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Sample records for 17-7 ph stainless

  1. Axial-Load Fatigue Tests on 17-7 PH Stainless Steel Under Constant-Amplitude Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leybold, Herbert A.

    1960-01-01

    Axial-load fatigue tests were conducted at room temperature on notched and unnotched sheet specimens of 17-7 PH stainless steel in Condition TH 1050. The notched specimens had theoretical stress-concentration factors of 2.32, 4.00, and 5.00. All specimens were tested under completely reversed loading. S-N curves are presented for each specimen configuration and ratios of fatigue strengths of unnotched specimens to those of notched specimens are given. Predictions of the fatigue behavior of notched specimens near the fatigue limit were made.

  2. Tensile Properties of 17-7 PH and 12 MoV Stainless-Steel Sheet under Rapid-Heating and Constant-Temperature Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Charles R., Jr.; Price, Howard L.

    1961-01-01

    Results are presented of rapid-heating tests of 17-7 PH and 12 MoV stainless-steel sheet heated to failure at temperature rates from about 1 F to 170 F per second under constant-load conditions. Yield and rupture strengths obtained from rapid-heating tests are compared with yield and tensile strengths obtained from short-time elevated-temperature tensile tests (30-minute exposure). A rate-temperature parameter was used to construct master curves from which yield and rupture stresses or temperatures can be predicted. A method for measuring strain by optical means is described.

  3. Irradiation effects on 17-7 PH stainless steel, A-201 carbon steel, and titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, R. A.; Hartley, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Irradiation effects on three materials from the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Surveillance Program were determined. An increase of 105 K in the nil-ductility temperature for A-201 steel was observed at a fluence of approximately 3.1 x 10 to the 18th power neutrons/sq cm (neutron energy E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). Only minor changes in the mechanical properties of 17-7 PH stainless steel were observed up to a fluence of 2 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). The titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy maintained its notch toughness up to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV).

  4. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  5. A scanning tunneling microscopy study of PH 3 adsorption on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 surfaces, P-segregation and thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Shen, T.-C.

    2007-04-01

    PH 3 adsorption on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 was studied after various exposures between 0.3 and 60 L at room temperature by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). PH 3-, PH 2-, H-reacted, and unreacted adatoms can be identified by analyzing empty-state STM images at different sample biases. PH x-reacted rest-atoms can be observed in empty-state STM images if neighboring adatoms are hydrogen terminated. Most of the PH 3 adsorbs dissociatively on the surface, generating H- and PH 2-adsorbed rest-atom and adatom sites. Dangling-bonds at rest-atom sites are more reactive than adatom sites and the faulted half of the 7 × 7 unit cell is more reactive than the unfaulted half. Center adatoms are overwhelmingly preferred over corner adatoms for PH 2 adsorption. The saturation P coverage is ˜0.18 ML. Annealing of PH 3-reacted 7 × 7 surfaces at 900 K generates disordered, partially P-covered surfaces, but dosing PH 3 at 900 K forms P/Si(1 1 1)- 6?{3} surfaces. Si deposition at 510 K leaves disordered clusters on the surface, which cannot be reordered by annealing up to 800 K. However, annealing above 900 K recreates P/Si(1 1 1)- 6?{3} surfaces. Surface morphologies formed by sequential rapid thermal annealing are also presented.

  6. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  7. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  8. The Structure and Properties of Diffusion Assisted Bonded Joints in 17-4 PH, Type 347, 15-5 PH and Nitronic 40 Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion assisted bonds are formed in 17-4 PH, 15-5 PH, type 347 and Nitronic 40 stainless steels using electrodeposited copper as the bonding agent. The bonds are analyzed by conventional metallographic, electron microprobe analysis, and scanning electron microscopic techniques as well as Charpy V-notch impact tests at temperatures of 77 and 300 K. Results are discussed in terms of a postulated model for the bonding process.

  9. Failure Maps for Rectangular 17-4PH Stainless Steel Sandwiched Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    A new and innovative concept is proposed for designing lightweight fan blades for aircraft engines using commercially available 17-4PH precipitation hardened stainless steel. Rotating fan blades in aircraft engines experience a complex loading state consisting of combinations of centrifugal, distributed pressure and torsional loads. Theoretical failure plastic collapse maps, showing plots of the foam relative density versus face sheet thickness, t, normalized by the fan blade span length, L, have been generated for rectangular 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels under these three loading modes assuming three failure plastic collapse modes. These maps show that the 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels can fail by either the yielding of the face sheets, yielding of the foam core or wrinkling of the face sheets depending on foam relative density, the magnitude of t/L and the loading mode. The design envelop of a generic fan blade is superimposed on the maps to provide valuable insights on the probable failure modes in a sandwiched foam fan blade.

  10. Mechanical Properties of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B. a.; Hebsur, M.; Cosgriff, L. M.; Fedor, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rectangular 17-4PH stainless steel sandwiched foam panels were fabricated using a commercial manufacturing technique by brazing two sheets to a foam core. Microstructural observations and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of the panels revealed large variations in the quality of the brazed areas from one panel to the next as well as within the same panel. Shear tests conducted on specimens machined from the panels exhibited failures either in the brazed region or in the foam core for the poorly brazed and well-brazed samples, respectively. Compression tests were conducted on the foam cores to evaluate their elastic and plastic deformation behavior. These data were compared with published data on polymeric and metallic foams, and with theoretical deformation models proposed for open cell foams.

  11. Shot Peening and Thermal Stress Relaxation in 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Enwei; Chen, Guoxing; Tan, Ziming; Wu, Shuhui

    2015-11-01

    Shot peening is an effective process to enhance the fatigue performance of turbine blades. In this study, the effect of peening pressures was discussed in terms of the residual stress distribution and the surface morphology. Shot peening processes were designed at varying pressures on a 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel. The profiles of hardness and residual stress were characterized in the cross section. The thermal stress relaxation was further carried out to evaluate the stability of the compressive residual stress under service temperatures of turbine blades. Results show that a maximum stress depth is obtained with peening pressure of 0.40 MPa, and the residual stress can be maintained up to 400 °C, which ensures the service in low-pressure turbine blades.

  12. Alloy Shrinkage Factors for the Investment Casting of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Porter, Wallace D.

    2008-04-01

    In this study, alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made, in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed a different evolution on heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation was performed with thermal expansion obtained on heating, and another one was performed with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from the numerical simulation results of the solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly overpredicted.

  13. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  14. Nonlinear ultrasonic characterization of precipitation in 17-4PH stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, Kathryn; Bradley, Harrison A.; Thiele, Sebastian; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Wall, James J.; Jung, Hee Joon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-04-01

    The extension of operational lifetime of most US nuclear reactors will cause reactor pressure vessel to be exposed to increased levels of neutron radiation damage. This research is part of a broader effort to develop a nondestructive evaluation technique to monitor radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels. The main contributor to radiation embrittlement in these steels is the formation of copper-rich precipitates. In this work, a precipitate hardenable martensitic alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel is exposed to thermal aging treatments, and used as a surrogate material to study the effects of copper precipitates on the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter. Previous work has demonstrated the effectiveness of these nonlinear ultrasonic (NLU) measurements in the characterization of radiation-induced microstructural changes in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels. NLU measurements using Rayleigh surface waves are performed on 17-4PH samples subjected to isothermal aging. NLU measurements are interpreted with hardness, thermo-electric power, TEM, and atom probe tomography measurements. The Rayleigh wave measurements showed a decrease in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter with increasing aging time, consistent with evidence of increasing number density of nucleated precipitates.

  15. The Effects of Casting Porosity on the Tensile Behavior of Investment Cast 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, D. F.; Crenshaw, T. B.; Gearhart, J. S.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of casting porosity on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel was studied as well as the effect of heat treatment on the alloy's sensitivity to casting defects. Interdendritic porosity, formed during solidification and shrinkage of the alloy, reduces the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength roughly in proportion to the reduction in load bearing cross-section. The effects of casting porosity on ductility (% strain, % reduction in area) are more severe, in agreement with research on other alloy systems. In this study, 10% porosity reduced the ductility of 17-4PH stainless steel by almost 80% for the high-strength H925 condition. Tensile testing at -10°C (263 K) further reduces the alloy ductility with and without pores present. In the lower strength H1100 condition, the ductility is higher than the H925 condition, as expected, and somewhat less sensitive to porosity. By measuring the area % porosity on the fracture surface of tensile specimens, the trend in failure strain versus area % porosity was obtained and analyzed using two methods: an empirical approach to determine an index of defect susceptibility with a logarithmic fit and an analytical approach based on the constitutive stress-strain behavior and critical strain concentration in the vicinity of the casting voids. The applicability of the second method depends on the amount of non-uniform strain (necking) and, as such, the softer H1100 material did not correlate well to the model. The behavior of 17-4PH was compared to previous work on cast Al alloys, Mg alloys, and other cast materials.

  16. 50 CFR 17.7 - Raptor exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Raptor exemption. 17.7 Section...General Provisions § 17.7 Raptor exemption. (a) The prohibitions...and 17.31 do not apply to any raptor [a live migratory bird of the Order Falconiformes...

  17. Numerical simulation of the solidification microstructure of a 17-4PH stainless steel investment casting and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You Yun; Tsai, DeChang; Hwang, Weng Sing

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique of numerically simulating the microstructure of 17-4PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel during investment casting. A cellular automation (CA) algorithm was adopted to simulate the nucleation and grain growth. First a calibration casting was made, and then by comparing the microstructures of the calibration casting with those simulated using different kinetic growth coefficients (a2, a3) in CA, the most appropriate set of values for a2 and a3 would be obtained. Then, this set of values was applied to the microstructure simulation of a separate casting, where the casting was actually made. Through this approach, this study has arrived at a set of growth kinetic coefficients from the calibration casting: a2 is 2.9 × 10-5, a3 is 1.49 × 10-7, which is then used to predict the microstructure of the other test casting. Consequently, a good correlation has been found between the microstructure of actual 17-4PH casting and the simulation result.

  18. A pH Sensor Based on a Stainless Steel Electrode Electrodeposited with Iridium Oxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, C. C. M.; Madrid, R. E.; Felice, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    A simple procedure to make an iridium oxide (IrO[subscript 2]) electrodeposited pH sensor, that can be used in a chemical, biomedical, or materials laboratory, is presented here. Some exercises, based on this sensor, that can be used to teach important concepts in the field of biomedical, biochemical, tissue, or materials engineering, are also…

  19. Role of alloy additions on strengthening in 17-4 PH stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Arpana Sudershan

    Alloy modifications by addition of niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), nitrogen (N) and cobalt (Co) to cast 17-4 PH steel were investigated to determine the effect on mechanical properties. Additions of Nb, V, and N increased the yield strength from 1120 MPa to 1310 MPa while decreased the room temperature charpy V notch (CVN) toughness from 20 J to four Joules. The addition of Co to cast 17-4 PH steel enhanced the yield strength and CVN toughness from 1140 MPa to 1290 MPa and from 3.7 J to 5.5 J, respectively. In the base 17-4 PH steel, an increase in block width from 2.27 ± 0.10 ?m in the solution treated condition to 3.06 ± 0.17 ?m upon aging at 755 K was measured using orientation image microscopy. Cobalt inhibited recrystallization and block boundary migration during aging resulting in a finer martensitic block structure. The influence of Co on copper (Cu) precipitation in steels was studied using atom probe tomography. A narrower precipitate size distribution was observed in the steels with Co addition. The concentration profile across the matrix / precipitate interface indicated rejection of Co atoms from the copper precipitates. This behavior was observed to be energetically favorable using first principle calculations. The activation energies for Cu precipitation increased from 205 kJ/ mol in the non-cobalt containing alloy, to 243 kJ/ mol, and 272 kJ/ mol in alloys with 3 wt. %Co, and 7 wt. % Co, respectively. The role of Co on Cu precipitation in cast 17-4 PH steel is proposed as follows: (i) Co is rejected out of the Cu precipitate and sets up a barrier to the growth of the Cu precipitate; (ii) results in Cu precipitates of smaller size and narrower distribution; (iii) the coarsening of Cu precipitates is inhibited; and (iv) the activation energy for Cu precipitation increases.

  20. Effects of the Treating Time on Microstructure and Erosion Corrosion Behavior of Salt-Bath-Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Mingxing; Fan, Hongyuan; Zeng, Dezhi; Xiong, Ji

    2013-08-01

    The effects of salt-bath nitriding time on the microstructure, microhardness, and erosion-corrosion behavior of nitrided 17-4PH stainless steel at 703 K (430 °C) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and erosion-corrosion testing. The experimental results revealed that the microstructure and phase constituents of the nitrided surface alloy are highly process condition dependent. When 17-4PH stainless steel was subjected to complex salt-bathing nitriding, the main phase of the nitrided layer was expanded martensite ( ?`), expanded austenite (S), CrN, Fe4N, and Fe2N. The thickness of nitrided layers increased with the treating time. The salt-bath nitriding improves effectively the surface hardness. The maximum values measured from the treated surface are observed to be 1100 HV0.1 for 40 hours approximately, which is about 3.5 times as hard as the untreated material (309 HV0.1). Low-temperature nitriding can improve the erosion-corrosion resistance against two-phase flow. The sample nitrided for 4 hours has the best corrosion resistance.

  1. 14 CFR 17.7 - Filing and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing and computation of time. 17.7 Section 17.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES PROCEDURES FOR PROTESTS AND CONTRACTS DISPUTES General § 17.7 Filing and computation of...

  2. Stress corrosion study of PH13-8Mo stainless steel using the Slow Strain Rate Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Pablo D.

    1989-01-01

    The need for a fast and reliable method to study stress corrosion in metals has caused increased interest in the Slow Strain Rate Technique (SSRT) during the last few decades. PH13-8MoH950 and H1000 round tensile specimens were studied by this method. Percent reduction-in-area, time-to-failure, elongation at fracture, and fracture energy were used to express the loss in ductility, which has been used to indicate susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Results from a 3.5 percent salt solution (corrosive medium) were compared to those in air (inert medium). A tendency to early failure was found when testing in the vicinity of 1.0 x 10(-6) mm/mm/sec in the 3.5 percent salt solution. PH13-8Mo H1000 was found to be less likely to suffer SCC than PH13-8Mo H950. This program showed that the SSRT is promising for the SCC characterization of metals and results can be obtained in much shorter times (18 hr for PH steels) than those required using conventional techniques.

  3. The Effect of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel on the Lifetime of a Pennzane(Trademark) Lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly Ball Screw for the AURA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Anderson, Mark; Lo, John; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-01-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10 percent of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50 C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  4. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  5. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  6. The Holocene 17,7 (2007)pp. 917-926 Holocene vegetation and fire history of

    E-print Network

    Long, Colin

    2007-01-01

    The Holocene 17,7 (2007)pp. 917-926 Holocene vegetation and fire history of the Coast Range- etation and fire history of the Oregon Coast Range for the last9000 years. The sites are locatedalong a north- to-south effectiveprecipitationgradientand changesin vegetationand fire activityprovided

  7. In Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence, 17(7):855-869, 2004.

    E-print Network

    Stone, Peter

    computer system via machine learning methods is a staggering challenge. If it is not achievable today, whatIn Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence, 17(7):855-869, 2004. CORRECTED VERSION: See little concrete progress made towards this goal. We view these problems as fundamentally machine learning

  8. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  9. Bladed-shrouded-disc aeroelastic analyses: Computer program updates in NASTRAN level 17.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, A. M.; Elchuri, V.; Skalski, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    In October 1979, a computer program based on the state-of-the-art compressor and structural technologies applied to bladed-shrouded-disc was developed. The program was more operational in NASTRAN Level 16. The bladed disc computer program was updated for operation in NASTRAN Level 17.7. The supersonic cascade unsteady aerodynamics routine UCAS, delivered as part of the NASTRAN Level 16 program was recorded to improve its execution time. These improvements are presented.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  11. Designing stainless exhaust systems

    SciTech Connect

    Douthett, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    With the ever-increasing price of automobiles, durability and reduced operating costs have become major concerns in North America, Europe, and Japan. In the US, the exhaust system was once thought of as disposable every 3--4 years, but it is now considered a nonreplaceable item for at least 5--7 years, the average time an initial owner keeps a vehicle. Through the mid-1980s, the only stainless steel on most US car exhausts was the downpipe and catalytic converter, and these were due to government warranty mandates. Today, most US passenger car exhaust systems are almost entirely stainless steel, and with the 1996 model year switch of GM light trucks, the average use of stainless alloys in US vehicles will exceed 23 kg per vehicle. The US experience with stainless has shown that certain design considerations can further increase system life and reduce manufacturing problems. Such considerations may also benefit the European situation, which has seen an increase in the use of stainless alloys in exhaust components since tighter pollution laws began taking effect in 1990.

  12. MATERIALS ENGINEERING KEYWORDS: beryllium, stainless

    E-print Network

    Abdou, Mohamed

    MATERIALS ENGINEERING KEYWORDS: beryllium, stainless steel, heat conductance EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERFACE HEAT CONDUCTANCE BETWEEN NONCONFORMING BERYLLIUM AND TYPE 316 STAINLESS STEEL In fusion blanket designs that employ beryllium as a neutron multiplier, the interface conductance h plays

  13. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  14. Method of forming dynamic membrane on stainless steel support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Joseph L. (inventor); Brandon, Craig A. (inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A suitable member formed from sintered, powdered, stainless steel is contacted with a nitrate solution of a soluble alkali metal nitrate and a metal such as zirconium in a pH range and for a time sufficient to effect the formation of a membrane of zirconium oxide preferably including an organic polymeric material such as polyacrylic acid.

  15. Saturation in ``nonmagnetic'' stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Fajans, J.

    1998-10-01

    Scientific equipment often uses "nonmagnetic" stainless steel, relying on the steel's nonmagnetic behavior to leave external magnetic fields unaltered. However, stainless steel's permeability can rise significantly when it is welded or machined, possibly perturbing an external field. Such perturbations will diminish well above the stainless steel's saturation point. The authors measured the permeability of both welded and machined 304 stainless steel as a function of an external magnetic field, and found that both saturate at fields of approximately 0.25 T.

  16. Welding of Stainless Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, H; Johnson, Lawrence

    1929-01-01

    It would appear that welds in some stainless steels, heat-treated in some practicable way, will probably be found to have all the resistance to corrosion that is required for aircraft. Certainly these structures are not subjected to the severe conditions that are found in chemical plants.

  17. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  18. Powder Technology 272 (2015) 34-44 Stability of stainless-steel nanoparticle and water mixtures

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    2015-01-01

    of pH 11. Keywords: Stainless steel, Nanofluid, Stability, Thermal conductivity, pH, Surfactant 1 or nanotube dispersions. An important characteristic of a nanoparticle-fluid mixture or nanofluid is its surfactants, and the thermal conductivity of nanofluids were higher with better stability [12, 22­28]. It may

  19. New J. Phys. 17 (2015) 072002 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/072002 FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION

    E-print Network

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    New J. Phys. 17 (2015) 072002 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/072002 FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION coupled cyanine dye monomers in which a strong coherent coupling between electronic and vibrational find a strong coherence component damped by fast electronic dephasing ( 50 fs) accompanied by a much

  20. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    This book reviews the mechanisms and forms of corrosion and examines the corrosion of stainless steels and similar chromium-bearing nickel containing higher alloys, detailing various corrosive environments including atmospheric and fire-side corrosion, corrosion by water and soil, and corrosion caused by particular industrial processes. It provides information on specific groups and grades of stainless steels; summarizes typical applications for specific stainless alloys; describes common corrosion problems associated with stainless steels; presents the acceptable isocorrosion parameters of concentration and temperature for over 250 chemicals for which stainless steels are the preferred materials of construction; discusses product forms and their availability; elucidates fabrication, welding, and joining techniques; and covers the effects of pickling and passivation.

  1. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  2. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  3. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  4. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  5. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  6. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  7. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  8. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  9. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  10. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  11. Stability of stainless-steel nanoparticle and water mixtures

    E-print Network

    Song, You Young; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-11-28

    the isoelectric points (IEP)1 of Fe, Cr and Ni are known to be pH > 7 [49], values of pH 3 ? 4 have been quoted for the surface of stainless steels which are covered with oxide layers [50]; the ?-potential of the mixture is expected to be in a stable range when... on zeta potential measurements. We are also grateful to Professor Kyoo Young Kim for provision of using facilities. References [1] J. C. Maxwell. A treatise on electricity and magnetism, volume 1. Clarendon Press, Oxford, U. K., 1873. [2] S. K. Das, S. U...

  12. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  13. Welding tritium aged stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Stainless steels exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to He buildup within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for new weapon systems, and service life extensions of older systems, methods for welding/repair on tritium-exposed material will become important. Results are reported that indicate that both solid-state resistance welding and low-heat gas metal arc overlay welding are promising methods for repair or modification of tritium-aged stainless steel.

  14. Welding tritium aged stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Stainless steels exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to He buildup within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for new weapon systems, and service life extensions of older systems, methods for welding/repair on tritium-exposed material will become important. Results are reported that indicate that both solid-state resistance welding and low-heat gas metal arc overlay welding are promising methods for repair or modification of tritium-aged stainless steel.

  15. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  16. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  17. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  19. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205). PMID:22014396

  20. Improvement of the thermal stability of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets by intergranular addition of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Shuai; Yan, Changjiang; Cai, Lingwen; Chen, Renjie; Yan, Aru; Lee, Don

    2014-05-07

    In this study, microstructure and magnetic properties of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with addition of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7} (wt.?%) were investigated. By adding a small amount of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7}, the coercivity is improved greatly, and the irreversible loss is decreased sharply. The increase of Curie temperature suggests that Co atoms have entered into the 2:14:1 main phase. Microstructural analysis indicates that a well-developed core-shell structure was formed in the magnets with the addition of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7}. The improvement of magnetic properties can be attributed to the microstructural modification and the intrinsic properties' improvement.

  1. Nano-composite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  2. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  3. Microstructure of Super-duplex Stainless Steels

    E-print Network

    Sharafi, Shahriar

    1993-12-07

    for their financial support and ESAB AB of Sweden for providing the materials. IV ABSTRACT Corrosion resistant stainless steels with a mixed microstructure of o-ferrite and austenite in approximately equal proportion are called "duplex stainless steels". The corrosion... and for various uses in chemical engineering. A major use however is as a casting alloy or forgings in pumps, valves and general marine engineering. The compositions of some of the currently available duplex stainless steels are shown in Table 1...

  4. 77 FR 64545 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ...731-TA-1201 (Final)] Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Scheduling of...less-than-fair-value imports from China of drawn stainless steel sinks, provided for in subheading...subject merchandise as ``drawn stainless steel sinks with single or...

  5. Modelling simultaneous precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels.

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling simultaneous precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels. T. Sourmail and H. K developed for simultaneous precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels, taking into account for important phases in creep-resistant austenitic stainless steels. 1 Introduction Precipitation phenomena

  6. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels

    E-print Network

    Siefert, Chris

    Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels: 21 of this information, whether direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential. #12;Austenitic Stainless Steels austenitic stainless steel that is alloyed with nitrogen to provide superior strength compared

  7. Comparative Study on the Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal, Borated Stainless Steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tiangan; Day, Daniel; Hailey, Phillip; Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloy Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} was compared to borated stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy on their corrosion resistance in various high-concentration chloride solutions. The melt-spun ribbon of this iron-based amorphous alloy have demonstrated a better corrosion resistance than the bulk borated stainless steel and the bulk Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy, in high-concentration chloride brines at temperatures 90 deg. C or higher. (authors)

  8. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  9. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dunwoody, John T; Mason, Richard E; Freibert, Franz J; Willson, Stephen P; Veirs, Douglas K; Worl, Laura A; Archuleta, Alonso; Conger, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  10. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  11. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  12. Cleaning, pickling, and passivation of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Stainless steels (SS) are chosen for various services because of their appearance and corrosion resistance and for their freedom from contamination in storage and shipment. However, certain conditions in handling or fabrication may make these alloys susceptible to localized corrosion or unsatisfactory performance. A surface of cleanliness, uniformity, and corrosion resistance is desirable and, in some services, absolutely required. Definitions and procedures for cleaning, pickling, and passivating stainless steels are reviewed. Surface contamination and defects including grinding marks and smut are discussed, as are measures for preventing and correcting them. The cleaning and passivating sequence required for free-machining stainless grades is included.

  13. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  14. A porous stainless steel membrane system for extraterrestrial crop production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, H. V.; Prince, R. P.; Berry, W. L.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    A system was developed in which nutrient flow to plant roots is controlled by a thin (0.98 or 1.18 mm) porous (0.2 or 0.5 microns) stainless steel sheet membrane. The flow of nutrient solution through the membrane is controlled by adjusting the relative negative pressure on the nutrient solution side of the membrane. Thus, the nutrient solution is contained by the membrane and cannot escape from the compartment even under microgravity conditions if the appropriate pressure gradient across the membrane is maintained. Plant roots grow directly on the top surface of the membrane and pull the nutrient solution through this membrane interface. The volume of nutrient solution required by this system for plant growth is relatively small, since the plenum, which contains the nutrient solution in contact with the membrane, needs only to be of sufficient size to provide for uniform flow to all parts of the membrane. Solution not passing through the membrane to the root zone is recirculated through a reservoir where pH and nutrient levels are controlled. The size of the solution reservoir depends on the sophistication of the replenishment system. The roots on the surface of the membrane are covered with a polyethylene film (white on top, black on bottom) to maintain a high relative humidity and also limit light to prevent algal growth. Seeds are sown directly on the stainless steel membrane under the holes in the polyethylene film that allow a pathway for the shoots.

  15. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  16. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 90oCElectrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 9

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J; Day, S D; Lian, T; Saw, C K; Hailey, P D; Choi, J S; Rebak, R B; Yang, N; Payer, J H; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Branagan, D J; Buffa, E J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-04-25

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was prepared as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stability was found to be comparable to that of high-performance nickel-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. This material also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. This material and its parent alloy maintained corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature, and remained in the amorphous state during exposure to relatively high neutron doses.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC susceptibility. Annealed and water quenched specimens were found to be immune to SCC in caustic environment. Aging treatment at 800°C gave rise to sigma and chi precipitates in the DSS. However, these sigma and chi precipitates, known to initiate cracking in DSS in chloride environment did not cause any cracking of DSS in caustic solutions. Aging of DSS at 475°C had resulted in '475°C embrittlement' and caused cracks to initiate in the ferrite phase. This was in contrast to the cracks initiating in the austenite phase in the as-received DSS. Alloy composition and microstructure of DSS as well as solution composition (dissolved ionic species) was also found to affect the electrochemical behavior and passivation of DSS which in turn plays a major role in stress corrosion crack initiation and propagation. Corrosion rates and SCC susceptibility of DSS was found to increase with addition of sulfide to caustic solutions. Corrosion films on DSS, characterized using XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the metal sulfide compounds were formed along with oxides at the metal surface in the presence of sulfide containing caustic environments. These metal sulfide containing passive films are unstable and hence breaks down under mechanical straining, leading to SCC initiations. The overall results from this study helped in understanding the mechanism of SCC in caustic solutions. Favorable slip systems in the austenite phase of DSS favors slip-induced local film damage thereby initiating a stress corrosion crack. Repeated film repassivation and breaking, followed by crack tip dissolution results in crack propagation in the austenite phase of DSS alloys. Result from this study will have a significant impact in terms of identifying the alloy compositions, fabrication processes, microstructures, and environmental conditions that may be avoided to mitigate corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of DSS in caustic solutions.

  18. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  19. A model for prediction of possibility of localized corrosion attack of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    Empirical or semi-empirical relations were developed to express the dependence of the possibility (probability) of localized corrosion attack of various stainless steels on environmental factors. Only chloride induced attack within the range 0--100 C (32--212 F) is considered. The environmental variables considered include temperature, pH, chloride content, sulfate content, presence of oxidizing agents, crevices and deposits, flow rate and possibility of concentration of solution by evaporation. Common mathematical operations are used to formulate the trends into equations. Examples of the predictions of the model are given for type AISI 316 stainless steel in two environments: Baltic Sea water at 25 C and a solution containing 300 mg/l of chloride ions at 70 C.

  20. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp...

  2. Quantification of phase transformation in stainless steel 301LN sheets

    E-print Network

    Beese, Allison M

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the large deformation behavior of stainless steel 301LN cold-rolled sheets which is largely governed by the initial anisotropy combined with the phase transformation during deformation. Stainless ...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group...

  4. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  5. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties.

  6. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  7. Ultralight Stainless Steel Urban Bus Concept

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bruce Emmons; Leonard J. Blessing

    2001-05-14

    While stainless steel buses are certainly not new, this study reveals opportunities for substantial improvements in structural performance.The objective of this project was to investigate the mass saving potential of ultra-high strength stainless steel as applied to the structure of a full size urban transit bus.The resulting design for a low floor,hybrid bus has an empty weight less than half that of a conventional transit bus.The reduced curb weight allows for a greater payload,without exceeding legal axle limits. A combination of finite element modeling and dynamic testing of scale models was used to predict structural performance.

  8. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  13. Analysis of deformation induced martensitic transformation in stainless steels

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Analysis of deformation induced martensitic transformation in stainless steels A. Das1,2,3 , P. C of applied stress. Keywords: Austenitic stainless steels, Stress induced transformation, Strain induced that the crystallographic texture due to martensitic transformation can be predicted for 18/8 austenitic stainless steel

  14. Characterisation of severely deformed austenitic stainless steel wire

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Characterisation of severely deformed austenitic stainless steel wire H. S. Wang1 , J. R. Yang1 of 316L austenitic stainless steel has been examined using TEM and X-ray diffraction. The deformation: Martensite, Mechanical Stabilization, Interface structure, Stainless steel Introduction Textiles woven using

  15. High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial

    E-print Network

    High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial Electrolysis Cells D O U G L show here that high surface area stainless steel brush cathodes produce hydrogen at rates. Using a stainless steel brush cathode with a specific surface area of 810 m2 /m3 , hydrogen was produced

  16. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels

    E-print Network

    Siefert, Chris

    Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels: Type 316 of this information, whether direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential. #12;Austenitic Stainless Steels Type 316 & 316L Fe-18Cr-13Ni-2.5Mo 1. General Type 316 & 316L stainless steels are metastable

  17. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels

    E-print Network

    Siefert, Chris

    Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels: 22 of this information, whether direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential. #12;Austenitic Stainless Steels-13-5 is a nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steel that combines excellent corrosion resistance with high

  18. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels

    E-print Network

    Siefert, Chris

    Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Austenitic Stainless Steels: Type 304;Austenitic Stainless Steels Type 304 & 304L Fe-19Cr-10Ni May 16, 2005 Page 1 Code 2101 1. General Type 304 stainless steels are austenitic alloys that have a good combination of machinability, weldability

  19. Electrodissolution studies of 304 stainless steel in sodium nitrate electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1997-12-01

    To explore the impact of a wide range of operating parameters upon 304 stainless steel (SS) dissolution in sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}) electrolyte, the staff of Engineering Science Applications-Energy and Process Engineering performed a series of beaker experiments. The variables that the authors explored included NaNO{sub 3} concentration, chromate concentration, pH, stirring rate, and current density. They adjusted the run length to obtain approximately 10 mg/cm{sup 2} metal removal so that they could compare surface finishes under similar test conditions. Key findings may be summarized as follows. Current efficiency during dissolution depends most strongly upon current density and electrolyte concentration. At 0.05 A/cm{sup 2}, current density is more dependent upon chromium concentration than they previously thought. They obtained the best surface finish in a classical electropolishing regime at current densities above 1.5 A/cm{sup 2}. Mirror-like finishes were obtained at near 100% current efficiency. At 0.05 a/cm{sup 2} they obtained reasonable surface finishes, particularly at lower electrolyte concentration. Current efficiency was low (30%). At intermediate current densities, they obtained the worst surface finishes, that is, surfaces with severe pitting. Also, they explored preferential attack of the weld zone during electrodissolution of 304 stainless steel cans. Electrodissolution removed approximately twice as much material from cans with unshielded weld zones as from cans with shielded weld zones. The following implications are apparent. While operation above 1 A/cm{sup 2} yields the best surface finish at 100% current efficiency, equipment size and power feedthrough limitations reduce the attractiveness of this option. Because other Los Alamos researchers, obtained more favorable results with the sulfate electrolyte, the authors recommend no further work for the sodium nitrate electrolyte system.

  20. Martensitic Transformation During Compressive Deformation of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Its Quantitative Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreethi, R.; Sampark, P.; Majhi, Goutam Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2015-11-01

    This report aims to examine the extent of deformation-induced phase transformation in a non-conventional austenitic stainless steel known as ISO/TR 15510 X12CrMnNiN17-7-5, upon compressive loading at room temperature. Experiments were carried out under varying length to diameter ratios (0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6). TFE (Tetrafluoroethylene)-fluorocarbon tapes were used at specimen-platen interfaces to reduce the effect of friction. The results indicate that the lubrication was effective up to 15% of strain. Optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicated martensitic phase transformation in the deformed specimens. The extent of phase transformation was determined by analyzing the XRD peaks using integrated intensity of the corresponding phases. The results are correlated with the extent of deformation in the respective samples. The presence of ? and ?'-martensite on the deformed samples has been substantiated by some limited experiments using transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel type 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel type 301 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  2. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  3. Bondable Stainless Surface Coats Protect Against Rust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Shaffer, D. K.; Clearfield, H. M.; Nagle, D.; Groff, G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests conducted to assess use of bondable stainless surface (BOSS) coating materials to protect steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors against corrosion and to provide surface microstructure and chemistry suitable for bonding to insulating material. Eliminates need to cover cases with grease to prevent corrosion and degreasing immediately prior to use.

  4. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  5. Copper metallization of stainless steels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblum, B.Z.

    1994-09-01

    Stainless steel plates were vacuum metallized with pure copper films 0.004 inch thick. Prior to metallization the surfaces were cleaned with EPA-approved detergents. A thin layer of chromium was sputtered for improved adhesion followed by sputtering of the copper. Results showed excellent adhesion of the sputtered films to the substrates.

  6. Durable nonslip stainless-steel drivebelts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahiman, H.

    1979-01-01

    Two toothed stainless-steel drive belt retains its strength and flexibility in extreme heat or cold, intense radiation, or under high loading. Belt does not stretch or slip and is particularly suited to machinery for which replacement is difficult or impossible.

  7. Proof Testing Of Stainless-Steel Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng H.; Hendrickson, James A.; Bamford, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of development of method for nondestructive proof testing of bolts made of A286 stainless steel. Based on concept that the higher load bolt survives, the smaller the largest flaw and, therefore, the longer its fatigue life after test. Calculations and experiments increase confidence in nondestructive proof tests.

  8. Hexagonal arrangement of Ge clusters self-organized on a template of half unit cells of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 observed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Z. A.; Arai, T.; Tomitori, M.

    2005-01-01

    We observe initial nucleation of Ge clusters and their arrangement on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy on an atomic scale; germanium amounts of sub-monolayer are slowly deposited at room temperature at a rate of 0.005 ML/min, and post-annealed. The clusters are arranged uncovering the corner holes and dimer rows of 7 × 7 structure, resulting in a regular hexagonal arrangement of Ge clusters with a periodicity of half unit cell of 7 × 7. This presents direct evidence of the self-organized hexagonal arrangement formed on a template of the 7 × 7 periodicity, which has been under debate between Yan et al. [Surf. Sci. 506 (2002) L255] and Ratto and Rosei [Discussion: Surf. Sci. 530 (2003) 221].

  9. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

    2006-12-12

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  10. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  11. Silicon strain gages bonded on stainless steel using glass frit for strain sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongyang; Cheng, Xingguo; Leng, Yi; Cao, Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a steel pressure sensor using strain gages bonded on a 17-4 PH stainless steel (SS) diaphragm based on glass frit technology is proposed. The strain gages with uniform resistance are obtained by growing an epi-silicon layer on a single crystal silicon wafer using epitaxial deposition technique. The inorganic glass frits are used as the bonding material between the strain gages and the 17-4 PH SS diaphragm. Our results show that the output performances of sensors at a high temperature of 125 °C are almost equal those at room temperature, which indicates that the glass frit bonding is a good method and may lead to a significant advance in the high temperature applicability of silicon strain gage sensors. Finally, the microstructure of the cured organic adhesive and the fired glass frit are compared. It may be concluded that the defects of the cured organic adhesive deteriorate the hysteresis and repeatability errors of the sensors.

  12. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a “total impact energy” approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper.

  13. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  14. Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1995-04-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

  15. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 ?g of Ni and 86 ?g of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  16. 76 FR 43981 - Circular Welded Austenitic Stainless Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ...Austenitic Stainless Pressure Pipe from the People's Republic...austenitic stainless pressure pipe not greater than 14 inches in...specifications; (2) boiler, heat exchanger, superheater, refining...Jiuli Welded Stainless Steel Pipe Co., Ltd.'', dated...

  17. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that...ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates the guide to...

  18. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide (Revision 4) describes...ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the guide to remove...

  19. 75 FR 30434 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ...Review)] Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan...duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and...

  20. 75 FR 81309 - Stainless Steel Plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ...Review)] Stainless Steel Plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan...duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and...

  1. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...Review)] Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan...duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and...

  2. 76 FR 50495 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ...Second Review] Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan...duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan would...determinations regarding stainless steel plate from Belgium, Korea, South Africa, and...

  3. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ...Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the basis...by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel...stainless steel pressure pipe from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Accordingly,...

  4. 75 FR 30437 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ...731-TA-798-803 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany...countervailing duty order on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from...

  5. 75 FR 67110 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ...640 (Third Review)] Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan...antidumping duty orders on forged stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan...antidumping duty orders on forged stainless steel flanges from India and...

  6. 77 FR 3231 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...Administration [A-533-808] Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation...antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods from India would likely...antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods (``wire...

  7. 75 FR 81308 - Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, And Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ...731-TA-798-803 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany...countervailing duty order on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from...

  8. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...731-TA-798-803 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany...countervailing duty order on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from...

  9. 78 FR 7395 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ...Administration [A-533-810] Stainless Steel Bar From India: Preliminary...the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from India. The...Duty Administrative Review: Stainless Steel Bar from India'' dated...

  10. 77 FR 39467 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ...Administration [A-533-810] Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results...the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from India. The review covers...2012, the Department published Stainless Steel Bar From India:...

  11. 77 FR 41969 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ...Administration [A-588-833] Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of...the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Japan (the Order...Suruga to the Secretary, ``Stainless Steel Bar--Withdrawal of...

  12. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...and 564 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From...the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from...the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings...

  13. Corrosion Resistance of Amorphous Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 coating - a new criticality-controlled material

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. Modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in various relevant environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  14. Long-Term Corrosion Tests of Prototypical SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R H; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P D; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-05-10

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  15. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed. PMID:23378148

  16. Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ºC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  17. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance, which is not impaired upon carburization. The passive film as analyzed by XPS is fully intact. Carbon concentration levels in PH13-8Mo reach 10 at.% and correlate with a surface hardness of up to 14GPa. Indication for the transformation from martensite to austenite during the process are observed. In this context, the shape of the carbon concentration-depth profile can be explained. Also the absence of carbides, as analyzed by TEM, can be rationalized. Upon cooling to room temperature, most of the austenite backtransforms into martensite and the surface regains its ferromagnetic properties. Compressive biaxial residual stresses in carburized PH13-8Mo are measured around (2--2.5)GPa. The applied low-temperature carburization process gives rise to a substantial loss in corrosion resistance of PH13-8Mo. Possible reasons including the observed formation of internal and external oxides as well as the change in alloy composition are discussed. Due to the penetration depth of X-rays into the probed specimen surface, a carbon concentration gradient may cause detectable asymmetry of diffraction peaks for certain alloys and under certain conditions. For the first time, this effect is rationalized, explained, and demonstrated on the basis of measured data.

  18. Variant selection in samples of austenitic stainless steel cold

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Variant selection in samples of austenitic stainless steel cold rolled and deformed by tension texture of samples deformed by cold rolling. ­ Comparing texture measured by EBSD in cold rolled samples Tensor for deformation in a tension test Tensor for deformation by cold rolling #12;Austenitic stainless

  19. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  20. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  1. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  2. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  3. Laser-assisted microscale deformation of stainless steels and ceramics

    E-print Network

    Xu, Xianfan

    Laser-assisted microscale deformation of stainless steels and ceramics Guofei Chen Xianfan Xu steel and ceramics due to laser irradiation. A pulsed Nd:YLF laser beam is used to scan over Abstract. We investigate deformation of stainless steel and ceramic specimens with a precision of the order

  4. Generation of stainless steel superhydrophobic surfaces using WEDM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanling; Liu, Xianping; Qi, Houjun

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a novel fabrication methodology for generating superhydrophobic surfaces on stainless steel. The Wire Electric Discharge Machining (WEDM) technique was utilized to change the wettability of stainless steel which is generally hydrophilic. Superhydrophobic surfaces were obtained on the stainless steel by strictly control the machining progress. The mechanism of wettability modulation was explored using the well-established surface metrology and characterisation instruments. It was noted that WEDM can be used to generate a recast layer on stainless steel surface. There was a number of hierarchic micro-structures in the irregular recast layer and the number of micro-holes increases the contact area between the water drop and the top surface of stainless steel. Thus, the contact angle was significantly increased and the wettability of stainless steel changed from hydrophilic into hydrophobic. Compared with other established fabrication approaches, the stainless steel based hydrophobic surface can provide long durability, high efficiency and low cost metallic surfaces, which paves the way for the practical applications of stainless steel hydrophobic surfaces in the academic and engineering fields.

  5. VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE FACILITY WAS DESCRIBED AS THE MOST MODERN NON-NUCLEAR MANUFACTURING BUILDING IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPLEX, WITH MANY PRECISION INSTRUMENTS. (9/21/83) - Rocky Flats Plant, Stainless Steel & Non-Nuclear Components Manufacturing, Southeast corner of intersection of Cottonwood & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... the notice in the Federal Register of March 7, 2012 (77 FR 13631). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... reason of imports from China of drawn stainless sinks, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of...

  7. 77 FR 64545 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... respect to electronic filing have been amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Scheduling of the final phase of countervailing duty and... retarded, by reason of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of drawn stainless...

  8. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ..., Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register on October 22, 2012 (77 FR 64545). The... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized...

  9. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Tulinski M; Jurczyk M

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts).

  10. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts). PMID:23421285

  11. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  12. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  13. 1. Introduction Austenitic stainless steels have many applications in

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    1. Introduction Austenitic stainless steels have many applications in industry for their corrosion such as a typical stainless steel, is that the solutes have different diffusivities, and yet must reach in equilibrium with the matrix (g). This is henceforth referred to as the flux-bal- ance condition. In steels

  14. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION. STAINLESS STEEL WAS MACHINED IN SIDE A OF THE BUILDING, BEGINNING IN 1957. (4/24/78) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Coping with PH over the Long Term

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Ask a PHriend Connect with Other ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Ask a PHriend Connect with Other ...

  16. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  17. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W. F.; Toben, P. T.; Soppet, W. K.; Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-03-03

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  18. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  19. Dislocation substructure in fatigued duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno . Academy of Sciences); Degallaix, S. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille); Kruml, T. . Academy of Sciences)

    1993-12-15

    Cyclic plastic straining of crystalline materials results in the formation of specific dislocation structures. Considerable progress in mapping and understanding internal dislocation structures has been achieved by studying single crystal behavior: however, most structural materials have a polycrystalline structure and investigations of polycrystals in comparison to single crystal behavior of simple metals prove to be very useful in understanding more complex materials. There are some classes of materials, however, with complicated structure which do not have a direct equivalent in single crystalline form. Moreover, the specific dimensions and shapes of individual crystallites play an important role both in the cyclic stress-strain response of these materials and in the formation of their interior structure in cyclic straining. Austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel, which is a kind of a natural composite, is a material of this type. The widespread interest in the application of duplex steels is caused by approximately doubled mechanical properties and equal corrosion properties, when compared with classical austenitic stainless steels. Fatigue resistance of these steels as well as the surface damage evolution in cyclic straining have been studied; however, much less is known about the internal substructure development in cyclic straining. In this study the dislocation arrangement in ferritic and austenitic grains of the austenitic-ferritic duplex steel alloyed with nitrogen and cyclically strained with two strain amplitudes, is reported and compared to the dislocation arrangement found in single and polycrystals of austenitic and ferritic materials of a similar composition and with the surface relief produced in cyclic plastic straining.

  20. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  1. Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagnall, Christopher (Hempfield, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield, PA)

    1985-01-01

    For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

  2. Repair welding of irradiated 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Rankin, D.T.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) of repair welds cracked when patches were welded to the tank wall of a nuclear reactor at the Savannah River Site. The cracking was caused by helium embrittlement. The presence of helium generated in irradiated type 304 stainless steel by neutron interaction with boron and nickel impairs weld repair. Welds on material with as little as one part per million helium generated by exposure to a thermal neutron fluence of 1{times}10{sup 21}n/cm{sup 2} developed substantial cracking in the weld heat-affected zone. Evaluation of conventional welds made on type 304 stainless steel containing 1 to 12 appm helium generated by neutron irradiation, or 3 to 220 appm helium generated by tritium decay, demonstrated cracking of the weld heat-affected zones. A newly developed, low penetration, weld overlay technique mitigates cracking by modifying the stress and temperature profile in the weld heat-affected zone. These results demonstrated the potential for a practical welding alternative to mechanical clamping for repair of irradiated material. The helium embrittlement process proceeds with the formation of helium bubbles, followed by agglomeration and growth of bubbles under the influence of the heat and stress of welding. To determine the effect of stress on weld quality in practical situations, a series of test welds with various conditions of mechanical restraint was evaluated. Generally, higher restraint produced greater cracking of the welds.

  3. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the borate mineral ezcurrite Na4B10O17·7H2O - Implications for the molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Theiss, Frederick L.; Scholz, Ricardo; Belotti, Fernanda M.

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the boron containing mineral ezcurrite Na4B10O17·7H2O using electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Both tetrahedral and trigonal boron units are observed. The nominal resolution of the Raman spectrometer is of the order of 2 cm-1 and as such is sufficient enough to identify separate bands for the stretching bands of the two boron isotopes. The Raman band at 1037 cm-1 is assigned to BO stretching vibration. Raman bands at 1129, 1163, 1193 cm-1 are attributed to BO stretching vibration of the tetrahedral units. The Raman band at 947 cm-1 is attributed to the antisymmetric stretching modes of tetrahedral boron. The sharp Raman peak at 1037 cm-1 is from the 11-B component such a mode, then it should have a smaller 10-B satellite near (1.03) × (1037) = 1048 cm-1, and indeed a small peak at 1048 is observed. The broad Raman bands at 3186, 3329, 3431, 3509, 3547 and 3576 cm-1 are assigned to water stretching vibrations. Broad infrared bands at 3170, 3322, 3419, 3450, 3493, 3542, 3577 and 3597 cm-1 are also assigned to water stretching vibrations. Infrared bands at 1330, 1352, 1389, 1407, 1421 and 1457 cm-1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of trigonal boron. The observation of so many bands suggests that there is considerable variation in the structure of ezcurrite. Infrared bands at 1634, 1646 and 1681 cm-1 are assigned to water bending modes. The number of water bending modes is in harmony with the number of water stretching vibrations.

  4. 76 FR 1599 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ...A-351-825] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...duty order on stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/exporter...order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. See Stainless Steel Bar From...

  5. 75 FR 39663 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ...A-351-825] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/exporter...order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. See Stainless Steel Bar From...

  6. Experimental Study of Fouling and Cleaning of Sintered Stainless Steel Membrane in Electro-Microfiltration of Calcium Salt Particles

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Frank G. F.; Mawson, John; Zeng, Xin An

    2011-01-01

    Sintered stainless steel (SSS) microfiltration membranes, which served as electrode directly, were used for the experiment of separating Alamin, a calcium salt and protein containing particles, found in dairy processing. Fouling and cleaning of the SSS membranes under the application of an external electric field were studied. The imposed electric field was found, diverging the pH of permeate and retentate. This in turn altered the solubility of the calcium salt and impacted the performance of electro microfiltration membrane. Using electric field as an enhanced cleaning-in-place (CIP) method in back flushing SSS membrane was also studied. PMID:24957615

  7. Experimental study of fouling and cleaning of sintered stainless steel membrane in electro-microfiltration of calcium salt particles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Frank G F; Mawson, John; Zeng, Xin An

    2011-01-01

    Sintered stainless steel (SSS) microfiltration membranes, which served as electrode directly, were used for the experiment of separating Alamin, a calcium salt and protein containing particles, found in dairy processing. Fouling and cleaning of the SSS membranes under the application of an external electric field were studied. The imposed electric field was found, diverging the pH of permeate and retentate. This in turn altered the solubility of the calcium salt and impacted the performance of electro microfiltration membrane. Using electric field as an enhanced cleaning-in-place (CIP) method in back flushing SSS membrane was also studied. PMID:24957615

  8. THE CLEANING OF 303 STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2004-04-20

    The sulfur found on the surfaces of stainless steel 303 (SS303) after nitric acid passivation originated from the MnS inclusions in the steel. The nitric acid attacked and dissolved these MnS inclusions, and redeposited micron-sized elemental sulfur particles back to the surface. To develop an alternative passivation procedure for SS303, citric and phosphoric acids have been evaluated. The experimental results show neither acid causes a significant amount of sulfur deposit. Thus, these two acids can be used as alternatives to nitric acid passivation for NIF applications. For SS303 previously passivated by nitric acid, NaOH soak can be used as a remedial cleaning process to effectively remove the sulfur deposits.

  9. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  10. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  11. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braski, David N. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rowcliffe, Arthur F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  12. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  13. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  14. Void coalescence in core/alloy nanoparticles with stainless interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjie; Maye, Mathew M

    2014-01-29

    The oxidation properties of nanoparticles with core/alloy microstructure and stainless steel like interfaces is described. In particular, 15-nm Fe/FeCr nanoparticles with a stainless steel like interface are prepared. These particles show a unique morphological transformation that is induced by surface oxidation, oxide passivation, and vacancy coalescence. This Kirkendall diffusion results in a tailorable oxide layer thickness, Fe-core size, as well as void size and symmetry. Much like the interface of bulk stainless steel, the interfacial FeCr oxide passivates oxidation, resulting in self-limited diffusion. Because of this, a highly uniform and stable core-void-shell morphology is observed. PMID:23881842

  15. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  16. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  17. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Langry, Kevin C. (Tracy, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  18. Cryogenic coefficient of thermal expansion measurements of type 440 and 630 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cease, H.; Alvarez, M.; Flaugher, B.; Montes, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is now installed on the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is cooled to 170K using a closed loop two-phase liquid nitrogen system. A submerged centrifugal pump is used to circulate the liquid from the base of the telescope to the camera in the prime focus cage. As part of the pump maintenance schedule, the rotor shaft bearings are periodically replaced. Common bearing and shaft materials are type 440 and 630 (17-4 PH) stainless steel. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials used is needed to predict the shaft and bearing housing dimensional changes at the 77K pump operating temperature. The thermal expansion from room temperature to 77K of type 440 and 630 stainless steel is presented . Measurements are performed using the ASTM E228 standard with a quartz push-rod dilatometer test stand. Aluminum 6061-T6 is used to calibrate the test stand.

  19. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Care for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. Traditionally, these components have been fabricated using expensive materials such as light weight titanium alloys, polymeric composite materials and carbon-carbon composites. The present study investigates the use of P sandwich foam fan blade made up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by a foam core. The resulting structure possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. Since the face sheets carry the applied bending loads, the sandwich architecture is a viable engineering concept. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of the sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and P detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of skin thickness and core volume %re presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  20. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  1. Low pH affects survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of the postlarvae and early juveniles of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Gunzo; Bagarinao, Teodora; Yong, Annita Seok Kian; Chen, Chiau Yu; Noor, Siti Norasidah Mat; Lim, Leong Seng

    2015-06-01

    Acidification of rain water caused by air pollutants is now recognized as a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems. We examined the effects of low pH (control pH 7.5, pH 6, pH 5, pH 4) on the survival, growth, and shell quality of Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles in the laboratory. Hatcheryproduced postlarvae (PL 5) were stocked at 250 PL per aquarium, acclimated over 7 d to experimental pH adjusted with hydrochloric acid, and reared for 30 d. Dead specimens were removed and counted twice a day. After 27 d rearing, all specimens were measured for total length and body weight. Carapace quality was assessed by spectrophotometry. Survival of juveniles was highest at pH 6 (binomial 95% confidence interval 79 - 89%) followed by control pH 7.5 (56 - 68%) and pH 5 (50 - 60%) and was lowest for unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles at pH 4 (43 - 49%). The final median total length and body weight of juveniles were similar at control pH 7.5 (18.2 TL, 50.2 mg BW) and pH 6 (17.7 mm TL, 45.0 mg BW) but significantly less at pH 5 (16.7 mm TL, 38.2 mg BW); at pH 4, the postlarvae did not metamorphose and measured only 9.8 mm TL, 29.3 mg BW. Length frequency distribution showed homogeneous growth at pH 6, positive skew at control pH 7.5 and pH 5, and extreme heterogeneity at pH 4. The carapace showed different transmittance spectra and lower total transmittance (i.e. thicker carapace) in juveniles at pH 7.5, pH 6, and pH 5 than in unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles with thinner carapace at pH 4. Thus, survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of M. rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles were negatively affected by pH 5 and especially pH 4. The thinner carapace of the survivors at pH 4 was mostly due to their small size and failure to metamorphose. Natural waters affected by acid rain could decimate M. rosenbergii populations in the wild.

  2. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  3. Bioactivity evaluation of titanium/hydroxyapatite composite coating on stainless steel prepared by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Nurul Humaira; Talari, Mahesh Kumar; Koong, Chue Keen

    2015-08-01

    In this study, titanium powder mixed with different wt % of HA was coated on stainless steel (SS) substrate using high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique to produce composite coating for biomedical applications. As the addition of HA is expected to influence the bioactivity of the coatings, these coatings were investigated for bioactivity by immersing the samples in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 14 days. The apatite growth rate was evaluated by measuring Ca and P concentration in the SBF using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The concentrations of Ca and P have decreased over time in the SBF, suggesting a bone like apatite precipitation on the sample surface. It was observed that pH value increased with the increase of immersion time during initial three days and a subsequent drop after 7 days. Microstructure analysis done using FESEM technique showed nucleation and growth of bone-like apatite on the surface of the coating.

  4. Multiple rhyolite magmas and basalt injection in the 17.7 ka Rerewhakaaitu eruption episode from Tarawera volcanic complex, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, Phil; Martin, S. B.; Smith, V. C.; Beggs, K. F.; Darragh, M. B.; Cole, J. W.; Nairn, I. A.

    2007-07-01

    The 17.7 ka Rerewhakaaitu eruption episode (volume ˜ 5 km 3 DRE rhyolite magma) was the second of five major episodes that have built the Tarawera volcanic complex in the Okataina Volcanic Centre over the past 22 kyr. The Rerewhakaaitu episode produced a widespread tephra fall deposit, associated proximal pyroclastic flow deposits, and voluminous rhyolite lava extrusions. Two different rhyolite magmas (T1 and T2) were simultaneously erupted from the main vent area throughout much of the eruption episode. T1 magma was a crystal-poor orthopyroxene-hornblende rhyolite that is highly evolved (whole rock SiO 2 = 77 wt.%), with a moderate temperature (˜ 760 °C, based on Fe-Ti oxides). T2 is a crystal-rich biotite-hornblende rhyolite that is less evolved (SiO 2 = 75 wt.%), with a Fe-Ti oxide temperature of ˜ 700 °C. Ejecta from the simultaneous and sequential eruption of these two magmas include some pumice clasts with mixed (hybrid) and mingled glass compositions and crystal populations. A third rhyolite magma (T3) was extruded from another vent 3 km distant to form an apparently contemporaneous lava dome. T3 was the least evolved (SiO 2 = 74 wt.%) and hottest (˜ 820 °C) of the three magmas. Saturation pressures calculated using dissolved H 2O and CO 2 contents of melt inclusions in quartz crystals indicate that T2 magma stagnated and crystallised at about 12 km depth, while small quartz crystals in T1 magma grew during ascent through ˜ 8 km depths. Some T1 and T2 rhyolite clasts contain vesicular brown blebs with widely variable (andesite to rhyolite) glass compositions, accompanied by olivine, clinopyroxene and calcic plagioclase crystals that are interpreted as xenocrysts derived from injected basalt. Temperatures over 1000 °C estimated from pyroxene phase equilibria in these clasts reflect intrusion of the more mafic magma, which is now identified as the priming and triggering mechanism for three of the four post-22 ka Tarawera rhyolite eruption episodes. However, the rhyolite magma bodies and conduits modelled for each episode have considerable differences in characteristics and geometry. Our preferred model for the Rerewhakaaitu episode is that eruptions occurred from three laterally and vertically isolated rhyolite magma bodies that were initially primed and triggered by basalt intrusion during a regional rifting event. The ascending hotter and less viscous T1 rhyolite magma intersected and further invigorated a stagnant pond of cooler, denser and more viscous T2 magma, and lubricated its transport to the surface.

  5. Fabrication of stainless steel clad tubing. [gas pressure bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of producing stainless steel clad carbon steel tubing by a gas pressure bonding process was evaluated. Such a tube product could provide substantial chromium savings over monolithic stainless tubing in the event of a serious chromium shortage. The process consists of the initial assembly of three component tubesets from conventionally produced tubing, the formation of a strong metallurgical bond between the three components by gas pressure bonding, and conventional cold draw and anneal processing to final size. The quality of the tubes produced was excellent from the standpoint of bond strength, mechanical, and forming properties. The only significant quality problem encountered was carburization of the stainless clad by the carbon steel core which can be overcome by further refinement through at least three different approaches. The estimated cost of clad tubing produced by this process is greater than that for monolithic stainless tubing, but not so high as to make the process impractical as a chromium conservation method.

  6. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  7. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  9. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  10. Steam oxidation of boron carbide-stainless steel liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, C.

    2012-08-01

    In the framework of nuclear reactor core meltdown accidents studies, the oxidation kinetics of boron carbide-stainless steel liquid mixtures exposed to argon/steam atmospheres was investigated at temperatures up to 1527 °C. A B-Cr-Si-O liquid protective layer forms on the surface of the mixtures in contact with steam. This protective layer gradually transforms into a Cr2O3-rich slag. Important quantities of liquid can be projected from the melt during oxidation. These projections are favoured by high B4C contents in the melt, high steam partial pressures and low temperatures. In addition to stainless steel-boron carbide melts, simpler compositions (pure 304L stainless steel, iron-boron, iron-boron carbide and stainless steel-boron) were studied, in order to identify the basic oxidation mechanisms.

  11. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yawas, D. S.; Aku, S. Y.; Aluko, S. O.

    The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10-5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10-5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  12. 27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF WASHINGTON, MISSOURI. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TOWARD VAULT OF THE TWELVE APOSTLES - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  13. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES THAT INTRODUCED SMOKE INTO UNIT; FLOOR IS UNPAINTED STEEL - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  14. Weak ferromagnetism in `non-magnetic' austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crangle, John; Fogarty, A.; Taylor, M. J.

    1992-06-01

    The magnetization and susceptability of the non-magnetic stainless steels AISI 304 and AISI 316 have been measured at low temperatures using a SQUID magnetometer. A small but stable ferromagnetic component is always present. Field cooling shows the effects of exchange anisotropy. Another stainless steel AISI 321 is non-magnetic at room temperature but it transforms irreversibly to a partially ferromagnetic state when it is cooled below 280 K.

  15. Nickel in food: the role of stainless-steel utensils.

    PubMed

    Brun, R

    1979-01-01

    Nickel may be found in prepared foods (tinned foods) at markedly higher concentrations than the safe threshold laid down for hypersensitive patients. Some foodstuffs cooked in stainless-steel utensils attack the metal and thus contain much more nickel than when enamel or aluminum saucepans are used. Among the natural organic acids which may be responsible for dissolving stainless-steel, oxalic acid is the most active at equivalent concentrations. PMID:421457

  16. Measurement of intergranular attack in stainless steel using ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Mott, Gerry (Pittsburgh, PA); Attaar, Mustan (Monroeville, PA); Rishel, Rick D. (Monroeville, PA)

    1989-08-08

    Ultrasonic test methods are used to measure the depth of intergranular attack (IGA) in a stainless steel specimen. The ultrasonic test methods include a pitch-catch surface wave technique and a through-wall pulse-echo technique. When used in combination, these techniques can establish the extent of IGA on both the front and back surfaces of a stainless steel specimen from measurements made on only one surface.

  17. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  18. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  19. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L ..-->.. L + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma... In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions.

  20. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

  1. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Migdalia Denis PH Association Leaders' Corner Email Group Seed Grant Program Seed Grant Application Form Become an MOU-holding PHA ... Migdalia Denis PH Association Leaders' Corner Email Group Seed Grant Program Seed Grant Application Form Become an ...

  2. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePLUS

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  3. Standard test method for evaluating stress-corrosion cracking of stainless alloys with different nickel content in boiling acidified sodium chloride solution

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in an acidified boiling sodium chloride solution. This test method is performed in 25% (by mass ) sodium chloride acidified to pH 1.5 with phosphoric acid. This test method is concerned primarily with the test solution and glassware, although a specific style of U-bend test specimen is suggested. 1.2 This test method is designed to provide better correlation with chemical process industry experience for stainless steels than the more severe boiling magnesium chloride test of Practice G36. Some stainless steels which have provided satisfactory service in many environments readily crack in Practice G36, but have not cracked during interlaboratory testing using this sodium chloride test method. 1.3 This boiling sodium chloride test method was used in an interlaboratory test program to evaluate wrought stainless steels, including duplex (ferrite-austenite) stainless and an alloy with up to about 33% nickel. It may also b...

  4. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D. (Kennewick, WA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  5. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  6. Radiation-induced swelling of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Shewmon, P G

    1971-09-10

    Significant swelling (1 to 10 percent due to small voids have been found in stainless steel when it is exposed to fast neutron doses less than expected in commercial fast breeder reactors. The main features of this new effect are: (i) the voids are formed by the precipitation of a small fraction of the radiation-produced vacancies; (ii) the voids form primarily in the temperature range 400 degrees to 600 degrees C (750 degrees to 1100 degrees F); and (iii) the volume increases with dose (fluence) at a rate between linear and parabolic. The limited temperature range of void formation can be explained, but the effects of fluence, microstructure, and composition are determined by a competition between several kinetic processes that are not well understood. This swelling does not affect the feasibility or safety of the breeder reactor,but will have a significant impact on the core design and economics of the breeder.Preliminary results indicate that one cannot eliminate the effect,but cold-working,heat treatment, or small changes in composition can reduce the swelling by a factor of 2 or more. Testing is hampered by the fact that several years in EBR-II are required to accumulate the fluence expected in demonstration plants. Heavyion accelerators,which allow damage rates corresponding to much higher fluxes than those found in EBR-II,hold great promise for short-term tests that will indicate the relative effect of the important variables. PMID:17796573

  7. Stainless steel tube-based cell cryopreservation containers.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wei-Hung; Yu, Zong-Yan; Wu, Wei-Te

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on increasing the freezing rate in cell vitrification cryopreservation by using a cryopreservation container possessing rigid mechanical properties and high heat-transfer efficiency. Applying a fast freezing rate in vitrification cryopreservation causes a rapid temperature change in the cryopreservation container and has a substantial impact on mechanical properties; therefore, a highly rigid cryopreservation container that possesses a fast freezing rate must be developed. To produce a highly rigid cryopreservation container possessing superior heat transfer efficiency, this study applies an electrochemical machining (ECM) method to an ANSI 316L stainless steel tube to treat the surface material by polishing and roughening, thereby increasing the freezing rate and reducing the probability of ice crystal formation. The results indicated that the ECM method provided high-quality surface treatment of the stainless steel tube. This method can reduce internal surface roughness in the stainless steel tube, thereby reducing the probability of ice crystal formation, and increase external surface roughness, consequently raising convection heat-transfer efficiency. In addition, by thinning the stainless steel tube, this method reduces heat capacity and thermal resistance, thereby increasing the freezing rate. The freezing rate (3399 ± 197 °C/min) of a stainless steel tube after interior and exterior polishing and exterior etching by applying ECM compared with the freezing rate (1818 ± 54 °C/min) of an original stainless steel tube was increased by 87%, which also exceeds the freezing rate (2015 ± 49 °C/min) of an original quartz tube that has a 20% lower heat capacity. However, the results indicated that increasing heat-transferring surface areas and reducing heat capacities cannot effectively increase the freezing rate of a stainless steel tube if only one method is applied; instead, both techniques must be implemented concurrently to improve the freezing rate. PMID:23993919

  8. 77 FR 24459 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ...1\\ See Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings...is certain stainless steel, butt-weld pipe fittings...product encompasses all grades of stainless steel and ``commodity...Fittings, or its foreign equivalents (e.g., DIN or...

  9. 78 FR 21592 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...Administration [A-570-983] Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's Republic...antidumping duty order on drawn stainless steel sinks (``drawn sinks...1\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's...

  10. 76 FR 67672 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Review of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ...Administration [A-533-808] Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Final...antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods from India, pursuant...antidumping duty order on certain stainless steel wire rods from India (wire...

  11. 76 FR 38686 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ...731-TA-638 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Institution...the Antidumping Duty Order on Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India AGENCY...the antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod from India would...

  12. 78 FR 72864 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of New Shipper Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ...Administration [A-570-983] Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic...antidumping duty order on drawn stainless steel sinks (``drawn sinks...1\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's...

  13. 75 FR 27987 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ...A-580-810] Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea...duty order on certain welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the Republic...from Korea. See Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes from the Republic of...

  14. 76 FR 64105 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...731-TA-638 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Scheduling...the Antidumping Duty Order on Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India AGENCY...the antidumping duty order on stainless steel wire rod from India would...

  15. Sintered Intermetallic Reinforced 434L Ferritic Stainless Steel Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, A.; Balaji, S.

    2009-03-01

    The present study examines the effect of aluminide (Ni3Al, Fe3Al) additions on the sintering behavior of ferritic 434L stainless steels during solid-state sintering (SSS) and supersolidus liquid-phase sintering (SLPS). 434L stainless steel matrix composites containing 5 and 10 wt pct of each aluminide were consolidated at 1200 °C (SSS) and 1400 °C (SLPS). The effects of sintering and aluminide additions on the densification, microstructural evolution, mechanical, tribological, and corrosion behavior of sintered ferritic (434L) stainless steels were investigated. The performances of the 434L-aluminide composites were compared with the straight 434L stainless steels processed at similar conditions. Supersolidus sintering resulted in significant improvement in densification, mechanical, wear, and corrosion resistance in both straight 434L and 434L-aluminide composites. Fe3Al additions to 434L stainless steels result in improved wear resistance without significant degradation of corrosion resistance in 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution.

  16. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  17. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  18. Author s note: Marie F. Smith, CRA;Valerie T. Eviner, PhD; Kathie Weathers, PhD; Maria Uriarte, PhD; Holly Ewing, PhD; Jonathan M. Jeschke, PhD; Peter Groffman, PhD; Clive G. Jones, PhD; Institute of Ecosystem Studies, 65 Sharon Turnpike (PO

    E-print Network

    Eviner, Valerie

    Uriarte, PhD; Holly Ewing, PhD; Jonathan M. Jeschke, PhD; Peter Groffman, PhD; Clive G. Jones, Ph. Eviner, PhD Kathie C. Weathers, PhD Maria Uriarte, PhD Holly A. Ewing, PhD Jonathan M. Jeschke, PhD Peter

  19. PLC-9 Non Rusting Stainless Steel Column 10" Square with Radius Corners

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    PLC-9 Non Rusting Stainless Steel Column 10" Square with Radius Corners Unit includes two lights General Specifications of PLC-9 Column Non Rusting, Non Magnetic Stainless Steel - .125" Thick Dimensions

  20. The hardening of Type 316L stainless steel welds with thermal aging

    E-print Network

    Ayers, Lauren Juliet

    2012-01-01

    Welded stainless steel piping is a component of boiling water reactors (BWRs). Reirculation and other large diameter piping are fabricated from Type 304 or 316 stainless steels. Delta ferrite is present in welds, because ...

  1. 76 FR 31588 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Rescission of Countervailing Duty Administrative...on stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty...revocation of this order from the Government of Belgium (``GOB'') via administrative...

  2. 78 FR 34644 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium, covering the period of review (POR...subject merchandise, Aperam Stainless Belgium N.V. (ASB). We have...

  3. 78 FR 31574 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ...Preliminary)] Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations...materially retarded, by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe,...

  4. 78 FR 35253 - Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ...Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam...Artman (Malaysia), Victoria Cho (Thailand), or Fred Baker (Vietnam), at...welded stainless pipe) from Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of...

  5. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL BIOFILM ON STAINLESS STEEL BY HYPERSPECTRAL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques were investigated for detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel plates typically used to manufacture food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures consisting of nonpathogenic E. coli, Pseudo...

  6. 77 FR 13631 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China; Institution and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...701-TA-489 and 731-TA-1201 (Preliminary)] Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China; Institution and Scheduling of Preliminary...retarded, by reason of imports from China of drawn stainless steel sinks, provided for in subheading 7324.10 of...

  7. 76 FR 8773 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ...731-TA-639 and 640 (Third Review)] Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan AGENCY: United States...revocation of the antidumping duty orders on forged stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan would be likely to...

  8. Fume generation rates for stainless steel, nickel and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, H.R.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes a study of the effects of pulsed welding current on fume produced during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of stainless steel, nickel, and aluminum alloys. This is an extension of earlier studies of mild steel electrode wire. Reduction of welding fume is important because steady current GMAW of stainless steels and nickel alloys may produce fume that exceeds recommended worker exposure limits for some of the fume constituents. Fume generation from aluminum alloy ER5356 was studied because steady current welding with this alloy produces much higher fume generation rates than ER4043 alloy electrode wire. This work shows that pulsed current can reduce GMAW fume generation rates for Er308L, ER310, and ER312 stainless steel, ERNiCr-3 nickel alloy, and ER5356 aluminum-magnesium alloy electrode wires.

  9. Corrosion in lithium-stainless steel thermal-convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion of types 304L and 316 austenitic stainless steel by flowing lithium was studied in thermal-convection loops operated at 500 to 650/sup 0/C. Both weight and compositional changes were measured on specimens distributed throughout each loop and were combined with metallographic examinations to evaluate the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate and mass transfer characteristics did not significantly differ between the two austenitic stainless steels. Addition of 500 or 1700 wt ppM N to purified lithium did not increase the dissolution rate or change the attack mode of type 316 stainless steel. Adding 5 wt % Al to the lithium reduced the weight loss of this steel by a factor of 5 relative to a pure lithium-thermal-convection loop.

  10. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  11. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    SciTech Connect

    Coteata, Margareta; Pop, Nicolae; Slatineanu, Laurentiu; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Besliu, Irina

    2011-05-04

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  12. Practical handbook of stainless steels and nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, S.

    1999-07-01

    This new handbook is an up-to-date technical guide to the grades, properties, fabrication characteristics, and applications of stainless steels and nickel alloys. The individual chapters were written by industry experts and focus on the key properties and alloy characteristics important in material selection and specification as well as the practical factors that influence the development and application of these materials. The contents include: alloy grades and their welding and fabrication characteristics and their application; monel metal; iron-based and nickel-based alloys; ferritic, austenitic, superaustenitic, and martensitic stainless steels; hastelloys; alloys 20, G, and 825; AOD and new refining technology; duplex stainless steels; 6-Mo alloys; corrosion-resistant castings; specification cross-reference tables; trade names; hardness conversions; list of common abbreviations.

  13. Characterizing pre-polished Type 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.; Summer, M.E.; Rankin, W.N.

    1994-10-01

    Prepolished Type 304L stainless steel surfaces are being specified for replacement of some equipment in the 221-H Canyon Building at the Savannah River Site. A prepolished stainless steel surface picks up less contamination than a hot-rolled and pickled surface and is easier to decontaminate; therefore, less waste is generated. Surface-characterization techniques and specification for a prepolished surface were developed to ensure that prepolished items being obtained were properly electropolished. The use of this technology has resulted in obtaining prepolished items with an improved surface finish.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  15. Microstructure and texture of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2008-12-15

    The microstructure, texture and grain boundary character distribution of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of alloying elements such as Ti and Nb to ferritic stainless steel causes the formation of TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb. The textures of cold rolled samples were dominated by the {alpha}-fiber, while the textures of annealed samples exhibit a very strong {gamma}-fiber. The changes in texture are closely related to the grain boundary characteristics.

  16. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  17. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  18. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  19. Author's personal copy Magnetic properties of stainless steels at room and cryogenic temperatures

    E-print Network

    Oxley, Paul

    Author's personal copy Magnetic properties of stainless steels at room and cryogenic temperatures: Magnetic measurement Ferromagnetic property Stainless steel Martensitic Ferritic a b s t r a c t The magnetic properties of ten types of ferritic and martensitic stainless steels have been measured at room

  20. 75 FR 67689 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ...A-351-825] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/ exporter...order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. See Antidumping Duty Orders:...

  1. 78 FR 4383 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ...A-351-825] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...order on stainless steel bar (SSB) from Brazil. The period of review (POR) is February...Administrative Review: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil'' dated concurrently with this...

  2. 75 FR 12514 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ...A-351-825] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. The review covers one producer/ exporter...order on certain stainless steel bar from Brazil. See Antidumping Duty Orders:...

  3. 76 FR 28809 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium; Termination of Five-Year Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...Review)] Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium; Termination of Five-Year Review AGENCY...duty order on stainless steel plate from Belgium (75 FR 30777 and 75 FR 30434). On May...concerning stainless steel plate from Belgium, finding that revocation of the...

  4. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  5. 76 FR 46323 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and...on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, and Mexico \\2\\ would not be...to stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, and Mexico, and...

  6. PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Stainless steel weld metal designed to

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Stainless steel weld metal designed to mitigate design methods have been used to create a stainless steel welding consumable which solidifies as d to be significantly better than commercially available martensitic stainless steel welding consumables, and it has

  7. Scripta Materialia 55 (2006) 779-781 Transformation Texture in Deformed Stainless Steel

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    2006-01-01

    Scripta Materialia 55 (2006) 779-781 Transformation Texture in Deformed Stainless Steel Saurabh.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase­trans In an elegant experimental study on an austenitic stainless steel, Gey et al. [1] found that not all of the 24 of necessary data do not exist for martensite in the 304 stainless steel of the type studied by Gey et al

  8. Effect of d-ferrite on impact properties of supermartensitic stainless steel

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Effect of d-ferrite on impact properties of supermartensitic stainless steel heat affected zones D of the presence of non-equilibrium d-ferrite on the impact properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel-ferrite. STWJ/410 Keywords: supermartensitic stainless steels, weld heat affected zone, delta-ferrite toughness

  9. A creep model for austenitic stainless steels incorporating cavitation and wedge cracking

    E-print Network

    Mahesh, Sivasambu

    A creep model for austenitic stainless steels incorporating cavitation and wedge cracking S Mahesh, Kalpakkam 603102. India Abstract. A model of damage evolution in austenitic stainless steels under creep experimental data for a type 316 austenitic stainless steel under uniaxial creep loading. Deformation

  10. Formation of annealing twins during recrystallization and grain growth in 304L austenitic stainless steel

    E-print Network

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    austenitic stainless steel is examined in relation to the thermo-mechanical history. The behavior results from a 304L austenitic stainless steel. 2. Experimental details 2.1 Material and thermo-mechanical treatments. Austenitic stainless steels, which do not undergo discernible phase transformation during

  11. Flow stress of Nitronic-50 stainless steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    E-print Network

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Flow stress of Nitronic-50 stainless steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures Wei August 2005 Abstract To understand and model the thermomechanical response of Nitronic-50 stainless steel are examined by optical microscopy. These experimental results show that: (1) Nitronic-50 stainless steel

  12. TiN-Coating Effects on Stainless Steel Tribological Behavior Under Dry and Lubricated Conditions

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    TiN-Coating Effects on Stainless Steel Tribological Behavior Under Dry and Lubricated Conditions microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. TiN coatings and 316L stainless steel had better tribologicalN-coated 316L stainless steel substrates sliding against silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic ball under dry

  13. Alternated high-and low-pressure nitriding of austenitic stainless steel: Mechanisms and results

    E-print Network

    Alternated high- and low-pressure nitriding of austenitic stainless steel: Mechanisms and results G a gas mixture of (N2 /H2):(50/50) in pressure, was applied to stainless-steel AISI 304. In the first penetrate far beyond the compound layer. These nitrogen atoms, uptaken into the austenitic stainless-steel

  14. CIGS Solar Cell on Flexible Stainless Steel Substrate Fabricated by Sputtering Method: Simulation and Experimental Results

    E-print Network

    Kanicki, Jerzy

    CIGS Solar Cell on Flexible Stainless Steel Substrate Fabricated by Sputtering Method: Simulation-electronic properties of the Cu(InGa)Se2(CIGS) solar cell fabricated by sputtering method on stainless steel substrate and Ahn et al.1) reported a flexible CIGS solar cell on stainless steel substrate by co

  15. Quick-Start Operating Guide Document No. 1800-13 Stainless Steel Glove Boxes

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Quick-Start Operating Guide Document No. 1800-13 Stainless Steel Glove Boxes (Series 300 ­ 600-Start Operating Guide Stainless Steel Glove Boxes (Series 300 ­ 600) © Copyright 2010 Terra Universal Inc. All.0Introduction This manual provides information on installing and operating your Terra Stainless Steel Glove Box

  16. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  17. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group or stainless steel intended to provide a permanent cusp (a projection on the chewing surface of a tooth) to...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group or stainless steel intended to provide a permanent cusp (a projection on the chewing surface of a tooth) to...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold and metals of the platinum group or stainless steel intended to provide a permanent cusp (a projection on the chewing surface of a tooth) to...

  1. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  2. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  3. New equation of state for stainless steel 347

    SciTech Connect

    Boettger, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    A new SESAME equation of state (EOS) for stainless steel 347 has been generated using the computer program GRIZZLY, and has been added to the SESAME EOS library as material number 4271. This new EOS is superior to its predecesser (material number 4270) in several respects.

  4. Neural network model of creep strength of austenitic stainless steels

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Neural network model of creep strength of austenitic stainless steels T. Sourmail, H. K. D. H, and solution treatment temperature. The method involved a neural network analysis of a vast and general, and stress. Neural networks represent a more general regression method, which ameliorates most

  5. The effects of alpha particle irradiation on stainless steel 

    E-print Network

    Shipp, John Douglas

    1999-01-01

    -surface region of stainless steel as would be produced by alpha particles from WGPu. This value was found to be 4.45E13 ?He? ions/cm² for each year of storage. Rutherford backscattering and channeling analysis was then used to analyze single crystal iron which...

  6. Lithium wetting of stainless steel for plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring continuous wetting of a solid container by the liquid metal is a critical issue in the design of liquid metal plasma facing components foreseen for NSTX-U and FNSF. Ultrathin wetting layers may form on metallic surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions if material reservoirs are present from which spreading and wetting can start. The combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ion beam etching capabilities of a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) have been used to study the spreading of lithium films on stainless steel substrates. A small (mm-scale) amount of metallic lithium was applied to a stainless steel surface in an argon glove box and transferred to the SAM. Native impurities on the stainless steel and lithium surfaces were removed by Ar+ ion sputtering. Elemental mapping of Li and Li-O showed that surface diffusion of Li had taken place at room temperature, well below the 181°C Li melting temperature. The influence of temperature and surface oxidation on the rate of Li spreading on stainless steel will be reported. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  8. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... this review on July 1, 2011 (76 FR 38686) and determined on October 4, 2011, that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 64105, October 17, 2011). The Commission transmitted its determination in this... Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the...

  9. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel alloy A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel alloy A-286 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  10. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) Stainless Steels

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    to gain oxidation benefit keep austenitic matrix for high-temperature strength introduce second-phase for AFA Stainless Steels ·Creep Strength - balance Al, Cr, Ni, to maintain single-phase FCC austenitic matrix - Nano NbC and submicron B2-NiAl + Fe2Nb base Laves precipitates ·To form protective alumina: - Ti

  11. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x}, have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 23}Zr{sub 6} during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy.

  12. Mechanical properties of four RSP stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, G.E.

    1996-12-01

    Four austenitic stainless steel alloys were processed by consolidating rapidly solidified gas atomized power using hot extrusion. These materials were characterized by measuring grain growth, hardness, tensile properties from 24 to 800{degrees}C, and creep-rupture at 600{degrees}C.

  13. Gas Leak from Vinyl Taped Stainless Steel Dressing Jars

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Hayes

    1999-03-01

    The leak rates of nitrogen gas from stainless steel dressing jars taped with 2 inch vinyl tape were measured. These results were used to calculate hydrogen leak rates from the same jars. The calculations show that the maximum concentration of hydrogen buildup in this type of container configuration will beat least 3 orders of magnitude below the lower explosion limit for hydrogen in air.

  14. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  15. Stainless steel 301 and Inconel 718 hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgeier, R. K.; Forman, R.

    1970-01-01

    Conditions and results of tensile tests of 26 Inconel 718 and four cryoformed stainless steel specimens are presented. Conclusions determine maximum safe hydrogen operating pressure for cryogenic pressure vessels and provide definitive information concerning flaw growth characteristics under the most severe temperature and pressure conditions

  16. Battery and fuel cell electrodes containing stainless steel charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Zuckerbrod, David (Pittsburgh, PA); Gibney, Ann (Monroeville, PA)

    1984-01-01

    An electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon particles; (ii) stainless steel particles; (iii) a nonwetting agent; and (iv) a catalyst, where at least one current collector contacts said composite.

  17. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, LOOKING EAST; SMOKEHOUSE UNITS WERE BUILT BY DRYING SYSTEMS COMPANY, DIVISION OF MICHIGAN OVEN COMPANY, MORTON GROVE, ILLINOIS - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  18. 6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LEVEL4; ENTRAILS WERE DROPPED INTO CHUTE, THEN PASSED THROUGH THE FLOOR TO THE GUT SHANTY ON LEVEL 3 TO BE SORTED AND CLEANED - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  19. Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel 

    E-print Network

    Ortensi, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Ion implantation of Ga ions into 316 stainless steel was performed at fluences ranging from 8x10¹? to 10¹? ions/cm². The depth profile of Ga in the steel was analyzed via Rutherford Backscattering and ToFSIMS. The surface effects were...

  20. Machining-induced deformation in stepped specimens of PH 13-8 Mo, 18 nickel maraging steel grade 200T1 and grain-refined HP 9-4-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study to evaluate the dimensional changes created during machining and subsequent cycling to cryogenic temperatures for three different metallic alloys are presented. Experimental techniques are described and results presented for 18 Ni Grade 200 maraging steel, PH-13-8 Mo stainless steel, and Grain-refined HP 9-4-20.

  1. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R.; Heuer, Arthur H.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys • Thermodynamic modeling to explain the high degree of carbon solubility possible in austenitic grades under the LTCSS process and experimental validation of model results • Corrosion testing to determine the corrosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Erosion testing to determine the erosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Wear testing to quantify the wear resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Fatigue testing for quantifying the extent of improvement from the LTCSS process • Component treating and testing under simulated and in-line commercial operations XRD verified expanded austenite lattice, with no evidence of carbide precipitation. Carbon concentration profiles via Auger and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) showed carbon levels in excess of 12 at. % in treated, type 316 SS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of pulled-to-failure treated tensile specimens showed slip bands and no de-cohesion of the treated layer, verifying that the layer remains ductile. Compressive stresses in excess of 2 GPa (300 ksi) have been calculated at the surface of the case. Phase diagram (CALPHAD) (ThermoCalc) and Wagner dilute solution thermodynamic models were developed that calculate the solubility of carbon in austenite as a function of alloying content for the process time and temperature. Several commercial alloys have been modeled, and the model has been used to design experimental alloys with enhanced affinity for carbon solubility at treatment temperatures. Four experimental alloys were melted, rolled, and manufactured into test specimens, and the LTCSS treatment indicated successfully enhanced results and validated the predictions based on thermodynamic modeling. Electrochemical polarization curves show a 600 to 800 mV increase in pitting potential in treated (900-1000 mV) versus non-treated (200-300 mV) type 316 in chloride solutions. Treated 316L showed crevice-corrosion behavior similar to that of Ti-6Al-4V and Hastelloy C22. Cavitation tests showed significant increases in cavitatio

  2. MeV-ion-beam induced localized enhancement of magnetization in stainless steel foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanda, H.; Takai, M.; Shigematu, H.; Namba, S.; Chayahara, A.; Satou, M.

    1991-07-01

    MeV ions were implanted into 301 and 304 stainless steel foils to investigate the localized modification of magnetic properties associated with the phase transformation. The intensity of the magnetization was found to increase by MeV Au + implantation because of the localized martensitic transformation. The increase in magnetization for 301 stainless steel was greater than that for 304 stainless steel because 301 stainless steel more easily transformed austenite into martensite. The beam-induced localized phase transformation in stainless steel can be applied to permanent magnetic recording.

  3. Photoionization study of PH: PH/sub 2/ revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Cho, H.

    1989-01-01

    The photoion yield curve of PH/sup +/ (PH) is presented, from threshold to 1040 A. The adiabatic ionization potential of PH is 10.149 +- 0.008 eV. Extensive autoionization structure is observed and analyzed. It is attributed to several Rydberg series, whose mutual convergence limit is 11.852 +- 0.002 eV, and corresponds to the onset of PH/sup +/ (a /sup 4/..sigma../sup -/). The photoion yield curve of AsH/sup +/ (AsH) is juxtaposed, and shown to have a similar pattern. A new photoion yield curve of PH/sup +//sub 2/ (PH/sub 2/) is shown, where the source of PH/sub 2/ is the H+PH/sub 3/ reaction. The new results corroborate the earlier data (based on the pyrolysis of benzylphosphine) regarding the adiabatic ionization potential of PH/sub 2/ to form X /sup 1/A/sub 1/, and the presence of broad autoionizing structure. They also display less scatter, and enable one to estimate the onset for a-italic-tilde /sup 3/B/sub 1/ to be about 0.70 eV above X /sup 1/A/sub 1/. From the analogous behavior of the AsH/sup +//sub 2/ (AsH/sub 2/) curve, the a /sup 3/B/sub 1/--X /sup 1/A/sub 1/ splitting in AsH/sup +//sub 2/ is estimated to be 0.58--0.68 eV.

  4. Heterogeneity effects of stainless steel subassembly walls in FBR blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.I.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron absorption in stainless steel in a fast reactor with fuel rods lumped into a hexagonal lattice surrounded by the subassembly wall, may be considerably less than that calculated from conventional homogeneous approximations. This is particularly the case for the softer neutron spectra of blanket regions. A methodology is developed to treat the heterogeneity effect of stainless steel subassembly walls in a fast reactor blanket; it is applied to the blanket in the new FBBF. Heterogeneous resonance absorption within the subassembly wall is calculated with integral transport theory for multiple scattering. In addition, the transitional self-shielding effect near the subassembly walls is evaluated with integral transport theory for a double-interface system. The calculation of transitional self-shielding leads to a difference in the capture rate in the near-wall clad as compared to the homogeneous calculation. This capture rate increment in the near-wall clad is combined with the capture rate of the subassembly wall to describe the total heterogeneity effect of the subassembly wall. Self-shielding within the subassembly wall due to major resonances reduces the VITAMIN-E cross sections for stainless steel in the subassembly wall by 3% to 65%. However, an increased transmission due to an increased self-shielding in stainless steel overcomes a decrease in the stainless steel capture rates and eventually yields larger values with increasing penetration into the blanket. The increased flux increases the U{sup 238} capture and fission rates by 6% from the conventional homogeneous values. The reaction rates in the blanket are accounted for by the flux behavior resulting from an increased transmission with increasing penetration into the blanket.

  5. Persistence of spiromesifen in soil: influence of moisture, light, pH and organic amendment.

    PubMed

    Mate, Ch Jamkhokai; Mukherjee, Irani; Das, Shaon Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Persistence of spiromesifen in soil as affected by varying moisture, light, compost amendment, soil sterilization and pH in aqueous medium were studied. Degradation of spiromesifen in soil followed the first-order reaction kinetics. Effect of different moisture regimes indicated that spiromesifen dissipated faster in submerged soil (t 1/2 14.3-16.7 days) followed by field capacity (t 1/2 18.7-20.0 days), and dry soil (t 1/2 21.9-22.9 days). Dissipation was faster in sterilized submerged (t 1/2 17.7 days) than in sterilized dry (t 1/2 35.8 days). Photo spiromesifen metabolite was not detected under different moisture regimes. After 30 days, enol spiromesifen metabolite was detected under submerged condition and was below detectable limit (<0.001 ?g g(-1)) after 90 days. Soil amendment compost (2.5 %) at field capacity enhanced dissipation of the insecticide, and half-life value was 14.3 against 22.4 days without compost amendment. Under different pH condition, residues persisted in water with half-life values 5.7 to 12.5 days. Dissipation in water was faster at pH 9.0 (t 1/2 5.7 days), followed by pH 4.0 (t 1/2 9.7 days) and pH 7.2 (t 1/2 12.5 days). Exposure of spiromesifen to different light conditions indicated that it was more prone to degradation under UV light (t 1/2 3-4 days) than sunlight exposure (t 1/2 5.2-8.1 days). Under sunlight exposure, photo spiromesifen metabolite was detected after 10 and 15 days as compared to 3 and 5 days under UV light exposure. PMID:25616783

  6. Surface charging patterns of stainless alloys - Effect of ageing in conditions of primary cooling circuit of pressurized water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin Cabanas, B.; Lützenkirchen, J.; Leclercq, S.; Barboux, P.; Lefèvre, G.

    2012-11-01

    The predominance of electrostatic interactions in the mechanism of particle deposition onto solid surfaces is well documented. Therefore, an electrostatic approach has been used to predict the behavior of activated corrosion products in the primary cooling circuit of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Only few results have been published on the potential at the interface of metallic alloys and aqueous solutions, even at room temperature. In this study, we present results about the characterization of representative materials such as Inconel 690, stainless steel 304 and Zircaloy 4 at room temperature, for pristine polished samples as well as after an 80-day ageing step in physico-chemical conditions similar to those of a primary circuit (360 °C, boron 1 g L-1 (as H3BO3), lithium 2 mg L-1 (as LiOH), hydrogen 30 cm3 kg-1). The surface potentials of these alloys have been determined using a streaming current method for pH from 3 to 7. Isoelectric points between 4.1 and 4.6 have been found for all samples and there is no effect of the ageing step. These values have been confirmed by adhesion studies of grafted latex particles either positively charged (amidine surface groups) or negatively charged (carboxylate groups) at pH 3.3 and pH 5.5. The results show that particles deposition is favored only when they carry a charge opposite to the substrate surfaces.

  7. Magnetic fields from electric toothbrushes promote corrosion in orthodontic stainless steel appliances but not in titanium appliances.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Takashi; Ohkuma, Kazuo; Oda, Hirotake; Sano, Natsuki; Batbayar, Nomintsetseg; Terashima, Yukari; Sato, Soh; Terada, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Electric toothbrushes are widely used, and their electric motors have been reported to produce low-frequency electromagnetic fields that induced electric currents in metallic objects worn by the users. In this study, we showed that electric toothbrushes generated low-frequency magnetic fields (MFs) and induced electric currents in orthodontic appliances in artificial saliva (AS), which accelerated corrosion in stainless steel (SUS) appliances, but not in titanium (Ti) appliances; the corrosion was evaluated by using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer and a three-dimensional laser confocal microscope. The pH of AS used for appliance immersion did not change during or after MF exposure. These results suggested that MF-induced currents from electric toothbrushes could erode SUS appliances, but not Ti appliances, because of their high corrosion potentials. Further studies are required to clarify the mechanisms of metallic corrosion by induced currents in dental fields, which may trigger metal allergies in patients. PMID:24240898

  8. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-06-27

    The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.

  9. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide (visible as a black corrosion product) forms during anodic dissolution. The sulfide is electronically conductive, and gives an increase of several orders of magnitude in the electrode capacitance; the sulfide also causes anodic activation to persist after the pure metals and steels were removed from the thiocyanate-containing electrolyte and transferred to a thiocyanate-free electrolyte. The main practical implications of this work are that low concentrations of reduced sulfur compounds strongly affect anodic dissolution of stainless steels, and that selecting steels with elevated concentrations of chromium, nickel or molybdenum would serve to limit the anodic dissolution rate in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds.

  10. Jacob Bernoulli, Ph.D. Erhard Weigel, Ph.D. Universitt Leipzig 1650

    E-print Network

    Matta, Abraham "Ibrahim"

    , Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles 1974 Leonard Kleinrock, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg 1713 Johann Christoph Wichmannshausen, Ph.D. Universität Leipzig 1685 Otto Mencke, Ph

  11. 3.0 SOP 6b pH 2007 10 12 pH pH total hydrogen

    E-print Network

    3.0 SOP 6b pH 2007 10 12 1 / 7 SOP 6b m- pH 1. pH pH total hydrogen ion concentration scale pH [H+ ] 1 kg 2. (1) ]HSO[]H[ )/1(]H[]H[ 4F STF -+ ++ + += KS (1) [H+ ]F ST [HSO4 - ]+[SO4 2- ] KS HSO4 - pH (2) 10 -= - + 110 soln-kgmol ][H logpH . (2) 3. pH m- pH (aq

  12. Name: _______________________________ Ph.D: MUSIC

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    Name: _______________________________ Ph.D: MUSIC INTEGRATED COMPOSITION, IMPROVISATION, AND TECHNOLOGY (ICIT) Degree Requirements (2015-2016) Music 200 (Bibliography and Research): ______ 4 units Music 215A (Computer Music Composition and Production): ______ 4 units Music 215B (Computer Music

  13. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  14. Voltammetric pH Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Magdalena; Kurel, Malgorzata; Jedraszko, Justyna; Toczydlowska, Diana; Wittstock, Gunther; Opallo, Marcin; Nogala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale pH evaluation is a prerequisite for understanding the processes and phenomena occurring at solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-gas interfaces, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, extraction, partitioning, and corrosion. Research on the homogeneous processes within small volumes such as intracellular fluids, microdroplets, and microfluidic chips also requires nanometer scale pH assessment. Due to the opacity of numerous systems, optical methods are useless and, if applicable, require addition of a pH-sensitive dye. Potentiometric probes suffer from many drawbacks such as potential drift and lack of selectivity. Here, we present a voltammetric nanosensor for reliable pH assessment between pH 2 and 12 with high spatial resolution. It consists of a pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrode obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) inside a quartz nanopipette. The carbon is modified by adsorption of syringaldazine from its ethanolic solution. It exhibits a stable quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram with nearly Nernstian dependency of midpeak potentials (-54 mV/pH). This sensor was applied as a probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in order to map pH over a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME), generating hydroxide ions (OH(-)) by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a diffusion-controlled rate in aerated phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the alkalization of the electrolyte close to the oxygen reducing electrode, showing the insufficient buffer capacity of PBS to maintain a stable pH at the given conditions. PMID:26516786

  15. The effect of dose rate on the response of austenitic stainless steels to neutron radiaiton

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Cole, J I.; Trybus, Carole L.; Porter, D. L.; Tsai, Hanchung; Garner, Francis A.; Kenik, E A.; Yoshitake, T.; Ohta, Joji

    2006-01-01

    Depending on reactor design and component location, austenitic stainless steels may experience significantly different irradiation dose rates in the same reactor. Understanding the effect of dose rate on radiation performance is important to predicting component lifetime. This study examined the effect of dose rate on swelling, grain boundary segregation, and tensile properties in austenitic stainless steels through the examination of components retrieved from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) following its shutdown. Annealed 304 stainless steel, stress-relieved 304 stainless steel, 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel, and 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel were irradiated over a dose range of 1-56 dpa at temperatures from 371 to 440 C and dose rates from 0.5 to 5.8 ? 10*7 dpa/s. Density and tensile properties were measured for 304 and 316 stainless steel. Changes in grain boundary composition were examined for 304 stainless steel. Swelling appears to increase at lower dose rates in both 304 and 316 stainless steel, although the effect was not always statistically significant. Grain boundary segregation also appears to increase at lower dose rate in 304 stainless steel. For the range of dose rates examined, no measurable dose rate effect on tensile properties was noted for any of the steels.

  16. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbraham, Richard J.; Boxall, Colin; Goddard, David T.; Taylor, Robin J.; Woodbury, Simon E.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H2O2-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H2O2] ? 100 ?mol dm-3 the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H2O2 concentrations between 1 mmol dm-3 and 0.1 mol dm-3, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H2O2] > 0.1 mol dm-3 the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO2 films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms of corrosion processes or otherwise. Through consideration of thermodynamic solubility product and complex formation constant data, we attribute the transition to the formation of soluble uranyl-peroxide complexes under mildly alkaline, high [H2O2] conditions - a conclusion that has implications for the design of both acid minimal, metal ion oxidant-free decontamination strategies with low secondary waste arisings, and single step processes for spent nuclear fuel dissolution such as the Carbonate-based Oxidative Leaching (COL) process.

  17. Sensitization and IGSCC susceptibility prediction in stainless steel pipe weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Atteridge, D.G.; Simmons, J.W.; Li, Ming; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1991-11-01

    An analytical model, based on prediction of chromium depletion, has been developed for predicting thermomechanical effects on austenitic stainless steel intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility. Model development and validation is based on sensitization development analysis of over 30 Type 316 and 304 stainless steel heats. The data base included analysis of deformation effects on resultant sensitization development. Continuous Cooling sensitization behavior is examined and modelled with and without strain. Gas tungsten are (GTA) girth pipe weldments are also characterized by experimental measurements of heat affected zone (HAZ) temperatures, strains and sensitization during/after each pass; pass by pass thermal histories are also predicted. The model is then used to assess pipe chemistry changes on IGSCC resistance.

  18. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T M

    2008-10-23

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  19. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  20. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  1. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1999-01-13

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-II reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  2. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  3. Long-Term Underground Corrosion of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2007-03-01

    In 1970, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) implemented the most ambitious and comprehensive long-term corrosion behavior test to date for stainless steels in soil environments. Over thirty years later, one of the six test sites was targeted to research subsurface contamination and transport processes in the vadose and saturated zones. This research directly applies to environmental management operational corrosion issues and long term stewardship scientific needs for understanding the behavior of waste forms and their near-field contaminant transport of chemical and radiological contaminants at nuclear disposal sites. This paper briefly describes the ongoing research and the corrosion analysis results of the stainless steel plate specimens recovered from the partial recovery of the first test site.

  4. Mechanical and physical properties of irradiated type 348 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Beeston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A type 348 stainless steel in-pile tube irradiated to a fluence of 3 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/, E > 1 MeV (57 dpa), was destructively examined. The service had resulted in a maximum total creep of 1.8% at the high fluence. The metal temperature ranged between 623 and 652/sup 0/K, hence the thermal creep portion of the total was negligible. Total creep was greater than had been anticipated from creep data for austenitic stainless steels irradiated in other reactors. The objectives of the destructive examination were to determine the service-induced changes of mechanical and physical properties, and to assess the possibility of adverse effects of both these changes and the greater total creep on the prospective service life of other tubes.

  5. Noise characteristics of stainless-steel surface electrodes.

    PubMed

    Godin, D T; Parker, P A; Scott, R N

    1991-11-01

    Bioelectric events measured with surface electrodes are subject to noise components which may be significant in comparison with low-level biological signals such as evoked neuroelectric potentials, and myoelectric potentials. In an effort to better understand noise arising from these electrodes, electrode and measurement system noise is modelled. The effect of electrode surface area on electrode impedance and noise is studied using circular stainless-steel electrodes of varying diameters. The main contributions of the work are the development of a model for stainless-steel electrode noise as a function of electrode area, and demonstrating that, for the band-width of interest to evoked neuroelectric and myoelectric signals (8-10,000 Hz), the primary noise components are thermal and amplifier current generated. The magnitudes of both of these depend on the electrode impedance magnitude. Electrode impedance is shown to be a power function of both electrode diameter and frequency, consistent with a capacitive electrode model. PMID:1813753

  6. STAINLESS STEEL INTERACTIONS WITH SALT CONTAINING PLUTONIUM OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Z.; Chandler, G.; Dunn, K.; Stefek, T.; Summer, M.

    2010-02-01

    Salt containing plutonium oxide materials are treated, packaged and stored within nested, stainless steel containers based on requirements established in the DOE 3013 Standard. The moisture limit for the stored materials is less than 0.5 weight %. Surveillance activities which are conducted to assess the condition of the containers and assure continuing 3013 container integrity include the destructive examination of a select number of containers to determine whether corrosion attack has occurred as a result of stainless steel interactions with salt containing plutonium oxides. To date, some corrosion has been observed on the innermost containers, however, no corrosion has been noted on the outer containers and the integrity of the 3013 container systems is not expected to be compromised over a 50 year storage lifetime.

  7. Microbiological test results using three urine pretreatment regimes with 316L stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1993-01-01

    Three urine pretreatments, (1) Oxone (Dupont) and sulfuric acid, (2) sodium hypochlorite and sulfuric acid, (3) and ozone, were studied for their ability to reduce microbial levels in urine and minimize surface attachment to 316L stainless steel coupons. Urine samples inoculated with Bacillus insolitus and a filamentous mold, organisms previously recovered from the vapor compression distillation subsystem of NASA Space Station Freedom water recovery test were tested in glass corrosion cells containing base or weld metal coupons. Microbial levels, changes in pH, color, turbidity, and odor of the fluid were monitored over the course of the 21-day test. Specimen surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy at completion of the test for microbial attachment. Ozonated urine samples were less turbid and had lower microbial levels than controls or samples receiving other pretreatments. Base metal coupons receiving pretreatment were relatively free of attached bacteria. However, well-developed biofilms were found in the heat-affected regions of welded coupons receiving Oxone and hypochlorite pretreatments. Few bacteria were observed in the same regions of the ozone pretreatment sample.

  8. Corrosion of stainless steels in chloride solution: An XPS investigation of passive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüesch, P.; Müller, K.; Atrens, A.; Neff, H.

    1985-09-01

    Five commercial steels ranging from the martensitic stainless steel containing 12% chromium to the superferrite containing 29% chromium, 4% molybdenum, and 2% nickel have been studied by XPS. In addition, a pure iron-chromium alloy containing 7% chromium has been investigated. Armco iron and pure chromium (99.99%) were included as references. The formation of the passive films (or corrosion) occurred in deoxygenated 0.1 M NaCl solution (pH=5.6), from which the samples were transferred directly to the XPS chamber under controlled atmosphere (Ar). Concentration profiles (at.-%) of the alloy constituents in their oxidized and metallic states have been determined separately from the measured XPS depth profiles. For c?= 12% chromium the passive films have the following structure: there is a depletion of Cr in the inner region, followed by an enrichment (concentration maximum) in the central region of the films. The height of this maximum increases, and its position shifts towards the surface with increasing chromium content in the alloy. The outermost monolayers are rich in water and hydroxyl groups. Various significant properties of the films change drastically at the critical chromium concentration of about 12%. This behaviour is rather independent of the other components (Mo, Ni, Cu) present in the alloys and is discussed in terms of a phase transition in the films which is controlled by the chromium concentration.

  9. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  10. Microstructural analysis and corrosion behavior of zirconium-stainless steel metallic waste form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N.; Abraham, G.; Sengupta, P.; Arya, Ashok; Kain, V.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Management of radioactive metallic waste using "alloy melting route" is currently being investigated by several researchers. In the present study, potentiodynamic polarizations were conducted on six as-cast zirconium (Zr)-stainless steel (SS) alloys (i.e. Zr-25, 20, 16, 12, 8 and 5 wt.% SS) at pH = 1, 5 and 8. Electrochemical behavior of metallic-waste-form (MWF) alloys containing more than 16 wt.% SS showed lower potentials at the break down of passivity attributed to localized attack mainly at Cr-depleted matrix-intermetallic interfaces. Zr-5SS and Zr-12SS alloys contain Zr3(Fe, Cr, Ni)/Zr3(Fe, Cr)-type of phases and their interfaces with matrices were prone to localized attack. Whereas, Zr-8SS and Zr-16SS alloys demonstrated better corrosion resistance in comparison to Zr-5SS and Zr-12SS respectively. In addition, occurrence of Laves phase, e.g. Zr2(Fe, Cr), in Zr-8SS and Zr-16SS alloys makes them suitable for MWF.

  11. Effects of ionic substances on the adsorption of egg white proteins to a stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hiroki; Hagiwara, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hisahiko; Sakiyama, Takaharu

    2012-01-01

    The surface fouling of food processing equipment by proteins was studied by investigating the adsorption of egg white proteins to the surface of stainless steel (SS) at pH 7.4 and 30 °C, and particularly the effects of different types of ionic substances. Ovalbumin and ovomucoid, acidic egg white proteins, were less adsorbed in the presence of phosphate (P(i)), a multivalent anion, than in the presence of HEPES, an amphoteric ion. On the other hand, lysozyme, a basic egg white protein, was more adsorbed in the presence of P(i) than in the presence of HEPES. Citrate as another multivalent anion and taurine as another amphoteric ion affected the respective adsorption of those egg white proteins similarly to P(i) and HEPES. The adsorption of an egg white protein to an SS surface therefore depended on the combination of the type of protein and the effective charge of the coexisting ionic substance. This behaviour can be well explained by assuming that a small ionic substance precedes a protein in attaching to an SS surface, resulting in an alteration to the effective surface charge. Pretreating SS with a P(i) buffer lowered the amount of ovalbumin adsorbed with the HEPES buffer, demonstrating that P(i) can attach to and remain on the SS surface to affect the subsequent protein adsorption. PMID:22451386

  12. Chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking of powder metallurgy duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, A.; Haenninen, H.

    1996-04-01

    The chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nitrogen-alloyed, powder metallurgically (P/M) produced and hot isostatically pressed (HIP) duplex stainless steels (DSS) was investigated and compared to the SCC resistance of two commercial wrought (forged) DSS. Constant-strain (deflection) SCC tests with four-point, loaded-bend specimens were performed in aerated 50 wt% calcium chloride solution at 100 C with pH = 6.5 to 7.0. The pitting corrosion resistance index value (PREN) was not a suitable parameter to predict SCC resistance of the investigated DSS. Instead of pitting corrosion, selective corrosion of the austenite or ferrite phases seemed to determine the SCC resistance of each material. Selective corrosion was not the primary cause for failure, but it assisted the initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks. Selective corrosion was noticed in all of the investigated DSS. The corroding phase, austenite or ferrite, was dependent on the material. High copper content in the specific material slightly lowered the stress limit at which stress corrosion cracks started to grow in the used test solution. The SCC resistance of P/M-HIP DSS was as good as the SCC resistance of forged DSS. The banded microstructure of forged DSS led to a directional selective corrosion attack. The corrosion grooves were ideal sites for initiation of SCC. Because of this phenomenon, the homogeneous microstructure of P/M-HIP DSS showed clear advantages over the banded microstructure of forged DSS.

  13. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  14. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  15. Mechanical properties of low-nickel stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Demand for improved corrosion-resistant steels, coupled with increased emphasis on conserving strategic metals, has led to development of family of stainless steels in which manganese and nitrogen are substituted for portion of usual nickel content. Advantages are approximately-doubled yield strength in annealed condition, better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, retention of low magnetic permeability even after severe cold working, excellent strength and ductility at cryogenic temperatures, superior resistance to wear and galling, and excellent high-temperature properties.

  16. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Buono, Donald P. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  17. Deflagration in stainless steel storage containers containing plutonium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D.

    1996-02-01

    Detonation of hydrogen and oxygen in stainless steel storage containers produces maximum pressures of 68.5 psia and 426.7 psia. The cylinders contain 3,000 g of PuO{sub 2} with 0.05 wt% and 0.5 wt% water respectively. The hydrogen and oxygen are produced by the alpha decomposition of the water. Work was performed for the Savannah River Site.

  18. AM363 martensitic Stainless Steel: a multiphase equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Crockett, Scott

    2015-06-01

    A multiphase equation of state for stainless steel AM363 has been developed. Three phases are constructed separately: the low pressure martensitic phase, the austenitic phase and the liquid. Room temperature data and the explicit introduction of a magnetic contribution to the free energy determine the martensitic phase, while shock Hugoniot data is used to determine the austenitic phase and the phase boundaries. More experimental data would be useful to better characterize the liquid.

  19. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  20. 37. REDUCTION PLANT DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. REDUCTION PLANT - DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased within an outer steel shell (top half missing). As fish were tumbled by the rotating screen, they were cooked and dried by live steam piped into the dryer through overhead pipes. The dryer is mounted on a slight angle, aiding the process by moving the drying fish towards the exhaust end of the dryer. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  1. The dimensional stability analysis of seventeen stepped specimens of 18Ni 200 grade, PH13-8Mo and A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the results of a dimensional stability analysis of seventeen stepped specimens that were used in the evaluation of factors influencing warpage in metallic alloys being used for cryogenic wind tunnel models. Specimens used in the analysis were manufactured from 18Ni 200 Grade Maaraging steel, PH13-8Mo, and A-286 stainless steel. Quantitative data are provided on the behavior of the specimens due to the effects of both machining and cryogenic cycling effects.

  2. Effects of carboxyl groups on the adsorption behavior of low-molecular-weight substances on a stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Nagayasu, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Chisato; Imamura, Koreyoshi; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2004-11-15

    The adsorption isotherms of various carboxylic acids and several amines on a stainless steel surface were taken as a function of pH and the ionic strength of the solution at 30 degrees C. In particular, the effect of the number of carboxyl groups on the adsorption behavior was investigated. Monocarboxylic acids such as benzoic acid and n-butyric acid were reversibly adsorbed on the stainless steel particles and showed a Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm, i.e., Q=KqmC/(1+KC), where Q and C are, respectively, the amount of adsorbate adsorbed and the equilibrium concentration in the bulk solution, qm, the maximum adsorbed amount, and K is the adsorption equilibrium constant. Carboxylic acids having plural carboxyl groups had much higher affinity to the surface and were adsorbed in both reversible and irreversible modes. The adsorption isotherms for the carboxylic acids having plural carboxyl groups could be expressed by a modified Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm, i.e., Q=q(irrev)+Kq(rev)C/(1+KC), where q(irrev) and q(rev) are, respectively, the maximum amounts adsorbed irreversibly and reversibly. The K and q(irrev) values increased with an increase in the number of carboxyl groups except for isophthalic acid and terephthalic acid. On the basis of the pH dependencies of K, qm, q(irrev), and q(rev) as well as the surface properties of the stainless steel, both reversible and irreversible adsorptions were considered to occur through the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged carboxyl groups and the positively charged sites on the surface. The dependency of the q(irrev) value on ionic strength was discussed on the basis of the differences in their adsorbed state with the interaction forces to the surface and repulsive forces among the adsorbed molecules. The adsorption of amine components was quite weak. The RA-IR and molecular dynamics calculation were done to investigate the adsorption states of phthalic acid, trimellitic acid, and mellitic acid. PMID:15464793

  3. Austenitic stainless steel patterning by plasma assisted diffusion treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwiec, T.; Marcos, G.; Thiriet, T.; Guo, Y.; Belmonte, T.

    2009-09-01

    The new concept of surface texturing or surface patterning on austenitic stainless steel by plasma assisted diffusion treatment is presented in this paper. It allows the creation of uniform micro or nano relief with regularly shaped asperities or depressions. Plasma assisted diffusion treatments are based on the diffusion of nitrogen and/or carbon in a metallic material at moderate to elevated temperatures. Below 420°C, a plasma assisted nitriding treatment of austenitic stainless steel produces a phase usually called expanded austenite. Expanded austenite is a metastable nitrogen supersaturated solid solution with a disordered fcc structure and a distorted lattice. The nitrided layer with the expanded austenite is highly enriched in nitrogen (from 10 to 35 at%) and submitted to high compressive residual stresses. From mechanical consideration, it is shown that the only possible deformation occurs in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Such an expansion of the layer from the initial surface of the substrate to the gas phase is used here for surface patterning of stainless steel parts. The surface patterning is performed by using masks (TEM grid) and multi-dipolar plasmas.

  4. Thermo-mechanical behavior of stainless steel knitted structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdani, Syed Talha Ali; Fernando, Anura; Maqsood, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    Heating fabric is an advanced textile material that is extensively researched by the industrialists and the scientists alike. Ability to create highly flexible and drapeable heating fabrics has many applications in everyday life. This paper presents a study conducted on the comparison of heatability of knitted fabric made of stainless steel yarn. The purpose of the study is to find a suitable material for protective clothing against cold environments. In the current research the ampacity of stainless steel yarn is observed in order to prevent the overheating of the heating fabrics. The behavior of the knitted structure is studied for different levels of supply voltage. Infrared temperature sensing is used to measure the heat generated from the fabrics in order to measure the temperature of the fabrics without physical contact. It is concluded that interlock structure is one of the most suited structures for knitted heating fabrics. As learnt through this research, fabrics made of stainless steel yarn are capable of producing a higher level of heating compared to that of knitted fabric made using silver coated polymeric yarn at the same supply voltage.

  5. Iodine susceptibility of pseudomonads grown attached to stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonads were adapted to grow in phosphate-buffered water and on stainless steel surfaces to study the iodine sensitivity of attached and planktonic cells. Cultures adapted to low nutrient growth were incubated at room temperature in a circulating reactor system with stainless steel coupons to allow biofilm formation on the metal surfaces. In some experiments, the reactor was partially emptied and refilled with buffer at each sampling time to simulate a "fill-and-draw" water system. Biofilms of attached bacteria, resuspended biofilm bacteria, and reactor suspension, were exposed to 1 mg l-1 iodine for 2 min. Attached bacterial populations which established on coupons within 3 to 5 days displayed a significant increase in resistance to iodine. Increased resistance was also observed for resuspended cells from the biofilm and planktonic bacteria in the system suspension. Generally, intact biofilms and resuspended biofilm cells were most resistant, followed by planktonic bacteria and phosphate buffer cultures. Thus, biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces within water systems can result in significantly increased disinfection resistance of commonly-occurring water-borne bacteria that may enhance their ability to colonise water treatment and distribution systems.

  6. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  7. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  8. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  9. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  10. Mechanical Behavior and Fractography of 304 Stainless Steel with High Hydrogen Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M.

    2003-02-05

    Hydrogen embrittlement of 304 stainless steel with different hydrogen concentrations has been investigated. An electrochemical technique was used to effectively charge the high level of hydrogen into 304 stainless steel in a short period of time. At 25 ppm of hydrogen, 304 stainless steel loses 10 percent of its original mechanical strength and 20 percent plasticity. Although the ductile feature dominates the fractography, the brittle crown area near the outer surface shows the intergranular rupture effected by hydrogen. At 60 ppm of hydrogen, 304 stainless steel loses 23 percent of its strength and 38 percent plasticity, where the brittle mode dominates the fracture of the materials. Experimental results show that hydrogen damage to the performance of 304 stainless steel is significant even at very low levels. The fractograph analysis indicates the high penetration ability of hydrogen in 304 stainless steel. This work also demonstrates the advantages of the electrochemical charging technique in the study of hydrogen embrittlement.

  11. Measurement of Local Strain Distribution of Austenitic Stainless Steels by Using Magnetic Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.; Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.

    2006-03-06

    Austenitic stainless steel is classified as a nonmagnetic material. However application of stress transforms the plastic part of it into a martensitic crystal structure and it takes on magnetization. Strain evaluation can be performed by measuring the leakage magnetic flux from the remanent magnetization after applying stress to austenitic stainless steels. This paper presents the measurement to make clear the distributions of the leakage magnetic flux after applying strain into austenitic stainless steels by magnetic sensors.

  12. Measurement of Local Strain Distribution of Austenitic Stainless Steels by Using Magnetic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Y.; Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.; Enokizono, M.

    2006-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is classified as a nonmagnetic material. However application of stress transforms the plastic part of it into a martensitic crystal structure and it takes on magnetization. Strain evaluation can be performed by measuring the leakage magnetic flux from the remanent magnetization after applying stress to austenitic stainless steels. This paper presents the measurement to make clear the distributions of the leakage magnetic flux after applying strain into austenitic stainless steels by magnetic sensors.

  13. Embedding metallic jacketed fused silica fibres into stainless steel using additive layer manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Robert R. J.; Havermann, Dirk; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2013-05-01

    Metal clad single mode optical fibres are successfully embedded into stainless steel using a layer by layer based additive manufacturing technology based on selective laser sintering of powered stainless steel material. The single mode fibre has been coated with a protective Ni metal layer to facilitate thermal protection and bonding to the stainless steel matrix. A loss of ~1 dB is observed after embedding which is attributed to micro bending in the embedded section.

  14. Stainless steels with improved strength for service at 760 C and above

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1998-03-01

    An evaluation was undertaken of modified 25Cr-20Ni stainless steels and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel for advanced energy applications at 760 C (1,400 F) and higher. It was found that good fabricability, strength, and ductility could be produced in the modified steels. Stress rupture data to beyond 10,000 h showed that the strengths of the modified steels were more than double that for type 310H stainless steel.

  15. Particle Impact Ignition Test Data on a Stainless Steel Hand Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the particle impact ignition test of a stainless steel hand valve. The impact of particles is a real fire hazard with stainless steel hand valves, however 100 mg of particulate can be tolerated. Since it is unlikely that 100 mg of stainless steel contaminant particles can be simultaneously released into this type of valve in the WSTF configuration, this is acceptable and within statistical confidence as demonstrated by testing.

  16. Evaluation of stainless steel cladding for use in current design LWRs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, A.; Santucci, J.; Lindquist, K.; Yario, W.; Stern, G.; Goldstein, L.; Joseph, L.

    1982-12-01

    The design of stainless steel-clad LWR fuel and its performance at steady-state, transient, and accident conditions were reviewed. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits and disadvantages of substituting stainless steel-clad fuel for the currently used Zircaloy-clad fuel. For a large, modern PWR, the technology and the fuel-cycle costs of stainless steel- and Zircaloy-clad fuels were compared.

  17. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott–Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  18. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  19. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  20. Improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel by nanocrystalline and electrochemical nitridation in artificial saliva solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinlong; Liang, Tongxiang

    2015-12-01

    The fluoride ion in artificial saliva significantly changed semiconductor characteristic of the passive film formed on the surface of 316L stainless steels. The electrochemical results showed that nanocrystalline ??-martensite improved corrosion resistance of the stainless steel in a typical artificial saliva compared with coarse grained stainless steel. Moreover, comparing with nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, corrosion resistance of the nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel was also improved significantly, even in artificial saliva solution containing fluoride ion. The present study showed that the cryogenic cold rolling and electrochemical nitridation improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel for the dental application.

  1. Cari Kitahara, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kitahara earned her Ph.D. in cancer epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She joined the Radiation Epidemiology Branch in 2008 as a predoctoral fellow and became a research fellow in 2011. In 2015, she was appointed to the position of tenure-track investigator.

  2. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Cast Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien; Busby, Jeremy T; Was, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Casting of austenitic stainless steels offers the possibility of directly producing large and/or relatively complex structures, such as the first wall shield modules or the diverter cassette for the ITER fusion reactor. Casting offers major cost savings when compared to fabrication via welding of quarter modules machined from large forgings. However, the strength properties of such cast components are typically considered inferior to those of conventionally forged and annealed components. To improve and validate cast stainless steel as a substitute for wrought stainless steel, a development and testing program was initiated, utilizing nitrogen and manganese additions to promote improved performance. This paper focuses on the response of the first set of developmental alloys to neutron-irradiation and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. These cast materials may also have applications for different components in light water reactors. Results showed that all steels exhibited irradiation-induced hardening and a corresponding drop in ductility, as expected, although there is still considerable ductility in the irradiated samples. The cast steels all exhibited reduced hardening in comparison to a wrought reference steels, which may be related to a larger grain size. Higher nitrogen contents did not negatively influence irradiation performance. Regarding stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, the large difference in grain size limits the comparison between wrought and cast materials, and inclusions in a reference and archive cast alloy tests complicate analysis of these samples. Results suggest that the irradiated archive heat was more susceptible to cracking than the modified alloys, which may be related to the more complex microstructure. Further, the results suggest that the modified cast steel is at least as SCC resistant as wrought 316LN. The beneficial effect of nitrogen on the mechanical properties of the alloys remains after irradiation and is not detrimental to SCC resistance.

  3. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  4. Biomonitoring of genotoxic exposure among stainless steel welders.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, L E; Boisen, T; Christensen, J M; Jelnes, J E; Jensen, G E; Jensen, J C; Lundgren, K; Lundsteen, C; Pedersen, B; Wassermann, K

    1992-05-16

    A biosurvey in the Danish metal industry measured the genotoxic exposure from stainless steel welding. The study comprised measurements of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoglobulin G. Environmental monitoring of welding fumes and selected metal oxides, biomonitoring of chromium and nickel in serum and urine and mutagenic activity in urine, and evaluation of semen quality were also done. Manual metal arc (MMA) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were the dominant welding processes. A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations, classified as translocations, double minutes, exchanges and rings, was observed in stainless steel welders than in non-welders. SCE was lower in welders working with both MMA and TIG welding than in reference persons. N-Acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF)-induced UDS was lower in 23 never-smoking welders than in 19 unexposed never-smokers. Smoking was a confounding factor resulting in significantly higher CA, SCE, NA-AAF binding to DNA and mutagenic activity in urine. Age was also a confounder: CA, SCE, NA-AAF binding to DNA and UDS increased significantly with age. No significant correlation between SCE and CA or between CA and UDS was found. UDS decreased significantly with increasing lymphocyte count and a higher lymphocyte count was seen in MMA welders than in reference persons and in smokers than in non-smokers. Differences in the composition among lymphocytes in exposed persons compared with non-exposed are suggested. MMA welding gave the highest exposure to chromium, an increased number of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease in SCE when compared with TIG welding. Consequently improvements in the occupational practice of stainless steel welding with MMA is recommended. PMID:1375338

  5. Systems design of high-performance stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Carelyn Elizabeth

    A systems approach has been applied to the design of high performance stainless steels. Quantitative property objectives were addressed integrating processing/structure/property relations with mechanistic models. Martensitic transformation behavior was described using the Olson-Cohen model for heterogeneous nucleation and the Ghosh-Olson solid-solution strengthening model for interfacial mobility, and incorporating an improved description of Fe-Co-Cr thermodynamic interaction. Coherent Msb2C precipitation in a BCC matrix was described, taking into account initial paraequilibrium with cementite. Using available SANS data, a composition dependent strain energy was calibrated and a composition independent interfacial energy was evaluated to predict the critical particle size versus the fraction of the reaction completed as input to strengthening theory. Multicomponent Pourbaix diagrams provided an effective tool for evaluating oxide stability; constrained equilibrium calculations correlated oxide stability to Cr enrichment in the oxide film to allow more efficient use of alloy Cr content. Multicomponent solidification simulations provided composition constraints to improve castability. Using the Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software packages, the models were integrated to design a carburizing, secondary-hardening martensitic stainless steel. Initial characterization of the prototype showed good agreement with the design models and achievement of the desired property objectives. Prototype evaluation confirmed the predicted martensitic transformation temperature and the desired carburizing response, achieving a case hardness of Rsb{c} 64 in the secondary-hardened condition without case primary carbides. Decarburization experiments suggest that the design core toughness objective (Ksb{IC} = 65 MPasurdm) can be achieved by reducing the core carbon level to 0.05 weight percent. To achieve the core toughness objective at high core strength levels requires further analysis of an observed intergranular fracture mechanism. Anodic polarization curves and salt-fog testing demonstrated superior corrosion resistance to 440C stainless steel with significantly reduced Cr content.

  6. Osteogenic ability of Cu-bearing stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ling; Wong, Hoi Man; Yan, Chun Hoi; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Yang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    A newly developed copper-bearing stainless steel (Cu-SS) by directly immobilizing proper amount of Cu into a medical stainless steel (317L SS) during the metallurgical process could enable continuous release of trace amount of Cu(2+) ions, which play the key role to offer the multi-biofunctions of the stainless steel, including the osteogenic ability in the present study. The results of in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that Cu(2+) ions from Cu-SS could promote the osteogenic differentiation by stimulating the Alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity and the osteogenic gene expressions (Col1a1, Opn, and Runx2), and enhancing the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts cultured on its surface. The in vivo test further proved that more new bone tissue formed around the Cu-SS implant with more stable bone-to-implant contact in comparison with the 317L SS. In addition, Cu-SS showed satisfied biocompatibility according to the results of in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo histocompatibility, and its daily released amount of Cu(2+) ions in physiological saline solution was at trace level of ppb order (1.4 ppb/cm(2) ), which is rather safe to human health. Apart from these results, it was also found that Cu-SS could inhibit the happening of inflammation with lower TNF-? expression in the bone tissue post implantation compared with 317L SS. In addition to good biocompatibility, the overall findings demonstrated that the Cu-SS possessed obvious ability of promoting osteogenesis, indicating a unique application advantage in orthopedics. PMID:25418073

  7. Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    2000-05-22

    Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.

  8. Iron contamination causes stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Khatak, H.S.; Bharasi, N.S.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B. . Metallurgy Div.)

    1994-06-01

    Iron-contaminated U-bend samples of types 316 and 304 stainless steels (SS) were exposed to a sodium chloride solution in the laboratory at room temperature. Two of the four samples of 304 SS and one of the four samples of 316 SS showed cracking. The cracks initiated in the iron-contaminated regions. Based on the results of these tests, the failure of many components in industries can be explained and the importance of carrying out pickling and passivation immediately after fabrication to remove possible iron contamination is highlighted.

  9. Evaluation of tantalum 316 stainless steel transition joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular transition joints providing a metallurgically bonded connection between tantalum and 316 stainless steel pipe sections were comparatively evaluated for durability under thermal cycling conditions approximating the operation of a SNAP-8 mercury boiler. Both coextruded and vacuum brazed transition joints of 50mm (2 inch) diameter were tested by thermal cycling 100 times between 730 C and 120 C(1350 F and 250 F) in a high vacuum environment. The twelve evaluated transition joints survived the full test sequence without developing leaks, although liquid penetrant bond line indications eventually developed in all specimens. The brazed transition joints exhibited the best dimensional stability and bond line durability.

  10. Weld repair of austenitic stainless steels containing helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Tosten, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory studies have shown that a weld overlay technique is a potential method for repair of austenitic stainless steel containing helium from irradiation or from implantation by tritium. An interest in helium embrittlement cracking during welding developed as a result of an extensive program to determine the cause of leaks in repair welds in a nuclear reactor tank. Recent studies have demonstrated the suitability of the overlay technique for welding over stress corrosion cracks in nuclear reactor vessels. This paper summarizes results of overlay weld development on helium-bearing material and emphasizes application of the technique over intergranular cracks. It contains two pages of text and twenty-nine viewgraphs. 2 refs.

  11. Weld repair of austenitic stainless steels containing helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Tosten, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    Laboratory studies have shown that a weld overlay technique is a potential method for repair of austenitic stainless steel containing helium from irradiation or from implantation by tritium. An interest in helium embrittlement cracking during welding developed as a result of an extensive program to determine the cause of leaks in repair welds in a nuclear reactor tank. Recent studies have demonstrated the suitability of the overlay technique for welding over stress corrosion cracks in nuclear reactor vessels. This paper summarizes results of overlay weld development on helium-bearing material and emphasizes application of the technique over intergranular cracks. It contains two pages of text and twenty-nine viewgraphs. 2 refs.

  12. Use of duplex stainless steel castings in control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels have enjoyed rapidly increasing popularity in recent years. For numerous reasons the availability of these alloys in the cast form has lagged behind the availability of the wrought form. Commercial demand for control valves in these alloys has driven development of needed information to move into production. A systematic approach was used to develop specifications, suppliers and weld procedures. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), sulfide stress cracking (SSC) and hardness results are also presented for several alloys including; CD3MN (UNS J92205), CD4MCu (UNS J93370) and CD7MCuN (cast UNS S32550).

  13. Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2011-09-01

    A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

  14. Advanced soft magnetic stainless steel for electric fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Honkura, Y.; Fujii, H.; Hayasi, K.

    1989-01-01

    An improved soft magnetic stainless steel has been developed which is effective in the response of electric fuel injectors. The chemical compositions of this steel is 10%Cr-3%Al-0.2%Pb. The steel provides 25% better magnetic response to pulse signal and 40% larger specific resistance than a soft magnetic 13%Cr-0.8%Si steel which is previously used for the core of electric fuel injectors. In addition this steel has a favorable magnetic properties together with corrosion resistance, cold forgeability and machinability.

  15. Laser Welding of Large Scale Stainless Steel Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitemeyer, D.; Schultz, V.; Syassen, F.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In this paper a welding process for large scale stainless steel structures is presented. The process was developed according to the requirements of an aircraft application. Therefore, stringers are welded on a skin sheet in a t-joint configuration. The 0.6 mm thickness parts are welded with a thin disc laser, seam length up to 1920 mm are demonstrated. The welding process causes angular distortions of the skin sheet which are compensated by a subsequent laser straightening process. Based on a model straightening process parameters matching the induced welding distortion are predicted. The process combination is successfully applied to stringer stiffened specimens.

  16. High Strength Stainless Steel Properties that Affect Resistance Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    2001-08-01

    This report discusses results of a study on selected high strength stainless steel alloy properties that affect resistance welding. The austenitic alloys A-286, JBK-75 (Modified A-286), 21-6-9, 22-13-5, 316 and 304L were investigated and compared. The former two are age hardenable, and the latter four obtain their strength through work hardening. Properties investigated include corrosion and its relationship to chemical cleaning, the effects of heat treatment on strength and surface condition, and the effect of mechanical properties on strength and weldability.

  17. Aluminum nanocomposites having wear resistance better than stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    An, Linan; Qu, Jun; Luo, Jinsong; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Ligong; Liu, Jinling; Xu, Chengying; Blau, Peter Julian

    2011-01-01

    Tribological behavior of alumina-particle-reinforced aluminum composites made by powder metallurgy process has been investigated. The nanocomposite containing 15 vol% of Al2O3 nanoparticles exhibits excellent wear resistance by showing significantly low wear rate and abrasive wear mode. The wear rate of the nanocomposite is even lower than stainless steel. We have also demonstrated that such excellent wear resistance only occurred in the composite reinforced with the high volume fraction of nanosized reinforcing particles. The results were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the nanocomposite.

  18. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugers, J. P. H. M.

    1993-01-01

    In the thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AISI316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out with and without the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel, and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure, and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95% vol. Ar and 5% vol. H2.

  19. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  20. General and Localized Corrosion of Borated Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    T.E. Lister; Ronald E. Mizia; A.W. Erickson; T.L. Trowbridge; B. S. Matteson

    2008-03-01

    The Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system is being proposed to transport and store spent nuclear fuel at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The preliminary design of this system identifies borated stainless steel as the neutron absorber material that will be used to fabricate fuel basket inserts for nuclear criticality control. This paper discusses corrosion test results for verifying the performance of this material manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A887, Grade A, under the expected repository conditions.

  1. The Development of Microstructure in Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    E-print Network

    Haddad, Naseem Issa Abdallah

    1990-05-08

    and its most important effect is to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels. Molybdenum has a tendency to combine with iron to form intermetallic phases. The most important intermetal1ic compound it forms is the Laves (1]) phase... been investigated by Bechtold and Vacher [29]. They found that Laves and Chi phases could be induced to form at temperatures as high as 1093°C at an iron content of 70 wt.%, Fig. 2.19. At lower temperatures, an increase in molybdenum concentration...

  2. Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils

    DOEpatents

    Leigh, Richard W. (New York, NY)

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

  3. Equation of state and electrical conductivity of stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2004-11-01

    Warm dense matter is the region in phase space of density and temperature where the thermal, Fermi, and Coulomb energies are approximately equal. The lack of a dominating scale and physical behavior makes it challenging to model the physics to high fidelity. For Sandia, a fundamental understanding of the region is of importance because of the needs of our experimental HEDP programs for high fidelity descriptive and predictive modeling. We show that multi-scale simulations of macroscopic physical phenomena now have predictive capability also for difficult but ubiquitous materials such as stainless steel, a transition metal alloy.

  4. Low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminum/stainless steel composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhagat, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Composites consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with various volume fractions of stainless steel wire were fabricated by hot die pressing under various conditions of temperature, time, and pressure. The composites were tested in plane bending to complete fracture under cycle loading, and the results were analyzed on a computer to obtain a statistically valid mathematical relationship between the low-cycle fatigue life and the fiber volume fraction of the composite. The fractured surfaces of the composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to identify the characteristic features of fatigue damage. Fatigue damage mechanisms are proposed and discussed.

  5. The effect of thermal aging and boiling water reactor environment on Type 316L stainless steel welds

    E-print Network

    Lucas, Timothy R

    2011-01-01

    The thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels and duplex stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well known "475°C" embrittlement ...

  6. 77 FR 21963 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ...Department'') has determined that Aperam Stainless Belgium N.V. (``Aperam'') is the successor-in- interest to ArcelorMittal Stainless Belgium N.V. (``AMSB''). As a result, Aperam will be accorded the same treatment previously...

  7. 77 FR 74883 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water; Revision 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ...REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0256] Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...Staff Guidance, LR-ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...corrects the identification numbers for aging management review (AMR) items in...

  8. Electron Microscopy Study of Stainless Steel Radiation Damage Due to Long-Term Irradation by Alpha Particles Emitted From Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Unlu, Kenan; Rios-Martinez, Carlos; Saglam, Mehmet; Hart, Ron R.; Shipp, John D.; Rennie, John

    1998-04-16

    Radiation damage and associated surface and microstructural changes produced in stainless steel encapsulation by high-fluence alpha particle irradiations from weapons-grade plutonium of 316-stainless steel are being investigated.

  9. 75 FR 45605 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Correction to Notice of Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Correction to Notice of Final Results...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...steel plate in coils (``SSPC'') from Belgium entered, or withdrawn from...

  10. 77 FR 73013 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 2010-2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium.\\1\\ This review covers one manufacturer...subject merchandise: Aperam Stainless Belgium N.V. (AS Belgium). The period...

  11. 75 FR 61699 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan: Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea...stainless steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea...the antidumping duty orders on SSPC from Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South...

  12. 77 FR 32517 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Preliminary Results of Antidumping...steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium covering the period of review (POR...subject merchandise, Aperam Stainless Belgium N.V. (AS...

  13. 50 CFR 17.7 - Raptor exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS Introduction and General Provisions...

  14. 75 FR 67689 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Brazil. See Antidumping Duty Orders: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil, India and Japan, 60 FR 9661... Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 74 FR 10022 (March... Less Than Fair Value: Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, 59 FR 66914 (December 28, 1994). These...

  15. 78 FR 62583 - Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... of Antidumping Duty Investigations, 78 FR 35253 (June 12, 2013). On September 19, 2013, more than 25... Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia: Request for Extension of Preliminary Determination,'' ``Welded... Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia: Amended Request for Extension of Preliminary...

  16. 78 FR 31574 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of Antidumping... materially retarded, by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel... the Commission's Handbook on Filing Procedures, 76 FR 62092 (Oct. 6, 2011), available on...

  17. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the basis of... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe... Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of May 24, 2013 (78 FR...

  18. 77 FR 3231 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Act of 1930, as amended (the Act). See Initiation of Five- Year (``Sunset'') Review, 76 FR 38613 (July... the Antidumping Duty Order on Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India, 76 FR 38686 (July 1, 2011). \\1\\ Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods from India, 58 FR 63335 (December 1, 1993). As...

  19. 75 FR 67110 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... employees, and Commission rule 201.15(b)(19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was... imports of forged stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan (59 FR 5994). Following first five-year... antidumping duty orders on imports of forged stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan (65 FR...

  20. 77 FR 41969 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ... Revocation in Part, and Deferral of Administrative Review, 77 FR 19179, 19181 (March 30, 2012). Based on a... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative...) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Japan...

  1. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this request... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan (53 FR 9787). On February 23, 1993, Commerce issued an antidumping duty order on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Korea (58 FR 11029). On...

  2. 75 FR 64709 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ...213(b), the Department received a timely request from ArcelorMittal Stainless Belgium N.V. (``AMS Belgium'') to conduct...Plaintiff's Motion to Modify the Preliminary Injunction Order, ArcelorMittal Stainless Belgium N.V. v. United States, No....

  3. Assessment of bacterial biofilm on stainless steel by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques were investigated for detection of two genera of microbial biofilms on stainless steel material which is commonly used to manufacture food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were deposited in nonpathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cultu...

  4. 76 FR 76437 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... (76 FR 38688) and determined on October 4, 2011, that it would conduct expedited reviews (76 FR 64106... Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would be likely to...

  5. 76 FR 8773 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ..., * * *'' (76 FR 5331). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1675(c... Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... November 2010 to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on forged stainless...

  6. 76 FR 74831 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0256] Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...LR-ISG), LR- ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...Nuclear Power Plants (SRP-LR) and Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report for...

  7. 76 FR 69292 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ...REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0256] Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...LR-ISG), LR- ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...Nuclear Power Plants (SRP-LR) and Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report for...

  8. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... its notice of institution (75 FR 30437, June 1, 2010) was adequate and that the respondent interested... Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and...

  9. 76 FR 54207 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Italy: Revocation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ...time. See Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan...the antidumping duty orders on SSPC from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan...and Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and...

  10. 78 FR 79662 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium.\\1\\ This review covers one manufacturer...subject merchandise: Aperam Stainless Belgium N.V. (ASB). The period of...

  11. 76 FR 53882 - Continuation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders: Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, the Republic of Korea, South Africa...stainless steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Belgium, the Republic of Korea (Korea), South...of the AD and CVD orders on SSPC from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and...

  12. 78 FR 21596 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Countervailing Duty Determination, 78 FR 13017 (February 26, 2013). \\2\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from... From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination, 77 FR... welding operation to form one unit are covered by the scope of the order. Drawn stainless steel sinks...

  13. 75 FR 70908 - Circular Welded Austenitic Stainless Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 22107 (April 27, 2010). The period of review (``POR'') is September 5... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Austenitic Stainless Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic... of the antidumping duty order on circular welded austenitic stainless pressure pipe from the...

  14. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  15. Materials Science and Engineering A 384 (2004) 3546 Self organization of shear bands in stainless steel

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    12 May 2004 Abstract The spatial distribution of shear bands was investigated in 304L stainless steelMaterials Science and Engineering A 384 (2004) 35­46 Self organization of shear bands in stainless steel Q. Xue, M.A. Meyers, V.F. Nesterenko Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  16. Oxidation of stainless steel 316 and Nitronic 50 in supercritical and ultrasupercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David; Chidambaram, Dev

    2015-08-01

    Corrosion of stainless steel 316 and Nitronic 50 exposed to supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and exposure time. Post-exposure surface analysis was performed using Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies to determine the chemistry of the oxides formed as a result of the exposure. When exposed to supercritical water, Nitronic 50 and stainless steel 316 were observed to have similar weight gains; however, stainless steel 316 was found to gain less weight than Nitronic 50 in exposure tests performed in ultrasupercritical water. Stainless steel 316 developed surface films primarily composed of iron oxides, while the surface of Nitronic 50 contained a mixture of iron, chromium and manganese oxides. Based on these analyses, the differences in weight gain and oxidation characteristics of the two materials are attributed to the higher concentration of Cr and Mn in Nitronic 50 compared to stainless steel 316.

  17. Abnormal grain growth in AISI 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2014-11-15

    The microstructural evolution during abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in 304L stainless steel was studied in a wide range of annealing temperatures and times. At relatively low temperatures, the grain growth mode was identified as normal. However, at homologous temperatures between 0.65 (850 °C) and 0.7 (900 °C), the observed transition in grain growth mode from normal to abnormal, which was also evident from the bimodality in grain size distribution histograms, was detected to be caused by the dissolution/coarsening of carbides. The microstructural features such as dispersed carbides were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and microhardness. Continued annealing to a long time led to the completion of secondary recrystallization and the subsequent reappearance of normal growth mode. Another instance of abnormal grain growth was observed at homologous temperatures higher than 0.8, which may be attributed to the grain boundary faceting/defaceting phenomenon. It was also found that when the size of abnormal grains reached a critical value, their size will not change too much and the grain growth behavior becomes practically stagnant. - Highlights: • Abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in AISI 304L stainless steel • Exaggerated grain growth due to dissolution/coarsening of carbides • The enrichment of carbide particles by titanium • Abnormal grain growth due to grain boundary faceting at very high temperatures • The stagnancy of abnormal grain growth by annealing beyond a critical time.

  18. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2? values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe2C5. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  19. High-pressure stainless steel active membrane microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G.; Svensson, S.; Ogden, S.; Klintberg, L.; Hjort, K.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, high-pressure membrane microvalves have been designed, manufactured and evaluated. The valves were able to withstand back-pressures of 200 bar with a response time of less than 0.6 s. These stainless steel valves, manufactured with back-end batch production, utilize the large volume expansion coupled to the solid-liquid phase transition in paraffin wax. When membrane materials were evaluated, parylene coated stainless steel was found to be the best choice as compared to polydimethylsiloxane and polyimide. Also, the influence of the orifice placement and diameter is included in this work. If the orifice is placed too close to the rim of the membrane, the valve can stay sealed even after turning the power off, and the valve will not open until the pressure in the system is released. The developed steel valves, evaluated for both water and air, provide excellent properties in terms of mechanical stability, ease of fabrication, and low cost. Possible applications include sampling at high pressures, chemical microreactors, high performance liquid chromatography, pneumatics, and hydraulics.

  20. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440?C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440?C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants. PMID:26593645

  1. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  2. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abudaia, F. B. Khalil, E. O. Esehiri, A. F. Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2? values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  3. Impulse pressuring diffusion bonding of titanium alloy to stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, X.J. Sheng, G.M. Qin, B.; Huang, W.Z.; Zhou, B.

    2008-07-15

    Impulse pressuring diffusion bonding between a titanium alloy TA17 and an austenitic stainless steel 0Cr18Ni9Ti has been carried out in vacuum. Relationships between the bonding parameters and the tensile strength of the joints were investigated, and the optimum bond parameters were obtained: bonding temperature T = 825 deg. C, maximum impulse pressure P{sub max} = 50 MPa, minimum impulse pressure P{sub min} = 8 MPa, number of impulses N = 30, impulse frequency f = 0.5 Hz. The maximum tensile strength of the joint was 321 MPa and the effective bonding time was only 180 s. The reaction products and the interface structure of the joints were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The study revealed the existence of FeTi, Fe{sub 2}Ti, {sigma} phase and {beta}-Ti in the reaction zone. Brittle Fe-Ti intermetallic phases lower the strength and ductility of the impulse pressuring diffusion bonded couples significantly. This technique provides a reliable and efficient bonding method of titanium alloy and stainless steel.

  4. Corrosion study of bare and coated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted at Kennedy Space Center from February 1968 to February 1971 to evaluate the performance of austenitic stainless steel alloys used in fluid systems lines. For several years, there had been numerous failures of stainless steel hardware caused by pitting and stress corrosion cracking. Several alloys were evaluated for effectiveness of certain sacrificial-type protective coverings in preventing corrosion failures. Samples were tested in specially designed racks placed 91 meters (100 yards) above high-tide line at Cape Kennedy. It is concluded that: (1) unprotected tubing samples showed evidence of pitting initiation after 2 weeks; (2) although some alloys develop larger pits than others, it is probable that the actual pitting rate is independent of alloy type; (3) the deepest pitting occurred in the sheltered part of the samples; and (4) zinc-rich coatings and an aluminum-filled coating have afforded sacrificial protection against pitting for at least 28 months. It is believed that a much longer effective coating life can be expected.

  5. Superplastic Forming of Duplex Stainless Steel for Aerospace Part

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Sung; Yoon, Jong-Hoon; Yoo, Joon-Tae; Yi, Young-Moo

    2011-08-22

    In this study, the high temperature forming behavior of duplex stainless steel has been characterized and the outer shell of a combustion chamber was fabricated with pressure difference of hot gas. It consists of two parts which are the outer skin made of stainless steel to sustain the internal pressure and the inner shell made of copper alloy for regenerative cooling channels. Two outer skins partitioned to half with respect to the symmetric axis was prepared by hot gas forming process with a maximum pressure of 7 MPa following to FEM analysis. For inner layer, copper alloy was machined for cooling channels and then placed in the gas pressure welding fixture. It is shown that the optimum condition of gas pressure welding is 7 MPa at 890 deg. C, for one hour. EDX analysis and scanning electron microscope micrograph confirm the atomic diffusion process is observed at the interface and copper atoms diffuse into steel, while iron and chrome atoms diffuse into copper. The result shows that the manufacturing method with superplastic forming and gas pressure welding of steel and copper alloy has been successful for near net shape manufacturing of scaled combustion chamber of launch vehicle.

  6. Defect microstructures in neutron-irradiated copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The defect microstructures of copper and type 304L austenitic stainless steel have been examined following neutron irradiation under widely different conditions. Less than 0.2% of the defect clusters in steel irradiated at 120/sup 0/C with moderated fission neutrons were resolvable as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The fraction of defect clusters identified as SFT in copper varied from approx.10% for a low-dose 14-MeV neutron irradiation at 25/sup 0/C to approx.50% for copper irradiated to 1.3 dpa in a moderated fission spectrum at 182/sup 0/C. The mean cluster size in copper was about 2.6 nm for both cases, despite the large differences in irradiation conditions. The mean defect cluster size in the irradiated steel was about 1.8 nm. The absence of SFT in stainless steel may be due to the generation of 35 appm He during the irradiation, which caused the vacancies to form helium-filled cavities instead of SFT. 20 refs.

  7. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440?C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440?C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants. PMID:26593645

  8. Cold Spray Repair of Martensitic Stainless Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccoli, M.; Cornacchia, G.; Maestrini, D.; Marconi, G. P.; Roberti, R.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of using cold spray as repair technique of martensitic stainless steel components was evaluated through laboratory investigations. An austenitic stainless steel feedstock powder was chosen, instead of soft metals powders like nickel, copper, or aluminum, used for repairing components made in light alloy or cast iron. The present study directly compares the microstructure, the residual stresses, and the micro-hardness of repairs obtained by cold spray and by TIG welding, that is commonly used as repair technique in large steel components. XRD and optical metallographic analysis of the repairs showed that cold spray offers some advantages, inducing compressive residual stresses in the repair and avoiding alterations of the interface between repair and base material. For these reasons, a heat treatment after the cold spray repair is not required to restore the base material properties, whereas a post-weld heat treatment is needed after the welding repair. Cold spray repair also exhibits a higher micro-hardness than the welding repair. In addition, the cavitation erosion resistance of a cold spray coating was investigated through ultrasonic cavitation tests, and the samples worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Microstructural characterization of titanium to 304 stainless steel brazed joints

    SciTech Connect

    Camargo, P.R.C.; Liu, S. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); Trevisan, R.E. . Dept. of Fabrication Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    The formation of intermetallic compounds in brazed joints between titanium and 304 stainless steel is of major concern, since they considerably degrade the joint properties. This research examined the vacuum brazing of commercially pure titanium to 304 stainless steel using two different silver-copper brazing filler metals. Pure copper and silver were used to prepare the brazing filler metals in these experiments. Special attention was given to the characterization of the different phases formed at the brazed joint and the effect of the intermetallic compounds on the mechanical properties of the brazed joints. Light and electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, microhardness, and shear testing were used to support the investigation. From the mechanical properties point of view, brazed joints using an eutectic composition filler metal (Ag-28 wt-% Cu) proved to be superior compared to the joints prepared with a filler metal of composition Ag-46 wt-% Cu. To maximize the shear strength of the joint, the brazing time must be optimized such that interfacial reactions, titanium-iron intermetallics formation are minimized.

  10. In Situ Measurement of Tritium Permeation Through Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  11. IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF TRITIUM PERMEATION THROUGH STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292° and 330°C. In-situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. An irradiation enhancement factor (IEF) was determined by comparing in-situ permeation data with a correlation for ex-reactor hydrogen permeation through austenitic stainless steel developed from literature data and reported by Le Claire. Nominal values for the IEF ranged between 3 and 5 for 316 SS. In-situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330°C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  12. Development of cryogenic thermal control heat pipes. [of stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of thermal control heat pipes that are applicable to the low temperature to cryogenic range was investigated. A previous effort demonstrated that stainless steel axially grooved tubing which met performance requirements could be fabricated. Three heat pipe designs utilizing stainless steel axially grooved tubing were fabricated and tested. One is a liquid trap diode heat pipe which conforms to the configuration and performance requirements of the Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP). The HEPP is scheduled for flight aboard the Long Duration Flight Exposure Facility (LDEF). Another is a thermal switch heat pipe which is designed to permit energy transfer at the cooler of the two identical legs. The third thermal component is a hybrid variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP). The design incorporates both a conventional VCHP system and a liquid trap diode. The design, fabrication and thermal testing of these heat pipes is described. The demonstrated heat pipe behavior including start-up, forward mode transport, recovery after evaporator dry-out, diode performance and variable conductance control are discussed.

  13. The diffusivity of hydrogen in Nb stabilized stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peterson, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of hydrogen from 347 stainless steel has been studied by using a real time dynamic technique under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the surface composition as a function of time and temperature. The surface film on the electropolished samples was found to be approximately 15 A thick and consisted of a carbon-oxygen complex and a metal oxide (FexOy). Upon heating to 400 C, the carbon-oxygen complex desorbed as CO and the remaining oxygen and carbon began to incorporate. Also at this temperature sulfur began to diffuse out of the bulk to the surface and at approximately 800 C formed a complete monolayer. At 900 C, carbon and oxygen virtually disappeared, leaving the monolayer of sulfur as the only surface contaminant. The hydrogen diffusivity was found to follow closely the equation D = 7.01 x 10 to the -7th exp(-48.0/RT) sq m per second over the entire temperature range studied, thus indicating that hydrogen evolution is not significantly affected by the changing surface composition. The somewhat higher value of the diffusivity obtained in this work compared to past measurements in austenitic stainless steels may indicate the importance of sample preprocessing and ultrahigh vacuum conditions in minimizing the effects of surface layers.

  14. 76 FR 79651 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...Administrative Review of Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings...is certain stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings...product encompasses all grades of stainless steel and ``commodity...Fittings, or its foreign equivalents (e.g., DIN or...

  15. 76 FR 38688 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Institution of a Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea (57 FR 62301) and Taiwan (57 FR 62300). Following first five... ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan (71 FR 53412, September 11, 2006). The Commission... as all welded stainless steel pipes and pressure tubes, excluding grade 409 tubes and...

  16. 75 FR 68324 - Certain Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, South Korea and Taiwan; Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ...A-583-816] Certain Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, South Korea and Taiwan...on certain stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, South Korea and Taiwan...on certain stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, South Korea and...

  17. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ...A-583-815] Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation...on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would...on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan.\\1\\ On July...

  18. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan... welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would likely lead to.... See Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Final Results of...

  19. 76 FR 67673 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Final Results of Expedited...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ...A-580-810, A-583-815] Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South...of the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South...of the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from...

  20. 77 FR 47595 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Orders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ...A-469-805] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain: Continuation...duty orders on stainless steel bar from Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain would likely...orders \\1\\ on stainless steel bar from Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain pursuant...

  1. 77 FR 16207 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain: Final Results of the Expedited Third...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ...A-469-805] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain: Final Results...duty orders on stainless steel bar from Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain pursuant to...duty orders on stainless steel bar from Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain\\1\\...

  2. 76 FR 74807 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain; Institution of Five-Year Reviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...Third Review)] Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain; Institution...duty orders on stainless steel bar from Brazil, India, Japan, and Spain would be likely...on imports of stainless steel bar from Brazil, India, and Japan (60 FR 9661)....

  3. 75 FR 62103 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From South Africa: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ...Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From South Africa: Final Results of Expedited Sunset...stainless steel plate in coils from South Africa pursuant to section 751(c) of...stainless steel plate in coils from South Africa pursuant to section 751(c)...

  4. 76 FR 37320 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Notice of Court Decision Not in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ...A-580-810] Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea...duty order on certain welded stainless steel pipes from the Republic of Korea...to SeAH. See Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of...

  5. Effect of Composition on the Formation of Sigma during Single-Pass Welding of Mo-Bearing Stainless Steels

    E-print Network

    DuPont, John N.

    -bearing stainless steel compositions ranging from 0 to 10 wt pct Mo and over a broad range of Ni and Cr contents and ASM International 2007 I. INTRODUCTION MANY high alloy stainless steels employ molybde- num additions and superaustenitic stainless steels, where microsegrega- tion during primary c-austenite solidification results in Mo

  6. Materials Science and Engineering A252 (1998) 117132 Optimization of 316 stainless steel/alumina functionally graded

    E-print Network

    Grujicic, Mica

    1998-01-01

    Materials Science and Engineering A252 (1998) 117­132 Optimization of 316 stainless steel in a 316 stainless steel/Al2O3 functionally graded material [FGM] model system during cooling from. Specifically, the effect of the material concentration profile of a 316 stainless steel/Al2O3 graded layer

  7. 76 FR 5331 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan: Final Results of Sunset Reviews and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ...A-533-809, A-583-821] Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan...antidumping duty orders on forged stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan...duty orders on certain forged stainless steel flanges from India and...

  8. Dilution Control in Gas-Tungsten-Arc Welds Involving Superaustenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-Based Alloys

    E-print Network

    DuPont, John N.

    Dilution Control in Gas-Tungsten-Arc Welds Involving Superaustenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel stainless steel, (the AL-6XN alloy) and two Ni-based filler metals (IN625 and IN622) using the gas must also consider methods to control the dilution the welding of superaustenitic stainless steels

  9. 75 FR 81966 - Top of the Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...C-580-602] Top of the Stove Stainless Steel Cooking Ware From the Republic...duty orders on top of the stove stainless steel cooking ware (cookware) from...duty orders on top of the stove stainless steel cooking ware from Korea...

  10. 75 FR 34424 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod from Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Spain, and Taiwan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ...A-469-807, A-583-828] Stainless Steel Wire Rod from Italy, Japan...the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel wire rod (SSWR) from Italy...should the orders be revoked. See Stainless Steel Wire Rod From Italy,...

  11. By: Leif Karlsson, ESAB AB, Gothenburg. The large and steadily growing family of stainless steels can offer unique combina-

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    By: Leif Karlsson, ESAB AB, Gothenburg. The large and steadily growing family of stainless steels into an increasing number of applications. This review briefly summarises the history of stainless steel development and discusses selected weldability aspects. Examples from ESAB's long history of stainless steel welding

  12. Stella Koutros, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Koutros received her M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University. She completed her doctoral work through the Yale-NCI partnership training program in cancer epidemiology, conducting research in the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch (OEEB). In 2008, upon completion of her doctorate she became a fellow in OEEB; she was appointed to the position of tenure-track investigator in 2015.

  13. Mark Purdue, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Purdue received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Toronto, Canada. He joined DCEG in 2004 as a postdoctoral fellow within the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, and was appointed to the position of tenure-track investigator in 2009. He has received several awards for his research in molecular epidemiology, including DCEG and NIH Fellowship Achievement awards and a DCEG Intramural Research Award.

  14. The Methods Behind PH WINS.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers-a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  15. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  16. (October 22, 2015) Neuroscience Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    HANDBOOK (October 22, 2015) Neuroscience Ph.D. Program Daniel Tranel, PhD Program Director Michael ...................................................................................................4 B. Neuroscience Program Graduate Research Assistantships .................................5 C ......................................................................................................................7 A. Required Core Neuroscience Courses

  17. Mechanisms of Intragastric pH Sensing

    E-print Network

    Goo, Tyralee; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    food in the stomach increases intragastric pH, which isof the stomach respond to changes in luminal pH and acidpH, and then enabling gastric acid secretion to continue. Finally, the intestinal phase occurs when stomach

  18. Andrew Terranova, Ph.D. Curriculum Vitae

    E-print Network

    Li, X. Rong

    Orleans, supervised by Timothy Stickle, Ph.D. and Amanda Morris, Ph.D. 2003 ­ 2004 Project Director, Bully, stability, and correlates to bullying roles in middle school children. Behavioral Sciences and the Law-based Sample of Boys and Girls. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. #12;CV ­ Andrew Terranova, Ph.D. Page 3

  19. My PhD Plan Completed Work

    E-print Network

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Background My PhD Plan Completed Work Planned Work Hierarchical Biped Control A Exam Matthew Kelly August 4, 2014 Matthew Kelly Hierarchical Biped Control 1 / 34 #12;Background My PhD Plan Completed Work Planned Work Table of Contents 1 Background 2 My PhD Plan 3 Completed Work 4 Planned Work Push Hold Free

  20. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH

  1. The pH Base Saturation Relationships

    E-print Network

    dePamphilis, Claude

    The pH Base Saturation Relationships of Pennsylvania Subsoils by Edward J. Ciolkosz Agronomy Series Number 149 November 2001 #12;The pH Base Saturation Relationships of Pennsylvania Subsoils by Edward J, soil scientists commonly use soil pH to estimate the percent base saturation. Predictions have not been

  2. The influence of saliva pH value on the retention and durability of bar-clip attachments

    PubMed Central

    Aroso, Carlos; Ustrell, Raul; Braga, Ana Cristina; Mendes, Jose Manuel; Escuin, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the durability and retention of 4 types of attachments placed over computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) titanium bars when subjected to different pH conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four commercially available attachments were investigated: Hader Yellow, Hader Red, Ackerman Gold and Ackerman Stainless Steel. These attachments and Ackerman CAD/CAM titanium bars were placed in 2 vessels containing different artificial saliva solutions (pH 7/pH 4) at 37? for one month to simulate corrosion conditions, and they were then subjected to mechanical testing (5400 cycles of insertion and removal). RESULTS The results revealed that there were significant differences in the average values of insertion/removal force due to the pH (F (1, 24)=9.207, P<.05) and the type of attachment (F (3, 24)=11.742, P<.05). CONCLUSION More acidic pH values were found to have a negative influence on the retention capacity of the attachments. PMID:25722835

  3. A mortality study among mild steel and stainless steel welders.

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, J J; Wild, P; Haguenoer, J M; Faucon, D; De Gaudemaris, R; Mur, J M; Mereau, M; Gary, Y; Toamain, J P; Birembaut, Y

    1993-01-01

    A mortality study was carried out in conjunction with the European mortality study among welders coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The study was aimed at assessing risks for lung cancer in relation to exposure to asbestos, welding fumes containing chromium and nickel, and tobacco smoke. The study included a cohort of 2721 welders and an internal comparison group of 6683 manual workers employed in 13 factories in France. The mortality of the two cohorts was studied from 1975 to 1988 by the historical prospective method. Job histories of welders were traced including welding processes used, metals welded, and proportion of worktime spent in welding. Data on smoking habits were collected from medical records. The observed number of deaths were compared with those expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR)) based on national rates with adjustments for age, sex, and calendar time. The smoking habits of 87% of the whole study population were known. The distribution of welders and controls according to smoking was not statistically different. The overall mortality was slightly higher for welders (SMR = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.89-1.18) than for controls (SMR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99). For lung cancer, the SMR was 1.24 (95% CI 0.75-1.94) for welders, whereas the corresponding value was lower for controls (SMR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.68-1.26). The SMR for lung cancer was 1.59 among non-shipyard mild steel welders (95% CI 0.73-3.02). This contrasted with the results for all stainless steel welders (SMR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.19-2.69), and for stainless steel welders predominantly exposed to chromium VI (SMR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.12-3.71). Moreover, SMRs for lung cancer for mild steel welders tended to increase with duration of exposure and time since first exposure, leading to significant excesses for duration > or = 20 years and latency > or = 20 years. Such a pattern was not found for stainless steel welders. PMID:8457490

  4. Arc characteristics of submerged arc welding with stainless steel wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Wu, Zhi-sheng; Liu, Cui-rong; Chen, Feng-hua

    2014-08-01

    The arc characteristics of submerged arc welding (SAW) with stainless steel wire were studied by using Analysator Hannover (AH). The tests were carried out under the same preset arc voltage combined with different welding currents. By comparing the probability density distribution (PDD) curves of arc voltage and welding current, the changes were analyzed, the metal transfer mode in SAW was deduced, and the characteristics of a stable arc were summarized. The analysis results show that, with an increase of welding parameters, the short-circuiting peak in the PDD curves of arc voltage decreases gradually until it disappears, and the dominant metal transfer mode changes from flux-wall guided transfer to projected transfer and then to streaming transfer. Moreover, when the PDD curves of arc voltage are both unimodal and generally symmetrical, the greater the peak probability and the smaller the peak span, the more stable the arc becomes.

  5. Corrosion of stainless steel piping in high manganese fresh water

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Lutey, R.W.; Musick, J.; Pinnow, K.E.; Tuthill, A.H.

    1996-09-01

    A potable water treatment plant, designed to reduce manganese and iron in well water, experienced leaks in the 16 in. (406 mm) raw water headers about nine months after startup. The material, type 304 (UNS 30403) stainless steel, was purchased to American Society of Testing Materials specification A 778, with additional stipulations governing internal finish, the use of filler metal, and pickling for scale removal. Laboratory screenings of deposits for bacteria revealed some potentially additive corrosive effects from microbial action. However, the correlation of corrosion with the presence or absence of heat tint in the heat-affected zone of the circumferential welds prevailed as a primary cause of the corrosion observed beneath an adherent manganese-iron deposit in a low chloride, high manganese, raw water.

  6. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  7. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  8. Sensitization and stabilization of type 409 ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, J.D.; Franson, I.A.

    1997-08-01

    Type 409 (UNS S40900) ferritic stainless steel, used widely in automotive exhaust systems, can be subject to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of weld heat-affected zones (HAZ), even though ASTM stabilization requirements (Ti = 6 {times} C) are met. A boiling Cu/6% CuSO{sub 4}/0.5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} test is shown to be appropriate for detecting IGC of welds and HAZ. This test was used to establish stabilization requirements for type 409, whether dual-stabilized with Ti + Nb or singly stabilized with Ti alone. It was found that the stabilization requirement should be Ti + Nb {ge} 0.08 + 8 (C + N). Benefits of dual stabilization include improved surface quality and formability without sacrifice of mechanical properties or weldability.

  9. Formability analysis of austenitic stainless steel-304 under warm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lade, Jayahari; Singh, Swadesh Kumar; Banoth, Balu Naik; Gupta, Amit Kumar

    2013-12-01

    A warm deep drawing process of austenitic stainless steel-304 (ASS-304) of circular blanks with coupled ther mal analysis is studied in this article. 65 mm blanks were deep drawn at different temperatures and thickness distribution is experimentally measured after cutting the drawn component into two halves. The process is simulated using explicit fin ite element code LS-DYNA. A Barlat 3 parameter model is used in the simulation, as the material is anisotropic up to 30 0°C. Material properties for the simulation are determined at different temperatures using a 5 T UTM coupled with a furn ace. In this analysis constant punch speed and variable blank holder force (BHF) is applied to draw cups without wrinkle.

  10. CO2 laser welding of AISI 321stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, A.; Hamdani, A. H.; Akhter, R.

    2014-06-01

    CO2 laser welding of AISI 321austenitic stainless steel has been carried out. Bead on plate welds on 2 mm thick steel were performed with 450W CO2 laser at speeds ranging from 200 to 900 mm/min. It was observed that weld depth and width was decreased with increasing the speed at constant laser power. Butt welds on different sheet thickness of 1, 2 and 2.5 mm were performed with laser power of 450 W and at speed 750, 275 and 175 mm/min, respectively. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy and SEM. The austenite/delta ferrite microstructure was reported in the welded zone. The microhardness and tensile strength of the welded joints were measured and found almost similar to base metal due to austenitic nature of steel.

  11. Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Puli, Ramesh Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

  12. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Martin, J. J.; Stewart, E. T.; Rhys, N. O.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005.

  13. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  14. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  15. Laser resistant stainless steel endotracheal tube: experimental and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fried, M P; Mallampati, S R; Liu, F C; Kaplan, S; Caminear, D S; Samonte, B R

    1991-01-01

    A fire due to endotracheal tube (ET) ignition is a catastrophic event that may occur during laser surgery of the upper airway, regardless of the wavelength utilized. Although methods exist that permit laser surgery without an ET, this is frequently not feasible. The current investigation was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of a double-cuffed stainless steel ET, first in the laboratory and subsequently in a clinical setting. Bench testing was performed using CO2 (both standard and milliwatt) and KTP/532 lasers. Only the distal polyvinyl chloride cuffed end of the tube was potentially ignitable, however, the appropriate use of saline to fill the cuffs allowed only for cuff perforation without ignition. Canine testing was performed in 10 animals: 4 dogs were intubated from 3 to 4.5 hours with the laser resistant stainless steel endotracheal tube (LRSS-ET) (Laser-Flex Tracheal Tube; Mallinckrodt Anesthesia Products, St. Louis, MO) and 2 with an aluminum tape wrapped red rubber ET. Visual and histological examination were performed in both groups at 3 and 7 days. Four dogs underwent CO2 laser laryngeal surgery with visual and histological examination performed at 7 days postoperatively. No untoward effects could be demonstrated due to the LRSS-ET. A clinical study was then performed in 24 patients who underwent laser surgery of the upper aerodigestive tract with either a CO2 or KTP/532 laser. In all cases ventilation was adequate, the shaft of the LRSS-ET proved impervious to the laser, and the distal end of the tube protected the tracheobronchial tree safely.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1861569

  16. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design. Suppl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas J. (Compiler); Martin, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005. This supplement contains drawings, analysis, and calculations

  17. Intergranular corrosion of Type 409 stainless steel used in automotive exhaust applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brossia, C.S.; Martin, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Automotive exhaust systems must meet increasingly stringent lifetime requirements, and thus the incorporation of stainless steels (primarily ferritic) has increased. One of the failure mechanisms that is rarely encountered, but does occur, is intergranular corrosion. Intergranular corrosion of ferritic stainless steels is believed to occur via a similar mechanism as is observed in austenitic stainless, namely precipitation of chromium-carbon nitride (Cr-C/N) particles at the grain boundaries leading to Cr-depleted regions. In the present study, the effect of thermal history (including heat treatment, welding and post-weld heat treatment) and alloy chemistry on the level of sensitization of Type 409SS were examined.

  18. Measurement of the magnetic moment in a cold worked 304 stainless steel using HTS SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. G.; Kim, D. W.; Angani, C. S.; Timofeev, V. P.; Cheong, Y. M.

    The magnetic properties of stainless steel have been investigated using a radio frequency (RF) high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device)-based susceptometer. The nuclear grade 304 stainless steel is nonmagnetic at a normal condition but it changes to a partially ferromagnetic state associated with martensitic transformation under a plastic deformation. The magnetic moment of the 304 stainless steels was increased with an increasing cold work rate, and decreased with an increasing annealing temperature. The change of mechanical properties such as yield strength and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) are also analyzed in terms of deformation-induced martensitic transformation.

  19. Comparison of discharge power in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with stainless steel and KCl liquid electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traikool, T.; Poolyarat, N.; Onjun, T.

    2015-05-01

    A Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) device is developed to generate cold atmospheric plasma. Two different materials used as a top electrode: stainless steel and KCl liquid are considered. The bottom electrode is stainless steel for both cases. The gap of this DBD can be varied up to 3 mm. The DBD is powered by an AC high voltage in the range of ±10 kV with frequency in a range of 2-7 kHz. It is found that the discharge with KCl liquid electrode yield higher power than that with stainless steel electrode.

  20. A solid-phase microextraction platinized stainless steel fiber coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyaniline nanocomposite film for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol in medicinal plants and honey.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Alireza; Dowlatshah, Samira; Nouraei, Nadia; Heidari, Nahid; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh

    2015-08-01

    A mechanically hard and cohesive porous fiber, with large surface area, for more strong attachment of the coating was provided by platinizing a stainless steel wire. Then, the platinized stainless steel fiber was coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (MWCNT/PANI) nanocomposite using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method and applied for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol with direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) quantification. To provide a larger coarse surface for the tightened attachment of coating on the fiber, a stainless steel wire was platinized using a suitable optimized EPD method. Different experimental parameters were studied and the optimal conditions were obtained as: pH of the sample solution: 2; extraction time: 60min; salt content in the sample solution: 1% w/v NaNO3; desorption time: 60min; type and volume of the desorption solvent: acetonitrile, 100?L. Under the optimized conditions, limits of detection (LODs) were 0.6 and 0.8?gmL(-1) for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. Linear dynamic range (LDR) for the calibration curves of both analytes were 1-80?gmL(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD%, n=6) was 6.8 for thymol and 12.7 for carvacrol. The proposed fiber was successfully applied for the recovery and determination of thymol and carvacrol in thyme, savory, and honey samples. PMID:26138604

  1. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  2. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R.; Bergen, R.; Balch, D. K.

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  3. A Study on Atmospheric Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel in a Simulated Marine Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wangyan; Pan, Chen; Su, Wei; Wang, Zhenyao; Liu, Shinian; Wang, Chuan

    2015-07-01

    The atmospheric corrosion behavior of 304 stainless steel in a simulated marine atmosphere has been investigated using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical measurements. The experimental results indicate that the main corrosion type of 304 stainless steel in a simulated marine atmosphere is pitting corrosion and the initiation of pits is associated with the dissolution of MnS inclusion. The maximum pit depth of 304 stainless steel increased in linear relationship with the extension of corrosion time. XPS results reveal that the corrosion products possess more hydroxide, and the ratio of [Cr]/{[Cr]+[Fe]} in the corrosion products gradually increases with the increasing time. The protective ability of corrosion products formed on 304 stainless steel has also been discussed.

  4. 13. Building H9; view of stainless steel probes and vacuum ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Building H-9; view of stainless steel probes and vacuum line, looking W. (Ryan and Harms) - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  5. 75 FR 81217 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Full Sunset Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ...adequate substantive response filed on behalf of the domestic interested parties and adequate substantive responses from ArcelorMittal Stainless Belgium N.V. (``AMS'') and the Government of Belgium (``GOB''), the Department determined to...

  6. PARAMETERS OF TREATED STAINLESS STEEL SURFACES IMPORTANT FOR RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of materials that are resistant to bacterial contamination could enhance food safety during processing. Common finishing treatments of stainless steel surfaces used for components of poultry processing equipment were tested for resistance to bacterial attachment. Surface char...

  7. Dissolution of a 316L stainless steel vessel by a pool of molten aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, N.K.; Finfrock, C.C.; Lara, J.D.; Schwarz, C.E.; Greene, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Two experiments to study the dissolution of a torospherical stainless steel vessel by an isothermal pool of molten aluminum have been performed. The test vessels consisted of 24 inch diameter 316L stainless steel ``ASME Flanged and Dished Heads.`` The nominal values of the average melt temperatures for the two tests were: 977{degree}C and 1007{degree}C. The measurements of the dissolution depth as a function of the position along the vessel surface showed the dissolution to be spatially highly non-uniform. Large variations in the dissolution depth with respect to the azimuthal coordinate were also observed. The maximum value of the measured time averaged dissolution rate was found to be 5.05 mm/hr, and this occurred near the edge of the molten pool. The concentration measurements indicated that the molten pool was highly stratified with respect to the concentration of stainless steel in the melt (molten aluminum-stainless steel solution).

  8. 76 FR 69292 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... as an aging effect requiring management for stainless steel heat exchanger tubes exposed to treated... a notice of availability was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35510)....

  9. 77 FR 60673 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...INFORMATION: Scope of the Investigation The products covered by the scope of this investigation are drawn stainless steel...unfinished, regardless of type of finish, gauge, or...by the scope of these investigations if they are...

  10. 77 FR 58355 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...Scope of the Investigation The products covered by the scope of this investigation are stainless steel sinks...unfinished, regardless of type of finish, gauge, or...by the scope of this investigation if they are...

  11. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel composites with different content of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work is to show that Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite can be synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). Hydroxyapatite was introduced into stainless steel because it is intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels. Therefore it's combination with hydroxyapatite that has high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone could have improved properties, as well. To confirm nanocrystalline structure of obtained material and reveal topographical features of the surface, small-angle X-ray analysis (SAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used. Results are consistent and the mean grain size of the obtained materials do not exceed 100 nm.

  12. Friction behavior of 304 stainless steel of varying hardness lubricated with benzene and some benzyl structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    The lubricating properties of some benzyl and benzene structures were determined by using 304 stainless steel surfaces strained to various hardness. Friction coefficients and wear track widths were measured with a Bowden-Leben type friction apparatus by using a pin-on-disk specimen configuration. Results obtained indicate that benzyl monosulfide, dibenzyl disulfide, and benzyl alcohol resulted in the lowest friction coefficients for 304 stainless steel, while benzyl ether provided the least surface protection and gave the highest friction. Strainhardening of the 304 stainless steel prior to sliding resulted in reduced friction in dry sliding. With benzyl monosulfide, dibenzyl disulfide, and benzyl alcohol changes in 304 stainless steel hardness had no effect upon friction behavior.

  13. Coating a stainless steel plate with silver nanoparticles by the sonochemical method.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Maria; Gedanken, Aharon

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound irradiation is used for the deposition of silver nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm on the surface of a stainless steel plate. The sonochemical reduction of an AgNO(3) solution (water, ethylene glycol and aqueous ammonia) was carried out at 30°C. Irradiation was done with a high intensity ultrasonic horn (Ti horn from Sonics and Materials VCX600, 20 kHz, 600 W at 70% efficiency) under an argon flow. The influence of the distance of the stainless steel plate from the sonicator tip varied, and a homogeneous coating without agglomeration was achieved at a distance of 1 cm. By controlling the reaction conditions and the distance from the tip we could achieve a homogeneous monolayer coating of silver nanoparticles on the stainless steel surface. The silver-deposited stainless steel plates were analysed by UV-visible, XRD, SEM and FIB analyses. PMID:20675175

  14. Metallurgical Research Engineer AK Steel, a leading producer of carbon, stainless and electrical steels, has an

    E-print Network

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    AK STEEL Metallurgical Research Engineer AK Steel, a leading producer of carbon, stainless and electrical steels, has an immediate opening for an Engineer in its Research & Innovation Center located development teams · Performing metallurgical research to support steel product development · Organizing

  15. The Otto Aufranc Award: Enhanced Biocompatibility of Stainless Steel Implants by Titanium Coating and Microarc Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kwon, Soon Yong; Sun, Doo Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Background Stainless steel is one of the most widely used biomaterials for internal fixation devices, but is not used in cementless arthroplasty implants because a stable oxide layer essential for biocompatibility cannot be formed on the surface. We applied a Ti electron beam coating, to form oxide layer on the stainless steel surface. To form a thicker oxide layer, we used a microarc oxidation process on the surface of Ti coated stainless steel. Modification of the surface using Ti electron beam coating and microarc oxidation could improve the ability of stainless steel implants to osseointegrate. Questions/purposes The ability of cells to adhere to grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated stainless steel in vitro was compared with that of two different types of surface modifications, machined and titanium-coated, and microarc-oxidated. Methods We performed energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy investigations to assess the chemical composition and structure of the stainless steel surfaces and cell morphology. The biologic responses of an osteoblastlike cell line (SaOS-2) were examined by measuring proliferation (cell proliferation assay), differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity), and attraction ability (cell migration assay). Results Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, migration, and adhesion were increased in the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated group compared to the two other groups. Osteoblastlike cells on the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated surface were strongly adhered, and proliferated well compared to those on the other surfaces. Conclusions The surface modifications we used (grit blasting, titanium coating, microarc oxidation) enhanced the biocompatibility (proliferation and migration of osteoblastlike cells) of stainless steel. Clinical Relevance This process is not unique to stainless steel; it can be applied to many metals to improve their biocompatibility, thus allowing a broad range of materials to be used for cementless implants. PMID:20936386

  16. Alumina-Forming Austenitics: A New Class of Heat-Resistant Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao Ping; Maziasz, Philip J; Liu, Chain T; Pint, Bruce A; Santella, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    A family of alumina (Al2O3)-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels is under development. These alloys offer the potential for significantly higher operating temperature and environmental durability than conventional chromia (Cr2O3)-forming stainless steels, without sacrificing other critical characteristics such as cost, creep resistance, and weldability. An overview of the alloy development approach and details of the oxidation and creep resistance properties achieved to date are presented.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hot wire laser clad layers for repairing precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Peng; Cai, Zhipeng; Feng, Zhenhua; Wang, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel (PH-MSS) is widely used as load-bearing parts because of its excellent overall properties. It is economical and flexible to repair the failure parts instead of changing new ones. However, it is difficult to keep properties of repaired part as good as those of the substrate. With preheating wire by resistance heat, hot wire laser cladding owns both merits of low heat input and high deposition efficiency, thus is regarded as an advantaged repairing technology for damaged parts of high value. Multi-pass layers were cladded on the surface of FV520B by hot wire laser cladding. The microstructure and mechanical properties were compared and analyzed for the substrate and the clad layer. For the as-cladded layer, microstructure was found non-uniform and divided into quenched and tempered regions. Tensile strength was almost equivalent to that of the substrate, while ductility and impact toughness deteriorated much. With using laser scanning layer by layer during laser cladding, microstructure of the clad layers was tempered to fine martensite uniformly. The ductility and toughness of the clad layer were improved to be equivalent to those of the substrate, while the tensile strength was a little lower than that of the substrate. By adding TiC nanoparticles as well as laser scanning, the precipitation strengthening effect was improved and the structure was refined in the clad layer. The strength, ductility and toughness were all improved further. Finally, high quality clad layers were obtained with equivalent or even superior mechanical properties to the substrate, offering a valuable technique to repair PH-MSS.

  18. Characterization of corrosion scale formed on stainless steel delivery pipe for reclaimed water treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Yu, Kanghua; Hu, Hongying; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    To reveal corrosion behavior of stainless steel delivery pipe used in reclaimed water treatment, this research focused on the morphological, mineralogical and chemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scale and corroded passive film. Corrosion scale and coupon samples were taken from a type 304 pipe delivering reclaimed water to a clear well in service for more than 12 years. Stainless steel corrosion scales and four representative pipe coupons were investigated using mineralogy and material science research methods. The results showed corrosion scale was predominantly composed of goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, magnetite, ferrous oxide, siderite, chrome green and chromite, the same as that of corroded pipe coupons. Hence, corrosion scale can be identified as podiform chromite deposit. The loss of chromium in passive film is a critical phenomenon when stainless steel passive film is damaged by localized corrosion. This may provide key insights toward improving a better comprehension of the formation of stainless steel corrosion scale and the process of localized corrosion. The localized corrosion behavior of stainless steel is directly connected with reclaimed water quality parameters such as residual chlorine, DO, Cl(-) and SO4(2-). In particular, when a certain amount of residual chlorine in reclaimed water is present as an oxidant, ferric iron is the main chemical state of iron minerals. PMID:26605686

  19. Long-term corrosion evaluation of stainless steels in Space Shuttle iodinated resin and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krohn, Douglas D.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of stainless steel exposure to iodinated water is a concern in developing the Integrated Water System (IWS) for Space Station Freedom. The IWS has a life requirement of 30 years, but the effects of general and localized corrosion over such a long period have not been determined for the candidate materials. In 1978, Umpqua Research Center immersed stainless steel 316L, 321, and 347 specimens in a solution of deionized water and the Space Shuttle microbial check valve resin. In April 1990, the solution was chemically analyzed to determine the level of corrosion formed, and the surface of each specimen was examined with scanning electron microscopy and metallography to determine the extent of general and pitting corrosion. This examination showed that the attack on the stainless steels was negligible and never penetrated past the first grain boundary layer. Of the three alloys, 316L performed the best; however, all three materials proved to be compatible with an aqueous iodine environment. In addition to the specimens exposed to aqueous iodine, a stainless steel specimen (unspecified alloy) was exposed to moist microbial check valve resin and air for a comparable period. This environment allowed contact of the metal to the resin as well as to the iodine vapor. Since the particular stainless steel alloy was not known, energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine that this alloy was stainless steel 301. The intergranular corrosion found on the specimen was limited to the first grain boundary layer.

  20. A review of microbiological corrosion in the high performance stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years ``microbiologically influenced corrosion`` has become accepted as a form of corrosion that occurs in stainless steels. In fact, although difficult to reproduce or study in the laboratory, evidence continues to mount of its pervasiveness in the real world of applications, especially in systems handling natural waters at near-ambient temperatures. Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) usually is of a localized nature in stainless steels. It exhibits many of the morphological features of localized pitting or crevice corrosion that often are associated with the chloride ion and its ability to locally depassivate a stainless surface. As this form of corrosion has become more accepted, a school of thought has developed which says that all grades are equally susceptible, and that stainless steels cannot be used where the threat of microbiological action exists. However, in virtually every case where ``classic`` symptoms are described and the grade of stainless steel was mentioned, the grade is Type 304, Type 316, or their low carbon or welding consumable counterparts. There has been a decided lack of similar case histories for the high performance stainless steels. Only one instance of apparent MIC in a service situation could be found; this involved alloy 904L which has only moderate pitting resistance. This suggests that a case has not yet been made that these alloys are susceptible to rapid MIC degradation in service applications, and indeed, they may offer a solution to this type of corrosion problem.

  1. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  2. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J. (San Jose, CA)

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  3. A comparison of dilatometry and in-situ neutron diffraction in tracking bulk phase transformations in a martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Christien, F.; Telling, M.T.F.; Knight, K.S.

    2013-08-15

    Phase transformations in the 17-4PH martensitic stainless steel have been studied using different in-situ techniques, including dilatometry and high resolution neutron diffraction. Neutron diffraction patterns were quantitatively processed using the Rietveld refinement method, allowing the determination of the temperature-dependence of martensite (??, bcc) and austenite (?, fcc) phase fractions and lattice parameters on heating to 1000 °C and then cooling to room temperature. It is demonstrated in this work that dilatometry doesn't permit an accurate determination of the end temperature (Ac3) of the ?? ? ? transformation which occurs upon heating to high temperature. The analysis of neutron diffraction data has shown that the respective volumes of the two phases become very close to each other at high temperature, thus making the dilatometric technique almost insensitive in that temperature range. However, there is a very good agreement between neutron diffraction and dilatometry at lower temperature. The martensitic transformation occurring upon cooling has been analysed using the Koistinen–Marburger equation. The thermal expansion coefficients of the two phases have been determined in addition. A comparison of the results obtained in this work with data from literature is presented. - Highlights: • Martensite is still present at very high temperature (> 930 °C) upon heating. • The end of austenitisation cannot be accurately monitored by dilatometry. • The martensite and austenite volumes become similar at high temperature (> ? 850 °C)

  4. Electrochemical Evaluation of Stainless Steels in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; MacDowell, L. G.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation in which several 300-series stainless steels (SS): AISI S30403 SS (UNS S30403), AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603), and AISI 317L SS (LINS S31703), as well as highly-alloyed: SS 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C (UNS S44735), were evaluated using DC electrochemical techniques in three different electrolyte solutions. The solutions consisted of neutral 3.55% NaCl, 3.55% NaCl in 0.1N HCl, and 3.55% NaCl in 1.0N HCl. These solutions were chosen to simulate environments that are less, similar, and more aggressive, respectively, than the conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pads. The electrochemical test results were compared to atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the subject alloys. The electrochemical measurements for the six alloys indicated that the higher-alloyed SS 254-SMO, AL29-4C, and AL-6XN exhibited significantly higher resistance to localized corrosion than the 300-series SS. There was a correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys during a two-year atmospheric exposure and the corrosion rates calculated from electrochemical (polarization resistance) measurements.

  5. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  6. Radiation effects in the stainless steel primary coolant supply adapter

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    1995-09-01

    The primary coolant supply adapter (PCSA) is a flanged, cylindrical collar of 316NG stainless steel that is part of the primary pressure boundary of the Advanced Neutron Source. The radiation fluxes on the PCSA are dominated by thermal neutrons. During its intended 40-year service life, the PCSA will receive a thermal neutron fluence of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 26} m{sup {minus}2} in its upper sections at a temperature of <1OO{degree}C. The PCSA will suffer radiation damage, caused primarily by the interaction of thermal neutrons with the 14% nickel in the steel, which will generate helium by the sequential reactions {sup 58}Ni (n,y){sup 59}Ni (n,{alpha}){sup 56}Fe and will concurrently produce significant atomic displacements per atom (dpa) from the {sup 59}Ni (n,{alpha}){sup 56}Fe recoils. It is estimated that the helium concentration and total atomic displacements in the upper parts of the PCSA will be about 430 atomic parts per million and 1 dpa, respectively. From newly compiled trend curves of tensile properties and fracture toughness data versus atomic displacements for 316 steel, it is deduced that the irradiated PCSA will retain at least 20% uniform tensile elongation and a fracture toughness of more than 200 Mpa{radical}m, which are judged adequate to resist brittle failure. Tberefore, employment of a neutron shield around the PCSA is unnecessary.

  7. Embrittlement in CN3MN Grade Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba?kan, Mertcan; Chumbley, Scott L.; Kalay, Yunus Eren

    2014-05-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels (SSS) are widely used in extreme environments such as off-shore oil wells, chemical and food processing equipment, and seawater systems due to their excellent corrosion resistance and superior toughness. The design of the corresponding heat treatment process is crucial to create better mechanical properties. In this respect, the short-term annealing behavior of CN3MN grade SSS was investigated by a combined study of Charpy impact tests, hardness measurements, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were heat treated at 1200 K (927 °C) for up to 16 minutes annealing time and their impact strengths and hardnesses were tested. The impact toughness was found to decrease to less than the half of the initial values while hardness stayed the same. Detailed fracture surface analyses revealed a ductile to brittle failure transition for relatively short annealing times. Brittle fracture occurred in both intergranular and transgranular modes. SEM and TEM indicated precipitation of nano-sized intermetallics, accounting for the intergranular embrittlement, along the grain boundaries with respect to annealing time. The transgranular fracture originated from linear defects seen to exist within the grains. Close observation of such defects revealed stacking-fault type imperfections, which lead to step-like cracking observed in microlength scales.

  8. Twinning and martensite in a 304 austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Li, Xi; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Zuo, Liang

    2012-08-30

    The microstructure characteristics and deformation behavior of 304L stainless steel during tensile deformation at two different strain rates have been investigated by means of interrupted tensile tests, electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The volume fractions of transformed martensite and deformation twins at different stages of the deformation process were measured using X-ray diffraction method and TEM observations. It is found that the volume fraction of martensite monotonically increases with increasing strain but decreases with increasing strain rate. On the other hand, the volume fraction of twins increases with increasing strain for strain level less than 57%. Beyond that, the volume fraction of twins decreases with increasing strain. Careful TEM observations show that stacking faults (SFs) and twins preferentially occur before the nucleation of martensite. Meanwhile, both {var_epsilon}-martensite and {alpha}{prime}-martensite are observed in the deformation microstructures, indicating the co-existence of stress induced- transformation and strain-induced-transformation. We also discussed the effects of twinning and martensite transformation on work-hardening as well as the relationship between stacking faults, twinning and martensite transformation.

  9. Effect of heat treatment on stainless steel orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido; Kasbergen, Geraldo Francisco; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos; Mendonça, Marcos Rogério de; Tondelli, Pedro Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of heat treatment on CrNi stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Half of forty archwires of each thickness - 0.014" (0.35 mm), 0.016" (0.40 mm), 0.018" (0.45 mm) and 0.020" (0.50 mm) (totalling 160 archwires) - were subjected to heat treatment while the remainder were not. All of the archwires had their individual thickness measured in the anterior and posterior regions using AutoCad 2000 software before and after compressive and tensile strength testing. The data was statistically analysed utilising multivariance ANOVA at a 5% significance level. All archwires without heat treatment that were subjected to tensile strength testing presented with anterior opening, which was more accentuated in the 0.020" archwires. In the posterior region, the opening produced by the tensile force was more accentuated in the archwires without heat treatment. There was greater stability in the thermally treated archwires, especially those subjected to tensile strength testing, which indicates that the heat treatment of orthodontic archwires establishes a favourable and indispensable condition to preserve the intercanine width. PMID:21359492

  10. Hydrogen release from ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, T.; Tanabe, T.

    2008-07-15

    Hydrogen release behaviors from the 8Cr2W stainless steel (RAF/M) around RT are examined by using tritium tracer techniques, and trapping effects of bulk and surface are discussed. In the overall release, three different release stages are clearly distinguished giving three different diffusion coefficients and release amounts which indicate the existence of different kinds of trapping. In addition, the appreciable amount of hydrogen (tritium) is trapped on the surface and/or surface oxides of RAF/M, but they are hardly released and show no influence on the overall hydrogen release behavior. At very low hydrogen concentration, almost all hydrogen atoms are trapped at the deepest trapping site, probably M23C6, and the sites are easily saturated. With increasing the hydrogen concentration, the shallower trapping sites are occupied. Remaining hydrogen atoms seem to be in normal (interstitial) sites, whose amount increases with the square root of the hydrogen loading pressure, but they are still influenced by trapping with lattice imperfections and/or grain boundaries. (authors)

  11. Magnetic properties of Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földeáki, Maria; Ledbetter, Hassel; Uggowitzer, Peter

    1992-04-01

    The magnetic susceptibility x of three Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steels was measured as a function of temperature in the range 5-400 K. All specimens showed a characteristic susceptibility maximum. The temperature of the maximum and especially the curve shape depend strongly on specimen composition and metallurgical conditions (as-quenched, deformed). Because no significant field dependence appeared, the susceptibility maximum was identified as the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature. x;( T) measurements above TN were fitted to a modified Curie-Weiss equation. Comparison between measurements and generalized-molecular-field-theory predictions allowed us to identify the magnetic structure as that of a first-type antiferromagnet with fcc crystal structure. The atomic magnetic moment and the molecular-field coefficients depend strongly not only on composition, but also on metallurgical prehistory, that is, on the degree of the applied mechanical deformation and heat treatment. Mainly, manganese affected the antiferromagnetic interactions, while chromium affected the ferromagnetic. Mn and Fe contributed the most to the effective atomic moment. Measurements on mechanically deformed specimens show a structure sensitivity of the molecular-field constants. This could be interpreted consistently in terms of lattice-parameter changes. The apparent structure sensitivity of the effective atomic moment can be attributed to changes in matrix composition caused by precipitation.

  12. Fracture toughness evaluations of TP304 stainless steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.W.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1997-02-01

    In the IPIRG-1 program, the J-R curve calculated for a 16-inch nominal diameter, Schedule 100 TP304 stainless steel (DP2-A8) surface-cracked pipe experiment (Experiment 1.3-3) was considerably lower than the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve calculated from a C(T) specimen (A8-12a). The results from several related investigations conducted to determine the cause of the observed toughness difference are: (1) chemical analyses on sections of Pipe DP2-A8 from several surface-cracked pipe and material property specimen fracture surfaces indicate that there are two distinct heats of material within Pipe DP2-A8 that differ in chemical composition; (2) SEN(T) specimen experimental results indicate that the toughness of a surface-cracked specimen is highly dependent on the depth of the initial crack, in addition, the J-R curves from the SEN(T) specimens closely match the J-R curve from the surface-cracked pipe experiment; (3) C(T) experimental results suggest that there is a large difference in the quasi-static, monotonic toughness between the two heats of DP2-A8, as well as a toughness degradation in the lower toughness heat of material (DP2-A8II) when loaded with a dynamic, cyclic (R = {minus}0.3) loading history.

  13. In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Watson, Bruce E.; Mathews, Royce; Harris, Robert V.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) was commonly used in selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems for corrosion resistance and enhanced durability in service. CASS materials are generally coarse-grained and elastically anisotropic in nature, and are consequently difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of ultrasonic wave interactions with the coarse-grain microstructures. To address the inspection needs for these materials, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being developed. However, to enhance the probability of detecting flaws, knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material may be required. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic backscatter measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date from laboratory experiments demonstrate the potential of these measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two homogeneous microstructures—equiaxed-grain material or columnar-grain material. Measurements on mixed or banded microstructures also show correlation with the estimated volume-fraction of columnar grains in the material. However, several operational issues will need to be addressed prior to applying this method for in-situ characterization of CASS microstructure.

  14. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    Work in fiscal year 2008 focused on the development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of an excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides [1-8]. High levels of Nb additions (> 1 wt.% Nb) and/or Ni additions (25-30 wt.%), at Al levels of 2.5-4 wt.%, were found to correlate with increased upper-temperature limit for Al2O3 scale formation in air ( 900 aC) and air with 10% water vapor ( 800 aC). Creep resistance also showed a strong dependence on the level of Nb additions, and was correlated with volume fraction of MC-type carbides using thermodynamic computational tools. A trial heat of a 50 lb AFA alloy ingot was made using conventional single-melt vacuum techniques, and the alloy was successfully hot-rolled without any cracking [2]. This heat showed good weldability, using filler material of the same alloy.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  16. Melt layer formation in stainless steel under transient thermal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steudel, I.; Klimov, N. S.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th.; Pintsuk, G.; Pitts, R. A.; Wirtz, M.

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the performance of stainless steel under transient thermal events, such as photon pulses caused by disruptions mitigated by massive gas injection (MGI), the material has been exposed to electron beam loads with ITER relevant power densities slightly above the melting threshold (245 MW/m2) and a pulse duration of 3 ms (Sugihara et al., 2012; Klimov et al., 2013; Pitts et al., 2013). The samples were manufactured from different steel grades with slightly modified chemical composition. To investigate the effect of repetitive surface heat loads on the melting process and the melt motion, identical heat pulses in the range of 100-3000 were applied. All tested materials showed intense melt-induced surface roughening, driven by repeated shallow surface melting up to several ten micrometre and fast re-solidification with epitaxial grain growth. During the liquid phase, melt motion induced by cohesive forces results in the formation of a wavy surface structure with apexes. Further experiments have been performed to study the effects of non-perpendicular surfaces or leading edges.

  17. Material Parameters for Creep Rupture of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.

    2014-08-01

    Creep rupture properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 °C in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with rupture lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher rupture ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.

  18. Short-range ordering kinetics in 316 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, J. T.; Cost, J. R.

    1982-11-01

    In situ measurements are reported of electrical resistance changes in 316 austenitic stainless steel after abruptly raising or lowering temperature in the range from 440 °C to 550 °C subsequent to equilibration. These changes are found to be reproducible and have a magnitude roughly proportional to the temperature change. They are believed to be manifestations of approach toward a new state of shortrange order at the new temperature. Analysis of the kinetics indicates that very nearly a simple first-order reaction is involved. The rate constants were found to have an activation energy of 3.18 ± 0.40 eV. By analogy with the Zener relaxation, the temperature-change-induced short-range order which we observe is also believed to result from local atomic rearrangements in which an average atom makes a relatively small (<10) number of jumps. Good agreement between our measured relaxation rates and those calculated from extrapolated diffusion studies for iron, chromium, and nickel in comparable alloys tends to substantiate the hypothesis that average atomic jump rates are being measured.

  19. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Bei, Hongbin; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the continued development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides and intermetallic precipitates. Efforts in fiscal year 2009 focused on the characterization and understanding of long-term oxidation resistance and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and microstructure. Computational thermodynamic calculations of the austenitic matrix phase composition and the volume fraction of MC, B2-NiAl, and Fe2(Mo,Nb) base Laves phase precipitates were used to interpret oxidation behavior. Of particular interest was the enrichment of Cr in the austenitic matrix phase by additions of Nb, which aided the establishment and maintenance of alumina. Higher levels of Nb additions also increased the volume fraction of B2-NiAl precipitates, which served as an Al reservoir during long-term oxidation. Ageing studies of AFA alloys were conducted at 750 C for times up to 2000 h. Ageing resulted in near doubling of yield strength at room temperature after only 50 h at 750 C, with little further increase in yield strength out to 2000 h of ageing. Elongation was reduced on ageing; however, levels of 15-25% were retained at room temperature after 2000 h of total ageing.

  20. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.