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Sample records for 17-7 ph stainless

  1. Axial-Load Fatigue Tests on 17-7 PH Stainless Steel Under Constant-Amplitude Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leybold, Herbert A.

    1960-01-01

    Axial-load fatigue tests were conducted at room temperature on notched and unnotched sheet specimens of 17-7 PH stainless steel in Condition TH 1050. The notched specimens had theoretical stress-concentration factors of 2.32, 4.00, and 5.00. All specimens were tested under completely reversed loading. S-N curves are presented for each specimen configuration and ratios of fatigue strengths of unnotched specimens to those of notched specimens are given. Predictions of the fatigue behavior of notched specimens near the fatigue limit were made.

  2. Cellular Precipitation at a 17-7 PH Stainless Steel Interphase Interface During Low-Temperature Nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Danqi; Ernst, Frank; Kahn, Harold; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2014-07-01

    Cellular precipitation of Cr-rich nitrides was observed at an austenite-ferrite interface in 17-7 PH stainless steel after low-temperature nitridation. Fine-scale lamellar rocksalt-structured nitride (MN1- x , M: randomly distributed Fe, Cr, and Al) was identified at the interfaces between austenite and ferrite by local-electrode atom-probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy. The small size and spacing of the nitride lamellae reflect the low mobility of substitutional atoms under the conditions of low-temperature nitridation. Nitrides of the same structure were formed within the ferrite grain as extremely small particles. The face-centered cubic nitride precipitates in the Bain orientation relationship with the ferrite.

  3. Tensile Properties of 17-7 PH and 12 MoV Stainless-Steel Sheet under Rapid-Heating and Constant-Temperature Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Charles R., Jr.; Price, Howard L.

    1961-01-01

    Results are presented of rapid-heating tests of 17-7 PH and 12 MoV stainless-steel sheet heated to failure at temperature rates from about 1 F to 170 F per second under constant-load conditions. Yield and rupture strengths obtained from rapid-heating tests are compared with yield and tensile strengths obtained from short-time elevated-temperature tensile tests (30-minute exposure). A rate-temperature parameter was used to construct master curves from which yield and rupture stresses or temperatures can be predicted. A method for measuring strain by optical means is described.

  4. Irradiation effects on 17-7 PH stainless steel, A-201 carbon steel, and titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, R. A.; Hartley, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Irradiation effects on three materials from the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Surveillance Program were determined. An increase of 105 K in the nil-ductility temperature for A-201 steel was observed at a fluence of approximately 3.1 x 10 to the 18th power neutrons/sq cm (neutron energy E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). Only minor changes in the mechanical properties of 17-7 PH stainless steel were observed up to a fluence of 2 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV). The titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium alloy maintained its notch toughness up to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 21st power neutrons/sq cm (E sub n greater than 1.0 MeV).

  5. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  6. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  7. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  8. Effect of temperature and pH on cavitation erosion of super duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Leung, L.K.

    1996-10-01

    Cavitation erosion characteristics of super duplex stainless steel (S32760) and austenitic stainless steel (S30400) in 3.5% NaCl solution with controlled temperature and pH value in the range of 10 to 70 C and pH 3 to 11 have been studied by means of a 20kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak to peak amplitude of 50 {micro}m. The erosion resistance of other stainless steels including S31803 and S31603 was also investigated for comparison purpose. Plots of cumulative erosion mass loss per unit area versus temperature for S32760 and S30400 indicate that the degree of erosion initially increases as the temperature increases from 10 C to 50 C and passes through a maximum at about 50 C and then decreases with further increase in temperature to 70 C. Results of cumulative erosion versus pH indicate that the degree of erosion of S32760 is more sensitive to pH value than that of S30400 at 23 C.

  9. Flow Curve Analysis of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel under Hot Compression Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzadeh, Hamed; Najafizadeh, Abbas; Moazeny, Mohammad

    2009-12-01

    The hot compression behavior of a 17-4 PH stainless steel (AISI 630) has been investigated at temperatures of 950 C to 1150 C and strain rates of 10-3 to 10 s-1. Glass powder in the Rastegaev reservoirs of the specimen was used as a lubricant material. A step-by-step procedure for data analysis in the hot compression test was given. The work hardening rate analysis was performed to reveal if dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred. Many samples exhibited typical DRX stress-strain curves with a single peak stress followed by a gradual fall toward the steady-state stress. At low Zener-Hollomon ( Z) parameter, this material showed a new DRX flow behavior, which was called multiple transient steady state (MTSS). At high Z, as a result of adiabatic deformation heating, a drop in flow stress was observed. The general constitutive equations were used to determine the hot working constants of this material. Moreover, after a critical discussion, the deformation activation energy of 17-4 PH stainless steel was determined as 337 kJ/mol.

  10. Surface laser alloying of 17-4PH stainless steel steam turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Qunli; Kong, Fanzhi; Lou, Chenghua; Chen, Zhijun

    2008-09-01

    As a known high-quality precipitation hardening stainless steel with high strength, high antifatigue, excellent corrosion resistance and good weldability, 17-4PH has been widely used to produce steam turbine blades. However, under the impact of high-speed steam and water droplets, the blades are prone to cavitation, which could lead to lower efficiency, shorter life time, and even accidents. In this article, the 17-4PH blade's surface was alloyed using a high power CO 2 laser. The microstructure and microhardness of hardened 17-4PH were tested by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS) and a microhardness tester. After laser alloying, the surface layer was denser and the grain refined, while the microhardness of the surface (average 610HV 0.2) was about one times higher than that of the substrate material (330HV 0.2). The friction coefficient of the laser-alloyed 17-4PH layer was much lower than that of the substrate.

  11. The Structure and Properties of Diffusion Assisted Bonded Joints in 17-4 PH, Type 347, 15-5 PH and Nitronic 40 Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion assisted bonds are formed in 17-4 PH, 15-5 PH, type 347 and Nitronic 40 stainless steels using electrodeposited copper as the bonding agent. The bonds are analyzed by conventional metallographic, electron microprobe analysis, and scanning electron microscopic techniques as well as Charpy V-notch impact tests at temperatures of 77 and 300 K. Results are discussed in terms of a postulated model for the bonding process.

  12. The characterization of small fatigue crack growth in PH13-8 molybdenum stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ohchang

    The rotor hubs of Navy CH-46 helicopters have been made of 4340 steel and had extensive corrosion fatigue problems. Since these helicopters have to be used until the year 2020, the Navy decided to replace 4340 steel with PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel. Because the rotors are exposed to high frequency high cycle fatigue, small fatigue cracks are important in estimating remaining lifetime of the components. The objective of this study was to characterize the small crack growth behavior in the PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel under various loading conditions. Constant amplitude loading was conducted at the stress ratios, R, 0.1 and 0.4. The crack growth rate was affected by the microstructures in early stage of the growth, mainly by the size of the martensite packets and oscillated up to the crack length of 200 mum. It was found that the crack growth rate was little influenced by the stress amplitudes and stress ratios. In addition, the small crack growth rate was found to be similar to the long crack growth rate at R = 0.1 and 0.4. Overload tests and simple block loading were performed to understand load interaction effects on the small crack growth rate. The overload tests indicated that the crack growth rate was little affected by the overload. This might result from the fact that the overload ratio used in this study was low (<1.3). However, the results of the simple block loading showed overall crack growth retardation. The compressive residual stress present at the notch root of the specimen tested at R = 0.1 may lower the effective stress ratio, Reff, from 0.1 to negative R, and may result in the crack growth retardation. The small crack growth behavior was also examined under the saltwater. There was no difference in the crack growth rate between under air and under saltwater. In addition, the crack growth rate of the specimens tested under the saltwater was not affected by the test frequencies of 10, 1 and 0.1 Hz. It was shown that under the saltwater the PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel had an excellent corrosion fatigue resistance.

  13. Failure Maps for Rectangular 17-4PH Stainless Steel Sandwiched Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    A new and innovative concept is proposed for designing lightweight fan blades for aircraft engines using commercially available 17-4PH precipitation hardened stainless steel. Rotating fan blades in aircraft engines experience a complex loading state consisting of combinations of centrifugal, distributed pressure and torsional loads. Theoretical failure plastic collapse maps, showing plots of the foam relative density versus face sheet thickness, t, normalized by the fan blade span length, L, have been generated for rectangular 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels under these three loading modes assuming three failure plastic collapse modes. These maps show that the 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels can fail by either the yielding of the face sheets, yielding of the foam core or wrinkling of the face sheets depending on foam relative density, the magnitude of t/L and the loading mode. The design envelop of a generic fan blade is superimposed on the maps to provide valuable insights on the probable failure modes in a sandwiched foam fan blade.

  14. Shot Peening and Thermal Stress Relaxation in 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Enwei; Chen, Guoxing; Tan, Ziming; Wu, Shuhui

    2015-11-01

    Shot peening is an effective process to enhance the fatigue performance of turbine blades. In this study, the effect of peening pressures was discussed in terms of the residual stress distribution and the surface morphology. Shot peening processes were designed at varying pressures on a 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel. The profiles of hardness and residual stress were characterized in the cross section. The thermal stress relaxation was further carried out to evaluate the stability of the compressive residual stress under service temperatures of turbine blades. Results show that a maximum stress depth is obtained with peening pressure of 0.40 MPa, and the residual stress can be maintained up to 400 C, which ensures the service in low-pressure turbine blades.

  15. Mechanical Properties of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B. a.; Hebsur, M.; Cosgriff, L. M.; Fedor, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rectangular 17-4PH stainless steel sandwiched foam panels were fabricated using a commercial manufacturing technique by brazing two sheets to a foam core. Microstructural observations and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of the panels revealed large variations in the quality of the brazed areas from one panel to the next as well as within the same panel. Shear tests conducted on specimens machined from the panels exhibited failures either in the brazed region or in the foam core for the poorly brazed and well-brazed samples, respectively. Compression tests were conducted on the foam cores to evaluate their elastic and plastic deformation behavior. These data were compared with published data on polymeric and metallic foams, and with theoretical deformation models proposed for open cell foams.

  16. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  17. Alloy Shrinkage Factors for the Investment Casting of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Porter, Wallace D.

    2008-04-01

    In this study, alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made, in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed a different evolution on heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation was performed with thermal expansion obtained on heating, and another one was performed with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from the numerical simulation results of the solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly overpredicted.

  18. Pitting behavior of type 17-4 PH stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, K.S.; Rao, K.P.

    1995-08-01

    Electrochemical methods of measuring pitting potentials (E{sub pit}) were used to study the pitting resistance of type 17% Cr-4% Ni (17-4, UNS S17400) precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel (SS) weldments. The main objectives were to evaluate the pitting resistance of the base metal, the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the weld metal portions of 17-4 PH SS welds welded autogenously using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Effects of different preweld and postweld heat treatments (PWHT) and of the weld heat input on pitting resistance were studied. Results showed a solution-treated base metal had a relatively lower pitting resistance. In contrast, aging preceded by solution treatment improved pitting resistance. Direct peak aging after welding improved pitting resistance of the weld metals, but it decreased resistance of the HAZ. Welding with relatively lower weld heat input decreased the pitting resistance of the weld metals, but the reverse occurred in the case of the HAZ. Solution treatment followed by peak aging nullified effects of the weld heat input and the preweld heat treatments on pitting resistance of the different portions of the weldment. This heat treatment produced relatively higher pitting resistance in all portions of the weldment.

  19. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  20. Nonlinear ultrasonic characterization of precipitation in 17-4PH stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Matlack, Kathryn; Bradley, Harrison A.; Thiele, Sebastian; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Wall, James J.; Jung, Hee Joon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-04-01

    The extension of operational lifetime of most US nuclear reactors will cause reactor pressure vessel to be exposed to increased levels of neutron radiation damage. This research is part of a broader effort to develop a nondestructive evaluation technique to monitor radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels. The main contributor to radiation embrittlement in these steels is the formation of copper-rich precipitates. In this work, a precipitate hardenable martensitic alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel is exposed to thermal aging treatments, and used as a surrogate material to study the effects of copper precipitates on the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter. Previous work has demonstrated the effectiveness of these nonlinear ultrasonic (NLU) measurements in the characterization of radiation-induced microstructural changes in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels. NLU measurements using Rayleigh surface waves are performed on 17-4PH samples subjected to isothermal aging. NLU measurements are interpreted with hardness, thermo-electric power, TEM, and atom probe tomography measurements. The Rayleigh wave measurements showed a decrease in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter with increasing aging time, consistent with evidence of increasing number density of nucleated precipitates.

  1. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  2. Microstructural evolution in a 17-4 PH stainless steel after aging at 400 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, M.; Hono, K.; Katayama, Y.

    1999-02-01

    The microstructure of 17-4 PH stainless steel at various stages of heat treatment, i.e., after solution heat treatment, tempering at 580 C, and long-term aging at 400 C, have been studied by atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The solution-treated specimen consists largely of martensite with a small fraction of ?-ferrite. No precipitates are present in the martensite phase, while spherical fcc-Cu particles are present in the ?-ferrite. After tempering for 4 hours at 580 C, coherent Cu particles precipitate in the martensite phase. At this stage, the Cr concentration in the martensite phase is still uniform. After 5000 hours aging at 400 C, the martensite spinodaly decomposes into Fe-rich ? and Cr-enriched ??. In addition, fine particles of the G-phase (structure type D8 a , space group Fmbar 3m) enriched in Si, Ni, and Mn have been found in intimate contact with the Cu precipitates. Following spinodal decomposition of the martensite phase, G-phase precipitation occurs after long-term aging.

  3. Water Droplet Erosion Behavior of High-Power Diode Laser Treated 17Cr4Ni PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2014-05-01

    This article deals with water droplet erosion (WDE) behavior of high-power diode laser (HPDL) treated 17Cr4Ni PH stainless steel. After HPDL treatment, the water droplet erosion resistance (WDER) of 17Cr4Ni PH stainless steel has not improved. The main reason is the surface hardness, which has not improved after HPDL treatment though the microstructure has become much finer. On the other hand, precipitation hardening of the alloy at 490C for 3 h has resulted in improved WDER more than twice. This is because of its increased microhardness and improved modified ultimate resilience (MUR), and formation of fine grained microstructure. The WDER has been correlated with MUR, a single mechanical property, based upon microhardness, ultimate tensile strength, and Young's modulus. WDERs of HPDL treated, untreated, and precipitation hardened 17Cr4Ni PH stainless steel samples were determined using a WDE test facility as per ASTM G73-1978. The WDE damage mechanism, compared on the basis of MUR and scanning electron micrographs, is discussed and reported in this article.

  4. Effect of postweld heat treatment on weld metal impact toughness of a semi-austenitic PH stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, N.; Raja, K.S.; Prasad Rao, K. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    Semi-austenitic precipitation hardened PH stainless steel plates, PH 15-7 Mo (Cu), 6.14 mm thick were autogenously welded using the electron beam welding (EBW) and plasma arc welding (PAW) processes. Impact toughness studies using Charpy V-notch samples (V-notch at the center of the weld metal) showed that EB welds had higher impact toughness than PA welds in various identical postweld heat treated (PWHT) conditions. Based on hardness and impact toughness values, the optimal postweld heat treated conditions are recommended. The effect of retained austenite, carbides and delta ferrite on impact toughness of the welds are discussed.

  5. Properties of cryogenically worked metals. [stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Kiefer, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine whether the mechanical properties of cryogenically worked 17-7PH stainless steel are suitable for service from ambient to cryogenic temperatures. It was determined that the stress corrosion resistance of the cryo-worked material is quite adequate for structural service. The tensile properties and fracture toughness at room temperature were comparable to titanium alloy 6Al-4V. However, at cryogenic temperatures, the properties were not sufficient to recommend consideration for structural service.

  6. 36 CFR 17.7 - Preference rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preference rights. 17.7... CONVEYANCE OF FREEHOLD AND LEASEHOLD INTERESTS ON LANDS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM 17.7 Preference rights... right to acquire the interest for an amount equal to the highest bid if within 30 days they notify...

  7. 36 CFR 17.7 - Preference rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preference rights. 17.7... CONVEYANCE OF FREEHOLD AND LEASEHOLD INTERESTS ON LANDS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM 17.7 Preference rights... right to acquire the interest for an amount equal to the highest bid if within 30 days they notify...

  8. 36 CFR 17.7 - Preference rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Preference rights. 17.7... CONVEYANCE OF FREEHOLD AND LEASEHOLD INTERESTS ON LANDS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM 17.7 Preference rights... right to acquire the interest for an amount equal to the highest bid if within 30 days they notify...

  9. 36 CFR 17.7 - Preference rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Preference rights. 17.7... CONVEYANCE OF FREEHOLD AND LEASEHOLD INTERESTS ON LANDS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM 17.7 Preference rights... right to acquire the interest for an amount equal to the highest bid if within 30 days they notify...

  10. 36 CFR 17.7 - Preference rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Preference rights. 17.7... CONVEYANCE OF FREEHOLD AND LEASEHOLD INTERESTS ON LANDS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM 17.7 Preference rights... right to acquire the interest for an amount equal to the highest bid if within 30 days they notify...

  11. 22 CFR 17.7 - Waiver precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... UNDER THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM (FSRDS) AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.7 Waiver precluded. (a) Waiver of an overpayment cannot be granted when: (1)...

  12. 22 CFR 17.7 - Waiver precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... UNDER THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM (FSRDS) AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE PENSION SYSTEM (FSPS) § 17.7 Waiver precluded. (a) Waiver of an overpayment cannot be granted when: (1)...

  13. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  14. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2015-12-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  15. Effects of Temperature on Microstructure and Wear of Salt Bath Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Fan, Hongyuan; Zeng, Dezhi; Peng, Qian; Shen, Baoluo

    2012-08-01

    Salt bath nitriding of 17-4 PH martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels was conducted at 610, 630, and 650 C for 2 h using a complex salt bath heat-treatment, and the properties of the nitrided surface were systematically evaluated. Experimental results revealed that the microstructure and phase constituents of the nitrided surface alloy are highly process condition dependent. When 17-4PH stainless steel was subjected to complex salt bathing nitriding, the main phase of the nitrided layer was expanded martensite (?'), expanded austenite (?N), CrN, Fe4N, and (Fe,Cr) x O y . In the sample nitrided above 610 C, the expanded martensite transformed into expanded austenite. But in the sample nitrided at 650 C, the expanded austenite decomposed into ?N and CrN. The decomposed ?N then disassembled into CrN and alpha again. The nitrided layer depth thickened intensively with the increasing nitriding temperature. The activation energy of nitriding in this salt bath was 125 5 kJ/mol.

  16. The Effects of Casting Porosity on the Tensile Behavior of Investment Cast 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, D. F.; Crenshaw, T. B.; Gearhart, J. S.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of casting porosity on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH stainless steel was studied as well as the effect of heat treatment on the alloy's sensitivity to casting defects. Interdendritic porosity, formed during solidification and shrinkage of the alloy, reduces the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength roughly in proportion to the reduction in load bearing cross-section. The effects of casting porosity on ductility (% strain, % reduction in area) are more severe, in agreement with research on other alloy systems. In this study, 10% porosity reduced the ductility of 17-4PH stainless steel by almost 80% for the high-strength H925 condition. Tensile testing at -10C (263 K) further reduces the alloy ductility with and without pores present. In the lower strength H1100 condition, the ductility is higher than the H925 condition, as expected, and somewhat less sensitive to porosity. By measuring the area % porosity on the fracture surface of tensile specimens, the trend in failure strain versus area % porosity was obtained and analyzed using two methods: an empirical approach to determine an index of defect susceptibility with a logarithmic fit and an analytical approach based on the constitutive stress-strain behavior and critical strain concentration in the vicinity of the casting voids. The applicability of the second method depends on the amount of non-uniform strain (necking) and, as such, the softer H1100 material did not correlate well to the model. The behavior of 17-4PH was compared to previous work on cast Al alloys, Mg alloys, and other cast materials.

  17. Carbide precipitates in solution-quenched PH13-8 Mo stainless steel: A small-angle neutron scattering investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, D.; Patra, A. K.; Mazumder, S.; Mittra, J.; Dey, G. K.; de, P. K.

    2004-08-01

    This paper deals with the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) investigation on solution-quenched PH13-8 Mo stainless steel. From the nature of the variation of the functionality of the profiles for varying specimen thickness and also from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it has been established that the small-angle scattering signal predominantly originates from the block-like metallic carbide precipitates in the specimen. The contribution due to double Bragg reflection is not significant in the present case. The single scattering profile has been extracted from the experimental profiles corresponding to different values of specimen thickness. In order to avoid complexity and non-uniqueness of the multi-parameter minimization for randomly oriented polydisperse block-like precipitate model, the data have been analyzed assuming randomly oriented polydisperse cylindrical particle model with a locked aspect ratio.

  18. A pH Sensor Based on a Stainless Steel Electrode Electrodeposited with Iridium Oxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, C. C. M.; Madrid, R. E.; Felice, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    A simple procedure to make an iridium oxide (IrO[subscript 2]) electrodeposited pH sensor, that can be used in a chemical, biomedical, or materials laboratory, is presented here. Some exercises, based on this sensor, that can be used to teach important concepts in the field of biomedical, biochemical, tissue, or materials engineering, are also

  19. A pH Sensor Based on a Stainless Steel Electrode Electrodeposited with Iridium Oxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, C. C. M.; Madrid, R. E.; Felice, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    A simple procedure to make an iridium oxide (IrO[subscript 2]) electrodeposited pH sensor, that can be used in a chemical, biomedical, or materials laboratory, is presented here. Some exercises, based on this sensor, that can be used to teach important concepts in the field of biomedical, biochemical, tissue, or materials engineering, are also…

  20. Role of alloy additions on strengthening in 17-4 PH stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Arpana Sudershan

    Alloy modifications by addition of niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), nitrogen (N) and cobalt (Co) to cast 17-4 PH steel were investigated to determine the effect on mechanical properties. Additions of Nb, V, and N increased the yield strength from 1120 MPa to 1310 MPa while decreased the room temperature charpy V notch (CVN) toughness from 20 J to four Joules. The addition of Co to cast 17-4 PH steel enhanced the yield strength and CVN toughness from 1140 MPa to 1290 MPa and from 3.7 J to 5.5 J, respectively. In the base 17-4 PH steel, an increase in block width from 2.27 0.10 ?m in the solution treated condition to 3.06 0.17 ?m upon aging at 755 K was measured using orientation image microscopy. Cobalt inhibited recrystallization and block boundary migration during aging resulting in a finer martensitic block structure. The influence of Co on copper (Cu) precipitation in steels was studied using atom probe tomography. A narrower precipitate size distribution was observed in the steels with Co addition. The concentration profile across the matrix / precipitate interface indicated rejection of Co atoms from the copper precipitates. This behavior was observed to be energetically favorable using first principle calculations. The activation energies for Cu precipitation increased from 205 kJ/ mol in the non-cobalt containing alloy, to 243 kJ/ mol, and 272 kJ/ mol in alloys with 3 wt. %Co, and 7 wt. % Co, respectively. The role of Co on Cu precipitation in cast 17-4 PH steel is proposed as follows: (i) Co is rejected out of the Cu precipitate and sets up a barrier to the growth of the Cu precipitate; (ii) results in Cu precipitates of smaller size and narrower distribution; (iii) the coarsening of Cu precipitates is inhibited; and (iv) the activation energy for Cu precipitation increases.

  1. Numerical simulation of the solidification microstructure of a 17-4PH stainless steel investment casting and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You Yun; Tsai, DeChang; Hwang, Weng Sing

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique of numerically simulating the microstructure of 17-4PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel during investment casting. A cellular automation (CA) algorithm was adopted to simulate the nucleation and grain growth. First a calibration casting was made, and then by comparing the microstructures of the calibration casting with those simulated using different kinetic growth coefficients (a2, a3) in CA, the most appropriate set of values for a2 and a3 would be obtained. Then, this set of values was applied to the microstructure simulation of a separate casting, where the casting was actually made. Through this approach, this study has arrived at a set of growth kinetic coefficients from the calibration casting: a2 is 2.9 10-5, a3 is 1.49 10-7, which is then used to predict the microstructure of the other test casting. Consequently, a good correlation has been found between the microstructure of actual 17-4PH casting and the simulation result.

  2. Constituted oxides/nitrides on nitriding 304, 430 and 17-4 PH stainless steel in salt baths over the temperature range 723 to 923 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Teng-Shih; Huang, Yung-Sen; Chen, Chi-Fan

    2011-10-01

    The progressively developed oxides and nitrides that form on nitriding 304, 430 and 17-4 PH stainless steel are analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) in this study. The experimental results show that the Cr contents and matrix structures (ferrite, austenite and martensite) play an important role in forming FeCr 2O 4, Cr 2O 3 and Fe 2O 3 oxides as well as nitrides. After a short immersion time, oxides of Cr 2O 3 and FeCr 2O 4 form in nitride films on 304 stainless steel samples. Fe 2O 3 oxide will subsequently form following an increasing immersion time. For the 430 stainless steel, Cr 2O 3 predominately forms after a short dipping time which hinders the growth of the nitride layer. As a result, this sample had the thinnest nitride film of the three for a given immersion time. After the formation of oxides, both CrN and Cr 2N were detected near the surface of the nitride films of three samples while Cr 2N phases formed in the deeper zone. The greatest amount of Fe 2O 3 oxide among the three samples was obtained on the nitriding 17-4 PH stainless steel which also had a high intensity count of N 1s.

  3. Data demonstrating the effects of build orientation and heat treatment on fatigue behavior of selective laser melted 17–4 PH stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    Yadollahi, Aref; Simsiriwong, Jutima; Thompson, Scott M.; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Axial fully-reversed strain-controlled (R=−1) fatigue experiments were performed to obtain data demonstrating the effects of building orientation (i.e. vertical versus horizontal) and heat treatment on the fatigue behavior of 17–4 PH stainless steel (SS) fabricated via Selective Laser Melting (SLM) (Yadollahi et al., submitted for publication [1]). This data article provides detailed experimental data including cyclic stress-strain responses, variations of peak stresses during cyclic deformation, and fractography of post-mortem specimens for SLM 17–4 PH SS. PMID:26955653

  4. Data demonstrating the effects of build orientation and heat treatment on fatigue behavior of selective laser melted 17-4 PH stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Aref; Simsiriwong, Jutima; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    Axial fully-reversed strain-controlled ([Formula: see text]) fatigue experiments were performed to obtain data demonstrating the effects of building orientation (i.e. vertical versus horizontal) and heat treatment on the fatigue behavior of 17-4 PH stainless steel (SS) fabricated via Selective Laser Melting (SLM) (Yadollahi et al., submitted for publication [1]). This data article provides detailed experimental data including cyclic stress-strain responses, variations of peak stresses during cyclic deformation, and fractography of post-mortem specimens for SLM 17-4 PH SS. PMID:26955653

  5. Heat treatment of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel; Part 2: Isothermal aging kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J. . Physical and Joining Metallurgy Dept.); Hochanadel, P.W.; Edwards, G.R. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The hardening response of investment cast PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel has been evaluated by hardness measurements following aging in the temperature range normally specified for this alloy (510 C to 593 C). A new relationship between fraction transformed and hardness was developed, and analysis of the data in terms of the kinetics of precipitation, in a manner similar to that frequently applied to other precipitation-hardenable martensitic steels, yielded low time exponents and a low value for the apparent activation energy. The values of the time exponents were 0.49, 0.37, 0.56, and 0.53 at 510 C, 538 C, 566 C, and 593 C, respectively, and that for the apparent activation energy was 139 kJ/mole. As has been proposed for other maraging type steels, these estimates suggest that [beta]-NiAl precipitates along or near dislocations and that growth of the precipitates is dominated by dislocation pipe diffusion. However, these predictions were neither supported nor refuted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) because of difficulties in imaging the [beta]-NiAl precipitates at the aging times and temperatures used. Further, analysis of the data using the formalism of Wert and Zener for the growth of precipitates with interfering diffusion fields indicated that the estimates of fraction transformed from hardness data are not fully appropriate for maraging type steels. Consideration of the nature of the Avrami analysis and the electron microscopy results suggests that other phenomena, including dislocation recovery and reversion of martensite to austenite, occur at rates sufficient to convolute the Avrami analysis. It is further suggested that these results cast doubt on the fundamental implications of previous analyses of precipitation kinetics in age-hardening martensitic steels.

  6. 7 CFR 17.7 - Notice of sale procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of sale procedures. 17.7 Section 17.7 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SALES OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES MADE AVAILABLE UNDER TITLE I OF THE AGRICULTURAL TRADE DEVELOPMENT AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1954, AS AMENDED § 17.7 Notice...

  7. 14 CFR 17.7 - Filing and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing and computation of time. 17.7 Section 17.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES PROCEDURES FOR PROTESTS AND CONTRACTS DISPUTES General 17.7 Filing and computation of...

  8. 14 CFR 17.7 - Filing and computation of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filing and computation of time. 17.7 Section 17.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURAL RULES PROCEDURES FOR PROTESTS AND CONTRACTS DISPUTES General 17.7 Filing and computation of...

  9. 45 CFR 17.7 - Retractions or corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Retractions or corrections. 17.7 Section 17.7 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF ADVERSE INFORMATION TO NEWS MEDIA 17.7 Retractions or corrections. Where the Assistant Secretary for Public...

  10. 45 CFR 17.7 - Retractions or corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Retractions or corrections. 17.7 Section 17.7 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF ADVERSE INFORMATION TO NEWS MEDIA 17.7 Retractions or corrections. Where the Assistant Secretary for Public...

  11. 45 CFR 17.7 - Retractions or corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retractions or corrections. 17.7 Section 17.7 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF ADVERSE INFORMATION TO NEWS MEDIA 17.7 Retractions or corrections. Where the Assistant Secretary for Public...

  12. 45 CFR 17.7 - Retractions or corrections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retractions or corrections. 17.7 Section 17.7 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF ADVERSE INFORMATION TO NEWS MEDIA 17.7 Retractions or corrections. Where the Assistant Secretary for Public...

  13. 27 CFR 17.7 - Delegations of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in TTB Order 1135.17, Delegation of the Administrator's Authorities in 27 CFR Part 17, Drawback on... Administrator. 17.7 Section 17.7 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... PRODUCTS General Provisions 17.7 Delegations of the Administrator. The regulatory authorities of...

  14. 27 CFR 17.7 - Delegations of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in TTB Order 1135.17, Delegation of the Administrator's Authorities in 27 CFR Part 17, Drawback on... Administrator. 17.7 Section 17.7 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... PRODUCTS General Provisions 17.7 Delegations of the Administrator. The regulatory authorities of...

  15. Effect of passive film on mechanical properties of martensitic stainless steel 15-5PH in a neutral NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei; Li, Songmei

    2015-02-01

    The effect of passive film on mechanical properties of the martensitic stainless steel 15-5PH in neutral 3.5 wt% NaCl solution was investigated, using surface analysis techniques, electrochemical measurements and slow strain rate technique. In neutral 3.5 wt% NaCl solution, the passive film formed at passivity potential is mainly divided into iron oxides-rich outer layer (FeO, Fe2O3) and chromium oxides-rich inner layer (Cr2O3, Cr(OH)3). During crack propagation, the passive film reduced formation of micro-cracks and micro-cleavages around the crack tip, and as a consequence, remarkably increased the fracture ductility of the martensitic stainless steel.

  16. Contribution of solution pH and buffer capacity to suppress intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel at 95 C

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Shibata, T.; Haruna, T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Processing)

    1999-05-01

    Controlling pH of high-temperature water to [approximately]pH 7 at 300 C by adding lithium hydroxide (LiOH) into the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) successfully has been mitigating the corrosion of PWR component materials. The effects of solution pH and buffer capacity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized type 304 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S30400) was examined at 95 C by slow strain rate technique (SSRT) with an in-situ cracking observation system. It was found that an increase in solution pH or buffer capacity increased crack initiation time and decreased mean crack initiation frequency, but exerted almost no effect on crack propagation. This inhibition effect on IGSCC initiation was explained as resulting from a retarding effect of solution pH and buffer capacity on the decrease in pH at crack nuclei caused by the hydrolysis of metal ions dissolved when the passive film was ruptured by strain in SSRT.

  17. The effect of 17-4PH stainless steel on the lifetime of a Pennzane lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly ball screw for the AURA spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Lo, John; Anderson, Mark; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-07-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10% of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  18. Stress corrosion study of PH13-8Mo stainless steel using the Slow Strain Rate Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Pablo D.

    1989-01-01

    The need for a fast and reliable method to study stress corrosion in metals has caused increased interest in the Slow Strain Rate Technique (SSRT) during the last few decades. PH13-8MoH950 and H1000 round tensile specimens were studied by this method. Percent reduction-in-area, time-to-failure, elongation at fracture, and fracture energy were used to express the loss in ductility, which has been used to indicate susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Results from a 3.5 percent salt solution (corrosive medium) were compared to those in air (inert medium). A tendency to early failure was found when testing in the vicinity of 1.0 x 10(-6) mm/mm/sec in the 3.5 percent salt solution. PH13-8Mo H1000 was found to be less likely to suffer SCC than PH13-8Mo H950. This program showed that the SSRT is promising for the SCC characterization of metals and results can be obtained in much shorter times (18 hr for PH steels) than those required using conventional techniques.

  19. Microstructure and dry-sliding wear properties of DC plasma nitrided 17-4 PH stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gui-jiang; Wang, Jun; Li, Cong; Peng, Qian; Gao, Jian; Shen, Bao-luo

    2008-05-01

    An attempt that the precipitation hardening steel 17-4PH was conducted by DC plasma nitriding (DCPN) is made to develop a kind of candidate material for nuclear reactor. Nitriding process performed at temperature ? 400 C takes effect on creation of the layers composed of S-phase (expanded austenite) and ?N? (expanded martensite). Up to the temperature of 420 C, the S-phase peaks disappear due to the transformation occurrence (S-phase ? ?N? + CrN). For the samples nitrided at temperature ? 450 C, no evidence of ?N? is found owing to a precipitation (?N? ? ? +CrN) taking place. For the 480 C/4 h treated sample, it is the surface microhardness that plays the lead role in the wear rate reduction but the surface roughness; while for the 400 C/4 h treated sample, it is both of the surface roughness and the S-phase formation. Dry sliding wear of the untreated 17-4PH is mainly characterized by strong adhesion, abrasion and oxidation mechanism. Samples nitrided at 400 C which is dominated by slight abrasion and plastic deformation exhibit the best dry sliding wear resistance compared to the samples nitrided at other temperatures.

  20. An investigation of the high-temperature and solidification microstructures of PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Hills, C. R.; Hlava, P. F.; David, S. A.

    1990-09-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA), high-temperature water-quench (WQ) experiments, and optical and electron microscopy were used to establish the near-solidus and solidification microstructures in PH 13-8 Mo. On heating at a rate of 0. 33 C/s, this alloy begins to transform from austenite to ?-ferrite at ?1350 C. Transformation is complete by ?1435 C. The solidus is reached at ?1447 C, and the liquidus is ?1493 C. On cooling from the liquid state at a rate of 0. 33 C/s, solidification is completed as ?-ferrite with subsequent transformation to austenite beginning in the solid state at ?1364 C. Insufficient time at temperature is available for complete transformation and the resulting room-temperature microstructure consists of matrix martensite (derived from the shear decomposition of the austenite) and residual ?-ferrite. The residual ?-ferrite in the DTA sample is enriched in Cr (?16 wt pct), Mo (?4 wt pct), and Al (?1. 5 wt pct) and depleted in Ni (?4 wt pct) relative to the martensite (?12. 5 wt pct Cr, ?2 wt pct Mo, ?1 wt pct Al, ?9 wt pct Ni). Solid-state transformation of ? ? ? was found to be quench-rate sensitive with large grain, fully ferritic microstructures undergoing a massive transformation as a result of water quenching, while a diffusionally controlled Widmansttten structure was produced in air-cooled samples.

  1. Effects of Powder Attributes and Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) Process Conditions on the Densification and Mechanical Properties of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrinki, Harish; Dexter, Michael; Barmore, Brenton; Enneti, Ravi; Pasebani, Somayeh; Badwe, Sunil; Stitzel, Jason; Malhotra, Rajiv; Atre, Sundar V.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of powders attributes (shape and size distribution) and critical processing conditions (energy density) on the densification and mechanical properties of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) 17-4 PH stainless steel were studied using four types of powders. The % theoretical density, ultimate tensile strength and hardness of both water- and gas-atomized powders increased with increased energy density. Gas-atomized powders showed superior densification and mechanical properties when processed at low energy densities. However, the % theoretical density and mechanical properties of water-atomized powders were comparable to gas-atomized powders when sintered at a high energy density of 104 J/mm3. An important result of this study was that, even at high % theoretical density (97% ± 1%), the properties of as-printed parts could vary over a relatively large range (UTS: 500-1100 MPa; hardness: 25-39 HRC; elongation: 10-25%) depending on powder characteristics and process conditions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively inexpensive water-atomized powders as starting raw material instead of the typically used gas-atomized powders to fabricate parts using L-PBF techniques by sintering at high energy densities.

  2. Effects of Powder Attributes and Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) Process Conditions on the Densification and Mechanical Properties of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrinki, Harish; Dexter, Michael; Barmore, Brenton; Enneti, Ravi; Pasebani, Somayeh; Badwe, Sunil; Stitzel, Jason; Malhotra, Rajiv; Atre, Sundar V.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of powders attributes (shape and size distribution) and critical processing conditions (energy density) on the densification and mechanical properties of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) 17-4 PH stainless steel were studied using four types of powders. The % theoretical density, ultimate tensile strength and hardness of both water- and gas-atomized powders increased with increased energy density. Gas-atomized powders showed superior densification and mechanical properties when processed at low energy densities. However, the % theoretical density and mechanical properties of water-atomized powders were comparable to gas-atomized powders when sintered at a high energy density of 104 J/mm3. An important result of this study was that, even at high % theoretical density (97% ± 1%), the properties of as-printed parts could vary over a relatively large range (UTS: 500-1100 MPa; hardness: 25-39 HRC; elongation: 10-25%) depending on powder characteristics and process conditions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively inexpensive water-atomized powders as starting raw material instead of the typically used gas-atomized powders to fabricate parts using L-PBF techniques by sintering at high energy densities.

  3. Influences of pH value, temperature, chloride ions and sulfide ions on the corrosion behaviors of 316L stainless steel in the simulated cathodic environment of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. G.; Wang, J. D.; Chen, D. R.; Liang, P.

    2014-12-01

    316L stainless steel is in the passive state in a simulated cathodic environment, and the passivity of 316L SS is enhanced with increasing pH value, decreasing temperature, decreasing chloride ions and sulfide ions concentrations. Mott-Schottky plots show that the passive films appear a p-n heterojunction, and the donor and acceptor densities reach 1022 cm-3, showing a highly defective character of the passive film. The donor and acceptor densities increase with increasing temperature, increasing chloride ions and sulfide ions concentrations, while they decreased with increasing pH value. The decreased passivity and the increased doping density may be beneficial to the conductivity of the passive film, but they adversely affect the protectiveness of the passive film toward corrosion.

  4. The Effect of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel on the Lifetime of a Pennzane(Trademark) Lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly Ball Screw for the AURA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Anderson, Mark; Lo, John; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-01-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10 percent of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50 C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  5. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in microstructure/microchemistry, density and thermo-electric power of type 304L and 316 stainless steels irradiated in the Phénix reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault Laborne, Alexandra; Gavoille, Pierre; Malaplate, Joël; Pokor, Cédric; Tanguy, Benoît

    2015-05-01

    Annealed specimens of type 304L and 316 stainless steel and cold-worked 316 specimens were irradiated in the Phénix reactor in the temperature range 381-394 °C and to different damage doses up to 39 dpa. The microstructure and microchemistry of both 304L and 316 have been examined using the combination of the different techniques of TEM to establish the void swelling and precipitation behavior under neutron irradiation. TEM observations are compared with results of measurements of immersion density and thermo-electric power obtained on the same irradiated stainless steels. The similarities and differences in their behavior on different scales are used to understand the factors in terms of the chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels, affecting the precipitation under irradiation and the swelling behavior. Irradiation induces the formation of some precipitate phases (e.g., M6C and M23C6-type carbides, and γ'- and G-phases), Frank loops and cavities. According to the metallurgical state and chemical composition of the steel, the amount of each type of radiation-induced defects is not the same, affecting their density and thermo-electric power.

  6. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  7. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  8. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  9. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  10. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. A notification to the Federal...

  11. 47 CFR 17.7 - Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna structures requiring notification to..., MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF ANTENNA STRUCTURES Federal Aviation Administration Notification Criteria § 17.7 Antenna structures requiring notification to the FAA. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 56986,...

  12. Bladed-shrouded-disc aeroelastic analyses: Computer program updates in NASTRAN level 17.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, A. M.; Elchuri, V.; Skalski, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    In October 1979, a computer program based on the state-of-the-art compressor and structural technologies applied to bladed-shrouded-disc was developed. The program was more operational in NASTRAN Level 16. The bladed disc computer program was updated for operation in NASTRAN Level 17.7. The supersonic cascade unsteady aerodynamics routine UCAS, delivered as part of the NASTRAN Level 16 program was recorded to improve its execution time. These improvements are presented.

  13. Electronic spectrum of AuF: hyperfine structure of the [17.7]1 state.

    PubMed

    Knurr, Benjamin J; Butler, Elissa K; Varberg, Thomas D

    2009-11-26

    The [17.7]1-X(1)Sigma(+) (0,0) band of AuF at 566 nm has been studied by laser excitation spectroscopy. The molecule was prepared in a dc electric discharge by flowing a dilute mixture of SF(6) in argon through a hollow gold cathode. The rotational structure of the band has been analyzed for the first time, yielding accurate values for the rotational and Omega-type doubling constants of the upper state. Hyperfine splittings arising from both the (197)Au and (19)F nuclei have been resolved by recording the spectrum at sub-Doppler resolution using the technique of intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. The hyperfine structure is dominated by the (197)Au magnetic dipole interaction in the [17.7]1 state, with the (197)Au magnetic hyperfine constant determined to be h(1) = -543(4) MHz. It is demonstrated that the negative value of this constant implies that the [17.7]1 state has significant (3)Delta(1) character and that spin-orbit mixing with a (1)Pi(1) state may be providing the transition intensity to the ground electronic state. PMID:19921947

  14. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  15. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  16. DcHsp17.7, a small heat shock protein in carrot, is tissue-specifically expressed under salt stress and confers tolerance to salinity.

    PubMed

    Song, Na-Hyun; Ahn, Yeh-Jin

    2011-10-01

    The expression and function of DcHsp17.7, a small heat shock protein in carrot (Daucus carota L.), were examined under salt stress, which is an exacerbating environmental condition due to water shortage and irrigation. DcHsp17.7 was constitutively expressed in leaf and stem tissues under normal growth conditions. Upon exposure to 300 mM NaCl, the protein level of DcHsp17.7 increased dramatically in leaf tissue, but did not significantly change in stem tissue. Native-PAGE analysis showed tissue-specific oligomer formation. Under normal growth conditions, DcHsp17.7 was found in an approximately 240 kDa complex in both tissues. However, NaCl treatment induced an additional approximately 160 kDa complex containing DcHsp17.7. This occurred only in leaf tissue, suggesting tissue-specific oligomeric complex formation. To examine the functional mechanism of DcHsp17.7 under stress conditions, the DcHsp17.7 coding gene was introduced into Escherichia coli. Heterologous expression of DcHsp17.7 was induced by isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside treatment. Upon exposure to salinity, protein levels of DcHsp17.7 decreased, and the protein was not detected after 16 hours. Native-PAGE analysis showed that DcHsp17.7 was present in an approximately 250 kDa complex both before and after salt treatment. Salinity reduced bacterial cell viability; however, the transgenic E. coli expressing DcHsp17.7 exhibited a higher survival rate than control E. coli under salt stress. When the level of soluble proteins was measured under salt stress, transgenic E. coli expressing DcHsp17.7 reproducibly showed slightly higher levels than control cells. This suggests that DcHsp17.7 performs molecular chaperone activity in salt-stressed transgenic E. coli. Our results suggest that DcHsp17.7 is likely to be involved in tolerance not only to thermal stresses but also to other abiotic stresses, such as salinity. PMID:21539946

  17. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanne, W. R., Jr.; Chandler, G. T.; Nelson, D. Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E. A.

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  18. Avoid stainless steel failures in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, J.P.; Schillmoller, C.M.

    1995-11-01

    Preventing pitting and localized corrosion is the key to success where low maintenance and high reliability are rime considerations in flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) designs. Knowing when to use a stainless steel, and when not to, is crucial. Operating parameters and environmental factors greatly affect alloy performance, especially pH, temperature, and chloride and oxygen levels. Failures of stainless steels can be avoided by understanding their limits in light of these variables. This article will focus on the capabilities of Types 316L, 317L, 317LM, 317LMN, 904L, and 6% Mo stainless steels and their applications, as well as provide details on unique combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the 22% Cr duplex and 25% Cr super-duplex stainless steels in acid chloride systems. Guidelines will be presented on methods to prevent intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and pitting and crevice corrosion, and what process steps can be taken to assure reasonable performance of marginal alloy selections. Emphasis will be on the lime/limestone wet scrubbing process and the quencher/absorber.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  20. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  1. Method of forming dynamic membrane on stainless steel support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Joseph L. (Inventor); Brandon, Craig A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A suitable member formed from sintered, powdered, stainless steel is contacted with a nitrate solution of a soluble alkali metal nitrate and a metal such as zirconium in a pH range and for a time sufficient to effect the formation of a membrane of zirconium oxide preferably including an organic polymeric material such as polyacrylic acid.

  2. Corrosion in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Suess, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    Although it is unreasonable to assume that technology will eventually eliminate all corrosion, it is of vital importance to note that many problems could be avoided through failure analysis and corrosion-preventive design. Laboratory analysis and testing often prove to be a wise investment in preventing potential corrosion problems in stainless steels. This article discusses important corrosion modes in stainless steels, including general, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically induced corrosion, as well as stress corrosion cracking. It also includes descriptions of failure analysis techniques, including visual and stereomicroscopic examination, chemical analysis, metallographic examination, scanning electron microscopy, immersion testing, and electrochemical corrosion testing.

  3. Welding of Stainless Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, H; Johnson, Lawrence

    1929-01-01

    It would appear that welds in some stainless steels, heat-treated in some practicable way, will probably be found to have all the resistance to corrosion that is required for aircraft. Certainly these structures are not subjected to the severe conditions that are found in chemical plants.

  4. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  5. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ...

  6. Improvement of the thermal stability of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets by intergranular addition of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Shuai; Yan, Changjiang; Cai, Lingwen; Chen, Renjie; Yan, Aru; Lee, Don

    2014-05-07

    In this study, microstructure and magnetic properties of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with addition of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7} (wt. %) were investigated. By adding a small amount of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7}, the coercivity is improved greatly, and the irreversible loss is decreased sharply. The increase of Curie temperature suggests that Co atoms have entered into the 2:14:1 main phase. Microstructural analysis indicates that a well-developed core-shell structure was formed in the magnets with the addition of Dy{sub 82.3}Co{sub 17.7}. The improvement of magnetic properties can be attributed to the microstructural modification and the intrinsic properties' improvement.

  7. Enhanced tolerance to drought stress in transgenic rice plants overexpressing a small heat-shock protein, sHSP17.7.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yutaka; Yokoya, Sakiko

    2008-02-01

    Exposure of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings to a high temperature (42 degrees C) for 24 h resulted in a significant increase in tolerance to drought stress. To try to determine the mechanisms of acquisition of tolerance to drought stress by heat shock, the rice small heat-shock protein gene, sHSP17.7, the product of which was shown to act as molecular chaperones in vitro and in vivo in our previous study, was overexpressed in the rice cultivar "Hoshinoyume". Western and Northern blot analyses showed higher expression levels of sHSP17.7 protein in three transgenic lines than in one transgenic line. Drought tolerance was assessed in these transgenic lines and wild-type plants by withholding water for 6 days for evaluation of the ability of plants to continue growth after water-stress treatments. Although no significant difference was found in water potential of seedlings between transgenic lines and wild-type plants at the end of drought treatments, only transgenic seedlings with higher expression levels of sHSP17.7 protein could regrow after rewatering. Similar results were observed in survival rates after treatments with 30% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3640 for 3 days. These results suggest that overproduction of sHSP17.7 could increase drought tolerance in transgenic rice seedlings. PMID:17968552

  8. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  9. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  10. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  11. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  12. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission...

  13. 47 CFR 74.32 - Operation in the 17.7-17.8 GHz and 17.8-19.7 GHz bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GHz bands. 74.32 Section 74.32 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED....8-19.7 GHz bands. (a) To minimize or avoid harmful interference to Federal Government Satellite... station license to provide MVPD operations in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band or to operate in the 17.8-19.7...

  14. 47 CFR 74.32 - Operation in the 17.7-17.8 GHz and 17.8-19.7 GHz bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GHz bands. 74.32 Section 74.32 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED....8-19.7 GHz bands. (a) To minimize or avoid harmful interference to Federal Government Satellite... station license to provide MVPD operations in the 17.7-17.8 GHz band or to operate in the 17.8-19.7...

  15. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    This book reviews the mechanisms and forms of corrosion and examines the corrosion of stainless steels and similar chromium-bearing nickel containing higher alloys, detailing various corrosive environments including atmospheric and fire-side corrosion, corrosion by water and soil, and corrosion caused by particular industrial processes. It provides information on specific groups and grades of stainless steels; summarizes typical applications for specific stainless alloys; describes common corrosion problems associated with stainless steels; presents the acceptable isocorrosion parameters of concentration and temperature for over 250 chemicals for which stainless steels are the preferred materials of construction; discusses product forms and their availability; elucidates fabrication, welding, and joining techniques; and covers the effects of pickling and passivation.

  16. Pitting inhibition of stainless steel by surfactants: an electrochemical and surface chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenqiang; Duby, Paul; Somasundaran, P

    2003-03-01

    Pitting corrosion of stainless steels causes tremendous damage in terms of material loss and resulting accidents. Organic surfactants have been tried as pitting inhibitors but the understanding of the inhibition mechanisms is mainly speculative. In the present study the inhibition of the pitting corrosion of 304 stainless steel by N-lauroylsarcosine sodium salt (NLS) in 0.1 M NaCl solutions at neutral pH was studied using an approach that combines surface chemical techniques with electrochemical ones. It was found that NLS increases the pitting resistance of 304 stainless steel, with possible complete inhibition at high NLS concentration (30 mM). Adsorption of NLS on 304 stainless steel particles was directly measured. NLS adsorbs significantly on 304 stainless steel with maximum adsorption density close to bilayer coverage. Electrophoretic mobility data for 304 stainless steel particles show that the surface of 304 stainless steel is negative in NaCl solution at neutral pH. The adsorption of NLS makes the interfacial charge even more negative. The relationship between pitting inhibition and adsorption density of NLS suggests that NLS does not adsorb preferentially on the pit nucleation sites and complete inhibition requires that the whole surface be covered completely by NLS. The inhibition mechanism of NLS is proposed to be due mainly to the blocking effect of a negatively charged NLS adsorption layer. This study shows that in addition to the adsorption amount of surfactant, interfacial charge also plays an important role in pitting inhibition. PMID:12651137

  17. Switch to duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Quik, J.M.A.; Geudeke, M.

    1994-11-01

    Duplex stainless steels contain approximately equal proportions of ferrite and austenite. These stainless steels have become an established material of construction in the chemical process industries (CPI). Duplexes offer benefits over austenitic stainless steels and carbon steels because of their higher strength, and good toughness and ductility, in combination with equivalent resistance to general corrosion, as well as better resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Additionally, duplex materials have thermal-conductivity and thermal-expansion coefficients similar to those of ferritic materials, are tough at low (sub-zero) temperatures, and have a high resistance to erosion and abrasion. In some of the highly corrosive environments encountered in the CPI, the super duplex stainless steels offer cost-effective options not possible with the standard austenitic stainless steels. The initial applications were almost exclusively as heat exchanger tubing in water-cooled service. In recent times, duplex stainless steels have been used in the oil, gas, and chemical industries. Examples include service in sweet and mildly sour corrosive environments, on offshore platforms where weight savings can be realized, and as a replacement for standard austenitic stainless steel in chemical-processing plants.

  18. Stainless steel display evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Trissell, Terry L.

    2007-04-01

    Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) technology is one candidate to become a low power alternative in some applications to the currently dominant, active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD), technology. Furthermore, fabrication of the AMOLED on stainless steel (SS) foil rather than the traditional glass substrate, while presenting a set of severe technical challenges, opens up the potential for displays that are both lighter and less breakable. Also, transition to an SS foil substrate may enable rollable displays - large when used but small for stowage within gear already worn or carried or installed. Research has been initiated on AMOLED/SS technology and the first 320 x 240 color pixel 4-in. demonstration device has been evaluated in the AFRL Display Test and Evaluation Laboratory. Results of this evaluation are reported along with a research roadmap.

  19. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions).

  20. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  1. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  2. Welding tritium aged stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanne, W. R., Jr.

    Stainless steels exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to He buildup within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for new weapon systems, and service life extensions of older systems, methods for welding/repair on tritium-exposed material will become important. Results are reported that indicate that both solid-state resistance welding and low-heat gas metal arc overlay welding are promising methods for repair or modification of tritium-aged stainless steel.

  3. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  4. Differences in corrosion behavior of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiro, T.; Yoshioka, K. ); Staehle, R.W. . Corrosion Research Center)

    1994-12-01

    Effects of chromium and molybdenum on differences in corrosion behavior of ferritic and austenitic stainless steels (SS) were investigated to clarify the reason for the superior corrosion resistance of high-alloy ferritic SS to austenitic SS. In the region where the corrosion index (Cr + 3xMo [mass%]) exceeded 32 to 35, ferritic SS showed superior pitting and crevice corrosion resistance to austenitic SS. Cr produced different effects on the anodic polarization behavior of ferritic and austenitic SS in solutions with low pH and high concentrations of chloride. The superiority of high-alloy ferritic SS could be explained by this behavior. The present work was undertaken to clarify reasons for the superiority of high-alloy ferritic stainless steels (SS) for seawater applications.

  5. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Casstevens, John M.

    1997-11-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 angstroms, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29 - 100 mm-1. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufacturability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible reasons for its unusual stability and polishability.

  6. Corrosion and inhibition of stainless steel pitting corrosion in alkaline medium and the effect of Cl - and Br - anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaey, S. A. M.; Taha, F.; El-Malak, A. M. Abd

    2005-03-01

    The effect of carbonate anion on the pitting corrosion and inhibition behavior of stainless steel samples (304L SS and 316L SS) has been studied using potentiodynamic and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The effect of concentration of CO 32- ions, pH, potential scanning rate and the composition of stainless steel are discussed. Additions of Cl - and Br - ions into the carbonate solution increase the anodic dissolution of stainless steel and decrease its pitting corrosion resistance. The effect of CO 32- anion on the inhibition of chloride and bromide pitting corrosion of the two stainless steel types has been studied also. Pitting corrosion decrease with the increasing of sodium carbonate concentration, i.e. increases the resistance of stainless steels towards the chloride and bromide pitting corrosion. This inhibition effect argued to formation of [Fe,Cr]CO 3 film caused by preferential adsorption of the CO 32- ion, leading to instantaneous repair of weak sites for pit nucleation.

  7. Overlay welding irradiated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanne, W. R.; Chandler, G. T.; Nelson, D. Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E. A.

    An overlay technique developed for welding irradiated stainless steel may be important for repair or modification of fusion reactor materials. Helium, present due to (n,alpha) reactions, is known to cause cracking using conventional welding methods. Stainless steel impregnated with 3 to 220 appm helium by decay of tritium was used to develop a welding process that could be used for repair. The result was a gas metal arc weld overlay technique with low-heat input and low-penetration into the helium-containing material. Extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of this technique demonstrated substantial reduction of helium embrittlement damage. The overlay technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel containing 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking, although greater than for tritium charged and aged material, was minimal compared to conventional welding methods.

  8. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  9. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 90oCElectrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 9

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J; Day, S D; Lian, T; Saw, C K; Hailey, P D; Choi, J S; Rebak, R B; Yang, N; Payer, J H; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Branagan, D J; Buffa, E J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-04-25

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was prepared as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stability was found to be comparable to that of high-performance nickel-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. This material also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. This material and its parent alloy maintained corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature, and remained in the amorphous state during exposure to relatively high neutron doses.

  10. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  11. Coping with PH over the Long Term

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ...

  12. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires. PMID:9228844

  13. Hexagonal arrangement of Ge clusters self-organized on a template of half unit cells of Si(1 1 1)-7 7 observed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Z. A.; Arai, T.; Tomitori, M.

    2005-01-01

    We observe initial nucleation of Ge clusters and their arrangement on Si(1 1 1)-7 7 by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy on an atomic scale; germanium amounts of sub-monolayer are slowly deposited at room temperature at a rate of 0.005 ML/min, and post-annealed. The clusters are arranged uncovering the corner holes and dimer rows of 7 7 structure, resulting in a regular hexagonal arrangement of Ge clusters with a periodicity of half unit cell of 7 7. This presents direct evidence of the self-organized hexagonal arrangement formed on a template of the 7 7 periodicity, which has been under debate between Yan et al. [Surf. Sci. 506 (2002) L255] and Ratto and Rosei [Discussion: Surf. Sci. 530 (2003) 221].

  14. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  15. Ratcheting Behavior of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Associated Microstructural Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Lopamudra; Mishra, Awanish Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2014-11-01

    Ratcheting fatigue behavior of a non-conventional stainless steel X12CrMnNiN17-7-5 has been investigated with varying combinations of mean stress (?m) and stress amplitude (?a) at room temperature using a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. X-ray diffraction profile analysis has been carried out for assessing possible martensitic phase transformation in the steel subjected to ratcheting deformation. The results indicate that ratcheting strain as well as volume fraction of martensite increases with increasing ?m and/or ?a; the phenomenon of strain accumulation is considered to be governed by the associated mechanics of cyclic loading, increased plastic damage as well as martensitic transformation. A correlation between strain produced by ratcheting deformation and martensitic transformation has been established.

  16. Ratcheting Behavior of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Associated Microstructural Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Lopamudra; Mishra, Awanish Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2014-09-01

    Ratcheting fatigue behavior of a non-conventional stainless steel X12CrMnNiN17-7-5 has been investigated with varying combinations of mean stress (?m) and stress amplitude (?a) at room temperature using a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. X-ray diffraction profile analysis has been carried out for assessing possible martensitic phase transformation in the steel subjected to ratcheting deformation. The results indicate that ratcheting strain as well as volume fraction of martensite increases with increasing ?m and/or ?a; the phenomenon of strain accumulation is considered to be governed by the associated mechanics of cyclic loading, increased plastic damage as well as martensitic transformation. A correlation between strain produced by ratcheting deformation and martensitic transformation has been established.

  17. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205). PMID:22014396

  18. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S < or = 0.007%) release less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel in acid artificial sweat and elicit no reactions in patients already sensitized to nickel. In contrast, nickel-plated samples release around 100 micrograms/cm2/week of Ni and high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same reaction to the DMG test (negative result), which shows again its lack of sensitivity. In contrast, the HNO3 spot test distinguished AISI 303 from the non-resulfurized grades. Clinical patch tests again showed that some patients (4%) were intolerant to AISI 303, while none were intolerant to the other grades. Thus, this study confirms that non-resulfurized stainless steels (S < or = 0.03%) like Ni-containing 304 and 304L should not elicit Ni contact dermatitis, while the resulfurized grades (S > 0.1%) should be avoided. PMID:9330816

  19. Nano-composite stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  20. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  1. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  2. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role, reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research. The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  3. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Langry, Kevin C. (Tracy, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  4. Refrigerant capacity of austenite in as-quenched and annealed Ni51.1Mn31.2In17.7 melt spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.; Flores-Zuñiga, H.; Sánchez-Valdes, C.; Ross, C. A.; García, C.

    2012-04-01

    The thermal dependence of the magnetic entropy change (ΔSM(T)) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of austenite in as-quenched ribbons of chemical composition Ni51.1Mn31.2In17.7 produced by melt spinning at a high cooling rate of 48 ms-1 is reported. The effect of annealing at 1073 K on the structure and the magnetic properties was studied. The as-quenched sample is a single-phase austenite that presents a B2 ordered structure. The annealing on the melt spun samples produced a L21-type ordered structure. Austenite is characterized by a broad ΔSM(T) curve that, for a field change of 5.0 T, exhibits a full-width at half-maximum δTFMHW of 107 K, a peak value of the magnetic entropy change ΔSMpeak of -3.1 Jkg-1 K-1, and RC = 345 Jkg-1. Although annealed samples show larger ΔSMpeak values the narrower ΔSM(T) curves leads to a reduction in RC. Thus, the as-quenched sample shows a higher efficiency for a refrigerant cycle.

  5. Stainless Steel Bipolar Plates Deposited with Multilayer Films for PEMFC Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun; Yun, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    A chromium nitride (CrN, Cr2N)/chromium (Cr)/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) system and a gold (Au)/titanium (Ti) system were separately deposited using a sputtering method and an E-beam method, respectively, onto stainless steel 316 and 304 plates. The XRD patterns of the deposited stainless steel plates showed the crystalline phase of typical indium-tin oxide and of metallic phases, such as chromium, gold, and the metal substrate, as well as those of external chromium nitride films. The nitride films were composed of two metal nitride phases that consisted of CrN and Cr2N compounds. The surface morphologies of the modified stainless steel bipolar plates were observed using atomic force microscopy and FE-SEM. The chromium nitride (CrN, Cr2N)/chromium (Cr)/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) multilayer that was formed on the stainless steel plates had a surface microstructural morphology that consisted of fine columnar grains 10 nm in diameter and 60 nm in length. The external gold films that were formed on the stainless steel plates had a grain microstructure approximately 100 nm in diameter. The grain size of the external surface of the stainless steel plates with the gold (Au)/titanium (Ti) system increased with increasing gold film thickness. The electrical resistances and water contact angles of the stainless steel bipolar plates that were covered with the multilayer films were examined as a function of the thickness of the ITO film or of the external gold film. In the corrosion test, ICP-MS results indicated that the gold (Au)/titanium (Ti) films showed relatively excellent chemical stability after exposure to H2SO4 solution with pH 3 at 80 C.

  6. Comparative Study on the Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal, Borated Stainless Steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tiangan; Day, Daniel; Hailey, Phillip; Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloy Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} was compared to borated stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy on their corrosion resistance in various high-concentration chloride solutions. The melt-spun ribbon of this iron-based amorphous alloy have demonstrated a better corrosion resistance than the bulk borated stainless steel and the bulk Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy, in high-concentration chloride brines at temperatures 90 deg. C or higher. (authors)

  7. Effect of acetic NaF solution on the corrosion behavior of stainless steel orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hee-Song; Son, Woo-Sung; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Hyung-Il; Yong, Hoon Kwon

    2006-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of acetic NaF solutions on stainless steel orthodontic brackets. Acetic acid was added to a 0.1% NaF solution to make two solutions, one with pH 3.5 and the other with pH 6. For the two different stainless steel brackets (Tomy, Dentaurum) used in this study, they had a similar elemental composition--except with Mo (molybdenum) in the Tomy bracket. The brackets were then immersed in the prepared test solutions for three days and their responses evaluated. In terms of hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration, the 0.1%/pH 3.5 solution showed a high HF concentration at 227 ppm, while that of 0.1%/pH 6 solution was very low at 7 ppm. In terms of color change and element release, only the Dentaurum brackets in 0.1%/pH 3.5 solution showed an appreciable color change (deltaE* = 4.0) and released a great amount of elements (Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn) after three days. Otherwise, regardless of pH value and product, only minor color change (deltaE* < 1.0) and negligible element release occurred. In terms of surface modification, no visible changes in surface morphology were observed in any product after immersion in test solutions. PMID:16916238

  8. Effect of Plasma Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing on HVOF-Sprayed Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gayoung; Bae, Gyuyeol; Moon, Kyungil; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the effects of plasma nitriding (PN) and nitrocarburizing on HVOF-sprayed stainless steel nitride layers were investigated. 316 (austenitic), 17-4PH (precipitation hardening), and 410 (martensitic) stainless steels were plasma-nitrided and nitrocarburized using a N2 + H2 gas mixture and the gas mixture containing C2H2, respectively, at 550 C. The results showed that the PN and nitrocarburizing produced a relatively thick nitrided layer consisting of a compound layer and an adjacent nitrogen diffusion layer depending on the crystal structures of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings. Also, the diffusion depth of nitrogen increased when a small amount of C2H2 (plasma nitrocarburizing process) was added. The PN and nitrocarburizing resulted in not only an increase of the surface hardness, but also improvement of the load bearing capacity of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings because of the formation of CrN, Fe3N, and Fe4N phases. Also, the plasma-nitrocarburized HVOF-sprayed 410 stainless steel had a superior surface microhardness and load bearing capacity due to the formation of Cr23C6 on the surface.

  9. Passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coating on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenja, S.; Pan, J.; Wallinder, I.O.; Leygraf, C.; Kulu, P.

    1999-11-01

    The passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coatings deposited by arc ion plating onto prenitrided AISI 304 stainless steel have been studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky measurements in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.05 M HCl. The chemical composition of the oxidized surface film atop TiN was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Up to 1.2 V/SHE the TiN coating exhibits passive behavior, which is attributed to the formation of a TiO{sub 2}-like film of nanometer thickness which grows linearly with anodic potential at a rate of 2.4 nm/V. Above 1.2 V/SHE enhanced anodic oxidation of TiN is observed at a rate of 17.7 nm/V, and the overall corrosion performance is governed both by the oxidized TiN coating and by a metallic Ti interlayer atop the nitrided stainless steel substrate. At all potentials the TiO{sub 2} film is characterized by relatively high donor densities and is, furthermore, terminated by a hydroxylated surface.

  10. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  11. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  12. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dunwoody, John T; Mason, Richard E; Freibert, Franz J; Willson, Stephen P; Veirs, Douglas K; Worl, Laura A; Archuleta, Alonso; Conger, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  13. A stainless steel bracket for orthodontic application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Choo, Sung-Uk; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    Aesthetics has become an essential element when choosing orthodontic fixed appliances. Most metallic brackets used in orthodontic therapy are made from stainless steel (SS) with the appropriate physical properties and good corrosion resistance, and are available as types 304, 316 and 17-4 PH SS. However, localized corrosion of these materials can frequently occur in the oral environment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of sizing, microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance, frictional resistance and cytotoxicity of commercially available Mini-diamond (S17400), Archist (S30403) and experimentally manufactured SR-50A (S32050) brackets. The size accuracy of Mini-diamond was the highest at all locations except for the external horizontal width of the tie wing (P < 0.05). Micrographs of the Mini-diamond and Archist showed precipitates in the grains and around their boundaries. SR-50A showed the only austenitic phase and the highest polarization resistance of the tested samples. SR-50A also had the highest corrosion resistance [SR-50A, Mini-diamond and Archist were 0.9 x 10(-3), 3.7 x 10(-3), and 7.4 x 10(-3) mm per year (mpy), respectively], in the artificial saliva. The frictional force of SR-50A decreased over time, but that of Mini-diamond and Archist increased. Therefore, SR-50A is believed to have better frictional properties to orthodontic wire than Mini-diamond and Archist. Cytotoxic results showed that the response index of SR-50A was 0/1 (mild), Mini-diamond 1/1 (mild+), and Archist 1/2 (mild+). SR-50A showed greater biocompatibility than either Mini-diamond or Archist. It is concluded that the SR-50A bracket has good frictional property, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility with a lower probability of allergic reaction, compared with conventionally used SS brackets. PMID:15947222

  14. VHF and L-band scintillation characteristics over an Indian low latitude station, Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Rao, P. V. S.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Niranjan, K.; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.; Gopi Krishna, S.; Lakshmi, N. K. M.

    2005-10-01

    Characteristics of simultaneous VHF (244 MHz) and L-band (1.5 GHz) scintillations recorded at a low-latitude station, Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E), during the low sunspot activity year of March 2004 to March 2005, suggest that the occurrence of scintillations is mainly due to two types, namely the Plasma Bubble Induced (PBI), which maximizes during the post sunset hours of winter and equinoctial months, and the Bottom Side Sinusoidal (BSS) type, which maximizes during the post-midnight hours of the summer solstice months. A detailed study on the spectral characteristics of the scintillations at both the frequencies show that the post-sunset scintillations are strong with fast fading (≈40 fad/min) and are multiple in nature in scattering, giving rise to steep spectral slopes, whereas the post-midnight scintillations, which occur mostly on the VHF signal with low fading rate (≈4 fad/min), are of the BSS type, often showing typical Fresnel oscillations with reduced roll off spectral slopes, indicating that the type of irregularity resembles a thin screen structure giving rise to weak scattering. Using the onset times of several similar scintillation patches across the two satellite (FLEETSAT 73° E, INMARSAT 65° E) ray paths (sub-ionospheric points are separated by 82 km), the East ward movement of the irregularity patches is found to vary from 150 to 250 m/s during the post sunset hours and decrease slowly during the post midnight hours. Further, the east-west extent of the PBI type of irregularities is found to vary from 100 to 500 km, while that of the BSS type extend up to a few thousand kilometers. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Auroral ionosphere; Electric fields and currents)

  15. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the borate mineral ezcurrite Na4B10O177H2O - Implications for the molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Lpez, Andrs; Theiss, Frederick L.; Scholz, Ricardo; Belotti, Fernanda M.

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the boron containing mineral ezcurrite Na4B10O177H2O using electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Both tetrahedral and trigonal boron units are observed. The nominal resolution of the Raman spectrometer is of the order of 2 cm-1 and as such is sufficient enough to identify separate bands for the stretching bands of the two boron isotopes. The Raman band at 1037 cm-1 is assigned to BO stretching vibration. Raman bands at 1129, 1163, 1193 cm-1 are attributed to BO stretching vibration of the tetrahedral units. The Raman band at 947 cm-1 is attributed to the antisymmetric stretching modes of tetrahedral boron. The sharp Raman peak at 1037 cm-1 is from the 11-B component such a mode, then it should have a smaller 10-B satellite near (1.03) (1037) = 1048 cm-1, and indeed a small peak at 1048 is observed. The broad Raman bands at 3186, 3329, 3431, 3509, 3547 and 3576 cm-1 are assigned to water stretching vibrations. Broad infrared bands at 3170, 3322, 3419, 3450, 3493, 3542, 3577 and 3597 cm-1 are also assigned to water stretching vibrations. Infrared bands at 1330, 1352, 1389, 1407, 1421 and 1457 cm-1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of trigonal boron. The observation of so many bands suggests that there is considerable variation in the structure of ezcurrite. Infrared bands at 1634, 1646 and 1681 cm-1 are assigned to water bending modes. The number of water bending modes is in harmony with the number of water stretching vibrations.

  16. In vitro corrosion resistance of plasma source ion nitrided austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Le, M K; Zhu, X M

    2001-04-01

    Plasma source ion nitriding has emerged as a low-temperature, low-pressure nitriding approach for low-energy implanting nitrogen ions and then diffusing them into steel and alloy. In this work, a single high nitrogen face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) phase (gammaN) formed on the 1Cr18Ni9Ti and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen concentration of about 32 at % was characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance of the gammaN-phase layer was studied by the electrochemical cyclic polarization measurement in Ringer's solutions buffered to pH from 3.5 to 7.2 at a temperature of 37 degrees C. No pitting corrosion in the Ringer's solutions with pH = 7.2 and 5.5 was detected for the gammaN-phase layers on the two stainless steels. The high pitting potential for the gammaN-phase layers is higher, about 500 and 600 mV, above that of the two original stainless steels, respectively, in the Ringer's solution with pH = 3.5. The corroded surface morphologies of the gammaN-phase layers observed by scanning electron microscopy are consistent with the results of the electrochemical polarization measurement. PMID:11246957

  17. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  18. Duplex stainless steels for osteosynthesis devices.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; Rondelli, G; Vicentini, B; Giacomazzi, M; Roos, A

    1989-09-01

    The austenitic stainless steels used today for the manufacture of osteosynthesis devices are sensitive to crevice corrosion. In this study the corrosion properties of some duplex stainless steels were evaluated and compared to traditional austenitic stainless steels. According to our results the following ranking was established: 23Cr-4Ni less than AISI 316L less than ASTM F138 less than 22Cr-5Ni-3Mo less than 27Cr-31Ni-3.5Mo less than 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N. In particular the results showed that the high-performance 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel, with high molybdenum and nitrogen contents, can be considered not susceptible to crevice corrosion in the human body. The duplex stainless steels have also better mechanical properties at the same degree of cold working compared with austenitic stainless steels. Hence the 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel can be considered a convenient substitute of ASTM F138 for orthopedic and osteosynthesis devices. PMID:2777835

  19. Cleaning, pickling, and passivation of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Stainless steels (SS) are chosen for various services because of their appearance and corrosion resistance and for their freedom from contamination in storage and shipment. However, certain conditions in handling or fabrication may make these alloys susceptible to localized corrosion or unsatisfactory performance. A surface of cleanliness, uniformity, and corrosion resistance is desirable and, in some services, absolutely required. Definitions and procedures for cleaning, pickling, and passivating stainless steels are reviewed. Surface contamination and defects including grinding marks and smut are discussed, as are measures for preventing and correcting them. The cleaning and passivating sequence required for free-machining stainless grades is included.

  20. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  1. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  2. Chemical mechanical polishing of stainless steel foil as flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaokai; Song, Zhitang; Liu, Weili; Qin, Fei; Zhang, Zefang; Wang, Haibo

    2012-05-01

    Stainless steel foils as thin as 120 ?m are polished to meet the requirement of low roughness for fabricating flexible thin-film transistors on them used in display or sensor. Using the colloidal silica as abrasives in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) procedure, different slurries are evaluated in terms of material removal rates (MRRs). Preliminary CMP tests show that the slurries containing oxidant with the pH less than 2.0 produce the greatest removal rate, and accordingly the mechanism of material removal is proposed. The surface topography of stainless steel before and after polishing is characterized by optical image, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy image. The surface roughness can be reduced from the unpolished 13.6 nm to the polished 0.7 nm. However, it's found that the microscopic defects of 1-2 ?m in size are always present within the polished surface, and the electrochemical cause of their occurrence is suggested according to elementary mapping analysis.

  3. A porous stainless steel membrane system for extraterrestrial crop production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, H. V.; Prince, R. P.; Berry, W. L.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    A system was developed in which nutrient flow to plant roots is controlled by a thin (0.98 or 1.18 mm) porous (0.2 or 0.5 microns) stainless steel sheet membrane. The flow of nutrient solution through the membrane is controlled by adjusting the relative negative pressure on the nutrient solution side of the membrane. Thus, the nutrient solution is contained by the membrane and cannot escape from the compartment even under microgravity conditions if the appropriate pressure gradient across the membrane is maintained. Plant roots grow directly on the top surface of the membrane and pull the nutrient solution through this membrane interface. The volume of nutrient solution required by this system for plant growth is relatively small, since the plenum, which contains the nutrient solution in contact with the membrane, needs only to be of sufficient size to provide for uniform flow to all parts of the membrane. Solution not passing through the membrane to the root zone is recirculated through a reservoir where pH and nutrient levels are controlled. The size of the solution reservoir depends on the sophistication of the replenishment system. The roots on the surface of the membrane are covered with a polyethylene film (white on top, black on bottom) to maintain a high relative humidity and also limit light to prevent algal growth. Seeds are sown directly on the stainless steel membrane under the holes in the polyethylene film that allow a pathway for the shoots.

  4. Urine pH test

    MedlinePLUS

    pH - urine ... meat products or cranberries can decrease your urine pH. ... provider may order this test to check for changes in your body's ... stones can form, depending on the acidity level of your urine.

  5. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  6. Stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  7. Precise carbon control of fabricated stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, R.J.

    1975-12-01

    A process is described for controlling the carbon content of fabricated stainless steel components including the steps of heat treating the component in hydrogen atmospheres of varying dewpoints and carbon potentials.

  8. Duplex stainless steel: From specialty to commodity

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, J.M.A.; Geudeke, M.

    1994-12-31

    Important applications of duplex stainless steel in the oil and chemical industry date from the seventies. Duplex stainless steel is attractive because it combines high mechanical strength, about the same as for carbon steel, and good corrosion resistance particularly against chloride stress corrosion cracking up to about 100 C. This paper highlights a number of examples that are typical for the potential as well as the problems associated with this type of material.

  9. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metals - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment: Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Choi, J; Yang, N; Bayles, R; Aprigliano, L; Payer, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E; Ajdelsztajn, L; Branagan, D J; Beardsely, M B

    2006-10-20

    Several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been identified that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to (or better than) that of Ni-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022), based on measurements of breakdown potential and corrosion rate in seawater. Both chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) provide corrosion resistance, boron (B) enables glass formation, and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) has no yttrium, and is characterized by relatively high critical cooling rates of approximately 600 Kelvin per second. Data for the SAM2X5 formulation is reported here. In contrast to yttrium-containing iron-based amorphous metals, SAM2X5 can be readily gas atomized to produce spherical powders which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. SAM2X5 also experiences crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying, due to the formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which depletes the matrix of key alloy elements, whereas SAM2X5 can be applied as coatings with the same corrosion resistance as a fully-dense completely amorphous melt-spun ribbon, provided that its amorphous nature is preserved during thermal spraying. The hardness of Type 316L Stainless Steel is approximately 150 VHN, that of Alloy C-22 is approximately 250 VHN, and that of HVOF SAM2X5 ranges from 1100-1300 VHN [MRS12-13]. Such hardness makes these materials particularly attractive for applications where corrosion-erosion and wear are also issues. Since SAM2X5 has high boron content, it can absorb neutrons efficiently, and may therefore find useful applications as a criticality control material within the nuclear industry.

  10. Corrosion Resistance of Amorphous Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 coating - a new criticality-controlled material

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. Modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in various relevant environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  11. Long-Term Corrosion Tests of Prototypical SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R H; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P D; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-05-10

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC susceptibility. Annealed and water quenched specimens were found to be immune to SCC in caustic environment. Aging treatment at 800C gave rise to sigma and chi precipitates in the DSS. However, these sigma and chi precipitates, known to initiate cracking in DSS in chloride environment did not cause any cracking of DSS in caustic solutions. Aging of DSS at 475C had resulted in '475C embrittlement' and caused cracks to initiate in the ferrite phase. This was in contrast to the cracks initiating in the austenite phase in the as-received DSS. Alloy composition and microstructure of DSS as well as solution composition (dissolved ionic species) was also found to affect the electrochemical behavior and passivation of DSS which in turn plays a major role in stress corrosion crack initiation and propagation. Corrosion rates and SCC susceptibility of DSS was found to increase with addition of sulfide to caustic solutions. Corrosion films on DSS, characterized using XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the metal sulfide compounds were formed along with oxides at the metal surface in the presence of sulfide containing caustic environments. These metal sulfide containing passive films are unstable and hence breaks down under mechanical straining, leading to SCC initiations. The overall results from this study helped in understanding the mechanism of SCC in caustic solutions. Favorable slip systems in the austenite phase of DSS favors slip-induced local film damage thereby initiating a stress corrosion crack. Repeated film repassivation and breaking, followed by crack tip dissolution results in crack propagation in the austenite phase of DSS alloys. Result from this study will have a significant impact in terms of identifying the alloy compositions, fabrication processes, microstructures, and environmental conditions that may be avoided to mitigate corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of DSS in caustic solutions.

  13. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  14. High-Power Diode Laser-Treated 13Cr4Ni Stainless Steel for Hydro Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2014-06-01

    The cast martensitic chromium nickel stainless steels such as 13Cr4Ni, 16Cr5Ni, and 17Cr4Ni PH have found wide application in hydro turbines. These steels have adequate corrosion resistance with good mechanical properties because of chromium content of more than 12%. The 13Cr4Ni stainless steel is most widely used among these steels; however, lacks silt, cavitation, and water impingement erosion resistances (SER, CER, and WIER). This article deals with characterizing 13Cr4Ni stainless steel for silt, cavitation, and water impingement erosion; and studying its improved SER, CER, and WIER behavior after high-power diode laser (HPDL) surface treatment. The WIER and CER have improved significantly after laser treatment, whereas there is a marginal improvement in SER. The main reason for improved WIER and CER is due to its increased surface hardness and formation of fine-grained microstructure after HPDL surface treatment. CER and WIER of HPDL-treated 13Cr4Ni stainless steel samples have been evaluated as per ASTM G32-2003 and ASTM G73-1978, respectively; and these were correlated with microstructure and mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, modified ultimate resilience, and microhardness. The erosion damage mechanism, compared on the basis of scanning electron micrographs and mechanical properties, is discussed and reported in this article.

  15. Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B.; Elmer, J.; Carol, L.

    1997-02-06

    Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

  16. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  17. Corrosion performance of martensitic stainless steel seamless pipe for linepipe application

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Mitsuo; Miyata, Yukio; Toyooka, Takaaki; Murase, Fumio

    1999-11-01

    The corrosion performance of two types of weldable martensitic stainless steel seamless pipe for pipeline application is investigated. 11Cr steel pipe developed for sweet environment gives better resistance to CO{sub 2} corrosion than the 13Cr martensitic stainless steel for OCTG. 12Cr steel pipe developed for light sour environment shows good SSC resistance in a mild sour environment and superior CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance at high temperature and high CO{sub 2} partial pressure condition. The suitable condition for the 11Cr steel pipe and the 12Cr steel pipe in sweet environment, and the critical pH and H{sub 2}S partial pressure for the 12Cr steel pipe welded joint in sour environment are clarified. Both welded joints have superior resistance to hydrogen embrittlement under the cathodic protection condition in sea water.

  18. A model for prediction of possibility of localized corrosion attack of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    Empirical or semi-empirical relations were developed to express the dependence of the possibility (probability) of localized corrosion attack of various stainless steels on environmental factors. Only chloride induced attack within the range 0--100 C (32--212 F) is considered. The environmental variables considered include temperature, pH, chloride content, sulfate content, presence of oxidizing agents, crevices and deposits, flow rate and possibility of concentration of solution by evaporation. Common mathematical operations are used to formulate the trends into equations. Examples of the predictions of the model are given for type AISI 316 stainless steel in two environments: Baltic Sea water at 25 C and a solution containing 300 mg/l of chloride ions at 70 C.

  19. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  20. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures. PMID:9713683

  1. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  2. Contribution of acidic amino residues to the adsorption of peptides onto a stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Kawasaki, Yuuki; Awadzu, Tomoka; Sakiyama, Takaharu; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2003-11-15

    The role of the acidic amino acid residues in the adsorption of peptides/proteins onto stainless steel particles was investigated using a peptide fragment from bovine beta-lactoglobulin, Thr-Pro-Glu-Val-Asp-Asp-Glu-Ala-Leu-Glu-Lys (T5 peptide), which has a high affinity to a stainless steel surface at acidic pHs, and its mutant peptides substituted with different numbers of acidic amino acid residues. The adsorption behavior of the mutant peptides as well as the T5 peptide were studied at pH 3 with respect to concentration and ionic strength dependencies and the reversibility of the adsorption process. The behavior of the peptides was generally characterized as two distinct irreversible adsorption modes, Mode I and Mode II. In Mode I, the amounts adsorbed lay on the ordinate at zero equilibrium concentration in the solution, while in Mode II, the amount adsorbed increased with increased equilibrium concentration. The area occupied by the peptides was predicted by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics. The state of the peptides, when adsorbed, was investigated using FT-IR analysis. The FT-IR analyses revealed that the side carboxylic groups of the peptides adsorbed on the stainless steel surface were ionized, while they were unionized in the solution at pH 3. Thus, the interactions between the carboxylic groups of the peptide and the stainless steel surface can be considered to be largely electrostatic. The peptide having four acidic amino acid residues took a maximum adsorbed amount, the reason for which is discussed. PMID:14583204

  3. Photoionization study of PH: PH/sub 2/ revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Cho, H.

    1989-01-01

    The photoion yield curve of PH/sup +/ (PH) is presented, from threshold to 1040 A. The adiabatic ionization potential of PH is 10.149 +- 0.008 eV. Extensive autoionization structure is observed and analyzed. It is attributed to several Rydberg series, whose mutual convergence limit is 11.852 +- 0.002 eV, and corresponds to the onset of PH/sup +/ (a /sup 4/..sigma../sup -/). The photoion yield curve of AsH/sup +/ (AsH) is juxtaposed, and shown to have a similar pattern. A new photoion yield curve of PH/sup +//sub 2/ (PH/sub 2/) is shown, where the source of PH/sub 2/ is the H+PH/sub 3/ reaction. The new results corroborate the earlier data (based on the pyrolysis of benzylphosphine) regarding the adiabatic ionization potential of PH/sub 2/ to form X /sup 1/A/sub 1/, and the presence of broad autoionizing structure. They also display less scatter, and enable one to estimate the onset for a-italic-tilde /sup 3/B/sub 1/ to be about 0.70 eV above X /sup 1/A/sub 1/. From the analogous behavior of the AsH/sup +//sub 2/ (AsH/sub 2/) curve, the a /sup 3/B/sub 1/--X /sup 1/A/sub 1/ splitting in AsH/sup +//sub 2/ is estimated to be 0.58--0.68 eV.

  4. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties.

  5. Ultralight Stainless Steel Urban Bus Concept

    SciTech Connect

    J. Bruce Emmons; Leonard J. Blessing

    2001-05-14

    While stainless steel buses are certainly not new, this study reveals opportunities for substantial improvements in structural performance.The objective of this project was to investigate the mass saving potential of ultra-high strength stainless steel as applied to the structure of a full size urban transit bus.The resulting design for a low floor,hybrid bus has an empty weight less than half that of a conventional transit bus.The reduced curb weight allows for a greater payload,without exceeding legal axle limits. A combination of finite element modeling and dynamic testing of scale models was used to predict structural performance.

  6. Friction Drilling of Stainless Steels Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Lamikiz, A.

    2011-01-17

    This work describes the experimental study of the friction drilling process in stainless steel by means of an optimization of the machining conditions. For such purpose austenitic stainless steel with different thicknesses were analyzed through controlled tests at different rotation speeds and feed rates. On one hand, the torque and the thrust force were computed and monitorized. On the other hand, the dimensional tolerances of the holes were evaluated, mainly the accuracy of the hole diameter and the burr thickness at different depths. Another topic of interest inherent to this special technique is the temperature level reached during the friction process which is crucial when it comes to development of microstructural transformations.

  7. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  8. Electrodissolution studies of 304 stainless steel in sodium nitrate electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1997-12-01

    To explore the impact of a wide range of operating parameters upon 304 stainless steel (SS) dissolution in sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}) electrolyte, the staff of Engineering Science Applications-Energy and Process Engineering performed a series of beaker experiments. The variables that the authors explored included NaNO{sub 3} concentration, chromate concentration, pH, stirring rate, and current density. They adjusted the run length to obtain approximately 10 mg/cm{sup 2} metal removal so that they could compare surface finishes under similar test conditions. Key findings may be summarized as follows. Current efficiency during dissolution depends most strongly upon current density and electrolyte concentration. At 0.05 A/cm{sup 2}, current density is more dependent upon chromium concentration than they previously thought. They obtained the best surface finish in a classical electropolishing regime at current densities above 1.5 A/cm{sup 2}. Mirror-like finishes were obtained at near 100% current efficiency. At 0.05 a/cm{sup 2} they obtained reasonable surface finishes, particularly at lower electrolyte concentration. Current efficiency was low (30%). At intermediate current densities, they obtained the worst surface finishes, that is, surfaces with severe pitting. Also, they explored preferential attack of the weld zone during electrodissolution of 304 stainless steel cans. Electrodissolution removed approximately twice as much material from cans with unshielded weld zones as from cans with shielded weld zones. The following implications are apparent. While operation above 1 A/cm{sup 2} yields the best surface finish at 100% current efficiency, equipment size and power feedthrough limitations reduce the attractiveness of this option. Because other Los Alamos researchers, obtained more favorable results with the sulfate electrolyte, the authors recommend no further work for the sodium nitrate electrolyte system.

  9. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  19. Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ... your Disease Exercise and PH Traveling with PH Climate and PH Doctors Who Treat PH Referral to ...

  20. Martensitic Transformation During Compressive Deformation of a Non-conventional Stainless Steel and Its Quantitative Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreethi, R.; Sampark, P.; Majhi, Goutam Kumar; Dutta, Krishna

    2015-11-01

    This report aims to examine the extent of deformation-induced phase transformation in a non-conventional austenitic stainless steel known as ISO/TR 15510 X12CrMnNiN17-7-5, upon compressive loading at room temperature. Experiments were carried out under varying length to diameter ratios (0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 1.6). TFE (Tetrafluoroethylene)-fluorocarbon tapes were used at specimen-platen interfaces to reduce the effect of friction. The results indicate that the lubrication was effective up to 15% of strain. Optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicated martensitic phase transformation in the deformed specimens. The extent of phase transformation was determined by analyzing the XRD peaks using integrated intensity of the corresponding phases. The results are correlated with the extent of deformation in the respective samples. The presence of ? and ?'-martensite on the deformed samples has been substantiated by some limited experiments using transmission electron microscopy.

  1. Bondable Stainless Surface Coats Protect Against Rust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Shaffer, D. K.; Clearfield, H. M.; Nagle, D.; Groff, G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests conducted to assess use of bondable stainless surface (BOSS) coating materials to protect steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors against corrosion and to provide surface microstructure and chemistry suitable for bonding to insulating material. Eliminates need to cover cases with grease to prevent corrosion and degreasing immediately prior to use.

  2. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  3. Stabilizing stainless steel components for cryogenic service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1967-01-01

    Warpage and creep in stainless steel valve components are decreased by a procedure in which components are machined to a semifinish and then cold soaked in a bath of cryogenic liquid. After the treatment they are returned to ambient temperature and machine finished to the final drawing dimensions.

  4. Proof Testing Of Stainless-Steel Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng H.; Hendrickson, James A.; Bamford, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of development of method for nondestructive proof testing of bolts made of A286 stainless steel. Based on concept that the higher load bolt survives, the smaller the largest flaw and, therefore, the longer its fatigue life after test. Calculations and experiments increase confidence in nondestructive proof tests.

  5. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  6. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel type 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel type 301 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  7. Impact of graphite gasket/duplex stainless steel couples on crevice chemistry and likelihood of crevice attack in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.

    1998-12-31

    Electrochemical polarization measurements have been made on a graphite laminate gasket and a super-duplex stainless steel (DSS) in deaerated IM NaCl solution over a range of pH. The open circuit potential of the graphite is significantly more noble than that of the duplex stainless steel and the kinetics of the hydrogen ion reduction are greater at potentials more positive than about 0.0 V SCE. The data were used as input to a model of crevice chemistry and predictions made for potentials up to +0.4 V SCE. For crevices of parallel plates of DSS-DSS and DSS-Plastic, the usual acidic conditions were predicted but for a DSS-Graphite combination the pH was predicted to be alkaline. The latter is a consequence of the enhanced kinetics for cathodic reduction of hydrogen ions and water on the graphite which, when contained within the crevice, act to elevate the pH. The predictions suggest that coupling to graphite, contained within the crevice, may act to prevent crevice corrosion initiation in contrast to the usual perception of behavior when coupling to more noble materials. In practice, there have been significant crevice corrosion failures of a super-duplex stainless steel associated with graphite gaskets. However, in all cases, the failures were in chlorinated systems for which the corrosion potentials are particularly high and beyond the range for which a benefit from graphite could be anticipated.

  8. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  9. Voltammetric pH Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Magdalena; Kurel, Malgorzata; Jedraszko, Justyna; Toczydlowska, Diana; Wittstock, Gunther; Opallo, Marcin; Nogala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale pH evaluation is a prerequisite for understanding the processes and phenomena occurring at solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-gas interfaces, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, extraction, partitioning, and corrosion. Research on the homogeneous processes within small volumes such as intracellular fluids, microdroplets, and microfluidic chips also requires nanometer scale pH assessment. Due to the opacity of numerous systems, optical methods are useless and, if applicable, require addition of a pH-sensitive dye. Potentiometric probes suffer from many drawbacks such as potential drift and lack of selectivity. Here, we present a voltammetric nanosensor for reliable pH assessment between pH 2 and 12 with high spatial resolution. It consists of a pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrode obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) inside a quartz nanopipette. The carbon is modified by adsorption of syringaldazine from its ethanolic solution. It exhibits a stable quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram with nearly Nernstian dependency of midpeak potentials (-54 mV/pH). This sensor was applied as a probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in order to map pH over a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME), generating hydroxide ions (OH(-)) by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a diffusion-controlled rate in aerated phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the alkalization of the electrolyte close to the oxygen reducing electrode, showing the insufficient buffer capacity of PBS to maintain a stable pH at the given conditions. PMID:26516786

  10. Corrosion of carbon steels, stainless steels, and titanium in aqueous lithium bromide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guinon, J.L.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Perez-Herranz, V. . Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear); Lacoste, G. )

    1994-03-01

    Effects of lithium bromide (LiBr) concentration, pH, temperature, exposure time, and the action of some inhibitors on corrosion of several carbon (C) steels, stainless steels (SS), and a titanium (Ti) alloy were studied. Corrosion rates were determined by the polarization resistance method and compared to rates determined by weight-loss measurements. Pitting potentials (E[sub p]) were evaluated in neutral LiBr solution and with different inhibitors. Pit density and average pit depth depended on the metal tested, with lowest values for Ti, the next lowest values for type 316 SS (UNS S31600), and the highest values for UNS G41350 tempered steel.

  11. Low pH affects survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of the postlarvae and early juveniles of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Gunzo; Bagarinao, Teodora; Yong, Annita Seok Kian; Chen, Chiau Yu; Noor, Siti Norasidah Mat; Lim, Leong Seng

    2015-06-01

    Acidification of rain water caused by air pollutants is now recognized as a serious threat to aquatic ecosystems. We examined the effects of low pH (control pH 7.5, pH 6, pH 5, pH 4) on the survival, growth, and shell quality of Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles in the laboratory. Hatcheryproduced postlarvae (PL 5) were stocked at 250 PL per aquarium, acclimated over 7 d to experimental pH adjusted with hydrochloric acid, and reared for 30 d. Dead specimens were removed and counted twice a day. After 27 d rearing, all specimens were measured for total length and body weight. Carapace quality was assessed by spectrophotometry. Survival of juveniles was highest at pH 6 (binomial 95% confidence interval 79 - 89%) followed by control pH 7.5 (56 - 68%) and pH 5 (50 - 60%) and was lowest for unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles at pH 4 (43 - 49%). The final median total length and body weight of juveniles were similar at control pH 7.5 (18.2 TL, 50.2 mg BW) and pH 6 (17.7 mm TL, 45.0 mg BW) but significantly less at pH 5 (16.7 mm TL, 38.2 mg BW); at pH 4, the postlarvae did not metamorphose and measured only 9.8 mm TL, 29.3 mg BW. Length frequency distribution showed homogeneous growth at pH 6, positive skew at control pH 7.5 and pH 5, and extreme heterogeneity at pH 4. The carapace showed different transmittance spectra and lower total transmittance (i.e. thicker carapace) in juveniles at pH 7.5, pH 6, and pH 5 than in unmetamorphosed postlarvae and juveniles with thinner carapace at pH 4. Thus, survival, growth, size distribution, and carapace quality of M. rosenbergii postlarvae and early juveniles were negatively affected by pH 5 and especially pH 4. The thinner carapace of the survivors at pH 4 was mostly due to their small size and failure to metamorphose. Natural waters affected by acid rain could decimate M. rosenbergii populations in the wild.

  12. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

    2006-12-12

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  13. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  14. Silicon strain gages bonded on stainless steel using glass frit for strain sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongyang; Cheng, Xingguo; Leng, Yi; Cao, Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a steel pressure sensor using strain gages bonded on a 17-4 PH stainless steel (SS) diaphragm based on glass frit technology is proposed. The strain gages with uniform resistance are obtained by growing an epi-silicon layer on a single crystal silicon wafer using epitaxial deposition technique. The inorganic glass frits are used as the bonding material between the strain gages and the 17-4 PH SS diaphragm. Our results show that the output performances of sensors at a high temperature of 125 C are almost equal those at room temperature, which indicates that the glass frit bonding is a good method and may lead to a significant advance in the high temperature applicability of silicon strain gage sensors. Finally, the microstructure of the cured organic adhesive and the fired glass frit are compared. It may be concluded that the defects of the cured organic adhesive deteriorate the hysteresis and repeatability errors of the sensors.

  15. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  16. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  17. Electrocoagulation of simulated reactive dyebath effluent with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes.

    PubMed

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Kabda?li, I?ik; Vardar, Burcu; Tnay, Olcay

    2009-05-30

    Reactive dyebath effluents are ideal candidates for electrocoagulation due to their intensive color, medium strength, recalcitrant COD and high electrolyte (NaCl) content. The present study focused on the treatability of simulated reactive dyebath effluent (COD(o)=300 mg/L; color in terms of absorbance values A(o,436)=0.532 cm(-1), A(o,525)=0.693 cm(-1) and A(o,620)=0.808 cm(-1)) employing electrocoagulation with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes. Optimization of critical operating parameters such as initial pH (pH(o) 3-11), applied current density (J(c)=22-87 mA/cm(2)) and electrolyte type (NaCl or Na(2)SO(4)) improved the overall treatment efficiencies resulting in effective decolorization (99% using stainless steel electrodes after 60 min, 95% using aluminum electrodes after 90 min electrocoagulation) and COD abatement (93% with stainless steel electrodes after 60 min, 86% with aluminum electrodes after 90 min of reaction time). Optimum electrocoagulation conditions were established as pH(o) 5 and J(c)=22 mA/cm(2) for both electrode materials. The COD and color removal efficiencies also depended on the electrolyte type. No in situ, surplus adsorbable organically bound halogens (AOX) formation associated with the use of NaCl as the electrolyte during electrocoagulation was detected. An economical evaluation was also carried out within the frame of the study. It was demonstrated that electrocoagulation of reactive dyebath effluent with aluminum and stainless steel electrodes was a considerably less electrical energy-intensive, alternative treatment method as compared with advanced chemical oxidation techniques. PMID:18849115

  18. Corrosion of stainless steel, nickel-titanium, coated nickel-titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Johnson, J W

    1999-02-01

    Orthodontic wires containing nickel have been implicated in allergic reactions. The potential for orthodontic wires to cause allergic reactions is related to the pattern and mode of corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions, such as nickel, into the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in the corrosive potential of stainless steel, nickel titanium, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires. At least two specimens of each wire were subjected to potentiostatic anodic dissolution in 0.9% NaCl solution with neutral pH at room temperature. Using a Wenking MP 95 potentiostat and an electrochemical corrosion cell, the breakdown potential of each wire was determined. Photographs were taken of the wire speci mens using a scanning electron microscope, and surface changes were qualitatively evaluated. The breakdown potentials of stainless steel, two nickel titanium wires, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium were 400 mV, 300 mV, 750 mV, 300 mV, 1800 mV, and >2000 mV, respectively. SEM photographs revealed that some nickel titanium and stainless steel wires were susceptible to pitting and localized corrosion. The results indicate that corrosion occurred readily in stainless steel. Variability in breakdown potential of nickel titanium alloy wires differed across vendors' wires. The nitride coating did not affect the corrosion of the alloy, but epoxy coating decreased corrosion. Titanium wires and epoxy-coated nickel titanium wires exhibited the least corrosive potential. For patients allergic to nickel, the use of titanium or epoxy-coated wires during orthodontic treatment is recommended. PMID:10022183

  19. Laboratory reproduction of potential ennoblement of stainless steels in natural seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Amaya, Hisashi; Miyuki, Hideaki

    1999-11-01

    The localized corrosion susceptibility of stainless steels, such as type 3 16L, immersed in natural seawater is higher than those in synthetic seawater. It is widely observed that the corrosion potential of stainless steels in natural seawater becomes noble over +0.3V vs SCE. This phenomenon is caused by the influence of the microorganisms in the natural seawater, and therefore it is considered as Microbially Influenced Corrosion (MIC). In this paper, the laboratory reproduction of the corrosion potential ennoblement was examined on the basis of the metabolize of aerobic bacteria (pH, dissolved oxygen and metabolize). The electrochemical measurements in natural seawater and synthetic seawater with bacterial mediums were carried out. The corrosion potential of stainless steels became noble in only natural seawater, and cathodic current density increased around corrosion potential, these results suggest that the presence of oxidizer on the metal surface which has higher redox potential than that of oxygen. As the corrosion potential became noble during the logarithmic phase of bacterial growth in the result of the examination with isolated bacteria, it is suggested that the aerobic metabolism of bacteria effects the ennoblement of corrosion potential. The ennoblement was also reproduced in laboratory by the addition of oxidase simulated the metabolism of aerobic bacteria. The oxidase produced the peroxide by the reduction of oxygen which has higher redox potential than that of oxygen, therefore it is considered that the corrosion potential ennoblement is caused by the peroxide generated by the metabolism of aerobic bacteria included in the biofilm formed on the surface of the stainless steels in natural seawater.

  20. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a “total impact energy” approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper.

  1. Nickel-free duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O.

    1998-12-04

    It is well known that nitrogen-alloying in steel produces a variety of exceptional properties such as high strength, high ductility and, eventually, resistance to stress corrosion cracking. High-nitrogen steels (HNS), therefore, have recently been developed to enhance the strength and corrosion resistance of stainless steels. However, due to a low solubility of nitrogen in a liquid steel under atmospheric pressure, the production of such high-nitrogen alloys needs high-pressure facilities that cause an extra cost. A possible route of developing high-nitrogen alloys under atmospheric pressure is to choose a duplex microstructure, where the amount of austenite and ferrite phase is nearly equal. A much lower nitrogen content is needed to maintain a 50% austenite phase compared with the necessary addition of nitrogen to reach a 100% austenitic microstructure. In addition, duplex stainless steels (DSS) with 40--60% ferrite can significantly improve the SCC-resistance. The objective of this work was to develop a new group of nickel-free, high strength and corrosion resistant DSS. Nickel was completely replaced by nitrogen in order to enhance SCC resistance and reduce the alloying element cost. The microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and cost analysis of new alloys are investigated in comparison with some commercial stainless steels.

  2. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  3. 75 FR 81308 - Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, And Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, And Taiwan AGENCY... countervailing duty order on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and antidumping duty orders on stainless... on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and/or the antidumping duty orders on stainless...

  4. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  5. Cari Kitahara, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kitahara earned her Ph.D. in cancer epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She joined the Radiation Epidemiology Branch in 2008 as a predoctoral fellow and became a research fellow in 2011. In 2015, she was appointed to the position of tenure-track investigator.

  6. Statistical patterns of fuel failure in stainless steel clad light water reactor fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Christensen, R.; Park, C.; Smith, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    A set of statistical patterns characterizing the conditions for failure of Type 304 stainless steel clad light water reactor fuel is formulated using a 450-assembly cycle data base from the Connecticut Yankee reactor and an information-theoretic (entropy) criterion of pattern formation. The pattern files, consisting of features formulated from output data obtained from the deterministic fuel performance code FCODE-BETA/SS are partitioned into five failure and six nonfailure patterns. The failure probabilities of the patterns span the 0.17 to 37.47% range, as compared with the data base average of 2.86%. Features that contribute to failure patterns include large swings in the linear power at high burnup, frequent stress cycling at the ridge, and low coolant pH at high linear power. Contributing to nonfailure are low fission gas release, high axial uniformity in linear power, peak burnup, and clad creep strain at the ridge. The feature describing cycling of the linear power agrees qualitatively with previously identified factors contributing to failure of stainless steel clad fuel in the Connecticut Yankee reactor. From an operational standpoint, the fuel failure probability can be reduced by minimizing the number and magnitude of power ramps and maintaining a neutral coolant pH.

  7. The effect of buffered solutions in corrosion testing of alloyed 13%Cr martensitic stainless steels for mildly sour applications

    SciTech Connect

    Drugli, J.M.; Rogne, T.; Svenning, M.; Axelsen, S.; Enerhaug, J.

    1999-11-01

    13% Cr stainless steels may suffer from sulfide stress corrosion cracking in sour environments if hydrogen enters the material. Hydrogen evolution is caused by the cathodic reaction in the corrosion process. As distinct from solutions without buffer, buffered solutions keep the pH stable at the surface almost independent of the electrochemical reactions. The most common initiation process for corrosion of stainless steels is break-down of the passive oxide by subsequent local acidification, which to a certain extent can be prevented in buffered solutions. For local corrosion the risk of corrosion therefore is higher in solutions without buffer than in buffered solutions at the same bulk pH. Hydrogen evolution may also be caused by general corrosion. For this type of corrosion the effect of buffer in the solution may be, contrary to the effect for local corrosion, that general corrosion of 13 Cr (with risk for cracking of loaded specimens) is more readily initiated in buffered solutions than in solutions without buffer at the same pH. With respect to corrosion on ground alloyed 13Cr base material by coupling to carbon steel, it is shown that general corrosion initiates both in strongly and moderately without buffer at pH 3.5, buffered solutions, but not in solution.

  8. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.

    1995-08-01

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging.

  9. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  10. Post midnight spread-F occurrence over Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E) during low and ascending phases of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, K.; Brahmanandam, P. S.; Ramakrishna Rao, P.; Uma, G.; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.; Rama Rao, P. V. S.

    2003-03-01

    A study carried out on the occurrence of post midnight spread-F events at a low-latitude station, Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E), India revealed that its occurrence is maximum in the summer solstice months of the low solar activity period and decreases with an increase in the sunspot activity. The F-region virtual height variations show that 80% of these spread-F cases are associated with an increase in the F-region altitude. It is suggested with the support of the night airglow 6300 A zenith intensity data obtained with co-located ground-based night airglow photometer and electron temperature data from the Indian SROSS C2 satellite that the seasonal variation of the occurrence and probable onset times of the post midnight spread-F depend on the characteristics of the highly variable semipermanent equatorial Midnight Temperature Maximum (MTM).

  11. Room-temperature chemisorption and thermal evolution of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene on Si(1 1 1)7 7: Formation of chlorinated vinylene and vinylidene and acetylide adspecies, and thermal etching reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenhua; Leung, K. T.

    2005-06-01

    The prominent surface species and their corresponding bonding structures of perchloroethylene (PCE, C 2Cl 4) and trichloroethylene (TCE, C 2HCl 3) upon room-temperature adsorption and thermal excitation on Si(1 1 1)7 7 have been examined by vibrational electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The presence of the Si-Cl stretch at 510 cm -1 shows that both PCE and TCE undergo dechlorination on Si(1 1 1)7 7, while the presence of the C dbnd C stretch near 1500 cm -1 indicates that the C dbnd C bond remains intact upon adsorption. The mono-? bonded trichlorovinyl ( ClC?dbnd CCl2) and 1,2-dichlorovinyl ( ClC?dbnd CHCl) adspecies have been proposed as plausible adsorption intermediates for PCE and TCE, respectively. Furthermore, the trichlorovinyl adspecies is found to further dechlorinate at 350 K, and becomes carbon clusters and/or SiC after complete dechlorination above 450 K. On the other hand, further dechlorination of the dichlorovinyl adspecies above 350 K is found to produce a di-? bonded chlorovinylene adspecies that is stable up to 450 K. As supported by the presence of the C tbnd C stretch at 3300 cm -1, an additional adspecies in the form of acetylide ( C?tbnd CH) is also observed. Above 580 K, hydrocarbon fragments and/or SiC are evident, likely due to dehydrogenation of the chlorovinylene and acetylide adspecies. In addition to these novel adspecies, our TDS data reveal desorption of SiCl 2 over 800-950 K and HCl over 700-900 K for both PCE and TCE, which supports thermal etching and recombinative dehydrochlorination reactions at a higher temperature. The TDS data also provide evidence for weak molecular adsorption, likely related to dative bonding as a result of inductive effects.

  12. Stella Koutros, Ph.D.

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Koutros received her M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University. She completed her doctoral work through the Yale-NCI partnership training program in cancer epidemiology, conducting research in the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch (OEEB). In 2008, upon completion of her doctorate she became a fellow in OEEB; she was appointed to the position of tenure-track investigator in 2015.

  13. The Methods Behind PH WINS.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers-a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  14. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  15. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich ..cap alpha..' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by ..cap alpha..' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450/sup 0/C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450/sup 0/C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed.

  16. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed. PMID:23378148

  17. Stainless hooks to bond lower lingual retainer.

    PubMed

    Durgekar, Sujala G; Nagaraj, K

    2011-01-01

    We introduced a simple and economical technique for precise placement of lower lingual retainers. Two stainless steel hooks made of 0.6mm wire are placed interdentally in the embrasure area between canine and lateral incisor bilaterally to lock the retainer wire in the correct position. Etch, rinse and dry the enamel surfaces with the retainer passively in place, then bond the retainer with light-cured adhesive. Hooks are simple to fabricate and eliminate the need for a transfer tray. PMID:22360083

  18. Stain-less staining for computed histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Mayerich, David; Walsh, Michael J.; Kadjacsy-Balla, Andre; Ray, Partha S.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Dyes such as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical stains have been increasingly used to visualize tissue composition in research and clinical practice. We present an alternative approach to obtain the same information using stain-free chemical imaging. Relying on Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging and computation, stainless computed histopathology can enable a rapid, digital, quantitative and non-perturbing visualization of morphology and multiple molecular epitopes simultaneously in a variety of research and clinical pathology applications. PMID:26029735

  19. Stainless steels for wet process phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M. ); Kobayashi, Y. )

    1994-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of stainless steels (SS) was investigated in laboratory-prepared wet process phosphoric acid (WPA) to determine material compatibility with a wide range of the actual WPA differing in impurity contents. The presence of activating impurities, for example, chlorine and fluoride ions, in WPA intensifies the corrosiveness of the phosphoric acid. Increasing the chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo) contents of SS generally improved corrosion resistance to WPA. The studies presume that SS containing Cr above 20 wt% and Mo above 2 wt% show sufficient resistance to be used in the severest actual WPA.

  20. Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ºC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  1. Durable icephobic coating for stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila B; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Ivanov, Vladimir K; Pashinin, Andrei S

    2013-04-10

    In this work, we present a modification of a stainless steel surface to impart superhydrophobic properties to it that are robust with respect to mechanical stresses associated with cyclic icing/deicing treatment, as well as to long-term contact with aqueous media and high humidity. The durability of the superhydrophobic state is ensured by the texture with multimodal roughness stable against mechanical stresses and a 2D polymer network of fluorooxysilane chemically bound to the texture elements. The designed superhydrophobic coating is characterized by contact angles exceeding 155 and a maximum rolling angle of 42 after 100 icing/deicing cycles. PMID:23470194

  2. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance, which is not impaired upon carburization. The passive film as analyzed by XPS is fully intact. Carbon concentration levels in PH13-8Mo reach 10 at.% and correlate with a surface hardness of up to 14GPa. Indication for the transformation from martensite to austenite during the process are observed. In this context, the shape of the carbon concentration-depth profile can be explained. Also the absence of carbides, as analyzed by TEM, can be rationalized. Upon cooling to room temperature, most of the austenite backtransforms into martensite and the surface regains its ferromagnetic properties. Compressive biaxial residual stresses in carburized PH13-8Mo are measured around (2--2.5)GPa. The applied low-temperature carburization process gives rise to a substantial loss in corrosion resistance of PH13-8Mo. Possible reasons including the observed formation of internal and external oxides as well as the change in alloy composition are discussed. Due to the penetration depth of X-rays into the probed specimen surface, a carbon concentration gradient may cause detectable asymmetry of diffraction peaks for certain alloys and under certain conditions. For the first time, this effect is rationalized, explained, and demonstrated on the basis of measured data.

  3. VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE FACILITY WAS DESCRIBED AS THE MOST MODERN NON-NUCLEAR MANUFACTURING BUILDING IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPLEX, WITH MANY PRECISION INSTRUMENTS. (9/21/83) - Rocky Flats Plant, Stainless Steel & Non-Nuclear Components Manufacturing, Southeast corner of intersection of Cottonwood & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  5. Hydrogen effects in high-purity stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, Jr, G R

    1982-01-01

    Internal and environmental hydrogen damage to three pure stainless steels (19% Cr and 10, 14 or 19% Ni) were evaluated by tensile tests. Concentrations of C, Mn, Si and P were less than in commercial alloys. Susceptibility of the pure alloys to hydrogen damage was comparable to that of commercial austenitic stainless steels. 3 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Generation of stainless steel superhydrophobic surfaces using WEDM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanling; Liu, Xianping; Qi, Houjun

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a novel fabrication methodology for generating superhydrophobic surfaces on stainless steel. The Wire Electric Discharge Machining (WEDM) technique was utilized to change the wettability of stainless steel which is generally hydrophilic. Superhydrophobic surfaces were obtained on the stainless steel by strictly control the machining progress. The mechanism of wettability modulation was explored using the well-established surface metrology and characterisation instruments. It was noted that WEDM can be used to generate a recast layer on stainless steel surface. There was a number of hierarchic micro-structures in the irregular recast layer and the number of micro-holes increases the contact area between the water drop and the top surface of stainless steel. Thus, the contact angle was significantly increased and the wettability of stainless steel changed from hydrophilic into hydrophobic. Compared with other established fabrication approaches, the stainless steel based hydrophobic surface can provide long durability, high efficiency and low cost metallic surfaces, which paves the way for the practical applications of stainless steel hydrophobic surfaces in the academic and engineering fields.

  7. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION. STAINLESS STEEL WAS MACHINED IN SIDE A OF THE BUILDING, BEGINNING IN 1957. (4/24/78) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 77 FR 64545 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... if they are included within the sales price of the drawn stainless steel sinks. (Mounting clips... not included within the sales price of the drawn stainless steel sinks, regardless of whether they are... will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of...

  9. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Tulinski M; Jurczyk M

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts).

  10. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts). PMID:23421285

  11. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... the notice in the Federal Register of March 7, 2012 (77 FR 13631). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... (April 2012), entitled Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from China: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-489 and...

  12. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ..., Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register on October 22, 2012 (77 FR 64545). The... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized...

  13. Persistence of spiromesifen in soil: influence of moisture, light, pH and organic amendment.

    PubMed

    Mate, Ch Jamkhokai; Mukherjee, Irani; Das, Shaon Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Persistence of spiromesifen in soil as affected by varying moisture, light, compost amendment, soil sterilization and pH in aqueous medium were studied. Degradation of spiromesifen in soil followed the first-order reaction kinetics. Effect of different moisture regimes indicated that spiromesifen dissipated faster in submerged soil (t 1/2 14.3-16.7 days) followed by field capacity (t 1/2 18.7-20.0 days), and dry soil (t 1/2 21.9-22.9 days). Dissipation was faster in sterilized submerged (t 1/2 17.7 days) than in sterilized dry (t 1/2 35.8 days). Photo spiromesifen metabolite was not detected under different moisture regimes. After 30 days, enol spiromesifen metabolite was detected under submerged condition and was below detectable limit (<0.001 ?g g(-1)) after 90 days. Soil amendment compost (2.5 %) at field capacity enhanced dissipation of the insecticide, and half-life value was 14.3 against 22.4 days without compost amendment. Under different pH condition, residues persisted in water with half-life values 5.7 to 12.5 days. Dissipation in water was faster at pH 9.0 (t 1/2 5.7 days), followed by pH 4.0 (t 1/2 9.7 days) and pH 7.2 (t 1/2 12.5 days). Exposure of spiromesifen to different light conditions indicated that it was more prone to degradation under UV light (t 1/2 3-4 days) than sunlight exposure (t 1/2 5.2-8.1 days). Under sunlight exposure, photo spiromesifen metabolite was detected after 10 and 15 days as compared to 3 and 5 days under UV light exposure. PMID:25616783

  14. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  15. Corrosion behavior of welded stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, T.G.

    1996-05-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steels depends on a protective, passive film being formed at the steel surface on exposure to the service environment. The use of fusion welding for fabrication leads to local compositional variations within the material, which may significantly alter the stability of the passive layer and hence the corrosion behavior. The paper reviews published work and practical experience on such effects of a weld thermal cycle. Compositional heterogeneity and locally reduced passive film stability can stem from three main causes. Attention is given first to the consequences of alloy element segregation during weld metal solidification and to the formation of a fusion boundary unmixed zone. Element partitioning as a result of solid-state phase change is then considered, with particular reference to duplex ferritic/austenitic materials. Finally, the effects are described of precipitation, both of carbide (or carbonitride) particles and of intermetallic phases, with resultant development of alloy depleted regions. Throughout, recognition is made of the different grades of stainless steel employed by industry in terms of overall composition and microstructure.

  16. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  17. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  18. Dislocation substructure in fatigued duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno . Academy of Sciences); Degallaix, S. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille); Kruml, T. . Academy of Sciences)

    1993-12-15

    Cyclic plastic straining of crystalline materials results in the formation of specific dislocation structures. Considerable progress in mapping and understanding internal dislocation structures has been achieved by studying single crystal behavior: however, most structural materials have a polycrystalline structure and investigations of polycrystals in comparison to single crystal behavior of simple metals prove to be very useful in understanding more complex materials. There are some classes of materials, however, with complicated structure which do not have a direct equivalent in single crystalline form. Moreover, the specific dimensions and shapes of individual crystallites play an important role both in the cyclic stress-strain response of these materials and in the formation of their interior structure in cyclic straining. Austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel, which is a kind of a natural composite, is a material of this type. The widespread interest in the application of duplex steels is caused by approximately doubled mechanical properties and equal corrosion properties, when compared with classical austenitic stainless steels. Fatigue resistance of these steels as well as the surface damage evolution in cyclic straining have been studied; however, much less is known about the internal substructure development in cyclic straining. In this study the dislocation arrangement in ferritic and austenitic grains of the austenitic-ferritic duplex steel alloyed with nitrogen and cyclically strained with two strain amplitudes, is reported and compared to the dislocation arrangement found in single and polycrystals of austenitic and ferritic materials of a similar composition and with the surface relief produced in cyclic plastic straining.

  19. Stainless steel 4003 in the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, H.; Stoeckl, M.

    1998-12-31

    The world today sees a dramatic increase in the number of people and the quantities of articles and products which are to be transported. This results in an ever-increasing demand in the steels used in the transportation industry. Key factors are environmental regulations, safety, and life expectancy and product cost in determining which types steel to use. Especially the ferritic 12% chromium stainless steels has seen a significant development and usage in recent years. Compared to typical carbon steels high strength/low alloy steels and structural steels the 12% chromium steels offers improvement in corrosion and wear resistance and weldability outlining advantages in light weight construction and an overall saving. The paper presents the chemical composition and mechanical properties of grade 4003 which is increasingly used worldwide in areas of public transportation, rail transportation, mining industry and sugar industry, among others. The impact of corrosion and abrasion of this stainless steel versus the standard carbon grades and cost efficiency are discussed.

  20. Repair welding of irradiated 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Rankin, D.T.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) of repair welds cracked when patches were welded to the tank wall of a nuclear reactor at the Savannah River Site. The cracking was caused by helium embrittlement. The presence of helium generated in irradiated type 304 stainless steel by neutron interaction with boron and nickel impairs weld repair. Welds on material with as little as one part per million helium generated by exposure to a thermal neutron fluence of 1{times}10{sup 21}n/cm{sup 2} developed substantial cracking in the weld heat-affected zone. Evaluation of conventional welds made on type 304 stainless steel containing 1 to 12 appm helium generated by neutron irradiation, or 3 to 220 appm helium generated by tritium decay, demonstrated cracking of the weld heat-affected zones. A newly developed, low penetration, weld overlay technique mitigates cracking by modifying the stress and temperature profile in the weld heat-affected zone. These results demonstrated the potential for a practical welding alternative to mechanical clamping for repair of irradiated material. The helium embrittlement process proceeds with the formation of helium bubbles, followed by agglomeration and growth of bubbles under the influence of the heat and stress of welding. To determine the effect of stress on weld quality in practical situations, a series of test welds with various conditions of mechanical restraint was evaluated. Generally, higher restraint produced greater cracking of the welds.

  1. Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagnall, Christopher; McBride, Marvin A.

    1985-01-01

    For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

  2. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W. F.; Toben, P. T.; Soppet, W. K.; Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-03-03

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  3. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  4. The performance of duplex stainless steels in chemical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.

    1994-12-31

    The process industries have used 300 series stainless steels for many years where the corrosion resistance of carbon steel is inadequate. Where stainless steels have proved inadequate there has been a tendency to utilize high nickel alloys, with a greatly increased cost. The present paper reviews the different grades of duplex stainless steel and shows how their superior corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance, plus their high strength, can be utilized to provide cost effective alternatives to the high nickel alloys. The use of alternative design codes to take advantages of the properties of duplex alloys is discussed. Data is presented to show the resistance of duplex stainless steels to a variety of chemical environments. The use of duplex stainless steels and the reason for their selection in a number of applications is reviewed.

  5. Welding type 347 stainless steel -- An interpretive report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.D. Jr.; Messler, R.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Stainless steels fall into three major classifications: ferritic, austenitic and martensitic. Type 347 stainless steels are classified as austenitic, though, as well be described later, they may contain small amounts of ferrite as well. They are of the 18-8 chromium-nickel type with up to 1% niobium, an element once referred to as columbium. Type 347 stainless steel is the primary focus of this document. Similar stainless steels containing niobium will be included, such as Types 348 and 309Nb, as these are frequently encountered in certain applications in welded construction. Ferritic and duplex stainless steels, some of which may contain niobium, are not within the scope of this report. This report covers the following topics: applicable welding processes; composition; properties; ferrite potential effect of weld thermal cycle; post-weld heat treatments; cracks and microfissures; and industrial applications.

  6. Flux-free ultrasonic soldering of aluminum and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faridi, Hamid Reza

    Flux-free ultrasonic soldering of 2024 Alclad and 304 stainless steel was conducted to determine the conditions to produce the highest joint shear strength in lap joints. Prior to this time, ultrasonic energy was always applied directly to the molten liquid pool to promote excellent coupling and fluxing by a mechanism of cavitation of the substrate. In this study, the ultrasonic energy was applied to a solid aluminum manifold (heated to the soldering temperature) and further transmitted through the aluminum or stainless steel test sheets to form a lap joint containing solder. Fundamental studies on aluminum and stainless steel samples revealed that the oxide removal and subsequent solder wetting resulted from the erosion of the substrate surface by the cavitation action caused by the ultrasonic vibrations. Although aluminum was successfully joined by the ultrasonic soldering, stainless steel could not be ultrasonically soldered regardless of the surface preparation. Therefore, it may be impractical to chemically clean stainless steel and expect any wetting without a strong fluxing agent. In fact, the results showed that practical soldering of stainless steel could only be achieved by plating the stainless steel substrate surfaces prior to soldering. The Al2O3 oxidation reaction is far more stable than the Cr2O3 reaction, however, the results imply that the rate of oxide formation and growth after chemical cleaning of stainless steel was several times faster than that for aluminum and the applied ultrasonic vibrations were not able to remove the thicker Cr 2O3 from the stainless steel substrate surfaces. with the results of this research, it is now possible to transmit ultrasonic energy through a solid to joint aluminum or stainless steel in a lap joint, it is also more feasible to optimize the most effective soldering variables for increasing the reliability and integrity of an ultrasonic soldering operation.

  7. Environment-Assisted Cracking in Custom 465 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. U.; Goswami, R.; Jones, M.; Vasudevan, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    The influence of cold work and aging on the environment-assisted cracking (EAC) behavior and mechanical properties of Custom 465 stainless steel (SS) was studied. Four sets of specimens were made and tested. All specimens were initially solution annealed, rapidly cooled, and refrigerated (SAR condition). The first specimen set was steel in the SAR condition. The second specimen set was aged to the H1000 condition. The third specimen set was 60 pct cold worked, and the fourth specimen set was 60 pct cold worked and aged at temperatures ranging from 755 K to 825 K (482 C to 552 C) for 4 hours in air. The specimens were subsequently subjected to EAC and mechanical testing. The EAC testing was conducted, using the rising step load (RSL) technique, in aqueous solutions of NaCl of pH 7.3 with concentrations ranging from 0.0035 to 3.5 pct at room temperature. The microstructure, dislocation substructure, and crack paths, resulting from the cold work, aging, or subsequent EAC testing, were examined by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The aging of the cold-worked specimens induced carbide precipitation within the martensite lath, but not at the lath or packet boundaries. In the aged specimens, as aging temperature rose, the threshold stress intensity for EAC (KIEAC), elongation, and fracture toughness increased, but the strength and hardness decreased. The KIEAC also decreased with increasing yield strength and NaCl concentration. In the SAR and H1000 specimens, the EAC propagated along the prior austenite grain boundary, while in the cold-worked and cold-worked and aged specimens, the EAC propagated along the martensite lath, and its packet and prior austenite grain boundaries. The controlling mechanism for the observed EAC was identified to be hydrogen embrittlement.

  8. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  9. Defining and Teaching pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Richard F.

    2007-07-01

    The 1909 definition of pH given in most general chemistry textbooks conflicts with the modern, operationally-defined pH scale that underlies laboratory measurement and relates to activities. At an elementary level, pH and the algebra of equilibria can be simply and correctly taught, without logarithms, in terms of the latter scale.

  10. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH

  11. Sigma phase formation kinetics in stainless steel laminate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wenmen, D.W.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    Stainless steel laminate composites were made to simulate weld microstructures. The use of laminates with variations in chemical composition allows for one dimensional analysis of phase transformation associated with the more complex three-dimensional solidification experience of weld metal. Alternate layers of austenitic (304L and 316L) and ferritic (Ebrite) stainless steels allowed for the study of sigma phase formation at the austenite-ferrite interface in duplex stainless steel. Two austenitic stainless steels, 304L (18.5Cr-9.2Ni-0.3Mo) and 316L (16.2Cr-10.1Ni-2.6Mo), and one ferritic stainless steel, Ebrite (26.3Cr-0Ni-1.0Mo) were received in the form of sheet which was laboratory cold rolled to a final thickness of 0.25 mm (0.030 in.). Laminate composites were prepared by laboratory hot rolling a vacuum encapsulated compact of alternating layers of the ferrite steel with either 304L or 316L stainless steel sheets. Laminate composite specimens, which simulate duplex austenite-ferrite weld metal structure, were used to establish the kinetics of nucleation and growth of sigma phase. The factors affecting sigma phase formation were identified. The effects of time, temperature, and transport of chromium and nickel were evaluated and used to establish a model for sigma phase formation in the austenite-ferrite interfacial region. Information useful for designing stainless steel welding consumables to be used for high temperature service was determined.

  12. Co-Doped Polypyrrole Coatings for Stainless Steel Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prissanaroon, W.; Brack, N.; Pigram, P. J.; Liesegang, J.

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films have been successfully electrodeposited on stainless steel substrates in aqueous solution. In this work, three systems of electrolytes were studied: oxalic acid, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) and a mixture of oxalic acid and DBSA. A combination of XPS and TOF-SIMS revealed the formation of an iron oxalate layer at the interface between the oxalic acid-doped PPy (PPy(Ox)) and stainless steel and a thin layer of DBSA was observed at the interface between DBSA-doped PPy (PPy(DBSA)) and stainless steel. Similar to the PPy(Ox) system, an iron oxalate was also present at the co-doped PPy/stainless steel interface. Cyclic voltammetry indicated that an iron oxalate layer initially formed at the surface of the stainless steel when the co-doping system was used. The adhesion strength and corrosion performance of the PPy coating on stainless steel were evaluated by lap shear tests and an anodic potentiodynamic polarization technique, respectively. The co-doped PPy-coated stainless steel exhibited the best adhesion and a significant shift of corrosion potential to the positive direction. This finding opens the possibility for the co-doped PPy coating to be deployed as a strongly adherent corrosion inhibitor by using a simple one-step electropolymerization process.

  13. Characterization of silane layers on modified stainless steel surfaces and related stainless steel-plastic hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkanen, Mari; Hoikkanen, Maija; Vippola, Minnamari; Vuorinen, Jyrki; Lepist, Toivo; Jussila, Petri; Ali-Lytty, Harri; Lampimki, Markus; Valden, Mika

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize silane layers on the modified stainless steel surfaces and relate it to the adhesion in the injection-molded thermoplastic urethane-stainless steel hybrids. The silane layers were characterized with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, allowing the direct quantization of silane layer thickness and its variation. The surface topographies were characterized with atomic force microscope and chemical analyses were performed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical strength of the respective stainless steel-thermoplastic urethane hybrids was determined by peel test. Polishing and oxidation treatment of the steel surface improved the silane layer uniformity compared to the industrially pickled surface and increased the adhesion strength of the hybrids, resulting mainly cohesive failure in TPU. XPS analysis indicated that the improved silane bonding to the modified steel surface was due to clean Fe 2O 3-type surface oxide and stronger interaction with TPU was due to more amino species on the silane layer surface compared to the cleaned, industrially pickled surface. Silane layer thickness affected failure type of the hybrids, with a thick silane layer the hybrids failed mainly in the silane layer and with a thinner layer cohesively in plastic.

  14. A XPS study of the Mo effect on passivation behaviors for highly controlled stainless steels in neutral and alkaline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Thiago J.; Chauveau, Eric; Mantel, Marc; Nogueira, Ricardo P.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effect of Mo additions on film passive properties of three different stainless steels (SS) types (austenitic, ferritic and duplex alloys). A comparison between Mo containing (3 wt% Mo) and free Mo (0 wt% Mo) grades of highly controlled laboratory heats was done considering their passive film formed in different aggressive conditions, from neutral to alkaline pH. The presence of oxidized Mo on the passive layer was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of Mo within the passive film improved the passivity breakdown potential for the duplex and ferritic SS, but seemed to have no effect for austenitic SS.

  15. Experimental Study of Fouling and Cleaning of Sintered Stainless Steel Membrane in Electro-Microfiltration of Calcium Salt Particles

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Frank G. F.; Mawson, John; Zeng, Xin An

    2011-01-01

    Sintered stainless steel (SSS) microfiltration membranes, which served as electrode directly, were used for the experiment of separating Alamin, a calcium salt and protein containing particles, found in dairy processing. Fouling and cleaning of the SSS membranes under the application of an external electric field were studied. The imposed electric field was found, diverging the pH of permeate and retentate. This in turn altered the solubility of the calcium salt and impacted the performance of electro microfiltration membrane. Using electric field as an enhanced cleaning-in-place (CIP) method in back flushing SSS membrane was also studied. PMID:24957615

  16. Experimental study of fouling and cleaning of sintered stainless steel membrane in electro-microfiltration of calcium salt particles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Frank G F; Mawson, John; Zeng, Xin An

    2011-01-01

    Sintered stainless steel (SSS) microfiltration membranes, which served as electrode directly, were used for the experiment of separating Alamin, a calcium salt and protein containing particles, found in dairy processing. Fouling and cleaning of the SSS membranes under the application of an external electric field were studied. The imposed electric field was found, diverging the pH of permeate and retentate. This in turn altered the solubility of the calcium salt and impacted the performance of electro microfiltration membrane. Using electric field as an enhanced cleaning-in-place (CIP) method in back flushing SSS membrane was also studied. PMID:24957615

  17. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  18. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  19. Dissolution of stainless steel in artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Lakatos-Varsnyi, M; Wegrelius, L; Olefjord, I

    1997-01-01

    Dissolution of stainless steel type 304 in artificial saliva was studied by electrochemical methods, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and atom absorption spectroscopy. The samples were polarized in the -400 mV (saturated calomel electrode) to -50 mV (saturated calomel electrode) range. The total thickness of the passive film was found to be 25 +/- 3 A, independent of the potential. The passive film consists of a duplex structure: an inner layer of (Cr0.5Fe0.5)2O3 and an outer layer of a mixture of Cr(OH)3 and (CrxFey)PO4.2H2O. The analysis indicated that 11 micrograms/cm2 of the alloying elements were dissolved during exposure for 1 year. PMID:9197105

  20. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  1. THE CLEANING OF 303 STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2004-04-20

    The sulfur found on the surfaces of stainless steel 303 (SS303) after nitric acid passivation originated from the MnS inclusions in the steel. The nitric acid attacked and dissolved these MnS inclusions, and redeposited micron-sized elemental sulfur particles back to the surface. To develop an alternative passivation procedure for SS303, citric and phosphoric acids have been evaluated. The experimental results show neither acid causes a significant amount of sulfur deposit. Thus, these two acids can be used as alternatives to nitric acid passivation for NIF applications. For SS303 previously passivated by nitric acid, NaOH soak can be used as a remedial cleaning process to effectively remove the sulfur deposits.

  2. Dendritic inhomogeneity of stainless maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnikova, S.I.; Drobot, A.V.; Shmelev, A.Y.; Vukelich, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated dendritic inhomogeneity in industrial ingots 630 mm (steel I) in diameter and 500 mm (steel II) in diameter. The variation in the degree of dendritic inhomogeneity was investigated over the height of the ingots and across the sections on an MS-46 microprobe. It was established that the elements can be placed in the following order in accordance with the degree of reduction in the liquation factor: titanium, molybdenum, nickel, chromium, and cobalt. Titanium and molybdenum exhibit forward liquation in both steels, and chromium in steel II. The distribution of nickel and chromium in the steel I ingots and cobalt in the steel II ingots is unconventional. Dendritic inhomogeneity, which must be considered in assigning the heat treatment for finished articles, develops during the crystallization of stainless maraging steels.

  3. Ductility of stabilized ferritic stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. B.; Eagar, T. W.

    1980-02-01

    An investigation was made into the mechanism of ductility loss in low interstitial 18 Cr-2Mo ferritic stainless steel welds stabilized with Ti and Nb. It was found that stabilizing TiN or Nb(C,N) precipitates are dissolved during the welding process, resulting in a finer distribution of precipitates in the weld metal than in the base metal. Furthermore, the FATT was found to increase by more than 200C, leading to decreased room temperature ductility. Such an increase in FATT may not be explained solely in terms of grain growth. Internal friction measurements indicate that no free nitrogen is present in the weld metal, yet wet chemical analysis reveals that the nitrogen is present in a soluble form. Kinetic arguments suggest that the stabilized nitrogen dissolved during welding tends to reprecipitate during solidification in the form of a chromium rich nitride phase.

  4. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  5. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  6. Fireside carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mirabal, E.; Molina, C.; Mayorga, A.; Hau, J.L.

    1999-11-01

    Most heavy Venezuelan crudes are recognized for having a high total acid number (TAN) that is usually associated with a high tendency to produce naphthenic acid corrosion. To resist this type of corrosion in vacuum heaters, 9Cr-1Mo steel and stainless steels containing molybdenum are usually recommended. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service, and just one year after undergoing the last turnaround inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 C (1250 F). Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023 O/O).Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur due to asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures.

  7. 75 FR 81309 - Stainless Steel Plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-376 and 379 and 731-TA-788, 790-793 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel... stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate... steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and/or the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel...

  8. The corrosion of some stainless steels in a marine mud

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Campbell, H.S.

    1999-11-01

    The report presents the results for three alloys: carbon steel, 316L stainless steel and a proprietary super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760), exposed in a marine mud off the south coast of England for 5 years. Analysis of the mud showed it to be very aggressive using a corrosion index developed at the University of Manchester. Carbon steel showed a typical corrosion rate for microbial attack with pits up to 0.64mm deep. The 316L stainless steel had extensive broad, shallow attack with a few, deeper pits. The Z100 parent pipe and weldments showed no evidence of corrosion attack.

  9. Subcascade formation ratio in neutron-irradiated stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Satoh, Y.; Huang, S. S.; Horiki, M.; Sato, K.; Xu, Q.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy-particle irradiation in metals produces cascade damage. If the particle energy is high enough, a cascade is divided into subcascades. In each subcascade, a vacancy rich area is surrounded by an interstitial area. Vacancy clusters are expected to form directly in the vacancy rich area. In this study, the vacancy cluster formation ratio in subcascades was estimated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy in commercial stainless steels and their model alloys. The vacancy cluster formation ratio was 1.710-3 and 9.110-5 in austenitic stainless steel and ferritic/martensitic stainless steel, respectively

  10. Void coalescence in core/alloy nanoparticles with stainless interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjie; Maye, Mathew M

    2014-01-29

    The oxidation properties of nanoparticles with core/alloy microstructure and stainless steel like interfaces is described. In particular, 15-nm Fe/FeCr nanoparticles with a stainless steel like interface are prepared. These particles show a unique morphological transformation that is induced by surface oxidation, oxide passivation, and vacancy coalescence. This Kirkendall diffusion results in a tailorable oxide layer thickness, Fe-core size, as well as void size and symmetry. Much like the interface of bulk stainless steel, the interfacial FeCr oxide passivates oxidation, resulting in self-limited diffusion. Because of this, a highly uniform and stable core-void-shell morphology is observed. PMID:23881842

  11. An examination of chromium substitution in stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floreen, S.

    1982-11-01

    A series of lower Cr stainless steels containing various levels of Mo, Si, Cu, V, N, and Ni were examined. In less severe environments it was possible to achieve corrosion resistance comparable to 18-8 type stainless steels in alloys containing about 9 pct Cr, along with additions of Ni, Mo, Cu, and V. The hot working behavior, weldability, and mechanical properties appear comparable to conventional grades of stainless. Alloys of this type could be used in decorative, aqueous, and some industrial applications, but should not be adequate for more severe environments.

  12. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  13. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  14. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  15. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Care for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. Traditionally, these components have been fabricated using expensive materials such as light weight titanium alloys, polymeric composite materials and carbon-carbon composites. The present study investigates the use of P sandwich foam fan blade made up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by a foam core. The resulting structure possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. Since the face sheets carry the applied bending loads, the sandwich architecture is a viable engineering concept. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of the sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and P detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of skin thickness and core volume %re presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  16. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  17. An in vitro investigation of the anodic polarization and capacitance behavior of 316-L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Pollack, S R; Korostoff, E

    1976-09-01

    Determinations were made of how the corrosion-resistant properties of the passive film on 316-L stainless steel are influenced by the material's mechanical and surface states, and the variable pH and PO2 conditions of the interstitial fluid. Cold-rolled and annealed specimens were surface-prepared, commercially and in the laboratory, respectively, as if for orthopedic implantation. Passive film behavior was studied by the anodic polarization and pulse-potentiostatic capacitance methods. The pH and PO2 of the Ringer's test solution were varied to include interstitial fluid values occurring postoperatively and onto recovery. The anodic polarization behavior of all specimens was found to be pH- and PO2-independent. Breakdown potentials of annealed specimens were 800-950 mV (SCE), in contrast to previously reported values of approximately 350 mV. This substantial increase is related to the influence of surface preparation and, in particular, to the optimization of electropolishing time which acts to produce a microscopically smooth surface, free of debris and disarrayed material. Capacitance behavior of annealed material for potentials greater than 400 mV was consistent with a model involving the entry of chloride and metal ions (mostly Fe) into the passive film. This entry is related to the onset of pitting. PMID:10307

  18. Role of structural orientation on the susceptibility of 2205 duplex stainless steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharrfeddin, A.; Musa, S. M.; Elshawesh, F. M.

    2012-09-01

    Relationship between the microstructure directionality of delta ferrite and austenite islands and the crack morphology, crack velocity and time to failure of the mechanically notched duplex stainless samples tested in hydrogen bearing environment was assessed in aqueous solution of 3.5% seawater. A number of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel samples were mechanically notched in perpendicular and transverse directions with respect to the austenite and ferrite rolling direction were subjected to slow tensile strain at 21.2 nm/s while undergoing cathodic charging in aqueous solution of 3.5% seawater. In order to assess the role of hydrogen content on embrittlement the hydrogen charging was conducted at various cathodic potentials of -800 mV/SCE to -1300 mV/SCE at two different pH (6.7 and 3.5). Generally, the longitudinal samples showed lower susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement compared with the transverse samples. The results also confirm that long austenite island can act as an obstacle for propagated crack owing to its low diffusivity and high solubility to the hydrogen.

  19. Cryogenic coefficient of thermal expansion measurements of type 440 and 630 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cease, H.; Alvarez, M.; Flaugher, B.; Montes, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is now installed on the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is cooled to 170K using a closed loop two-phase liquid nitrogen system. A submerged centrifugal pump is used to circulate the liquid from the base of the telescope to the camera in the prime focus cage. As part of the pump maintenance schedule, the rotor shaft bearings are periodically replaced. Common bearing and shaft materials are type 440 and 630 (17-4 PH) stainless steel. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials used is needed to predict the shaft and bearing housing dimensional changes at the 77K pump operating temperature. The thermal expansion from room temperature to 77K of type 440 and 630 stainless steel is presented . Measurements are performed using the ASTM E228 standard with a quartz push-rod dilatometer test stand. Aluminum 6061-T6 is used to calibrate the test stand.

  20. Bioactivity evaluation of titanium/hydroxyapatite composite coating on stainless steel prepared by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Nurul Humaira; Talari, Mahesh Kumar; Koong, Chue Keen

    2015-08-01

    In this study, titanium powder mixed with different wt % of HA was coated on stainless steel (SS) substrate using high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique to produce composite coating for biomedical applications. As the addition of HA is expected to influence the bioactivity of the coatings, these coatings were investigated for bioactivity by immersing the samples in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 14 days. The apatite growth rate was evaluated by measuring Ca and P concentration in the SBF using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The concentrations of Ca and P have decreased over time in the SBF, suggesting a bone like apatite precipitation on the sample surface. It was observed that pH value increased with the increase of immersion time during initial three days and a subsequent drop after 7 days. Microstructure analysis done using FESEM technique showed nucleation and growth of bone-like apatite on the surface of the coating.

  1. Nanotextured stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biological response in coronary stenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Chandini C.; Prabhath, Anupama; Cherian, Aleena Mary; Vadukumpully, Sajini; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Chennazhi, Krishnaprasad; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-12-01

    Nanosurface engineering of metallic substrates for improved cellular response is a persistent theme in biomaterials research. The need to improve the long term prognosis of commercially available stents has led us to adopt a `polymer-free' approach which is cost effective and industrially scalable. In this study, 316L stainless steel substrates were surface modified by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline pH, with and without the addition of a chromium precursor, to generate a well adherent uniform nanotopography. The modified surfaces showed improved hemocompatibility and augmented endothelialization, while hindering the proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Moreover, they also exhibited superior material properties like corrosion resistance, surface integrity and reduced metal ion leaching. The combination of improved corrosion resistance and selective vascular cell viability provided by nanomodification can be successfully utilized to offer a cell-friendly solution to the inherent limitations pertinent to bare metallic stents.

  2. Corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    Present study relates to the corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel (SS) as a construction material for the effluent treatment plant (ETP). Accordingly, immersion test and electrochemical polarization tests were performed on SS 304 L, 316 L and duplex 2205 in paper mill effluent and synthetic effluent. This paper presents electrochemical polarization measurements, performed for the first time to the best of the authors' information, to see the influence of chlorophenols on the corrosivity of effluents. The corrosivity of the effluent was observed to increase with the decrease in pH and increase in Cl- content while the addition of SO4- tends to inhibit corrosion. Mill effluent was found to be more corrosive as compared to synthetic effluent and has been attributed to the presence of various chlorophenols. Corrosion performance of SS was observed to govern by the presence of Cr, Mo and N contents. PMID:25188842

  3. Kinetics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to 304 and 316-L stainless steel: role of cell surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhaecke, E; Remon, J P; Moors, M; Raes, F; De Rudder, D; Van Peteghem, A

    1990-01-01

    Fifteen different isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to study the kinetics of adhesion to 304 and 316-L stainless steel. Stainless steel plates were incubated with approximately 1.5 X 10(7) CFU/ml in 0.01 M phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4). After the plates were rinsed with the buffer, the number of adhering bacteria was determined by a bioluminescence assay. Measurable adhesion, even to the electropolished surfaces, occurred within 30 s. Bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity, as determined by the bacterial adherence to hydrocarbons test and the contact angle measurement test, was the major parameter influencing the adhesion rate constant for the first 30 min of adhesion. A parabolic relationship between the CAM values and the logarithm of the adhesion rate constants (In k) was established. No correlation between either the salt aggregation or the improved salt aggregation values and the bacterial adhesion rate constants could be found. Since there was no significant correlation between the bacterial electrophoretic mobilities and the In k values, the bacterial cell surface charge seemed of minor importance in the process of adhesion of P. aeruginosa to 304 and 316-L stainless steel. PMID:2107796

  4. The role of environmental and metallurgical variables on the resistance of duplex stainless steels to sulphide SCC

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.

    1997-08-01

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are widely used by the Oil and Gas industry for handling slightly sour process fluids. These alloys have limits, beyond which sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) is likely. In NACE MR0175 the operating limits of alloys are usually defined by a maximum hardness and an H{sub 2}S limit. For one or two alloys another parameter may also be specified. The present paper has collected together a body of evidence, some of it previously unpublished, to show that the susceptibility to SSCC depends on a number of environmental variables, i.e. temperature, chloride, pH and H{sub 2}S, as well as several metallurgical variables e.g. microstructure and degree of cold work. The data for one alloy, a proprietary super duplex stainless steel, is used to show how these variables inter-relate, and where the alloy may be safely used. The results clearly show that NACE MR0175 is inadequate for specifying the limits of use of a duplex or super duplex stainless steel. The authors suggest that where an alloy is though likely to be useful and the conditions are outside the scope of MR0175, testing as specified in the European Federation of Corrosion document on CRA`s (Publication No. 17), should be carried out.

  5. Machining-induced deformation in stepped specimens of PH 13-8 Mo, 18 nickel maraging steel grade 200T1 and grain-refined HP 9-4-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study to evaluate the dimensional changes created during machining and subsequent cycling to cryogenic temperatures for three different metallic alloys are presented. Experimental techniques are described and results presented for 18 Ni Grade 200 maraging steel, PH-13-8 Mo stainless steel, and Grain-refined HP 9-4-20.

  6. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  7. High-strength stainless steels for corrosion mitigation in prestressed concrete: Development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Robert D.

    Corrosion of prestressing reinforcement in concrete structures exposed to marine environments and/or deicing chemicals is a problem of critical concern. While many corrosion mitigation technologies are available for reinforced concrete (RC), those available for use in prestressed concrete (PSC) are limited and in many cases cannot provide the 100+ year service life needed in new construction, particularly when exposed to severe marine environments. The use of stainless steel alloys in RC structures has shown great success in mitigating corrosion in even the most severe of exposures. However, the use of high-strength stainless steels (HSSSs) for corrosion mitigation in PSC structures has received limited attention. To address these deficiencies in knowledge, an experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using HSSSs for corrosion mitigation in PSC. The study examined mechanical behavior, corrosion resistance, and techniques for the production of HSSS prestressing strands. Stainless steel grades 304, 316, 2101, 2205, 2304, and 17-7 were produced as cold drawn wires with diameters of approximately 4 mm (0.16 in). A 1080 prestressing steel was also included to serve as a control. Tensile strengths of 1250 to 1550 MPa (181 to 225 ksi) were achieved in the cold-drawn candidate HSSSs. Non-ductile failure modes with no post-yield strain hardening were observed in all candidate HSSSs. 1000 hr stress relaxation of all candidate HSSSs was predicted to be between 6 and 8 % based on the results of 200 hr tests conducted at 70 % of the ultimate tensile strength. Residual stresses due to the cold drawing had a significant influence on stress vs. strain behavior and stress relaxation. Electrochemical corrosion testing found that in solutions simulating alkaline concrete, all candidate HSSSs showed exceptional corrosion resistance at chloride (Cl-) concentrations from zero to 0.25 M. However, when exposed to solutions simulating carbonated concrete, corrosion resistance was reduced and the only candidate HSSSs with acceptable corrosion resistance were duplex grades 2205 and 2304, with 2205 being resistant to corrosion initiation at Cl- concentrations of up to 1.0 M (twice the Cl- concentration in seawater). A strong correlation between microstructural defects and corrosion damage was observed in the heavily cold-drawn HSSSs. Based on these results, duplex grades 2205 and 2304 were identified as optimal HSSSs and were included in additional studies which found that: (1) 2304 is susceptible to corrosion when tested in a stranded geometry, (2) 2205 and 2304 are not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, and (3) 2205 and 2304 are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Efforts focused on the production of 2205 and 2304 prestressing strands showed that they could be produced as strands using existing ASTM A416 prestressing strand production facilities. Due to the ferromagnetic properties of 2205 and 2304, a low-relaxation heat treatment to reduce stress relaxation and improve mechanical properties was also found to be feasible. The overall conclusion of the study was that HSSSs, especially duplex grades 2205 and 2304, show excellent promise to mitigate corrosion if utilized as prestressing reinforcement in PSC structures exposed to severe marine environments.

  8. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  9. Stainless Steel in Waste Packages for TSPA-SR

    SciTech Connect

    C.D. Leigh

    2000-06-12

    The objective of the calculation is to determine how commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) stainless-steel clad assemblies are distributed over the CSNF waste packages (WPs) in the Yucca Mountain repository. The calculation defines the number of CSNF WPs that will contain stainless-steel clad assemblies, and the stainless steel content, on average, in those WPs for the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR). Cladding models for TSPA-SR for stainless-steel clad assemblies differ from the models used for zirconium-clad assemblies. The information derived in this calculation helps to determine how the-cladding models are applied to WPs in TSPA-SR. The calculation addresses the WP configurations for CSNF defined in an interoffice correspondence from E.P. Stroupe to D.R. Wilkins (Stroupe 2000) and shown in Table 1.

  10. Steam oxidation of boron carbide-stainless steel liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, C.

    2012-08-01

    In the framework of nuclear reactor core meltdown accidents studies, the oxidation kinetics of boron carbide-stainless steel liquid mixtures exposed to argon/steam atmospheres was investigated at temperatures up to 1527 °C. A B-Cr-Si-O liquid protective layer forms on the surface of the mixtures in contact with steam. This protective layer gradually transforms into a Cr2O3-rich slag. Important quantities of liquid can be projected from the melt during oxidation. These projections are favoured by high B4C contents in the melt, high steam partial pressures and low temperatures. In addition to stainless steel-boron carbide melts, simpler compositions (pure 304L stainless steel, iron-boron, iron-boron carbide and stainless steel-boron) were studied, in order to identify the basic oxidation mechanisms.

  11. Fabrication of stainless steel clad tubing. [gas pressure bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of producing stainless steel clad carbon steel tubing by a gas pressure bonding process was evaluated. Such a tube product could provide substantial chromium savings over monolithic stainless tubing in the event of a serious chromium shortage. The process consists of the initial assembly of three component tubesets from conventionally produced tubing, the formation of a strong metallurgical bond between the three components by gas pressure bonding, and conventional cold draw and anneal processing to final size. The quality of the tubes produced was excellent from the standpoint of bond strength, mechanical, and forming properties. The only significant quality problem encountered was carburization of the stainless clad by the carbon steel core which can be overcome by further refinement through at least three different approaches. The estimated cost of clad tubing produced by this process is greater than that for monolithic stainless tubing, but not so high as to make the process impractical as a chromium conservation method.

  12. Systems design of high performance stainless steels II. Prototype characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. E.; Olson, G. B.

    2000-10-01

    Within the framework of a systems approach, the design of a high performance stainless steel integrated processing/structure/property/performance relations with mechanistic computational models. Using multicomponent thermodynamic and diffusion software platforms, the models were integrated to design a carburizable, secondary-hardening, martensitic stainless steel for advanced gear and bearing applications. Prototype evaluation confirmed the predicted martensitic transformation temperature and the desired carburizing and tempering responses, achieving a case hardness of R c 64 in the secondary-hardened condition without case primary carbides. Comparison with a commercial carburizing stainless steel demonstrated the advantage of avoiding primary carbides to resist quench cracking associated with a martensitic start temperature gradient reversal. Based on anodic polarization measurements and salt-spray testing, the prototype composition exhibited superior corrosion resistance in comparison to the 440C stainless bearing steel, which has a significantly higher alloy Cr concentration.

  13. In vivo behavior of a high performance duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; De Santis, G; Gatti, A M; Roos, A; Zaffe, D

    1993-01-01

    An in vivo investigation of a new high molybdenum and nitrogen duplex stainless steel (25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N) has been performed. Cylindrical pins and specially developed devices, to test in static conditions the in vivo localized corrosion resistance, made of this new duplex steel and of a common austenitic stainless steel were implanted in rabbit's femurs for 6 and 12 months. After sacrifice, SEM observations and EDS microanalyses to detect metallic ion release were carried out on the femur sections surrounding the pins. Morphologic observations with stereoscope and SEM were performed on the metallic surfaces of the special devices in order to detect the presence of localized corrosion. Both ion release and localized corrosion were observed for the specimens made of austenitic stainless steel, but not for those made of 25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N duplex stainless steel. PMID:10148344

  14. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  15. Electrolytic etching process provides effective bonding surface on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Electrolytic etching process prepares surfaces of a stainless steel shell for reliable, high strength adhesive bonding to dielectric materials. The process uses a 25 percent aqueous solution of phosphoric acid.

  16. Assessment of thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for assessing thermal embrittlement and predicting Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness J-R curve of cast stainless steel components under Light Water Reactor operating conditions from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Fracture properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. A common ``predicted lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  17. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yawas, D. S.; Aku, S. Y.; Aluko, S. O.

    The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 10-5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 10-5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  18. Stainless-steel elbows formed by spin forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Large seamless austenitic stainless steel elbows are fabricated by spin forging /rotary shear forming/. A specially designed spin forging tool for mounting on a hydrospin machine has been built for this purpose.

  19. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES THAT INTRODUCED SMOKE INTO UNIT; FLOOR IS UNPAINTED STEEL - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  20. 27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF WASHINGTON, MISSOURI. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TOWARD VAULT OF THE TWELVE APOSTLES - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  1. Field experience with stainless steel materials in seawater systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strandmyr, O.; Hagerup, O.

    1998-12-31

    Stainless steels are an important group of materials for seawater systems. This group of materials, including high alloyed austenitic and superduplex type materials, was primarily introduced with the aim to reduce maintenance costs involved with materials as carbon steel with internal linings and coatings. However, on some offshore platforms the leak frequency in seawater stainless steel piping systems has been high resulting in unacceptable maintenance costs. This study has evaluated the field experience with stainless steel materials in seawater systems at three company operated offshore platforms in the North Sea area. Variables as specifications, qualification test criteria, quality and operating conditions have been evaluated. In addition, actual material samples from the involved field installations have been tested for corrosion resistance and have been metallographically examined. The findings from this study will be further evaluated for implementation both in material standards and in quality control strategies for deliveries and installation of high alloyed stainless steels for new projects.

  2. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  3. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  4. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  5. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  6. Measurement of intergranular attack in stainless steel using ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Mott, Gerry; Attaar, Mustan; Rishel, Rick D.

    1989-08-08

    Ultrasonic test methods are used to measure the depth of intergranular attack (IGA) in a stainless steel specimen. The ultrasonic test methods include a pitch-catch surface wave technique and a through-wall pulse-echo technique. When used in combination, these techniques can establish the extent of IGA on both the front and back surfaces of a stainless steel specimen from measurements made on only one surface.

  7. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  8. Performance of ferritic stainless steels for automobile muffler corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tarutani, Y.; Hashizume, T.

    1995-11-01

    Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steels was studied in artificial exhaust gas condensates containing corrosive ions such as Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Continuous immersion tests in flasks and Dip and Dry tests by using the alternate corrosion tester with a heating system clarified the effects of chromium and molybdenum additions on the corrosion resistance of a ferritic stainless steel in the artificial exhaust gas condensates. Effects of surface oxidation on the corrosion behavior were investigated in a temperature range of 573K to 673K. Oxidation of 673K reduced the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels in the artificial environment of the automobile muffler. Particulate matter deposited on the muffler inner shell from the automobile exhaust gas was also examined. Deposited particulate matter increased the corrosion rate of the ferritic stainless steel. Finally, the authors also investigated the corrosion of the automobile mufflers made of Type 436L ferritic stainless steel with 18% chromium-1.2% molybdenum after 24 months, in Japan. The sets of results clarified that Type 436L ferritic stainless steel as the material for the automobile muffler exhibited acceptable corrosion resistance.

  9. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

  10. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

  11. pH of estuarine waters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The emf measurements for the TRIS buffer in seawater have been used to define buffer solutions that can be used to determine the pH on a free or total proton scale for estuarine waters. The pH is related to the stoichiometric dissociation constant (K*) of TRISH/sup +/, the concentration of buffer (m/sub TRIS/) and salinity (S). An electrode system with liquid junction was used to measure these buffers to compare the various pH scales.

  12. Coal slurry pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1995-12-01

    Coal slurry pH values can be used to characterize coals. pH values depend on the coal, time since slurry preparation, contact with gas atmosphere, particle size, and stirring. Measured values reflect a sequence of reactions including: carbon dioxide absorption by water from the air, wetting of the coal (pH may be affected by the elemental composition of the mineral matter), and further equilibration with species in the water. The pH initially drops as carbon dioxide is absorbed, then rapidly increases as the coal is wetted, and then slowly decreases as some reactions with species in the water take place.

  13. Coal slurry pH studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal slurry pH values can be used to characterize coals. pH values depend on the coal, time since slurry preparation, contact with gas atmosphere, particle size, and stirring. Measured values reflect a sequence of reactions probably including: carbon dioxide absorption by water from the air, wetting of the coal (pH may be affected by the elemental composition of the mineral matter), and further equilibration with species in the water. The pH initially drops as carbon dioxide is absorbed, then rapidly increases as the coal is wetted, and then slowly decreases as some reactions with species in the water take place.

  14. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J. (San Jose, CA)

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  15. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  16. Laminar inclusions of duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.E.

    1993-12-31

    Duplex Stainless Steel have been utilized in the offshore petrochemical industries for over twenty years. The steels are normally manufactured to produce a 50:50 duplex austenitic and ferritic microstructure. The microstructure yields the benefits of high strength, corrosion resistance and low thermal expansion. While constructing a high pressure header box for an air cooled heat exchanger, linear indications were observed along the weld preparation faces. These laminations were parallel to the plate surfaces, reminiscent to oxide inclusions found in carbon steel plates manufactured 20 years ago. Concern over premature failure at the highly stressed corner joints resulted in the rejection of the plates. A metallurgical investigation followed. From scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray, the indications were shown to be rich in Cr, Mn and Si. The inclusions occurred during steel manufacturing and were most likely due to incorrect removal of oxides at the top of the ingot and/or the exclusion of a secondary remelting process. New plates were ordered with tighter production controls on steel processing. The plates were ultrasonically inspected prior to fabrication and no further problems were discovered.

  17. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  18. Corrosion of stainless steel during acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, J.S.; Lester, G.C.

    1996-07-01

    Corrosion of types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L stainless steel (SS) during the esterification of acetic acid and alcohol or glycol ether was investigated. The catalyst for this reaction, sulfuric acid or para-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA), was shown to cause more corrosion on reactor equipment than CH{sub 3}COOH under the process conditions commonly practiced in industry. The corrosive action of the catalyst occurred only in the presence of water. Thus, for the batch processes, corrosion occurred mostly during the initial stage of esterification, where water produced by the reaction created an aqueous environment. After water was distilled off, the corrosion rate declined to a negligible value. The corrosion inhibitor copper sulfate, often used in industrial acetate processes, was found to work well for a low-temperature process (< 95 C) such as in production of butyl acetate, but it accelerated corrosion in the glycol ether acetate processes where temperatures were > 108 C. Process conditions that imparted low corrosion rates were determined.

  19. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  20. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining.

  1. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  2. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  3. The dimensional stability analysis of seventeen stepped specimens of 18Ni 200 grade, PH13-8Mo and A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the results of a dimensional stability analysis of seventeen stepped specimens that were used in the evaluation of factors influencing warpage in metallic alloys being used for cryogenic wind tunnel models. Specimens used in the analysis were manufactured from 18Ni 200 Grade Maaraging steel, PH13-8Mo, and A-286 stainless steel. Quantitative data are provided on the behavior of the specimens due to the effects of both machining and cryogenic cycling effects.

  4. Response to the "Responsive PhD"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyssen, David

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, 50 graduate school deans gathered at Princeton to address the fact that the number of new PhDs conferred each year far exceeds the number of tenure-track academic jobs on offer. Under the auspices of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's Responsive PhD Project, these deans spoke passionately about how American…

  5. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a

  6. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  7. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Normal pH: 7.25 to 7.35 Borderline pH: 7.20 to 7.25 The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ...

  8. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  9. Response to the "Responsive PhD"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyssen, David

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, 50 graduate school deans gathered at Princeton to address the fact that the number of new PhDs conferred each year far exceeds the number of tenure-track academic jobs on offer. Under the auspices of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's Responsive PhD Project, these deans spoke passionately about how American

  10. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePLUS

    The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the kidneys to send acid to the urine when there is too much acid in the ... Urine with a pH less than 5.3 is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different ...

  11. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  12. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  13. CALCULATING THE PH OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new expressions for the pH of saturation (pH subs) were derived. One is a simplified equation developed from an aqueous carbonate equilibrium system in which correction for ionic strength was considered. The other is a more accurate quadratic formula that involves computerize...

  14. Parameters affecting downhole pH

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Jangama, V.R.; Willmon, J.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

  15. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  16. Aging of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1984-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are evaluated to determine the expected embrittlement of cast components during the operating lifetime of reactors and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. This presentation describes the status of the program. Data for the metallurgical characterization of the various cast stainless steels used in the investigation are presented. Charpy impact tests on short-term aged material indicate that CF-3 stainless steels are less susceptible to embrittlement than CF-8 or CF-8M stainless steels. Microstructural characterization of cast stainless steels that were obtained from Georg Fischer Co. and aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400/sup 0/C reveals the formation of four different types of precipitates that are not ..cap alpha..'. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase is primarily due to pinning of the dislocations by two of these precipitates, designated as Type M and Type X. The ferrite phase is embrittled after approx. 8 y at 300/sup 0/C and shows cleavage fracture. Examination of the fracture surfaces of the impact-test specimens indicates that the toughness of the long-term aged material is determined by the austenite phase. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, A. B.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Belous, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K = Cr eff - αC eff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr eff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C eff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 × 10 22 n/cm 2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC.

  18. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  19. Irradiation resistance of a nanostructured 316 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathy Rajan, P. B.; Monnet, I.; Hug, E.; Etienne, A.; Enikeev, N.; Keller, C.; Sauvage, X.; Valiev, R.; Radiguet, B.

    2014-08-01

    The reduction of grain size down to several tens or hundreds of nanometers leads to the enhancement of radiation resistance of metals. Based on this approach, the aim of the Labex EMC3 (Energy Materials and Clean Combustion Center) project "Naninox" is (1) to study the stability of the microstructure of a nanostructured 316 stainless steel under ion irradiation and (2) to link between this microstructure and the properties (corrosion resistance and the microhardness) of the steel (thanks to a better irradiation resistance, a better corrosion resistance and higher mechanical properties after irradiation are expected in the ultra-fine grained stainless steel). Ultrafine grained 316L austenitic stainless steel samples have been produced by high pressure torsion (HPT) at 430C and then ion irradiated in Jannus facilities (CEA Saclay) at 450C and 5 displacements per atoms (dpa). Their microstructure is characterized before and after irradiation by atom probe tomography, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Corrosion behavior in NaCl solution is tested and nano-indentation tests are performed. The first results obtained by atom probe tomography described in this paper indicate that the microstructure of ultrafine grain 316 austenitic stainless steel is more stable under irradiation than the microstructure of a coarse grain 316 austenitic stainless steel.

  20. Investigation of the diffusion kinetics of borided stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayali, Yusuf

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the kinetics of borides formed on AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels was investigated. Boronizing treatment was carried out using Ekabor-II powders at the processing temperatures of 1123, 1173 and 1223 K for 2, 4 and 6 h. The phases of the boride layers of borided AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were FeB, Fe2B, CrB and NiB, respectively. The thickness of the boride layer formed on the borided steels ranged from 4.6 to 64 μm depending on the boriding temperature, boriding time and alloying elements of the stainless steels. Depending on the chemical composition, temperature and layer thickness, the activation energies of boron in AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were found to be 206.161, 234.641 and 222.818 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics of growth of the boride layers formed on the AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels and the thickness of the boride layers were investigated.

  1. Sintered Intermetallic Reinforced 434L Ferritic Stainless Steel Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, A.; Balaji, S.

    2009-03-01

    The present study examines the effect of aluminide (Ni3Al, Fe3Al) additions on the sintering behavior of ferritic 434L stainless steels during solid-state sintering (SSS) and supersolidus liquid-phase sintering (SLPS). 434L stainless steel matrix composites containing 5 and 10 wt pct of each aluminide were consolidated at 1200 C (SSS) and 1400 C (SLPS). The effects of sintering and aluminide additions on the densification, microstructural evolution, mechanical, tribological, and corrosion behavior of sintered ferritic (434L) stainless steels were investigated. The performances of the 434L-aluminide composites were compared with the straight 434L stainless steels processed at similar conditions. Supersolidus sintering resulted in significant improvement in densification, mechanical, wear, and corrosion resistance in both straight 434L and 434L-aluminide composites. Fe3Al additions to 434L stainless steels result in improved wear resistance without significant degradation of corrosion resistance in 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution.

  2. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; Dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-10-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  3. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrcia Campos; Arajo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Jnior, Jos Felcio; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nlio Jos

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  4. Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steel with 15wt% chromium for the automobile exhaust system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-bing; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Feng, Hao; Zhu, Hong-chun; Sun, Bin-han; Li, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    The effect of chloride ion concentration, pH value, and grain size on the pitting corrosion resistance of a new ferritic stainless steel with 15wt% Cr was investigated using the anodic polarization method. The semiconducting properties of passive films with different chloride ion concentrations were performed using capacitance measurement and Mott-Schottky analysis methods. The aging precipitation and intergranular corrosion behavior were evaluated at 400-900C. It is found that the pitting potential decreases when the grain size increases. With the increase in chloride ion concentration, the doping density and the flat-bland potential increase but the thickness of the space charge layer decreases. The pitting corrosion resistance increases rapidly with the decrease in pH value. Precipitants is identified as Nb(C,N) and NbC, rather than Cr-carbide. The intergranular corrosion is attributed to the synergistic effects of Nb(C,N) and NbC precipitates and Cr segregation adjacent to the precipitates.

  5. Structure and Long-Term Stability of Alkylphosphonic Acid Monolayers on SS316L Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Kosian, Medea; Smulders, Maarten M J; Zuilhof, Han

    2016-02-01

    Surface modification of stainless steel (SS316L) to improve surface properties or durability is an important avenue of research, as SS316L is widely used in industry and science. We studied, therefore, the formation and stability of a series of organic monolayers on SS316L under industrially relevant conditions. These included acidic (pH 3), basic (pH 11), neutral (Milli-Q water), and physiological conditions [10 mM phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)], as well as dry heating (120 C). SS316L was modified with alkylphosphonic acids of chain length (CH2)n with n varying between 3 and 18. While alkylphosphonic acids of all chain lengths formed self-assembled monolayers with hydrophobic properties, only monolayers of chain lengths 12-18 formed ordered monolayers, as evidenced by static water contact angle (SCA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). A long-term stability study revealed the excellent stability of monolayers with chain lengths 12-18 for up to 30 days in acid, neutral, and physiological solutions, and for up to 7 days under dry heating. Under strong basic conditions a partial breakdown of the monolayer was observed, especially for the shorter chain lengths. Finally, the effect of multivalent surface attachment on monolayer stability was explored by means of a series of divalent bisphosphonic acids. PMID:26771302

  6. New explosive welding technique to weld aluminum alloy and stainless steel plates using a stainless steel intermediate plate

    SciTech Connect

    Hokamoto, K.; Fujita, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Izuma, T. )

    1993-10-01

    Various aluminum alloys and stainless steel were explosively welded using a thin stainless steel intermediate plate inserted between the aluminum alloy driver and stainless steel base plates. At first. the velocity change of the driver plate with flying distance is calculated using finite-difference analysis. Since the kinetic energy lost by collision affects the amount of the fused layer generated at the interface between the aluminum alloy and stainless steel, the use of a thin stainless steel intermediate plate is effective for decreasing the energy dissipated by the collision. The interfacial zone at the welded interface is composed of a fine eutectic structure of aluminum and Fe[sub 4]Al[sub 13], and the explosive welding, process of this metal combination proceeds mainly by intensive deformation of the aluminum alloy. The weldable region for various aluminum alloys is decided by the change in collision velocity and kinetic energy lost by collision, and the weldable region is decreased with the increase in the strength of the aluminum alloy.

  7. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  8. Survey of stainless steel performance in low chloride waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, A.H.; Avery, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steel is well-known for its corrosion-resistant properties and has seen widespread application in many situations. In a special user survey of stainless steel performance, the authors examined its use in municipal potable water distribution systems, municipal potable water treatment plants, building water supply systems, wastewater treatment plants, household plumbing systems, dams, locks, and hydroelectric plants. Type 304/304L (UNS S30400/30403) and type 316/316L (UNS S31600/31603) are the principal materials used. The authors found cases of under deposit corrosion at incompletely fused circumferential welds, corrosion at brazed joints where acid chloride fluxes had been used, corrosion from excessive chlorination, corrosion from iron embedded during fabrication, and microbiological corrosion from water left standing after hydrotesting. The incidence of such problems in the approximately 70,000 tons of stainless steel currently used per year worldwide in these applications is estimated to be less than 0.01%.

  9. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of high molybdenum austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.J.B. ); Davies, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Extensive literature exists documenting laboratory and field studies of corrosion of the 300 series stainless steels by bacteria. There is, however, little data confirming similar microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of higher alloy stainless steels, which are thought by some to be immune. This paper presents a case history of a UNS NO8904 (904L) heat exchanger where marine bacterial attack was determined to be a factor in the corrosion failure. On-site sampling and testing confirmed the existence of this type of attack and developed a program of biocide treatment. Subsequent laboratory studies were undertaken to confirm the bacteria can induce and propagate pitting corrosion of a high molybdenum austenitic stainless steel.

  10. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    SciTech Connect

    Coteata, Margareta; Pop, Nicolae; Slatineanu, Laurentiu; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Besliu, Irina

    2011-05-04

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  11. Aluminum and stainless steel tubes joined by simple ring and welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townhill, A.

    1967-01-01

    Duranel ring is used to join aluminum and stainless steel tubing. Duranel is a bimetal made up of roll-bonded aluminum and stainless steel. This method of joining the tubing requires only two welding operations.

  12. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL BIOFILM ON STAINLESS STEEL BY HYPERSPECTRAL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques were investigated for detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel plates typically used to manufacture food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures consisting of nonpathogenic E. coli, Pseudo...

  13. Microstructure and texture of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2008-12-15

    The microstructure, texture and grain boundary character distribution of Nb + Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The addition of alloying elements such as Ti and Nb to ferritic stainless steel causes the formation of TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb. The textures of cold rolled samples were dominated by the {alpha}-fiber, while the textures of annealed samples exhibit a very strong {gamma}-fiber. The changes in texture are closely related to the grain boundary characteristics.

  14. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  16. Twinning-Induced Plasticity Aided High Ductile Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeom Yong; Hwang, Si Woo; Park, Kyung-Tae

    2013-02-01

    Extended ductility over 70 pct was realized in duplex stainless steel by implementing twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP). The steel also exhibited the tensile strength over 800 MPa. The steel chemistry was designed so that the stacking fault energy of austenite was high enough to induce TWIP during deformation. After the initial decrease, the strain hardening rate increased at high tensile strains above ~30 pct. The microstructures of austenite at such high strains were manifested by well-developed primary twins and nanotwins between them, which effectively block dislocation motion. This observation ensures that extended ductility and high strength of a newly designed duplex stainless steel are originated from TWIP in austenite.

  17. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Corra, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 0.2) 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 0.3) 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  18. Characterizing pre-polished Type 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.; Summer, M.E.; Rankin, W.N.

    1994-10-01

    Prepolished Type 304L stainless steel surfaces are being specified for replacement of some equipment in the 221-H Canyon Building at the Savannah River Site. A prepolished stainless steel surface picks up less contamination than a hot-rolled and pickled surface and is easier to decontaminate; therefore, less waste is generated. Surface-characterization techniques and specification for a prepolished surface were developed to ensure that prepolished items being obtained were properly electropolished. The use of this technology has resulted in obtaining prepolished items with an improved surface finish.

  19. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  20. Colorimetric Determination of pH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sheryl; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which the pH of a solution can be quantitatively measured using a spectrophotometer. The theory, experimental details, sample preparation and selection, instrumentation, and results are discussed. (CW)

  1. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  2. Preliminary Investigation of Keyhole Phenomena during Single Layer Fabrication in Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti; Nyrhilä, Olli

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is a fabrication technology that enables production of complex parts from metallic materials with mechanical properties comparable to conventionally manufactured parts. In the LAM process, parts are manufactured by melting metallic powder layer-by-layer with a laser beam. This manufacturing technology is nowadays called powder bed fusion (PBF) according to the ASTM F2792-12a standard. This strategy involves several different independent and dependent thermal cycles, all of which have an influence on the final properties of the manufactured part. The quality of PBF parts depends strongly on the characteristics of each single laser-melted track and each single layer. This study consequently concentrates on investigating the effects of process parameters such as laser power on single track and layer formation and laser-material interaction phenomena occurring during the PBF process. Experimental tests were done with two different machines: a modified research machine based on an EOS EOSINT M-series system and an EOS EOSINT M280 system. The material used was EOS stainless steel 17-4 PH. Process monitoring was done with an active illuminated high speed camera system. After microscopy analysis, it was concluded that a keyhole can form during laser additive manufacturing of stainless steel. It was noted that heat input has an important effect on the likelihood of keyhole formation. The threshold intensity value for keyhole formation of 106 W/cm2 was exceeded in all manufactured single tracks. Laser interaction time was found to have an effect on penetration depth and keyhole formation, since the penetration depth increased with increased laser interaction time. It was also concluded that active illuminated high speed camera systems are suitable for monitoring of the manufacturing process and facilitate process control.

  3. 77 FR 41754 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Postponement...'') initiated an antidumping duty investigation on drawn stainless steel sinks from the People's Republic of... determination is currently due no later than August 8, 2012. \\1\\ See Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the...

  4. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  5. 77 FR 60673 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping...'') preliminarily determines that drawn stainless steel sinks (``drawn sinks'') from the People's Republic of China... unfinished, regardless of type of finish, gauge, or grade of stainless steel. Mounting clips,...

  6. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-376 and 379 and 731-TA-788, 790-793 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel... countervailing duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan. SUMMARY:...

  7. 77 FR 18211 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... International Trade Administration Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Initiation...'') petition concerning imports of drawn stainless steel sinks from the People's Republic of China (``PRC... Antidumping and Countervailing Duties Against Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's Republic of...

  8. 75 FR 67689 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Brazil. See Antidumping Duty Orders: Stainless Steel Bar from Brazil, India and Japan, 60 FR 9661... Less Than Fair Value: Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, 59 FR 66914 (December 28, 1994). These deposit..., 75 FR 15679 (March 30, 2010). \\1\\ Carpenter Technology Corporation, Valbruna Slater Stainless,...

  9. 76 FR 50495 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan Determinations On the.... 1675(c)), that revocation of the countervailing duty order on stainless steel plate from South Africa and revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Korea,...

  10. 78 FR 34644 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium...: Scope of the Order The product covered by this order is certain stainless steel plate in...

  11. 77 FR 39467 - Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ...: Stainless Steel Bar from India, 59 FR 66915 (December 28, 1994). These cash deposit requirements, when... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From India: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty... the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from India. The...

  12. 75 FR 81217 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Full Sunset Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Full... review of the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on certain stainless steel plate in coils from Belgium... June 2, 2010, the Department initiated the second sunset review of the CVD order on stainless...

  13. 75 FR 62624 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States-Final Antidumping Measures on Stainless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Measures on Stainless Steel from Mexico AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION... Stainless Steel from Mexico to a panel. The request may be found at http://www.wto.org in document WT/DS344... Stainless Steel from Mexico. The recommendations and rulings stem from the DSB's adoption of the panel...

  14. 76 FR 1599 - Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Less Than Fair Value: Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil, 59 FR 66914 (December 28, 1994). These deposit... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Bar From Brazil: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... results of its administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel bar from Brazil....

  15. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet and Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Taiwan AGENCY... five-year reviews concerning the countervailing duty order on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel sheet and strip from Germany, Italy,...

  16. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan (53 FR 9787). On February 23, 1993, Commerce issued an antidumping duty order on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Korea (58 FR... on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (65 FR...

  17. 76 FR 31585 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of... stainless steel flanges from India. The period of review is February 1, 2010, through January 22, 2011... stainless steel flanges from India. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or...

  18. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  19. Characteristics of Interdiffusion between 17-4 PH Steel and Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laik, A.; Gawde, P. S.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Kale, G. B.

    2008-04-01

    The characteristics of interdiffusion between precipitation-hardened 17-4 PH grade stainless steel and nickel were studied in the temperature range of 900 C to 1100 C, using diffusion couples of these two materials. The diffusion coefficients of the major diffusing elements Fe, Ni, Cr, and Cu were evaluated for this multicomponent system. The diffusion paths plotted on the Fe-Ni-Cr isotherm showed a flat S shape, suggesting insignificant interaction among the diffusing species. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients for each element was evaluated, and the activation energies for diffusion were determined. The asymmetric nature of concentration variation of the elements at the diffusion zone was observed and was explained by the difference in diffusivities of the diffusing species. The activation energy for diffusion of Ni was found to be lower than that of Fe and Cr.

  20. The influence of saliva pH value on the retention and durability of bar-clip attachments

    PubMed Central

    Aroso, Carlos; Ustrell, Raul; Braga, Ana Cristina; Mendes, Jose Manuel; Escuin, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the durability and retention of 4 types of attachments placed over computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) titanium bars when subjected to different pH conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four commercially available attachments were investigated: Hader Yellow, Hader Red, Ackerman Gold and Ackerman Stainless Steel. These attachments and Ackerman CAD/CAM titanium bars were placed in 2 vessels containing different artificial saliva solutions (pH 7/pH 4) at 37? for one month to simulate corrosion conditions, and they were then subjected to mechanical testing (5400 cycles of insertion and removal). RESULTS The results revealed that there were significant differences in the average values of insertion/removal force due to the pH (F (1, 24)=9.207, P<.05) and the type of attachment (F (3, 24)=11.742, P<.05). CONCLUSION More acidic pH values were found to have a negative influence on the retention capacity of the attachments. PMID:25722835

  1. An investigation of the typical corrosion parameters used to test polymer electrolyte fuel cell bipolar plate coatings, with titanium nitride coated stainless steel as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, A.; Kongstein, O. E.; Hamilton, P. J.; Oedegaard, A.; Svenum, I. H.; Cooke, K.

    2015-07-01

    Stainless steel bipolar plates (BPP) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have good manufacturability, durability and low costs, but inadequate corrosion resistance and elevated interfacial contact resistance (ICR) in the fuel cell environment. Thin film coatings of titanium nitride (TiN) of 1 ?m in thickness, were deposited by means of physical vapour deposition (PVD) process on to stainless steel (SS) 316L substrates and were evaluated, in a series of tests, for their level of corrosion protection and ICR. In the ex-situ corrosion tests, variables such as applied potential, experimental duration and pH of the sulphate electrolyte at 80 C were altered. The ICR values were found to increase after exposure to greater applied potentials and electrolytes of a higher pH. In terms of experimental duration, the ICR increased most rapidly at the beginning of each experiment. It was also found that the oxidation of TiN was accelerated after exposure to electrolytes of a higher pH. When coated BPPs were incorporated into an accelerated fuel cell test, the degradation of the fuel cell cathode resembled the plates that were tested at the highest anodic potential (1.4 VSHE).

  2. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH<6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470nm and emission at 550nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505nm and emission at 600nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9<pH<7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5<pH<5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference. PMID:25969385

  3. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Mechanical properties of four RSP stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, G.E.

    1996-12-01

    Four austenitic stainless steel alloys were processed by consolidating rapidly solidified gas atomized power using hot extrusion. These materials were characterized by measuring grain growth, hardness, tensile properties from 24 to 800{degrees}C, and creep-rupture at 600{degrees}C.

  5. Laser heat treatment of welds for various stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontu, O.; Ganatsios, S.; Alexandrescu, N.; Predescu, C.

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents a study concerning the post - weld heat treatment of a duplex stainless steel. Welded joint samples were surface - treated using the same laser source adopted during welding in order to counterbalance the excess of ferrite formed in the welding process.

  6. Simplified Estimation of Tritium Inventory in Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Willms, R. Scott

    2005-07-15

    An important part of tritium facility waste management is estimating the residual tritium inventory in stainless steel. This was needed as part of the decontamination and decommissioning associated with the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In particular, the disposal path for three, large tanks would vary substantially depending on the tritium inventory in the stainless steel walls. For this purpose the time-dependant diffusion equation was solved using previously measured parameters. These results were compared to previous work that measured the tritium inventory in the stainless steel wall of a 50-L tritium container. Good agreement was observed. These results are reduced to a simple algebraic equation that can readily be used to estimate tritium inventories in room temperature stainless steel based on tritium partial pressure and exposure time. Results are available for both constant partial pressure exposures and for varying partial pressures. Movies of the time dependant results were prepared which are particularly helpful for interpreting results and drawing conclusions.

  7. Reactor Material Program Fracture Toughness of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Awadalla, N.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes the experimental procedure for Type 304 Stainless Steel fracture toughness measurements and the application of results. Typical toughness values are given based on the completed test program for the Reactor Materials Program (RMP). Test specimen size effects and limitations of the applicability in the fracture mechanics methodology are outlined as well as a brief discussion on irradiation effects.

  8. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel alloy A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel alloy A-286 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  9. Stainless steel 301 and Inconel 718 hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgeier, R. K.; Forman, R.

    1970-01-01

    Conditions and results of tensile tests of 26 Inconel 718 and four cryoformed stainless steel specimens are presented. Conclusions determine maximum safe hydrogen operating pressure for cryogenic pressure vessels and provide definitive information concerning flaw growth characteristics under the most severe temperature and pressure conditions

  10. Cleavage-like fracture of austenite in duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Foct, J. ); Akdut, N. )

    1993-07-15

    Nitrogen alloying of stainless steel has proved to be extremely successful for mechanical and corrosion properties. For duplex stainless steel, which appears to be very promising for industrial application, the beneficial influence of nitrogen has also been established for contents of about 0.2 wt-%. Duplex structures are found in many alloys and systems as, for instance, in Cu- and Ti-alloys and in stainless steel. They all are characterized by a mixture of similar amounts of two phases whose plastic behaviors are different from one another. In the case of duplex stainless steel the matrix phase is usually ferrite. However, by increasing the nitrogen content and therefore the stability of austenite, it is shown in the present work that austenite can also become the matrix. Because the partition coefficient of nitrogen between [alpha] and [gamma] is large, it is also possible to harden the [gamma] phase more than [alpha]. The question this paper attempts to answer is whether or not nitrogen alloying can exchange the roles of the [alpha] and the [gamma] phases with respect to mechanical properties.

  11. Ferrite determination in stainless steel welds -- Advances since 1974

    SciTech Connect

    Kotecki, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    Examination of MagneGage Number 3 Magnet strengths led to a concept for extending, by extrapolation, the calibration range of AWS A4.2-7.4 to ferrite levels above 28 FN. Ferrite Numbers could then be assigned to thinner coating thickness standards for primary calibration of MagneGages over the extended range. Calibration using primary standards is limited to a very few instruments, due to the difference in distribution of ferromagnetic material in coating thickness standards vs that in stainless steel weld metal. secondary standards, covering the range from near zero to about 100 FN, became available for calibrating additional instruments at the beginning of 1995. A round robin of tests established that the interlaboratory reproducibility of measurement after calibration by the secondary standards is similar to that observed with MagneGages calibrated by use of primary standards. Excessive ferrite in duplex stainless steel weld metals has adverse effects on weld properties. The utility of the Ferrite Number measurement system for duplex stainless steels is thus established. Development of a solid link between Ferrite Number and ferrite percent, determination of ferrite in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of duplex stainless steel weldments, and further development of predicting diagrams remain for the future.

  12. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 2+x}, have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni){sub 23}Zr{sub 6} during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy.

  13. Lithium wetting of stainless steel for plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring continuous wetting of a solid container by the liquid metal is a critical issue in the design of liquid metal plasma facing components foreseen for NSTX-U and FNSF. Ultrathin wetting layers may form on metallic surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions if material reservoirs are present from which spreading and wetting can start. The combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ion beam etching capabilities of a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) have been used to study the spreading of lithium films on stainless steel substrates. A small (mm-scale) amount of metallic lithium was applied to a stainless steel surface in an argon glove box and transferred to the SAM. Native impurities on the stainless steel and lithium surfaces were removed by Ar+ ion sputtering. Elemental mapping of Li and Li-O showed that surface diffusion of Li had taken place at room temperature, well below the 181C Li melting temperature. The influence of temperature and surface oxidation on the rate of Li spreading on stainless steel will be reported. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Plastic plus stainless-steel fibers make resilient, impermeable material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirra, J. R.

    1965-01-01

    Plastic material combined with stainless-steel fibers and molded under heat and pressure into a desired configuration is both soft enough to deform under a load and resilient enough to return to its original shape when the load is removed.

  15. Gas Leak from Vinyl Taped Stainless Steel Dressing Jars

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Hayes

    1999-03-01

    The leak rates of nitrogen gas from stainless steel dressing jars taped with 2 inch vinyl tape were measured. These results were used to calculate hydrogen leak rates from the same jars. The calculations show that the maximum concentration of hydrogen buildup in this type of container configuration will beat least 3 orders of magnitude below the lower explosion limit for hydrogen in air.

  16. 304L stainless steel resistance to cesium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1998-08-27

    B and W Hanford Company have two Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Type 4 canisters filled with cesium chloride (CsCl) originally produced at WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility). These canisters are constructed of 304L stainless steel per drawing ORNL 970-294. Instead of removing the CsCl from the Type 4 canisters and repacking into an Inner Capsule, it is intended (for ALARA, schedule and cost purposes) that the Type 4 canisters be decontaminated (scrubbed) and placed [whole] inside a Type ``W`` overpack. The overpack is constructed from 316L stainless steel. Several tests have been run by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) over the. years documenting the corrosion compatibility of 316L SS with CsCl (Bryan 1989 and Fullam 1972). However, no information for 304L SS compatibility is readily available. This document estimates the corrosion resistance of 304L stainless steel in a WESF CsCl environment as it compares with that of 316L stainless steel.

  17. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  18. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  19. 6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LEVEL4; ENTRAILS WERE DROPPED INTO CHUTE, THEN PASSED THROUGH THE FLOOR TO THE GUT SHANTY ON LEVEL 3 TO BE SORTED AND CLEANED - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  20. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, LOOKING EAST; SMOKEHOUSE UNITS WERE BUILT BY DRYING SYSTEMS COMPANY, DIVISION OF MICHIGAN OVEN COMPANY, MORTON GROVE, ILLINOIS - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  1. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-03-01

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized. PMID:26514345

  2. Graphene Nanoplatelets Based Protective and Functionalizing Coating for Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jayanta; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Sammelselg, Väino

    2015-09-01

    Stainless steel is the most widely used alloy for many industrial and everyday applications, and protection of this alloy substrate against corrosion is an important industrial issue. Here we report a promising application of graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets as effective corrosion inhibitors for AISI type 304 stainless steel alloy. The graphene oxide and graphene coatings on the stainless steel substrates were prepared using spin coating techniques. Homogeneous and complete surface coverage by the graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets were observed with a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The corrosion inhibition ability of these materials was investigated through measurement of open circuit potential and followed by potentiodymamic polarization analysis in aqueous sodium chloride solution before and after a month of immersion. Analyzed result exhibits effective corrosion inhibition for both substrates coated with graphene oxide or graphene nanoplatelets by increasing corrosion potential, pitting potential and decreasing passive current density. The corrosion inhibition ability of the coated substrates has not changed even after the long-term immersion. The result showed both graphene materials can be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor for the stainless steel substrates, which would certainly increase lifetime the substrate. However, long-term protection ability of the graphene coated susbtsrate showed somewhat better inhibition performance than the ones coated with graphene oxide. PMID:26716239

  3. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... Commission instituted this review on July 1, 2011 (76 FR 38686) and determined on October 4, 2011, that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 64105, October 17, 2011). The Commission transmitted its... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in...

  4. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  5. Battery and fuel cell electrodes containing stainless steel charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Zuckerbrod, David; Gibney, Ann

    1984-01-01

    An electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon particles; (ii) stainless steel particles; (iii) a nonwetting agent; and (iv) a catalyst, where at least one current collector contacts said composite.

  6. MRF with adjustable pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2011-10-01

    Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are difficult to polish at pH 10 with MRF, due to their grain size and the relatively low stiffness of the MR fluid lap. If microns of material are removed, the grain structure of the material begins to appear. In 2005, Kozhinova et al. (Appl. Opt. 44 4671-4677) demonstrated that lowering pH could improve MRF of ZnS. However, magnetic CI particle corrosion rendered their low pH approach unstable and unsuitable for commercial implementation. In 2009, Shafrir et al. described a sol-gel coating process for manufacturing a zirconia-coated CI particle that protects the magnetic core from aqueous corrosion (Appl. Opt .48 6797-6810). The coating process produces free nanozirconia polishing abrasives during the coating procedure, thereby creating an MR polishing powder that is "self-charged" with the polishing abrasive. By simply adding water, it was possible to polish optical glasses and ceramics with good stability at pH 8 for three weeks. The development of a corrosion resistant, MR polishing powder, opens up the possibility for polishing additional materials, wherein the pH may be adjusted to optimize effectiveness. In this paper we describe the CI coating process, the characterization of the coated powder, and procedures for making stable MR fluids with adjustable pH, giving polishing results for a variety of optical glasses and crystalline ceramics.

  7. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  8. Phase formation at bonded vanadium and stainless steel interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, T.S.E.

    1992-01-01

    The interface between vanadium bonded to stainless steel was studies to determine whether a brittle phase formed during three joining operations. Inertia friction welds between V and 21-6-9 stainless steel were examined using TEM. In the as-welded condition, a continuous, polygranular intermetallic layer about 0.25 {mu}m thick was present at the interface. This layer grew to about 50 {mu}m thick during heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for two hours. Analysis of electron diffraction patterns confirmed that this intermetallic was the {omega} phase. The interface between vanadium and type 304, SANDVIK SAF 2205, and 21-6-9 stainless steel bonded by a co-extrusion process had intermetallic particles at the interface in the as-extruded condition. Heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for two hours caused these particles to grow into continuous layers in all three cases. Based on the appearance, composition and hardness of this interfacial intermetallic, it was also concluded to be {omega} phase. Bonding V to type 430 stainless steel by co-extrusion caused V-rich carbides to form at the interface due to the higher concentration of C in the type 430 than in the other stainless steels investigated. The carbide particles initially present grew into a continuous layer during a two-hour heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C. Co-hipping 21-6-9 stainless steel tubing with V rod resulted in slightly more concentric specimens than the co-extruded ones, but a continuous layer of the {omega} phase formed during the hipping operation. This brittle layer could initiate failure during subsequent forming operations. The vanadium near the stainless steel interface in the co-extruded and co-hipped tubing in some cases was harder than before heat treatment. It was concluded that this hardening was due to thermal straining during cooling following heat treatment and that thermal strains might present a greater problem than seen here when longer tubes are used in actual applications.

  9. Properties of super stainless steels for orthodontic applications.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Young-Sik; Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2004-05-15

    Orthodontic stainless-steel appliances are considered to be corrosion resistant, but localized corrosion can occur in the oral cavity. This study was undertaken to evaluate the properties of super stainless steels in orthodontic applications. Accordingly, the metallurgical properties, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, amount of the released nickel, cytotoxicity, and characteristics of the passive film were investigated. Corrosion resistances of the specimens were high and in the following order: super austenitic stainless steel (SR-50A) > super ferritic stainless steel (SFSS) = super duplex stainless steel (SR-6DX) > 316L SS > super martensitic stainless steel (SR-3Mo) in artificial saliva, 37 degrees C. At 500 mV (SCE), current densities of SR-50A, SFSS, SR-6DX, 316L SS, and SR-3Mo were 5.96 microA/cm(2), 20.3 microA/cm(2), 31.9 microA/cm(2), 805 microA/cm(2), and 5.36 mA/cm(2), respectively. Open circuit potentials of SR-50A, 316L SS, SR-6DX, SR-3Mo, and SFSS were - 0.2, - 0.22, - 0.24, - 0.43, and - 0.46 V (SCE), respectively. SR-50A, SFSS, and SR-6DX released below 3 ng/ml nickel for 8 weeks, and increased a little with immersion time, and 316L SS released about 3.5 ng/ml nickel, but SR-3Mo released a large amount of nickel, which increased with immersion time. The study demonstrated that SR-50A, SR-6DX, and SFSS have high corrosion resistance and mild or no cytotoxicity, due to the passive film enhanced by synergistic effect of Mo + N or by high addition effect of Cr + W. All super stainless steels showed very low cytotoxicity regardless of their nickel contents, although SR-3Mo was found to be relatively cytotoxic. From these studies, these steels are considered suitable for orthodontic applications. PMID:15116408

  10. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. PMID:26952459

  11. pH. Training Module 5.305.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with pH, measurement of pH with a pH meter and maintenance of pH meter electrodes. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers the definition of pH, types of electrodes and…

  12. pH Dependent Transitions in Xanthorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Balashov, Sergei P.; Wang, Jennifer M.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2009-01-01

    Xanthorhodopsin (XR), the light-driven proton pump of the halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, exhibits substantial homology to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) of archaea and proteorhodopsin (PR) of marine bacteria, but unlike them contains a light-harvesting carotenoid antenna, salinixanthin, as well as retinal. We report here the pH dependent properties of XR. The pKa of the retinal Schiff base is as high as in BR, i.e., ? 12.4. Deprotonation of the Schiff base and the ensuing alkaline denaturation causes large changes in the absorption bands of the carotenoid antenna, which lose intensity and become broader making the spectrum similar to that of salinixanthin not bound to XR. A small red shift of the retinal chromophore band and increase of its extinction, as well as the pH dependent amplitude of the M intermediate indicate that in detergent-solubilized XR the pKa of the Schiff base counter-ion and proton acceptor is about 6 (compared to 2.6 in BR, and 7.5 in PR). The protonation of the counter-ion is accompanied by a small blue shift of the carotenoid absorption bands. The pigment is stable in the dark upon acidification to pH 2. At pH < 2 a transition to a blue shifted species absorbing around 440 nm occurs, accompanied by loss of resolution of the carotenoid absorption bands. At pH < 3 illumination of XR with continuous light causes accumulation of long-lived photoproducts(s) with an absorption maximum around 400 nm. The photocycle of XR was examined between pH 4 and 10 in solubilized samples. The pH dependence of recovery of the initial state slows at both acid and alkaline pH, with pKas of 6.0 and 9.3. The decrease in the rates with pKa 6.0 is apparently caused by protonation of the counter-ion and proton acceptor while that at high pH reflects the pKa of the internal proton donor, Glu94, at the times in the photocycle when this group equilibrates with the bulk. PMID:16649816

  13. Study of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) removal from waters using ferric hydroxide supported on silica gel prepared at low pH.

    PubMed

    Cifti, Tlin Deniz; Yayayrk, Onur; Henden, Emr

    2011-01-01

    Removal of As(III) and As(V) species using ferric hydroxide supported on silica gel was studied. Laboratory reagent quality silica gel was used as to avoid uncertainties that may be caused by impurities. Ferric hydroxide precipitation was realized at various pH values and a relatively low pH 6.0 was chosen because, at this pH, the highest arsenic removal capacity and removal efficiency were obtained and clear supernatant solution was observed. It was also shown by arsenic speciation analysis at trace level that As(III) is adsorbed onto ferric hydroxide partly without oxidation to As(V); this has been a controversial point in the literature. The effects on arsenic removal of some parameters such as pH, flow rate and matrix ions were investigated. In the batch method, initial pH change of the solution did not significantly affect the arsenic removal efficiencies for As(III) and As(V) in the pH range of 3.1-9.7. This was attributed to the decreases of the initial pH values to around 5 at equilibrium. The column capacities of 1.32 mg As(III)/g sorbent and 1.21 mg As(V)/g sorbent were found for initial concentration of 1.00 mg/L arsenic. Batch capacities were 16.2 mg As(III)/g sorbent and 17.7 mg As(V)/g sorbent for initial arsenic concentration of 100 mg/L. The method was applied successfully to the removal of As(III) and As(V) from drinking water, geothermal water and mineral water. PMID:21780702

  14. A Nanocrystal-based Ratiometric pH Sensor for Natural pH Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Rebecca C.; Lanning, Ryan M.; Snee, Preston T.; Greytak, Andrew B.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor based on CdSe/CdZnS nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) has been designed for biological pH ranges. The construct is formed from the conjugation of a pH dye (SNARF) to NCs coated with a poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. The sensor exhibits a well–resolved ratio response at pH values between 6 and 8 under linear or two–photon excitation, and in the presence of a 4% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. PMID:26413260

  15. Stainless steel cookware as a significant source of nickel, chromium, and iron.

    PubMed

    Kuligowski, J; Halperin, K M

    1992-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used materials in food preparation and in home and commercial cookware. Stainless is readily attacked by organic acids, particularly at cooking temperatures; hence iron, chromium, and nickel should be released from the material into the food. Nickel is implicated in numerous health problems, notably allergic contact dermatitis. Conversely, chromium and iron are essential nutrients for which stainless could be a useful source. Home cookware was examined by atomic absorption spectroscopy: seven different stainless utensils as well as cast iron, mild steel, aluminum and enamelled steel. The materials were exposed to mildly acidic conditions at boiling temperature. Nickel was a major corrosion product from stainless steel utensils; chromium and iron were also detected. It is recommended that nickel-sensitive patients switch to a material other than stainless, and that the stainless steel cookware industry seriously consider switching to a non-nickel formulation. PMID:1514841

  16. Wetting Properties of Liquid Lithium on Stainless Steel and Enhanced Stainless Steel Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Xu, W.; Raman, P.; Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D. N.; Curreli, D.

    2012-10-01

    Research into lithium as a first wall material has proven its ability to effectively getter impurities and reduce recycling of hydrogen ions at the wall. Current schemes for introducing lithium into a fusion device consist of lithium evaporators, however, as these devices evolve from pulsed to steady state, new methods will need to be employed such as the LIMIT concept of UIUC, or thin flowing film lithium walls. Critical to their implementation is understanding the interactions of liquid lithium with various surfaces. One such interaction is the wetting of materials by lithium, which may be characterized by the contact angle between the lithium and the surface. Experiments have been performed at UIUC into the contact angle of liquid lithium with a given surface, as well as methods to increase it. To reduce the oxidation rate of the droplets, the experiments were performed in vacuum, using a lithium injector to deposit drops on each surface. Among the materials investigated are stainless steel, both untreated and coated with a diamond like carbon (DLC) layer, molybdenum, and boronized molybdenum. The contact angle and its dependence on temperature is measured.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of type 403 stainless steel in sodium chloride at 95 C under different heat treatment conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Martinez-Villafane, A.

    1999-10-01

    Slow strain rate tests were used to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the stress corrosion cracking (SC) susceptibility of type AISI 34 (UNS S40300) martensitic stainless steel in 20% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 95 C. Heat treatments included water-quenched, quenched, and tempered at 200 C, 400 C, and 600 C and annealed at 850 C. When tested in oil (90 C), the highest loss in ductility was shown by the quenched specimen, and the lowest by the annealed specimen. Between these two specimens, there were specimens tempered at 200 C, 400 C, and 600 C, respectively. When tested in 20% NaCl (wt%) at pH 7, 6, and 5, all specimens were embrittled by the environment, the most severe one being the solution with pH 5, showing at least 50% reduction in the elongation exhibited in oil. Fracture morphology was completely intergranular along the prior austenite for the quenched specimen and completely transgranular for the annealed specimen. The percentage of intergranular cracking decreased as the tempering temperature increased from 200 C to 600 C, and as the pH increased from 5 to 7. The fracture mechanism was thought to be hydrogen embrittlement.

  18. Biomimetic PEG-catecholates for stabile antifouling coatings on metal surfaces: applications on TiO2 and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Faiza; Franzmann, Elisa; Ramcke, Julian; Dakischew, Olga; Lips, Katrin S; Reinhardt, Alexander; Heisig, Peter; Maison, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Trimeric catecholates have been designed for the stable immobilization of effector molecules on metal surfaces. The design of these catecholates followed a biomimetic approach and was inspired by natural multivalent metal binders, such as mussel adhesion proteins (MAPs) and siderophores. Three catecholates have been conjugated to central scaffolds based on adamantyl or trisalkylmethyl core structures. The resulting triscatecholates have been immobilized on TiO2 and stainless steel. In a proof of concept study we have demonstrated the high stability of the resulting nanolayers at neutral and slightly acidic pH. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates of our triscatecholates have been synthesized and were immobilized on TiO2 and stainless steel. The PEG coated surfaces showed excellent antifouling properties upon exposure to human blood and bacteria as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, ellipsometry and a bacterial assay with Staphylococcus epidermidis. In addition, our PEG-triscatecholates showed no cytotoxicity against bone-marrow stem cells on TiO2. PMID:24632391

  19. Elucidation of a trigger mechanism for pitting corrosion of stainless steels using submicron resolution scanning electrochemical and photoelectrochemical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.E.; Mohiuddin, T.F.; Zhu, Y.Y.

    1998-08-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy with submicron resolution shows that the local current density for dissolution of certain MnS inclusions in stainless steel can be extremely high (>1 A/cm{sup 2}) and appears to be chloride-catalyzed, a result not anticipated by previous work on chemically prepared MnS. The dissolution forms a sulfur-rich crust extending over the inclusion and the surrounding metal. Photoelectrochemical and optical microscopy indicate that formation of a sulfur-rich stain around an inclusion is a necessary preliminary to the initiation of a pit and show attack on the metal underneath the stain. Therefore it is reasonable to propose that the very high local current density of inclusion dissolution leads to a significant local concentration of chloride under the crust, as a consequence of electromigration to support the current, and may also cause a significant decrease in the local pH as a consequence of the chemistry of the inclusion dissolution reaction, especially if the inclusion also contains some Cr. It is then further reasonable to propose that the conditions generated under the sulfur crust might be sufficiently extreme to cause the stainless steel to depassivate and a pit to trigger.

  20. Effect of poly(aspartic acid) on calcium phosphate removal from stainless steel tubing under turbulent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, Felicia

    Calcium phosphate deposition causes cleaning problems in a number of situations including water treatment, dairy processing, and dental applications. This problem is exacerbated by the limited choices of cleaning chemicals that meet environmental regulations. To promote the development of biodegradable, non-toxic alternatives, this research examines the removal of calcium phosphate deposits consisting of brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate; DCPD) and a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and DCPD from stainless steel in the presence of poly(aspartic acid) and its sodium salt (PASP). The effects of solvent pH, PASP concentration, and flow rate on the calcium phosphate removal rates are measured from stainless steel tubing under turbulent flow conditions using a solid scintillation detection technique. A mechanistic evaluation of the cleaning data in the absence of PASP indicates that DCPD removal is dominated by shear while HAP/DCPD deposit removal is limited by a combination of mass transfer and interfacial processes. Although the removal mechanisms differ, the results conclusively show that PASP promotes calcium phosphate removal under conditions that favor calcium sequestration in both cases. An in-depth study of DCPD removal in the presence of PASP reveals that this additive is most effective under conditions where calcium sequestration and phosphate protonation occur simultaneously.

  1. Corrosion-induced release of the main alloying constituents of manganese-chromium stainless steels in different media.

    PubMed

    Herting, Gunilla; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall; Leygraf, Christofer

    2008-09-01

    The main focus of this paper is the assessment of release rates of chromium, nickel, iron and manganese from manganese-chromium stainless steel grades of low nickel content. The manganese content varied between 9.7 and 1.5 wt% and the corresponding nickel content between 1 and 5 wt%. All grades were exposed to artificial rain and two were immersed in a synthetic body fluid of similar pH but of different composition and exposure conditions. Surface compositional studies were performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in parallel to correlate the metal release process with changes in surface oxide properties. All grades, independent of media, revealed a time-dependent metal release process with a preferential low release of iron and manganese compared to nickel and chromium while the chromium content of the surface oxide increased slightly. Manganese was detected in the surface oxide of all grades, except the grade of the lowest manganese bulk content. No nickel was observed in the outermost surface oxide. Stainless steel grades of the lowest chromium content (approximately 16 wt%) and highest manganese content (approximately 7-9 wt%), released the highest quantity of alloy constituents in total, and vice versa. No correlation was observed between the release rate of manganese and the alloy composition. Released main alloy constituents were neither proportional to the bulk alloy composition nor to the surface oxide composition. PMID:18728902

  2. Quasi-equilibrium of stainless steel in a non-isothermal sodium loop constructed of Type 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tadashi; Mutoh, Isao

    1991-12-01

    Quasi-equilibrium of stainless steel in a sodium environment is studied using specimens of three kinds of Fe-(5, 7 or 9)Cr-1Mo-0.1C(wt%) martensitic/ferritic steels and a maximum isothermal region in a sodium loop constucted of a commercial Type 316 stainless steel. The weight loss, the composition of metallic elements near the surface, and the average carbon content for the specimens exposed to sodium of 700 C, 1-2 wppm oxygen level, and 4.0 m/s velocity are determined as a function of exposure time of the specimens. From the present results and the previous results at 650 and 600 C, it may be concluded that the contents of iron, chromium and nickel in stainless steel in quasi-equilibrium are Fe- ~ 5Cr- < 1Ni at 700 C, Fe- ~ 6Cr- < 1Ni at 650 C, and Fe- ~ 7Cr- < 1Ni at 600 C. The nickel in stainless steel will directly dissolve in the sodium according to the solubility of nickel, while the iron and chromium will predominantly react with the sodium containing 1-2 wppm oxygen and dissolve in the sodium in the maximum isothermal region of the loop according to the reactions Fe(or Cr)[s] + Na + -O 2- cluster[1] ? Na-Fe(or Cr)-O[1], On the basis of the quasi-equilibrium compositions, it appears that the free energy change in the reaction for the formation of Na-Cr-O complex is more negative than that of Na-Fe-O complex, and that the buffering action of chromium for oxygen in sodium, which would lower the corrosion of stainless steel in sodium, is confirmed.

  3. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys • Thermodynamic modeling to explain the high degree of carbon solubility possible in austenitic grades under the LTCSS process and experimental validation of model results • Corrosion testing to determine the corrosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Erosion testing to determine the erosion resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Wear testing to quantify the wear resistance improvement possible from the LTCSS process • Fatigue testing for quantifying the extent of improvement from the LTCSS process • Component treating and testing under simulated and in-line commercial operations XRD verified expanded austenite lattice, with no evidence of carbide precipitation. Carbon concentration profiles via Auger and electron dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) showed carbon levels in excess of 12 at. % in treated, type 316 SS. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of pulled-to-failure treated tensile specimens showed slip bands and no de-cohesion of the treated layer, verifying that the layer remains ductile. Compressive stresses in excess of 2 GPa (300 ksi) have been calculated at the surface of the case. Phase diagram (CALPHAD) (ThermoCalc) and Wagner dilute solution thermodynamic models were developed that calculate the solubility of carbon in austenite as a function of alloying content for the process time and temperature. Several commercial alloys have been modeled, and the model has been used to design experimental alloys with enhanced affinity for carbon solubility at treatment temperatures. Four experimental alloys were melted, rolled, and manufactured into test specimens, and the LTCSS treatment indicated successfully enhanced results and validated the predictions based on thermodynamic modeling. Electrochemical polarization curves show a 600 to 800 mV increase in pitting potential in treated (900-1000 mV) versus non-treated (200-300 mV) type 316 in chloride solutions. Treated 316L showed crevice-corrosion behavior similar to that of Ti-6Al-4V and Hastelloy C22. Cavitation tests showed significant increases in cavitation resistance for treated materials as compared to the non-treated materials. Standard ASTM pin-on-disk sliding friction and reciprocating friction wear tests also indicate significant enhancement in wear properties. Fatigue testing showed an order of magnitude improvement for treated versus non-treated Type 316 at the same maximum stress level (R = -1). The maximum stress at 107 cycles and the endurance stress for infinite life, improved by approximately 50%, from 30 to 45 ksi. The energy savings from this project is estimated at 21.8 trillion Btu/year by 2020. This energy savings will be associated with a CO2 reduction of 1.3 million ton/year. One application of this technology in a sludge pump of a cardboard recycling plant during the course of this project has resulted in an energy savings of 84. 106 Btu and cost savings of $900.

  4. Corrosion resistance of multilayer hybrid sol-gel coatings deposited on the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Y. T.; Rondón, E. A.; Rueda, L.; Hernández Barrios, C. A.; Coy, A.; Viejo, F.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work multilayer hybrid sol-gel coatings were synthesized on the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel employed in the fabrication of orthopaedic implants. Hybrid sols were obtained from a mixture of inorganic precursor, TEOS, and organic, GPTMS, using ethanol as solvent, and acetic acid as catalyst. The characterization of the sols was performed using pH measurements, rheological tests and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for different ageing times. On the other hand, the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the corrosion resistance was evaluated using anodic potentiodynamic polarization in SBF solution at 37±2°C. The results confirmed that sol-gel synthesis employing TEOS-GPTMS systems produces uniform and homogeneous coatings, which enhanced the corrosion resistance with regard to the parent alloy. Moreover, corrosion performance was retained after applying more than one layer (multilayer coatings).

  5. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-06-27

    The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.

  6. Wet H{sub 2}S performance of as delivered and quenched modified martensitic stainless steels determined by SSRT

    SciTech Connect

    Boellinghaus, T.; Hoffmeister, H.; Tanski, T.

    1999-11-01

    Application of modified low carbon (LC) martensitic stainless steels in the oil and gas industry is not only restricted to subsea flowlines, but is planned to be extended also to the topside equipment of production units. Since no service experience of such materials is available so far, the sour service tolerance of two typical LC 13%Cr steels with different nickel and molybdenum contents has been investigated at free corrosion by the slow strain rate test (SSRT), predominantly in the state as delivered. For basic information on hardening effects by welding, a simple quenching procedure was applied to another test series. As a result, the nickel and molybdenum richer material maintained its sour service resistance at different pH and H{sub 2}S levels in the NACE TM 0177-96 standard solution. The lower alloyed steel exhibited an increasing susceptibility to sulfide stress cracking in the quenched condition, as compared to the as delivered state.

  7. Validation of an HPLC-UV method for the determination of ceftriaxone sodium residues on stainless steel surface of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipments.

    PubMed

    Akl, Magda A; Ahmed, Mona A; Ramadan, Ahmed

    2011-05-15

    In pharmaceutical industry, an important step consists in the removal of possible drug residues from the involved equipments and areas. The cleaning procedures must be validated and methods to determine trace amounts of drugs have, therefore, to be considered with special attention. An HPLC-UV method for the determination of ceftriaxone sodium residues on stainless steel surface was developed and validated in order to control a cleaning procedure. Cotton swabs, moistened with extraction solution (50% water and 50% mobile phase), were used to remove any residues of drugs from stainless steel surfaces, and give recoveries of 91.12, 93.8 and 98.7% for three concentration levels. The precision of the results, reported as the relative standard deviation (RSD), were below 1.5%. The method was validated over a concentration range of 1.15-6.92 μg ml(-1). Low quantities of drug residues were determined by HPLC-UV using a Hypersil ODS 5 μm (250×4.6 mm) at 50 °C with an acetonitrile:water:pH 7:pH 5 (39-55-5.5-0.5) mobile phase at flow rate of 1.5 ml min(-1), an injection volume of 20 μl and were detected at 254 nm. A simple, selective and sensitive HPLC-UV assay for the determination of ceftriaxone sodium residues on stainless steel surfaces was developed, validated and applied. PMID:21330092

  8. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide (visible as a black corrosion product) forms during anodic dissolution. The sulfide is electronically conductive, and gives an increase of several orders of magnitude in the electrode capacitance; the sulfide also causes anodic activation to persist after the pure metals and steels were removed from the thiocyanate-containing electrolyte and transferred to a thiocyanate-free electrolyte. The main practical implications of this work are that low concentrations of reduced sulfur compounds strongly affect anodic dissolution of stainless steels, and that selecting steels with elevated concentrations of chromium, nickel or molybdenum would serve to limit the anodic dissolution rate in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds.

  9. Ph.D.'s and the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, James

    Throughout the last decade, Ph.D. recipients were accustomed to a job market in which demand for their services far exceeded supply. During the same period, manpower experts predicted this situation would continue in the foreseeable future. However, when the 60's ended, the employment illusion had been rudely dispelled by frantic reports of a

  10. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the

  11. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been

  12. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  13. James M. Cherry, Ph.D. (Video)

    Cancer.gov

    View this video on YouTube. James M. Cherry, Ph.D. details his educational journey from football player to biology major and, ultimately, a career in molecular biology. Dr. Cherry serves as scientific program director, Office of Scientific Operations,

  14. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  15. PhAST: pharmacophore alignment search tool.

    PubMed

    Hhnke, Volker; Hofmann, Bettina; Grgat, Tomislav; Proschak, Ewgenij; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schneider, Gisbert

    2009-04-15

    We present a ligand-based virtual screening technique (PhAST) for rapid hit and lead structure searching in large compound databases. Molecules are represented as strings encoding the distribution of pharmacophoric features on the molecular graph. In contrast to other text-based methods using SMILES strings, we introduce a new form of text representation that describes the pharmacophore of molecules. This string representation opens the opportunity for revealing functional similarity between molecules by sequence alignment techniques in analogy to homology searching in protein or nucleic acid sequence databases. We favorably compared PhAST with other current ligand-based virtual screening methods in a retrospective analysis using the BEDROC metric. In a prospective application, PhAST identified two novel inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase product formation with minimal experimental effort. This outcome demonstrates the applicability of PhAST to drug discovery projects and provides an innovative concept of sequence-based compound screening with substantial scaffold hopping potential. PMID:18727161

  16. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in

  17. What My Ph.D. Taught Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The author started in the Ph.D. program in comparative literature at Princeton in 1992, a year after she graduated from college. She fell in love with mythology and the classical traditions and find herself teaching literature. In the remainder of her time at Princeton, she precepted for four or five more classes, got the chance to join the…

  18. Monitoring fetal pH by telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A.; Donahoe, T.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Ryan, W.

    1980-01-01

    Telemetry unit has been developed for possible use in measuring scalp-tissue pH and heart rate of unborn infant. Unit radius data to receiver as much as 50 ft. away. Application exists during hours just prior to childbirth to give warning of problems that might require cesarean delivery.

  19. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are

  20. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  1. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbraham, Richard J.; Boxall, Colin; Goddard, David T.; Taylor, Robin J.; Woodbury, Simon E.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H2O2-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H2O2] ⩽ 100 μmol dm-3 the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H2O2 concentrations between 1 mmol dm-3 and 0.1 mol dm-3, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H2O2] > 0.1 mol dm-3 the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO2 films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms of corrosion processes or otherwise. Through consideration of thermodynamic solubility product and complex formation constant data, we attribute the transition to the formation of soluble uranyl-peroxide complexes under mildly alkaline, high [H2O2] conditions - a conclusion that has implications for the design of both acid minimal, metal ion oxidant-free decontamination strategies with low secondary waste arisings, and single step processes for spent nuclear fuel dissolution such as the Carbonate-based Oxidative Leaching (COL) process.

  2. The effect of dose rate on the response of austenitic stainless steels to neutron radiaiton

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Cole, J I.; Trybus, Carole L.; Porter, D. L.; Tsai, Hanchung; Garner, Francis A.; Kenik, E A.; Yoshitake, T.; Ohta, Joji

    2006-01-01

    Depending on reactor design and component location, austenitic stainless steels may experience significantly different irradiation dose rates in the same reactor. Understanding the effect of dose rate on radiation performance is important to predicting component lifetime. This study examined the effect of dose rate on swelling, grain boundary segregation, and tensile properties in austenitic stainless steels through the examination of components retrieved from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) following its shutdown. Annealed 304 stainless steel, stress-relieved 304 stainless steel, 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel, and 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel were irradiated over a dose range of 1-56 dpa at temperatures from 371 to 440 C and dose rates from 0.5 to 5.8 ? 10*7 dpa/s. Density and tensile properties were measured for 304 and 316 stainless steel. Changes in grain boundary composition were examined for 304 stainless steel. Swelling appears to increase at lower dose rates in both 304 and 316 stainless steel, although the effect was not always statistically significant. Grain boundary segregation also appears to increase at lower dose rate in 304 stainless steel. For the range of dose rates examined, no measurable dose rate effect on tensile properties was noted for any of the steels.

  3. Microstructural modification of austenitic stainless steels by rapid solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitek, J. M.; Dasgupta, A.; David, S. A.

    1983-09-01

    The microstructural modifications in three austenitic stainless steels (types 308, 310, and 312) were evaluated after rapid solidification. These three steels are commonly used weld filler metals. Two methods of rapid solidification were investigated, autogenous laser welding and arc-hammer splat quenching. The structure of 310 stainless steel was found to be 100 pct austenite, and did not vary over the range of conditions studied. On the contrary, the structures of types 308 and 312 steels were very sensitive to the cooling rates and solidification conditions. With the highest cooling rates, the type 308 structure was fully austenitic while the type 312 structure was fully ferritic. At lower cooling rates, the structures were duplex ferrite plus austenite. The results were interpreted in terms of faster kinetics of solidification of austenite compared to ferrite under the conditions examined. A comparison of the structures produced by the two rapid solidification techniques indicated the cooling rates are comparable.

  4. Microstructural modification of austenitic stainless steels by rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Dasgupta, A.; David, S.A.

    1983-09-01

    The microstructural modifications in three austenitic stainless steels (types 308, 310, and 312) were evaluated after rapid solidification. These three steels are commonly used weld filler metals. Two methods of rapid solidification were investigated, autogenous laser welding and arc-hammer splat quenching. The structure of 310 stainless steel was found to be 100% austenite, and did not vary over the range of conditions studied. On the contrary, the structures of types 308 and 312 steels were very sensitive to the cooling rates and solidification conditions. With the highest cooling rates, the type 308 structure was fully austenitic while the type 312 structure was fully ferritic. At lower cooling rates, the structures were duplex ferrite plus austenite. The results were interpreted in terms of faster kinetics of solidification of austenite compared to ferrite under the conditions examined. A comparison of the structures produced by the two rapid solidification techniques indicated the cooling rates are comparable.

  5. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  6. Lifetest investigations with stainless steel/water heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenzel, W. D.; Kraehling, H.

    Life tests were conducted on water heat pipes, made from four different alloys of stainless steel, at operation temperatures of 120, 160, 220, and 320 C in a reflux boiler mode for more than 20,000 hr. Other parameters varied during the tests included capillary structure, pretreatment and cleaning of the components, additional oxidation of the inner surface, filling procedures, amoung of liquid change, the number of ventings, and the duration of the reaction runs. The best results were obtained with pipes containing stainless steels with molybdenum alloy additions and with carbon contents of greater than 0.03%; with components which formed a protective surface layer; with the use of double-distilled water that had been ultrasonically degassed; with repeated ventings during the initial reaction run of 500 hr minimum duration; and with the addition of gaseous oxygen into the heat pipe during the reaction run with subsequent venting.

  7. Corrosion testing of stainless steel-zirconium metal waste form.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1998-12-14

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposition of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste forms contain irradiated cladding hulls, components of the alloy fuel, noble metal fission products, and actinide elements. The baseline waste form is a stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article presents microstructure and some of the corrosion studies being conducted on the waste form alloys. Electrochemical corrosion, immersion corrosion, and vapor hydration tests have been performed on various alloy compositions to evaluate corrosion behavior and resistance to selective leaching of simulated fission products. The SS-Zr waste forms are successful at the immobilization and retention of fission products and show potential for acceptance as high-level nuclear waste forms.

  8. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.

    1999-01-13

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-II reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  9. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  10. Precipitation and cavity formation in austenitic stainless steels during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels subjected to displacement damage at high temperature is strongly influenced by the interactions between helium atoms and second phase particles. Cavity nucleation occurs by the trapping of helium at partially coherent particle-matrix interfaces. The recent precipitate point defect collector theory describes the more rapid growth of precipitate-attached cavities compared to matrix cavities where the precipitate-matrix interface collects point defects to augment the normal point deflect flux to the cavitry. Data are presented which support these ideas. It is shown that during nickel ion irradiation of a titanium-modified stainless steel at 675/sup 0/C the rate of injection of helium has a strong effect on the total swelling and also on the nature and distribution of precipitate phases.

  11. Thermal conductivity of Inconel 718 and 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.N.; Roth, E.P.; Moss, M.

    1987-07-01

    The results of thermal conductivity measurements on Inconel 718 and 304 stainless steel by the comparative and flash diffusivity techniques are reported for the temperature range 0-700/sup 0/C. For 304 stainless steel, excellent agreement with published data is found for the specific heat, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity. In the case of Inconel 718, the measurements show that the conductivity depends critically on the sample thermal history and the metallurgical condition of the alloy. Measurements on a solution-treated sample indicated a conductivity function close to that reported previously, while precipitated samples showed a higher conductivity, similar to the conductivity-vs-temperature function used for reduction of comparative thermal conductivity data with Inconel 718 references. These results indicate that Inconel 718 is not a suitable reference for high-accuracy comparative thermal conductivity measurements unless its thermal history and associated conductivity function are known.

  12. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  13. New hermetic sealing material for vacuum brazing of stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, S.; Wiehl, G.; Silze, F.

    2016-03-01

    For vacuum brazing applications such as in vacuum interrupter industry Hermetic Sealing Materials (HSM) with low partial pressure are widely used. AgCu28 dominates the hermetic sealing market, as it has a very good wetting behavior on copper and metallized ceramics. Within recent decades wetting on stainless steel has become more and more important. However, today the silver content of HSMs is more in focus than in the past decades, because it has the biggest impact on the material prices. Umicore Technical Materials has developed a new copper based HSM, CuAg40Ga10. The wettability on stainless steel is significantly improved compared to AgCu28 and the total silver content is reduced by almost 44%. In this article the physical properties of the alloy and its brazed joints will be presented compared to AgCu28.

  14. Duplex stainless steels for the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsson, E.; Olsson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The metallurgy and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel, particularly with regards to applications in the pulp and paper industry, are described. Practical experiences from pressure vessel installations in cooking plants and bleach plants as well as from non-pressurized items in different parts along the fiber line, are given. The paper also reviews corrosion test results presented previously and compares these with recent test data and the practical experiences. Though most of the installations have been successful, some cases of corrosion attacks on duplex stainless steel have been reported, although these are very limited in number: one digester, one calorifier, two pulp storage towers, and two bleach plant filter washers, of a total of more than 700 identified installations.

  15. Long-Term Underground Corrosion of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2007-03-01

    In 1970, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) implemented the most ambitious and comprehensive long-term corrosion behavior test to date for stainless steels in soil environments. Over thirty years later, one of the six test sites was targeted to research subsurface contamination and transport processes in the vadose and saturated zones. This research directly applies to environmental management operational corrosion issues and long term stewardship scientific needs for understanding the behavior of waste forms and their near-field contaminant transport of chemical and radiological contaminants at nuclear disposal sites. This paper briefly describes the ongoing research and the corrosion analysis results of the stainless steel plate specimens recovered from the partial recovery of the first test site.

  16. Hydrogen transport through stainless steel under plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of gas exchange through stainless steel surface of the plasma chamber under irradiation with hydrogen atoms in oxygen atmosphere or oxygen contaminated hydrogen plasma. Dependence of this process on various irradiation parameters, such as the metal temperature, energy of irradiating ions, gas composition of plasma are studied. It is shown, that desorption from stainless steel is activated with the increase of the plasma chamber walls temperature and energy of irradiating ions. Hydrogen release occurs also under irradiation of the walls by helium and argon plasmas added with oxygen, however the amount of released hydrogen is several times lower than in the case of irradiation with oxygen contaminated deuterium plasma.

  17. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Seoh, S. Y.; Senin, H. B.; Nik, W. N. Wan; Amin, M. M.

    2007-05-09

    The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawater samples, it giving {>=} 90% efficiencies.

  18. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  19. Inhibition of Sodium Benzoate on Stainless Steel in Tropical Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoh, S. Y.; Senin, H. B.; Nik, W. N. Wan; Amin, M. M.

    2007-05-01

    The inhibition of sodium benzoate for stainless steel controlling corrosion was studied in seawater at room temperature. Three sets of sample have been immersed in seawater containing sodium benzoate with the concentrations of 0.3M, 0.6M and 1.0M respectively. One set of sample has been immersed in seawater without adding any sodium benzoate. It was found that the highest corrosion rate was observed for the stainless steel with no inhibitor was added to the seawater. As the concentration of sodium benzoate being increased, the corrosion rate is decreases. Results show that by the addition of 1.0M of sodium benzoate in seawater samples, it giving ? 90% efficiencies.

  20. Mechanical and physical properties of irradiated type 348 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Beeston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A type 348 stainless steel in-pile tube irradiated to a fluence of 3 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/, E > 1 MeV (57 dpa), was destructively examined. The service had resulted in a maximum total creep of 1.8% at the high fluence. The metal temperature ranged between 623 and 652/sup 0/K, hence the thermal creep portion of the total was negligible. Total creep was greater than had been anticipated from creep data for austenitic stainless steels irradiated in other reactors. The objectives of the destructive examination were to determine the service-induced changes of mechanical and physical properties, and to assess the possibility of adverse effects of both these changes and the greater total creep on the prospective service life of other tubes.

  1. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  2. Robustness of steel joints with stainless steel bolts in fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheeskumar, N.; Davison, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The robustness of steel joints in fire is important for steel building structures because of the need to prevent progressive collapse. Stainless steel is widely used in building construction mainly because of its corrosion resistance, but it also possesses improved fire resistance compared with conventional non-alloy, fine grain structural steels. Extensive research performed on the robustness of steel joints in fire has revealed that failure at elevated temperature may be controlled by bolt shear for fin plate and web cleat connections. Hence, this study focussed on the use of stainless steel in experimental tests conducted on fin plate and web cleat connections at high temperatures. In addition, this study investigated the use of a component-based model to predict connection performance at elevated temperature.

  3. Sensitization and IGSCC susceptibility prediction in stainless steel pipe weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Atteridge, D.G.; Simmons, J.W.; Li, Ming ); Bruemmer, S.M. )

    1991-11-01

    An analytical model, based on prediction of chromium depletion, has been developed for predicting thermomechanical effects on austenitic stainless steel intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility. Model development and validation is based on sensitization development analysis of over 30 Type 316 and 304 stainless steel heats. The data base included analysis of deformation effects on resultant sensitization development. Continuous Cooling sensitization behavior is examined and modelled with and without strain. Gas tungsten are (GTA) girth pipe weldments are also characterized by experimental measurements of heat affected zone (HAZ) temperatures, strains and sensitization during/after each pass; pass by pass thermal histories are also predicted. The model is then used to assess pipe chemistry changes on IGSCC resistance.

  4. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T M

    2008-10-23

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  5. STAINLESS STEEL INTERACTIONS WITH SALT CONTAINING PLUTONIUM OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Z.; Chandler, G.; Dunn, K.; Stefek, T.; Summer, M.

    2010-02-01

    Salt containing plutonium oxide materials are treated, packaged and stored within nested, stainless steel containers based on requirements established in the DOE 3013 Standard. The moisture limit for the stored materials is less than 0.5 weight %. Surveillance activities which are conducted to assess the condition of the containers and assure continuing 3013 container integrity include the destructive examination of a select number of containers to determine whether corrosion attack has occurred as a result of stainless steel interactions with salt containing plutonium oxides. To date, some corrosion has been observed on the innermost containers, however, no corrosion has been noted on the outer containers and the integrity of the 3013 container systems is not expected to be compromised over a 50 year storage lifetime.

  6. Noise characteristics of stainless-steel surface electrodes.

    PubMed

    Godin, D T; Parker, P A; Scott, R N

    1991-11-01

    Bioelectric events measured with surface electrodes are subject to noise components which may be significant in comparison with low-level biological signals such as evoked neuroelectric potentials, and myoelectric potentials. In an effort to better understand noise arising from these electrodes, electrode and measurement system noise is modelled. The effect of electrode surface area on electrode impedance and noise is studied using circular stainless-steel electrodes of varying diameters. The main contributions of the work are the development of a model for stainless-steel electrode noise as a function of electrode area, and demonstrating that, for the band-width of interest to evoked neuroelectric and myoelectric signals (8-10,000 Hz), the primary noise components are thermal and amplifier current generated. The magnitudes of both of these depend on the electrode impedance magnitude. Electrode impedance is shown to be a power function of both electrode diameter and frequency, consistent with a capacitive electrode model. PMID:1813753

  7. The Biological Safety of Stainless Steel Needles Used in Warm-needling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghun; Yi, Seung-Ho; Son, Yang-Sun; Choi, Sung-min; Kim, Young-Kon

    2010-01-01

    Warm-needling (also called thermo-acupuncture) is a combination of acupuncture and moxibustion. Due to the intense heat involved, there have been concerns over the biological safety of the acuneedles used in the treatment. This paper reports two phases of a safety test. For a preliminary test, we compared the temperature change patterns of stainless steel (SS304) needles and traditional gold alloy needles, which have been increasingly replaced by the former. To verify the effects of the presence of coating materials, the main test involved three different kinds of SS304: silicone-coated, salicylic acid-coated and non-coated needles. Each group of needles was tested for pH level, heavy metals and UV absorbance spectrum along with biological tests on the cytotoxicity and hemolysis of the needle. All the tests on the extractants from the needles were negative. In the biological tests, each test result showed a significant difference from the positive control samples, while no significant difference was observed compared with the negative control samples. In the hemolysis tests, all samples satisfied the Korean Government Standards. All the results suggest that SS304 needles are biologically safe to be used in warm-needling, though they can be improved to perform as well as the gold alloy needles in terms of temperature fluctuations. PMID:19098297

  8. Corrosion of stainless steels in chloride solution: An XPS investigation of passive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüesch, P.; Müller, K.; Atrens, A.; Neff, H.

    1985-09-01

    Five commercial steels ranging from the martensitic stainless steel containing 12% chromium to the superferrite containing 29% chromium, 4% molybdenum, and 2% nickel have been studied by XPS. In addition, a pure iron-chromium alloy containing 7% chromium has been investigated. Armco iron and pure chromium (99.99%) were included as references. The formation of the passive films (or corrosion) occurred in deoxygenated 0.1 M NaCl solution (pH=5.6), from which the samples were transferred directly to the XPS chamber under controlled atmosphere (Ar). Concentration profiles (at.-%) of the alloy constituents in their oxidized and metallic states have been determined separately from the measured XPS depth profiles. For c≳= 12% chromium the passive films have the following structure: there is a depletion of Cr in the inner region, followed by an enrichment (concentration maximum) in the central region of the films. The height of this maximum increases, and its position shifts towards the surface with increasing chromium content in the alloy. The outermost monolayers are rich in water and hydroxyl groups. Various significant properties of the films change drastically at the critical chromium concentration of about 12%. This behaviour is rather independent of the other components (Mo, Ni, Cu) present in the alloys and is discussed in terms of a phase transition in the films which is controlled by the chromium concentration.

  9. Microbiological test results using three urine pretreatment regimes with 316L stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    1993-01-01

    Three urine pretreatments, (1) Oxone (Dupont) and sulfuric acid, (2) sodium hypochlorite and sulfuric acid, (3) and ozone, were studied for their ability to reduce microbial levels in urine and minimize surface attachment to 316L stainless steel coupons. Urine samples inoculated with Bacillus insolitus and a filamentous mold, organisms previously recovered from the vapor compression distillation subsystem of NASA Space Station Freedom water recovery test were tested in glass corrosion cells containing base or weld metal coupons. Microbial levels, changes in pH, color, turbidity, and odor of the fluid were monitored over the course of the 21-day test. Specimen surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy at completion of the test for microbial attachment. Ozonated urine samples were less turbid and had lower microbial levels than controls or samples receiving other pretreatments. Base metal coupons receiving pretreatment were relatively free of attached bacteria. However, well-developed biofilms were found in the heat-affected regions of welded coupons receiving Oxone and hypochlorite pretreatments. Few bacteria were observed in the same regions of the ozone pretreatment sample.

  10. Weld microstructure development and properties of precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.

    1994-12-31

    Precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels provide excellent strength (170--220 ksi Y.S.) with high corrosion resistance. However, upon aging, a large reduction in toughness may also occur. The gas tungsten arc (GTA) cold wire feed process was used to weld half inch thick plates of PH 13-8 Mo and Custom 450 from which both tensile and Charpy specimens were machined. A fundamental understanding of the details of weld microstructural evolution was developed by liquid tin quenching GTA welds in which the solidification behavior, primary phase of solidification, microsegregation, and solid-state transformations could be followed. For both alloys studied, the as-welded yield strengths were similar to those of the unaged base material, 130 ksi. Weld properties were very similar to those of the base materials for both alloy systems. Weld strength increases significantly upon aging and achieves a maximum at intermediate aging temperatures. The increase in strength is accompanied by a large decrease in Charpy impact energy; however, the minimum in toughness occurs at aging temperatures slightly less than those resulting in peak strengths. The evolution of the weld microstructure was found to support predictions of microstructural modeling. Although a high degree of alloying partitioning occurs during solidification, a large degree of homogenization occurs upon further solidification and cooling as a result of solid-state diffusion.

  11. Application of martensitic, modified martensitic and duplex stainless steel bar stock for completion equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Montani, R.

    1998-12-31

    Martensitic and duplex stainless steel tubing are commonly used for oil and gas applications containing CO{sub 2}. Completion equipment manufacturing requires use of solid round bar or heavy wall hollows. Material properties for this stock are not identical in all cases. Material properties as well as corrosion characteristics are discussed for 13Cr, 13Cr-5Ni-2Mo and 25Cr alloys. Corrosion testing of modified or Enhanced 13Cr solid bar stock, UNS S41425 and other compositions in H{sub 2}S-Cl{sup {minus}} and pH is reported in coupled and uncoupled condition. Corrosion testing of various super duplex bar stock at various H{sub 2}S-chlorides and temperature in CO{sub 2} environment is reported. Impact value requirements, welding issues and special consideration required for these alloys for completion equipment is discussed. Modified 13Cr and Super Duplex Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) are readily available, however, availability of completion equipment raw material compatible with these OCTG is limited.

  12. Microstructural analysis and corrosion behavior of zirconium-stainless steel metallic waste form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N.; Abraham, G.; Sengupta, P.; Arya, Ashok; Kain, V.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Management of radioactive metallic waste using "alloy melting route" is currently being investigated by several researchers. In the present study, potentiodynamic polarizations were conducted on six as-cast zirconium (Zr)-stainless steel (SS) alloys (i.e. Zr-25, 20, 16, 12, 8 and 5wt.% SS) at pH=1, 5 and 8. Electrochemical behavior of metallic-waste-form (MWF) alloys containing more than 16wt.% SS showed lower potentials at the break down of passivity attributed to localized attack mainly at Cr-depleted matrix-intermetallic interfaces. Zr-5SS and Zr-12SS alloys contain Zr3(Fe, Cr, Ni)/Zr3(Fe, Cr)-type of phases and their interfaces with matrices were prone to localized attack. Whereas, Zr-8SS and Zr-16SS alloys demonstrated better corrosion resistance in comparison to Zr-5SS and Zr-12SS respectively. In addition, occurrence of Laves phase, e.g. Zr2(Fe, Cr), in Zr-8SS and Zr-16SS alloys makes them suitable for MWF.

  13. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  14. Chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking of powder metallurgy duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, A.; Haenninen, H.

    1996-04-01

    The chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nitrogen-alloyed, powder metallurgically (P/M) produced and hot isostatically pressed (HIP) duplex stainless steels (DSS) was investigated and compared to the SCC resistance of two commercial wrought (forged) DSS. Constant-strain (deflection) SCC tests with four-point, loaded-bend specimens were performed in aerated 50 wt% calcium chloride solution at 100 C with pH = 6.5 to 7.0. The pitting corrosion resistance index value (PREN) was not a suitable parameter to predict SCC resistance of the investigated DSS. Instead of pitting corrosion, selective corrosion of the austenite or ferrite phases seemed to determine the SCC resistance of each material. Selective corrosion was not the primary cause for failure, but it assisted the initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks. Selective corrosion was noticed in all of the investigated DSS. The corroding phase, austenite or ferrite, was dependent on the material. High copper content in the specific material slightly lowered the stress limit at which stress corrosion cracks started to grow in the used test solution. The SCC resistance of P/M-HIP DSS was as good as the SCC resistance of forged DSS. The banded microstructure of forged DSS led to a directional selective corrosion attack. The corrosion grooves were ideal sites for initiation of SCC. Because of this phenomenon, the homogeneous microstructure of P/M-HIP DSS showed clear advantages over the banded microstructure of forged DSS.

  15. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  16. Arc welding duplex stainless steels for maximum corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, T.G.; Gunn, R.N.

    1995-03-01

    Arc welding ferritic-austenitic stainless steel can influence material corrosion behavior and, therefore, service performance. This article describes the main factors in formulating a welding procedure. Depending on material composition, arc energy should be between minimum and maximum levels to promote austenite formation in the weld area without inducing intermetallic formation. Nitrogen loss should be minimized, and slight overalloying of the consumable is preferred.

  17. Deflagration in stainless steel storage containers containing plutonium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D.

    1996-02-01

    Detonation of hydrogen and oxygen in stainless steel storage containers produces maximum pressures of 68.5 psia and 426.7 psia. The cylinders contain 3,000 g of PuO{sub 2} with 0.05 wt% and 0.5 wt% water respectively. The hydrogen and oxygen are produced by the alpha decomposition of the water. Work was performed for the Savannah River Site.

  18. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  19. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D purposes.

  20. Characterization of long term aged martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubota, M.; Hattori, K.; Okada, T.

    1992-12-31

    Types CA6NM (13Cr), 431 and 630 (17Cr) were aged at 400{degrees}C and 350{degrees}C for up to 10000 hours, and their hardness change and SCC susceptibility in 288{degrees}C water were investigated. Hardness of the alloys increased with aging. Hardness of type 431 aged at 400{degrees}C for 10000 hours exceeded 340 in Hv, over which tempered martensitic stainless steels had become susceptible to SCC, and showed high SCC susceptibility. Type 630 had high SCC susceptibility in before and after aged condition, and the hardness in both conditions was more than Hv 340. Therefore, hardness was considered to be a parameter which could describe the SCC susceptibility of martensitic stainless steels. Using activation energy for hardness change 105-125kJ/mol and the critical hardness level Hv=340, the marginal life-time for martensitic stainless steels at 288{degrees}C was estimated. Predicted life of type 431 and CA6NM were around 10{sup 5} hours and more than 10{sup 6} hours, respectively. Activation energies obtained for toughness change and hardness change were different. Consequently, it was concluded that at least two factors should be taken into consideration for determining the total life-limit for usage of martensitic stainless steels in the light water reactor environment. The meaning of the existence of critical hardness for SCC susceptibility has been also discussed. Higher than 340 in Hv, yield strength and strain for uniform deformation showed a tendency of saturation. Therefore, it was conjectured that some extreme internal strain level, which may change the plastic deformation manner, is the absolute factor for determining the SCC susceptibility of the alloys in high temperature water.

  1. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Buono, Donald P. (Schenectady, NY)

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  2. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Buono, Donald P. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  3. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  4. AM363 martensitic Stainless Steel: a multiphase equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Crockett, Scott

    2015-06-01

    A multiphase equation of state for stainless steel AM363 has been developed. Three phases are constructed separately: the low pressure martensitic phase, the austenitic phase and the liquid. Room temperature data and the explicit introduction of a magnetic contribution to the free energy determine the martensitic phase, while shock Hugoniot data is used to determine the austenitic phase and the phase boundaries. More experimental data would be useful to better characterize the liquid.

  5. Highly alloyed stainless steels for sea water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Audouard, J.P.; Verneau, M.

    1996-10-01

    Natural sea water is known as a very aggressive environment which generates pitting and crevice corrosion on stainless steels. High chromium grades with sufficient molybdenum and nitrogen additions (PREN > 40) are generally recognized as resistant materials in natural sea water bu the material selection criteria must be improved to take into account the effect of climatic conditions and of biocide treatments which are widely used as anti-fouling agents in sea water circuits. The paper deals with the localized corrosion properties of conventional stainless steels (SS), duplex and superaustenitic alloys. The results of laboratory investigations conducted in more or less oxidizing chloride containing media are discussed. Then, immersion tests carried out in natural sea waters in different climatic conditions are presented and discussed. Finally, the effect of biocide addition on fouling and its consequences on corrosion is investigated. The results are interpreted taking into account the chemical composition of the stainless steels and biofilm criteria. The results showed the Mediterranean Sea to be slightly more aggressive than other European seas but a PREN value higher than 40 is sufficient for stainless steels to withstand localized corrosion in European natural sea waters. A residual chlorine level around 0.3--0.4 ppm was found to be very effective to limit the fouling and to avoid localized corrosion on SS. Nevertheless, due to difficulties in monitoring chlorine addition, PREN values higher than 50 are recommended to withstand localized corrosion in treated sea waters. As an example, the new super-austenitic grade 25Cr-22Ni-5.8Mo-1.5Cu-2W-0.45N with a PRENW value of 54 was found to be perfectly resistant to crevice corrosion with 0.5 ppm free chlorine at ambient temperature.

  6. Hydrogen trapping, diffusion, and recombination in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Trapping, diffusion, and recombination of hydrogen in austenitic stainless steels are reviewed. It is suggested that since all of these processes are strongly interdependent and since the measured recombination rates are found to vary four orders of magnitude at any temperature, the data analysis techniques used to date are insufficient. A two-region diffusion model with surface recombination is proposed in which the surface layer is characterized by a smaller diffusion coefficient than the bulk.

  7. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  8. 37. REDUCTION PLANT DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. REDUCTION PLANT - DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased within an outer steel shell (top half missing). As fish were tumbled by the rotating screen, they were cooked and dried by live steam piped into the dryer through overhead pipes. The dryer is mounted on a slight angle, aiding the process by moving the drying fish towards the exhaust end of the dryer. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  9. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurryusually lime or limestonecreates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  10. Effects of carboxyl groups on the adsorption behavior of low-molecular-weight substances on a stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Nagayasu, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Chisato; Imamura, Koreyoshi; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2004-11-15

    The adsorption isotherms of various carboxylic acids and several amines on a stainless steel surface were taken as a function of pH and the ionic strength of the solution at 30 degrees C. In particular, the effect of the number of carboxyl groups on the adsorption behavior was investigated. Monocarboxylic acids such as benzoic acid and n-butyric acid were reversibly adsorbed on the stainless steel particles and showed a Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm, i.e., Q=KqmC/(1+KC), where Q and C are, respectively, the amount of adsorbate adsorbed and the equilibrium concentration in the bulk solution, qm, the maximum adsorbed amount, and K is the adsorption equilibrium constant. Carboxylic acids having plural carboxyl groups had much higher affinity to the surface and were adsorbed in both reversible and irreversible modes. The adsorption isotherms for the carboxylic acids having plural carboxyl groups could be expressed by a modified Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm, i.e., Q=q(irrev)+Kq(rev)C/(1+KC), where q(irrev) and q(rev) are, respectively, the maximum amounts adsorbed irreversibly and reversibly. The K and q(irrev) values increased with an increase in the number of carboxyl groups except for isophthalic acid and terephthalic acid. On the basis of the pH dependencies of K, qm, q(irrev), and q(rev) as well as the surface properties of the stainless steel, both reversible and irreversible adsorptions were considered to occur through the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged carboxyl groups and the positively charged sites on the surface. The dependency of the q(irrev) value on ionic strength was discussed on the basis of the differences in their adsorbed state with the interaction forces to the surface and repulsive forces among the adsorbed molecules. The adsorption of amine components was quite weak. The RA-IR and molecular dynamics calculation were done to investigate the adsorption states of phthalic acid, trimellitic acid, and mellitic acid. PMID:15464793

  11. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  12. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich ?'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of ?-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  13. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  14. Thermo-mechanical behavior of stainless steel knitted structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdani, Syed Talha Ali; Fernando, Anura; Maqsood, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    Heating fabric is an advanced textile material that is extensively researched by the industrialists and the scientists alike. Ability to create highly flexible and drapeable heating fabrics has many applications in everyday life. This paper presents a study conducted on the comparison of heatability of knitted fabric made of stainless steel yarn. The purpose of the study is to find a suitable material for protective clothing against cold environments. In the current research the ampacity of stainless steel yarn is observed in order to prevent the overheating of the heating fabrics. The behavior of the knitted structure is studied for different levels of supply voltage. Infrared temperature sensing is used to measure the heat generated from the fabrics in order to measure the temperature of the fabrics without physical contact. It is concluded that interlock structure is one of the most suited structures for knitted heating fabrics. As learnt through this research, fabrics made of stainless steel yarn are capable of producing a higher level of heating compared to that of knitted fabric made using silver coated polymeric yarn at the same supply voltage.

  15. Electrochemical and microelectrode studies of stainless steel ennoblement

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, W.; Lewandowski, Z.

    1995-12-01

    Ennobled open-circuit potential (E{sub corr}) for stainless steel exposed to fresh river water is investigated using microelectrodes to measure dissolved oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and local E{sub corr} within the biofilm. Results indicate the biofilm is uniformly aerobic and does not contain elevated levels of cathodic depolarizers. Development of ennobled potential is observed to correlate with E{sub corr} near beginning of exposure and occurs on surfaces exhibiting as little as 20% biofilm coverage. Galvanostatic measurements of coupon capacitance reveal a strong correlation between capacitance and E{sub corr} as the latter increases during microbial colonization. Cathodic reduction measurements indicate that an increase in surface Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} content occurs for stainless steel samples that develop ennobled potential. Results suggest an ennoblement mechanism involving modifications of the metal-oxide surface. A new interpretation of cathodic polarization behavior for ennobled stainless steel is given based on proposed changes in cathodic reaction rates that occur on the microbially modified oxide surface during polarization.

  16. Tribological Properties of Stainless Steels Treated by Colossal Carbon Supersaturation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Jolly, Brian C

    2007-01-01

    A promising, alternative surface treatment to traditional case carburizing was recently developed. It enables extremely high ('colossal') super-saturation of carbon (up to 12 at%) in austenitic stainless steel surfaces. This new treatment offers the advantage of hardening the surface while still retaining the corrosion resistance of stainless steels. In this study, the tribological properties of the colossal supersaturation carburized Type 316 stainless steel were investigated and benchmarked against non-treated steel. The carburized surfaces exhibited higher hardness, higher elastic modulus, and higher corrosion resistance to acid etching than non-treated surfaces. Hot hardness measurements were conducted and linear relations between the hardness and temperature had been observed for both treated and non-treated specimens. The friction and wear characteristics were evaluated at both room and elevated temperatures (200 and 400 oC) under non-lubricated sliding conditions (pin-on-disk). Additional room-temperature tests were performed in salt water. Improved wear-resistance was observed on the treated surfaces at all test conditions, though less benefit was observed at elevated temperatures or in salt water.

  17. Yag laser welding of neutron irradiated stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, S.; Katsura, R.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.; Takahashi, H.; Koshiishi, M.; Kato, T.; Asano, K.

    1998-10-01

    Type 304L stainless steel plates of 8 mm thickness irradiated in a boiling water reactor (BWR) to 1.2 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 1.0 MeV) containing 9 appm helium from transmutation have been successfully welded using a high power Nd-YAG laser under conditions of both continuous wave (CW) and pulse modes. Unirradiated Type 316L stainless steel plate was lap welded to the irradiated Type 304L stainless steel plate under heat inputs ranging from 240 to 540 J/cm. Bead on plate welding was carried out under the same welding conditions as lap welding. Tensile tests of lap welded joints were conducted at room temperature. All joints fractured not in the irradiated materials but in the unirradiated materials and showed good mechanical properties. Based on these results it does not appear that helium affects the mechanical properties of joints. Small grain boundary cracks were observed in HAZ of the weld made by the CW YAG laser with heat inputs of 480 and 540 J/cm and crack length decreased with decreasing heat input.

  18. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  19. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  20. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.