data. Finally, new perspectives and applications offered by 13C hyperpolarization are described. PMID:24367329

  13. Fractional deuteration applied to biomolecular solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nand, Deepak; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance can provide detailed insight into structural and dynamical aspects of complex biomolecules. With increasing molecular size, advanced approaches for spectral simplification and the detection of medium to long-range contacts become of critical relevance. We have analyzed the protonation pattern of a membrane-embedded ion channel that was obtained from bacterial expression using protonated precursors and D(2)O medium. We find an overall reduction of 50% in protein protonation. High levels of deuteration at H(α) and H(β) positions reduce spectral congestion in ((1)H,(13)C,(15)N) correlation experiments and generate a transfer profile in longitudinal mixing schemes that can be tuned to specific resonance frequencies. At the same time, residual protons are predominantly found at amino-acid side-chain positions enhancing the prospects for obtaining side-chain resonance assignments and for detecting medium to long-range contacts. Fractional deuteration thus provides a powerful means to aid the structural analysis of complex biomolecules by solid-state NMR. PMID:22105305

  14. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  15. Coordination Environment of a Site-Bound Metal Ion in the Hammerhead Ribozyme Determined by 15N and 2H ESEEM Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Matthew; Lahiri, Simanti; Hoogstraten, Charles G.; Britt, R. David; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2010-01-01

    Although site-bound Mg2+ ions have been proposed to influence RNA structure and function, establishing the molecular properties of such sites has been challenging due largely to the unique electrostatic properties of the RNA biopolymer. We have previously determined that, in solution, the hammerhead ribozyme (a self-cleaving RNA) has a high-affinity metal ion binding site characterized by a Kd,app < 10 µM for Mn2+ in 1 M NaCl and speculated that this site has functional importance in the ribozyme cleavage reaction. Here we determine both the precise location and the hydration level of Mn2+ in this site using ESEEM (electron spin–echo envelope modulation) spectroscopy. Definitive assignment of the high-affinity site to the activity-sensitive A9/G10.1 region is achieved by site-specific labeling of G10.1 with 15N guanine. The coordinated metal ion retains four water ligands as measured by 2H ESEEM spectroscopy. The results presented here show that a functionally important, specific metal binding site is uniquely populated in the hammerhead ribozyme even in a background of high ionic strength. Although it has a relatively high thermodynamic affinity, this ion remains partially hydrated and is chelated to the RNA by just two ligands. PMID:17177426

  16. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  17. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell

  18. In vivo two-dimensional NMR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    The poor resolution of in-vivo one- dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has limited its clinical potential. Currently, only the large singlet methyl resonances arising from N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine are quantitated in a clinical setting. Other metabolites such as myo- inositol, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, and γ- amino butyric acid (GABA) are of clinical interest but quantitation is difficult due to the overlapping resonances and limited spectral resolution. To improve the spectral resolution and distinguish between overlapping resonances, a series of two- dimensional chemical shift correlation spectroscopy experiments were developed for a 1.5 Tesla clinical imaging magnet. Two-dimensional methods are attractive for in vivo spectroscopy due to their ability to unravel overlapping resonances with the second dimension, simplifying the interpretation and quantitation of low field NMR spectra. Two-dimensional experiments acquired with mix-mode line shape negate the advantages of the second dimension. For this reason, a new experiment, REVOLT, was developed to achieve absorptive mode line shape in both dimensions. Absorptive mode experiments were compared to mixed mode experiments with respect to sensitivity, resolution, and water suppression. Detailed theoretical and experimental calculations of the optimum spin lock and radio frequency power deposition were performed. Two-dimensional spectra were acquired from human bone marrow and human brain tissue. The human brain tissue spectra clearly reveal correlations among the coupled spins of NAA, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, GABA, aspartate and myo-inositol obtained from a single experiment of 23 minutes from a volume of 59 mL. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  19. 1H, 13C, 15N NMR coordination shifts in Fe(II), Ru(II) and Os(II) cationic complexes with 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek; Pawlak, Tomasz; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kozerski, Lech; Szlyk, Edward

    2011-05-01

    (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of iron(II), ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) bis-chelated cationic complexes with 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine ([M(terpy)(2) ](2+) ; M = Fe, Ru, Os) were performed. Significant shielding of nitrogen-adjacent H(6) and deshielding of H(3'), H(4') protons were observed, both effects being mostly expressed for Fe(II) compounds. The metal-bonded nitrogens were shielded, this effect being much larger for the outer N(1), N(1″) than the inner N(1') atoms, and enhanced in the Fe(II) → Ru(II) → Os(II) series. PMID:21491480

  20. An Oil Spill in a Tube: An Accessible Approach for Teaching Environmental NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre´ J.; Mitchell, Perry J.; Masoom, Hussain; Mobarhan, Yalda Liaghati; Adamo, Antonio; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has great potential as an instrumental method for environmental chemistry research and monitoring but may be underused in teaching laboratories because of its complexity and the level of expertise required in operating the instrument and interpreting data. This laboratory experiment introduces environmental NMR spectroscopy to…

  1. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  2. Structure of a protein determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Federica; van Rossum, Barth; Diehl, Annette; Schubert, Mario; Rehbein, Kristina; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2002-11-01

    The determination of a representative set of protein structures is a chief aim in structural genomics. Solid-state NMR may have a crucial role in structural investigations of those proteins that do not easily form crystals or are not accessible to solution NMR, such as amyloid systems or membrane proteins. Here we present a protein structure determined by solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR. Almost complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a micro-crystalline preparation of the α-spectrin Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance restraints. These restraints were derived from proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) spectra of biosynthetically site-directed, labelled samples obtained from bacteria grown using [1,3-13C]glycerol or [2-13C]glycerol as carbon sources. This allowed the observation of long-range distance correlations up to ~7Å. The calculated global fold of the α-spectrin SH3 domain is based on 286 inter-residue 13C-13C and six 15N-15N restraints, all self-consistently obtained by solid-state MAS NMR. This MAS NMR procedure should be widely applicable to small membrane proteins that can be expressed in bacteria.

  3. Saturation in Deuteron Hadamard NMR Spectroscopy of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greferath, M.; Blumich, B.; Griffith, W. M.; Hoatson, G. L.

    Hadamard NMR was investigated for wide-line solid-state deuteron spectroscopy by numerical simulations and experiments on hexamethylbenzene. Similar signal-to-noise ratios were obtained at large filter bandwidths (500 kHz) by both the quadrupolar echo and the Hadamard methods, although the excitation power differs by up to four orders in magnitude. Increasing the excitation power leads to systematic, noise-like features in Hadamard spectra. In contrast to phase modulation, simulations indicate that for amplitude modulation of the pseudorandom excitation, the pulse sequence burns a saturation hole into the lineshape at the carrier frequency. Violation of the cyclicity requirement by introduction of a recycle delay between successive Hadamard scans results in a high-frequency noise contribution. Finite pulse widths are shown not to cause significant spectral distortions.

  4. Preparation of isotopically labeled ribonucleotides for multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Batey, R T; Inada, M; Kujawinski, E; Puglisi, J D; Williamson, J R

    1992-01-01

    A general method for large scale preparation of uniformly isotopically labeled ribonucleotides and RNAs is described. Bacteria are grown on isotopic growth medium, and their nucleic acids are harvested and degraded to mononucleotides. These are enzymatically converted into ribonucleoside triphosphates, which are used in transcription reactions in vitro to prepare RNAs for NMR studies. For 15N-labeling, E.coli is grown on 15N-ammonium sulfate, whereas for 13C-labeling, Methylophilus methylotrophus is grown on 13C-methanol, which is more economical than 13C-glucose. To demonstrate the feasibility and utility of this method, uniformly 13C-labeled ribonucleotides were used to synthesize a 31 nucleotide HIV TAR RNA that was analyzed by 3D-NMR. This method should find widespread use in the structural analysis of RNA by NMR. Images PMID:1383928

  5. Protein fold determined by paramagnetic magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Helmus, Jonathan J.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2012-05-01

    Biomacromolecules that are challenging for the usual structural techniques can be studied with atomic resolution by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. However, the paucity of distance restraints >5 Å, traditionally derived from measurements of magnetic dipole-dipole couplings between protein nuclei, is a major bottleneck that hampers such structure elucidation efforts. Here, we describe a general approach that enables the rapid determination of global protein fold in the solid phase via measurements of nuclear paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) in several analogues of the protein of interest containing covalently attached paramagnetic tags, without the use of conventional internuclear distance restraints. The method is demonstrated using six cysteine-EDTA-Cu2+ mutants of the 56-residue B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, for which ~230 longitudinal backbone 15N PREs corresponding to distances of ~10-20 Å were obtained. The mean protein fold determined in this manner agrees with the X-ray structure with a backbone atom root-mean-square deviation of 1.8 Å.

  6. Protein fold determined by paramagnetic magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Helmus, Jonathan J; Schwieters, Charles D; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2012-05-01

    Biomacromolecules that are challenging for the usual structural techniques can be studied with atomic resolution by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. However, the paucity of distance restraints >5 Å, traditionally derived from measurements of magnetic dipole-dipole couplings between protein nuclei, is a major bottleneck that hampers such structure elucidation efforts. Here, we describe a general approach that enables the rapid determination of global protein fold in the solid phase via measurements of nuclear paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) in several analogues of the protein of interest containing covalently attached paramagnetic tags, without the use of conventional internuclear distance restraints. The method is demonstrated using six cysteine-EDTA-Cu(2+) mutants of the 56-residue B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G, for which ~230 longitudinal backbone (15)N PREs corresponding to distances of ~10-20 Å were obtained. The mean protein fold determined in this manner agrees with the X-ray structure with a backbone atom root-mean-square deviation of 1.8 Å. PMID:22522262

  7. Structure Determination of a Membrane Protein with Two Trans-membrane Helices in Aligned Phospholipid Bicelles by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Anna A.; Howell, Stanley C.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the membrane protein MerFt was determined in magnetically aligned phospholipid bicelles by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. With two trans-membrane helices and a 10-residue inter-helical loop, this truncated construct of the mercury transport membrane protein MerF has sufficient structural complexity to demonstrate the feasibility of determining the structures of polytopic membrane proteins in their native phospholipid bilayer environment under physiological conditions. PISEMA, SAMMY, and other double-resonance experiments were applied to uniformly and selectively 15N labeled samples to resolve and assign the backbone amide resonances, and to measure the associated 15N chemical shift and 1H-15N heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies as orientation constraints for structure calculations. 1H/13C/15N triple-resonance experiments were applied to selectively 13C′ and 15N labeled samples to complete the resonance assignments, especially for residues in the non-helical regions of the protein. A single resonance is observed for each labeled site in one- and two-dimensional spectra. Therefore, each residue has a unique conformation, and all protein molecules in the sample have the same three-dimensional structure and are oriented identically in planar phospholipid bilayers. Combined with the absence of significant intensity near the isotropic resonance frequency, this demonstrates that the entire protein, including the loop and terminal regions, has a well-defined, stable structure in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:16967977

  8. Quantitative high-resolution on-line NMR spectroscopy in reaction and process monitoring.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Michael; Fischer, Holger H; Kim, Young-Kyu; Albert, Klaus; Hasse, Hans

    2004-02-01

    On-line nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (on-line NMR) is a powerful technique for reaction and process monitoring. Different set-ups for direct coupling of reaction and separation equipment with on-line NMR spectroscopy are described. NMR spectroscopy can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information from complex reacting multicomponent mixtures for equilibrium or reaction kinetic studies. Commercial NMR probes can be used at pressures up to 35 MPa and temperatures up to 400 K. Applications are presented for studies of equilibria and kinetics of complex formaldehyde-containing mixtures as well as homogeneously and heterogeneously catalyzed esterification kinetics. Direct coupling of a thin-film evaporator is described as an example for the benefits of on-line NMR spectroscopy in process monitoring. PMID:14729025

  9. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions. PMID:26575437

  11. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  12. 15N NMR coordination shifts in Pd(II), Pt(II), Au(III), Co(III), Rh(III), Ir(III), Pd(IV), and Pt(IV) complexes with pyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, quinoline, isoquinoline, 2,2'-biquinoline, 2,2':6', 2'-terpyridine and their alkyl or aryl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pazderski, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    The 15N NMR data for 105 complexes of Pd(II), Pt(II), Au(III), Co(III), Rh(III), Ir(III), Pd(IV), and Pt(IV) complexes with simple azines such as pyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, quinoline, isoquinoline, 2,2'-biquinoline, 2,2':6', 2''-terpyridine and their alkyl or aryl derivatives have been reviewed. The 15N NMR coordination shifts, i.e. the differences between the 15N chemical shifts of the same nitrogen in the molecules of the complex and the ligand (Delta(15N) (coord) = delta(15N) (compl)--delta(15N) (lig)), have been related to some structural features of the reviewed coordination compounds, like the type of the central ion and the character of auxiliary ligands (mainly in trans position). These Delta(15N) (coord) parameters are negative, their absolute magnitudes (ca 30-150 ppm) generally increasing in the metal order Au(III) < Pd(II) < Pt(II) and Rh(III) < Co(III) < Pt(IV) < Ir(III), as well as with the enhanced trans influence of the other donor atoms (H, C < Cl < N). PMID:18855335

  13. In situ temperature jump high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization experiments: enhanced sensitivity in liquid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Chan-Gyu; Hu, Kan-Nian; Bryant, Jeffrey A; Griffin, Robert G

    2006-07-26

    We describe an experiment, in situ temperature jump dynamic nuclear polarization (TJ-DNP), that is demonstrated to enhance sensitivity in liquid-state NMR experiments of low-gamma spins--13C, 15N, etc. The approach consists of polarizing a sample at low temperature using high-frequency (140 GHz) microwaves and a biradical polarizing agent and then melting it rapidly with a pulse of 10.6 microm infrared radiation, followed by observation of the NMR signal in the presence of decoupling. In the absence of polarization losses due to relaxation, the enhancement should be epsilon+ = epsilon(T(obs)/T(mu)(wave)), where epsilon+ is the observed enhancement, epsilon is the enhancement obtained at the temperature where the polarization process occurs, and T(mu)(wave) and T(obs) are the polarization and observation temperatures, respectively. In a single experimental cycle, we observe room-temperature enhancements, epsilon(dagger), of 13C signals in the range 120-400 when using a 140 GHz gyrotron microwave source, T(mu)(wave) = 90 K, and T(obs) = 300 K. In addition, we demonstrate that the experiment can be recycled to perform signal averaging that is customary in contemporary NMR spectroscopy. Presently, the experiment is applicable to samples that can be repeatedly frozen and thawed. TJ-DNP could also serve as the initial polarization step in experiments designed for rapid acquisition of multidimensional spectra. PMID:16848479

  14. Membrane structure and conformational changes of the antibiotic heterodimeric peptide distinctin by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Jarbas M.; Moraes, Cléria Mendonça; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Verly, Rodrigo M.; Bertani, Philippe; Cesar, Amary; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    The heterodimeric antimicrobial peptide distinctin is composed of 2 linear peptide chains of 22- and 25-aa residues that are connected by a single intermolecular S-S bond. This heterodimer has been considered to be a unique example of a previously unrecorded class of bioactive peptides. Here the 2 distinctin chains were prepared by chemical peptide synthesis in quantitative amounts and labeled with 15N, as well as 15N and 2H, at selected residues, respectively, and the heterodimer was formed by oxidation. CD spectroscopy indicates a high content of helical secondary structures when associated with POPC/POPG 3:1 vesicles or in membrane-mimetic environments. The propensity for helix formation follows the order heterodimer >chain 2 >chain 1, suggesting that peptide-peptide and peptide-lipid interactions both help in stabilizing this secondary structure. In a subsequent step the peptides were reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers and investigated by 2H and proton-decoupled 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Whereas chain 2 stably inserts into the membrane at orientations close to perfectly parallel to the membrane surface in the presence or absence of chain 1, the latter adopts a more tilted alignment, which further increases in the heterodimer. The data suggest that membrane interactions result in considerable conformational rearrangements of the heterodimer. Therefore, chain 2 stably anchors the heterodimer in the membrane, whereas chain 1 interacts more loosely with the bilayer. These structural observations are consistent with the antimicrobial activities when the individual chains are compared to the dimer. PMID:19805350

  15. Occurrence of non-hydrolysable amides in the macromolecular constituent of Scenedesmus quadricauda cell wall as revealed by 15N NMR: Origin of n-alkylnitriles in pyrolysates of ultralaminae-containing kerogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.; Taulelle, F.

    1993-02-01

    New structures, termed ultralaminae, were recently shown to occur in kerogens from numerous oil shales and source rocks. Morphological and chemical studies revealed that ultralaminae originate from the selective preservation of the non-hydrolysable biomacromolecules (algaenans) building up the thin outer walls of several Chlorophyceae (green microalgae) including the cosmopolitan genera Scenedesmus and Chlorella. The chemical correlation between such algaenans and fossil ultralaminae was mainly based on the production, on pyrolysis, of nitrogen compounds, n-alkylnitriles, with specific distributions depending on the lacustrine or marine origin of the considered samples. In addition, these bioand geopolymers were characterized by quite high N levels. Solid-state 15N NMR was carried out on 15N-enriched algaenan (isolated from Scenesdesmus quadricauda grown with 15NO 3- as sole nitrogen source) and revealed that amides are the most abundant nitrogen groups in this material. Minor amounts of two other nitrogen groups, amines and probably Nalkyl substituted pyrroles (indoles, carbazoles), are also observed. Amines are unlikely to contribute to the macromolecular structure but could simply correspond to trapped compounds. A part of the tentatively identified N-alkyl substituted pyrroles is released during pyrolysis, but a large fraction of these moieties is retained in the insoluble residue while their N-alkyl substituents are eliminated. The predominant amide groups associated with long polymethylenic chains, occurring in S. quadricauda algaenan, are eliminated during pyrolysis and lead, after a fast dehydration, to the formation of n-alkylnitriles. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first example of non-hydrolysable amide moieties in a biomacromolecule. This unusual resistance is probably due to steric protection within the macromolecular network. Such a protection also allows amide groups in chlorophycean algaenans to survive diagenesis and accounts for the

  16. Protein functional dynamics in multiple timescales as studied by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Gabriel; Pons, Miquel; Millet, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Protein functional dynamics are defined as the atomic thermal fluctuations or the segmental motions that are essential for the function of the biomolecule. NMR is a very versatile technique that allows obtaining quantitative information from these processes at atomic resolution. This review is focused on the use of 15N spin relaxation methods to study functional dynamics although the connections with other NMR methods and biophysical techniques will be briefly mentioned. In the first part of the chapter, methodological aspects will be considered, while a set of selected cases will be described in more detail in the second part. PMID:23954103

  17. Three-Dimensional Maximum-Quantum Correlation HMQC NMR Spectroscopy (3D MAXY-HMQC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maili; Mao, Xi-An; Ye, Chaohui; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    1997-11-01

    The extension of two-dimensional maximum-quantum correlation spectroscopy (2D MAXY NMR), which can be used to simplify complex NMR spectra, to three dimensions (3D) is described. A new pulse sequence for 3D MAXY-HMQC is presented and exemplified using the steroid drug dexamethasone. The sensitivity and coherence transfer efficiency of the MAXY NMR approach has also been assessed in relation to other HMQC- and HSQC-based 3D methods.

  18. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  19. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  20. Functional group analysis in coal by sup 31 P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the labile-hydrogen functional group composition of coal and coal-derived materials by the nmr spectroscopy of their derivatives made with reagents containing the nmr-active nuclei {sup 31}P, {sup 119}Sn, or {sup 205}Tl. 7 refs.

  1. Mobility and Diffusion-Ordered Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kevin Freeman

    Mobility and diffusion-ordered two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have been developed for the analysis of mixtures. In the mobility -ordered experiments, the full range of positive and negative electrophoretic mobilities is displayed in one dimension and chemical shifts are displayed in the other. A concentric cylindrical tube electrophoresis chamber was designed to reduce the effective pathlength for current and to provide unidirectional flow for ions of interest. Techniques based upon the reverse precession method were also implemented to recover the signs of the mobilities and improved resolution in the mobility dimension was obtained by replacing Fourier transformation of truncated data sets with a linear prediction analysis. In the diffusion-ordered two-dimensional NMR experiments, the conventional chemical shift spectrum is resolved in one dimension and spectra of diffusion rates or molecular radii are resolved in the other. Diffusion dependent pulsed field gradient NMR data sets were inverted by means of the computer programs SPLMOD or DISCRETE, when discrete diffusion coefficients were present, and CONTIN when continuous distributions were present. Since the inversion is ill -conditioned, it was necessary to introduce additional information to limit the range of the solutions. In addition to prior knowledge of the decay kernels and non-negativity of amplitudes and damping constants, a set of rejection criteria was constructed for the discrete analysis case that took into account physical limits on diffusion coefficients, experimentally accessible values, and variations in effective decay kernels resulting from instrumental non-linearities. Examples of analyses of simulated data and experimental data for mixtures are presented as well as two-dimensional spectra generated by CONTIN for polydisperse polymer samples. Also, resolution in the diffusion dimension was increased by performing experiments on hydrophobic molecules in

  2. Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of the catalytic-triad histidine of a serine protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Wong, W.Y.L.; Farr-Jones, S. ); Shenvi, A.B.; Kettner, C.A. )

    1988-10-04

    {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the active-site histidyl residue of {alpha}-lytic protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes. Two distinct types of complexes were observed: (1) Boronic acids that are analogues of substrates form complexes in which the active-site imidazole ring is protonated and both imidazole N-H protons are strongly hydrogen bonded. (2) Boronic acids that are not substrate analogues form complexes in which N{sup {epsilon}2} of the active-site histidine is covalently bonded to the boron atom of the inhibitor. The proton bound to N{sup {delta}1} of the histidine in these histidine-boronate adducts remains strongly hydrogen bonded, presumably to the active-site aspartate. In both types of complexes the N-H protons of His-57 exchange unusually slowly as evidenced by the room temperature visibility of the low-field {sup 1}H resonances and the {sup 15}N-H spin couplings. These results indicate that occupancy of the specificity subsites may be required to fully form the transition-state binding site. The significance of these findings for understanding inhibitor binding and the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases is discussed.

  3. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  4. Characterization of protein hydration by solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Joshua

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between protein molecules and hydration water remains elusive. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proposed as a means to characterize these interactions but is plagued with artifacts when employed in bulk aqueous solution. Encapsulation of proteins in reverse micelles prepared in short chain alkane solvents can overcome these technical limitations. Application of this approach has revealed that the interaction of water with the surface of protein molecules is quite heterogeneous with some regions of the protein having long-lived interactions while other regions show relatively transient hydration. Results from several proteins will be presented including ubiquitin, staphylococcal nuclease, interleukin 1beta, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and T4 lysozyme. Ubiquitin and interleukin 1beta are signaling proteins and interact with other proteins through formation of dry protein-protein interfaces. Interestingly, the protein surfaces of the free proteins show relatively slowed (restricted) motion at the surface, which is indicative of low residual entropy. Other regions of the protein surface have relatively high mobility water. These results are consistent with the idea that proteins have evolved to maximize the hydrophobic effect in optimization of binding with protein partners. As predicted by simulation and theory, we find that hydration of internal hydrophobic cavities of interleukin 1beta and T4 lysozyme is highly disfavored. In contrast, the hydrophilic polar cavity of HEWL is occupied by water. Initial structural correlations suggest that hydration of alpha helical structure is characterized by relatively mobile water while those of beta strands and loops are more ordered and slowed. These and other results from this set of proteins reveals that the dynamical and structural character of hydration of proteins is heterogeneous and complex. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  6. [Non-invasive analysis of proteins in living cells using NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tochio, Hidehito; Murayama, Shuhei; Inomata, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Daichi; Ohno, Ayako; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables structural analyses of proteins and has been widely used in the structural biology field in recent decades. NMR spectroscopy can be applied to proteins inside living cells, allowing characterization of their structures and dynamics in intracellular environments. The simplest "in-cell NMR" approach employs bacterial cells; in this approach, live Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a specific protein are subjected to NMR. The cells are grown in an NMR active isotope-enriched medium to ensure that the overexpressed proteins are labeled with the stable isotopes. Thus the obtained NMR spectra, which are derived from labeled proteins, contain atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of the proteins. Recent progress enables us to work with higher eukaryotic cells such as HeLa and HEK293 cells, for which a number of techniques have been developed to achieve isotope labeling of the specific target protein. In this review, we describe successful use of electroporation for in-cell NMR. In addition, (19)F-NMR to characterize protein-ligand interactions in cells is presented. Because (19)F nuclei rarely exist in natural cells, when (19)F-labeled proteins are delivered into cells and (19)F-NMR signals are observed, one can safely ascertain that these signals originate from the delivered proteins and not other molecules. PMID:25759048

  7. Dynamics of a truncated prion protein, PrP(113-231), from (15)N NMR relaxation: order parameters calculated and slow conformational fluctuations localized to a distinct region.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Denis B D; Jones, Christopher E; Abdelraheim, Salama R; Brazier, Marcus W; Toms, Harold; Brown, David R; Viles, John H

    2009-02-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the prion protein (PrP(C)) from a largely alpha-helical isoform to a beta-sheet rich oligomer (PrP(Sc)). Flexibility of the polypeptide could contribute to the ability of PrP(C) to undergo the conformational rearrangement during PrP(C)-PrP(Sc) interactions, which then leads to the misfolded isoform. We have therefore examined the molecular motions of mouse PrP(C), residues 113-231, in solution, using (15)N NMR relaxation measurements. A truncated fragment has been used to eliminate the effect of the 90-residue unstructured tail of PrP(C) so the dynamics of the structured domain can be studied in isolation. (15)N longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse relaxation (T(2)) times as well as the proton-nitrogen nuclear Overhauser effects have been used to calculate the spectral density at three frequencies, 0, omega(N,) and 0.87omega(H). Spectral densities at each residue indicate various time-scale motions of the main-chain. Even within the structured domain of PrP(C), a diverse range of motions are observed. We find that removal of the tail increases T(2) relaxation times significantly indicating that the tail is responsible for shortening of T(2) times in full-length PrP(C). The truncated fragment of PrP has facilitated the determination of meaningful order parameters (S(2)) from the relaxation data and shows for the first time that all three helices in PrP(C) have similar rigidity. Slow conformational fluctuations of mouse PrP(C) are localized to a distinct region that involves residues 171 and 172. Interestingly, residues 170-175 have been identified as a segment within PrP that will form a steric zipper, believed to be the fundamental amyloid unit. The flexibility within these residues could facilitate the PrP(C)-PrP(Sc) recognition process during fibril elongation. PMID:19173221

  8. Perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy for structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckel, Sina; Hiller, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses future perspectives of solution NMR spectroscopy to study structures and functions of integral membrane proteins at atomic resolution, based on a review of recent progress in this area. Several selected examples of structure determinations, as well as functional studies of integral membrane proteins are highlighted. We expect NMR spectroscopy to make future key scientific contributions to understanding membrane protein function, in particular for large membrane protein systems with known three-dimensional structure. Such situations can benefit from the fact that functional NMR studies have substantially less limitations by molecular size than a full de novo structure determination. Therefore, the general potential for NMR spectroscopy to solve biologic key questions associated with integral membrane proteins is very promising.

  9. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  10. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000