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Sample records for 15o radioactive ion

  1. Study of Nuclear Reactions with 11C and 15O Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwon

    2007-05-14

    Nuclear reaction study with radioactive ion beams is one of the most exciting research topics in modern nuclear physics. The development of radioactive ion beams has allowed nuclear scientists and engineers to explore many unknown exotic nuclei far from the valley of nuclear stability, and to further our understanding of the evolution of the universe. The recently developed radioactive ion beam facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron is denoted as BEARS and provides {sup 11}C, {sup 14}O and {sup 15}O radioactive ion beams of high quality. These moderate to high intensity, proton-rich radioactive ion beams have been used to explore the properties of unstable nuclei such as {sup 12}N and {sup 15}F. In this work, the proton capture reaction on {sup 11}C has been evaluated via the indirect d({sup 11}C, {sup 12}N)n transfer reaction using the inverse kinematics method coupled with the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) theoretical approach. The total effective {sup 12}N {yields} {sup 11}C+p ANC is found to be (C{sub eff}{sup 12{sub N}}){sup 2} = 1.83 {+-} 0.27 fm{sup -1}. With the high {sup 11}C beam intensity available, our experiment showed excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and previous experimental studies. This study also indirectly confirmed that the {sup 11}C(p,{gamma}) reaction is a key step in producing CNO nuclei in supermassive low-metallicity stars, bypassing the slow triple alpha process. The newly developed {sup 15}O radioactive ion beam at BEARS was used to study the poorly known level widths of {sup 16}F via the p({sup 15}O,{sup 15}O)p reaction. Among the nuclei in the A=16, T=1 isobaric triad, many states in {sup 16}N and {sup 16}O have been well established, but less has been reported on {sup 16}F. Four states of {sup 16}F below 1 MeV have been identified experimentally: 0{sup -}, 1{sup -}, 2{sup -}, and 3{sup -} (E{sub x} = 0.0, 0.19, 0.42, and 0.72 MeV, respectively). Our study utilized R

  2. Trojan Horse method and radioactive ion beams: study of 18F(p,α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulino, M.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Kubono, S.; Lamia, L.; La Cognata, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, H.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.; Spitaleri, C.

    2013-03-01

    The Trojan Horse Method was applied for the first time to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction to study the reaction 18F(p,α)15O via the three body reaction 18F(d,α 15O)n at the low energies relevant for astrophysics. The abundance of 18F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy 18F in Novae. 18F(p,α)15O is one of the main 18F destruction channels. Preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  3. First application of the Trojan horse method with a radioactive ion beam: Study of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; de Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.; Binh, D. N.

    2015-07-01

    Measurement of nuclear cross sections at astrophysical energies involving unstable species is one of the most challenging tasks in experimental nuclear physics. The use of indirect methods is often unavoidable in this scenario. In this paper the Trojan horse method is applied for the first time to a radioactive ion beam-induced reaction studying the 18F (p ,α )15O process at low energies relevant to astrophysics via the three-body reaction 2H (18F ,α15O ) n . The knowledge of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the nova explosion phenomena. The cross section of this reaction is characterized by the presence of several resonances in 19Ne and possibly interference effects among them. The results reported in literature are not satisfactory and new investigations of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction cross section will be useful. In the present work the spin-parity assignments of relevant levels have been discussed and the astrophysical S factor has been extracted considering also interference effects.

  4. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  5. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  6. Adequacy of a compartment model for CMRO2 quantitation using 15O-labeled oxygen and PET: a clearance measurement of 15O-radioactivity following intracarotid bolus injection of 15O-labeled oxyhemoglobin on Macaca fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Hidehiro; Iguchi, Satoshi; Teramoto, Noboru; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akihide; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Enmi, Junichiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Joni Shah, Nadim; Nakagawara, Jyoji

    2014-01-01

    We aimed at evaluating the adequacy of the commonly employed compartmental model for quantitation of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) using 15O-labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET). Sequential PET imaging was carried out on monkeys following slow bolus injection of blood samples containing 15O2–oxyhemoglobin (15O2–Hb), 15O-labeled water (H215O), and C15O-labeled hemoglobin (C15O–Hb) into the internal carotid artery (ICA). Clearance slopes were assessed in the middle cerebral artery territory of the injected hemisphere. The time–activity curves were bi-exponential for both 15O2–Hb and H215O. Single exponential fitting to the early (5 to 40 seconds) and late (80 to 240 seconds) periods after the peak was performed and the 15O2–Hb and H215O results were compared. It was found that a significant difference between the clearance rates of the 15O2–Hb and H215O injections is unlikely, which supports the mathematical model that is widely used to describe the kinetics of 15O2–Hb and H215O in cerebral tissues and is the basis of recent approaches to simultaneously assess CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow in a single PET session. However, it should be noted that more data are necessary to unequivocally confirm the result. PMID:25005879

  7. Graphene wrapped ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods as promising cathode material for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao; Jan, S. Savut; Qian, Yanyan; Xia, Hui; Ni, Jiangfeng; Savilov, Serguei V.; Aldoshin, Serguei M.

    2015-01-01

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods wrapped with graphene nanosheets have been prepared and investigated as high energy and high power cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The structural characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods prepared from β-MnO2 nanowires have ordered spinel structure with P4332 space group. The morphological characterization by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods of 100–200 nm in diameter are well dispersed and wrapped in the graphene nanosheets for the composite. Benefiting from the highly conductive matrix provided by graphene nanosheets and one-dimensional nanostructure of the ordered spinel, the composite electrode exhibits superior rate capability and cycling stability. As a result, the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-graphene composite electrode delivers reversible capacities of 127.6 and 80.8 mAh g−1 at 0.1 and 10 C, respectively, and shows 94% capacity retention after 200 cycles at 1 C, greatly outperforming the bare LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorod cathode. The outstanding performance of the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-graphene composite makes it promising as cathode material for developing high energy and high power lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26148558

  8. Graphene wrapped ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods as promising cathode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao; Jan, S Savut; Qian, Yanyan; Xia, Hui; Ni, Jiangfeng; Savilov, Serguei V; Aldoshin, Serguei M

    2015-01-01

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods wrapped with graphene nanosheets have been prepared and investigated as high energy and high power cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The structural characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods prepared from β-MnO2 nanowires have ordered spinel structure with P4332 space group. The morphological characterization by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorods of 100-200 nm in diameter are well dispersed and wrapped in the graphene nanosheets for the composite. Benefiting from the highly conductive matrix provided by graphene nanosheets and one-dimensional nanostructure of the ordered spinel, the composite electrode exhibits superior rate capability and cycling stability. As a result, the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-graphene composite electrode delivers reversible capacities of 127.6 and 80.8 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 and 10 C, respectively, and shows 94% capacity retention after 200 cycles at 1 C, greatly outperforming the bare LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 nanorod cathode. The outstanding performance of the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-graphene composite makes it promising as cathode material for developing high energy and high power lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26148558

  9. Investigation on preparation and performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with different microstructures for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuan; Wang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Lili; Yu, Fuda; Liu, Baosheng; Zhang, Yin; Ke, Ke

    2015-08-01

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is a promising cathode material in next generation of lithium ion batteries. In this study, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with various particle microstructures are prepared by controlling the microstructures of precursors. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel samples with solid, hollow and hierarchical microstructures are prepared with solid MnCO3, hollow MnO2 and hierarchical Mn2O3 as precursor, respectively. The homemade spinel materials are investigated and the results show that the content of Mn3+ and impurity phase differ much in these three spinel samples obtained under the same calcining and annealing conditions. It is revealed for the first time that an inhomogeneous migration of atoms may introduce Mn3+ and impurity phase in the spinel. The hierarchical microstructure with the primary particles interconnected is optimal for electrode materials because this microstructure has a higher conductivity between the interconnected primary particles and appropriate specific surface area. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 in this microstructure has the best rate capability and also the best long-term cycling stability.

  10. Investigation on preparation and performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with different microstructures for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuan; Wang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Lili; Yu, Fuda; Liu, Baosheng; Zhang, Yin; Ke, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is a promising cathode material in next generation of lithium ion batteries. In this study, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with various particle microstructures are prepared by controlling the microstructures of precursors. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel samples with solid, hollow and hierarchical microstructures are prepared with solid MnCO3, hollow MnO2 and hierarchical Mn2O3 as precursor, respectively. The homemade spinel materials are investigated and the results show that the content of Mn(3+) and impurity phase differ much in these three spinel samples obtained under the same calcining and annealing conditions. It is revealed for the first time that an inhomogeneous migration of atoms may introduce Mn(3+) and impurity phase in the spinel. The hierarchical microstructure with the primary particles interconnected is optimal for electrode materials because this microstructure has a higher conductivity between the interconnected primary particles and appropriate specific surface area. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 in this microstructure has the best rate capability and also the best long-term cycling stability. PMID:26299774

  11. Investigation on preparation and performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with different microstructures for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Wang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Lili; Yu, Fuda; Liu, Baosheng; Zhang, Yin; Ke, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is a promising cathode material in next generation of lithium ion batteries. In this study, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with various particle microstructures are prepared by controlling the microstructures of precursors. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel samples with solid, hollow and hierarchical microstructures are prepared with solid MnCO3, hollow MnO2 and hierarchical Mn2O3 as precursor, respectively. The homemade spinel materials are investigated and the results show that the content of Mn3+ and impurity phase differ much in these three spinel samples obtained under the same calcining and annealing conditions. It is revealed for the first time that an inhomogeneous migration of atoms may introduce Mn3+ and impurity phase in the spinel. The hierarchical microstructure with the primary particles interconnected is optimal for electrode materials because this microstructure has a higher conductivity between the interconnected primary particles and appropriate specific surface area. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 in this microstructure has the best rate capability and also the best long-term cycling stability. PMID:26299774

  12. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Vane, C Randy; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Mattolat, C.; Lassen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A resonant ionization laser ion source based on all-solid-state, tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers is being developed for the production of pure radioactive ion beams. It consists of a hot-cavity ion source and three pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers operating at a 10 kHz pulse repetition rate. Spectroscopic studies are being conducted to develop ionization schemes that lead to ionizing an excited atom through an auto-ionization or a Rydberg state for numerous elements of interest. Three-photon resonant ionization of 12 elements has been recently demonstrated. The overall efficiency of the laser ion source measured for some of these elements ranges from 1 to 40%. The results indicate that Ti:Sapphire lasers could be well suited for laser ion source applications. The time structures of the ions produced by the pulsed lasers are investigated. The information may help to improve the laser ion source performance.

  13. BEARS: Radioactive ion beams at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Guo, F.Q.; Haustein, P.E.

    1998-07-01

    BEARS (Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species) is an initiative to develop a radioactive ion-beam capability at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The aim is to produce isotopes at an existing medical cyclotron and to accelerate them at the 88 inch Cyclotron. To overcome the 300-meter physical separation of these two accelerators, a carrier-gas transport system will be used. At the terminus of the capillary, the carrier gas will be separated and the isotopes will be injected into the 88 inch Cyclotron`s Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. The first radioactive beams to be developed will include 20-min {sup 11}C and 70-sec {sup 14}O, produced by (p,n) and (p,{alpha}) reactions on low-Z targets. A test program is currently being conducted at the 88 inch Cyclotron to develop the parts of the BEARS system. Preliminary results of these tests lead to projections of initial {sup 11}C beams of up to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} ions/sec and {sup 14}O beams of 3 {times} 10{sup 5} ions/sec.

  14. Storage rings for radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolden, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Steck, M.

    2008-10-01

    Storage rings for radioactive heavy ions can be applied for a wide range of experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. The rare isotope beams are produced in flight via fragmentation or fission of high-intensity primary ions and they circulate in the storage ring at moderately relativistic energies (typically between 0.1 GeV/u up to 1 GeV/u). Due to their production mechanism they are usually highly charged or even fully stripped. The circulating radioactive heavy ion beams can be used to measure nuclear properties such as masses and decay times, which, in turn, can depend strongly on the ionic charge state. The storage rings must have large acceptances and dynamic apertures. The subsequent application of stochastic precooling of the secondary ions which are injected with large transverse and longitudinal emittances, and electron cooling to reach very high phase space densities has turned out to be a helpful tool for experiments with short-lived ions having lifetimes down to a few seconds. Some of these experiments have already been performed at the experimental storage ring ESR at GSI. The storage ring complex of the FAIR project is intended to enhance significantly the range of experimental possibilities. It is planned to extend the scope of experimental possibilities to collisions with electron or antiproton beams.

  15. Ion sources and targets for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    A high-intensity ISOL-type radioactive beam facility depends critically on the performance of the target/ion source system. We developed a concept for producing high-intensity secondary beams of fission fragments, such as {sup 132}Sn, using a two-part target and ion source combination. The idea involves stopping a 1000-kW beam of 200-MeV deuterons in a target of Be or U to produce a secondary beam of neutrons. Just behind the neutron production target is a second target, typically a porous form of UC, coupled to an ISOL-type ion source. In December 1994, we tested this concept with 200-MeV deuterons at low intensity in an experiment at the NSCL. The yields of characteristic gamma rays were measured and confirmed our predictions.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics with radioactive ions at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, R.; Altstadt, S.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Koloczek, A.; Langer, C.; Plag, R.; Pohl, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Weigand, M.; Adachi, T.; Aksouh, F.; Al-Khalili, J.; AlGarawi, M.; AlGhamdi, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alkhomashi, N.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Andreev, V.; Andrei, B.; Atar, L.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Bacri, C.; Bagchi, S.; Barbieri, C.; Beceiro, S.; Beck, C.; Beinrucker, C.; Belier, G.; Bemmerer, D.; Bendel, M.; Benlliure, J.; Benzoni, G.; Berjillos, R.; Bertini, D.; Bertulani, C.; Bishop, S.; Blasi, N.; Bloch, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Bonaccorso, A.; Boretzky, K.; Botvina, A.; Boudard, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Boztosun, I.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Briz Monago, J.; Caamano, M.; Caesar, C.; Camera, F.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkall, J.; Cederwall, B.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Cherciu, M.; Chulkov, L.; Coleman-Smith, P.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespi, F.; Crespo, R.; Cresswell, J.; Csatlós, M.; Déchery, F.; Davids, B.; Davinson, T.; Derya, V.; Detistov, P.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; DiJulio, D.; Dmitry, S.; Doré, D.; Dueñas, J.; Dupont, E.; Egelhof, P.; Egorova, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Endres, J.; Ershov, S.; Ershova, O.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Fetisov, A.; Fiori, E.; Fomichev, A.; Fonseca, M.; Fraile, L.; Freer, M.; Friese, J.; Borge, M. G.; Galaviz Redondo, D.; Gannon, S.; Garg, U.; Gasparic, I.; Gasques, L.; Gastineau, B.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Ghosh, T.; Gilbert, M.; Glorius, J.; Golubev, P.; Gorshkov, A.; Gourishetty, A.; Grigorenko, L.; Gulyas, J.; Haiduc, M.; Hammache, F.; Harakeh, M.; Hass, M.; Heine, M.; Hennig, A.; Henriques, A.; Herzberg, R.; Holl, M.; Ignatov, A.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ilieva, S.; Ivanov, M.; Iwasa, N.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H.; Jonson, B.; Joshi, P.; Junghans, A.; Jurado, B.; Körner, G.; Kalantar, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kezzar, K.; Khan, E.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kiselev, O.; Kogimtzis, M.; Körper, D.; Kräckmann, S.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kratz, J.; Kresan, D.; Krings, T.; Krumbholz, A.; Krupko, S.; Kulessa, R.; Kumar, S.; Kurz, N.; Kuzmin, E.; Labiche, M.; Langanke, K.; Lazarus, I.; Le Bleis, T.; Lederer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Lemmon, R.; Liberati, V.; Litvinov, Y.; Löher, B.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Machado, J.; Maev, E.; Mahata, K.; Mancusi, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez Perez, M.; Marusov, V.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Morcelle, V.; Moreno, O.; Movsesyan, A.; Nacher, E.; Najafi, M.; Nakamura, T.; Naqvi, F.; Nikolski, E.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nolan, P.; Novatsky, B.; Nyman, G.; Ornelas, A.; Palit, R.; Pandit, S.; Panin, V.; Paradela, C.; Parkar, V.; Paschalis, S.; Pawłowski, P.; Perea, A.; Pereira, J.; Petrache, C.; Petri, M.; Pickstone, S.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Pivovarov, Y.; Potlog, P.; Prokofiev, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Rauscher, T.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M.; Richter, A.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Rios, A.; Ritter, C.; Rodriguez Frutos, T.; Rodriguez Vignote, J.; Röder, M.; Romig, C.; Rossi, D.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Rout, P.; Roy, S.; Söderström, P.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Sakuta, S.; Salsac, M.; Sampson, J.; Sanchez, J.; Rio Saez, del; Sanchez Rosado, J.; Sanjari, S.; Sarriguren, P.; Sauerwein, A.; Savran, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Scheit, H.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, C.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Schrock, P.; Schwengner, R.; Seddon, D.; Sherrill, B.; Shrivastava, A.; Sidorchuk, S.; Silva, J.; Simon, H.; Simpson, E.; Singh, P.; Slobodan, D.; Sohler, D.; Spieker, M.; Stach, D.; Stan, E.; Stanoiu, M.; Stepantsov, S.; Stevenson, P.; Strieder, F.; Stuhl, L.; Suda, T.; Sümmerer, K.; Streicher, B.; Taieb, J.; Takechi, M.; Tanihata, I.; Taylor, J.; Tengblad, O.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Terashima, S.; Teubig, P.; Thies, R.; Thoennessen, M.; Thomas, T.; Thornhill, J.; Thungstrom, G.; Timar, J.; Togano, Y.; Tomohiro, U.; Tornyi, T.; Tostevin, J.; Townsley, C.; Trautmann, W.; Trivedi, T.; Typel, S.; Uberseder, E.; Udias, J.; Uesaka, T.; Uvarov, L.; Vajta, Z.; Velho, P.; Vikhrov, V.; Volknandt, M.; Volkov, V.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; von Schmid, M.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Wells, D.; Westerberg, L.; Wieland, O.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.; Wimmer, K.; Winfield, J. S.; Winkel, M.; Woods, P.; Wyss, R.; Yakorev, D.; Yavor, M.; Zamora Cardona, J.; Zartova, I.; Zerguerras, T.; Zgura, M.; Zhdanov, A.; Zhukov, M.; Zieblinski, M.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis of elements beyond iron is dominated by neutron captures in the s and r processes. However, 32 stable, proton-rich isotopes cannot be formed during those processes, because they are shielded from the s-process flow and r-process, β-decay chains. These nuclei are attributed to the p and rp process. For all those processes, current research in nuclear astrophysics addresses the need for more precise reaction data involving radioactive isotopes. Depending on the particular reaction, direct or inverse kinematics, forward or time-reversed direction are investigated to determine or at least to constrain the desired reaction cross sections. The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will offer unique, unprecedented opportunities to investigate many of the important reactions. The high yield of radioactive isotopes, even far away from the valley of stability, allows the investigation of isotopes involved in processes as exotic as the r or rp processes.

  17. Radioactive Ion Beam Production Capabilities At The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beene, J. R.; Dowling, D. T.; Gross, C. J.; Juras, R. C.; Liu, Y.; Meigs, M. J.; Mendez, A. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sinclair, J. W.; Stracener, D. W.; Tatum, B. A.

    2011-06-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility for research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) that has been in routine operation since 1996. It is located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and operated by the ORNL Physics Division. The principal mission of the HRIBF is the production of high quality beams of shortlived radioactive isotopes to support research in nuclear structure physics and nuclear astrophysics. HRIBF is currently unique worldwide in its ability to provide neutron-rich fission fragment beams post-accelerated to energies above the Coulomb barrier for nuclear reactions. HRIBF produces RIBs by the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique using a particle accelerator system that consists of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) driver accelerator, one of the two Injectors for Radioactive Ion Species (IRIS1 or IRIS2) production systems, and the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator that is used for RIB post-acceleration. ORIC provides a light ion beam (proton, deuteron, or alpha) which is directed onto a thick target mounted in a target-ion source (TIS) assembly located on IRIS1 or IRIS2. Radioactive atoms that diffuse from the target material are ionized, accelerated, mass selected, and transported to the tandem accelerator where they are further accelerated to energies suitable for nuclear physics research. RIBs are transported through a beam line system to various experimental end stations including the Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) for nuclear structure research, and the Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) for nuclear astrophysics research. HRIBF also includes two off-line ion source test facilities, one low-power on-line ISOL test facility (OLTF), and one high-power on-line ISOL test facility (HPTL). This paper provides an overview and status update of HRIBF, describes the recently completed 4.7M IRIS2 addition and incorporation of laser systems for beam production and purification, and discusses a

  18. Development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) construction project has been completed and the first radioactive ion beam has been successfully accelerated. The project, which began in 1992, has involved numerous facility modifications. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron has been converted from an energy booster for heavy ion beams to a light ion accelerator with internal ion source. A target-ion source and mass analysis system have been commissioned as key components of the facility`s radioactive ion beam injector to the 25MV tandem electrostatic accelerator. Beam transport lines have been completed, and new diagnostics for very low intensity beams have been developed. Work continues on a unified control system. Development of research quality radioactive beams for the nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics communities continues. This paper details facility development to date.

  19. Study of nuclear reactions with carnon-11 and oxygen-15 radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongwon

    Nuclear reaction study with radioactive ion beams is one of the most exciting research topics in modern nuclear physics. The development of radioactive ion beams has allowed nuclear scientists and engineers to explore many unknown exotic nuclei far from the valley of nuclear stability, and to further our understanding of the evolution of the universe. The recently developed radioactive ion beam facility at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron is denoted as BEARS and provides 11C, 14O and 15O radioactive ion beams of high quality. These moderate to high intensity, proton-rich radioactive ion beams have been used to explore the properties of unstable nuclei such as 12N and 15F. In this work, the proton capture reaction on 11C has been evaluated via the indirect d(11C,12N)n transfer reaction using the inverse kinematics method coupled with the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient (ANC) theoretical approach. The total effective 12N→11C +p ANC is found to be C12Neff 2 = 1.83 +/- 0.27 fm-1. With the high 11C beam intensity available, our experiment showed excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and previous experimental studies. This study also indirectly confirmed that the 11C(p,gamma) reaction is a key step in producing CNO nuclei in supermassive low-metallicity stars, bypassing the slow triple alpha process. The newly developed 15O radioactive ion beam at BEARS was used to study the poorly known level widths of 16F via the p(15O,15O)p reaction. Among the nuclei in the A=16, T=1 isobaric triad, many states in 16N and 16O have been well established, but less has been reported on 16F. Four states of 16F below 1 MeV have been identified experimentally: 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3- (Ex = 0.0, 0.19, 0.42, and 0.72 MeV, respectively). Our study utilized R-matrix analysis and found that the 0- state has a level width of 23.1 +/- 2.2 keV, and that the broader 1 - state has a width of 91.1 +/- 9.9 keV. The level width of the 2- state is found to be 3

  20. Titanate-based adsorbents for radioactive ions entrapment from water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-03-21

    This feature article reviews some titanate-based adsorbents for the removal of radioactive wastes (cations and anions) from water. At the beginning, we discuss the development of the conventional ion-exchangeable titanate powders for the entrapment of radioactive cations, such as crystalline silicotitanate (CST), monosodium titanate (MST), peroxotitanate (PT). Then, we specially emphasize the recent progress in the uptake of radioactive ions by one-dimensional (1D) sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes, which includes the synthesis and phase transformation of the 1D nanomaterials, adsorption ability (capacity, selectivity, kinetics, etc.) of radioactive cations and anions, and the structural evolution during the adsorption process. PMID:23412572

  1. Crystallographic origin of cycle decay of the high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel lithium-ion battery electrode.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei Kong; Lu, Cheng-Zhang; Liu, Chia-Erh; Peterson, Vanessa K; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Ming

    2016-06-29

    High-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is considered a potential high-power-density positive electrode for lithium-ion batteries, however, it suffers from capacity decay after extended charge-discharge cycling, severely hindering commercial application. Capacity fade is thought to occur through the significant volume change of the LNMO electrode occurring on cycling, and in this work we use operando neutron powder diffraction to compare the structural evolution of the LNMO electrode in an as-assembled 18650-type battery containing a Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode with that in an identical battery following 1000 cycles at high-current. We reveal that the capacity reduction in the battery post cycling is directly proportional to the reduction in the maximum change of the LNMO lattice parameter during its evolution. This is correlated to a corresponding reduction in the MnO6 octahedral distortion in the spinel structure in the cycled battery. Further, we find that the rate of lattice evolution, which reflects the rate of lithium insertion and removal, is ∼9 and ∼10% slower in the cycled than in the as-assembled battery during the Ni(2+)/Ni(3+) and Ni(3+)/Ni(4+) transitions, respectively. PMID:26961230

  2. Insertion of lattice strains into ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel by mechanical stress: A comparison of perfect versus imperfect structures as a cathode for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Naito, Makio

    2016-07-01

    The Ni-doped lithium manganese oxide, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, has received much attention as a cathode active material in high-energy lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). This active material has two different spinel structures depending on the ordering state of the Ni and Mn ions. The ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel has an inferior cathode performance than the disordered phase because of its poor electronic conductivity. However, the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel possesses the potential advantage of avoiding dissolution of the Mn ion, which is an issue for the disordered spinel. The improvement of cathode performance is important for future applications. Here, we report a unique approach to improve the cathode performance of the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel. The mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill successfully inserted lattice strains into the ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel structure without a phase transformation to the disordered phase. The insertion of lattice strains by mechanical stresses provided an increased discharge capacity and a decreased charge transfer resistance. This limited crystal structure modification improved the cathode performance. The present work has the potential for application of the mechanically treated ordered LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel as a cathode for high-energy LIBs.

  3. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: 18F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Bishop, S.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.

    2014-05-01

    The abundance of 18F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the 18F(p,α)15O is one of the most important 18F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction.

  4. First results of Trojan horse method using radioactive ion beams: {sup 18}F(p,α) at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Binh, D.; Bishop, S.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.

    2014-05-02

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is considered to be an important piece of information for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. It is then necessary to study the nuclear processess that both produce and destroy this isotope in Novae. Among these latter reactions, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O is one of the most important {sup 18}F destruction channels. Here we report on an experiment performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of the University of Tokyo. This was the first experiment that used the Trojan Horse method applied to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction.

  5. Status of radioactive ion beams at the HRIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stracener, D. W.

    2003-05-01

    Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) are produced using the isotope separation on-line technique and are subsequently accelerated up to a few MeV per nucleon for use in nuclear physics experiments. The first RIB experiments at the HRIBF were completed at the end of 1998 using 17F beams. Since then other proton-rich ion beams have been developed and a large number of neutron-rich ion beams are now available. The neutron-rich radioactive nuclei are produced via proton-induced fission of uranium in a low-density matrix of uranium carbide. Recently developed RIBs include 25Al from a silicon carbide target and isobarically pure beams of neutron-rich Ge, Sn, Br and I isotopes from a uranium carbide target.

  6. Fixation of radioactive ions in porous media with ion exchange gels

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Jr., Basil W.; Godfrey, Wesley L.

    1979-01-01

    A method is provided for fixing radioactive ions in porous media by injecting into the porous media water-soluble organic monomers which are polymerizable to gel structures with ion exchange sites and polymerizing the monomers to form ion exchange gels. The ions and the particles of the porous media are thereby physically fixed in place by the gel structure and, in addition, the ions are chemically fixed by the ion exchange properties of the resulting gel.

  7. A High-Voltage and High-Capacity Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 Cathode Material: From Synthesis to Full Lithium-Ion Cells.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Marilena; Axmann, Peter; Gabrielli, Giulio; Kinyanjui, Michael; Kaiser, Ute; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2016-07-21

    We report Co-free, Li-rich Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (0ion cells. Their tailored morphology allows high density and facile processability for electrode development. In the potential range 2.4-4.9 V, the cathode material of composition Li1.5 Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 shows excellent performance in terms of capacity and cycling stability in half-cells. In addition, for the first time, we demonstrate the application of the high-voltage and high-capacity cathode in full Li-ion cells with graphite anodes with very high cycling stability. The electrochemical performance and low cost of the cathode material, together with the feasibility of a chemical method to obtain Li-rich Li1+x Ni0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (0ion batteries possible. PMID:27273330

  8. Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.F.

    1996-12-31

    Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

  9. Ion beam analysis of radioactive samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raepsaet, C.; Khodja, H.; Bossis, P.; Pipon, Y.; Roudil, D.

    2009-06-01

    The nuclear microprobe facility of the Pierre Süe Laboratory is fitted with two microbeam lines. One is dedicated to non-active samples. The other one, located in a controlled shielded area, offers the unique feature of being devoted to radioactive samples. Operational since 1998, it is strongly linked to nuclear research programs and has been dimensioned to accept radioactive but non-contaminant radioactive samples, including small quantities of UOX or MOX irradiated fuel. The samples, transported in a shipping cask, are unloaded and handled in hot cells with slaved arms. The analysis chamber, situated in a concrete cell, is equipped with charged particle detectors and a Si(Li) X-ray detector, shielded in order to reduce the radioactive noise produced by the sample, allowing ERDA, RBS, NRA and PIXE. After a description of the facility, including the sample handling in the hot cells and the analysis chamber, we will give an overview of the various experimental programs which have been performed, with an emphasis on the determination of the hydrogen distribution and local content in nuclear fuel cladding tubes.

  10. Charge breeding simulations for radioactive ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Variale, V.; Raino, A. C.; Clauser, T.

    2012-02-15

    The charge breeding technique is used for radioactive ion beam (RIB) production in order of optimizing the re-acceleration of the radioactive element ions produced by a primary beam in a thick target. Charge breeding is achieved by means of a device capable of increasing the ion charge state from 1+ to a desired value n+. In order to get high intensity RIB, experiments with charge breeding of very high efficiency could be required. To reach this goal, the charge breeding simulation could help to optimize the high charge state production efficiency by finding more proper parameters for the radioactive 1+ ions. In this paper a device based on an electron beam ion source (EBIS) is considered. In order to study that problem, a code already developed for studying the ion selective containment in an EBIS with RF quadrupoles, BRICTEST, has been modified to simulate the ion charge state breeding rate for different 1+ ion injection conditions. Particularly, the charge breeding simulations for an EBIS with a hollow electron beam have been studied.

  11. Laser Ion Source Operation at the TRIUMF Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The TRIUMF Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) for radioactive ion beam production is presented, with target ion source, laser beam transport, laser system and operation. In this context aspects of titanium sapphire (TiSa) laser based RILIS and facility requirements are discussed and results from the first years of TRILIS RIB delivery are given.

  12. Sonochemical synthesis of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and its electrochemical performance as a cathode material for 5 V Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, P; Nayak, Prasant Kumar; Markovsky, Boris; Aurbach, Doron; Gedanken, Aharon

    2015-09-01

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was synthesized as a cathode material for Li-ion batteries by a sonochemical reaction followed by annealing, and was characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with electrochemical measurements. Two samples were prepared by a sonochemical process, one without using glucose (sample-S1) and another with glucose (sample-S2). An initial discharge specific capacity of 130 mA h g(-1) is obtained for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 at a relatively slow rate of C/10 in galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling. The capacity retention upon 50 cycles at this rate was around 95.4% and 98.9% for sample-S1 and sample-S2, respectively, at 30°C. PMID:25748990

  13. Radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B. S.; Najafi, M. A.; Atanasov, D. R.; Blaum, K.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, X. C.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, Ch.; Faestermann, Th.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Kovalenko, O.; Kozhuharov, C.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Maier, L.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Sanjari, M. S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Spillmann, U.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th.; Trageser, Ch.; Tu, X. L.; Weick, H.; Winckler, N.; Xu, H. S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yan, X. L.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.

    2015-05-01

    Access to stored and cooled highly-charged radionuclides offers unprecedented opportunities to perform high-precision investigations of their decays. Since the few-electron ions, e.g. hydrogen- or helium-like ions, are quantum mechanical systems with clear electronic ground state configurations, the decay studies of such ions are performed under well-defined conditions and allow for addressing fundamental aspects of the decay process. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR of GSI. A particular emphasis is given to the investigations of the two-body beta decay, namely the bound-state β-decay and its time-mirrored counterpart, orbital electron-capture.

  14. Status report for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Auble, R.L.; Alton, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the HHIRF became a project to develop a first-generation radioactive ion beam facility, the HRIBF, a national user facility for RIB research. Intense beams from ORIC will produce radioactive atoms as reaction products in thick targets using an ISOL-type target-ion source mounted on a 300-kV RIB injector. These radioactive atoms will be ionized, mass analyzed, charge exchanged, accelerated to ground potential, and analyzed again to separate isobars with a second-stage mass analyzer. The resulting RIBs will be injected into the tandem and accelerated to energies of interest for nuclear physics and astrophysics studied. The construction phase of the project has been completed. A report on the status and progress developing the facility is given, along with the long term development plans.

  15. Spin Observables in Reactions with Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Urrego Blanco, Juan Pablo

    2007-01-01

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with exotic nuclei will provide important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms. We are currently engaged in exploring the use of polarization observables with radioactive ion beams and in the development of a polarized cryogenic target.

  16. Electrochemical performance and electronic properties of shell LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 hollow spheres for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongli; Wang, Jiali; Wang, Mingzhen; Zhuang, Quanchao

    2016-03-01

    Shell spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 hollow microspheres were successfully synthesized by MnCO3 template, and characterized by XRD, SEM, and TEM. The results show that the hollow LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode has good cycle stability to reach 124.5, 119.8, and 96.6mAh/g at 0.5, 1, and 5 C, the corresponding retention rate of 98.1%, 98.2%, and 98.0% after 50 cycles at 20∘C, and the reversible capacity of 94.6mAh/g can be obtained at 1 C rate at 55∘C, 83.3% retention after 100 cycles. As the temperature decreases from 10∘C to ‑20∘C, the resistance of RSEI increases from 5.5 Ω to 135 Ω, Re from 27 Ω to 353.2 Ω, and Rct from 12.7 Ω to 73.0 Ω. Moreover, the B constant and Ea activation energy are 4480K and 37.22KJ/mol for the NTC spinel material, respectively.

  17. Role of morphology in the performance of LiFe0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel cathodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Pico, M P; Álvarez-Serrano, I; López, M L; Veiga, M L

    2014-10-21

    Spinel oxides with composition LiMn2-xMxO4 (M, a transition metal) are intensively studied due to their remarkable electrochemical properties. This study deals with cathode materials based on the lithium iron manganese oxide LiFe0.5Mn1.5O4 synthesized by different methods (sol-gel, in solution and hydrothermal) in order to obtain samples with various morphologies. SEM results show microspheres, composed of nanosized/submicrometer-sized subunits, microrods with a less porous surface, and finally nanoparticles that form micro-sized aggregates. The samples obtained by both solution and hydrothermal methods provided the best electrochemical behavior. In all cases, the coulombic efficiency is around 90%, and it remains constant during the tested cycles. Specific capacities remain stable between 95% and 98% of capacity retention after series of cycles in samples formed by microspheres or micro-size aggregates. These values are notably higher than those obtained for the samples with particles of heterogeneous size (49%). A LiMn1.5Fe0.5O4/Li2MnO3 composite has been prepared by the solvothermal technique in order to increase its capacity and energy density. These cells show a good cyclability at different current densities. All cells based on these LiFe0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes recover their discharge capacity when the current density returns to C/10. PMID:25160729

  18. The Scientific program with RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Hussein, M. S.; Barioni, A.; Condori, R. Pampa; Morais, M. C.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Otani, Y.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V.; Benjamim, E. A.; Arazi, A.; Assuncao, M.

    2009-06-03

    The Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (RIBRAS) is in operation since 2004 at the Pelletron Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Sao Paulo and consists of two superconducting solenoids capable of producing low energy secondary beams of light exotic nuclei. Measurements of the elastic scattering, breakup and transfer reactions with radioactive projectiles such as {sup 6}He,{sup 8}Li,{sup 7}Be on several targets have been performed. A review of the research program carried on along the last four years using the RIBRAS facility is presented.

  19. Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    The potential for understanding spectacular stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts will be greatly enhanced by the availability of the low-energy, high-intensity, accelerated beams of proton-rich radioactive nuclei currently being developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These beams will be utilized in absolute cross section measurements of crucial (p, {gamma}) capture reactions in efforts to resolve the substantial qualitative uncertainties in current models of explosive stellar hydrogen burning outbursts. Details of the nuclear astrophysics research program with the unique HRIBF radioactive beams and a dedicated experimental endstation--centered on the Daresbury Recoil Separator--will be presented.

  20. Morphological Evolution of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries: The Critical Effects of Surface Orientations and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Dong; Qi, Xin; Qiu, Bao; Fang, Jianhui; Kloepsch, Richard; Schumacher, Gerhard; Liu, Zhaoping; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    An evolution panorama of morphology and surface orientation of high-voltage spinel LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 cathode materials synthesized by the combination of the microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique and a postcalcination process is presented. Nanoparticles, octahedral and truncated octahedral particles with different preferential growth of surface orientations are obtained. The structures of different materials are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The influence of various morphologies (including surface orientations and particle size) on kinetic parameters, such as electronic conductivity and Li(+) diffusion coefficients, are investigated as well. Moreover, electrochemical measurements indicate that the morphological differences result in divergent rate capabilities and cycling performances. They reveal that appropriate surface-tailoring can satisfy simultaneously the compatibility of power capability and long cycle life. The morphology design for optimizing Li(+) transport and interfacial stability is very important for high-voltage spinel material. Overall, the crystal chemistry, kinetics and electrochemical performance of the present study on various morphologies of LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 spinel materials have implications for understanding the complex impacts of electrode interface and electrolyte and rational design of rechargeable electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. The outstanding performance of our truncated octahedral LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 materials makes them promising as cathode materials to develop long-life, high energy and high power lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26824793

  1. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  2. A singly charged ion source for radioactive ¹¹C ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, K; Noda, A; Nagatsu, K; Nakao, M; Hojo, S; Muramatsu, M; Suzuki, K; Wakui, T; Noda, K

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive (11)C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source. PMID:26932062

  3. Transport of radioactive ions in soil by electrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    An electrokinetic approach is being evaluated for in situ soil remediation at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The work discussed in this paper involves the development of a new method to monitor the movement of the radioactive ions within the soil during the electrokinetic process. A closed cell and a gamma counter were used to provide iii situ measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results show that for an applied potential of 200 V over approximately 200 hr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}60 were transported a distance of 4 to 5 in. The monitoring technique demonstrated the feasibility of using electrokinetics for soil separation applications.

  4. Role of pH value during chemical reaction, and site occupancy of Ni2+ and Fe3+ ions in spinel structure for tuning room temperature magnetic properties in Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K. S. Aneesh; Bhowmik, R. N.; Mahmood, Sami H.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic properties of Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite have been investigated using the techniques of dc magnetometry and Mӧssbauer spectroscopy. The material has been prepared by chemical reaction of metal nitrates at different pH values and subsequently, annealed at different temperatures to improve the microstructure. The samples with single-phased cubic spinel structure have been used for magnetic study. The material showed a variety of magnetic features, including superparamagnetic and soft ferromagnetic properties. At room temperature, changes of the ferromagnetic parameters of the material have been found in the range 0-47 emu/g for spontaneous magnetization, 0-0.37 for squareness, and 0-195 Oe for coercivity. Variation of the pH value during chemical reaction and changes of the grain size by thermal treatment played an important role in tuning the coexisting superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic components in the material. Samples prepared at high pH value showed small grain size and superparamagnetic features, whereas the samples prepared at low pH value produced large grain size and better ferromagnetic features. The ferromagnetic properties of the material have been enhanced by lowering the pH value and increasing the annealing temperature. Mössbauer spectra provided insight of the local magnetic order, site occupancy of Ni and Fe ions and oxidation state of Fe ions in the spinel structure of Ni1.5Fe1.5O4 ferrite.

  5. Synthesis of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with secondary plate morphology as cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risthaus, Tim; Wang, Jun; Friesen, Alex; Wilken, Andrea; Berghus, Debbie; Winter, Martin; Li, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material has been synthesized by a spray drying process and subsequent solid state reaction. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is given as additive to the spray drying precursor solution and its effects on structural and electrochemical properties are evaluated. By using PVP in the synthesis process, the obtained sample displays a secondary plate morphology which is consisting of densely arranged primary octahedrally shaped particles. The new cathode material has a lesser degree of impurity phases, a higher discharge capacity, a superior rate capability, and a slightly better cycling performance than the sample synthesized without PVP. In more detail, by the use of PVP the ratio of Mn3+ to Mn4+ in the final product decreases from 20.8 to 9.2%. The initial discharge capacity at 0.1 C exhibits an increase of about 14%. The normalized capacity at 20 C is 84.1% instead of 67.0%. A slightly improved cycling performance with the capacity retention increase from 93.8 to 97.9% could be observed as well.

  6. Surface-modified carbon nanotube coating on high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Lee, Joong Kee; Mun, Junyoung; Choi, Wonchang

    2016-08-01

    Surface-modified carbon nanotubes were utilized as a coating for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) via a mechano-fusion method as a strategy to prevent unfavorable carbothermal reduction. Two types of carbon nanotubes were investigated as coating materials: carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and oxidized carbon nanotubes (OCNTs), which were prepared by a simple re-oxidation process. The samples coated with CNTs or OCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and elemental analyses. The OCNT-coated LNMO presented a highly enhanced discharge capacity retention (95.5%) and a coulombic efficiency of 99.9% after 80 cycles between 3.5 and 4.9 V (versus Li/Li+), whereas the CNT-coated LNMO exhibited poor retention of 47.2% and a coulombic efficiency of 95.3%. In addition, post-mortem XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis proved that the OCNT coating improved the surface electrochemical stability and rate capability, whereas the CNT coating formed a thick resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film by accelerating the surface side reactions.

  7. Composition-structure relationships in the Li-ion battery electrode material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jordi; Casas-Cabanas, Montserrat; Omenya, Fredrick O.; Chernova, Natasha A.; Zeng, Dongli; Whittingham, M. Stanley; Grey, Clare P.

    2012-01-01

    A study of the correlations between the stoichiometry, secondary phases and transition metal ordering of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was undertaken by characterizing samples synthesized at different temperatures. Insight into the composition of the samples was obtained by electron microscopy, neutron diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In turn, analysis of cationic ordering was performed by combining neutron diffraction with Li MAS NMR spectroscopy. Under the conditions chosen for the synthesis, all samples systematically showed an excess of Mn, which was compensated by the formation of a secondary rock salt phase and not via the creation of oxygen vacancies. Local deviations from the ideal 3:1 Mn:Ni ordering were found, even for samples that show the superlattice ordering by diffraction, with different disordered schemes also being possible. The magnetic behavior of the samples was correlated with the deviations from this ideal ordering arrangement. The in-depth crystal-chemical knowledge generated was employed to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the electrochemical behavior of the materials. PMID:23002325

  8. Auger Stimulated Ion Desorption of Negative Ions via K -Capture Radioactive Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Verkhoturov, S. V.; Schweikert, E. A.; Chechik, Victor; Sabapathy, Rajaram C.; Crooks, Richard M.; Parilis, E. S.

    2001-07-16

    We report on Auger stimulated ion desorption via Coulomb explosion from surface self-assembled alkylthiol and fluorocarbon molecular layers, triggered by K -capture decay of an imbedded radioactive {sup 55}Fe atom. The charge state of the ejecta is determined by charge exchange in binary atomic collisions in bulk and electron tunneling outside the solid, as well as by fragmentation of electronically excited molecules or molecular fragments. We describe the first nonbeam experiments documenting positive and abundant negative ion desorption due solely to core electron excitation after radioactive decay.

  9. Development of ECR plasmas for radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, R.; Bouly, J. L.; Bruandet, J. F.; Chauvin, N.; Curdy, J. C.; Lamy, T.; Nifenecker, H.; Sole, P.; Sortais, P.; Vieux-Rochaz, J. L.

    1999-04-26

    ECR plasmas are utilized for : 1) Charge breeding of 1+ RIB into N+ RIB in continuous regime with an efficiency for one given charge of 10% for noble gases and about 5% for solid elements. 2) Charge breeding with beam bunching (bunch duration 20 ms, 5 Hz) was obtained for Rb{sup 15+} ions with an efficiency of 2.2%. These results are very reproducible and need only about 200 W of RF power. The number of ions contained in one bunch exceeds 1000 times those achieved with EBIS systems. The ECR trap is better suited for pulsed post acceleration. 3) Ion accumulation in the ECR plasma trap may become a method for realizing a radioactive target.

  10. Truncated octahedral LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material for ultralong-life lithium-ion battery: Positive (100) surfaces in high-voltage spinel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haidong; Kloepsch, Richard; Wang, Jun; Winter, Martin; Li, Jie

    2015-12-01

    So far, it has not yet reached an agreement that (111) surfaces or (100) surfaces are more positive to electrochemical performance in the spinel system. Herein, we present the synthesis of regular truncated octahedral high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 single crystals with preferred growth of (100) surfaces, which incredibly exhibit the best long-term cycling stability compared with the state-of-art spinel material. The capacity retention is about 90% after 2000 cycles at 1 C. The extraordinary performance is mostly attributed to the highly regular truncated octahedral microstructure with large portions of stable (100) facets, which can stabilize the spinel structure to effectively suppress the side reactions with the electrolyte at high operating voltage and are also orientated to support Li+ transport kinetics. Therefore, our work further promotes the practical application of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material in next generation Lithium-ion batteries with high energy density and power performance.

  11. Determination of transition metal ion distribution in cubic spinel Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} using anomalous x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. N.; Sinha, A. K. Ghosh, Haranath

    2015-08-15

    We report anomalous x-ray diffraction studies on Co ferrite with composition Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} to obtain the distribution of transition metal ions in tetrahedral and octahedral sites. We synthesize spinel oxide (Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4}) through co-precipitation and subsequent annealing route. The imaginary part (absorption) of the energy dependent anomalous form factor is measured and the real part is calculated theoretically through Kramers–Krönig transformation to analyze anomalous x-ray diffraction peak intensities. Fe and Co K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra are used to estimate charge states of transition metals. Our analysis, within experimental errors, suggests 44% of the tetrahedral sites contain Co in +2 oxidation state and the rest 56% sites contain Fe in +2 and +3 oxidation states. Similarly, 47% of the octahedral sites contain Fe in +3 oxidation states, whereas, the rest of the sites contain Co in +2 and +3 oxidation states. While a distinct pre-edge feature in the Fe K-edge XANES is observed, Co pre-edge remains featureless. Implications of these results to magnetism are briefly discussed.

  12. Importance of nanostructure for reversible Li-insertion into octahedral sites of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and its application towards aqueous Li-ion chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, Nagasubramanian; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Ling, Wong Chui; Madhavi, Srinivasan

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate the significance of nanostructuring on the reversible Li-insertion into octahedral sites of the nickel substituted spinel Li[Ni0.5Mn1.5]O4. One dimensional nanofibers (50-250 nm diameter) of the Li[Ni0.5Mn1.5]O4 were prepared by a single spinneret electrospinning and their performance was compared with powders synthesized via a conventional solid state approach. Li-diffusion coefficient of electrospun fibers was an order of magnitude higher (5.8 × 10-11 cm2 s-1) than that of conventional powders (1.22 × 10-12 cm2 s-1). Galvanostatic studies revealed a much improved capacity and rate performance for electrospun fibers. The fibers delivered a reversible capacity of ∼87 mAh g-1 after 150 cycles at 1C rate compared to negligible capacity for solid-state prepared material. Finally, the performance of this nanostructured spinel phase as an anode in aqueous rechargeable Li-ion system was demonstrated to require a strongly alkaline electrolyte.

  13. Effect of C6+ Ion Irradiation on structural and electrical properties of Yb and Eu doped Bi1.5 Zn0.92 Nb1.5 O6.92 pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumak, Mehmet; Mergen, Ayhan; Qureshi, Anjum; Singh, N. L.

    2015-03-01

    Pyrochlore general formula of A2B2X7 where A and B are cations and X is an anion Pyrochlore compounds exhibit semiconductor, metallic or ionic conduction properties, depending on the doping, compositions/ substituting variety of cations and oxygen partial pressure. Ion beam irradiation can induce the structural disordering by mixing the cation and anion sublattices, therefore we aim to inevestigate effects of irradiation in pyrochlore compounds. In this study, Eu and Yb-doped Bi1.5Zn0.92Nb1.5O6.92 (Eu-BZN, Yb-BZN) Doping effect and single phase formation of Eu-BZN, Yb-BZN was characterized by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD). Radiation-induced effect of 85 MeV C6+ ions on Eu-BZN, Yb-BZN was studied by XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and temperature dependent dielectric measurements at different fluences. XRD results revealed that the ion beam-induced structural amorphization processes in Eu-BZN and Yb-BZN structures. Our results suggested that the ion beam irradiation induced the significant change in the temprature depndent dielectric properties of Eu-BZN and Yb-BZN pyrochlores due to the increased oxygen vacancies as a result of cation and anion disordering. Department of Metallurgical and Materials Eng., Marmara University, Istanbul-81040, Turkey.

  14. Building a LLNL Capability in Radioactive Ion Beam Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, L A; Becker, J A; Garrett, P E; Younes, W; Schiller, A

    2002-01-31

    The purpose of this LDRD was to establish a program at LLNL in radioactive ion beam (RIB) experiments that would use these experiments to address a wide range physics issues in both stellar nucleosynthesis and stockpile stewardship radiochemistry. The LDRD was funded for a total of two years (fiscal years 2000 and 2001) and transferred to the Physical Data Research Program in fiscal year 2002. Reactions on unstable nuclei and isomeric states play a central role in the formation of elements in both stars and nuclear devices. However, the abilities of reaction models to predict cross sections on radioactive nuclei are uncertain at best. This can be attributed to the lack of experimental data to guide reaction-modeling efforts. Only the 10% of all bound nuclei that can be formed with stable targets and beams have been accessed and studied. The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) and existing RIB facilities offer an unprecedented opportunity to address many of the outstanding questions in nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics by enabling the observation of nuclear reactions with radioactive targets and/or beams. The primary goal of this LDRD is to develop three experimental capabilities for use with RIB experiments: (1) Level density and {gamma}-ray strength function measurements using statistical {gamma}-rays. (2) Charged particle-induced cross sections measurements on radioactive nuclei. (3) Neutron-induced cross section measurements on a radioactive target. RIA and RIB based experiments are the new frontier for nuclear physics. The joint DOE/NSF nuclear science advisory committee has named development of a RIA facility in the United States as the highest new construction priority. In addition to addressing the questions presented above, this LDRD has helped to establish a position for LLNL at the forefront of the international nuclear science community.

  15. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.H.; Allmond, James M; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Beene, James R; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Chae, K. Y.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Howard, Meredith E; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Matos, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pain, Steven D; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott; Stracener, Daniel W; Stroberg, S.; Tostevin, Jeffrey A; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  16. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L. Ayres, A.; Bey, A.; Burcher, S.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Radford, D. C.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at {sup 100}Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at {sup 132}Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich {sup 130}Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  17. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Suzuki, K.; Nagatsu, K.; Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2015-12-01

    A 11C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. In the ISOL system, 11CH4 molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive 12CH4 gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of 11CH4 gases. We investigated the separation of CH4 molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH4. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system.

  18. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn0.85Mg0.15O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-01

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on <100> Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of <101¯0> and <101¯3> peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the <0002> peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton-exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton-exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  19. Simultaneous fluorination of active material and conductive agent for improving the electrochemical performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 electrode for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Min Sang; Kim, Dae Sik; Park, Eunjun; Choi, Jae Man; Kim, Hansu

    2016-09-01

    High-voltage cathode materials have gained much attention as one of the promising electrode materials to increase power density of lithium ion batteries by raising the working voltage. However, the use of such high-voltage cathode materials is still challenging, because their working voltage is close to the electrochemical oxidation potential of organic electrolyte used in lithium ion batteries. In this work, we demonstrated that simultaneous fluorination of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) particles as well as conductive agent in the electrode could significantly improve the electrochemical stability of LNMO cathode. The resulting electrode showed better cycle performance both at room temperature and elevated temperature compared to both bare LNMO electrode and the electrode with only LNMO fluorinated. These results showed that direct fluorination of high voltage cathode can reduce the side reaction of high voltage cathode electrode with the electrolyte, thereby stabilizing the surface of carbon black as well as that of high voltage cathode material.

  20. The future radioactive ion beam research program at Oak Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, James B.

    1994-03-01

    Early in 1995, the ORNL Holifield Facility is scheduled to return to operation as a dedicated radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. This enhanced capability will open up new possibilities for research on the structure of and phenomena occurring in proton-rich nuclei. Among the opportunities will be the creation of heavier N≈Z nuclei, approaching 100Sn, and the study of exotic nuclear shapes, extensions of studies of the p-n interaction and super-allowed beta decay, and examination of nuclear structure near the proton drip line. In addition to new nuclear and atomic physics research opportunities, the beams from the Holifield RIB facility are expected to provide new capabilities for measurements important to nuclear astrophysics. To carry out this experimental program, various upgrades are planned to the existing experimental apparatus, and a new, third-generation, recoil-mass separator is being constructed.

  1. a Gas Jet Target for Radioactive Ion Beam Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F.; Smith, M. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Schatz, H.; Montes, F.; Meisel, Z.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Wiescher, M.; Couder, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Robertson, D.; Vetter, P. A.; Lemut, A.; Erikson, L.

    2013-03-01

    With the development of new radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities such as FRIB, which will push measurements further away from stability, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever. Important scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on hydrogen and helium require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure. To this end, the JENSA Collaboration led by the Colorado ol of Mines (CSM) is designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target allows for a high density and purity of target nuclei (such as 3He) within a highly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials, and will also enable the use of state-of-the-art detection systems. The motivation, specifications and status of the CSM gas jet target system is discussed.

  2. Recent results on reactions with radioactive beams at RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimarães, V.; Arazi, A.; Barioni, A.; Benjamim, E. A.; de Faria, P. N.; Descouvemont, P.; Gasques, L. R.; E; Leistenschneider; Mendes, D. R., Jr.; Morais, M. C.; Morcelle, V.; Moro, A. M.; Pampa Condori, R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Scarduelli, V.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    We present a quick description of RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion beams in Brazil), which is a superconducting double solenoid system, installed at the Pelletron Laboratory of the University of São Paulo and extends the capabilities of the original Pelletron Tandem Accelerator of 8MV terminal voltage (8UD) by producing secondary beams of unstable nuclei. The experimental program of the RIBRAS covers the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo (6He and 8B) projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, have also been included in our recent experimental program.

  3. A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Browne, J.; Couder, M.; Erikson, L. E.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Kontos, A.; Lemut, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Pain, S. D.; Robertson, D.; Sarazin, F.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

    2013-04-01

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

  4. A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F.; Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Browne, J.; Kontos, A.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Schatz, H.; Erikson, L. E.; Lemut, A.; and others

    2013-04-19

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

  5. High-spin nuclear structure studies with radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.

    1992-12-31

    Two important developments in the sixties, namely the advent of heavy-ion accelerators and fabrication of Ge detectors, opened the way for the experimental studies of nuclear properties at high angular momentum. Addition of a new degree of freedom, namely spin, made it possible to observe such fascinating phenomena as occurrences and coexistence of a variety of novel shapes, rise, fall and occasionally rebirth of nuclear collectivity, and disappearance of pairing correlations. Today, with the promise of development of radioactive ion beams (RIB) and construction of the third-generation Ge-detection systems (GAMMASPHERE and EUROBALL), the authors are poised to explore new and equally fascinating phenomena that have been hitherto inaccessible. With the addition of yet another dimension, namely the isospin, they will be able to observe and verify predictions for exotic shapes as varied as rigid triaxiality, hyperdeformation and triaxial octupole shapes, or to investigate the T = 0 pairing correlations. In this paper, they shall review, separately for neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei, these and a few other new high-spin physics opportunities that may be realized with RIB. Following this discussion, they shall present a list of the beam species, intensities and energies that are needed to fulfill these goals. The paper will conclude with a description of the experimental techniques and instrumentations that are required for these studies.

  6. Lithium-ion transport through a tailored disordered phase on the LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 surface for high-power cathode materials.

    PubMed

    Jo, Mi Ru; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yunok; Chae, Ji Su; Roh, Kwang Chul; Yoon, Won-Sub; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2014-08-01

    The phase control of spinel LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 was achieved through surface treatment that led to an enhancement of its electrochemical properties. Li(+) diffusion inside spinel LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 could be promoted by modifying the surface structure of LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 through phosphidation into a disordered phase (Fd3m) that allows facile Li(+) transport. Phosphidated LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 showed a significantly enhanced electrochemical performance, even at high rates exceeding 10 C, demonstrating that the improved kinetics (related to the amount of Mn(3+) ) can render LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 competitive as a high-power cathode material for electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles. PMID:24924807

  7. Tailoring high-voltage and high-performance LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material for high energy lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axmann, P.; Gabrielli, G.; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Increased specific capacity and/or working potential are important prerequisites for high energy functional materials for lithium-ion batteries. Furthermore practical applications require materials with high tap density in order to maximize the loading of the electrodes, thereby optimizing the energy density on cell level. Stoichiometric and phase pure LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LMNO) has been synthesised via a continuous co-precipitation and lithiation process, suited for large scale production. Powder properties have been controlled in order to obtain spherical particles consisting of a multitude of densely-packed primary crystallites. The obtained material exhibits a single plateau at 4.7 V vs. Li/Li+ with high capacity, rate capability and cycling stability. Morphological factors such as crystallite size, particle size and particle architecture, and additionally the variation of oxygen stoichiometry have been investigated. This study clearly illustrates the importance of these factors on the electrochemical performance of an optimized LMNO high-voltage material.

  8. The radioactive ion beams facility project for the legnaro laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecchio, Luigi B.

    1999-04-01

    In the frame work of the Italian participation to the project of a high intensity proton facility for the energy amplifier and nuclear waste transmutations, LNL is involving in the design and construction of prototypes of the injection system of the 1 GeV linac that consists of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) followed by a 100 MeV linac. This program has been already financially supported and the work is actually in progress. In this context, the LNL has been proposed a project for the construction of a second generation facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) by using the ISOL method. The final goal consists in the production of neutron rich RIBs with masses ranging from 80 to 160 by using primary beams of protons, deuterons and light ions with energy of 100 MeV and 100 kW power. This project is proposed to be developed in about 10 years from now and intermediate milestones and experiments are foreseen and under consideration for the next INFN five year plan (1999-2003). In such period of time is proposed the construction of a proton/deuteron accelerator of 10 MeV energy and 10 mA current, consisting of a RFQ (5 MeV, 30 mA) and a linac (10 MeV, 10 mA), and of a neutron area dedicated to the RIBs production, to the BNCT applications and to the neutron physics. Some remarks on the production methods will be presented. The possibility of producing radioisotopes by means of the fission induced by neutrons will be investigated and the methods of production of neutrons will be discussed.

  9. Direct reaction measurements with a 132Sn radioactive ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. L.; Nunes, F. M.; Adekola, A. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Erikson, L.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Livesay, R.; Ma, Z.; Moazen, B.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Patterson, N. P.; Shapira, D.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.

    2011-09-01

    The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of 132Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the elastic scattering cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects, in the angular range studied, was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p1/2 state expected above the N=82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite-range adiabatic-wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted-wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first-excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one-neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly magic nucleus 208Pb.

  10. Direct reaction measurements with a 132Sn radioactive ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine L.; Nunes, Filomena M.; Adekola, Aderemi S.; Bardayan, Dan W.; Blackmon, Jeff; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, Kelly A.; Cizewski, Jolie A.; Erikson, Luke E.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, Raymond L.; Liang, J. F.; Livesay, Ronald J.; Ma, Zhongguo J.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Pain, Steven D.; Patterson, N. P.; Shapira, Dan; Shriner, Jr., John F.; Smith, Michael S.; Swan, Thomas P.; Thomas, Jeff S.

    2011-09-01

    The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of 132Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the elastic scattering cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects, in the angular range studied, was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p1/2 state expected above the N = 82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite-range adiabatic-wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted-wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first-excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one-neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly magic nucleus 208Pb.

  11. Direct reaction measurements with a (132)Sn radioactive ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Chae, K. Y.; Kapler, R.; Ma, Zhanwen; Moazen, Brian; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Pain, S. D.; Swan, T. P.; Nunes, F. M.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Liang, J Felix; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Chipps, Kelly A; Erikson, Luke; Livesay, R. J.; Harlin, Christopher W; Patterson, N. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Kozub, R. L.; Shriner, Jr., John F

    2011-01-01

    The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of {sup 132}Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the elastic scattering cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects, in the angular range studied, was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p{sub 1/2} state expected above the N=82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite-range adiabatic-wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted-wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first-excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one-neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly magic nucleus {sup 208}Pb.

  12. Proton-transfer study of unbound ^19Ne states via ^2H(^18F,α+^15O)n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, C. R.; Adekola, A.; Heinen, Z.; Hornish, M. J.; Massey, T. N.; Voinov, A. V.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Smith, M. S.; Chae, K.; Ma, Z.; Champagne, A. E.; Visser, D. W.; Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S.; Greife, U.; Livesay, R.; Porter-Peden, M.; Sarazin, F.; Johnson, M.; Domizioli, C.; Kozub, R. L.; Moazen, B.

    2006-04-01

    The nuclear structure of ^19Ne near the proton threshold is of interest for understanding the rates of proton-induced reactions on ^18F in novae. The proton transfer reaction ^18F(d,n)^19Ne has been measured by bombarding a 720-μg/cm^2 CD2 target with a 150-MeV ^18F^9+ beam at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The ^19Ne states of interest near the proton threshold decay by breakup into α+^15O which are detected in coincidence with position-sensitive E-δE Si telescopes. The reconstruction of the relative energy reveals the excited states of ^19Ne which are populated. The mirror reaction ^2H(^18F,α+^15N)p has been measured simultaneously. The implications for the ^18F(p,α)^15O reaction and ^19Ne-^19F mirror symmetry will be discussed.

  13. Improvement of technology for treatment of spent radioactive ion-exchange resins at nuclear power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchagin, Yu. P.; Aref'ev, E. K.; Korchagin, E. Yu.

    2010-07-01

    Results from tests of technology for decontaminating spent radioactive ion-exchange resins at the Balakovo and Kalinin nuclear power stations are presented. Versions of technological schemes with cleaning and repeated use of decontaminating solution are considered. The possibility of considerably reducing the volume of radioactive wastes is demonstrated.

  14. Trojan Horse Method and RIBs: The {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, H.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; De Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.

    2012-11-12

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy this isotope in novae. Among these latter processes, the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O is one of the main {sup 18}F destruction channels. We report here on the preliminary results of the first experiment that applies the Trojan Horse Method to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction. The experiment was performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of The Tokyo University.

  15. Fabrication of densely packed LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material with excellent long-term cycleability for high-voltage lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun-Chuan; Xu, Yue-Feng; Xu, Gui-Liang; Shen, Shou-Yu; Li, Jun-Tao; Huang, Ling; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-02-01

    Densely packed submicron polyhedral LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material with disordered Fd 3 barm structure was synthesized via a modified sol-gel method. The as-synthesized material has a high tap density of 2.15 g cm-3, guaranteeing a high volumetric energy density for high power batteries. Electrochemical properties were investigated in both a LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li half-cell and a LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite full-cell. The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/Li half-cell exhibits a superior cycle stability and rate capability. Here the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material can deliver capacity retentions of 86% at 25 °C and 75% at 55 °C within 1000 cycles for a charge-discharge rate of 1 C. At a much higher rate of 10 C, a discharge capacity of 95 mAh g-1 can be still obtained. The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/graphite full-cell delivers a stable discharge capacity of 130.2 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C, corresponding to a discharge energy density as high as 576.2 Wh kg-1. After 100 cycles, the full cell can maintain a working voltage of 4.55 V and capacity retention of 84.6%. The excellent cycle stability is attributed to the dense structure, large particle size, low specific surface area and less exposed (110) facets, which dramatically reduce irreversible surface chemical reactions and manganese dissolution.

  16. Recent developments of SOLEROO: Australia's first high energy radioactive Ion Beam capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Luong, D. H.; Williams, E.; Ramachandran, K.; Cook, K. J.; Muirhead, A. G.; Marshall, S.; Tunningley, T.

    2015-04-01

    The first measurements of the Australian National University's new radioactive ion beam capability were carried out using elastic scattering of a 8Li radioactive beam from a 197Au target. The purpose of this experiment was to test the radioactive ion beam capability as a complete system, which uses a pair of twin position-sensitive parallel plate avalanche counters as tracking detectors along with a highly pixelated double sided Si detector array. The tracking detector system allows us to have extremely high purity secondary radioactive ion beams by electronically tagging the reaction products of interest, thus allowing complete separation from the unwanted contaminant beam species of similar mass and charge. Here, some recent developments and characteristics of this system are presented.

  17. High intensity ion guides and purification techniques for low energy radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grévy, S.

    2016-06-01

    This report gives an overview of the different devices which can be used for the purification of high intensity low energy radioactive ion beams: high resolution magnetic separators (HRS), multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separators (MR-TOF-MS) and Penning traps (PT). An overview of HRS, existing or in development, and the methods to increase the resolving power are presented. The MR-TOF-MS of ISOLTRAP and other projects having been presented during this conference, only the main characteristics of such devices are discussed. Concerning the PT, intensively used to measure masses with high precisions, we will present the PIPERADE project which aims to provide pure beams of exotic nuclei with unprecedent intensities at the future DESIR/SPIRAL2 facility.

  18. Linear radio frequency quadrupole for the cooling and bunching of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darius, G.; Ban, G.; Brégeault, J.; Delahaye, P.; Desrues, Ph.; Durand, D.; Fléchard, X.; Herbane, M.; Labalme, M.; LeBrun, Ch.; Liénard, E.; Mauger, F.; Merrer, Y.; Méry, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Szerypo, J.; Vallerand, Ph.; Vandamme, Ch.

    2004-11-01

    A linear radio frequency quadrupole has been built for the transport, cooling, and bunching of radioactive ions extracted from an ECR source. The device uses the buffer gas cooling technique and was designed such as to extend the technique for the cooling of very light ions using H2 as buffer gas. We describe here the technical specifications of the device and present results of the first tests concerning the cooling and bunching of stable ions.

  19. X-ray absorption near-edge structures of LiMn2O4 and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel oxides for lithium-ion batteries: the first-principles calculation study.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toyoki; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Hironori

    2016-07-21

    Experimental Mn and Ni K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were well reproduced for 5 V-class LixNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinels as well as 4 V-class LixMn2O4 spinels using density functional theory. Local environmental changes around the Mn or Ni centres due to differences in the locations of Li ions and/or phase transitions in the spinel oxides were found to be very important contributors to the XANES shapes, in addition to the valence states of the metal ions. PMID:27333155

  20. Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

    1983-10-31

    A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

  1. The acceleration and storage of radioactive ions for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    B. Autin et al.

    2003-12-23

    The term beta-beam has been coined for the production of a pure beam of electron neutrinos or their antiparticles through the decay of radioactive ions circulating in a storage ring. This concept requires radioactive ions to be accelerated to a Lorentz gamma of 150 for {sup 6}He and 60 for {sup 18}Ne. The neutrino source itself consists of a storage ring for this energy range, with long straight sections in line with the experiment(s). Such a decay ring does not exist at CERN today, nor does a high-intensity proton source for the production of the radioactive ions. Nevertheless, the existing CERN accelerator infrastructure could be used as this would still represent an important saving for a beta-beam facility. This paper outlines the first study, while some of the more speculative ideas will need further investigations.

  2. One-step hydrothermal method synthesis of core-shell LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanzhuang; Zhang, Minghao; Xia, Yonggao; Qiu, Bao; Liu, Zhaoping; Li, Xing

    2014-06-01

    Spherical LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material with a core-shell structure is synthesized by a urea-assisted hydrothermal method followed by heat treatment with LiOH at high temperature. After the process of hydrothermal treatment, the carbonate precursor with a concentration gradient is produced, in a single spherical particle, the content of Ni in the surface is higher than that in the center while Mn has a reversal trend. LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 synthesized through the hydrothermal route has a great improvement in cycling stability at elevated temperature and rate capability. The capacity retention can maintain at 95% after 30 cycles at 55 °C. Furthermore, it can deliver a discharge capacity of 118 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 10 C at room temperature. Such excellent electrochemical properties of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 can be ascribed to its unique core-shell structure and nano-size particle.

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

  4. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  5. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-30

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for m{sub n}u<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than deltap/p<10{sup -5}, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(10{sup 18}) decays.

  6. β-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Yee, R M; Scielzo, N D; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Caldwell, S; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; Fallis, J; Greene, J P; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Savard, G; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G; Van Schelt, J; Zabransky, B J

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated using trapped ions. The neutron-energy spectrum is reconstructed by measuring the time of flight of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection, such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and γ rays and complicated detector-response functions. (137)I(+) ions delivered from a (252)Cf source were confined in a linear Paul trap surrounded by radiation detectors, and the β-delayed neutron-energy spectrum and branching ratio were determined by detecting the β(-) and recoil ions in coincidence. Systematic effects were explored by determining the branching ratio three ways. Improvements to achieve higher detection efficiency, better energy resolution, and a lower neutron-energy threshold are proposed. PMID:23496704

  7. Element synthesis calculations for stellar explosions: robust uncertainties, sensitivities, and radioactive ion beam measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Hix, W. Raphael; Parete-Koon, Suzanne; Dessieux, Luc; Ma, Zhanwen; Starrfield, Sumner; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Guidry, Michael W.; Smith, Donald L.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2004-12-01

    We utilize multiple-zone, post-processing element synthesis calculations to determine the impact of recent ORNL radioactive ion beam measurements on predictions of novae and X-ray burst simulations. We also assess the correlations between all relevant reaction rates and all synthesized isotopes, and translate nuclear reaction rate uncertainties into abundance prediction uncertainties, via a unique Monte Carlo technique.

  8. Michigan state upgrade to produce intense radioactive ion beams by fragmentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lubkin, G.B.

    1997-05-01

    This article describes the planned upgrading of accelerator facilities to produce intense radioactive ion beams, by a fragmentation technique, for experimental simulation of nucleosynthesis in novas and supernovas. (AIP) {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.} {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics}

  9. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The status of the new Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is slated to start its scientific program late this year is discussed, as is the new experimental equipment which is being constructed at this facility. Information on the early scientific program also is given.

  10. Activities of the Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski, J. A.

    2006-10-01

    The Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science is a consortium of universities, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, led by Rutgers University. The purpose of this project, funded by the NNSA/DP Academic Alliance for Stewardship Science program, is to use radioactive ion beams to study low-energy nuclear reactions of importance to stewardship science, as well as to prepare future researchers in applied nuclear science. These studies are enabled by the plethora of unstable accelerated beams available at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge. The initial measurements use neutron-rich beams of uranium fission fragments to study the neutron-transfer (d,p) reaction, a possible surrogate of neutron capture reactions. We also develop new radioactive ion beams of interest to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, and stewardship science. This talk will present an overview of the activities of the Center and the available facilities, describe initial results of a (d,p) reaction with a fission fragment beam, and outline activities proposed for the near term. In collaboration with H.K. Carter, ORAU.

  11. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  12. Precision mass measurements at TITAN with radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Macdonald, T. D.; Andreoiu, C.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of the atomic mass further our understanding in many disciplines from metrology to physics beyond the standard model. The accuracy and precision of Penning trap mass spectrometry have been well demonstrated at TITAN, including measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes to investigate three-body forces in nuclear structure and within the island of inversion to study the mechanism of shell quenching and deformation. By charge breeding ions, TITAN has enhanced the precision of the measurement technique. The precision achieved in the measurement of the superallowed β-emitter 74Rb in the 8+ charge state rivaled earlier measurements with singly charged ions in a fraction of the time. By breeding 78Rb to the same charge state, the ground state could be easily distinguished from the isomer. Further developments led to threshold charge breeding, which permitted capturing and measuring isobarically and elementally pure ion samples in the Penning trap. This was demonstrated via the Q-value determination of 71Ge. An overview of the TITAN facility and recent results are presented herein.

  13. Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Heggen, H.; Kunz, P.; Lassen, J.; Mjøs, A.; Raeder, S.; Teigelhöfer, A.

    2014-02-01

    At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 μA of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source.

  14. Radioactive ion beam research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K.E.; Bauer, R.W.; Boyd, R.N.; Mathews, G.J.; Haight, R.C.; Corn, P.B.

    1986-09-01

    Several modifications and additions have been made to improve the radioactive beam facility at Livermore with the main aim of measuring the cross section for /sup 7/Be(p,..gamma..)/sup 8/B (which is important in determining the solar neutrino flux) and other reactions of astrophysical interest. The quadrupole sextuplet spectrometer has been upgraded by inserting an electrostatic deflection element near the midpoint and by installing a movable beam stop near the /sup 7/Be production target. These changes have allowed an improvement in the purity, and a large increase in the intensity, of the /sup 7/Be beam. Six large NaI(Tl) detectors and the gas cell from the OSU system along with its active and passive shielding have been incorporated into the Lawrence Livermore facility. True events are to be identified by a multiple coincidence. The first requirement is the detection of a ..gamma..-ray from the proton capture /sup 7/Be(p,..gamma..)/sup 8/B. After the candidate capture gamma is observed the /sup 8/B decay signature is required. This signature is a positron (from /sup 8/B ..-->.. /sup 8/Be* + e/sup +/ + ..nu..) along with the two ..cap alpha..'s from /sup 8/Be ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. + ..cap alpha.. observed in a CaF/sub 2/ detector into which the /sup 8/B have implanted. Also a detector telescope inside the gas cell monitors the incoming /sup 7/Be beam. The current status of the /sup 7/Be(p,..gamma..)/sup 8/B measurement is discussed.

  15. Low energy nuclear reactions with RIBRAS, Radioactive Ion Beam in Brasil, system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, V.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; de Faria, P. N.; Barioni, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Mendes, D. R.; Zamora, J. C.; Morais, M. C.; Condori, R. P.; Benjamim, E. A.; Monteiro, D. S.; Crema, E.; Moro, A. M.; Lubian, J.

    2011-09-01

    RIBRAS, Radioactive Ion beam in Brasil, is a system based on superconducting solenoids which can produce low energy RNB (Radioactive Nuclear Beams) at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Secondary radioactive beams of light particles such as 6He, 7Be and 8Li have been produced and low energy elastic scattering and transfer reaction experiments have been performed. The recent scientific program using this facility includes elastic scattering and transfer reactions of 6He halo nucleus on 9Be, 27Al, 51V and 120Sn targets and 8Li on 9Be, 12C and 51V targets. The total reaction cross section as a function of energy has been extracted from the elastic scattering data and the role of breakup of weakly bound or exotic nuclei is discussed. Also spectroscopic factors have been obtained from the transfer reactions.

  16. A Negative-Surface Ionization for Generation of Halogen Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zaim, H.

    2001-04-16

    A simple and efficient negative surface ionization source has been designed, fabricated and initially tested for on-line generation of radioactive ion beams of the halogens (Cl, Br, I, and At) for use in the nuclear-structure and nuclear-astrophysics research programs at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The source utilizes a solid, spherical geometry LaB{sub 6} surface ionizer for forming highly electronegative atoms and molecules. Despite its widely publicized propensity for being easily poisoned, no evidences of this effect were experienced during testing of the source. Nominal efficiencies of 15% for Br{sup {minus}} beam generation were obtained during off-line evaluation of the source with AlBr3 feed material when account is taken of the fractional dissociation of the molecule. Principles of operation, design features, operational parameter data, initial performance results, and beam quality data (emittance) are presented in this article.

  17. Charge state breeding for the acceleration of radioactive ions at TRIUMFa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, F.; Baartman, R.; Bricault, P.; Jayamanna, K.; Lamy, T.; McDonald, M.

    2010-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (PHOENIX from Pantechnik) has been set up at the Isotope Separation and ACceleration (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF for the charge state breeding of radioactive ions. After extensive testing and optimization on a test bench it has been moved on-line and put into operation. During a first test in 2008 a beam of R80b14+ was successfully created from R80b1+ and accelerated by the ISAC postaccelerator. Further tests with different stable and radioactive isotopes from the ISAC on-line sources and from a test source with stable Cs have been carried out. Until now an efficiency of 1.4% for C124s20+ has been obtained.

  18. Charge state breeding for the acceleration of radioactive ions at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, F.; Baartman, R.; Bricault, P.; Jayamanna, K.; McDonald, M.; Lamy, T.

    2010-02-15

    A 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (PHOENIX from Pantechnik) has been set up at the Isotope Separation and ACceleration (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF for the charge state breeding of radioactive ions. After extensive testing and optimization on a test bench it has been moved on-line and put into operation. During a first test in 2008 a beam of {sup 80}Rb{sup 14+} was successfully created from {sup 80}Rb{sup 1+} and accelerated by the ISAC postaccelerator. Further tests with different stable and radioactive isotopes from the ISAC on-line sources and from a test source with stable Cs have been carried out. Until now an efficiency of 1.4% for {sup 124}Cs{sup 20+} has been obtained.

  19. Key strategies for enhancing the cycling stability and rate capacity of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 as high-voltage cathode materials for high power lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ting-Feng; Mei, Jie; Zhu, Yan-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is one of the most promising high voltage cathode materials for future application due to its advantages of large reversible capacity, high thermal stability, low cost, environmental friendliness, and high energy density. LNMO can provide 20% and 30% higher energy density than traditional cathode materials LiCoO2 and LiFePO4, respectively. Unfortunately, LNMO-based batteries with LiPF6-based carbonate electrolytes always suffer from severe capacity deterioration and poor thermostability because of the oxidization of organic carbonate solvents and decomposition of LiPF6, especially at elevated temperatures and water-containing environment. Hence, it is necessary to systematically and comprehensively summarize the progress in understanding and modifying LNMO cathode from various aspects. In this review, the structure, transport properties and different reported possible fading mechanisms of LNMO cathode are first discussed detailedly. And then, the major goal of this review is to highlight new progress in using proposed strategies to improve the cycling stability and rate capacity of LNMO-based batteries, including synthesis, control of special morphologies, element doping and surface coating etc., especially at elevated temperatures. Finally, an insight into the future research and further development of LNMO cathode is discussed.

  20. The SPES radioactive ion beam project of LNL: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Prete, G.; Andrigetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 8 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.7 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission on an Uranium target at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research centre for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

  1. Nuclear and Astro Physics at the Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, Jolie A.

    2010-10-11

    Neutron transfer reactions with radioactive ion beams of atomic nuclei have been used to probe the shell structure of nuclei far from stability and provide information important to understanding the origin of the elements heavier than iron.

  2. Nuclear and Astro Physics at the Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski, Jolie A.

    2010-10-01

    Neutron transfer reactions with radioactive ion beams of atomic nuclei have been used to probe the shell structure of nuclei far from stability and provide information important to understanding the origin of the elements heavier than iron.

  3. TATRA: a versatile high-vacuum tape transportation system for decay studies at radioactive-ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, V.; Sedlák, M.; Venhart, M.; Janičkovič, D.; Kliman, J.; Petrík, K.; Švec, P.; Švec, , P.; Veselský, M.

    2016-03-01

    A compact and versatile tape transport system for the collection and counting of radioactive samples from radioactive ion beam facilities has been developed. It uses an amorphous metallic tape for transportation of the activity. Because of this material, the system can hold very good vacuum, typically below 10-7 mbar.

  4. Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

    1997-04-01

    Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies.

  5. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Hiroshi Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Yoshida, H. P.; Imai, K.; and others

    2014-02-15

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a {sup 18}O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  6. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line. PMID:24593466

  7. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  8. New reaction chamber for transient field g-factor measurements with radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illana, A.; Perea, A.; Nácher, E.; Orlandi, R.; Jungclaus, A.

    2015-06-01

    A new reaction chamber has been designed and constructed to measure g-factors of short-lived excited states using the Transient Field technique in combination with Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics. In this paper we will discuss several important aspects which have to be considered in order to successfully carry out this type of measurement with radioactive ion beams, instead of the stable beams used in a wide range of experiments in the past. The technical solutions to the problems arising from the use of such radioactive beams will be exposed in detail and the first successful experiment using the new chamber in combination with MINIBALL cluster detectors at REX-ISOLDE (CERN) will be reported on.

  9. Mitigation of the irreversible capacity and electrolyte decomposition in a LiNi 0.5Mn 1.5O 4/nano-TiO 2 Li-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutti, Sergio; Gentili, Valentina; Reale, Priscilla; Carbone, Lorenzo; Panero, Stefania

    Nanosized titanium oxides can achieve large reversible specific capacity (above 200 mAh g -1) and good rate capabilities, but suffer irreversible capacity losses in the first cycle. Moreover, due to the intrinsic safe operating potential (1.5 V), the use of titanium oxide requires to couple it with high-potential cathodes, such as lithium nickel manganese spinel (LNMO) in order to increase the energy density of the final cell. However the use of the 4.7 V vs. Li +/Li 0 LNMO cathode material requires to tackle the continuous electrolyte decomposition upon cycling. Coupling these two electrodes to make a lithium ion battery is thus highly appealing but also highly difficult because the cell balancing must account not only for the charge reversibly exchanged by each electrode but also for the irreversible charge losses. In this paper a LNMO-nano TiO 2 Li-ion cell with liquid electrolyte is presented: two innovative approaches on both the cathode and the anode sides were developed in order to mitigate the electrolyte decomposition upon cycling. In particular the LNMO surface was coated with ZnO in order to minimize the surface reactivity, and the TiO 2 nanoparticles where activated by incorporating nano-lithium in the electrode formulation to compensate for the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle. With these strategies we were able to assemble balanced Li-ion coin cells thus avoiding the use of electrolyte additives and more hazardous and expensive ex-situ SEI preforming chemical or electrochemical procedures.

  10. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y. Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W.

    2014-02-15

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 μA], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 μA], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  11. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (HRIBF) -- getting ready to do experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.; Lewis, T.A.

    1998-02-26

    The conversion of the HHIRF facility to a Radioactive Ion Beam facility started in 1994. In this ISOL type facility the Cyclotron has been re-fitted as a driver providing high intensity proton beams which react with the target from which the radioactive products are extracted and then accelerated in the Tandem Electrostatic Accelerator to the desired energy for nuclear science studies. Facilities for nuclear physics experiments are at different stages of development: A Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) with a complement of detectors at the focal plane and around the target is used primarily for nuclear structure studies. A large recoil separator combining velocity and momentum selection, with its complement of focal plane detectors, will be dedicated to measurements relevant to nuclear astrophysics. The Enge Split Pole spectrograph is being re-fitted for operation in a gas filled mode, making it a more versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies. With the new experimental equipment being commissioned and the prospects of running experiments with low intensity radioactive beams a significant effort to develop equipment for beam diagnostics is underway. Some of the efforts and results in developing beam diagnostic tools will be described.

  12. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-11

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on 〈100〉 Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of 〈101{sup ¯}0〉 and 〈101{sup ¯}3〉 peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the 〈0002〉 peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton–exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton–exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  13. Cryogenic molecular separation system for radioactive {sup 11}C ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Suzuki, K.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.; Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A {sup 11}C molecular production/separation system (CMPS) has been developed as part of an isotope separation on line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive {sup 11}C ion beams. In the ISOL system, {sup 11}CH{sub 4} molecules will be produced by proton irradiation and separated from residual air impurities and impurities produced during the irradiation. The CMPS includes two cryogenic traps to separate specific molecules selectively from impurities by using vapor pressure differences among the molecular species. To investigate the fundamental performance of the CMPS, we performed separation experiments with non-radioactive {sup 12}CH{sub 4} gases, which can simulate the chemical characteristics of {sup 11}CH{sub 4} gases. We investigated the separation of CH{sub 4} molecules from impurities, which will be present as residual gases and are expected to be difficult to separate because the vapor pressure of air molecules is close to that of CH{sub 4}. We determined the collection/separation efficiencies of the CMPS for various amounts of air impurities and found desirable operating conditions for the CMPS to be used as a molecular separation device in our ISOL system.

  14. Proceedings of the workshop on the science of intense radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.B.; Vieira, D.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a 2-1/2 day workshop on the Science of Intense Radioactive Ion Beams which was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on April 10--12, 1990. The workshop was attended by 105 people, representing 30 institutions from 10 countries. The thrust of the workshop was to develop the scientific opportunities which become possible with a new generation intense Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, currently being discussed within North America. The workshop was organized around five primary topics: (1) reaction physics; (2) nuclei far from stability/nuclear structure; (3) nuclear astrophysics; (4) atomic physics, material science, and applied research; and (5) facilities. Overview talks were presented on each of these topics, followed by 1-1/2 days of intense parallel working group sessions. The final half day of the workshop was devoted to the presentation and discussion of the working group summary reports, closing remarks and a discussion of future plans for this effort.

  15. An overview on TRIUMF's developments on ion source for radioactive beams.

    PubMed

    Bricault, Pierre; Ames, Friedhelm; Achtzehn, Tobias; Dombsky, Marik; Labrecque, Francis; Lassen, Jens; Lavoie, Jean-Phillipe; Lecesne, Nathalie

    2008-02-01

    The ISAC facility at TRIUMF utilizes up to 100 microA from the 500 MeV H(-) cyclotron to produce the radioactive ion beam (RIB) using the isotopic separation on line method. The ISAC-I facility comprised the RIB production target stations, the mass separator, and the beam delivery to low energy area and to a room temperature linear accelerator composed of a four-rod radio frequency quadrupole and an interdigital H-type structure drift tube LINAC. ISAC-I linear accelerator can provide beam from A=3 to 30 amu with an energy range from 0.15 to 1.5 A MeV. Since the beginning of operations target development program has been to increase proton beam currents on targets. Now we routinely operate our target at 50-85 microA and recently we have operated our target at 100 microA. Other developments are in place to add other ion sources, laser, force electron beam induced are discharge and electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the actual surface ion source. The last two five year plans were mainly devoted to the construction of a heavy ion superconducting LINAC (ISAC-II) that will upgrade the mass and the energy range from 30 to 150 and from 1.5 to 6.5 A MeV, respectively. The intermediate stage E< or =4.2 A MeV is already completed and commissioned; three experiments using (11)Li, (9)Li, and (29)Na have been completed this summer. PMID:18315163

  16. Analysis methods of safe Coulomb-excitation experiments with radioactive ion beams using the GOSIA code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, M.; Gaffney, L. P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Clément, E.; Grahn, T.; Kesteloot, N.; Napiorkowski, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.

    2016-04-01

    With the recent advances in radioactive ion beam technology, Coulomb excitation at safe energies becomes an important experimental tool in nuclear-structure physics. The usefulness of the technique to extract key information on the electromagnetic properties of nuclei has been demonstrated since the 1960s with stable beam and target combinations. New challenges present themselves when studying exotic nuclei with this technique, including dealing with low statistics or number of data points, absolute and relative normalisation of the measured cross-sections and a lack of complementary experimental data, such as excited-state lifetimes and branching ratios. This paper addresses some of these common issues and presents analysis techniques to extract transition strengths and quadrupole moments utilising the least-squares fit code, GOSIA.

  17. Sodium niobate adsorbents doped with tantalum (TaV) for the removal of bivalent radioactive ions in waste waters.

    PubMed

    Paul, Blain; Yang, Dongjiang; Martens, Wayde N; Frost, Ray L

    2011-04-01

    Sodium niobates doped with different amounts of tantalum (Ta(V)) were prepared via a thermal reaction process. It was found that pure nanofibrils and bar like solids can be obtained when tantalum is introduced into the reaction system. For the well crystallized fibril solids, the Na(+) ions are difficult to exchange, and the radioactive ions such as Sr(2+) and Ra(2+) just deposit on the surface of the fibers during the sorption process, resulting in lower sorption capacity and distribution coefficients (K(d)). However, the bar like solids are poorly crystallized and have many exchangeable Na(+) ions. They are able to remove highly hazardous bivalent radioactive isotopes such as Sr(2+) and Ra(2+) ions. Even in the presence of many Na(+) ions, they also have higher K(d). More importantly, such sorption finally intelligently triggers considerable collapse of the structure, resulting in permanent entrapment of the toxic bivalent cations in the solids, so that they can be safely disposed of. This study highlights new opportunities for the preparation of Nb-based adsorbents to efficiently remove toxic radioactive ions from contaminated water. PMID:21266294

  18. Novel fungus-titanate bio-nanocomposites as high performance adsorbents for the efficient removal of radioactive ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingze; Wei, Guodong; Liu, Na; Zhou, Liang; Fu, Chengwei; Chubik, M; Gromov, A; Han, Wei

    2014-01-21

    Reclaimable adsorbents have a critical application in the adsorption of radioactive materials. In this study, the novel bio-nanocomposites comprising fungi and titanate nanotubes are successfully synthesized by a simple and low-cost method. Morphological characterizations and composite mechanism analysis confirm that the composites are sufficiently stable to avoid dust pollution resulting from the titanate nanomaterials. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the bio-nanocomposites are efficient adsorbents with a saturated sorption capacity as high as 120 mg g(-1) (1.75 meq. g(-1)) for Ba(2+) ions. The results suggest that the bio-nanocomposites can be used as promising radioactive adsorbents for removing radioactive ions from water caused by nuclear leakage. PMID:24287628

  19. Nuclear reactions with 11C and 14O radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fanqing

    2004-12-09

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been shown to be a useful tool for studying proton-rich nuclides near and beyond the proton dripline and for evaluating nuclear models. To take full advantage of RIBs, Elastic Resonance Scattering in Inverse Kinematics with Thick Targets (ERSIKTT), has proven to be a reliable experimental tool for investigations of proton unbound nuclei. Following several years of effort, Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species (BEARS), a RIBs capability, has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The current BEARS provides two RIBs: a 11C beam of up to 2x108 pps intensity on target and an 14O beam of up to 3x104 pps intensity. While the development of the 11C beam has been relatively easy, a number of challenges had to be overcome to obtain the 14O beam. The excellent 11C beam has been used to investigate several reactions. The first was the 197Au(11C,xn)208-xnAt reaction, which was used to measure excitation functions for the 4n to 8n exit channels. The measured cross sections were generally predicted quite well using the fusion-evaporation code HIVAP. Possible errors in the branching ratios of ?? decays from At isotopes as well as the presence of incomplete fusion reactions probably contribute to specific overpredictions. 15F has been investigated by the p(14O,p)14O reaction with the ERSIKTT technology. Several 14O+p runs have been performed. Excellent energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction in inverse kinematics, and comparing the results to those obtained earlier with normal kinematics. The differences between 14N+p and 14O+p in the stopping power function have been evaluated for better energy calibration. After careful calibration, the energy levels of 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. Spins and parities were assigned to the two observed resonances. This new measurement of the 15F ground state supports the disappearance of the Z = 8

  20. Radioactive Ion Beam Monitoring System and Simulation of the DRIB's Complex Target - Catcher Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Gulbekian, G. G.; Mitrofanov, S. V.; Denisov, S. V.; Tarasov, O. B.

    2007-05-22

    The Dubna Radioactive Ion Beams accelerator complex (DRIBs) is based on two U-400 and U-400M isochronous cyclotrons, which are equipped with two ECR ion sources. We use to 7Li as primary beam with energy equal to 32 AMeV. The results are showed here was obtained with interaction of 7Li with carbon target for 6He isotope. Productive carbon target and catcher was combined into one unit. The catcher unit located in front of the ECR source and consists of the generating target and gas-vacuum system. In this review the results a number of tests of the DRIBs project are described. During the tests some of defects in catcher unit had been found and have been removed in the new module witch are gave us increasing of secondary beam current. The system of the DRIBs beam monitoring have been improved and completed. Also the new subroutine of the Lise++ simulation toolkit for modeling catchers properties has been designed.

  1. Simultaneous injection of stable and radioactive ions into upgraded multi-user atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Amichay

    Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) national user research facility, located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Presently, Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) produced in the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility are charge bred in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) charge breeder prior to post acceleration in ATLAS. A new state of the art Electron Beam Ion Source charge breeder, the CARIBU-EBIS charge breeder, has been developed (not in the scope of the work presented here) at ANL to replace the existing ECR charge breeder for charge breeding RIBs generated in CARIBU. The CARIBU-EBIS charge breeder is now in the final stages of offline at the Accelerator Development Test Facility (ADTF). A significant part of the commissioning effort has been devoted to testing the source by breeding singly-charged cesium ions injected from a surface ionization source. Characterization of the CARIBU-EBIS performance has been accomplished through a comparison between the measured properties of extracted beams and simulation results. Following its offline commissioning, CARIBU-EBIS will be relocated to its permanent location in ATLAS. An electrostatic transport line has been designed to transport RIBs from CARIBU and inject them into CARIBU-EBIS. In addition, modifications to the existing ATLAS Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) were required in order to transport the charge bred RIBs from CARIBU-EBIS to ATLAS. A proposal for upgrading ATLAS to a multi-user facility has been explored as well. In this context, beam dynamics simulations show that further modifications to the ATLAS LEBT will enable the simultaneous injection and acceleration of RIBs and stable beams in ATLAS. Furthermore, a novel technique proposed by Ostroumov et al. will allow for the acceleration of multiple charge states from CARIBU-EBIS, thereby increasing the intensity of available RIBs by up to 60%.

  2. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Vivian, G.

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the 238U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed.

  3. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams.

    PubMed

    Manzolaro, M; Meneghetti, G; Andrighetto, A; Vivian, G

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 10(13) fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the (238)U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed. PMID:27036768

  4. Affinity of radioactive cesium and strontium for illite and smectite clay in the presence of groundwater ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, C.H.; Kim, C.S.; Kim, S.J.; Park, S.W.

    1996-10-01

    Sorption behavior of hazardous nuclides such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr onto illite and smectite clay was studied in the presence of major groundwater ions (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, Na{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}). Illite and smectite clay can selectively sorb small hydrated Cs{sup +} ion in the presence of groundwater cations except K{sup +} ion. In contrast, sorption of larger and stable hydrated Sr{sup 2+} ion onto illite and smectite clay is highly competed by background groundwater cations. The results of this study indicate that the transport of {sup 137}Cs in geologic barrier of a radioactive waste repository would be greatly retained by illite and smectite clay, and that the fate of {sup 90}Sr would be significantly controlled by ionic strength of groundwater cations and bicarbonate ion as a complex agent. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: The {sup 132}Sn{sup +} case study

    SciTech Connect

    Osswald, F. Bouquerel, E.; Boutin, D.; Dinkov, A.; Sellam, A.

    2014-12-15

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards.

  6. Time-dependent chemical compositions of 13N and 15O induced in air by the operation of a high energy electron accelerator.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Henshaw, J; Mignanelli, M A

    1998-04-01

    Time-dependent chemical compositions for 13N and 15O induced in the air atmosphere of a high energy electron accelerator room have been studied using a computer simulation method. A radiation chemistry model was developed to describe the chemical reactions of 13N and 15O species with the air molecules and their radiolytic products. By assuming several chemical forms of 13N and 15O generated by the (gamma, n) reaction, the variations of the concentrations of 13N and 15O species were simulated under a radiation field. From the comparison between the simulations and experiment in a 100 MeV electron linear accelerator (linac) facility, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) Just after the (gamma, n) reaction, 25-50% of 13N and 15O are present as atoms (13N, 15O) and/or their ions (13N+, 15O+) and the remainder as nitrogen and oxygen molecules (13NN, 15OO) and/or their ions (13NN+, 15OO+); (2) Neutralization of 13N+ and 15O+ ions into 13N and 15O atoms occurs instantaneously and the same is the case with the neutralization of 13NN+ and 15OO+ ions to 13NN and 15OO molecules; (3) The neutralized 13N and 15O atoms react with the air molecules and the radiolytic products to form nitrogen oxide compounds and ozone, while 13NN and 15OO remain as these molecules. Factors that control the chemical reactions of 13N and 15O are discussed. PMID:9525420

  7. Development of Polarized Solid Targets for Spectroscopic Studies with Radioactive Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; van den Brandt, B.

    2005-04-01

    Exciting new findings with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) in nuclear spectroscopy have resulted in a growing interest in this field. In order to fully exploit the potential of RIBs it is necessary to develop appropriate experimental tools. We are investigating the possibility of introducing polarization observables in spectroscopic studies with RIBs, at energies around the Coulomb barrier, through polystyrene targets of polarized protons and deuterons in the thickness range between 20 and 100μm. The operation of such target systems requires a cooling scheme where the target is situated in the isolation vacuum of a cryostat in open connection to the vacuum of the beamline. This can be achieved by using two parallel polarized foils mounted on a copper tube, serving also as the NMR coil (for sampling the polarization), to form together a closed volume. Cooling of the foils is then achieved by a liquid helium bath (^4He or ^3He) via the copper tube, and subsequently via a superfluid ^4He film that can be added through the hollow NMR coil. The first tests of this proposed geometry are discussed and a status of the project is delivered.

  8. Recent progress in the development of a polarized proton target for reactions with radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; Bingham, C. R.; van den Brandt, B.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gómez del Campo, J.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

    2007-08-01

    Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with stable beams have provided important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms and hold great promise in the context of exotic nuclei. We report on the development of a polarized target based on plastic foils of 20-200 μm thickness to be used with radioactive ion beams. The operation of such a target requires a moderately high magnetic field and very low temperatures. The plastic foil is placed inside a chamber attached to the mixing chamber of a 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. Cooling of the foil is achieved via a superfluid film of 4He that can be supplied through two capillaries. The chamber has two thin, highly uniform silicon nitride windows. An NMR coil is attached to the target to monitor the polarization. Results of a first test to characterize the target system, using the elastic scattering of 38 MeV 12C by protons in inverse kinematics are presented.

  9. Thermal-electric coupled-field finite element modeling and experimental testing of high-temperature ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams.

    PubMed

    Manzolaro, M; Meneghetti, G; Andrighetto, A; Vivian, G; D'Agostini, F

    2016-02-01

    In isotope separation on line facilities the target system and the related ion source are two of the most critical components. In the context of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) project, a 40 MeV 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 10(13) fissions per second. The radioactive isotopes produced in this way are then directed to the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work both the surface ion source and the plasma ion source adopted for the SPES facility are presented and studied by means of numerical thermal-electric models. Then, numerical results are compared with temperature and electric potential difference measurements, and finally the main advantages of the proposed simulation approach are discussed. PMID:26932055

  10. Thermal-electric coupled-field finite element modeling and experimental testing of high-temperature ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Vivian, G.; D'Agostini, F.

    2016-02-01

    In isotope separation on line facilities the target system and the related ion source are two of the most critical components. In the context of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) project, a 40 MeV 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The radioactive isotopes produced in this way are then directed to the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work both the surface ion source and the plasma ion source adopted for the SPES facility are presented and studied by means of numerical thermal-electric models. Then, numerical results are compared with temperature and electric potential difference measurements, and finally the main advantages of the proposed simulation approach are discussed.

  11. Recoil in vacuum for Te ions: Calibration, models, and applications to radioactive-beam g-factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchbery, A. E.; Stone, N. J.

    2007-09-15

    In the light of new g factor results for the stable isotopes between {sup 122}Te and {sup 130}Te, the calibration and modeling of the recoil-in-vacuum (RIV) interaction for Te ions is reexamined, and the recent radioactive-beam g factor measurement on {sup 132}Te by the RIV technique is reevaluated. The implications for further RIV g-factor measurements in the {sup 132}Sn region are discussed.

  12. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-01

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution. PMID:26999358

  13. Isobar separation by time-of-flight mass spectrometry for low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Dickel, Timo; Czok, Ulrich; Geissel, Hans; Petrick, Martin; Reinheimer, Katrin; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Yavor, Mikhail I.

    2008-10-01

    A multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) system for low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities has been developed, which can be used for (i) isobar separation and (ii) direct mass measurements of very short-lived nuclei with half-lives of about 1 ms or longer, and (iii) for identification and diagnosis of the ion beam by mass spectrometry. The system has been designed and simulated, and individual subsystems have been built and characterized experimentally. An injection trap for cooling and bunching of the ion beam has been developed, and cooling times of less than one millisecond have been achieved. The performance of the MR-TOF-MS was characterized using the isobaric doublet of carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecular ions. A mass resolving power of 105 (FWHM) has been obtained even with an uncooled ion population. The separator capabilities of the MR-TOF-MS have been demonstrated by removing either carbon monoxide or nitrogen ions from the beam in a Bradbury-Nielsen Gate after a flight time of 320 μs. The separation power achieved is thus at least 7000 (FWHM) and increases for longer time-of-flight. An energy buncher stage has been designed that compresses the energy spread of the beam after the separation and facilitates efficient injection of the selected ions into an accumulation trap prior to transfer of the ions to experiments downstream of the MR-TOF-MS.

  14. Mapping 15O production rate for proton therapy verification

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian; Normandin, Marc D.; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This is a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of 15O production as an imaging target, through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were taken for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged in both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to the phantom and the in vivo data, yielding estimates of the 15O production and clearance rates, which was compared for live versus dead for the rabbit, and to Monte Carlo (MC) predictions. Results PET clearance rates agreed with the decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in three different phantom materials. In two oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of 15O production rates agreed with the MC prediction. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using the 15O decay constant, while the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the 15O production rates agreed within 2% (p> 0.5) between conditions. Conclusion We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of 15O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of 15O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, 15O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy. PMID:25817530

  15. Mapping {sup 15}O Production Rate for Proton Therapy Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian; Normandin, Marc D.; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 ({sup 15}O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials: Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. Results: PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of {sup 15}O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using {sup 15}O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the {sup 15}O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. Conclusions: We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, {sup 15}O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy.

  16. Ion microscopy of the thyroid gland: a method for imaging stable and radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.P.; Escaig, F.; Lange, F.; Galle, P.

    1986-07-01

    Analytical ion microscopy has been applied to the study of distribution of stable and radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland. Analytical images, each of them representing the distribution of one isotope of iodine, can easily be obtained in a few seconds from an Epon section with a resolution of 0.5 micron. In thyroids of normal rats, intrafollicular and intracytoplasmic stable 127I can be clearly distinguished. After thyreostimulin injection, a rapid and important redistribution of 127I is observed which reflects an intense cytoplasmic reabsorption of intrafollicular iodine. After injection of a long-lived isotope of iodine, 129I, the progressive incorporation of this isotope has been observed and the images of the natural iodine 129I have been compared to the images of 127I. An unusual iodine distribution has been observed in proliferating cells of an autonomous nodule. The very high sensitivity of this method makes possible the study of intracellular and extracellular stable iodine in the thyroid gland in a number of physiological and pathological conditions; its ability for isotopic analysis in microscopic volumes offers new possibilities for kinetic studies of iodine metabolism. However, in the present state of the art the specimen cannot be studied at the ultrastructural level as it is with other methods, and some difficulties remain in qualitative analysis such as the contamination of spectra with organic mass fragments which makes difficult the study of some elements such as sulfur. In addition, the matrix effect on ionization efficiency or on sputtering rate makes quantitative analysis difficult. In the future, image processing systems will be needed for a better quantitative interpretation.

  17. Astrophysically Important 19Ne States Studied with the 2H(18F,alpha+15O)n Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Brune, C.; Chae, K. Y.; Champagne, A. E.; Domizioli, Carlo P; Greife, U.; Heinen, Z.; Hornish, M.; Johnson, Micah; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Massey, T.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Thomas, J. S.; Smith, Nathan A; Smith, Michael Scott; Visser, D. W.; Voinov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear structure of {sup 19}Ne near the proton threshold is of interest for understanding the rates of proton-induced reactions on {sup 18}F in novae. Analogues for several states in the mirror nucleus {sup 19}F have not yet been identified in {sup 19}Ne indicating the level structure of {sup 19}Ne in this region is incomplete. The {sup 18}F(d;n){sup 19}Ne and {sup 18}F(d,p){sup 19}F reactions have been measured simultaneously at E{sub c.m.} = 14.9 MeV. The experiments were performed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by bombarding a 720-mg/cm{sub 2} CD{sub 2} target with a radioactive {sup 18}F beam. The {sup 19}Ne states of interest near the proton threshold decay by breakup into a and {sup 15}O particles. These decay products were detected in coincidence with position-sensitive E-{Delta}E silicon telescopes. The {alpha} and {sup 15}N particles from the break up of the mirror nucleus {sup 19}F were also measured with these detectors. Particle identification, coincidence, and Q-value requirements enable us to distinguish the reaction of interest from other reactions. The reconstruction of relative energy of the detected particles reveals the excited states of {sup 19}Ne and {sup 19}F which are populated. The neutron (proton) angular distributions for states in {sup 19}Ne ({sup 19}F) were extracted using momentum conservation. The observed states in {sup 19}Ne and {sup 19}F will be presented.

  18. Development of materials for the removal of metal ions from radioactive and non-radioactive waste streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Shameem

    Nuclear wastes that were generated during cold-war era from various nuclear weapon programs are presently stored in hundreds of tanks across the United States. The composition of these wastes is rather complex containing both radionuclides and heavy metals, such as 137Cs, 90Sr, Al, Pb, Cr, and Cd. In this study, chitosan based biosorbents were prepared to adsorb some of these metal ions. Chitosan is a partially acetylated glucosamine biopolymer encountered in the cell walls of fungi. In its natural form this material is soft and has a tendency to agglomerate or form gels. Various methods were used to modify chitosan to avoid these problems. Chitosan is generally available commercially in the form of flakes. For use in an adsorption system, chitosan was made in the form of beads to reduce the pressure drop in an adsorption column. In this research, spherical beads were prepared by mixing chitosan with perlite and then by dropwise addition of the slurry mixture into a NaOH precipitation bath. Beads were characterized using Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Tunneling Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The SEM, EDS, and TEM data indicated that the beads were porous in nature. The TGA data showed that bead contained about 32% chitosan. The surface area, pore volume, and porosity of the beads were determined from the BET surface area that was measured using N2 as adsorbate at 77K. Adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI), Cr(III), Cd(II), U(VI), Cu(II), from aqueous solutions of these metal ions were studied to evaluate the adsorption capacities of the beads for these metals ions. Equilibrium adsorption data of these metals on the beads were found to correlate well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. Chitosan coated perlite beads had negligible adsorption capacity for Sr(II) and Cs(I). It was found that Fullers earth

  19. Induced radioactivity in CU targets produced by high-energy heavy ions and the corresponding estimated photon dose rates.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Uwamino, Y; Sugita, H; Ito, S; Nakamura, T; Fukumura, A

    2004-01-01

    Irradiation experiments were performed at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) facility, National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The radioactive spallation products in a thick Cu target were obtained for Ar(230, 400 MeV per nucleon), Si(800 MeV per nucleon), Ne(100, 230, 400 MeV per nucleon), C(100, 230, 400 MeV per nucleon), He(100, 230 MeV per nucleon), p(100, 230 MeV) ions. The gamma-ray spectra from irradiated Cu samples inserted into the composite Cu target were measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. From the gamma-ray spectra, we obtained the spatial distribution of radioactive yields of spallation products of 40 nuclides in the Cu sample in the Cu target. From the spatial distribution of radioactive yields, we estimated the residual activity and photon dose induced in the Cu target. The residual activity and photon dose become larger with the increase in projectile energy per nucleon and the range of the projectile beam for the same projectile energy per nucleon. PMID:15280565

  20. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber used with TwinSol radioactive-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Becchetti, F. D.; Bradt, J.; Brodeur, M.; Carpenter, L.; Chajecki, Z.; Cortesi, M.; Fritsch, A.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; O'Malley, P.; Suzuki, D.

    2016-06-01

    The study of low-energy reactions with radioactive-ion beams has been greatly enhanced by the recent use of active-target detectors, which have high efficiency and low thresholds to detect low-energy charged-particle decays. Both of these features have been used in experiments with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber to study α -cluster structure in unstable nuclei and 3-body charged-particle decays after implantation. Predicted α -cluster structures in 14 C were probed using resonant α scattering and the nature of the 3- α breakup of the 02+ Hoyle state in 12 C after the beta decay of 12 N and 12 B was studied. These experiments used in-flight radioactive-ion beams that were produced using the dual superconducting solenoid magnets TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. Preliminary results from these experiments as well as the development of future radioactive beams to be used in conjunction with the PAT-TPC are presented.

  1. Validity of using a 3-dimensional PET scanner during inhalation of 15O-labeled oxygen for quantitative assessment of regional metabolic rate of oxygen in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Iguchi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Enmi, Junichiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Morita, Naomi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Casey, Michael E.; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-09-01

    Use of 15O labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative assessment of the regional metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in vivo, which is essential to understanding the pathological status of patients with cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. The method has, however, been challenging, when a 3D PET scanner is employed, largely attributed to the presence of gaseous radioactivity in the trachea and the inhalation system, which results in a large amount of scatter and random events in the PET assessment. The present study was intended to evaluate the adequacy of using a recently available commercial 3D PET scanner in the assessment of regional cerebral radioactivity distribution during an inhalation of 15O2. Systematic experiments were carried out on a brain phantom. Experiments were also performed on a healthy volunteer following a recently developed protocol for simultaneous assessment of CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow, which involves sequential administration of 15O2 and C15O2. A particular intention was to evaluate the adequacy of the scatter-correction procedures. The phantom experiment demonstrated that errors were within 3% at the practically maximum radioactivity in the face mask, with the greatest radioactivity in the lung. The volunteer experiment demonstrated that the counting rate was at peak during the 15O gas inhalation period, within a verified range. Tomographic images represented good quality over the entire FOV, including the lower part of the cerebral structures and the carotid artery regions. The scatter-correction procedures appeared to be important, particularly in the process to compensate for the scatter originating outside the FOV. Reconstructed images dramatically changed if the correction was carried out using inappropriate procedures. This study demonstrated that accurate reconstruction could be obtained when the scatter compensation was appropriately carried out. This study also suggested the

  2. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam 7Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, M.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Di Meo, P.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; Lay, J. A.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Pakou, A.; Parkar, V. V.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Sava, T.; Sgouros, O.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Zerva, K.

    2015-10-01

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam 7Be (Sα = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass (58Ni) and heavy (208Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×105 pps 7Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  3. Biodegradable radioactive implants for glaucoma filtering surgery produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmann, W.; Schubert, M.; Held, A.; Pichler, A.; Chill, A.; Kiermaier, S.; Schlösser, K.; Busch, H.; Schenk, K.; Streufert, D.; Lanzl, I.

    2007-04-01

    A biodegradable, β-emitting implant has been developed and successfully tested which prevents fresh intraocular pressure increase after glaucoma filtering surgery. Ion implantation has been used to load the polymeric implants with the β-emitter 32P. The influence of ion implantation and gamma sterilisation on degradation and 32P-fixation behavior has been studied by ion beam and chemical analysis. Irradiation effects due to the applied ion fluence (1015 ions/cm2) and gamma dose (25 kGy) are found to be tolerable.

  4. The use of aluminum nitride to improve Aluminum-26 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry measurements and production of Radioactive Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Meghan S.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo; Liu, Yuan; Mills, Gerald D.; Romero-Romero, Elisa; Stracener, Daniel W.

    2015-10-01

    We present results and discuss the use of aluminum nitride as a promising source material for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) science applications of 26Al isotopes. The measurement of 26Al in geological samples by AMS is typically conducted on Al2O3 targets. However, Al2O3 is not an ideal source material because it does not form a prolific beam of Al- required for measuring low-levels of 26Al. Multiple samples of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), aluminum nitride (AlN), mixed Al2O3-AlN as well as aluminum fluoride (AlF3) were tested and compared using the ion source test facility and the stable ion beam (SIB) injector platform at the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Negative ion currents of atomic and molecular aluminum were examined for each source material. It was found that pure AlN targets produced substantially higher beam currents than the other materials and that there was some dependence on the exposure of AlN to air. The applicability of using AlN as a source material for geological samples was explored by preparing quartz samples as Al2O3 and converting them to AlN using a carbothermal reduction technique, which involved reducing the Al2O3 with graphite powder at 1600 °C within a nitrogen atmosphere. The quartz material was successfully converted to AlN. Thus far, AlN proves to be a promising source material and could lead towards increasing the sensitivity of low-level 26Al AMS measurements. The potential of using AlN as a source material for nuclear physics is also very promising by placing 26AlN directly into a source to produce more intense radioactive beams of 26Al.

  5. Sub-barrier radioactive ion beam investigations using a new methodology and analysis for the stacked target technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisichella, M.; Shotter, A. C.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Marchetta, C.; Privitera, V.; Romano, L.; Ruiz, C.; Zadro, M.

    2015-12-01

    For low energy reaction studies involving radioactive ion beams, the experimental reaction yields are generally small due to the low intensity of the beams. For this reason, the stacked target technique has been often used to measure excitation functions. This technique offers considerable advantages since the reaction cross-section at several energies can be simultaneously measured. In a further effort to increase yields, thick targets are also employed. The main disadvantage of the method is the degradation of the beam quality as it passes through the stack due to the statistical nature of energy loss processes and any nonuniformity of the stacked targets. This degradation can lead to ambiguities of associating effective beam energies to reaction product yields for the targets within the stack and, as a consequence, to an error in the determination of the excitation function for the reaction under study. A thorough investigation of these ambiguities is reported, and a best practice procedure of analyzing data obtained using the stacked target technique with radioactive ion beams is recommended. Using this procedure a re-evaluation is reported of some previously published sub-barrier fusion data in order to demonstrate the possibility of misinterpretations of derived excitation functions. In addition, this best practice procedure has been used to evaluate, from a new data set, the sub-barrier fusion excitation function for the reaction 6Li+120Sn .

  6. Extending studies of the fusion of heavy nuclei to the neutron rich region using accelerated radioactive ion beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Dan

    2011-01-01

    One of the stated goals for proposed and existing facilities that produce and accelerate radioactive ion beams is to explore and achieve a new understanding of the reactions mechanisms leading to the synthesis of the heaviest nuclei. Nuclear synthesis of two large nuclei into a single entity is a complex multistep process. The beam intensities of radioactive ions accelerated at present day facilities are not sufficient to synthesize super heavy elements. However the study of the iso-spin dependence of nuclear synthesis and the many processes competing with it can be carried out at present day facilities. Of special interest are cases where the interacting nuclei and the synthesized product are extremely neutron-rich. The effects of neutron excess on the reaction processes leading to the formation of the synthesized nucleus that emerged in earlier studies are poorly understood and sometimes counter intuitive. Results from measurements performed at HRIBF, as well as our plans for future measurements and the equipment being prepared will be presented.

  7. Characteristics of the chemical forms of 11C, 13N, and 15O induced in air by the operation of a 100 MeV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Kikuchi, M; Izawa, S; Ikezawa, Y

    1995-01-01

    To characterize airborne radioactivity induced by the operation of high-energy accelerators, the fractions of aerosol and gaseous components, and the chemical forms of 11C, 13N, and 15O produced in the air of a target room of a 100 MeV electron linear accelerator were studied. Measurements of radioactivity using a particulate air sampling filter and a gas flow-through ionization chamber showed that more than 98% of 11C, 13N, and 15O were present as gaseous forms. Their chemical forms, detected by means of radio-gas chromatography, were 11C as CO2; 13N as N2 and NO; and 15O as O2 and NO. Machine operating conditions, which affect the compositions of the induced radionuclides and of their chemical forms, and the resulting effect on the estimation of internal doses are discussed. PMID:7989199

  8. Quantitative measurement of local cerebral blood flow in humans by positron computed tomography and /sup 15/O-water

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.C.; Carson, R.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Carson, J.; MacDonald, N.; Barrio, J.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1983-06-01

    A noninvasive method that employs /sup 15/O-water and positron-computed tomography (PCT) was used to measure quantitative local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) in man. /sup 15/O-Water (about 30-50 mCi) was introduced through a single-breath inhalation of /sup 15/O-carbon dioxide or through an intravenous bolus injection of /sup 15/O-water. A sequence of five 2-min PCT scans was initiated at the time of tracer administration. A series of 15-20 blood samples (1 ml each) was withdrawn from the radial artery of the subject over a period of 10 min. Oxygen-15 radioactivities in the blood samples were immediately counted in a well counter to give an input function, which together with the projection data collected by PCT were processed to provide images of 1CBF and local water distribution volume. The method was found to be convenient to use and gave good-quality images of 1CBF. Quantitative values of 1CBF in images were 59 +/- 11 and 20 +/- 4 ml/min/100 g for gray and white matter, respectively, with a gray-to-white matter ratio of 2.93 and a global flow value of 42 +/- 8 ml/min/100 g. Distribution volume of water was 0.85 +/- 0.03, 0.76 +/- 0.03, and 0.81 +/- 0.02 ml/g respectively, for gray matter, white matter, and whole brain.

  9. Soft-Landing Ion Deposition of Isolated Radioactive Probe Atoms on Surfaces: A Novel Method

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, C.R.; Rosu, M.F.; Pleiter, F.; Niesen, L.

    1997-05-01

    We present a method to deposit a wide range of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces, without introducing lattice damage or contaminating the surface with other elements or isotopes. In this method, the probe atoms are mass separated using an isotope separator, decelerated to 5eV, and directly deposited on the surface. The method allows for performing hyperfine interactions experiments using trace amounts of radioactive probes located at surfaces and interfaces. The characteristics of the deposition method were studied by performing perturbed angular correlation experiments on the system In on Cu(17,1,1). The results are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of the deposition process. The potential of this novel technique is briefly discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Modeling [15O] oxygen tracer data for estimating oxygen consumption

    PubMed Central

    Deussen, Andreas; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The most direct measure of oxidative tissue metabolism is the conversion rate of oxygen to water via mitochondrial respiration. To calculate oxygen consumption from the analysis of tissue residue curves or outflow dilution curves after injection of labeled oxygen one needs realistic mathematical models that account for convection, diffusion, and transformation in the tissue. A linear, three-region, axially distributed model accounts for intravascular convection, penetration of capillary and parenchymal cell barriers (with the use of appropriate binding spaces to account for oxygen binding to hemoglobin and myoglobin), the metabolism to [15O]water in parenchymal cells, and [15O]water transport into the venous effluent. Model solutions fit residue and outflow dilution data obtained in an isolated, red blood cell-perfused rabbit heart preparation and give estimates of the rate of oxygen consumption similar to those obtained experimentally from the flow times the arteriovenous differences in oxygen contents. The proposed application is for the assessment of regional oxidative metabolism in vivo from tissue 15O-residue curves obtained by positron emission tomography. PMID:8780210

  11. Reaction dynamics induced by the radioactive ion beam {sup 7}Be on medium-mass and heavy targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzocco, M. Stefanini, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Lay, J. A.; Molini, P.; Soramel, F.; Boiano, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Di Meo, P.; Boiano, C.; La Commara, M.; Sandoli, M.; Silvestri, R.; Manea, C.; Nicoletto, M.; Acosta, L.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Glodariu, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    We studied the reaction dynamics induced at Coulomb barrier energies by the weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beam {sup 7}Be (S{sub α} = 1.586 MeV) on medium-mass ({sup 58}Ni) and heavy ({sup 208}Pb) targets. The experiments were performed at INFN-LNL (Italy), where a 2-3×10{sup 5} pps {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced with the RIB in-flight facility EXOTIC. Charged reaction products were detected by means of high-granularity silicon detectors in rather wide angular ranges. The contribution presents an up-to-date status of the data analysis and theoretical interpretation for both systems.

  12. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  13. Structure effects on reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pietro, A. Di Figuera, P.; Scuderi, V.; Amorini, F.; Angulo, C.; Cardella, G.; Casarejos, E.; Cherubini, S.; Lu, J.; Marchetta, C.; Musumarra, A.; Papa, M.; Pellegriti, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Raabe, R.; Rizzo, F.; Sida, J. L.; Tian, W.

    2006-08-15

    The present paper concerns the study of reactions induced by radioactive beams of halo and weakly bound nuclei at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier. The results obtained for the reaction induced by the halo nucleus {sup 6}He on {sup 64}Zn have been compared with the results for the reaction induced by {sup 4}He on the same target. The results of the reaction induced by the weakly bound unstable {sup 13}N on the weakly bound {sup 9}Be have been compared with those for the reaction {sup 10}B + {sup 12}C.

  14. Hydrogels Containing Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Toward Removal of Radioactive Cesium Ions.

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Yuichiro; Zakaria, Mohamed B; Torad, Nagy L; Nakato, Teruyuki; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Malgras, Victor; Yamauchil, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated the practical application of Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles toward environmental clean-up of radionuclide 173Cs. Herein, we prepared a large amount of PB nanoparticles by mixing both iron(III) chloride and sodium ferrocyanide hydrate as starting precursors. The obtained PB nanoparticles show a high surface area (440 m2. g-1) and consequently an excellent uptake ability of Cs ions from aqueous solutions. The uptake ability of Cs ions into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPA) hydrogel is drastically increased up to 156.7 m2. g-1 after incorporating our PB nanoparticles, compared to 30.2 m2 . g-1 after using commercially available PB. Thus, our PB-containing PNIPA hydrogel can be considered as an excellent candidate for the removal of Cs ions from aqueous solutions, which will be useful for the remediation of the nuclear waste. PMID:27451787

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Progress in laser spectroscopy at radioactive ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K. T.

    2010-11-01

    In the last decade there has been a renaissance in laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities. This has included the introduction of ion traps and the use of laser ion sources to study the hyperfine structure of exotic nuclei far from stability and produce selective enhancement of isomeric beams. In-source spectroscopy has allowed the study of rare isotopes with yields as low as 0.1 atoms per second. In the case of high-resolution spectroscopy, cooling and trapping the ions has dramatically improved the sensitivity. Some elements that were previously inaccessible to laser spectroscopy are now available for study through the technique of in-trap optical pumping. This paper reviews the field of laser spectroscopy at on-line facilities, with an emphasis on new techniques. A summary of experimental data is presented.

  16. Extrapolation of astrophysical S factors for the reaction {sup 14}N((p, {gamma}) {sup 15}O to near-zero energies

    SciTech Connect

    Artemov, S. V.; Igamov, S. B. Tursunmakhatov, Q. I.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-03-15

    The astrophysical S factors for the radiative-capture reaction {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O in the region of ultralow energies were calculated on the basis of the R-matrix approach. The values of the radiative and protonic widths were fitted to new experimental data. The contribution of direct radiative capture to bound states of the {sup 15}O nucleus was determined with the aid of asymptotic normalization coefficients, whose values were refined in the present study on the basis of the results obtained from an analysis of the reaction {sup 14}N({sup 3}He, d){sup 15}O at three different energies of incident helium ions. A value of S(0) = 1.79 {+-} 0.31 keV b was obtained for the total astrophysical S factor, and the reaction rate was determined for the process {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O.

  17. Radioactive ions for solid-state investigations at magnetic surfaces and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschat, H. H.; Potzger, K.; Weber, A.; Zeitz, W.-D.

    Hyperfine interactions observed at isomeric states of radioactive probe nuclei are used as a tool for solid-state investigations. This method is sensitive to atomic-scale properties. In recent years surface and interface investigations using radioactive probes delivered many results which can hardly be achieved by any other method. Several groups, e.g., from Konstanz, Leuven, Groningen, Aarhus, Uppsala, Tel Aviv, Pennsylvania, contributed to this field. Our group studies magnetic properties at surfaces and interfaces performing perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN). We take advantage of the enhanced variety of PAC probes delivered by the on-line mass separator ISOLDE. First, we report on measurements of magnetic hyperfine fields ( Bhf) at Se adatoms on a ferromagnetic substrate using 77Se as a PAC probe. The investigation of induced magnetic interactions in nonmagnetic materials is a further subject of our studies. Here the nonmagnetic 4d element Pd is investigated, when it is in contact with ferromagnetic nickel. An outlook will be given on studies to be done in the future. The experiments were performed at the HMI, Berlin, and at CERN, Geneva.

  18. The Research Program at RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)-III

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Barioni, A.; Morais, M. C.; Pampa Condori, R.; Assuncao, M.; Moro, A. M.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Arazi, A.

    2010-04-30

    A part of the research program developed in the RIBRAS facility over the last four years is presented. Experiments using radioactive secondary beams of light exotic nuclei such as {sup 6}He, {sup 7}Be, {sup 8}Li on several targets have been performed. Elastic angular distributions have been analysed by the Optical Model and four body Continuous Discretized Coupled Channels Calculations (4b-CDCC) and the total reaction cross sections have been obtained. A comparison between the reaction cross sections of {sup 6}He and other stable projectiles with medium-heavy targets was performed. Measurements of the proton transfer reaction {sup 12}C({sup 8}Li,{sup 9}Be){sup 11}B are also presented.

  19. Transportation of a radioactive ion beam for precise laser-trapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Francium is the heaviest species among the alkali elements. Due to its properties, francium is said to be of advantage in measurements of tiny observations, such as atomic parity violation and electric dipole moment. Before executing experiments with francium, it must be produced artificially because it is one of the most unstable elements. We produced francium with the nuclear fusion reaction of an oxygen beam and gold target, ionized the produced francium through a thermal ionization process, and extracted the ion with electrostatic fields. However, the thermal ionization process is known to ionize not only an objective atom but also other atomic species. Therefore, a Wien filter was installed to analyze the composition of the ion beam and purify the beam. This allowed us to improve the beam purity from ˜10-6 to ˜10-3.

  20. Transportation of a radioactive ion beam for precise laser-trapping experiments.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Arikawa, H; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kato, K; Köhler, L; Sakamoto, K; Uchiyama, A; Sakemi, Y

    2016-02-01

    Francium is the heaviest species among the alkali elements. Due to its properties, francium is said to be of advantage in measurements of tiny observations, such as atomic parity violation and electric dipole moment. Before executing experiments with francium, it must be produced artificially because it is one of the most unstable elements. We produced francium with the nuclear fusion reaction of an oxygen beam and gold target, ionized the produced francium through a thermal ionization process, and extracted the ion with electrostatic fields. However, the thermal ionization process is known to ionize not only an objective atom but also other atomic species. Therefore, a Wien filter was installed to analyze the composition of the ion beam and purify the beam. This allowed us to improve the beam purity from ∼10(-6) to ∼10(-3). PMID:26932093

  1. Characterization of radioactive ion exchange media waste generated at Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    Runion, T.C.; Holzworth, R.E.; Ogle, R.E.; Burton, H.M.; Bixby, W.W.

    1981-10-01

    The March 1979 accident at General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation (GPUNC) Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station Unit 2 (TMI-2), resulted in the transfer of more than 1100 m/sup 3/ of contaminated water to the auxiliary and fuel handling building. The principal sources of the water were the makeup and letdown purification system and the containment building sump. The contaminated water was processed through an ion exchange system designated as EPICOR II. The EPICOR-II System is a three-stage process. The contaminated water passes through a first stage of ion exchange media, designated as prefilters, and then through the second and third stages, designated as demineralizers. The majority of the activity was deposited in the first-stage prefilters, which have a maximum administrative loading limit of 1300 curies. The predominant radionuclides present in the prefilters are cesium and strontium.

  2. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides by Multi-Functional Microcapsules Enclosing Inorganic Ion-Exchangers and Organic Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Mimura, H.; Akiba, K.; Onodera, Y.

    2002-02-26

    The microcapsules enclosing two kinds of functional materials, inorganic ion-exchangers and organic extractants, were prepared by taking advantage of the high immobilization ability of alginate gel polymer. The fine powders of inorganic ion-exchanger and oil drops of extractant were kneaded with sodium alginate (NaALG) solution and the kneaded sol readily gelled in a salt solution of CaCl2, BaCl2 or HCl to form spherical gel particles. The uptake properties of various nuclides, 137Cs, 85Sr, 60Co, 88Y, 152Eu and 241Am, for thirty-four specimens of microcapsules in the presence of 10-1-10-4 M HNO3 were evaluated by the batch method. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Cs+ above 103 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules enclosing CuFC or AMP. The Kd of Sr2+ around 102 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules containing clinoptilolite, antimonic acid, zeolite A, zeolite X or titanic acid. The microcapsules enclosing DEHPA exhibited relatively large Kd values of trivalent metal ions above 103 cm3/g; for example, the Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for a favorable microcapsule (CuFC/clinoptilolite/DEHPA/CaALG) were 1.1x104, 7.5x10, 1.1x10, 1.0x104, 1.4x104, 3.4x103 cm3/g, respectively. The uptake rates of Cs+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for this microcapsule were rather fast; the uptake percentage above 90% was obtained after 19 h-shaking and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. The AMP/CaALG exhibited high uptake ability for Cs+ even after irradiation of 188 kGy, and DEHPA/CaALG microcapsule had similar Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ ions before and after irradiation. The microcapsules with various shapes such as spherical, columnar, fibrous and filmy forms were easily prepared by changing the way of dipping kneaded sol into gelling salt solution. The microcapsules enclosing inorganic ion-exchangers and extractants have a potential possibility for the simultaneous removal of various radioactive nuclides from waste solutions.

  3. Insight into the Atomic Structure of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material in the First Cycle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xuejie; Yu, Xiqian; Lin, Mingxiang; Ben, Liubin; Sun, Yang; Wang, Hao; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zhao, Haofei; et al

    2014-12-22

    Application of high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material is the closest and the most realistic approach to meeting the midterm goal of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). However, this application has been hampered by long-standing issues, such as capacity degradation and poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Although it is well-known that the structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 into which Li ions are reversibly intercalated plays a critical role in the above issues, performance degradation related to structural changes, particularly in the first cycle, are not fully understood. Here, we report detailed investigations ofmore » local atomic-level and average structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 during first cycle (3.5–4.9 V) at room temperature. We observed two types of local atomic-level migration of transition metals (TM) ions in the cathode of a well-prepared LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4//Li half-cell during first charge via an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Surface regions (~2 nm) of the cycled LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 particles show migration of TM ions into tetrahedral Li sites to form a Mn3O4-like structure. However, subsurface regions of the cycled particles exhibit migration of TM ions into empty octahedral sites to form a rocksalt-like structure. The migration of these TM ions are closely related to dissolution of Ni/Mn ions and building-up of charge transfer impedance, which contribute significantly to the capacity degradation and the poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Accordingly, we provide suggestions of effective stabilization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 structure to obtain better electrochemical performance.« less

  4. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  5. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  6. Radioactive Spent Ion-Exchange Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP - Early Experience - 12200

    SciTech Connect

    Braet, Johan; Charpentier, David; Centner, Baudouin; Vanderperre, Serge

    2012-07-01

    Spent ion-exchange resins are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during their conditioning to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. In Belgium, for economical reasons, the Volume Reduction Factor is a key criterion. After Tractebel Engineering performed a technical and economical comparison of the industrially available systems, Tihange NPP decided to install a spent ion-exchange resins hot supercompaction unit with Tractebel Engineering in the role of architect-engineer. The treatment and conditioning unit processes the spent ion-exchange resins through the following steps: dewatering of the resins, drying the resins under deep vacuum, discharging the dried resins into compactable drums, super-compacting the drums to generate pellets, grouting the pellets into standard 400 litres waste drums (overpacks) licensed for final disposal in the near-surface repository in Belgium. Several developments were required to adapt the reference process and equipment to PWR spent ion-exchange bead resins and Belgian radioactive waste acceptance criteria. In order to avoid cracks on the compacted drum, and external surface contamination from resin leaks, some improvements were achieved to minimize spring-back as well as the risk of cracking the drum wall. Placing the compactable drum inside a second, slightly larger drum, guarantees clean and reproducible pellets. Currently the commissioning phase is on-going. Numerous process validation tests have been completed. An acceptance file was transmitted to the Belgian Waste Management Authority recently. This will be followed by demonstration tests necessary to obtain their final acceptance of the installation. More than 3 800 drums of mixed powdered and bead resins have been processed by the reference Hot Compaction process, achieving a Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) of 2.5. The equipment has been proven to be a reliable technology with low operation and maintenance

  7. Radioactive ion beams produced by neutron-induced fission at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isolde Collaboration; Catherall, R.; Lettry, J.; Gilardoni, S.; Köster, U.

    2003-05-01

    The production rates of neutron-rich fission products for the next-generation radioactive beam facility EURISOL [EU-RTD Project EURISOL (HPRI-CT-1999-50001)] are mainly limited by the maximum amount of power deposited by protons in the target. An alternative approach is to use neutron beams to induce fission in actinide targets. This has the advantage of reducing: the energy deposited by the proton beam in the target; contamination from neutron-deficient isobars that would be produced by spallation; and mechanical stress on the target. At ISOLDE CERN [E. Kugler, Hyperfine Interact. 129 (2000) 23], tests have been made on standard ISOLDE actinide targets using fast-neutron bunches produced by bombarding thick, high-/Z metal converters with 1 and 1.4 GeV proton pulses. This paper reviews the first applications of converters used at ISOLDE. It highlights the different geometries and the techniques used to compare fission yields produced by the proton beam directly on the target with neutron-induced fission. Results from the six targets already tested, namely UC2/graphite and ThO2 targets with tungsten and tantalum converters, are presented. To gain further knowledge for the design of a dedicated target as required by the TARGISOL project [EU-RTD Project TARGISOL (HPRI-CT-2001-50033)], the results are compared to simulations, using the MARS [N.V. Mokhov, S.I. Striganov, A. Van Ginneken, S.G. Mashnik, A.J. Sierk, J. Ranft, MARS code developments, in: 4th Workshop on Simulating Accelerator Radiation Environments, SARE-4, Knoxville, USA, 14-15.9.1998, FERMILAB-PUB-98-379, nucl-th/9812038; N.V. Mokhov, The Mars Code System User's Guide, Fermilab-FN-628, 1995; N.V. Mokhov, MARS Code Developments, Benchmarking and Applications, Fermilab-Conf-00-066, 2000; O.E. Krivosheev, N.V. Mokhov, A New MARS and its Applications, Fermilab-Conf-98/43, 1998] code interfaced with MCNP [J.S. Hendrics, MCNP4C LANL Memo X-5; JSH-2000-3; J.F. Briemesteir (Ed.), MCNP - A General Montecarlo N

  8. Copper Ferrocyanide Functionalized Core-Shell Magnetic Silica Composites for the Selective Removal of Cesium Ions from Radioactive Liquid Waste.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Kyu; Yang, Da Som; Oh, Wonzin; Choi, Sang-June

    2016-06-01

    The copper ferrocyanide functionalized core-shell magnetic silica composite (mag@silica-CuFC) was prepared and was found to be easily separated from aqueous solutions by using magnetic field. The synthesized mag@silica-CuFC composite has a high sorption ability of Cs owing to its strong affinity for Cs as well as the high surface area of the supports. Cs sorption on the mag@silica-CuFC composite quickly reached the sorption equilibrium after 2 h of contact time. The effect of the presence of salts with a high concentration of up to 3.5 wt% on the efficiency of Cs sorption onto the composites was also studied. The maximum sorption ability was found to be maintained in the presence of up to 3.5 wt% of NaCl in the solution. Considering these results, the mag@silica-CuFC composite has great potential for use as an effective sorbent for the selective removal of radioactive Cs ions. PMID:27427694

  9. Effect of temperature on the durability of class C fly ash belite cement in simulated radioactive liquid waste: synergy of chloride and sulphate ions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-06-15

    The durability of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) in simulated radioactive liquid waste (SRLW) rich in a mixed sodium chloride and sulphate solution is presented here. The effect of the temperature and potential synergic effect of chloride and sulfate ions are discussed. This study has been carried out according to the Koch-Steinegger test, at the temperature of 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C during a period of 180 days. The durability has been evaluated by the changes of the flexural strength of mortar, fabricated with this cement, immersed in a simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulfate (0.5M), chloride (0.5M) and sodium (1.5M) ions--catalogued like severely aggressive for the traditional Portland cement--and demineralised water, which was used as reference. The reaction mechanism of sulphate, chloride and sodium ions with the mortar was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the chloride binding and formation of Friedel's salt was inhibited by the presence of sulphate. Sulphate ion reacts preferentially with the calcium aluminate hydrates forming non-expansive ettringite which precipitated inside the pores; the microstructure was refined and the mechanical properties enhanced. This process was faster and more marked at 40 degrees C. PMID:19056176

  10. Investigation of the CNO-break-out reaction: 15O(2p,γ)17Ne by the Coulomb dissociation of 17Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganiec, Justyna; Aumann, Thomas; Heil, Michael; Plag, Ralf; Warners, Felix; LAND-RB Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    By the Coulomb dissociation of 17Ne, the time-reversed reaction 15O(2p, γ)17Ne has been investigated. This reaction might play an important role in the rp process, as a bypass of the 15O waiting point. The secondary 17Ne ion beam of 500 AMeV has been dissociated on a Pb target, and the reaction products have been recorded with the LAND-R3B experimental setup (GSI). This experiment allows to determine the Coulomb dissociation cross section σCoul, which can be converted into a photo-absorption cross section σphoto, and a radiative-capture cross section σcap for the 15O(2p,γ) 17Ne reaction. Additionally, informations about the structure of the 17Ne nucleus, a possible two-proton halo, may be obtained. The analysis is still in progress.

  11. Intersubject variability and reproducibility of 15O PET studies.

    PubMed

    Coles, Jonathan P; Fryer, Tim D; Bradley, Peter G; Nortje, Jurgens; Smielewski, Peter; Rice, Kenneth; Clark, John C; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen-15 positron emission tomography (15O PET) can provide important data regarding patients with head injury. We provide reference data on intersubject variability and reproducibility of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolism (CMRO2) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in patients and healthy controls, and explored alternative ways of assessing reproducibility within the context of a single PET study. In addition, we used independent measurements of CBF and CMRO2 to investigate the effect of mathematical correlation on the relationship between flow and metabolism. In patients, intersubject coefficients of variation (CoV) for CBF, CMRO2 and OEF were larger than in controls (32.9%+/-2.2%, 23.2%+/-2.0% and 22.5%+/-3.4% versus 13.5%+/-1.4%, 12.8%+/-1.1% and 7.3%+/-1.2%), while CoV for CBV were lower (15.2%+/-2.1% versus 22.5%+/-2.8%) (P<0.001). The CoV for the test-retest reproducibility of CBF, CBV, CMRO2 and OEF in patients were 2.1%+/-1.5%, 3.8%+/-3.0%, 3.7%+/-3.0% and 4.6%+/-3.5%, respectively. These were much lower than the intersubject CoV figures, and were similar to alternative measures of reproducibility obtained by fractionating data from a single study. The physiological relationship between flow and metabolism was preserved even when mathematically independent measures were used for analysis. These data provide a context for the design and interpretation of interventional PET studies. While ideally each centre should develop its own bank of such data, the figures provided will allow initial generic approximations of sample size for such studies. PMID:15988475

  12. An Artificial SEI Enables the Use of A LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 5 V Cathode with Conventional Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Juchuan ORNL; Baggetto, Loic ORNL; Martha, Surendra K ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M ORNL; Nanda, Jagjit ORNL; Liang, Chengdu ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J ORNL

    2013-01-01

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel is considered one of the most promising cathodes for advanced lithium ion batteries. However, the operation potential of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, ~4.75 V, is beyond the high voltage limit of the state-of-art electrolyte, ~4.3 V. Here, using thin films of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 as a model material, we show evidence that an artificial solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) enables the use of this 5 V cathode with conventional carbonate electrolytes. A thin coating of Lipon (lithium phosphorus oxynitride) as an artificial SEI on LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 could remedy the decomposition of the electrolyte. The thickness of the Lipon artificial SEI is optimized by balancing the protection and additional resistance. The strategy of artificial SEI on cathodes is expected to enable the wide application of other high voltage cathodes for lithium ion batteries.

  13. Trojan Horse measurement of the 18F(p,α)15O astrophysical S(E)-factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Roeder, B. T.; McCleskey, M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Spartá, R.

    2016-02-01

    Crucial information on novae nucleosynthesis is linked to the abundance of 18F , which, due to great improvements in gamma-ray astronomy, can be detected in explosive environments. Therefore, the reaction network producing and destroying this radioactive isotope has been extensively studied in the last years. Among those reactions, the 18F(p,α)15O cross section has been measured by means of several dedicated experiments, both using direct and indirect methods. The presence of resonances in the energy region of astrophysical interest has been reported by many authors. In the present work a report on a recent experiment performed via the Trojan Horse Method (THM) is presented and the results are given and compared with the ones known in the literature, both direct and indirect. Data arising from THM measurements are then averaged and the reaction rate calculated in the novae energy range.

  14. Direct measurement of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction at nova temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, C. E.; Laird, A. M.; Bentley, M. A.; Diget, C. A.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Davinson, T.; Salter, P.; Buchman, L.; Davids, B.; Hager, U.; Howell, D.; Martin, L.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Vockenhuber, C.; Walden, P.

    2011-04-15

    The {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction rate is crucial for understanding the final abundance of {sup 18}F predicted by nova models. The {gamma}-ray emission in the first few hours after a nova outburst is expected to be dominated by 511 keV annihilation photons from the decay of {sup 18}F, and so understanding its production can provide important constraints on the conditions during the outburst when compared with observations. Results are presented from the lowest-energy direct measurement to date, performed at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator radioactive beam facility at the TRIUMF laboratory, Canada. Cross section measurements at center-of-mass energies of 250, 330, 453, and 673 keV are obtained and the results compared to previous data and R-matrix calculations. The implications for the overall reaction rate in the context of nova explosions have been discussed.

  15. Evaporation Residue Yields in Reactions of Heavy Neutron-Rich Radioactive Ion Beams with 64Ni and 96Zr Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Dan; Liang, J Felix; Gross, Carl J; Varner Jr, Robert L; Beene, James R; Stracener, Daniel W; Mueller, Paul Edward; Kolata, Jim J; Roberts, Amy; Loveland, Walter; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Prisbrey, Landon; Sprunger, Peter H; Grzywacz-Jones, Kate L; Caraley, Anne L

    2009-01-01

    As hindrance sets in for the fusion of heavier systems, the effect of large neutron excess in the colliding nuclei on their probability to fuse is still an open question. The detection of evaporation residues (ERs), however, provides indisputable evidence for the fusion (complete and incomplete) in the reaction. We therefore devised a system with which we could measure ERs using low intensity neutron-rich radioactive ion beams with an efficiency close to 100%. We report on measurements of the production of ERs in collisions of {sup 132,134}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 134}Sb ion beams with medium mass, neutron-rich targets. The data taken with {sup 132,134}Sn bombarding a {sup 64}Ni target are compared to available data (ERs and fusion) taken with stable Sn isotopes. Preliminary data on the fusion of {sup 132}Sn with {sup 96}Zr target are also presented.

  16. Evaporation residue yields in reactions of heavy neutron-rich radioactive ion beams with {sup 64}Ni and {sup 96}Zr targets

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.; Liang, J. F.; Gross, C. J.; Varner, R. L.; Beene, J. R.; Stracener, D. W.; Mueller, P. E.; Kolata, J. J.; Roberts, A.; Loveland, W.; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Prisbrey, L.; Sprunger, P.; Jones, K. L.; Caraley, A. L.

    2009-03-04

    As hindrance sets in for the fusion of heavier systems, the effect of large neutron excess in the colliding nuclei on their probability to fuse is still an open question. The detection of evaporation residues (ERs), however, provides indisputable evidence for the fusion (complete and incomplete) in the reaction. We therefore devised a system with which we could measure ERs using low intensity neutron-rich radioactive ion beams with an efficiency close to 100%. We report on measurements of the production of ERs in collisions of {sup 132,134}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 134}Sb ion beams with medium mass, neutron-rich targets. The data taken with {sup 132,134}Sn bombarding a {sup 64}Ni target are compared to available data (ERs and fusion) taken with stable Sn isotopes. Preliminary data on the fusion of {sup 132}Sn with {sup 96}Zr target are also presented.

  17. Remote processing, delivery and injection of H2[15O] produced from a N2/H2 gas target using a simple and compact apparatus.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, R A; Alexoff, D L; Schlyer, D J; Wolf, A P

    1994-12-01

    We report here a simple apparatus for remote trapping and processing of H2[15O] produced from the N2/H2 target. The system performs a three step operation for H2[15O] delivery at the PET imaging facility which includes the following: (i) collecting the radiotracer in sterile water; (ii) adjusting preparation pH through removal of radiolytically produced ammonia, while at the same time adjusting solution isotonicity; and (iii) delivery of the radiotracer preparation to the injection syringe in a sterile and pyrogen-free form suitable for human studies. The processing apparatus is simple, can be remotely operated and fits inside a Capintec Dose Monitoring Chamber for direct measurement of accumulated radioactivity. Using this system, 300 mCi of H2[15O] (15 microA of 8 MeV D+ on target) is transferred from target through 120 m x 3.18 mm o.d. Impolene tubing to yield 100 mCi of H2[15O] which is isotonic, neutral and suitable for human studies. A remote hydraulically driven system for i.v. injection of the H2[15O] is also described. The device allows for direct measurement of syringe dose while filling, and for easy, as well as safe transport of the injection syringe assembly to the patient's bedside via a shielded delivery cart. This cart houses a hydraulic piston that allows the physician to "manually" inject the radiotracer without directly handling the syringe. PMID:7894394

  18. X-ray production with heavy post-accelerated radioactive-ion beams in the lead region of interest for Coulomb-excitation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, N.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Butler, P. A.; Gaffney, L. P.; Grahn, T.; Huyse, M.; Kesteloot, N.; Pakarinen, J.; Petts, A.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.

    2015-10-01

    Characteristic K X-rays have been observed in Coulomb-excitation experiments with heavy radioactive-ion beams in the lead region (Z = 82), produced at the REX-ISOLDE facility, and were used to identify the decay of strongly converted transitions as well as monopole 02+ → 01+ transitions. Different targets were used, and the X-rays were detected by the Miniball γ-ray spectrometer surrounding the target position. A stable mercury isotope, as well as neutron-deficient mercury, lead, polonium, and radon isotopes were studied, and a detailed description of the analysis using the radioactive 182,184,186,188Hg isotopes is presented. Apart from strongly converted transitions originating from the decay of excited states, the heavy-ion induced K-vacancy creation process has been identified as an extra source for K X-ray production. Isolating the atomic component of the observed K X-rays is essential for a correct analysis of the Coulomb-excitation experiment. Cross sections for the atomic reaction have been estimated and are compared to a theoretical approach.

  19. Efficient removal of radioactive iodide ions from water by three-dimensional Ag2O-Ag/TiO2 composites under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuaishuai; Wang, Na; Zhang, Yuchang; Li, Yaru; Han, Zhuo; Na, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional Ag2O and Ag co-loaded TiO2 (3D Ag2O-Ag/TiO2) composites have been synthesized through a facile method, characterized using SEM, EDX, TEM, XRD, XPS, UV-vis DRS, BET techniques, and applied to remove radioactive iodide ions (I(-)). The photocatalytic adsorption capacity (207.6 mg/g) of the 3D Ag2O-Ag/TiO2 spheres under visible light is four times higher than that in the dark, which is barely affected by other ions, even in simulated salt lake water where the concentration of Cl(-) is up to 590 times that of I(-). The capability of the composites to remove even trace amounts of I(-) from different types of water, e.g., deionized or salt lake water, is demonstrated. The composites also feature good reusability, as they were separated after photocatalytic adsorption and still performed well after a simple regeneration. Furthermore, a mechanism explaining the highly efficient removal of radioactive I(-) has been proposed according to characterization analyses of the composites after adsorption and subsequently been verified by adsorption and desorption experiments. The proposed cooperative effects mechanism considers the interplay of three different phenomena, namely, the adsorption performance of Ag2O for I(-), the photocatalytic ability of Ag/TiO2 for oxidation of I(-), and the readsorption performance of AgI for I2. PMID:25463231

  20. Phase transition kinetics of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 analyzed by temperature-controlled operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ikuma; Arai, Hajime; Murayama, Haruno; Sato, Kenji; Komatsu, Hideyuki; Tanida, Hajime; Koyama, Yukinori; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2016-01-21

    LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is a promising positive electrode material for lithium ion batteries because it shows a high potential of 4.7 V vs. Li/Li(+). Its charge-discharge reaction includes two consecutive phase transitions between LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (Li1) ↔ Li0.5Ni0.5Mn1.5O4 (Li0.5) and Li0.5 ↔ Ni0.5Mn1.5O4 (Li0) and the complex transition kinetics that governs the rate capability of LNMO can hardly be analyzed by simple electrochemical techniques. Herein, we apply temperature-controlled operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy to directly capture the reacting phases from -20 °C to 40 °C under potential step (chronoamperometric) conditions and evaluate the phase transition kinetics using the apparent first-order rate constants at various temperatures. The constant for the Li1 ↔ Li0.5 transition (process 1) is larger than that for the Li0.5 ↔ Li0 transition (process 2) at all the measured temperatures, and the corresponding activation energies are 29 and 46 kJ mol(-1) for processes 1 and 2, respectively. The results obtained are discussed to elucidate the limiting factor in this system as well as in other electrode systems. PMID:26686382

  1. Production of multicharged radioactive ion beams: New results for the 1+-->n+ method with the MINIMAFIOS and SARA-CAPRICE electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, T.; Bruandet, J.-F.; Chauvin, N.; Curdy, J.-C.; Fruneau, M.; Geller, R.; Gimond, G.; Sole, P.; Vieux-Rochas, J.-L.; Gaubert, G.; Maunoury, L.; Sortais, P.; Villari, A. C. C.

    1998-02-01

    The backward and forward injection of a 1+ ion beam in a MINIMAFIOS type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) have given good results for the 1+→n+ method. Due to the technological simplicity of the forward injection, additional experiments have been performed with this configuration. Different primary sources (1+) have been used for the injection (2.45 GHz ECRIS, hollow cathode source, simplified 10 GHz NANOGAN type ECRIS), an increase of the performances has already been obtained (Zn, Kr, Ar), and a measurement of the absolute efficiency with the NANOGAN type-MINIMAFIOS association is performed. Due to the high performance of the 10 GHz CAPRICE source used as a highly charged ion injector in the first cyclotron of SARA (Système Accélérateur Rhône-Alpes), it has been tested as a different n+ source for the 1+→n+ method. In this purpose, a low energy spread-low emittance thermoionization Rb ion source has been used as 1+ injector. A standard operation of the SARA-CAPRICE source has been kept with respect to the microwave coupling. The spectra of the Rbn+ ions extracted are compared when using N2 and O2 as support gases. The highest efficiency is obtained for the Rb13+.

  2. Production of multicharged radioactive ion beams: New results for the 1+-->n+ method with the MINIMAFIOS and SARA-CAPRICE electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, T.; Bruandet, J.-F.; Chauvin, N.; Curdy, J.-C.; Fruneau, M.; Geller, R.; Gimond, G.; Sole, P.; Vieux-Rochas, J.-L.; Gaubert, G.; Maunoury, L.; Sortais, P.; Villari, A. C. C.

    1998-03-01

    The backward and forward injection of a 1+ ion beam in a MINIMAFIOS type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) have given good results for the 1+→n+ method. Due to the technological simplicity of the forward injection, additional experiments have been performed with this configuration. Different primary sources (1+) have been used for the injection (2.45 GHz ECRIS, hollow cathode source, simplified 10 GHz NANOGAN type ECRIS), an increase of the performances has already been obtained (Zn, Kr, Ar), and a measurement of the absolute efficiency with the NANOGAN type-MINIMAFIOS association is performed. Due to the high performance of the 10 GHz CAPRICE source used as a highly charged ion injector in the first cyclotron of SARA (Système Accélérateur Rhône-Alpes), it has been tested as a different n+ source for the 1+→n+ method. In this purpose, a low energy spread-low emittance thermoionization Rb ion source has been used as 1+ injector. A standard operation of the SARA-CAPRICE source has been kept with respect to the microwave coupling. The spectra of the Rbn+ ions extracted are compared when using N2 and O2 as support gases. The highest efficiency is obtained for the Rb13+.

  3. Lifetime Measurement of the 6.79 MeV Excited State of 15O to Help Constrain the 14N(p,gamma)15O Reaction Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinski, Naomi

    2013-12-01

    In main sequence stars such as our Sun, the source of energy comes from converting hydrogen into helium. There are two competing mechanisms via which this can happen: the pp chain and CNO cycle. The latter is a cycle of reactions involving carbon, nitrogen and oxygen which are catalysts for the conversion of hydrogen into helium. The slowest reaction 14N(p, gamma) 15O in the cycle will affect the energy generation timescale and the amount of helium ash produced via the CNO cycle. This has several astrophysical impacts. It affects the evolutionary timescale of main sequence stars from which the ages of globular clusters can be calculated, the nucleosynthesis of heavier elements in H burning shells of red giant stars, and the fraction of energy produced by the CNO cycle compared to the pp chain in our Sun which helps determine the interior composition of the Sun. For main sequence stars the CNO cycle dominates over the pp chain for core temperatures T ≳ 0.02 GK. For the 14N(p, gamma)15O reaction this corresponds to a low center of mass energy Ecm = 30 keV. This is lower than the low energy limit of the reaction rate measurable in the laboratory. This means that we need to extrapolate down to low energy using theory. The largest remaining uncertainty in the theoretical calculations is due to the lifetime tau of the 6.79 MeV state of 15O. In this work the lifetimes of three excited states of 15O were measured using the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM) populating the states via the 3He(16O,alpha)15O reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. The low lifetime limit measurable using the DSAM is ˜1 fs. The lifetime of the 6.79 MeV state is near that limit, making this measurement challenging. A 1.8 fs upper limit (68.3% C.L.) on this lifetime is reported here. In addition we measured the lifetimes of the 6.17 and 6.86 MeV state in 15O which were < 2.5 fs and 13.3+0.8-1.2 fs (68.3% C.L.) respectively. iii Acknowledgments

  4. Experimental study of the 15O(2p, γ)17Ne cross section by Coulomb Dissociation for the rp process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganiec, J.; Warners, F.; Aksouh, F.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alvarez Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro, S.; Bertulani, C.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Egorova, I.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Forssén, C.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Grigorenko, L.; Heil, M.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Hoffmann, J.; Johansson, H.; Jonson, B.; Karakoç, M.; Karagiannis, C.; Kiselev, O.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Kurz, N.; Langer, C.; Lantz, M.; Larsson, K.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Mahata, K.; Müntz, C.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nyman, G.; Ott, W.; Panin, V.; Parfenova, Yu; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Richter, A.; Riisager, K.; Rodríguez Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Schrieder, G.; Shulgina, N.; Simon, H.; Stroth, J.; Sümmerer, K.; Taylor, J.; Tengblad, O.; Tengborn, E.; Weick, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.; Zhukov, M.

    2016-01-01

    The time-reversed reaction 15O(2p, γ)17Ne has been studied by the Coulomb dissociation technique. Secondary 17Ne ion beams at 500 AMeV have been produced by fragmentation reactions of 20Ne in a beryllium production target and dissociated on a secondary Pb target. The incoming beam and the reaction products have been identified with the kinematically complete LAND-R3B experimental setup at GSI. The excitation energy prior to decay has been reconstructed by using the invariant-mass method. The preliminary differential and integral Coulomb Dissociation cross sections (σCoul) have been calculated, which provide a photoabsorption (σphoto) and a radiative capture cross section (σcap). Additionally, important information about the nuclear structure of the 17Ne nucleus will be obtained. The analysis is in progress.

  5. Two-step oxalate approach for the preparation of high performance LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material with high voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zushan; Jiang, Yangmei; Zeng, Xiaoyuan; Xiao, Guan; Song, Huiyu; Liao, Shijun

    2014-02-01

    A high voltage cathode material, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, is synthesized with a two-step approach, in which the nickel-manganese oxalate precipitate is firstly obtained by adding oxalic acid to the solution of nickel and manganese ions precursors, followed by calcining the oxalates to obtain spinel nickel-manganese oxide, incorporating lithium ions with ball milling and calcining at 900 °C for 15 h. The materials are characterized with TG, XRD, SEM, BET and FTIR; it is revealed that both nickel-manganese oxide and final LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 have well defined spinel structure. The LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel materials exhibit high capacities and good cyclic stability, the capacity of the materials is in the range from 126 to 136 mAh -1, depending on the calcining temperatures. The sample calcined at an optimal temperature of 900 °C exhibits best performance, the capacity is high up to 136 mAh g-1 at tenth cycle and the capacity retention after 50 cycles is 93%. For the sample prepared by mixing and milling oxalate with lithium salt, the discharge capacity is only 115 mAh g-1. We suggest that the spinel oxide derived from oxalate may play an important role for the high performance and high stability of the final cathode materials.

  6. Recent developments in production of radioactive ion beams with the selective laser ion source at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherall, R.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Köster, U.; Lettry, J.; Suberlucq, G.; Marsh, B. A.; Tengborn, E.

    2004-05-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) of the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility is based on the method of laser stepwise resonance ionization of atoms in a hot metal cavity. The atomic selectivity of the RILIS compliments the mass selection process of the ISOLDE separator magnets to provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. Using a system of dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers, ion beams of 22 elements have been generated at ISOLDE with ionization efficiencies in the range of 0.5%-30%. As part of the ongoing RILIS development, recent off-line resonance ionization spectroscopy studies have determined the optimal three-step ionization schemes for yttrium, scandium, and antimony.

  7. Yield Of Radioactive Products Of Transfer Reactions Induced By {sup 6}He Ions On {sup 197}Au Target

    SciTech Connect

    Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Kulko, A. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Skobelev, N. K.

    2011-10-28

    The excitation functions and isomeric cross section ratios of Tl isotopes obtained at irradiation of {sup 197}Au by a {sup 6}He-ions beams with energies from 15 to 60 MeV are analyzed. The EMPIRE-2.18 code which takes into account the branching ratios of gamma-transitions of discrete gamma-cascade in a residual nucleus in the calculations of the cross sections of the isomeric and ground nuclear states production is used.

  8. An experimental investigation of radioactivity induced by ions associated with the operation of pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosburg, S. K.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Schmidlapp, F. A.

    1993-03-01

    Energetic light ion beams are being studied in Sandia National Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) for the purpose of studying the physics of applied B-diodes with the hope that these beams can be applied to inertial confinement fusion. These beams induce nuclear reactions both in the diode itself and in the materials surrounding the diode. A series of experiments was conducted wherein samples of metals typically used in the diode/gas cell region of PBFA II were exposed to ion beams at energies expected to be achieved in PBFA II. The metals studied were aluminum alloys 2024 and 6061, brass, copper, Inconel alloys 625 and 718, Stainless Steel 304, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten. The ion beams studied consisted of protons at energies of 6, 12, and 19 MeV; deuterons at 6 MeV; Lithium-7 at energies of 10, 15, 20, and 30 MeV; Lithium-6 at 30 MeV; and Boron-10 and Boron-11 at 30 MeV. The induced activity of each sample was measured as a function of time with an ion chamber and was used to estimate the rate at which the initial short-lived activity of the sample decayed. In addition, the activity of each sample was periodically measured with a Geiger counter in contact with the irradiated surface of the sample, was normalized to the total amount of energy incident on the sample, and was used as a basis to compare the amount of activity generated per mega-joule of energy for each sample. Additionally, gamma-ray spectra of the activated samples were collected using a germanium detector, and these spectra were analyzed qualitatively to identify the long-lived radioisotopes present in the sample.

  9. Isospin Effects in Heavy-Ion Collisions: Some Results From CHIMERA Experiments At LNS And Perspectives With Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G.; Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C.; Arena, N.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G.; Auditore, L.

    2009-05-04

    CHIMERA is a 4{pi} multidetector for charged particles available at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS). A new method to measure the time scale of the emission of nuclear fragments is described, together with some applications in the field of the isospin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. Competition between fusion-like and binary reactions near the energy threshold for nuclear multifragmentation is discussed. Opportunities are pointed out to use the detector at low and intermediate energies using the kinematical-coincidence method.

  10. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: Resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Ferrer, R.; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-02-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-gas-cell ionization spectroscopy. Properties of supersonic beams, obtained from the de Laval-, the spike-, and the free jet nozzles that are important for the reduction of the spectral line broadening mechanisms in cold and low density environments are discussed. Requirements for the laser radiation and for the vacuum pumping system are also examined. Finally, first results of high-resolution spectroscopy in the supersonic free jet are presented for the 327.4 nm 3d104s 2S1/2→ 3d104p 2P1/2 transition in the stable 63Cu isotope using an amplified single mode laser radiation.

  11. Measurement of human cerebral blood flow with (15O)butanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, M.S.; Adler, L.P.; Nelson, A.D.; Cassidy, E.H.; Muzic, R.F.; Bednarczyk, E.M.; Miraldi, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Although H2(15)O is widely used for CBF measurement by positron tomography, it underestimates CBF, especially at elevated flow rates. Several tracers, including butanol, overcome this problem, but the short half-life of 15O provides advantages that cause water to remain the tracer of choice. The authors report the first use and evaluation of 15O-labeled butanol for CBF measurement. Flow measurements made in a similar fashion with water and butanol at 10-min intervals were compared in normal volunteers under resting and hypercapnic conditions. Regional analysis showed good agreement between the tracers at low flows, and significant underestimation of flow by water relative to butanol in regions of elevated flow. The observed relationship between the tracers and the curve-fitted permeability-surface area product for water (133 ml.100 g-1.min-1) follow the known relationship between water and true flow. These observations indicate that (15O)-butanol provided accurate measurements of human regional CBF under conditions of elevated perfusion. They conclude that butanol is a convenient and accurate method for routine CBF determination by positron emission tomography.

  12. ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

    2003-02-27

    Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing

  13. Removal Efficiency of Radioactive Cesium and Iodine Ions by a Flow-Type Apparatus Designed for Electrochemically Reduced Water Production

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 11, 2011 attracted people’s attention, with anxiety over possible radiation hazards. Immediate and long-term concerns are around protection from external and internal exposure by the liberated radionuclides. In particular, residents living in the affected regions are most concerned about ingesting contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. Efficient removal of radionuclides from rainwater and drinking water has been reported using several pot-type filtration devices. A currently used flow-type test apparatus is expected to simultaneously provide radionuclide elimination prior to ingestion and protection from internal exposure by accidental ingestion of radionuclides through the use of a micro-carbon carboxymethyl cartridge unit and an electrochemically reduced water production unit, respectively. However, the removability of radionuclides from contaminated tap water has not been tested to date. Thus, the current research was undertaken to assess the capability of the apparatus to remove radionuclides from artificially contaminated tap water. The results presented here demonstrate that the apparatus can reduce radioactivity levels to below the detection limit in applied tap water containing either 300 Bq/kg of 137Cs or 150 Bq/kg of 125I. The apparatus had a removal efficiency of over 90% for all concentration ranges of radio–cesium and –iodine tested. The results showing efficient radionuclide removability, together with previous studies on molecular hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles as reactive oxygen species scavengers, strongly suggest that the test apparatus has the potential to offer maximum safety against radionuclide-contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. PMID:25029447

  14. Removal efficiency of radioactive cesium and iodine ions by a flow-type apparatus designed for electrochemically reduced water production.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 11, 2011 attracted people's attention, with anxiety over possible radiation hazards. Immediate and long-term concerns are around protection from external and internal exposure by the liberated radionuclides. In particular, residents living in the affected regions are most concerned about ingesting contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. Efficient removal of radionuclides from rainwater and drinking water has been reported using several pot-type filtration devices. A currently used flow-type test apparatus is expected to simultaneously provide radionuclide elimination prior to ingestion and protection from internal exposure by accidental ingestion of radionuclides through the use of a micro-carbon carboxymethyl cartridge unit and an electrochemically reduced water production unit, respectively. However, the removability of radionuclides from contaminated tap water has not been tested to date. Thus, the current research was undertaken to assess the capability of the apparatus to remove radionuclides from artificially contaminated tap water. The results presented here demonstrate that the apparatus can reduce radioactivity levels to below the detection limit in applied tap water containing either 300 Bq/kg of 137Cs or 150 Bq/kg of 125I. The apparatus had a removal efficiency of over 90% for all concentration ranges of radio-cesium and -iodine tested. The results showing efficient radionuclide removability, together with previous studies on molecular hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles as reactive oxygen species scavengers, strongly suggest that the test apparatus has the potential to offer maximum safety against radionuclide-contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. PMID:25029447

  15. Low energy proton capture study of the 14N(p, gamma)15O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Stephen Michael

    The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction regulates the rate of energy production for stars slightly more massive than the sun throughout stable hydrogen burning on the main sequence. The 14N(p,gamma)15O reaction rate also determines the luminosity for all stars after leaving the main sequence when their cores have exhausted hydrogen fuel, and later when they become red giant stars. The significant role that this reaction plays in stellar evolution has far-reaching consequences, from neutrino production in our Sun, to age estimates of globular clusters in our Galaxy. The weak cross section and inherent coincidence summing in the 15O gamma-ray decay scheme make a precision measurement of the astrophysical S-factor especially challenging, particularly for the ground-state transition. The present study, performed in the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA), was aimed at measuring the ground-state transition at low energy by utilizing a new 24-element, position-sensitive, NaI(Tl) detector array. Because the array is highly segmented, the 14N( p,gamma)15O S-factor was evaluated for transitions to the ground, 5.18, 6.18, and 6.79 MeV states without the need for coincidence summing corrections. Additionally, the position-sensitivity of the detector was exploited to measure the angular correlation of the two-photon cascades. Software cuts were made to the data in order to identify single and coincident gamma-ray events and a fraction fit analysis technique was used to extract the characteristic 15O peaks from the composite gamma-ray spectrum. The results from the current work demonstrated a new approach to measuring weak nuclear cross sections near astrophysically relevant energies that, with refinements, has broader applications in gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  16. 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne breakout reaction and impact on X-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Tan, W P; Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Couder, M; Wiescher, M

    2007-06-15

    The breakout reaction 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne, which regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rp process, is critical for the explanation of the burst amplitude and periodicity of x-ray bursters. We report on the first successful measurement of the critical alpha-decay branching ratios of relevant states in 19Ne populated via 19F(3He,t)19Ne. Based on the experimental results and our previous lifetime measurements of these states, we derive the first experimental rate of 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne. The impact of our experimental results on the burst pattern and periodicity for a range of accretion rates is analyzed. PMID:17677960

  17. Lifetimes of states in {sup 19}Ne above the {sup 15}O+{alpha} breakup threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Mythili, S.; Davids, B.; Ball, G. C.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Hackman, G.; Padilla, E.; Pearson, C. J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Tanihata, I.; Vockenhuber, C.; Walden, P.; Yen, S.; Alexander, T. K.; Chicoine, M.; Forster, J. S.; Gujrathi, S.; Howell, D.; Kanungo, R.

    2008-03-15

    The {sup 15}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction plays a role in the ignition of type I x-ray bursts on accreting neutron stars. The lifetimes of states in {sup 19}Ne above the {sup 15}O+{alpha} threshold of 3.53 MeV are important inputs to calculations of the astrophysical reaction rate. These levels in {sup 19}Ne were populated in the {sup 3}He({sup 20}Ne,{alpha}){sup 19}Ne reaction at a {sup 20}Ne beam energy of 34 MeV. The lifetimes of six states above the threshold were measured with the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The present measurements agree with previous determinations of the lifetimes of these states and in some cases are considerably more precise.

  18. Measurement of the 330-keV resonance in 18F(p,alpha)15O

    SciTech Connect

    Moazen, Brian; Blackmon, Jeff C; Bardayan, Daniel W; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-03-01

    While recent measurements have substantially improved our understanding of the {sup 18}F(p, {alpha}){sup 15}O reaction that is important in novae, the production of {sup 18}F is still uncertain by more than 2 orders of magnitude, due in large part to the contribution of a resonance located at E{sub cm} = 330 keV. We developed a new technique to study resonant (p, {alpha}) reactions and employed it to measure properties of the E{sub cm} = 183 keV resonance in {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N which had been previously reported to decrease {sup 18}F production in ONeMg novae by as much as a factor of 10. The previous results were confirmed using the new technique and we now propose to use this technique to study the {sup 18}F(p, {alpha}){sup 15}O reaction.

  19. Production of [15O]Water at Low-Energy Proton Cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, James; O'Neil, James P.

    2005-12-12

    We report a simple system for producing [15O]H2O from nitrogen-15 in a nitrogen/hydrogen gas target with recycling of the target nitrogen, allowing production on low-energy proton-only accelerators with minimal consumption of isotopically enriched nitrogen-15. The radiolabeled water is separated from the target gas and radiolytically produced ammonia by temporary freezing in a small trap at -40 C.

  20. The astrophysical reaction rate for the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Paul, M.; Roberts, A.D.

    1996-03-01

    Proton and alpha widths for a 3/2{sup +} ({ell}{sub p} = 0) state in {sup 19}Ne at E{sub x} = 7.1 MeV have been extracted using the results of recent measurements of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction. This {ell}{sub p} = 0 resonance dominates the astrophysical reaction rates at temperatures T{sub 9} > 0.5.

  1. RADIOACTIVE CONCENTRATOR AND RADIATION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, L.P.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for forming a permeable ion exchange bed using Montmorillonite clay to absorb and adsorb radioactive ions from liquid radioactive wastes. A paste is formed of clay, water, and a material that fomns with clay a stable aggregate in the presence of water. The mixture is extruded into a volume of water to form clay rods. The rods may then be used to remove radioactive cations from liquid waste solutions. After use, the rods are removed from the solution and heated to a temperature of 750 to 1000 deg C to fix the ratioactive cations in the clay.

  2. The level structure of ^19Ne via measurement of the ^2H(^18F,α+^15O)n reaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekola, A. S.; Brune, C. R.; Heinen, Z.; Hornish, M. J.; Massey, T. N.; Voinov, A. V.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Smith, M. S.; Chae, A.; Domizioli, C.; Ma, Z.; Moazen, B.; Champagne, A. E.; Visser, D. W.; Greife, U.; Livesay, R.; Porter-Peden, M.; Johnson, M.; Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S.; Kozub, R. L.; Shriner, J. F.; Smith, N. D.

    2007-04-01

    The ^18F(d,n)^19Ne and ^18F(d,p)^19F reactions have been measured simultaneously at Ec.m. = 14.9 MeV at ORNL's HRIBF with a radioactive ^18F beam. The ^19Ne excited states near the proton threshold are potentially important for the ^18F(p,α) reaction rate in novae. These states decay by breakup into α+^15O which were detected in coincidence with position-sensitive E--δE telescopes. The neutron (proton) angular distributions for states in ^19Ne (^19F) were extracted using momentum conservation. Information on the spins and spectroscopic strengths of these states will be presented and ^19Ne -- ^19F mirror symmetry will be discussed.

  3. Enhanced rate performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 fibers synthesized by electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaofeng; chamoun, rita; Shui, Jianglan; Li, James; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Belharouak, IB

    2015-05-29

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) provides a high working potential as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Yet there is a phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure in LNMO during the ~3 V charge/discharge region. To suppress the large volume change and capacity fade inherent with bulk-sized LNMO particles when discharged to below 3.0 V, one-dimensional nano-structured LNMO was prepared by an electrospinning method and a subsequent heat treatment. The well-separated nanofiber precursors combat the growth and aggregation of LNMO particles during the heating procedure and lead to improved capacity, better cycling stability, and improved rate capability of the final LMNO nanofibers. The as-prepared LMNO nanofibers have a diameter as thin as 50–100 nm, which is the thinnest of this kind of complex compounds that contain multi-transition metal elements produced through the electrospinning method. In coin cell tests of this material at a current density of 27 mA g-1, the initial discharge capacity was 130 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 3.5–4.8 V and 300 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 2.0–4.8 V.

  4. An on-line system for long-distance transport of 15O-labelled gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heselius, Sven-Johan; Mäkelä, Pekka; Solin, Olof; Saarni, Hannu

    1984-12-01

    Short-lived radioactive gases are conveniently produced by particle bombardment of gas targets. Transport of short-lived radioactive gases over long distances is possible with the help of a high target pressure driving the gaseous radioactive products through narrow-bore transport tubes. An on-line system for routine transport of short-lived accelerator-produced radioactive gases from the target chamber to two clinical laboratories at 650 m and 970 m distances from the accelerator is described. Targetry and gas handling for preparation of oxygen-15 labelled molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide for inhalation are presented.

  5. Lattice Mn3+ Behaviors in Li4Ti5O12/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Full Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-05-28

    High voltage spinels LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) with different contents of residual Mn3+ ions have been evaluated in full cells using Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as standard anode. Greatly improved cycling stability has been observed for all spinels in LTO-limited full cell, compared with those in LNMO-limited ones, while the underlying mechanisms are quite different. It has been discovered that the participation of active Mn3+ in the extended cycling and thus its observable contribution to Li+ diffusion kinetics depend on the limiting electrode and the sufficiency of Li+ ions. Potential Mn dissolution has also been discussed to identify the key factors that need to be considered to construct full cells employing high voltage spinel as the cathode.

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow measurement with intravenous ( sup 15 O)water bolus and ( sup 18 F)fluoromethane inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Herholz, K.; Pietrzyk, U.; Wienhard, K.; Hebold, I.; Pawlik, G.; Wagner, R.; Holthoff, V.; Klinkhammer, P.; Heiss, W.D. )

    1989-09-01

    In 20 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease, classic migraine, or angiomas, we compared paired dynamic positron emission tomographic measurements of regional cerebral blood flow using both ({sup 15}O)water and ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane as tracers. Cerebral blood flow was also determined according to the autoradiographic technique with a bolus injection of ({sup 15}O)water. There were reasonable overall correlations between dynamic ({sup 15}O)water and ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane values for cerebral blood flow (r = 0.82) and between dynamic and autoradiographic ({sup 15}O)water values for cerebral blood flow (r = 0.83). We found a close correspondence between abnormal pathologic findings and visually evaluated cerebral blood flow tomograms obtained with the two tracers. On average, dynamic ({sup 15}O)water cerebral blood flow was 6% lower than that measured with ({sup 18}F)fluoromethane. There also was a general trend toward a greater underestimation with ({sup 15}O)water in high-flow areas, particularly in hyperemic areas, probably due to incomplete first-pass extraction of ({sup 15}O)water. Underestimation was not detected in low-flow areas or in the cerebellum. Absolute cerebral blood flow values were less closely correlated between tracers and techniques than cerebral blood flow patterns. The variability of the relation between absolute flow values was probably caused by confounding effects of the variation in the circulatory delay time. The autoradiographic technique was most sensitive to this type error.

  7. High-Performance LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Spinel Controlled by Mn3+ Concentration and Site Disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Sushko, P. V.; Sushko, Maria L.; Kovarik, Libor; Feng, Jijun; Deng, Zhiqun; Zheng, Jianming; Graff, Gordon L.; Nie, Zimin; Choi, Daiwon; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Whittingham, M. S.

    2012-03-19

    The influences of Mn3+ ions on the properties of high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is systematically investigated in this work. The content of Mn3+ ions in the spinel is tuned by further annealing of the sample or partially substitution of Ni2+ in the lattice structure. The former decreases the amount of Mn3+ while the latter increases Mn3+ concentration, which has been confirmed by both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron diffraction analysis. It has also been experimentally and theoretically proven that Mn3+ ions are directly related to the disordering between Ni2+ and Mn4+ on the octahedral sites in the spinel structure which facilitates the transportation of Li+ ions especially at elevated current densities. An extremely cycling stability as well as good rate capability have been observed in the Cr-substituted spinel confirming that an appropriate amount of Mn3+ ions is the key for a high performance high voltage spinel.

  8. Enhancing the elevated temperature performance of high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 by V doping with in-situ carbon and polyimide encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G. H.; Kim, H. S.; Baek, S. G.; Choi, H. J.; Chung, K. Y.; Cho, B. W.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, Yun-Sung

    2015-12-01

    We report the enhanced electrochemical performance of high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode by small amount of aliovalent doping in Li-site (Li0.995V0.005Ni0.5Mn1.5O4) and polyimide-carbon (PI-C) coating as well. Such small amount of V-doping in Li-sites leads to the crystallization of ordered spinel. The performances of the cathodes are studied in half-cell assembly at elevated temperature conditions (50, 55 and 60 °C). Although, the notable improvement in elevated temperature conditions are noted for Li0.995V0.005Ni0.5Mn1.5O4 phase at 50 °C, but not sustained while increasing to 55 and 60 °C. Nevertheless, the combined advantages of mixed conducting (ionic and electronic) features of PI-C, an excellent performance are noted for the Li0.995V0.005Ni0.5Mn1.5O4 phase after introducing the PI-C layer, irrespective of the testing temperature. Cyclic voltammetry and impedance studies are also performed to corroborate the Li-ion kinetics.

  9. A continuous [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O production and infusion system for PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, Munawwar; Liow, Jeih-San

    1999-06-10

    A system for continuous production and infusion of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O has been designed for PET cerebral blood flow studies. The injection system consists of a four-port-two-position valve, two Horizon Nxt infusion pumps, and a sterile 50 ml vial. The variation of the production of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O was <1%. The variation of activity delivered measured by scanner counts during the steady state period was <2%.

  10. Structure study of BaCe0.85Y0.15O3-Δ as solid state fuel cell material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhov, K.; Vladikova, D.; Raikova, G.; Genov, I.; Malakova, T.; Dimitrov, D.; Svab, E.; Fabian, M.

    2016-03-01

    The structural details of powder, dense and porous samples of BaCe0.85Y0.15O3-δ (BCY15) used recently in an innovative monolithic design of SOFC were studied from multiple Rietveld analysis of neutron and x-ray diffraction patterns. The 3-layered monolithic assembly built from BCY15 material works as oxide ion conductor in the oxygen space, as proton conductor in the hydrogen area and as mixed conductor in the central membrane. We find that in all the samples of studied BCY15 based materials there are no indications of difference in crystallographic symmetry and the structure refinements did produce best agreement factors in orthorhombic Pnma space group.

  11. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction studied at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, Michele

    2010-03-01

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the bottleneck of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle. Recent studies of this reaction have been performed in the low energy range E<500 keV. However, also data at higher energy are necessary to extrapolate the S-factor down to the energy range of astrophysical interest. Up to now, only one set of data from an experiment performed in 1987 extends up to 2.5 MeV. A new study has been carried out at the high-current FZD Tandetron in Dresden, in the energy region from 0.6 to 2.5 MeV. The astrophysics motivations, setup and on-going analysis are presented.

  12. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  13. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  14. Assessment of blood flow with (68)Ga-DOTA PET in experimental inflammation: a validation study using (15)O-water.

    PubMed

    Autio, Anu; Saraste, Antti; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Saanijoki, Tiina; Johansson, Jarkko; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Tarkia, Miikka; Oikonen, Vesa; Sipilä, Hannu T; Roivainen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Increased blood flow and vascular permeability are key events in inflammation. Based on the fact that Gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (Gd-DOTA) is commonly used in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of blood flow (perfusion), we evaluated the feasibility of its Gallium-68 labeled DOTA analog ((68)Ga-DOTA) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of blood flow in experimental inflammation. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats with turpentine oil induced sterile skin/muscle inflammation were anesthetized with isoflurane, and imaged under rest and adenosine-induced hyperemia by means of dynamic 2-min Oxygen-15 labeled water (H2 (15)O) and 30-min (68)Ga-DOTA PET. For the quantification of PET data, regions of interest (ROIs) were defined in the focus of inflammation, healthy muscle, myocardium and heart left ventricle. Radioactivity concentration in the ROIs versus time after injection was determined for both tracers and blood flow was calculated using image-derived input. According to the H2 (15)O PET, blood flow was 0.69 ± 0.15 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.15 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for muscle during rest. The blood flow remained unchanged during adenosine-induced hyperemia 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.12 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for inflammation and muscle, respectively, indicating that adenosine has little effect on blood flow in peripheral tissues in rats. High focal uptake of (68)Ga-DOTA was seen at the site of inflammation throughout the 30-min PET imaging. According to the (68)Ga-DOTA PET, blood flow measured as the blood-to-tissue transport rate (K1) was 0.60 ± 0.07 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.14 ± 0.06 ml/min/g for muscle during rest and 0.63 ± 0.08 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.09 ± 0.04 ml/min/g for muscle during adenosine-induced hyperemia. The H2 (15)O-based blood flow and (68)Ga-DOTA-based K1 values correlated well (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001). These results show that (68)Ga-DOTA PET imaging is useful for the quantification of

  15. Assessment of blood flow with 68Ga-DOTA PET in experimental inflammation: a validation study using 15O-water

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Anu; Saraste, Antti; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Saanijoki, Tiina; Johansson, Jarkko; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Tarkia, Miikka; Oikonen, Vesa; Sipilä, Hannu T; Roivainen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Increased blood flow and vascular permeability are key events in inflammation. Based on the fact that Gadolinium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N‘,N‘‘,N‘‘‘-tetraacetic acid (Gd-DOTA) is commonly used in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of blood flow (perfusion), we evaluated the feasibility of its Gallium-68 labeled DOTA analog (68Ga-DOTA) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of blood flow in experimental inflammation. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats with turpentine oil induced sterile skin/muscle inflammation were anesthetized with isoflurane, and imaged under rest and adenosine-induced hyperemia by means of dynamic 2-min Oxygen-15 labeled water (H2 15O) and 30-min 68Ga-DOTA PET. For the quantification of PET data, regions of interest (ROIs) were defined in the focus of inflammation, healthy muscle, myocardium and heart left ventricle. Radioactivity concentration in the ROIs versus time after injection was determined for both tracers and blood flow was calculated using image-derived input. According to the H2 15O PET, blood flow was 0.69 ± 0.15 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.15 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for muscle during rest. The blood flow remained unchanged during adenosine-induced hyperemia 0.67 ± 0.11 and 0.12 ± 0.03 ml/min/g for inflammation and muscle, respectively, indicating that adenosine has little effect on blood flow in peripheral tissues in rats. High focal uptake of 68Ga-DOTA was seen at the site of inflammation throughout the 30-min PET imaging. According to the 68Ga-DOTA PET, blood flow measured as the blood-to-tissue transport rate (K1) was 0.60 ± 0.07 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.14 ± 0.06 ml/min/g for muscle during rest and 0.63 ± 0.08 ml/min/g for inflammation and 0.09 ± 0.04 ml/min/g for muscle during adenosine-induced hyperemia. The H2 15O-based blood flow and 68Ga-DOTA-based K1 values correlated well (r = 0.94, P < 0.0001). These results show that 68Ga-DOTA PET imaging is useful for the quantification of increased

  16. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  17. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  18. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  19. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible. PMID:27280308

  20. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a 12C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u‑1. Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  1. Cross section measurement of 14N(p ,γ )15O in the CNO cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.; Imbriani, G.; Best, A.; Kontos, A.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: The CNO cycle is the main energy source in stars more massive than our sun; it defines the energy production and the cycle time that lead to the lifetime of massive stars, and it is an important tool for the determination of the age of globular clusters. In our sun about 1.6% of the total solar neutrino flux comes from the CNO cycle. The largest uncertainty in the prediction of this CNO flux from the standard solar model comes from the uncertainty in the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction rate; thus, the determination of the cross section at astrophysical temperatures is of great interest. Purpose: The total cross section of the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction has large contributions from the transitions to the Ex=6.79 MeV excited state and the ground state of 15O. The Ex=6.79 MeV transition is dominated by radiative direct capture, while the ground state is a complex mixture of direct and resonance capture components and the interferences between them. Recent studies have concentrated on cross-section measurements at very low energies, but broad resonances at higher energy may also play a role. A single measurement has been made that covers a broad higher-energy range but it has large uncertainties stemming from uncorrected summing effects. Furthermore, the extrapolations of the cross section vary significantly depending on the data sets considered. Thus, new direct measurements have been made to improve the previous high-energy studies and to better constrain the extrapolation. Methods: Measurements were performed at the low-energy accelerator facilities of the nuclear science laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. The cross section was measured over the proton energy range from Ep=0.7 to 3.6 MeV for both the ground state and the Ex=6.79 MeV transitions at θlab=0∘ , 45∘, 90∘, 135∘, and 150∘. Both TiN and implanted-14N targets were utilized. γ rays were detected by using an array of high-purity germanium detectors. Results: The excitation function as

  2. Cyclotrons for the production of radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics and design choices for modern cyclotrons. Cyclotrons can be used in 3 areas in the radioactive beam field: the production of high energy heavy ion beams for use in fragmentation, the spallation of targets with high energy protons, and the acceleration of radioactive beams from low energy to the MeV/u range. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  3. A storage ring for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    Preliminary ideas are presented for the scientific justification of a storage ring for radioactive beams. This storage ring would be suitable for many nuclear and atomic physics experiments. Ideally, it would be constructed and tested at an existing low-energy heavy-ion facility before relocation to a major radioactive beam facility.

  4. Precision Measurement of the Hyperfine Structure of Laser-Cooled Radioactive {sup 7}Be{sup +} Ions Produced by Projectile Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, K.; Wada, M.; Nakamura, T.; Takamine, A.; Schury, P.; Ishida, Y.; Sonoda, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kojima, T. M.; Lioubimov, V.; Ogawa, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Kubo, T.; Katayama, I.; Ohtani, S.; Wollnik, H.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2008-11-21

    The ground state hyperfine splitting of {sup 7}Be{sup +} has been measured by laser-microwave double-resonance spectroscopy in the online rf trap of RIKEN's slow RI-beam facility. Be ions produced by projectile fragmentation of {sup 13}C at {approx_equal}1 GeV were thermalized in a rf ion guide gas cell and subsequently laser cooled in the ion trap to {approx_equal}1 {mu}eV. This 10{sup 15}-fold reduction of the kinetic energy allows precision spectroscopy of these ions. A magnetic hfs constant of A=-742.772 28(43) MHz was measured for {sup 7}Be{sup +}, from which a nuclear magnetic moment of {mu}{sub I}=-1.399 28(2){mu}{sub N} was deduced.

  5. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  6. A new strategy to diminish the 4 V voltage plateau of LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guoqiang Zhang, Lingxi; Sun, Lu; Wang, Lun

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The annealed sample LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} cannot eliminate the 4-V voltage plateau completely. The Mg-doped compound LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.45}Mg{sub 0.05}O{sub 4} can effectively diminish the 4 V voltage plateau during charge and discharge process. - Highlights: • Mg-doped compound LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.45}Mg{sub 0.05}O{sub 4} was prepared. • The 4 V voltage plateau in the charge–discharge curves of LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.45}Mg{sub 0.05}O{sub 4} was diminished. • Compound LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.45}Mg{sub 0.05}O{sub 4} exhibited good electrochemical properties. - Abstract: As for spinel LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4}, there is 4 V voltage plateau in the charge–discharge profiles. This voltage plateau can be reduced by an annealing process, however it is hard to avoid it completely. In this study, a new strategy of partial substitution for Mn by Mg is applied. There is no 4 V voltage plateau in the charge–discharge profiles of Mg-doped compound LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.45}Mg{sub 0.05}O{sub 4}. This compound exhibits good electrochemical properties which can be used as cathode material of lithium ion batteries. At 1 C rate, it can deliver a capacity of around 129 mAh g{sup −1} and remain good cycle performance.

  7. Exceptional performance of a high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode in all one dimensional architectures with an anatase TiO2 anode by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, Nagasubramanian; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Shubha, Nageswaran; Ling, Wong Chui; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Madhavi, Srinivasan

    2014-07-01

    We report for the first time the synthesis and extraordinary performance of a high voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 fiber cathode in all one dimensional (1D) architecture. Structural and morphological features are analyzed by various characterization techniques. Li-insertion/extraction properties are evaluated in a half-cell assembly (Li/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4) and subsequently in full-cell configuration with an anatase TiO2 fiber anode. In both half- and full-cell assemblies, gelled polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVdF-HFP) is used as the separator-cum-electrolyte. All the one dimensional components used for fabricating Li-ion cells are prepared by a simple and scalable electrospinning technique. The full-cell, LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4/gelled PVdF-HFP/TiO2 delivered the reversible capacity of ~102 mA h g-1 at 0.1 C rate with an operating potential of ~2.8 V. Excellent rate capability and stable cycling profiles are noted for such a full-cell assembly with a capacity retention of ~86% after 400 cycles.

  8. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  9. Radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

  10. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in 15O with the AGATA demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Bazzacco, D.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Erhard, M.; Farnea, E.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Keeley, N.; Lunardi, S.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatović, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szücs, T.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Agata Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The 14N(p,γ)15O reaction is the slowest process of the CN cycle, and thus it is of high astrophysical interest since it regulates the total rate of energy and neutrinos production through the cycle. The 14N+p ground state capture is strongly influenced by a sub-threshold resonance corresponding to the 6.79 MeV state in 15O. The width of this resonance is a major source of uncertainty in the extrapolation of the reaction cross section in the Gamow energy window. Preliminary results of a new Doppler Shift Attenuation measurement of the lifetime of the 6.79 MeV state in 15O are discussed. The level of interest was populated via the 2H(14N,n)15O reaction in inverse kinematics at 32 MeV beam energy. The gamma-rays emitted in the decay of the 6.79 MeV level to the ground state were detected with the AGATA Demonstrator array of high-purity germanium detectors. The sensitivity of the shape of the peak in the gamma-ray energy spectrum to the level lifetime is investigated comparing the experimental peaks with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction mechanisms and the gamma-ray emission and detection. Nuclear levels in 15N (also populated in the 14N+2H reaction) for which the lifetimes are known in the literature provided a test of the analysis technique.

  11. Cortical activation in profoundly deaf patients during cochlear implant stimulation demonstrated by H sub 2 (15)O PET

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, H.; Lamprecht, A.; Kuehn, A.R.; Roden, W.; Vosteen, K.H.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1991-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are used to provide sensations of sound to profoundly deaf patients. The performance of the CI is assessed mainly by the subjective reports of patients. The aim of this study was to look for objective cortical responses to the stimulation of the CI. Two postlingually and two prelingually deaf patients were investigated by positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 15}O-labeled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) to determine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Instead of quantifying rCBF in absolute terms, it was estimated by referring the regional tissue concentration of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O to the mean whole brain concentration. CI stimulation encoded from white noise and sequential words led to an increased rCBF in the primary and secondary (Wernicke) auditory cortex. Relative elevations of up to 33% were observed bilaterally, although they were higher contralateral to the CI. These results were obtained not only in the postlingually deaf patients but also in two patients who had never been able to hear. Thus, it could be demonstrated that PET measurements of cerebral H{sub 2}{sup 15}O distribution yield objective responses of the central auditory system during electrical stimulation by CIs in profoundly deaf patients.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of TRI3 trichothecene 15-O-acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Graeme S.; McCormick, Susan P.; Alexander, Nancy J.; Rayment, Ivan

    2009-08-14

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease of cereal crops whose worldwide incidence is increasing and at present there is no satisfactory way of combating this pathogen or its associated toxins. There is a wide variety of trichothecene mycotoxins and they all contain a 12,13-epoxytrichothecene skeleton but differ in their substitutions. Indeed, there is considerable variation in the toxin profile across the numerous Fusarium species that has been ascribed to differences in the presence or absence of biosynthetic enzymes and their relative activity. This article addresses the source of differences in acetylation at the C15 position of the trichothecene molecule. Here, we present the in vitro structural and biochemical characterization of TRI3, a 15-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase isolated from F. sporotrichioides and the 'in vivo' characterization of Deltatri3 mutants of deoxynivalenol (DON) producing F. graminearum strains. A kinetic analysis shows that TRI3 is an efficient enzyme with the native substrate, 15-decalonectrin, but is inactive with either DON or nivalenol. The structure of TRI3 complexed with 15-decalonectrin provides an explanation for this specificity and shows that Tri3 and Tri101 (3-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase) are evolutionarily related. The active site residues are conserved across all sequences for TRI3 orthologs, suggesting that differences in acetylation at C15 are not due to differences in Tri3. The tri3 deletion mutant shows that acetylation at C15 is required for DON biosynthesis even though DON lacks a C15 acetyl group. The enzyme(s) responsible for deacetylation at the 15 position of the trichothecene mycotoxins have not been identified.

  13. An apparatus for the preparation of [{sup 15}O]-H{sub 2}O for rapid repetitive PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, J. R.; Chaly, T. C.; Matacchieri, R. A.; Yee, A.; Dhawan, V.; Horowitz, S.; Jespersen, K.; Margouleff, D.; Eidelberg, D.

    1999-06-10

    The use of [{sup 15}O]-H{sub 2}O to follow changes in cerebral blood flow using PET has become frequent and widespread, requiring an apparatus easily operated by personnel unfamiliar with the physics and chemistry involved. Oxygen-15 is prepared by the {sup 14}N(d,n){sup 15}O nuclear reaction using a target of UHP nitrogen with 1% UHP hydrogen added, contained in a target chamber similar to that reported for the preparation of [{sup 18}F]-F{sub 2}. Nucleogenic {sup 15}O reacts with hydrogen in the target gas to produce [{sup 15}O]-H{sub 2}O. Some of the N target reacts with hydrogen to produce NH{sub 3}, which must be removed. At the end of bombardment (minimum 6 min.) the target gas is released through a small amount of parenteral water which then flows through approximately 50 mg Dowex 50W-X8 resin (100-200 mesh) to remove the NH{sub 3}. Sufficient 23.4% NaCl solution is added to produce an isotonic solution. The isotonic solution is sterilized by filtration through a 0.22 micron filter into an injection syringe which is sent via pneumatic transport to the PET imaging room. The apparatus, which uses a programmable logic controller and four switches to allow the operator to select standby, refill, collect activity, or deliver dose operations of the production process, provides doses of [{sup 15}O]-H{sub 2}O up to 35 mCi/dose at intervals as frequent as seven minutes with minimal radiation exposure to the operators.

  14. An apparatus for the preparation of [15O]-H2O for rapid repetitive PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, J. R.; Chaly, T. C.; Matacchieri, R. A.; Yee, A.; Dhawan, V.; Horowitz, S.; Jespersen, K.; Margouleff, D.; Eidelberg, D.

    1999-06-01

    The use of [15O]-H2O to follow changes in cerebral blood flow using PET has become frequent and widespread, requiring an apparatus easily operated by personnel unfamiliar with the physics and chemistry involved. Oxygen-15 is prepared by the 14N(d,n)15O nuclear reaction using a target of UHP nitrogen with 1% UHP hydrogen added, contained in a target chamber similar to that reported for the preparation of [18F]-F2. Nucleogenic 15O reacts with hydrogen in the target gas to produce [15O]-H2O. Some of the N target reacts with hydrogen to produce NH3, which must be removed. At the end of bombardment (minimum 6 min.) the target gas is released through a small amount of parenteral water which then flows through approximately 50 mg Dowex 50W-X8 resin (100-200 mesh) to remove the NH3. Sufficient 23.4% NaCl solution is added to produce an isotonic solution. The isotonic solution is sterilized by filtration through a 0.22 micron filter into an injection syringe which is sent via pneumatic transport to the PET imaging room. The apparatus, which uses a programmable logic controller and four switches to allow the operator to select standby, refill, collect activity, or deliver dose operations of the production process, provides doses of [15O]-H2O up to 35 mCi/dose at intervals as frequent as seven minutes with minimal radiation exposure to the operators.

  15. Multifunctional flexible free-standing titanate nanobelt membranes as efficient sorbents for the removal of radioactive 90Sr2+ and 137Cs+ ions and oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zhiwei; Shen, Congcong; Li, Jiaxing; Tan, Xiaoli; Zeb, Akif; Wang, Xiangke; Xu, An-Wu

    2016-02-01

    For the increasing attention focused on saving endangered environments, there is a growing need for developing membrane materials able to perform complex functions such as removing radioactive pollutants and oil spills from water. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with good mechanical and thermal stability, superior resistance to radiation, and excellent recyclability. In this study, we constructed a multifunctional flexible free-standing sodium titanate nanobelt (Na-TNB) membrane that was assembled as advanced radiation-tainted water treatment and oil uptake. We compared the adsorption behavior of 137Cs+ and 90Sr2+ on Na-TNB membranes under various environmental conditions. The maximum adsorption coefficient value (Kd) for Sr2+ reaches 107 mL g-1. The structural collapse of the exchange materials were confirmed by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy as well as Raman analysis. The adsorption mechanism of Na-TNB membrane is clarified by forming a stable solid with the radioactive cations permanently trapped inside. Besides, the engineered multilayer membrane is exceptionally capable in selectively and rapidly adsorbing oils up to 23 times the adsorbent weight when coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic molecules. This multifunctional membrane has exceptional potential as a suitable material for next generation water treatment and separation technologies.

  16. Multifunctional flexible free-standing titanate nanobelt membranes as efficient sorbents for the removal of radioactive 90Sr2+ and 137Cs+ ions and oils

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zhiwei; Shen, Congcong; Li, Jiaxing; Tan, Xiaoli; Zeb, Akif; Wang, Xiangke; Xu, An-Wu

    2016-01-01

    For the increasing attention focused on saving endangered environments, there is a growing need for developing membrane materials able to perform complex functions such as removing radioactive pollutants and oil spills from water. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with good mechanical and thermal stability, superior resistance to radiation, and excellent recyclability. In this study, we constructed a multifunctional flexible free-standing sodium titanate nanobelt (Na-TNB) membrane that was assembled as advanced radiation-tainted water treatment and oil uptake. We compared the adsorption behavior of 137Cs+ and 90Sr2+ on Na-TNB membranes under various environmental conditions. The maximum adsorption coefficient value (Kd) for Sr2+ reaches 107 mL g−1. The structural collapse of the exchange materials were confirmed by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy as well as Raman analysis. The adsorption mechanism of Na-TNB membrane is clarified by forming a stable solid with the radioactive cations permanently trapped inside. Besides, the engineered multilayer membrane is exceptionally capable in selectively and rapidly adsorbing oils up to 23 times the adsorbent weight when coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic molecules. This multifunctional membrane has exceptional potential as a suitable material for next generation water treatment and separation technologies. PMID:26865116

  17. Multifunctional flexible free-standing titanate nanobelt membranes as efficient sorbents for the removal of radioactive (90)Sr(2+) and (137)Cs(+) ions and oils.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zhiwei; Shen, Congcong; Li, Jiaxing; Tan, Xiaoli; Zeb, Akif; Wang, Xiangke; Xu, An-Wu

    2016-01-01

    For the increasing attention focused on saving endangered environments, there is a growing need for developing membrane materials able to perform complex functions such as removing radioactive pollutants and oil spills from water. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with good mechanical and thermal stability, superior resistance to radiation, and excellent recyclability. In this study, we constructed a multifunctional flexible free-standing sodium titanate nanobelt (Na-TNB) membrane that was assembled as advanced radiation-tainted water treatment and oil uptake. We compared the adsorption behavior of (137)Cs(+) and (90)Sr(2+) on Na-TNB membranes under various environmental conditions. The maximum adsorption coefficient value (Kd) for Sr(2+) reaches 10(7) mL g(-1). The structural collapse of the exchange materials were confirmed by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy as well as Raman analysis. The adsorption mechanism of Na-TNB membrane is clarified by forming a stable solid with the radioactive cations permanently trapped inside. Besides, the engineered multilayer membrane is exceptionally capable in selectively and rapidly adsorbing oils up to 23 times the adsorbent weight when coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic molecules. This multifunctional membrane has exceptional potential as a suitable material for next generation water treatment and separation technologies. PMID:26865116

  18. Synthesis and bioimaging of positron-emitting 15O-labeled 2-deoxy-D-glucose of two-minute half-life.

    PubMed

    Yorimitsu, Hideki; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Shintaro; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET), which exploits the affinity of a radiopharmaceutical for the target organ, a systematic repertoire of oxygen-15-labeled PET tracers is expected to be useful for bioimaging owing to the ubiquity of oxygen atoms in organic compounds. However, because of the 2-min half-life of 15O, the synthesis of complex biologically active 15O-labeled organic molecules has not yet been achieved. A state-of-the-art synthesis now makes available an 15O-labeled complex organic molecule, 6-[15O]-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Ultrarapid radical hydroxylation of 2,6-dideoxy-6-iodo-D-glucose with molecular oxygen labeled with 15O of two-minute half-life provided the target 15O-labeled molecule. The labeling reaction with 15O was complete in 1.3 min, and the entire operation time starting from the generation of 15O-containing dioxygen by a cyclotron to the purification of the labeled sugar was 7 min. The labeled sugar accumulated in the metabolically active organs as well as in the bladder of mice and rats. 15O-labeling offers the possibility of repetitive scanning and the use of multiple PET tracers in the same body within a short time, and hence should significantly expand the scope of PET studies of small animals. PMID:17441139

  19. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML.; Crucillà, V.; Gulino, M.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; and others

    2015-02-24

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called 'narrow systems' because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of 'hot hydrogen burning' are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as {sup 13}N and {sup 18}F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of {sup 18}F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of {sup 18}F. Among these, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction, using a beam of {sup 18}F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo code

  20. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Crucillà, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; de Séréville, N.

    2015-02-01

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called "narrow systems" because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of "hot hydrogen burning" are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as 13N and 18F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of 18F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of 18F . Among these, the 18F(p,α)15O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction, using a beam of 18F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo code developed to be used in the data analysis process.

  1. Microwave property improvement of Ca[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ perovskite by A-site substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mingzhe; Xiong, Gang; Ding, Zhao

    2016-04-01

    The crystal structure and microwave dielectric properties of Ca[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramic (CLNZ) are tuned by A-site substitution of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in the present paper. The tuning effect on the crystal structure is investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and it illustrates that single phase of orthorhombic perovskite structure is formed, however, minor amount of BaNb2O6-type second phase is also detected in (Ca1‑xBax)[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramics (CBLNZ) in the range of x ≥ 0.025, while pure perovskite phase is obtained in (Ca1‑xSrx)[(Li1/3Nb2/3)0.95Zr0.15]O3+δ ceramics (CSLNZ) in the whole investigation range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2. With the increase of x value, the unit cell volumes of both CBLNZ and CSLNZ perovskites gradually expand, which results in the degradation of the vibration bond strength between the B-site ions and oxygen in the perovskites. The microscopic structure related thermal parameters in CSLNZ and CBLNZ perovskites are analyzed in terms of Clausius-Mossotti equation to reveal the original contributors in the temperature coefficients. The results show that both Sr2+ and Ba2+ substitution can effectively improve the permittivity and Qf value, especially, improve the temperature coefficient of CLNZ ceramic in a certain range.

  2. 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A, two diterpenes isolated from Euphorbia helioscopia suppress microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jingling; Xu, Jing; Cui, Chun-Ai; Guo, Yuanqiang; Jin, Da-Qing

    2016-01-26

    Microglia activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases by producing neurotoxic factors. In the present study, we found that two diterpenes isolated from Euphorbia helioscopia, 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A suppressed NO and PGE2 production by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia cells. The diterpenes also inhibited the production of ROS and proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the mechanism involved the NF-κB but not Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Moreover, the two diterpenes also attenuate microglia activation-mediated neuronal death. These results suggest that 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A may provide potential therapeutic strategy for various neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:26683904

  3. Determination of Complex Structures from Powder Diffraction Data: The Crystal Structure of La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Russell E.; Owen, Jonathan J.; Stalick, Judith K.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    1994-07-01

    The applicability of powder diffraction techniques to structure determination has improved substantially in recent times, but it has only been successfully utilized in the solution of relatively simple structures of up to 29 atoms in the asymmetric unit. The structure La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37, which has 60 atoms in the asymmetric unit, has been solved using a combination of synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. This represents a considerable advance in the size of structure that has been solved using powder diffraction techniques. The structure of La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37 consists of small regions of simpler structure types in the La/Ti/Al/O system, interleaved to form a complex 3D network.

  4. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in 15O with the AGATA demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelagnoli, C.; Depalo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Menegazzo, R.; Broggini, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Caciolli, A.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Keeley, N.; Erhard, M.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatović, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szücs, T.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    The preliminary results of a new direct measurement of the lifetime of the first excited 3/2+ state in 15O are discussed. An accurate evaluation of this lifetime is of paramount importance for the determination of the cross section of the 14N(p,γ)15O reaction, the slowest one in the CNO cycle, at the energies of the solar Gamow peak. The 2H(14N,15O)n reaction in inverse kinematics at 32MeV beam energy (XTU Tandem, LNL) was used to populate the level of interest, which decays via a 6.79 MeV E1 gamma-ray transition to the ground state. Gamma rays were detected with 4 triple clusters of HPGe detectors of the AGATA Demonstrator array. The energy resolution and position sensitivity of this state-of-the-art gamma-ray spectrometer have been exploited to investigate the Doppler Shift Attenuation effect on the lineshape of the gamma-ray peak in the energy spectrum. The deconvolution of the lifetime effects from those due to the kinematics of the emitting nuclei has been performed using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma emission and detection. CDCC-CRC calculations for the nucleon transfer process have been used for this purpose and preliminary results are shown.

  5. Lifetime measurement of the 6.79 MeV state in {sup 15}O with the AGATA demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Michelagnoli, C.; Depalo, R.; Ur, C. A.; Menegazzo, R.; Broggini, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Caciolli, A.; Farnea, E.; Lunardi, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Keeley, N.; Erhard, M.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Marta, M.; Mengoni, D.; Mijatovic, T.; Recchia, F.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Szuecs, T.; and others

    2012-11-12

    The preliminary results of a new direct measurement of the lifetime of the first excited 3/2{sup +} state in {sup 15}O are discussed. An accurate evaluation of this lifetime is of paramount importance for the determination of the cross section of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction, the slowest one in the CNO cycle, at the energies of the solar Gamow peak. The {sup 2}H({sup 14}N,{sup 15}O)n reaction in inverse kinematics at 32MeV beam energy (XTU Tandem, LNL) was used to populate the level of interest, which decays via a 6.79 MeV E1 gamma-ray transition to the ground state. Gamma rays were detected with 4 triple clusters of HPGe detectors of the AGATA Demonstrator array. The energy resolution and position sensitivity of this state-of-the-art gamma-ray spectrometer have been exploited to investigate the Doppler Shift Attenuation effect on the lineshape of the gamma-ray peak in the energy spectrum. The deconvolution of the lifetime effects from those due to the kinematics of the emitting nuclei has been performed using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma emission and detection. CDCC-CRC calculations for the nucleon transfer process have been used for this purpose and preliminary results are shown.

  6. Determining the isotopic compositions of uranium and fission products in radioactive environmental microsamples using laser ablation ICP-MS with multiple ion counters.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Prohaska, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS)--a Nu Plasma HR--equipped with three ion-counting multipliers and coupled to a laser ablation system (LA) for the rapid and sensitive determination of the 235U/238U, 236U/238U, 145Nd/143Nd, 146Nd/143Nd, 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios in microsamples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl. Microsamples with dimensions ranging from a hundred mum to about 1 mm and with surface alpha activities of 3-38 mBq were first identified using nuclear track radiography. U, Nd and Ru isotope systems were then measured sequentially for the same microsample by LA-MC-ICP-MS. The application of a zoom ion optic for aligning the ion beams into the ion counters allows fast switching between different isotope systems, which enables all of the abovementioned isotope ratios to be measured for the same microsample within a total analysis time of 15-20 min (excluding MC-ICP-MS optimization and calibration). The 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios were measured for four microsamples and were found to be significantly lower than the natural ratios, indicating that the microsamples were contaminated with the corresponding fission products (Ru and Tc). A slight depletion in 146Nd of about 3-5% was observed in the contaminated samples, but the Nd isotopic ratios measured in the contaminated samples coincided with natural isotopic composition within the measurement uncertainty, as most of the Nd in the analyzed samples originates from the natural soil load of this element. The 235U/238U and 236U/238U isotope ratios were the most sensitive indicators of irradiated uranium. The present work yielded a significant variation in uranium isotope ratios in microsamples, in contrast with previously published results from the bulk analysis of contaminated samples originating from the vicinity of Chernobyl. Thus, the 235U/238U ratios measured in ten

  7. FLUORINE-18 Production for PET and AN Investigation of the FLUORINE-18(P, ALPHA)OXYGEN-15 Reaction with a Radioactive Beam.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Andrew David

    1995-01-01

    Improved methods for the production of ^{18}F have been developed. The isotope, a beta^{+} emitter with a 110 min half-life, serves a vital role in positron emission tomography (PET), and more recently has become important in the emerging field of a radioactive beam development for nuclear reaction studies. Aside from increasing some PET radiopharmaceutical yields by factors of 2-20, the present work made possible a factor of 10 ^3-10^4 improvement in ^{18}F ion beam intensity over previously published methods. ^{18}F production targetry was developed for an 11.4 MeV, 6-8 mm FWHM, 50 muA proton beam from the UW cyclotron. Nucleophilic aqueous (^ {18}F) fluoride is produced via the ^{18}O(p,n)^ {18}F reaction on an enriched ( ^{18}O) water target. The target yield is (80 +/- 15)% of the theoretical maximum for beam currents up to 40 muA, with the highest yield to date of 70 GBq. Gas targets for the production of electrophilic (^ {18}F] F_2 were developed with a saturation bombardment yield of 3.10 +/- 0.40 GBq/muA for beam currents up to 45 muA, and a maximum yield to date of 45.5 GBq. The ^{18} F in either form has important applications in the labeling of PET radiopharmaceuticals, and the applicability of each to radioactive beam technology has been investigated. An ^{18}F ion beam was generated by a dual-accelerator method incorporating off-line chemical separation. ^ {18}F was produced on the UW radioisotope production cyclotron, then delivered to Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for beam formation on the tandem accelerator on ATLAS. An average ^{18}F ^{-} beam intensity of 1ppA was achieved from a cesium vapor, sputter negative ion source (SNICS) with a peak intensity of 4.5 ppA. This was sufficient to allow direct measurements of the ^{18}F(p,alpha) ^{15}O reaction cross section at energies of astrophysical interest. Cyclotron targetry studies, radioactive beam production techniques and results from the ^{18 }F(p,alpha)^ {15}O experiment are presented.

  8. Lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate and LiBF4 blend salts electrolyte for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongming; Xiao, Kaiwen; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of lithium difluoro(oxalate)borate (LiODFB) and LiBF4 blend salts in ethylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate + ethyl(methyl) carbonate (EC + DMC + EMC, 1:1:1, by wt.) have been investigated for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode in lithium-ion batteries. The electric conductivity tests are utilized to examine the relationship among solution conductivity, the electrolyte composition and temperature. Through cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge test and AC impedance measurements, we compare the capacity and cycling efficiency of LNMO cathode in different electrolyte systems at different temperatures and discharge current rates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are served to analyze the surface nature of LNMO cathode after cycles at elevated temperature. These results demonstrate that LNMO cathode can exert excellent electrochemical performance with the increase of LiODFB concentration at room temperature and elevated temperature and it is found that just slight LiBF4, mixed with LiODFB as blend salts, can strikingly improve the cyclability at -20 °C, especially in high-rate cycling. Grouped together, the optimum LiODFB/LiBF4 molar ratio is around 4:1, which can present an excellent affinity to LNMO cathode in a wide electrochemical window.

  9. Preparation and conductivity of composite apatite La9.33Si6O26 (LSO) - Zr0.85Y0.15O1.925 (YSZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noviyanti, Atiek Rostika; Irwansyah, Ferli S.; Hidayat, Sahrul; Hardian, Arie; Syarif, Dani Gustaman; Yuliyati, Yati B.; Hastiawan, Iwan

    2016-02-01

    A great challenge to reduce high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to intermediate temperature SOFC (IT-SOFC, 500-750 °C), is the development of solid electrolyte materials with high ionic conductivity at intermediate temperature range. In response to this challenge, here we report a novel composite material La9.33Si6O26 (LSO)-Zr0.85Y0.15O1.925 (YSZ). LSO-YSZ composite synthesis was carried out by combining LSO with commercial YSZ (9:1, 8:2, 7:3) using hydrothermal method. In order to get dense pellet, all of the product were sintered at 1450 °C for 3 hours. X-ray diffraction pattern of the entire pellets show typical both of LSO and YSZ pattern which indicate that the composite was succesfully formed. The highest conductivity was detected in YSZ-7LSO (YSZ:LSO = 7: 3), i.e 1.72 × 10-4 Scm-1 at 700 °C and also has low activation energy (0.88 eV). This result suggests that the LSO-YSZ composite materials are good oxide ion conductor and potential to be used as an alternative solid electrolyte in IT-SOFC technology.

  10. Exploiting chemically and electrochemically reactive phosphite derivatives for high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Min; Kim, Choon-Ki; Kim, Ko-Eun; Hong, Sung You; Choi, Nam-Soon

    2016-01-01

    A family of organophosphorus compounds including triphenyl phosphite (TPP), trimethyl phosphite (TMP), tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), and tris(trimethylsilyl) phosphite (TMSP) is investigated as additives for the stabilization of high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) cathode-electrolyte interface. Our investigation reveals that the cycling performance of Li/LNMO half cells with the TMP, TFEP or TMSP additive is drastically improved at 60 °C compared to the baseline electrolyte. Among the various phosphite-based additives tested, TMSP additive enables facile Li ion transport at high C rates and significantly enhances the storage performance of the Li/LNMO cells at 60 °C. To understand the effects of the phosphite-based additives on electrolyte oxidative decomposition at high voltages, the surface chemistry of the cathode after precycling is investigated via ex-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, the roles of phosphite-based additives to suppress LiPF6 hydrolysis and to remove HF are examined via 19F and 31P NMR spectroscopies.