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Sample records for 17q12 amplicon promotes

  1. Recurrent duplications of 17q12 associated with variable phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Elyse; Douglas, Andrew; Kjaegaard, Susanne; Callewaert, Bert; Vanlander, Arnaud; Janssens, Sandra; Yuen, Amy Lawson; Skinner, Cindy; Failla, Pinella; Alberti, Antonino; Avola, Emanuela; Fichera, Marco; Kibaek, Maria; Digilio, Maria C; Hannibal, Mark C; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Bizzarri, Veronica; Renieri, Alessandra; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Piazzolla, Serena; van Oudenhove, Elke; Romano, Corrado; Schwartz, Charles; Eichler, Evan E; Slavotinek, Anne; Escobar, Luis; Rajan, Diana; Crolla, John; Carter, Nigel; Hodge, Jennelle C; Mefford, Heather C

    2015-12-01

    The ability to identify the clinical nature of the recurrent duplication of chromosome 17q12 has been limited by its rarity and the diverse range of phenotypes associated with this genomic change. In order to further define the clinical features of affected patients, detailed clinical information was collected in the largest series to date (30 patients and 2 of their siblings) through a multi-institutional collaborative effort. The majority of patients presented with developmental delays varying from mild to severe. Though dysmorphic features were commonly reported, patients do not have consistent and recognizable features. Cardiac, ophthalmologic, growth, behavioral, and other abnormalities were each present in a subset of patients. The newly associated features potentially resulting from 17q12 duplication include height and weight above the 95th percentile, cataracts, microphthalmia, coloboma, astigmatism, tracheomalacia, cutaneous mosaicism, pectus excavatum, scoliosis, hypermobility, hypospadias, diverticulum of Kommerell, pyloric stenosis, and pseudohypoparathryoidism. The majority of duplications were inherited with some carrier parents reporting learning disabilities or microcephaly. We identified additional, potentially contributory copy number changes in a subset of patients, including one patient each with 16p11.2 deletion and 15q13.3 deletion. Our data further define and expand the clinical spectrum associated with duplications of 17q12 and provide support for the role of genomic modifiers contributing to phenotypic variability. PMID:26420380

  2. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia may be associated with 17q12 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goumy, Carole; Laffargue, Fanny; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Kemeny, Stéphen; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetiti; Gallot, Denis; Francannet, Christine; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Vago, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions of 17q12 encompassing TCF2 are associated with maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5, cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, Mullerian aplasia in females and variable cognitive impairment. We report on a patient with a de novo 17q12 microdeletion, 1.8 Mb in size, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The 5-year-old male patient presented multicystic renal dysplasia kidneys, minor facial dysmorphic features and skeletal anomalies, but neither developmental delay nor behavioral abnormalities. CDH has been previously associated with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome only in one prenatal case. The present study reinforces the hypothesis that CDH is part of the phenotype for 17q12 microdeletion and that 17q12 encompasses candidate(s) gene(s) involved in diaphragm development. We suggest that PIGW, a gene involved in an early step of GPI biosynthesis, could be a strong candidate gene for CDH. PMID:25425496

  3. Prenatally diagnosed 17q12 microdeletion syndrome with a novel association with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Nancy W; Clemens, Michele; Canavan, Timothy P; Surti, Urvashi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first reported case of a prenatally diagnosed and recently described 17q12 microdeletion syndrome. The fetus was noted to have a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), echogenic kidneys and cystic left lung on prenatal ultrasound. The patient underwent amniocentesis which resulted in a normal fluorescence in-situ hybridization and karyotype. An oligonucleotide microarray was then performed which demonstrated a 1.4-Mb deletion within the 17q12 region. The deletion caused haploinsufficiency for 17 genes, including AATF, ACACA, DDX52, DUSP14, GGNBP2, HNF-1B, LHX1, PIGW, SYNRG, TADA2A, and ZNHIT3. The deleted region on 17q12 is similar in size and gene content to previously reported 17q12 microdeletion syndromes, which have a minimal critical region of 1.52 Mb. The newly described 17q12 microdeletion syndrome has been associated with MODY5 (maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5), cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, liver abnormalities, cognitive impairment and structural brain abnormalities. CDH has not been previously described with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome. We hypothesize that CDH is part of the spectrum of this syndrome and likely not detected postnatally due to high prenatal mortality. PMID:22178801

  4. Clinical report of a 17q12 microdeletion with additionally unreported clinical features.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer L; Gandomi, Stephanie K; Parra, Melissa; Lu, Ira; Gau, Chia-Ling; Dasouki, Majed; Butler, Merlin G

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations involving the 17q12 region have been associated with developmental and speech delay, autism, aggression, self-injury, biting and hitting, oppositional defiance, inappropriate language, and auditory hallucinations. We present a tall-appearing 17-year-old boy with marfanoid habitus, hypermobile joints, mild scoliosis, pectus deformity, widely spaced nipples, pes cavus, autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and psychiatric manifestations including physical and verbal aggression, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, and oppositional defiance. An echocardiogram showed borderline increased aortic root size. An abdominal ultrasound revealed a small pancreas, mild splenomegaly with a 1.3 cm accessory splenule, and normal kidneys and liver. A testing panel for Marfan, aneurysm, and related disorders was negative. Subsequently, a 400 K array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) + SNP analysis was performed which identified a de novo suspected pathogenic deletion on chromosome 17q12 encompassing 28 genes. Despite the limited number of cases described in the literature with 17q12 rearrangements, our proband's phenotypic features both overlap and expand on previously reported cases. Since syndrome-specific DNA sequencing studies failed to provide an explanation for this patient's unusual habitus, we postulate that this case represents an expansion of the 17q12 microdeletion phenotype. Further analysis of the deleted interval is recommended for new genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:24991439

  5. Assignment of the Waldner blood group locus (WD) to 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinski, T.; Coghlan, G.; White, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Waldner blood group antigen (WD1) was first recognized as a distinct erythrocyte surface structure in 1978. Occurring infrequently (incidence <1/1000) in random Caucasian blood samples, WD1 was assigned to the low-incidence (700) series by the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) working party on terminology for red cell surface antigens. To date, WD1 has been identified in Hutterites from Manitoba, in Khoisans from South Africa, and in a family from Holland. Despite the isolated occurrence of WD1 in different populations, we are fortunate to have the only documented sizeable collection of families segregating for WD. In this article, we report the results of genetic linkage analyses that demonstrate that WD is somewhat loosely linked to the reference marker D17S41 at 17q12-q24 and closely linked to the anion exchange protein 1 locus (AE1) at 17q12-21. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Chromosome 17q12 microdeletions but not intragenic HNF1B mutations link developmental kidney disease and psychiatric disorder.

    PubMed

    Clissold, Rhian L; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Turnpenny, Peter; Bunce, Benjamin; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Kerecuk, Larissa; Waller, Simon; Bowman, Pamela; Ford, Tamsin; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T; Bingham, Coralie

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the HNF1B gene are the commonest known monogenic cause of developmental kidney disease. Half of patients have a deletion (approximately 1.3 Mb) of chromosome 17q12, encompassing HNF1B plus 14 additional genes. This 17q12 deletion has been linked with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism. Here we compared the neurodevelopmental phenotype of 38 patients with HNF1B-associated renal disease due to an intragenic mutation in 18 patients or due to 17q12 deletion in 20 patients to determine whether haploinsufficiency of HNF1B is responsible for the neurodevelopmental phenotype. Significantly, brief behavioral screening in children with the deletion showed high levels of psychopathology and its impact. Eight individuals (40%) with a deletion had a clinical diagnosis of a neurodevelopmental disorder compared to none with an intragenic mutation. The 17q12 deletions were also associated with more autistic traits. Two independent clinical geneticists were able to predict the presence of a deletion with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 79% when assessing facial dysmorphic features as a whole. Thus, the 17q12 deletions but not HNF1B intragenic mutations are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Hence, the HNF1B gene is not involved in the neurodevelopmental phenotype of these patients. Nephrologists need to be aware of this association to ensure appropriate referral to psychiatric services. PMID:27234567

  7. Cloning mammary cell cDNAs from 17q12-q23 using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cerosaletti, K.M.; Shapero, M.H.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned human genes that are encoded in the region 17q12-q23 and expressed in breast tissue using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization. Two mouse microcell hybrids containing fragments of human chromosome 17 with a nonoverlap region at 17q12-q23 were generated by microcell transfer. Radiolabeled cDNA was synthesized from the hybrid cell containing the 17q12-q23 interval and was subtracted with an excess of RNA from the hybrid cell lacking the interval. Resulting cDNA probes enriched for sequences from 17q12-q23 were used to screen a human premenopausal breast cDNA library, and 60 cDNAs were identified. Three of these cDNAs mapped to the hybrid cell nonoverlap region. These cDNAs were expressed in mammary epithelial cell hybrids, although none appeared to be breast-specific. Sequence analysis of the cDNAs revealed that clone 93A represents a previously unidentified gene, clone 98C has homology to an expressed sequence tag from goat mammary tissue, and clone 200A is identical to the human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene. These genes map outside a 1-cM region linked to early onset familial breast cancer but may be useful genetic markers in the 17q12-q23 region. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Recurrent reciprocal genomic rearrangements of 17q12 are associated with renal disease, diabetes, and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mefford, Heather C; Clauin, Severine; Sharp, Andrew J; Moller, Rikke S; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kapur, Raj; Pinkel, Dan; Cooper, Gregory M; Ventura, Mario; Ropers, H Hilger; Tommerup, Niels; Eichler, Evan E; Bellanne-Chantelot, Christine

    2007-11-01

    Most studies of genomic disorders have focused on patients with cognitive disability and/or peripheral nervous system defects. In an effort to broaden the phenotypic spectrum of this disease model, we assessed 155 autopsy samples from fetuses with well-defined developmental pathologies in regions predisposed to recurrent rearrangement, by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We found that 6% of fetal material showed evidence of microdeletion or microduplication, including three independent events that likely resulted from unequal crossing-over between segmental duplications. One of the microdeletions, identified in a fetus with multicystic dysplastic kidneys, encompasses the TCF2 gene on 17q12, previously shown to be mutated in maturity-onset diabetes, as well as in a subset of pediatric renal abnormalities. Fine-scale mapping of the breakpoints in different patient cohorts revealed a recurrent 1.5-Mb de novo deletion in individuals with phenotypes that ranged from congenital renal abnormalities to maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5. We also identified the reciprocal duplication, which appears to be enriched in samples from patients with epilepsy. We describe the first example of a recurrent genomic disorder associated with diabetes. PMID:17924346

  9. A radiation hybrid map of the BRCA1 region of chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.J.; Boehnke, M.; Prahalad, M.; Flejter, W.L.; Watkins, M.; Chandrasekharappa, S.C.; Glover, T.W. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI ); Ho, P.; VanderStoep, J.; Weber, B.L. ); Collins, F.S. Michigan Human Genome Center, Ann Arbor, MI Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI )

    1993-09-01

    The chromosomal region 17q12-q21 contains a gene (BRCA1) conferring susceptibility to early-onset familial breast and ovarian cancer. An 8000-rad radiation-reduced hybrid (RH) panel was constructed to provide a resource for long-range mapping of this region. A large fraction of the hybrids ([approximately]90%) retained detectable human chromosome 17 sequences. The complete panel of 76 hybrids was scored for the presence or absence of 22 markers from this chromosomal region, including 14 cloned genes, seven microsatellite repeats, and one anonymous DNA segment. Statistical analysis of the marker retention data employing multipoint methods provided both comprehensive and framework maps of this chromosomal region, including distance estimates between adjacent markers. The comprehensive RH map includes 17 loci and spans 179 cRays[sub (8000)]. Likelihood ratios of at least 1000:1 support the 10-locus framework order: cen-D17S250-ERBB2-(THRA1, TOP2A)-D17S855-PPY-D17S190-MTBT1-GP3A-BTR-D17S588-tel. The order obtained from RH mapping, when used in conjunction with other methods, will be useful in linkage analysis of breast cancer families and will facilitate the development of a physical map of this region. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Detailed gene copy number and RNA expression analysis of the 17q12-23 region in primary breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Willis, Simon; Hutchins, Anne-Marie; Hammet, Fleur; Ciciulla, John; Soo, Wee-Kheng; White, David; van der Spek, Peter; Henderson, Michael A; Gish, Kurt; Venter, Deon J; Armes, Jane E

    2003-04-01

    Chromosome region 17q12-23 commonly shows an increase in DNA copy number in breast cancers, suggesting that several oncogenes are located at this site. We performed a high-resolution expression array and comparative genomic hybridization analysis of genes mapped to the entire 17q12-23 region, to identify novel candidate oncogenes. We identified 24 genes that showed significant overexpression in breast cancers with gain of 17q12-23, compared to cancers without gain. These genes included previously identified oncogenes, together with several novel candidate oncogenes. FISH analysis using specific gene probes hybridized to tissue arrays confirmed the underlying amplification of overexpressed genes. This high-resolution analysis of the 17q12-23 region indicates that several established and novel candidate oncogenes, including a Wnt-signaling pathway member, are amplified and overexpressed within individual primary breast cancer samples. We were also able to confirm the presence of two apparently separate and reciprocally amplified groups of genes within this region. Investigation of these genes and their functional interactions will facilitate our understanding of breast oncogenesis and optimal management of this disease. PMID:12619162

  11. 17q12 Deletion in a patient with Williams syndrome: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lilian; Samanich, Joy; Pan, Quilu; Mehta, Lakshmi; Marion, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a complex genomic disorder entailing distinctive facial dysmorphism, cardiovascular abnormalities, intellectual disabilities, unusual behavioral features, and a specific cognitive profile with considerable variability. Additional symptoms include endocrine abnormalities, renal anomalies and connective tissue disorders. We report a monozygotic twin patient with WS who presented with multicystic kidneys in the newborn period, and, in addition to the typical WS deletion at 7q11.23, was found to have a de novo 1.7 Mb deletion in the 17q12 region on microarray comparative genomic hybridization. The co-twin was selectively terminated at 23 wk of gestation after being diagnosed with bilateral multicystic dysplastic kidneys and anhydramnios. Review of the literature shows that deletion of chromosome 17q12, encompassing hepatocyte nuclear factor 1beta gene, is associated with cystic renal disease and is the first recurrent genomic deletion associated with maturity onset diabetes of the young. In addition, reports of female reproductive tract malformations and patients with neurocognitive or psychiatric phenotypes have recently been described. This review of the literature summarizes 47 other cases involving 17q12 deletions with wide variability in phenotype, possibly suggesting a contiguous gene syndrome. It is likely that the additional 17q12 deletion has played a role in modifying the phenotype in our patient. This case highlights the importance of using array comparative genomic hybridization in the clinical setting to uncover the etiology of atypical findings in individuals with known microdeletion syndromes.

  12. Variants at IRF5-TNPO3, 17q12-21 and MMEL1 are associated with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Hirschfield, Gideon M; Liu, Xiangdong; Han, Younghun; Gorlov, Ivan P; Lu, Yan; Xu, Chun; Lu, Yue; Chen, Wei; Juran, Brian D; Coltescu, Catalina; Mason, Andrew L; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Myers, Robert P; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Speiciene, Danute; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Gregersen, Peter K; Zhang, Jinyi; Heathcote, E Jenny; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2010-08-01

    We genotyped individuals with primary biliary cirrhosis and unaffected controls for suggestive risk loci (genome-wide association P < 1 x 10(-4)) identified in a previous genome-wide association study. Combined analysis of the genome-wide association and replication datasets identified IRF5-TNPO3 (combined P = 8.66 x 10(-13)), 17q12-21 (combined P = 3.50 x 10(-13)) and MMEL1 (combined P = 3.15 x 10(-8)) as new primary biliary cirrhosis susceptibility loci. Fine-mapping studies showed that a single variant accounts for the IRF5-TNPO3 association. As these loci are implicated in other autoimmune conditions, these findings confirm genetic overlap among such diseases. PMID:20639879

  13. Familial site-specific Ovarian cancer is linked to BRCA1 on 17q12-21

    SciTech Connect

    Steichen-Gersdorf, E.; Gallion, H.H.; Ponder, M.A.; Pye, C.; Mazoyer, S.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.F.; Girodet, C.

    1994-11-01

    In a study of nine families with {open_quotes}site-specific{close_quotes} ovarian cancer (criterion: three or more cases of epithelial ovarian cancer and no cases of breast cancer diagnosed at age <50 years) we have obtained evidence of linkage to the breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 on 17q12-21. If the risk of cancer in these families is assumed to be restricted to the ovary, the best estimate of the proportion of families linked to BRCA1 is .78 (95% confidence interval .32-1.0). If predisposition to both breast and ovarian cancer is assumed, the proportion linked is 1.0 (95% confidence interval .46-1.0). The linkage of familial site-specific ovarian cancer to BRCA1 indicates the possibility of predictive testing in such families; however, this is only appropriate in families where the evidence for linkage to BRCA1 is conclusive. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. High-density genetic map of the BRCA1 region of chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.A.; Friedman, L.; Lynch, E.; King, M.C. ); Osborne-Lawrence, S.; Bowcock, A. ); Weissenbach, J. )

    1993-09-01

    To facilitate the positional cloning of the breast-ovarian cancer gene BRCA1, the authors constructed a high-density genetic map of the 8.3-cM interval between D17S250 and GIP on chromosome 17q12-q21. Markers were mapped by linkage in the CEPH and in extended kindreds in the breast cancer series. The map comprises 33 ordered polymorphisms, including 12 genes and 21 anonymous markers, yielding an average of one polymorphism every 250 kb. Twenty-five of the markers are PCR-based systems. The order of polymorphic genes and markers is cen-D17S250-D17S518-HER2-THRA1-RARA-D17S80-KRT10-[D17S800-D17S857]-GAS-D17S856-EDH17B-D17S855-D17S859-D17S858-[PPY-D17S78]-D17S183-EPB3-D17S579-D17S509-[D17S508-D17S190 = D17S810]-D17S791-[D17S181 = D17S806]-D17S797-HOX2B-GP3A-[D17S507 = GIP]-qter. BRCA1 lies in the middle of the interval, between THRA1 and D17S183. Markers from this map can be used to determine whether cancer is linked to BRCA1 in families, to evaluate whether tumors have lost heterozygosity at loci in the region, and to identify probes for characterizing chromosomal rearrangements from patients and from tumors. 21 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide in childhood is associated with 17q11.2-q12 and 17q12-q21 variants

    PubMed Central

    Timpson, Nicolas J; Salam, Muhammad T; Standl, Marie; Curtin, John A; Genuneit, Jon; Kerhof, Marjan; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Cáceres, Alejandro; Gref, Anna; Liang, Liming L; Taal, H Rob; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Demenais, Florence; Nadif, Rachel; Ober, Carole; Thompson, Emma E; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornélia; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Li, Xia; Eckel, Sandrah P; Berhane, Kiros; Gauderman, W James; Granell, Raquel; Evans, David M; St Pourcain, Beate; McArdle, Wendy; Kemp, John P; Smith, George Davey; Tiesler, Carla MT; Flexeder, Claudia; Simpson, Angela; Murray, Clare S; Fuchs, Oliver; Postma, Dirkje S; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Torrent, Maties; Andersson, Martin; Sleiman, Patrick; Hakonarson, Hakon; Cookson, William O; Moffatt, Miriam F; Paternoster, Lavinia; Melén, Erik; Sunyer, Jordi; Bisgaard, Hans; Koppelman, Gerard H; Ege, Markus; Custovic, Adnan; Heinrich, Joachim; Gilliland, Frank D; Henderson, Alexander J; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; de Jongste, Johan C

    2014-01-01

    Background The fractional concentration of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) is a biomarker of eosinophilic airway inflammation and associated with childhood asthma. Identification of common genetic variants associated with childhood FeNO may help to define biological mechanisms related to specific asthma phenotypes. Objective To identify genetic variants associated with childhood FeNO, and their relation with asthma. Methods FeNO was measured in children aged 5 to 15 years. In 14 genome-wide association (GWA) studies (N = 8,858), we examined the associations of ~2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with FeNO. Subsequently, we assessed whether significant SNPs were expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in genome-wide expression datasets of lymphoblastoid cell lines (N = 1,830), and were related with asthma in a previously published GWA dataset (cases: n=10,365; controls: n=16,110). Results We identified 3 SNPs associated with FeNO: rs3751972 in LYR motif containing 9 (LYRM9) (P = 1.97×10−10) and rs944722 in inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) (P = 1.28×10−9) both located at 17q11.2-q12, and rs8069176 near gasdermin B (GSDMB) (P = 1.88×10−8) at 17q12-q21. We found a cis eQTL for the transcript soluble galactoside-binding lectin 9 (LGALS9) that is in linkage disequilibrium with rs944722. Rs8069176 was associated with GSDMB and ORM1-like 3 (ORMDL3) expression. Rs8069176 at 17q12-q21, and not rs3751972 and rs944722 at 17q11.2-q12, were associated with physician-diagnosed asthma. Conclusion This study identified 3 variants associated with FeNO, explaining 0.95% of the variance. Identification of functional SNPs and haplotypes in these regions might provide novel insight in the regulation of FeNO. This study highlights that both shared and distinct genetic factors affect FeNO and childhood asthma. PMID:24315451

  16. Multicolor FISH mapping with Alu-PCR-amplified YAC clone DNA determines the order of markers in the BRCA1 region on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Flejter, W.J.; Glover, T.W.; Barcroft, C.L.; Guo, Sun Wei; Boehnke, M.; Chandrasekharappa, S.; Collins, F.S. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI ); Lynch, E.D. ); Hayes, S. ); Weber, B.L. )

    1993-09-01

    A gene designated BRCA1, implicated in the susceptibility to early-onset familial breast cancer, has recently been localized to chromosome 17q12-q21. To date, the order of DNA markers mapped within this region has been based on genetic linkage analysis. The authors report the use of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization to establish a physically based map of five polymorphic DNA markers and 10 cloned genes spanning this region. Three cosmid clones and Alu-PCR-Generated products derived from 12 yeast artificial chromosome clones representing each of these markers were used in two-color mapping experiments to determine an initial proximity of markers relative to each other on metaphase chromosomes. Interphase mapping was then employed to determine the order and orientation of closely spaced loci by direct visualization of fluorescent signals following hybridization of three probes, each detected in a different color. Statistical analysis of the combined data suggests that the order of markers in the BRCA1 regions is cen-THRA1-TOP2-GAS-OF2-17HSD-248yg9-RNU2-OF3-PPY/p131-EPB3-Mfd188-WNT3-HOX2-GP3A-tel. This map is consistent with that determined by radiation-reduced hybrid mapping and will facilitate positional cloning strategies in efforts to isolate and characterize the BRCA1 gene. 27 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies two new susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer at 5q23.3 and 17q12 in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Liang; Guo, Yong; Guo, Sutang; Li, Hai; Zhang, Lianhai; Zhou, Yanbing; Jiang, Bo; Ren, Yonghong; Xu, Youchun; Yang, Xiongfei; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Yirui; Shen, Zhanlong; Qin, Wenyan; Guo, Peng; Jiang, Yuyang; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Yinxue; Wang, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have reported a number of loci harboring common variants that influence risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in European descent. But all the SNPs identified explained a small fraction of total heritability. To identify more genetic factors that modify the risk of CRC, especially Chinese Han specific, we conducted a three-stage GWAS including a screening stage (932 CRC cases and 966 controls) and two independent validations (Stage 2: 1,759 CRC cases and 1,875 controls; Stage 3: 943 CRC cases and 1,838 controls). In the combined analyses, we discovered two novel loci associated with CRC: rs12522693 at 5q23.3 (CDC42SE2-CHSY3, OR = 1.31, P = 2.08 × 10−8) and rs17836917 at 17q12 (ASIC2-CCL2, OR = 0.75, P = 4.55 × 10−8). Additionally, we confirmed two previously reported risk loci, rs6983267 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.17, P = 7.17 × 10−7) and rs10795668 at 10p14 (OR = 0.86, P = 2.96 × 10−6) in our cohorts. These results bring further insights into the CRC susceptibility and advance our understanding on etiology of CRC. PMID:26515597

  18. Isolation of a gene (DLG3) encoding a second member of the discs-large family on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.A.; Holik, P.; Stevens, J.

    1996-01-15

    The discs-large family is a collection of proteins that have a common structural organization and are thought to be involved in signal transduction and mediating protein-protein interactions at the cytoplasmic surface of the cell membrane. The defining member of this group of proteins is the gene product of the Drosophila lethal (1) discs large (dlg) 1 locus, which was originally identified by the analysis of recessive lethal mutants. Germline mutations in dlg result in loss of apical-basolateral polarity, disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion, and neoplastic overgrowth of the imaginal disc epithelium. We have isolated and characterized a novel human gene, DLG3, that encodes a new member of the discs-large family of proteins. The putative DLG3 gene product has a molecular weight of 66 kDa and contains a discs-large homologous region, an src oncogene homology motif 3, and a domain with homology to guanylate kinase. The DLG3 gene is located on chromosome 17, in the same segment, 17q12-q21, as the related gene, DLG2. The products of the DLG2 and DLG3 genes show 36% identity and 58% similarity to each other, and both show nearly 60% sequence similarity to p55, an erythroid phosphoprotein that is a component of the red cell membrane. We suggest that p55, DLG2, and DLG3 are closely related members of a gene family, whose protein products have a common structural organization and probably a similar function. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  19. The human insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 gene maps to chromosome region 17q12-q21. 1 and is close to the gene for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tonin, P.; Vivier, A.; Morgan, K.; Narod, S.; Pollack, M. ); Ehrenborg, E.; Zazzi, H.; Luthman, H.; Larsson, C. ); Lenoir, G. )

    1993-11-01

    The gene for insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP4) codes for a serum protein that binds to the family of insulin-like growth factors and modulates their activity. It has been mapped by in situ hybridization to chromosome region 17q12-q21.1. The authors have developed a CA-repeat polymorphism from a cosmid clone containing IGFBP4. By linkage analysis, IGFBP4 maps to the chromosome 17q interval THRA1-D17S579. This interval also contains the gene for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, BRCA1. Genetic recombination between IGFBP4 and BRCA1 places IGFBP4 centromeric to the cancer susceptibility gene and effectively excludes it as a candidate gene for BRCA1. IGFBP4 is, however, one of the closest known centromeric markers for BRCA1; the estimated recombination fraction is 0.015. IGFBP4 and D17S579 together define a 2.8-cM interval that contains BRCA1. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The HER2 amplicon includes several genes required for the growth and survival of HER2 positive breast cancer cells — A data description

    PubMed Central

    Hongisto, Vesa; Aure, Miriam Ragle; Mäkelä, Rami; Sahlberg, Kristine Kleivi

    2014-01-01

    A large number of breast cancers are characterized by amplification and overexpression of the chromosome segment surrounding the HER2 (ERBB2) oncogene. As the HER2 amplicon at 17q12 contains multiple genes, we have systematically explored the role of the HER2 co-amplified genes in breast cancer cell growth and their relation to trastuzumab resistance. We integrated array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data of the HER2 amplicon from 71 HER2 positive breast tumors and 10 cell lines with systematic functional RNA interference analysis of 23 core amplicon genes with several phenotypic endpoints in a panel of trastuzumab responding and non-responding HER2 positive breast cancer cells. In this Data in Brief we give a detailed description of the experimental procedures and the data analysis methods used in the study (1). PMID:26484103

  1. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S. N.

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether there are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.

  2. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether theremore » are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.« less

  3. Association analysis of ERBB2 amplicon genetic polymorphisms and STARD3 expression with risk of gastric cancer in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yue; Zhang, Zuo-Yang; Du, Wei-Dong; Ye, Lei; Xu, Song; Zuo, Xian-Bo; Zhou, Fu-Sheng; Chen, Gang; Ma, Xue-Ling; Schneider, Marion E; Xia, Hong-Zhen; Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Ji-Feng; Yuan-Hong, Xu; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2014-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether risk of gastric cancer (GC) was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene cluster on the chromosome 17q12-q21 (ERBB2 amplicon) in the Chinese Han population. We detected twenty-six SNPs in this gene cluster containing steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer domain containing 3 (STARD3), protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 1B (PPP1R1B/DARPP32), titin-cap (TCAP), per1-like domain containing 1(PERLD1/CAB2), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (ERBB2/HER2), zinc-finger protein subfamily 1A 3 (ZNFN1A3/IKZF3) and DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha (TOP2A) genes in 311 patients with GC and in 425 controls by Sequenom. We found no associations between genetic variations and GC risk. However, haplotype analysis implied that the haplotype CCCT of STARD3 (rs9972882, rs881844, rs11869286 and rs1877031) conferred a protective effect on the susceptibility to GC (P=0.043, odds ratio [OR]=0.805, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI]=0.643-0.992). The STARD3 rs1877031 TC genotype endued histogenesis of gastric mucinous adenocarcinoma and signet-ring cell carcinoma (P=0.021, OR=2.882, 95% CI=1.173-7.084). We examined the expression of STARD3 in 243 tumor tissues out of the 311 GC patients and 20 adjacent normal gastric tissues using immumohistochemical (IHC) analysis and tissue microarrays (TMA). The expression of STARD3 was observed in the gastric parietal cells and in gastric tumor tissues and significantly correlated with gender (P=0.004), alcohol drinking (P<0.001), tumor location (P=0.007), histological type (P=0.005) and differentiation (P=0.023) in GC. We concluded that the combined effect of haplotype CCCT of STARD3 might affect GC susceptibility. STARD3 expression might be related to the tumorigenesis of GC in the Chinese population. PMID:24291029

  4. Amplicon-based metagenomics identified candidate organisms in soils that caused yield decline in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangming; Passey, Thomas; Wei, Feng; Saville, Robert; Harrison, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of yield decline due to weak plant growth in strawberry was recently observed in non-chemo-fumigated soils, which was not associated with the soil fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, the main target of fumigation. Amplicon-based metagenomics was used to profile soil microbiota in order to identify microbial organisms that may have caused the yield decline. A total of 36 soil samples were obtained in 2013 and 2014 from four sites for metagenomic studies; two of the four sites had a yield-decline problem, the other two did not. More than 2000 fungal or bacterial operational taxonomy units (OTUs) were found in these samples. Relative abundance of individual OTUs was statistically compared for differences between samples from sites with or without yield decline. A total of 721 individual comparisons were statistically significant - involving 366 unique bacterial and 44 unique fungal OTUs. Based on further selection criteria, we focused on 34 bacterial and 17 fungal OTUs and found that yield decline resulted probably from one or more of the following four factors: (1) low abundance of Bacillus and Pseudomonas populations, which are well known for their ability of supressing pathogen development and/or promoting plant growth; (2) lack of the nematophagous fungus (Paecilomyces species); (3) a high level of two non-specific fungal root rot pathogens; and (4) wet soil conditions. This study demonstrated the usefulness of an amplicon-based metagenomics approach to profile soil microbiota and to detect differential abundance in microbes. PMID:26504572

  5. Amplicon-based metagenomics identified candidate organisms in soils that caused yield decline in strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangming; Passey, Thomas; Wei, Feng; Saville, Robert; Harrison, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon of yield decline due to weak plant growth in strawberry was recently observed in non-chemo-fumigated soils, which was not associated with the soil fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, the main target of fumigation. Amplicon-based metagenomics was used to profile soil microbiota in order to identify microbial organisms that may have caused the yield decline. A total of 36 soil samples were obtained in 2013 and 2014 from four sites for metagenomic studies; two of the four sites had a yield-decline problem, the other two did not. More than 2000 fungal or bacterial operational taxonomy units (OTUs) were found in these samples. Relative abundance of individual OTUs was statistically compared for differences between samples from sites with or without yield decline. A total of 721 individual comparisons were statistically significant – involving 366 unique bacterial and 44 unique fungal OTUs. Based on further selection criteria, we focused on 34 bacterial and 17 fungal OTUs and found that yield decline resulted probably from one or more of the following four factors: (1) low abundance of Bacillus and Pseudomonas populations, which are well known for their ability of supressing pathogen development and/or promoting plant growth; (2) lack of the nematophagous fungus (Paecilomyces species); (3) a high level of two non-specific fungal root rot pathogens; and (4) wet soil conditions. This study demonstrated the usefulness of an amplicon-based metagenomics approach to profile soil microbiota and to detect differential abundance in microbes. PMID:26504572

  6. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P.; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S.M.; Hillmer, Axel M.; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Hidalgo Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  7. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy; Miranda, Alfredo Hidalgo; Liu, Edison T

    2014-10-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  8. AmpliconDuo: A Split-Sample Filtering Protocol for High-Throughput Amplicon Sequencing of Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Anja; Jost, Steffen; Heider, Dominik; Bock, Christina; Budeus, Bettina; Schilling, Elmar; Strittmatter, Axel; Boenigk, Jens; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTSeq) of small ribosomal subunit amplicons has the potential for a comprehensive characterization of microbial community compositions, down to rare species. However, the error-prone nature of the multi-step experimental process requires that the resulting raw sequences are subjected to quality control procedures. These procedures often involve an abundance cutoff for rare sequences or clustering of sequences, both of which limit genetic resolution. Here we propose a simple experimental protocol that retains the high genetic resolution granted by HTSeq methods while effectively removing many low abundance sequences that are likely due to PCR and sequencing errors. According to this protocol, we split samples and submit both halves to independent PCR and sequencing runs. The resulting sequence data is graphically and quantitatively characterized by the discordance between the two experimental branches, allowing for a quick identification of problematic samples. Further, we discard sequences that are not found in both branches (“AmpliconDuo filter”). We show that the majority of sequences removed in this way, mostly low abundance but also some higher abundance sequences, show features expected from random modifications of true sequences as introduced by PCR and sequencing errors. On the other hand, the filter retains many low abundance sequences observed in both branches and thus provides a more reliable census of the rare biosphere. We find that the AmpliconDuo filter increases biological resolution as it increases apparent community similarity between biologically similar communities, while it does not affect apparent community similarities between biologically dissimilar communities. The filter does not distort overall apparent community compositions. Finally, we quantitatively explain the effect of the AmpliconDuo filter by a simple mathematical model. PMID:26523925

  9. DNA-based methods to prepare helper virus-free herpes amplicon vectors and versatile design of amplicon vector plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kazue; Saeki, Yoshinaga

    2006-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector is a versatile plasmid-based gene delivery vehicle with a large transgene capacity (up to 150 kb) and the ability to infect a broad range of cell types. The vector system was originally developed by Frenkel and her colleagues in 1980. Ever since, a great deal of effort by various investigators has been directed at minimizing the toxicity associated with the inevitable contamination by helper virus. In 1996, Fraefel and his colleagues successfully devised a cosmid-based packaging system that was free of contamination by helper virus (so-called helper virus-free packaging), which utilized as helper a set of 5 overlapping cosmid clones that covered the entire HSV genome, which lacked the DNA packaging/cleavage signals. With the helper virus-free system, broader applications of the vector became possible. Cloning of the entire HSV genome in bacteria artificial chromosome (BAC) plasmids enabled stable maintenance and propagation of the helper HSV genome in bacteria. It also allowed for the development of BAC-based helper virus-free packaging systems. In this article, we review various versions of DNA-based methods to prepare HSV amplicon vectors free of helper virus contamination. We also examine recent advances in vector design, including methods of vector construction, hybrid amplicon vectors, and the infectious BAC system. Future directions in improving packaging systems and vector designs are discussed. PMID:16787182

  10. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  11. Mutascope: sensitive detection of somatic mutations from deep amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Shawn E.; Alakus, Hakan; Matsui, Hiroko; Schwab, Richard B.; Jepsen, Kristen; Frazer, Kelly A.; Harismendy, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Summary: We present Mutascope, a sequencing analysis pipeline specifically developed for the identification of somatic variants present at low-allelic fraction from high-throughput sequencing of amplicons from matched tumor-normal specimen. Using datasets reproducing tumor genetic heterogeneity, we demonstrate that Mutascope has a higher sensitivity and generates fewer false-positive calls than tools designed for shotgun sequencing or diploid genomes. Availability: Freely available on the web at http://sourceforge.net/projects/mutascope/. Contact: oharismendy@ucsd.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23712659

  12. Variants at IRF5-TNPO3, 17q12-21 and MMEL1 are associated with primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfield, Gideon M; Liu, Xiangdong; Han, Younghun; Gorlov, Ivan P; Lu, Yan; Xu, Chun; Lu, Yue; Chen, Wei; Juran, Brian D; Coltescu, Catalina; Mason, Andrew L; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Myers, Robert P; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Speiciene, Danute; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Gregersen, Peter K; Zhang, Jinyi; Heathcote, E Jenny; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2010-01-01

    We genotyped individuals with primary biliary cirrhosis and unaffected controls for suggestive risk loci (genome-wide association P < 1 × 10−4) identified in a previous genome-wide association study. Combined analysis of the genome-wide association and replication datasets identified IRF5-TNPO3 (combined P = 8.66 × 10−13), 7q12-21 (combined P = 3.50 × 10−13) and MMEL1 (combined P = 3.15 × 10−8) as new primary biliary cirrhosis susceptibility loci. Fine-mapping studies showed that a single variant accounts for the IRF5-TNPO3 association. As these loci are implicated in other autoimmune conditions, these findings confirm genetic overlap among such diseases. PMID:20639879

  13. The herpes simplex virus amplicon: analyses of cis-acting replication functions.

    PubMed Central

    Spaete, R R; Frenkel, N

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that defective virus vectors (amplicons) derived from herpes simplex viruses could be efficiently propagated in virus stocks in the presence of trans-acting helper virus functions. The present study established that two separate cis-acting functions--a DNA replication origin and a cleavage/packaging signal--are required for amplicon propagation. Using deleted derivatives of cloned amplicons, we mapped one of the viral DNA replication origins (ori-2 or oriL) at coordinate 0.422 of the standard HSV-1 genome and at an equivalent position within the HSV-2 genome. Images PMID:2983310

  14. Amplicon pyrosequencing reveals the soil microbial diversity associated with invasive Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii DC.).

    PubMed

    Coats, V C; Pelletreau, K N; Rumpho, M E

    2014-03-01

    The soil microbial community acts as a reservoir of microbes that directly influences the structure and composition of the aboveground plant community, promotes plant growth, increases stress tolerance and mediates local patterns of nutrient cycling. Direct interactions between plants and rhizosphere-dwelling microorganisms occur at, or near, the surface of the root. Upon introduction and establishment, invasive plants modify the soil microbial communities and soil biochemistry affecting bioremediation efforts and future plant communities. Here, we used tag-encoded FLX amplicon 454 pyrosequencing (TEFAP) to characterize the bacterial and fungal community diversity in the rhizosphere of Berberis thunbergii DC. (Japanese barberry) from invasive stands in coastal Maine to investigate effects of soil type, soil chemistry and surrounding plant cover on the soil microbial community structure. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia were the dominant bacterial phyla, whereas fungal communities were comprised mostly of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla members, including Agaricomycetes and Sordariomycetes. Bulk soil chemistry had more effect on the bacterial community structure than the fungal community. An effect of geographic location was apparent in the rhizosphere microbial communities, yet it was less significant than the effect of surrounding plant cover. These data demonstrate a high degree of spatial variation in the rhizosphere microbial communities of Japanese barberry with apparent effects of soil chemistry, location and canopy cover on the microbial community structure. PMID:24118303

  15. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  16. Taxonomic Assessment of Rumen Microbiota Using Total RNA and Targeted Amplicon Sequencing Approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuyong; Henderson, Gemma; Sun, Xu; Cox, Faith; Janssen, Peter H; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of active gastrointestinal microbiota is essential to detect shifts in microbial communities and functions under various conditions. This study aimed to identify and quantify potentially active rumen microbiota using total RNA sequencing and to compare the outcomes of this approach with the widely used targeted RNA/DNA amplicon sequencing technique. Total RNA isolated from rumen digesta samples from five beef steers was subjected to Illumina paired-end sequencing (RNA-seq), and bacterial and archaeal amplicons of partial 16S rRNA/rDNA were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing (RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq). Taxonomic assessments of the RNA-seq, RNA Amplicon-seq, and DNA Amplicon-seq datasets were performed using a pipeline developed in house. The detected major microbial phylotypes were common among the three datasets, with seven bacterial phyla, fifteen bacterial families, and five archaeal taxa commonly identified across all datasets. There were also unique microbial taxa detected in each dataset. Elusimicrobia and Verrucomicrobia phyla; Desulfovibrionaceae, Elusimicrobiaceae, and Sphaerochaetaceae families; and Methanobrevibacter woesei were only detected in the RNA-Seq and RNA Amplicon-seq datasets, whereas Streptococcaceae was only detected in the DNA Amplicon-seq dataset. In addition, the relative abundances of four bacterial phyla, eight bacterial families and one archaeal taxon were different among the three datasets. This is the first study to compare the outcomes of rumen microbiota profiling between RNA-seq and RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq datasets. Our results illustrate the differences between these methods in characterizing microbiota both qualitatively and quantitatively for the same sample, and so caution must be exercised when comparing data. PMID:27446027

  17. Taxonomic Assessment of Rumen Microbiota Using Total RNA and Targeted Amplicon Sequencing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyong; Henderson, Gemma; Sun, Xu; Cox, Faith; Janssen, Peter H.; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic characterization of active gastrointestinal microbiota is essential to detect shifts in microbial communities and functions under various conditions. This study aimed to identify and quantify potentially active rumen microbiota using total RNA sequencing and to compare the outcomes of this approach with the widely used targeted RNA/DNA amplicon sequencing technique. Total RNA isolated from rumen digesta samples from five beef steers was subjected to Illumina paired-end sequencing (RNA-seq), and bacterial and archaeal amplicons of partial 16S rRNA/rDNA were subjected to 454 pyrosequencing (RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq). Taxonomic assessments of the RNA-seq, RNA Amplicon-seq, and DNA Amplicon-seq datasets were performed using a pipeline developed in house. The detected major microbial phylotypes were common among the three datasets, with seven bacterial phyla, fifteen bacterial families, and five archaeal taxa commonly identified across all datasets. There were also unique microbial taxa detected in each dataset. Elusimicrobia and Verrucomicrobia phyla; Desulfovibrionaceae, Elusimicrobiaceae, and Sphaerochaetaceae families; and Methanobrevibacter woesei were only detected in the RNA-Seq and RNA Amplicon-seq datasets, whereas Streptococcaceae was only detected in the DNA Amplicon-seq dataset. In addition, the relative abundances of four bacterial phyla, eight bacterial families and one archaeal taxon were different among the three datasets. This is the first study to compare the outcomes of rumen microbiota profiling between RNA-seq and RNA/DNA Amplicon-seq datasets. Our results illustrate the differences between these methods in characterizing microbiota both qualitatively and quantitatively for the same sample, and so caution must be exercised when comparing data. PMID:27446027

  18. Mapping and characterization of the amplicon near APOA2 in 1q23 in human sarcomas by FISH and array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Kresse, Stine H; Berner, Jeanne-Marie; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Gregory, Simon G; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W; Forus, Anne; Myklebost, Ola

    2005-01-01

    Background Amplification of the q21-q23 region on chromosome 1 is frequently found in sarcomas and a variety of other solid tumours. Previous analyses of sarcomas have indicated the presence of at least two separate amplicons within this region, one located in 1q21 and one located near the apolipoprotein A-II (APOA2) gene in 1q23. In this study we have mapped and characterized the amplicon in 1q23 in more detail. Results We have used fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) to map and define the borders of the amplicon in 10 sarcomas. A subregion of approximately 800 kb was identified as the core of the amplicon. The amplification patterns of nine possible candidate target genes located to this subregion were determined by Southern blot analysis. The genes activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and dual specificity phosphatase 12 (DUSP12) showed the highest level of amplification, and they were also shown to be over-expressed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In general, the level of expression reflected the level of amplification in the different tumours. DUSP12 was expressed significantly higher than ATF6 in a subset of the tumours. In addition, two genes known to be transcriptionally activated by ATF6, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa and -94 kDa (GRP78 and GRP94), were shown to be over-expressed in the tumours that showed over-expression of ATF6. Conclusion ATF6 and DUSP12 seem to be the most likely candidate target genes for the 1q23 amplification in sarcomas. Both genes have possible roles in promoting cell growth, which makes them interesting candidate targets. PMID:16274472

  19. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/. PMID:26424080

  20. Efficient error correction for next-generation sequencing of viral amplicons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing allows the analysis of an unprecedented number of viral sequence variants from infected patients, presenting a novel opportunity for understanding virus evolution, drug resistance and immune escape. However, sequencing in bulk is error prone. Thus, the generated data require error identification and correction. Most error-correction methods to date are not optimized for amplicon analysis and assume that the error rate is randomly distributed. Recent quality assessment of amplicon sequences obtained using 454-sequencing showed that the error rate is strongly linked to the presence and size of homopolymers, position in the sequence and length of the amplicon. All these parameters are strongly sequence specific and should be incorporated into the calibration of error-correction algorithms designed for amplicon sequencing. Results In this paper, we present two new efficient error correction algorithms optimized for viral amplicons: (i) k-mer-based error correction (KEC) and (ii) empirical frequency threshold (ET). Both were compared to a previously published clustering algorithm (SHORAH), in order to evaluate their relative performance on 24 experimental datasets obtained by 454-sequencing of amplicons with known sequences. All three algorithms show similar accuracy in finding true haplotypes. However, KEC and ET were significantly more efficient than SHORAH in removing false haplotypes and estimating the frequency of true ones. Conclusions Both algorithms, KEC and ET, are highly suitable for rapid recovery of error-free haplotypes obtained by 454-sequencing of amplicons from heterogeneous viruses. The implementations of the algorithms and data sets used for their testing are available at: http://alan.cs.gsu.edu/NGS/?q=content/pyrosequencing-error-correction-algorithm PMID:22759430

  1. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/ PMID:26424080

  2. Integration of complete chloroplast genome sequences with small amplicon datasets improves phylogenetic resolution in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anna V; Miller, Joseph T; Small, Ian; Nevill, Paul G; Boykin, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Combining whole genome data with previously obtained amplicon sequences has the potential to increase the resolution of phylogenetic analyses, particularly at low taxonomic levels or where recent divergence, rapid speciation or slow genome evolution has resulted in limited sequence variation. However, the integration of these types of data for large scale phylogenetic studies has rarely been investigated. Here we conduct a phylogenetic analysis of the whole chloroplast genome and two nuclear ribosomal loci for 65 Acacia species from across the most recent Acacia phylogeny. We then combine this data with previously generated amplicon sequences (four chloroplast loci and two nuclear ribosomal loci) for 508 Acacia species. We use several phylogenetic methods, including maximum likelihood bootstrapping (with and without constraint) and ExaBayes, in order to determine the success of combining a dataset of 4000bp with one of 189,000bp. The results of our study indicate that the inclusion of whole genome data gave a far better resolved and well supported representation of the phylogenetic relationships within Acacia than using only amplicon sequences, with the greatest support observed when using a whole genome phylogeny as a constraint on the amplicon sequences. Our study therefore provides methods for optimal integration of genomic and amplicon sequences. PMID:26702955

  3. Assessing copy number alterations in targeted, amplicon-based next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Catherine; Butler, Timothy; Rhodes, Katherine; Quist, Michael; Neff, Tanaya L; Moore, Stephen; Tomlins, Scott A; Reinig, Erica; Beadling, Carol; Andersen, Mark; Corless, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene copy number are important in the setting of precision medicine. Recent studies have established that copy number alterations (CNAs) can be detected in sequencing libraries prepared by hybridization-capture, but there has been comparatively little attention given to CNA assessment in amplicon-based libraries prepared by PCR. In this study, we developed an algorithm for detecting CNAs in amplicon-based sequencing data. CNAs determined from the algorithm mirrored those from a hybridization-capture library. In addition, analysis of 14 pairs of matched normal and breast carcinoma tissues revealed that sequence data pooled from normal samples could be substituted for a matched normal tissue without affecting the detection of clinically relevant CNAs (>|2| copies). Comparison of CNAs identified by array comparative genomic hybridization and amplicon-based libraries across 10 breast carcinoma samples showed an excellent correlation. The CNA algorithm also compared favorably with fluorescence in situ hybridization, with agreement in 33 of 38 assessments across four different genes. Factors that influenced the detection of CNAs included the number of amplicons per gene, the average read depth, and, most important, the proportion of tumor within the sample. Our results show that CNAs can be identified in amplicon-based targeted sequencing data, and that their detection can be optimized by ensuring adequate tumor content and read coverage. PMID:25468433

  4. Analysis of a Drosophila amplicon in follicle cells highlights the diversity of metazoan replication origins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jane C; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the properties of metazoan replication origins, recent studies in cell culture have adopted the strategy of identifying origins using genome-wide approaches and assessing correlations with such features as transcription and histone modifications. Drosophila amplicon in follicle cells (DAFCs), genomic regions that undergo repeated rounds of DNA replication to increase DNA copy number, serve as powerful in vivo model replicons. Because there are six DAFCs, compared with thousands of origins activated in the typical S phase, close molecular characterization of all DAFCs is possible. To determine the extent to which the six DAFCs are different or similar, we investigated the developmental and replication properties of the newly identified DAFC-34B. DAFC-34B contains two genes expressed in follicle cells, although the timing and spatial patterns of expression suggest that amplification is not a strategy to promote high expression at this locus. Like the previously characterized DAFC-62D, DAFC-34B displays origin activation at two separate stages of development. However, unlike DAFC-62D, amplification at the later stage is not transcription-dependent. We mapped the DAFC-34B amplification origin to 1 kb by nascent strand analysis and delineated cis requirements for origin activation, finding that a 6-kb region, but not the 1-kb origin alone, is sufficient for amplification. We analyzed the developmental localization of the origin recognition complex (ORC) and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM)2-7 complex, the replicative helicase. Intriguingly, the final round of origin activation at DAFC-34B occurs in the absence of detectable ORC, although MCMs are present, suggesting a new amplification initiation mechanism. PMID:21933960

  5. Silencing Status Epilepticus-Induced BDNF Expression with Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Based Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Falcicchia, Chiara; Trempat, Pascal; Binaschi, Anna; Perrier-Biollay, Coline; Roncon, Paolo; Soukupova, Marie; Berthommé, Hervé; Simonato, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to produce pro- but also anti-epileptic effects. Thus, its validity as a therapeutic target must be verified using advanced tools designed to block or to enhance its signal. The aim of this study was to develop tools to silence the BDNF signal. We generated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) derived amplicon vectors, i.e. viral particles containing a genome of 152 kb constituted of concatameric repetitions of an expression cassette, enabling the expression of the gene of interest in multiple copies. HSV-1 based amplicon vectors are non-pathogenic and have been successfully employed in the past for gene delivery into the brain of living animals. Therefore, amplicon vectors should represent a logical choice for expressing a silencing cassette, which, in multiple copies, is expected to lead to an efficient knock-down of the target gene expression. Here, we employed two amplicon-based BDNF silencing strategies. The first, antisense, has been chosen to target and degrade the cytoplasmic mRNA pool of BDNF, whereas the second, based on the convergent transcription technology, has been chosen to repress transcription at the BDNF gene. Both these amplicon vectors proved to be effective in down-regulating BDNF expression in vitro, in BDNF-expressing mesoangioblast cells. However, only the antisense strategy was effective in vivo, after inoculation in the hippocampus in a model of status epilepticus in which BDNF mRNA levels are strongly increased. Interestingly, the knocking down of BDNF levels induced with BDNF-antisense was sufficient to produce significant behavioral effects, in spite of the fact that it was produced only in a part of a single hippocampus. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable effect of amplicon vectors in knocking down gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, this approach may find broad applications in neurobiological studies. PMID:26954758

  6. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 replication and packaging is entirely supported by a herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon expressing Rep and Cap.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, J E; Zolotukhin, S; Muzyczka, N; Hayward, G S; Byrne, B J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 (rAAV) vectors have recently been shown to have great utility as gene transfer agents both in vitro and in vivo. One of the problems associated with the use of rAAV vectors has been the difficulty of large-scale vector production. Low-efficiency plasmid transfection of the rAAV vector and complementing AAV type 2 (AAV-2) functions (rep and cap) followed by superinfection with adenovirus has been the standard approach to rAAV production. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the ability of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon expressing AAV-2 Rep and Cap to support replication and packaging of rAAV vectors. HSV-1 amplicon vectors were constructed which contain the AAV-2 rep and cap genes under control of their native promoters (p5, p19, and p40). An HSV-1 amplicon vector, HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27, was generated by supplying helper functions with either wild-type HSV-1 (KOS strain) or the ICP27-deleted mutant of HSV-1, d27-1, respectively. Replication of the amplicon stocks is not inhibited by the presence of AAV-2 Rep proteins, which highlights important differences between HSV-1 and adenovirus replication and the mechanism of providing helper function for productive AAV infection. Coinfection of rAAV and HSV-RC/KOS resulted in the replication and amplification of rAAV genomes. Similarly, rescue and replication of rAAV genomes occurred when rAAV vector plasmids were transfected into cells followed by HSV-RC/KOS infection and when two rAAV proviral cell lines were infected with HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27. Production of infectious rAAV by rescue from two rAAV proviral cell lines has also been achieved with HSV-RC/KOS and HSV-RC/d27. The particle titer of rAAV produced with HSV-RC/d27 is equal to that achieved by supplying rep and cap by transfection followed by adenovirus superinfection. Importantly, no detectable wild-type AAV-2 is generated with this approach. These results demonstrate

  7. Constitutive and Inducible Innate Responses in Cells Infected by HSV-1-Derived Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tsitoura, Eliza; Epstein, Alberto L

    2010-01-01

    Amplicons are helper-dependent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based vectors that can deliver very large foreign DNA sequences and, as such, are good candidates both for gene delivery and vaccine development. However, many studies have shown that innate constitutive or induced cellular responses, elicited or activated by the entry of HSV-1 particles, can play a significant role in the control of transgenic expression and in the induction of inflammatory responses. Moreover, transgene expression from helper-free amplicon stocks is often weak and transient, depending on the particular type of infected cells, suggesting that cellular responses could be also responsible for the silencing of amplicon-mediated transgene expression. This review summarizes the current experimental evidence underlying these latter concepts, focusing on the impact on transgene expression of very-early interactions between amplicon particles and the infected cells, and speculates on possible ways to counteract the cellular protective mechanisms, thus allowing stable transgene expression without enhancement of vector toxicity. PMID:20811588

  8. Characterizing partial AZFc deletions of the Y chromosome with amplicon-specific sequence markers

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; Pereira, Luísa; Alves, Cíntia; Gusmão, Leonor; Proença, Carmen; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Rocha, Tiago; Correia, Sónia C; Jorge, Sónia; Neves, António; Soares, Ana P; Nunes, Joaquim; Calhaz-Jorge, Carlos; Amorim, António; Plancha, Carlos E; Gonçalves, João

    2007-01-01

    Background The AZFc region of the human Y chromosome is a highly recombinogenic locus containing multi-copy male fertility genes located in repeated DNA blocks (amplicons). These AZFc gene families exhibit slight sequence variations between copies which are considered to have functional relevance. Yet, partial AZFc deletions yield phenotypes ranging from normospermia to azoospermia, thwarting definite conclusions on their real impact on fertility. Results The amplicon content of partial AZFc deletion products was characterized with novel amplicon-specific sequence markers. Data indicate that partial AZFc deletions are a male infertility risk [odds ratio: 5.6 (95% CI: 1.6–30.1)] and although high diversity of partial deletion products and sequence conversion profiles were recorded, the AZFc marker profiles detected in fertile men were also observed in infertile men. Additionally, the assessment of rearrangement recurrence by Y-lineage analysis indicated that while partial AZFc deletions occurred in highly diverse samples, haplotype diversity was minimal in fertile men sharing identical marker profiles. Conclusion Although partial AZFc deletion products are highly heterogeneous in terms of amplicon content, this plasticity is not sufficient to account for the observed phenotypical variance. The lack of causative association between the deletion of specific gene copies and infertility suggests that AZFc gene content might be part of a multifactorial network, with Y-lineage evolution emerging as a possible phenotype modulator. PMID:17903263

  9. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples. PMID:25343859

  10. Evaluation of Hybridization Capture Versus Amplicon-Based Methods for Whole-Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Samorodnitsky, Eric; Jewell, Benjamin M; Hagopian, Raffi; Miya, Jharna; Wing, Michele R; Lyon, Ezra; Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Bhatt, Darshna; Reeser, Julie W; Datta, Jharna; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has aided characterization of genomic variation. While whole-genome sequencing may capture all possible mutations, whole-exome sequencing remains cost-effective and captures most phenotype-altering mutations. Initial strategies for exome enrichment utilized a hybridization-based capture approach. Recently, amplicon-based methods were designed to simplify preparation and utilize smaller DNA inputs. We evaluated two hybridization capture-based and two amplicon-based whole-exome sequencing approaches, utilizing both Illumina and Ion Torrent sequencers, comparing on-target alignment, uniformity, and variant calling. While the amplicon methods had higher on-target rates, the hybridization capture-based approaches demonstrated better uniformity. All methods identified many of the same single-nucleotide variants, but each amplicon-based method missed variants detected by the other three methods and reported additional variants discordant with all three other technologies. Many of these potential false positives or negatives appear to result from limited coverage, low variant frequency, vicinity to read starts/ends, or the need for platform-specific variant calling algorithms. All methods demonstrated effective copy-number variant calling when evaluated against a single-nucleotide polymorphism array. This study illustrates some differences between whole-exome sequencing approaches, highlights the need for selecting appropriate variant calling based on capture method, and will aid laboratories in selecting their preferred approach. PMID:26110913

  11. Co-existence of circular and multiple linear amplicons in methotrexate-resistant Leishmania.

    PubMed Central

    Olmo, A; Arrebola, R; Bernier, V; González-Pacanowska, D; Ruiz-Pérez, L M

    1995-01-01

    Circular and linear amplicons were analyzed in detail in Leishmania tropica cells resistant to methotrexate (MTX). Both types of elements presented sequences related to the H locus and coexisted in resistant cells. The linear amplicons appeared first during the selection process (at 10 microM MTX) and varied with regard to size and structure in cells exposed to increasing concentrations of drug. The circular element was evident at higher concentrations (50 microMs) but was the major amplified DNA in cells resistant to 1000 microM MTX while the level of amplification of the linear elements remained low. The extrachromosomal DNAs were unstable in the absence of drug and their disappearance coincided with an increase in sensitivity to MTX. Mapping of the minichromosomes and the circular element showed that they were all constituted by inverted duplications. The circular amplicon contained an inverted repeat derived from the H locus that encompassed the pteridine reductase gene (PTR1) responsible for MTX resistance. The amplified segment in the linear amplicons was longer and included the pgpB and pgpC genes that encode P-glycoproteins of unknown function previously characterized in different Leishmania species. Images PMID:7659507

  12. De novo-generated small palindromes are characteristic of amplicon boundary junction of double minutes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Yu, Yang; Meng, Xiangning; Fan, Yihui; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Chunshui; Yue, Zhichao; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Chunyu; Yu, Lisa; Ji, Wei; Jia, Xueyuan; Guan, Rongwei; Wu, Jie; Yu, Jingcui; Bai, Jing; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Mingrong; Lee, Ki-Young; Sun, Wenjing; Fu, Songbin

    2013-08-15

    Double minutes (DMs) are hallmarks of gene amplification. However, their molecular structure and the mechanisms of formation are largely unknown. To elucidate the structure and underlying molecular mechanism of DMs, we obtained and cloned DMs using microdissection; and degenerated oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) from the ovarian cancer cell line UACC-1598. Two large amplicons, the 284 kb AmpMYCN, originating from locus 2p24.3 and the 391 kb AmpEIF5A2, from locus 3q26.2, were found co-amplified on the same DMs. The two amplicons are joined through a complex 7 kb junction DNA sequence. Analysis of the junction has revealed three de novo created small palindromes surrounding the six breakpoints. Consistent with these observations, we further found that 70% of the 57 reported DM junction sequences have de novo creation of small palindromic sequences surrounding the breakpoints. Together, our findings indicate that de novo-generated small palindromic sequences are characteristic of amplicon boundary junctions on DMs. It is possible that the de novo-generated small palindromic sequences, which may be generated through non-homologous end joining in concert with a novel DNA repair machinery, play a common role in amplicon rejoining and gene amplification. PMID:23382041

  13. Estimation of copy number using SYBR Green: confounding by AT-rich DNA and by variation in amplicon length.

    PubMed

    Colborn, James M; Byrd, Brian D; Koita, Ousmane A; Krogstad, Donald J

    2008-12-01

    Although SYBR Green is used to estimate copy number, its fluorescence varies with amplicon length and adenine/thymine (AT) content. As a result, threshold cycle (Ct) values obtained using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are lower for longer amplicons (P<0.001) and amplicons with greater AT content (P<0.001). In contrast, neither amplicon length nor AT content affects the Ct with TaqMan probes or LUX-labeled primers. Because SYBR Green yields lower Cts with AT-rich templates and longer templates, it overestimates copy number for those templates. Therefore, sequence-specific methods such as TaqMan probes or LUX-labeled primers should be considered when using real-time PCR to estimate copy number if the amplicons generated are AT-rich or vary in length. PMID:19052298

  14. Association of BRCA1 promoter methylation with sporadic breast cancers: Evidence from 40 studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Long, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) located at chromosome 17q12-21 is a classic tumor suppressor gene, and has been considered as a significant role in hereditary breast cancers. Moreover, numerous studies demonstrated the methylation status of CpG islands in the promoter regions of BRCA1 gene was aberrant in patients with sporadic breast tumors compared with healthy females or patients with benign diseases. However, these conclusions were not always consistent. Hence, a meta-analysis was performed to get a more precise estimate for these associations. Crude odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were used to assess the association of BRCA1 promoter methylation and the risk or clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancers under fixed or random effect model. A total of 40 studies were eligible for this present study. We observed the frequency of BRCA1 promoter methylation was statistically significant higher in breast cancers than non-cancer controls. Furthermore, BRCA1 methylation was statistically associated with lymph node metastasis, histological grade 3, ER(-), PR(-), triple-negative phenotype, and decreased or lack levels of BRCA1 protein expression. In conclusion, this study indicated that BRCA1 promoter methylation appeared to be a useful predictive or prognostic biomarker for breast cancers in clinical assessment. PMID:26643130

  15. Association of BRCA1 promoter methylation with sporadic breast cancers: Evidence from 40 studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Long, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) located at chromosome 17q12-21 is a classic tumor suppressor gene, and has been considered as a significant role in hereditary breast cancers. Moreover, numerous studies demonstrated the methylation status of CpG islands in the promoter regions of BRCA1 gene was aberrant in patients with sporadic breast tumors compared with healthy females or patients with benign diseases. However, these conclusions were not always consistent. Hence, a meta-analysis was performed to get a more precise estimate for these associations. Crude odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were used to assess the association of BRCA1 promoter methylation and the risk or clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancers under fixed or random effect model. A total of 40 studies were eligible for this present study. We observed the frequency of BRCA1 promoter methylation was statistically significant higher in breast cancers than non-cancer controls. Furthermore, BRCA1 methylation was statistically associated with lymph node metastasis, histological grade 3, ER(-), PR(-), triple-negative phenotype, and decreased or lack levels of BRCA1 protein expression. In conclusion, this study indicated that BRCA1 promoter methylation appeared to be a useful predictive or prognostic biomarker for breast cancers in clinical assessment. PMID:26643130

  16. Fast, accurate and easy-to-pipeline methods for amplicon sequence processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Livio; Sessitsch, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies established since years as an essential resource in microbiology. While on the one hand metagenomic studies can benefit from the continuously increasing throughput of the Illumina (Solexa) technology, on the other hand the spreading of third generation sequencing technologies (PacBio, Oxford Nanopore) are getting whole genome sequencing beyond the assembly of fragmented draft genomes, making it now possible to finish bacterial genomes even without short read correction. Besides (meta)genomic analysis next-gen amplicon sequencing is still fundamental for microbial studies. Amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) remains a well-established widespread method for a multitude of different purposes concerning the identification and comparison of archaeal/bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (ITS) communities occurring in diverse environments. Numerous different pipelines have been developed in order to process NGS-derived amplicon sequences, among which Mothur, QIIME and USEARCH are the most well-known and cited ones. The entire process from initial raw sequence data through read error correction, paired-end read assembly, primer stripping, quality filtering, clustering, OTU taxonomic classification and BIOM table rarefaction as well as alternative "normalization" methods will be addressed. An effective and accurate strategy will be presented using the state-of-the-art bioinformatic tools and the example of a straightforward one-script pipeline for 16S rRNA gene or ITS MiSeq amplicon sequencing will be provided. Finally, instructions on how to automatically retrieve nucleotide sequences from NCBI and therefore apply the pipeline to targets other than 16S rRNA gene (Greengenes, SILVA) and ITS (UNITE) will be discussed.

  17. Characterization of FGFR1 Locus in sqNSCLC Reveals a Broad and Heterogeneous Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Claire; Geh, Catherine; Williams, Victoria; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Menon, Roopika; Schneider, Petra; Al-Kadhimi, Katherine; Dymond, Michael; Smith, Neil R.; Baker, Dawn; French, Tim; Smith, Paul D.; Harrington, Elizabeth A.; Barrett, J. Carl; Kilgour, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    FGFR1 amplification occurs in ~20% of sqNSCLC and trials with FGFR inhibitors have selected FGFR1 amplified patients by FISH. Lung cancer cell lines were profiled for sensitivity to AZD4547, a potent, selective inhibitor of FGFRs 1–3. Sensitivity to FGFR inhibition was associated with but not wholly predicted by increased FGFR1 gene copy number. Additional biomarker assays evaluating expression of FGFRs and correlation between amplification and expression in clinical tissues are therefore warranted. We validated nanoString for mRNA expression analysis of 194 genes, including FGFRs, from clinical tumour tissue. In a panel of sqNSCLC tumours 14.4% (13/90) were FGFR1 amplified by FISH. Although mean FGFR1 expression was significantly higher in amplified samples, there was significant overlap in the range of expression levels between the amplified and non-amplified cohorts with several non-amplified samples expressing FGFR1 to levels equivalent to amplified samples. Statistical analysis revealed increased expression of FGFR1 neighboring genes on the 8p12 amplicon (BAG4, LSM1 and WHSC1L1) in FGFR1 amplified tumours, suggesting a broad rather than focal amplicon and raises the potential for codependencies. High resolution aCGH analysis of pre-clinical and clinical samples supported the presence of a broad and heterogeneous amplicon around the FGFR1 locus. In conclusion, the range of FGFR1 expression levels in both FGFR1 amplified and non-amplified NSCLC tissues, together with the breadth and intra-patient heterogeneity of the 8p amplicon highlights the need for gene expression analysis of clinical samples to inform the understanding of determinants of response to FGFR inhibitors. In this respect the nanoString platform provides an attractive option for RNA analysis of FFPE clinical samples. PMID:26905262

  18. DADA2: High-resolution sample inference from Illumina amplicon data.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Benjamin J; McMurdie, Paul J; Rosen, Michael J; Han, Andrew W; Johnson, Amy Jo A; Holmes, Susan P

    2016-07-01

    We present the open-source software package DADA2 for modeling and correcting Illumina-sequenced amplicon errors (https://github.com/benjjneb/dada2). DADA2 infers sample sequences exactly and resolves differences of as little as 1 nucleotide. In several mock communities, DADA2 identified more real variants and output fewer spurious sequences than other methods. We applied DADA2 to vaginal samples from a cohort of pregnant women, revealing a diversity of previously undetected Lactobacillus crispatus variants. PMID:27214047

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a 20q13.2 amplicon in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, C.; Froula, J.; Kowbel, D.

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has identified an amplification event involving chromosome band 20q13.2 in 15-20% of primary breast carcinomas. The application of FISH to the study of tumor interphase nuclei using 33 locus specific cosmid and P1 probes revealed amplification of band 20q13.2 in 35% of breast cancer cell lines and 8% of primary tumors. Moreover, this study localized the amplification event to the 1.5Mb interval defined by (Flpter 0.80-0.84.) and excluded all known genes in the region as candidates for the putative oncogene(s). To both identify the putative oncogene(s) and characterize the amplicon, a 12 member 4Mb YAC contig has been assembled by STS mapping that spans the core of the amplicon. The YAC contig is now being converted to a P1 contig to facilitate sequencing, exon trapping and direct selection of cDNAs. This is being accomplished by performing interAlu PCR reactions on individual YACs and sequencing the reaction products to create 5-10 new STSs per megaYAC. The DuPont P1 library is then screened for these STSs by the PCR. To date 21 P1 clones, forming 6 contigs, have been isolated by screening the DuPont P1 library for existing and/or newly created STSs. The ends of the 21 P1 clones are being sequenced to facilitate contig alignment and to enable chromosome walking. In collaboration with the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory we have initiated the directed sequencing of two P1 contigs, localized within the amplicon core, and ultimately will sequence the entire 1-2Mb amplicon.

  20. Massively parallel sequencing of 17 commonly used forensic autosomal STRs and amelogenin with small amplicons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hye; Lee, Hwan Young; Yang, In Seok; Jung, Sang-Eun; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The next-generation sequencing (NGS) method has been utilized to analyze short tandem repeat (STR) markers, which are routinely used for human identification purposes in the forensic field. Some researchers have demonstrated the successful application of the NGS system to STR typing, suggesting that NGS technology may be an alternative or additional method to overcome limitations of capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based STR profiling. However, there has been no available multiplex PCR system that is optimized for NGS analysis of forensic STR markers. Thus, we constructed a multiplex PCR system for the NGS analysis of 18 markers (13CODIS STRs, D2S1338, D19S433, Penta D, Penta E and amelogenin) by designing amplicons in the size range of 77-210 base pairs. Then, PCR products were generated from two single-sources, mixed samples and artificially degraded DNA samples using a multiplex PCR system, and were prepared for sequencing on the MiSeq system through construction of a subsequent barcoded library. By performing NGS and analyzing the data, we confirmed that the resultant STR genotypes were consistent with those of CE-based typing. Moreover, sequence variations were detected in targeted STR regions. Through the use of small-sized amplicons, the developed multiplex PCR system enables researchers to obtain successful STR profiles even from artificially degraded DNA as well as STR loci which are analyzed with large-sized amplicons in the CE-based commercial kits. In addition, successful profiles can be obtained from mixtures up to a 1:19 ratio. Consequently, the developed multiplex PCR system, which produces small size amplicons, can be successfully applied to STR NGS analysis of forensic casework samples such as mixtures and degraded DNA samples. PMID:26799314

  1. Ioncopy: a novel method for calling copy number alterations in amplicon sequencing data including significance assessment

    PubMed Central

    Budczies, Jan; Pfarr, Nicole; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Treue, Denise; Endris, Volker; Ismaeel, Fakher; Bangemann, Nikola; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Dietel, Manfred; Loibl, Sibylle; Klauschen, Frederick; Weichert, Wilko; Denkert, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that calling of copy number alterations (CNAs) from amplicon sequencing (AS) data is feasible. Most approaches, however, require non-tumor (germline) DNA for data normalization. Here, we present the method Ioncopy for CNA detection which requires no normal controls and includes a significance assessment for each detected alteration. Ioncopy was evaluated in a cohort of 184 clinically annotated breast carcinomas. A total number of 252 amplifications were detected, of which 183 (72.6%) could be validated by a call of an additional amplicon interrogating the same gene. Moreover, a total number of 33 deletions were found, whereof 27 (81.8%) could be validated. Analyzing the 16 most frequently amplified genes, validation rates of over 89% could be achieved for 11 of these genes. 11 of the top 16 genes showed significant overexpression in the amplified tumors. 89.5% of the HER2-amplified tumors were GRB7 and STARD3 co-amplified, whereas 68.4% of the HER2-amplified tumors had additional MED1 amplifications. Correlations between CNAs measured by amplicons in HER2 exons 19, 20 and 21 were strong (all R > 0.93). AS based detection of HER2 amplifications had a sensitivity of 90.0% and a specificity of 98.8% compared to the gold standard of HER2 immunohistochemistry combined with in situ hybridization. In summary, we developed and validated a novel method for detection and significance assessment of CNAs in amplicon sequencing data. Using Ioncopy, AS offers a straightforward and efficient approach to simultaneously analyze gene amplifications and gene deletions together with simple somatic mutations in a single assay. PMID:26910888

  2. Electrochemical DNA sensor for anthrax toxin activator gene atxA-detection of PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Das, Ritu; Goel, Ajay K; Sharma, Mukesh K; Upadhyay, Sanjay

    2015-12-15

    We report the DNA probe functionalized electrochemical genosensor for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, specific towards the regulatory gene atxA. The DNA sensor is fabricated on electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticle on self assembled layer of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTS) on GC electrode. DNA hybridization is monitored by differential pulse voltammogram (DPV). The modified GC electrode is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. We also quantified the DNA probe density on electrode surface by the chronocoulometric method. The detection is specific and selective for atxA gene by DNA probe on the electrode surface. No report is available for the detection of B. anthracis by using atxA an anthrax toxin activator gene. In the light of real and complex sample, we have studied the PCR amplicons of 303, 361 and 568 base pairs by using symmetric and asymmetric PCR approaches. The DNA probe of atxA gene efficiently hybridizes with different base pairs of PCR amplicons. The detection limit is found to be 1.0 pM (S/N ratio=3). The results indicate that the DNA sensor is able to detect synthetic target as well as PCR amplicons of different base pairs. PMID:26257186

  3. Induction of humoral responses to BHV-1 glycoprotein D expressed by HSV-1 amplicon vectors

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Andrea Maria; Berois, Mabel Beatriz; Tomé, Lorena Magalí; Epstein, Alberto L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are versatile and useful tools for transferring genes into cells that are capable of stimulating a specific immune response to their expressed antigens. In this work, two HSV-1-derived amplicon vectors were generated. One of these expressed the full-length glycoprotein D (gD) of bovine herpesvirus 1 while the second expressed the truncated form of gD (gDtr) which lacked the trans-membrane region. After evaluating gD expression in the infected cells, the ability of both vectors to induce a specific gD immune response was tested in BALB/c mice that were intramuscularly immunized. Specific serum antibody responses were detected in mice inoculated with both vectors, and the response against truncated gD was higher than the response against full-length gD. These results reinforce previous findings that HSV-1 amplicon vectors can potentially deliver antigens to animals and highlight the prospective use of these vectors for treating infectious bovine rhinotracheitis disease. PMID:22437537

  4. From Benchtop to Desktop: Important Considerations when Designing Amplicon Sequencing Workflows

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Dáithí C.; Coghlan, Megan L.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon sequencing has been the method of choice in many high-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) applications. To date there has been a heavy focus on the means by which to analyse the burgeoning amount of data afforded by HTS. In contrast, there has been a distinct lack of attention paid to considerations surrounding the importance of sample preparation and the fidelity of library generation. No amount of high-end bioinformatics can compensate for poorly prepared samples and it is therefore imperative that careful attention is given to sample preparation and library generation within workflows, especially those involving multiple PCR steps. This paper redresses this imbalance by focusing on aspects pertaining to the benchtop within typical amplicon workflows: sample screening, the target region, and library generation. Empirical data is provided to illustrate the scope of the problem. Lastly, the impact of various data analysis parameters is also investigated in the context of how the data was initially generated. It is hoped this paper may serve to highlight the importance of pre-analysis workflows in achieving meaningful, future-proof data that can be analysed appropriately. As amplicon sequencing gains traction in a variety of diagnostic applications from forensics to environmental DNA (eDNA) it is paramount workflows and analytics are both fit for purpose. PMID:25902146

  5. Analysing 454 amplicon resequencing experiments using the modular and database oriented Variant Identification Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Next-generation amplicon sequencing enables high-throughput genetic diagnostics, sequencing multiple genes in several patients together in one sequencing run. Currently, no open-source out-of-the-box software solution exists that reliably reports detected genetic variations and that can be used to improve future sequencing effectiveness by analyzing the PCR reactions. Results We developed an integrated database oriented software pipeline for analysis of 454/Roche GS-FLX amplicon resequencing experiments using Perl and a relational database. The pipeline enables variation detection, variation detection validation, and advanced data analysis, which provides information that can be used to optimize PCR efficiency using traditional means. The modular approach enables customization of the pipeline where needed and allows researchers to adopt their analysis pipeline to their experiments. Clear documentation and training data is available to test and validate the pipeline prior to using it on real sequencing data. Conclusions We designed an open-source database oriented pipeline that enables advanced analysis of 454/Roche GS-FLX amplicon resequencing experiments using SQL-statements. This modular database approach allows easy coupling with other pipeline modules such as variant interpretation or a LIMS system. There is also a set of standard reporting scripts available. PMID:20487544

  6. Sample Preparation for Fungal Community Analysis by High-Throughput Sequencing of Barcode Amplicons.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Karina Engelbrecht; Ihrmark, Katarina; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Lindahl, Björn D

    2016-01-01

    Fungal species participate in vast numbers of processes in the landscape around us. However, their often cryptic growth, inside various substrates and in highly diverse species assemblages, has been a major obstacle to thorough analysis of fungal communities, hampering exhaustive description of the fungal kingdom. Recent technological developments allowing rapid, high-throughput sequencing of mixed communities from many samples at once are currently having a tremendous impact in fungal community ecology. Universal DNA extraction followed by amplification and sequencing of fungal species-level barcodes such as the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region now enable identification and relative quantification of fungal community members across well-replicated experimental settings. Here, we present the sample preparation procedure presently used in our laboratory for fungal community analysis by high-throughput sequencing of amplified ITS2 markers. We focus on the procedure optimized for studies of total fungal communities in humus-rich soils, wood, and litter. However, this procedure can be applied to other sample types and markers. We focus on the laboratory-based part of sample preparation, that is, the procedure from the point where samples enter the laboratory until amplicons are submitted for sequencing. Our procedure comprises four main parts: (1) universal DNA extraction, (2) optimization of PCR conditions, (3) production of tagged ITS amplicons, and (4) preparation of the multiplexed amplicon mix to be sequenced. The presented procedure is independent of the specific high-throughput sequencing technology used, which makes it highly versatile. PMID:26791497

  7. Ultra-high resolution HLA genotyping and allele discovery by highly multiplexed cDNA amplicon pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution HLA genotyping is a critical diagnostic and research assay. Current methods rarely achieve unambiguous high-resolution typing without making population-specific frequency inferences due to a lack of locus coverage and difficulty in exon-phase matching. Achieving high-resolution typing is also becoming more challenging with traditional methods as the database of known HLA alleles increases. Results We designed a cDNA amplicon-based pyrosequencing method to capture 94% of the HLA class I open-reading-frame with only two amplicons per sample, and an analogous method for class II HLA genes, with a primary focus on sequencing the DRB loci. We present a novel Galaxy server-based analysis workflow for determining genotype. During assay validation, we performed two GS Junior sequencing runs to determine the accuracy of the HLA class I amplicons and DRB amplicon at different levels of multiplexing. When 116 amplicons were multiplexed, we unambiguously resolved 99%of class I alleles to four- or six-digit resolution, as well as 100% unambiguous DRB calls. The second experiment, with 271 multiplexed amplicons, missed some alleles, but generated high-resolution, concordant typing for 93% of class I alleles, and 96% for DRB1 alleles. In a third, preliminary experiment we attempted to sequence novel amplicons for other class II loci with mixed success. Conclusions The presented assay is higher-throughput and higher-resolution than existing HLA genotyping methods, and suitable for allele discovery or large cohort sampling. The validated class I and DRB primers successfully generated unambiguously high-resolution genotypes, while further work is needed to validate additional class II genotyping amplicons. PMID:22866951

  8. Impact of Mutation Type and Amplicon Characteristics on Genetic Diversity Measures Generated Using a High-Resolution Melting Diversity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    We adapted high-resolution melting (HRM) technology to measure genetic diversity without sequencing. Diversity is measured as a single numeric HRM score. Herein, we determined the impact of mutation types and amplicon characteristics on HRM diversity scores. Plasmids were generated with single-base changes, insertions, and deletions. Different primer sets were used to vary the position of mutations within amplicons. Plasmids and plasmid mixtures were analyzed to determine the impact of mutation type, position, and concentration on HRM scores. The impact of amplicon length and G/C content on HRM scores was also evaluated. Different mutation types affected HRM scores to varying degrees (1-bp deletion < 1-bp change < 3-bp insertion < 9-bp insertion). The impact of mutations on HRM scores was influenced by amplicon length and the position of the mutation within the amplicon. Mutations were detected at concentrations of 5% to 95%, with the greatest impact at 50%. The G/C content altered melting temperature values of amplicons but had no impact on HRM scores. These data are relevant to the design of assays that measure genetic diversity using HRM technology. PMID:23178437

  9. Using Amplicon Sequencing To Characterize and Monitor Bacterial Diversity in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jennifer L. A.; Weyrich, Laura S.; Sawade, Emma; Drikas, Mary; Cooper, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water assessments use a variety of microbial, physical, and chemical indicators to evaluate water treatment efficiency and product water quality. However, these indicators do not allow the complex biological communities, which can adversely impact the performance of drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs), to be characterized. Entire bacterial communities can be studied quickly and inexpensively using targeted metagenomic amplicon sequencing. Here, amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene region was performed alongside traditional water quality measures to assess the health, quality, and efficiency of two distinct, full-scale DWDSs: (i) a linear DWDS supplied with unfiltered water subjected to basic disinfection before distribution and (ii) a complex, branching DWDS treated by a four-stage water treatment plant (WTP) prior to disinfection and distribution. In both DWDSs bacterial communities differed significantly after disinfection, demonstrating the effectiveness of both treatment regimes. However, bacterial repopulation occurred further along in the DWDSs, and some end-user samples were more similar to the source water than to the postdisinfection water. Three sample locations appeared to be nitrified, displaying elevated nitrate levels and decreased ammonia levels, and nitrifying bacterial species, such as Nitrospira, were detected. Burkholderiales were abundant in samples containing large amounts of monochloramine, indicating resistance to disinfection. Genera known to contain pathogenic and fecal-associated species were also identified in several locations. From this study, we conclude that metagenomic amplicon sequencing is an informative method to support current compliance-based methods and can be used to reveal bacterial community interactions with the chemical and physical properties of DWDSs. PMID:26162884

  10. Clinical impact of targeted amplicon sequencing for meningioma as a practical clinical-sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Sayaka; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Mohri, Hiromi; Wang, Lei; Kimura, Taichi; Tsuda, Masumi; Tanino, Mishie; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Recent genetic analyses using next-generation sequencers have revealed numerous genetic alterations in various tumors including meningioma, which is the most common primary brain tumor. However, their use as routine laboratory examinations in clinical applications for tumor genotyping is not cost effective. To establish a clinical sequencing system for meningioma and investigate the clinical significance of genotype, we retrospectively performed targeted amplicon sequencing on 103 meningiomas and evaluated the association with clinicopathological features. We designed amplicon-sequencing panels targeting eight genes including NF2 (neurofibromin 2), TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, and SMO. Libraries prepared with genomic DNA extracted from PAXgene-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of 103 meningioma specimens were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq. NF2 loss in some cases was also confirmed by interphase-fluorescent in situ hybridization. We identified NF2 loss and/or at least one mutation in NF2, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, and SMO in 81 out of 103 cases (79%) by targeted amplicon sequencing. On the basis of genetic status, we categorized meningiomas into three genotype groups: NF2 type, TRAKLS type harboring mutation in TRAF7, AKT1, KLF4, and/or SMO, and 'not otherwise classified' type. Genotype significantly correlated with tumor volume, tumor location, and magnetic resonance imaging findings such as adjacent bone change and heterogeneous gadolinium enhancement, as well as histopathological subtypes. In addition, multivariate analysis revealed that genotype was independently associated with risk of recurrence. In conclusion, we established a rapid clinical sequencing system that enables final confirmation of meningioma genotype within 7 days turnaround time. Our method will bring multiple benefits to neuropathologists and neurosurgeons for accurate diagnosis and appropriate postoperative management. PMID:27102344

  11. The bias associated with amplicon sequencing does not affect the quantitative assessment of bacterial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ibarbalz, Federico M; Pérez, María Victoria; Figuerola, Eva L M; Erijman, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The performance of two sets of primers targeting variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene V1-V3 and V4 was compared in their ability to describe changes of bacterial diversity and temporal turnover in full-scale activated sludge. Duplicate sets of high-throughput amplicon sequencing data of the two 16S rRNA regions shared a collection of core taxa that were observed across a series of twelve monthly samples, although the relative abundance of each taxon was substantially different between regions. A case in point was the changes in the relative abundance of filamentous bacteria Thiothrix, which caused a large effect on diversity indices, but only in the V1-V3 data set. Yet the relative abundance of Thiothrix in the amplicon sequencing data from both regions correlated with the estimation of its abundance determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In nonmetric multidimensional analysis samples were distributed along the first ordination axis according to the sequenced region rather than according to sample identities. The dynamics of microbial communities indicated that V1-V3 and the V4 regions of the 16S rRNA gene yielded comparable patterns of: 1) the changes occurring within the communities along fixed time intervals, 2) the slow turnover of activated sludge communities and 3) the rate of species replacement calculated from the taxa-time relationships. The temperature was the only operational variable that showed significant correlation with the composition of bacterial communities over time for the sets of data obtained with both pairs of primers. In conclusion, we show that despite the bias introduced by amplicon sequencing, the variable regions V1-V3 and V4 can be confidently used for the quantitative assessment of bacterial community dynamics, and provide a proper qualitative account of general taxa in the community, especially when the data are obtained over a convenient time window rather than at a single time point. PMID:24923665

  12. Analysis and Visualization Tool for Targeted Amplicon Bisulfite Sequencing on Ion Torrent Sequencers.

    PubMed

    Pabinger, Stephan; Ernst, Karina; Pulverer, Walter; Kallmeyer, Rainer; Valdes, Ana M; Metrustry, Sarah; Katic, Denis; Nuzzo, Angelo; Kriegner, Albert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of PCR amplicons generated from bisulfite deaminated DNA is a flexible, cost-effective way to study methylation of a sample at single CpG resolution and perform subsequent multi-target, multi-sample comparisons. Currently, no platform specific protocol, support, or analysis solution is provided to perform targeted bisulfite sequencing on a Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Here, we present a novel tool, called TABSAT, for analyzing targeted bisulfite sequencing data generated on Ion Torrent sequencers. The workflow starts with raw sequencing data, performs quality assessment, and uses a tailored version of Bismark to map the reads to a reference genome. The pipeline visualizes results as lollipop plots and is able to deduce specific methylation-patterns present in a sample. The obtained profiles are then summarized and compared between samples. In order to assess the performance of the targeted bisulfite sequencing workflow, 48 samples were used to generate 53 different Bisulfite-Sequencing PCR amplicons from each sample, resulting in 2,544 amplicon targets. We obtained a mean coverage of 282X using 1,196,822 aligned reads. Next, we compared the sequencing results of these targets to the methylation level of the corresponding sites on an Illumina 450k methylation chip. The calculated average Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.91 confirms the sequencing results with one of the industry-leading CpG methylation platforms and shows that targeted amplicon bisulfite sequencing provides an accurate and cost-efficient method for DNA methylation studies, e.g., to provide platform-independent confirmation of Illumina Infinium 450k methylation data. TABSAT offers a novel way to analyze data generated by Ion Torrent instruments and can also be used with data from the Illumina MiSeq platform. It can be easily accessed via the Platomics platform, which offers a web-based graphical user interface along with sample and parameter storage. TABSAT is freely

  13. Analysis and Visualization Tool for Targeted Amplicon Bisulfite Sequencing on Ion Torrent Sequencers

    PubMed Central

    Pabinger, Stephan; Ernst, Karina; Pulverer, Walter; Kallmeyer, Rainer; Valdes, Ana M.; Metrustry, Sarah; Katic, Denis; Nuzzo, Angelo; Kriegner, Albert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of PCR amplicons generated from bisulfite deaminated DNA is a flexible, cost-effective way to study methylation of a sample at single CpG resolution and perform subsequent multi-target, multi-sample comparisons. Currently, no platform specific protocol, support, or analysis solution is provided to perform targeted bisulfite sequencing on a Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Here, we present a novel tool, called TABSAT, for analyzing targeted bisulfite sequencing data generated on Ion Torrent sequencers. The workflow starts with raw sequencing data, performs quality assessment, and uses a tailored version of Bismark to map the reads to a reference genome. The pipeline visualizes results as lollipop plots and is able to deduce specific methylation-patterns present in a sample. The obtained profiles are then summarized and compared between samples. In order to assess the performance of the targeted bisulfite sequencing workflow, 48 samples were used to generate 53 different Bisulfite-Sequencing PCR amplicons from each sample, resulting in 2,544 amplicon targets. We obtained a mean coverage of 282X using 1,196,822 aligned reads. Next, we compared the sequencing results of these targets to the methylation level of the corresponding sites on an Illumina 450k methylation chip. The calculated average Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.91 confirms the sequencing results with one of the industry-leading CpG methylation platforms and shows that targeted amplicon bisulfite sequencing provides an accurate and cost-efficient method for DNA methylation studies, e.g., to provide platform-independent confirmation of Illumina Infinium 450k methylation data. TABSAT offers a novel way to analyze data generated by Ion Torrent instruments and can also be used with data from the Illumina MiSeq platform. It can be easily accessed via the Platomics platform, which offers a web-based graphical user interface along with sample and parameter storage. TABSAT is freely

  14. Quick diagnosis of human brain meningitis using omp85 gene amplicon as a genetic marker.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K; Sharma, Minakshi; Khare, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-06-01

    The usual diagnosis of life-threatening human brain bacterial meningitis are expensive, time consuming or non-confirmatory. A quick PCR based diagnosis of meningitis in cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) using specific primers of virulent Omp85 gene of Neisseria meningitidis can detect as low as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA (G-DNA) in 80 min for confirmation of bacterial meningitis caused by N. meningitidis infection. The 257 bp amplicon of Omp85 gene does not show homology with other suspected pathogens in CSF and can be used as a specific genetic marker for diagnosis of the disease. PMID:24426115

  15. Parallel tagged amplicon sequencing of relatively long PCR products using the Illumina HiSeq platform and transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan-Jie; Liu, Qing-Feng; Chen, Meng-Yun; Liang, Dan; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In phylogenetics and population genetics, a large number of loci are often needed to accurately resolve species relationships. Normally, loci are enriched by PCR and sequenced by Sanger sequencing, which is expensive when the number of amplicons is large. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques are increasingly used for parallel amplicon sequencing, which reduces sequencing costs tremendously, but has not reduced preparation costs very much. Moreover, for most current NGS methods, amplicons need to be purified and quantified before sequencing and their lengths are also restricted (normally <700 bp). Here, we describe an approach to sequence pooled amplicons of any length using the Illumina platform. Using this method, amplicons are pooled at equal volume rather than at equal concentration, thus eliminating the laborious purification and quantification steps. We then shear the pooled amplicons, repair the ends, add sample identifying linkers and pool multiple samples prior to Illumina library preparation. Data are then assembled using the transcriptome assembly program trinity, which is optimized to deal with templates of highly varying quantities. We demonstrated the utility of our approach by recovering 93.5% of the target amplicons (size up to 1650 bp) in full length for a 16 taxa × 101 loci project, using ~2.0 GB of Illumina HiSeq paired-end 90-bp data. Overall, we validate a rapid, cost-effective and scalable approach to sequence a large number of targeted loci from a large number of samples that is particularly suitable for both phylogenetics and population genetics studies that require a modest scale of data. PMID:25959587

  16. Bioinformatic Amplicon Read Processing Strategies Strongly Affect Eukaryotic Diversity and the Taxonomic Composition of Communities

    PubMed Central

    Majaneva, Markus; Hyytiäinen, Kirsi; Varvio, Sirkka Liisa; Nagai, Satoshi; Blomster, Jaanika

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon read sequencing has revolutionized the field of microbial diversity studies. The technique has been developed for bacterial assemblages and has undergone rigorous testing with mock communities. However, due to the great complexity of eukaryotes and the numbers of different rDNA copies, analyzing eukaryotic diversity is more demanding than analyzing bacterial or mock communities, so studies are needed that test the methods of analyses on taxonomically diverse natural communities. In this study, we used 20 samples collected from the Baltic Sea ice, slush and under-ice water to investigate three program packages (UPARSE, mothur and QIIME) and 18 different bioinformatic strategies implemented in them. Our aim was to assess the impact of the initial steps of bioinformatic strategies on the results when analyzing natural eukaryotic communities. We found significant differences among the strategies in resulting read length, number of OTUs and estimates of diversity as well as clear differences in the taxonomic composition of communities. The differences arose mainly because of the variable number of chimeric reads that passed the pre-processing steps. Singleton removal and denoising substantially lowered the number of errors. Our study showed that the initial steps of the bioinformatic amplicon read processing strategies require careful consideration before applying them to eukaryotic communities. PMID:26047335

  17. Photochemical immobilization of anthraquinone conjugated oligonucleotides and PCR amplicons on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Koch, T; Jacobsen, N; Fensholdt, J; Boas, U; Fenger, M; Jakobsen, M H

    2000-01-01

    Ligand immobilization on solid surfaces is an essential step in fields such as diagnostics, bio sensor manufacturing, and new material sciences in general. In this paper a photochemical approach based on anthraquinone as the chromophore is presented. Photochemical procedures offer special advantages as they are able to generate highly reactive species in an orientation specific manner. As presented here, anthraquinone (AQ) mediated covalent DNA immobilization appears to be superior to currently known procedures. A synthetic procedure providing AQ-phosphoramidites is presented. These reagents facilitate AQ conjugation during routine DNA synthesis, thus enabling the AQ-oligonucleotides to be immobilized in a very convenient and efficient manner. AQ-conjugated PCR primers can be used directly in PCR. When the PCR is performed in solution, the amplicons can be immobilized after the PCR. Moreover, when the primers are immobilized prior to the PCR, a solid-phase PCR can be performed and the amplicons are thus produced directly on the solid support. PMID:10898568

  18. AMPLISAS: a web server for multilocus genotyping using next-generation amplicon sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alvaro; Herdegen, Magdalena; Migalska, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing the fields of biology and medicine as powerful tools for amplicon sequencing (AS). Using combinations of primers and barcodes, it is possible to sequence targeted genomic regions with deep coverage for hundreds, even thousands, of individuals in a single experiment. This is extremely valuable for the genotyping of gene families in which locus-specific primers are often difficult to design, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The utility of AS is, however, limited by the high intrinsic sequencing error rates of NGS technologies and other sources of error such as polymerase amplification or chimera formation. Correcting these errors requires extensive bioinformatic post-processing of NGS data. Amplicon Sequence Assignment (AMPLISAS) is a tool that performs analysis of AS results in a simple and efficient way, while offering customization options for advanced users. AMPLISAS is designed as a three-step pipeline consisting of (i) read demultiplexing, (ii) unique sequence clustering and (iii) erroneous sequence filtering. Allele sequences and frequencies are retrieved in excel spreadsheet format, making them easy to interpret. AMPLISAS performance has been successfully benchmarked against previously published genotyped MHC data sets obtained with various NGS technologies. PMID:26257385

  19. Multiplex amplicon sequencing for microbe identification in community-based culture collections.

    PubMed

    Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Microbiome analysis using metagenomic sequencing has revealed a vast microbial diversity associated with plants. Identifying the molecular functions associated with microbiome-plant interaction is a significant challenge concerning the development of microbiome-derived technologies applied to agriculture. An alternative to accelerate the discovery of the microbiome benefits to plants is to construct microbial culture collections concomitant with accessing microbial community structure and abundance. However, traditional methods of isolation, cultivation, and identification of microbes are time-consuming and expensive. Here we describe a method for identification of microbes in culture collections constructed by picking colonies from primary platings that may contain single or multiple microorganisms, which we named community-based culture collections (CBC). A multiplexing 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing based on two-step PCR amplifications with tagged primers for plates, rows, and columns allowed the identification of the microbial composition regardless if the well contains single or multiple microorganisms. The multiplexing system enables pooling amplicons into a single tube. The sequencing performed on the PacBio platform led to recovery near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences allowing accurate identification of microorganism composition in each plate well. Cross-referencing with plant microbiome structure and abundance allowed the estimation of diversity and abundance representation of microorganism in the CBC. PMID:27404280

  20. Multiplex amplicon sequencing for microbe identification in community-based culture collections

    PubMed Central

    Armanhi, Jaderson Silveira Leite; de Souza, Rafael Soares Correa; de Araújo, Laura Migliorini; Okura, Vagner Katsumi; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Imperial, Juan; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Microbiome analysis using metagenomic sequencing has revealed a vast microbial diversity associated with plants. Identifying the molecular functions associated with microbiome-plant interaction is a significant challenge concerning the development of microbiome-derived technologies applied to agriculture. An alternative to accelerate the discovery of the microbiome benefits to plants is to construct microbial culture collections concomitant with accessing microbial community structure and abundance. However, traditional methods of isolation, cultivation, and identification of microbes are time-consuming and expensive. Here we describe a method for identification of microbes in culture collections constructed by picking colonies from primary platings that may contain single or multiple microorganisms, which we named community-based culture collections (CBC). A multiplexing 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing based on two-step PCR amplifications with tagged primers for plates, rows, and columns allowed the identification of the microbial composition regardless if the well contains single or multiple microorganisms. The multiplexing system enables pooling amplicons into a single tube. The sequencing performed on the PacBio platform led to recovery near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences allowing accurate identification of microorganism composition in each plate well. Cross-referencing with plant microbiome structure and abundance allowed the estimation of diversity and abundance representation of microorganism in the CBC. PMID:27404280

  1. Analysis of the microbiome: Advantages of whole genome shotgun versus 16S amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Ravi; Rani, Asha; Metwally, Ahmed; McGee, Halvor S; Perkins, David L

    2016-01-22

    The human microbiome has emerged as a major player in regulating human health and disease. Translational studies of the microbiome have the potential to indicate clinical applications such as fecal transplants and probiotics. However, one major issue is accurate identification of microbes constituting the microbiota. Studies of the microbiome have frequently utilized sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. We present a comparative study of an alternative approach using whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS). In the present study, we analyzed the human fecal microbiome compiling a total of 194.1 × 10(6) reads from a single sample using multiple sequencing methods and platforms. Specifically, after establishing the reproducibility of our methods with extensive multiplexing, we compared: 1) The 16S rRNA amplicon versus the WGS method, 2) the Illumina HiSeq versus MiSeq platforms, 3) the analysis of reads versus de novo assembled contigs, and 4) the effect of shorter versus longer reads. Our study demonstrates that whole genome shotgun sequencing has multiple advantages compared with the 16S amplicon method including enhanced detection of bacterial species, increased detection of diversity and increased prediction of genes. In addition, increased length, either due to longer reads or the assembly of contigs, improved the accuracy of species detection. PMID:26718401

  2. Bioinformatic Amplicon Read Processing Strategies Strongly Affect Eukaryotic Diversity and the Taxonomic Composition of Communities.

    PubMed

    Majaneva, Markus; Hyytiäinen, Kirsi; Varvio, Sirkka Liisa; Nagai, Satoshi; Blomster, Jaanika

    2015-01-01

    Amplicon read sequencing has revolutionized the field of microbial diversity studies. The technique has been developed for bacterial assemblages and has undergone rigorous testing with mock communities. However, due to the great complexity of eukaryotes and the numbers of different rDNA copies, analyzing eukaryotic diversity is more demanding than analyzing bacterial or mock communities, so studies are needed that test the methods of analyses on taxonomically diverse natural communities. In this study, we used 20 samples collected from the Baltic Sea ice, slush and under-ice water to investigate three program packages (UPARSE, mothur and QIIME) and 18 different bioinformatic strategies implemented in them. Our aim was to assess the impact of the initial steps of bioinformatic strategies on the results when analyzing natural eukaryotic communities. We found significant differences among the strategies in resulting read length, number of OTUs and estimates of diversity as well as clear differences in the taxonomic composition of communities. The differences arose mainly because of the variable number of chimeric reads that passed the pre-processing steps. Singleton removal and denoising substantially lowered the number of errors. Our study showed that the initial steps of the bioinformatic amplicon read processing strategies require careful consideration before applying them to eukaryotic communities. PMID:26047335

  3. Application of novel "mini-amplicon" STR multiplexes to high volume casework on degraded skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Thomas J; Huel, Rene; Davoren, Jon; Katzmarzyk, Cheryl; Milos, Ana; Selmanović, Arijana; Smajlović, Lejla; Coble, Michael D; Rizvić, Adnan

    2007-06-01

    The International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) conducts high throughput STR profiling on degraded skeletal remains, primarily recovered from mass graves relating to conflicts from 1992 to 1999 in the former Yugoslavia. To date, over 11,000 individuals have been identified through comparison of bone profiles to a large database of profiles from family members of the missing. To increase success rates in STR recovery, three short amplicon STR multiplexes (a 7-plex, a 6-plex, and a 5-plex) have been devised and implemented. These target loci from large commercial multiplexes, with an average decrease in amplicon size of 144 bp. The ICMP "miniplexes" have proven to provide substantially greater recovery of DNA data from a certain subset of difficult samples. However, the circumstances under which miniplexes provide additional data are restricted, and their advantages do not outweigh those of large commercial multiplexes for a majority of cases. The miniplexes, however, also have a very powerful use in DNA testing to support large scale reassociation of commingled, partial skeletons recovered from secondary mass graves. PMID:19083751

  4. ICO amplicon NGS data analysis: a Web tool for variant detection in common high-risk hereditary cancer genes analyzed by amplicon GS Junior next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Menéndez, Mireia; Lopez-Doriga, Sergio; Morón-Duran, Francisco D; del Valle, Jesús; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Campos, Olga; Gómez, Carolina; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized genomic research and is set to have a major impact on genetic diagnostics thanks to the advent of benchtop sequencers and flexible kits for targeted libraries. Among the main hurdles in NGS are the difficulty of performing bioinformatic analysis of the huge volume of data generated and the high number of false positive calls that could be obtained, depending on the NGS technology and the analysis pipeline. Here, we present the development of a free and user-friendly Web data analysis tool that detects and filters sequence variants, provides coverage information, and allows the user to customize some basic parameters. The tool has been developed to provide accurate genetic analysis of targeted sequencing of common high-risk hereditary cancer genes using amplicon libraries run in a GS Junior System. The Web resource is linked to our own mutation database, to assist in the clinical classification of identified variants. We believe that this tool will greatly facilitate the use of the NGS approach in routine laboratories. PMID:24227591

  5. Single-step conversion of cells to retrovirus vector producers with herpes simplex virus-Epstein-Barr virus hybrid amplicons.

    PubMed

    Sena-Esteves, M; Saeki, Y; Camp, S M; Chiocca, E A; Breakefield, X O

    1999-12-01

    We report here on the development and characterization of a novel herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon-based vector system which takes advantage of the host range and retention properties of HSV-Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) hybrid amplicons to efficiently convert cells to retrovirus vector producer cells after single-step transduction. The retrovirus genes gag-pol and env (GPE) and retroviral vector sequences were modified to minimize sequence overlap and cloned into an HSV-EBV hybrid amplicon. Retrovirus expression cassettes were used to generate the HSV-EBV-retrovirus hybrid vectors, HERE and HERA, which code for the ecotropic and the amphotropic envelopes, respectively. Retrovirus vector sequences encoding lacZ were cloned downstream from the GPE expression unit. Transfection of 293T/17 cells with amplicon plasmids yielded retrovirus titers between 10(6) and 10(7) transducing units/ml, while infection of the same cells with amplicon vectors generated maximum titers 1 order of magnitude lower. Retrovirus titers were dependent on the extent of transduction by amplicon vectors for the same cell line, but different cell lines displayed varying capacities to produce retrovirus vectors even at the same transduction efficiencies. Infection of human and dog primary gliomas with this system resulted in the production of retrovirus vectors for more than 1 week and the long-term retention and increase in transgene activity over time in these cell populations. Although the efficiency of this system still has to be determined in vivo, many applications are foreseeable for this approach to gene delivery. PMID:10559361

  6. Herpes simplex virus amplicon: effect of size on replication of constructed defective genomes containing eucaryotic DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, A D; Frenkel, N

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies (R. R. Spaete and N. Frenkel, Cell 30:295-304, 1982) have documented the potential use of defective virus vectors (amplicons) derived from herpes simplex virus for the efficient introduction of foreign DNA sequences into eucaryotic cells. Specifically, cotransfection of cells with helper virus DNA and cloned amplicons (8 to 10 kilobases [kb]) containing bacterial plasmid DNA sequences linked to a set of herpes simplex virus cis-acting propagation signals (a replication origin and a cleavage-packaging signal) resulted in the generation of virus stocks containing packaged defective genomes that consisted of uniform head-to-tail reiterations of the chimeric seed amplicon sequences. The chimeric defective genomes could be stably propagated in virus stocks and could thus be used to efficiently infect cells. We now report on additional studies designed to propagate relatively large sets of eucaryotic DNA sequences within chimeric packaged defective genomes. These studies have utilized a 12-kb chicken DNA sequence encoding the chicken ovalbumin gene and cloned by Lai et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:244-248, 1980) in the plasmid pOV12. Virus stocks derived from cells cotransfected with helper virus DNA and chimeric amplicons (overall size of 19.8 kb, of which 12 kb corresponded to the chicken DNA) contained defective genomes composed of reiterations of the 19.8-kb seed amplicon sequences. However, in addition to the authentically sized repeat units, defective genomes in the derivative virus stocks contained smaller repeat units representing deleted versions of the seed 19.8-kb amplicons. The recombinational events leading to the formation of deleted repeats did not appear to occur at unique sites, as shown by comparative analyses of multiple, independently generated virus series propagated from separate transfections. In contast, seed amplicons ranging in size from 11 to 15 kb and containing subsets of the 12-kb chicken DNA sequences replicated

  7. The Bias Associated with Amplicon Sequencing Does Not Affect the Quantitative Assessment of Bacterial Community Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Figuerola, Eva L. M.; Erijman, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The performance of two sets of primers targeting variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene V1–V3 and V4 was compared in their ability to describe changes of bacterial diversity and temporal turnover in full-scale activated sludge. Duplicate sets of high-throughput amplicon sequencing data of the two 16S rRNA regions shared a collection of core taxa that were observed across a series of twelve monthly samples, although the relative abundance of each taxon was substantially different between regions. A case in point was the changes in the relative abundance of filamentous bacteria Thiothrix, which caused a large effect on diversity indices, but only in the V1–V3 data set. Yet the relative abundance of Thiothrix in the amplicon sequencing data from both regions correlated with the estimation of its abundance determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In nonmetric multidimensional analysis samples were distributed along the first ordination axis according to the sequenced region rather than according to sample identities. The dynamics of microbial communities indicated that V1–V3 and the V4 regions of the 16S rRNA gene yielded comparable patterns of: 1) the changes occurring within the communities along fixed time intervals, 2) the slow turnover of activated sludge communities and 3) the rate of species replacement calculated from the taxa–time relationships. The temperature was the only operational variable that showed significant correlation with the composition of bacterial communities over time for the sets of data obtained with both pairs of primers. In conclusion, we show that despite the bias introduced by amplicon sequencing, the variable regions V1–V3 and V4 can be confidently used for the quantitative assessment of bacterial community dynamics, and provide a proper qualitative account of general taxa in the community, especially when the data are obtained over a convenient time window rather than at a single time point. PMID:24923665

  8. Pitfalls of haplotype phasing from amplicon-based long-read sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Laver, Thomas W.; Caswell, Richard C.; Moore, Karen A.; Poschmann, Jeremie; Johnson, Matthew B.; Owens, Martina M.; Ellard, Sian; Paszkiewicz, Konrad H.; Weedon, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-read sequencers from Pacific Bioscience (PacBio) and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) offer the opportunity to phase mutations multiple kilobases apart directly from sequencing reads. In this study, we used long-range PCR with ONT and PacBio sequencing to phase two variants 9 kb apart in the RET gene. We also re-analysed data from a recent paper which had apparently successfully used ONT to phase clinically important haplotypes at the CYP2D6 and HLA loci. From these analyses, we demonstrate PCR-chimera formation during PCR amplification and reference alignment bias are pitfalls that need to be considered when attempting to phase variants using amplicon-based long-read sequencing technologies. These methodological pitfalls need to be avoided if the opportunities provided by long-read sequencers are to be fully exploited. PMID:26883533

  9. Amplicon restriction patterns associated with nitrogenase activity of root nodules for selection of superior Myrica seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yanthan, Mhathung; Misra, Arvind K

    2013-11-01

    Trees of Myrica sp. grow abundantly in the forests of Meghalaya, India. These trees are actinorhizal and harbour nitrogen-fixing Frankia in their root nodules and contribute positively towards the enhancement of nitrogen status of forest areas. They can be used in rejuvenation of mine spoils and nitrogen-depleted fallow lands generated due to slash and burn agriculture practiced in the area. We have studied the association of amplicon restriction patterns (ARPs) of Myrica ribosomal RNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and nitrogenase activity of its root nodules. We found that ARPs thus obtained could be used as markers for early screening of seedlings that could support strains of Frankia that fix atmospheric nitrogen more efficiently. PMID:24287658

  10. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing dataset for conventionalized and conventionally raised zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Davis, Daniel J; Bryda, Elizabeth C; Gillespie, Catherine H; Ericsson, Aaron C

    2016-09-01

    Data presented here contains metagenomic analysis regarding the sequential conventionalization of germ-free zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos that underwent a germ-free sterilization process immediately after fertilization were promptly exposed to and raised to larval stage in conventional fish water. At 6 days postfertilization (dpf), these "conventionalized" larvae were compared to zebrafish larvae that were raised in conventional fish water never undergoing the initial sterilization process. Bacterial 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from homogenates of the larvae revealing distinct microbiota variations between the two groups. The dataset described here is also related to the research article entitled "Microbial modulation of behavior and stress responses in zebrafish larvae" (Davis et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27508247

  11. Integrating metagenomic and amplicon databases to resolve the phylogenetic and ecological diversity of the Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Weinmaier, Thomas; Lauro, Federico M; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Rattei, Thomas; Horn, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    In the era of metagenomics and amplicon sequencing, comprehensive analyses of available sequence data remain a challenge. Here we describe an approach exploiting metagenomic and amplicon data sets from public databases to elucidate phylogenetic diversity of defined microbial taxa. We investigated the phylum Chlamydiae whose known members are obligate intracellular bacteria that represent important pathogens of humans and animals, as well as symbionts of protists. Despite their medical relevance, our knowledge about chlamydial diversity is still scarce. Most of the nine known families are represented by only a few isolates, while previous clone library-based surveys suggested the existence of yet uncharacterized members of this phylum. Here we identified more than 22,000 high quality, non-redundant chlamydial 16S rRNA gene sequences in diverse databases, as well as 1900 putative chlamydial protein-encoding genes. Even when applying the most conservative approach, clustering of chlamydial 16S rRNA gene sequences into operational taxonomic units revealed an unexpectedly high species, genus and family-level diversity within the Chlamydiae, including 181 putative families. These in silico findings were verified experimentally in one Antarctic sample, which contained a high diversity of novel Chlamydiae. In our analysis, the Rhabdochlamydiaceae, whose known members infect arthropods, represents the most diverse and species-rich chlamydial family, followed by the protist-associated Parachlamydiaceae, and a putative new family (PCF8) with unknown host specificity. Available information on the origin of metagenomic samples indicated that marine environments contain the majority of the newly discovered chlamydial lineages, highlighting this environment as an important chlamydial reservoir. PMID:23949660

  12. Long amplicon (LA)-qPCR for the discrimination of infectious and noninfectious phix174 bacteriophages after UV inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Johannes; Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard; Eggers, Jutta; Tiehm, Andreas

    2016-10-15

    Waterborne viruses are increasingly being considered in risk assessment schemes. In general, virus detection by culture methods is time consuming. In contrast, detection by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is more rapid and therefore, more suitable for monitoring. At present, qPCR lacks the essential ability for discriminating between infectious and non-infectious viruses, thus limiting its applicability for monitoring disinfection processes. In this study, a method was developed to quantify UV inactivation by long amplicon (LA)-qPCR. Bacteriophage phiX174 was used as a surrogate for human pathogenic viruses. A qPCR protocol was developed with new sets of primers, resulting in amplicon lengths of 108, 250, 456, 568, 955, 1063, 1544, and 1764 nucleotides. The log reduction of gene copies increased with increasing amplicon length. Additional treatment with the intercalating dye, PMA, had no effect, indicating that the bacteriophage capsids were not damaged by low pressure UV irradiation. A qPCR of nearly the complete genome (approx. 5000 nucleotides) showed similar results to the plaque assay. The log reduction in qPCR correlates with [specific amplicon length x UV dose]. The normalized DNA effect constant can be applied to calculate phiX174 inactivation based on qPCR detection. PMID:27450352

  13. Virion-associated cofactor high-mobility group DNA-binding protein-1 facilitates transposition from the herpes simplex virus/Sleeping Beauty amplicon vector platform.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Suresh; Lotta, Louis T; Burris, Clark A; Bowers, William J

    2010-11-01

    The development of the integration-competent, herpes simplex virus/Sleeping Beauty (HSV/SB) amplicon vector platform has created a means to efficiently and stably deliver therapeutic transcription units (termed "transgenons") to neurons within the mammalian brain. Furthermore, an investigation into the transposition capacity of the HSV/SB vector system revealed that the amplicon genome provides an optimal substrate for the transposition of transgenons at least 12 kb in length [de Silva, S., Mastrangelo, M.A., Lotta, L.T., Jr., Burris, C.A., Federoff, H.J., and Bowers, W.J. ( 2010 ). Gene Ther. 17, 424-431]. These results prompted an investigation into the factors that may contribute toward efficient transposition from the HSV/SB amplicon. One of the cellular cofactors known to play a key role during SB-mediated transposition is the high-mobility group DNA-binding protein-1 (HMGB1). Our present investigation into the role of HMGB1 during amplicon-based transposition revealed that transposition is not strictly dependent on the presence of cellular HMGB1, contrary to what had been previously demonstrated with plasmid-based SB transposition. We have shown for the first time that during amplicon preparation, biologically active HMGB1 derived from the packaging cell line is copackaged into amplicon vector particles. As a result, HSV/SB amplicon virions arrive prearmed with HMGB1 protein at levels sufficient for facilitating SB-mediated transposition in the transduced mammalian cell. PMID:20568967

  14. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon.

    PubMed

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  15. Shedding Light on the Microbial Community of the Macropod Foregut Using 454-Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Kang, Alicia Y. H.; Maguire, Anita J.; Kienzle, Marco; Klieve, Athol V.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty macropods from five locations in Queensland, Australia, grazing on a variety of native pastures were surveyed and the bacterial community of the foregut was examined using 454-amplicon pyrosequencing. Specifically, the V3/V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was examined. A total of 5040 OTUs were identified in the data set (post filtering). Thirty-two OTUs were identified as ‘shared’ OTUS (i.e. present in all samples) belonging to either Firmicutes or Bacteroidetes (Clostridiales/Bacteroidales). These phyla predominated the general microbial community in all macropods. Genera represented within the shared OTUs included: unclassified Ruminococcaceae, unclassified Lachnospiraceae, unclassified Clostridiales, Peptococcus sp. Coprococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Blautia sp., Ruminoccocus sp., Eubacterium sp., Dorea sp., Oscillospira sp. and Butyrivibrio sp. The composition of the bacterial community of the foregut samples of each the host species (Macropus rufus, Macropus giganteus and Macropus robustus) was significantly different allowing differentiation between the host species based on alpha and beta diversity measures. Specifically, eleven dominant OTUs that separated the three host species were identified and classified as: unclassified Ruminococcaceae, unclassified Bacteroidales, Prevotella spp. and a Syntrophococcus sucromutans. Putative reductive acetogens and fibrolytic bacteria were also identified in samples. Future work will investigate the presence and role of fibrolytics and acetogens in these ecosystems. Ideally, the isolation and characterization of these organisms will be used for enhanced feed efficiency in cattle, methane mitigation and potentially for other industries such as the biofuel industry. PMID:23626688

  16. Rare amplicons implicate frequent deregulation of cell fate specification pathways in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Antoine M; Schmidt, Brian L; Fridlyand, Jane; Dekker, Nusi; Pinkel, Daniel; Jordan, Richard C K; Albertson, Donna G

    2005-06-16

    Genomes of solid tumors are characterized by gains and losses of regions, which may contribute to tumorigenesis by altering gene expression. Often the aberrations are extensive, encompassing whole chromosome arms, which makes identification of candidate genes in these regions difficult. Here, we focused on narrow regions of gene amplification to facilitate identification of genetic pathways important in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) to define minimum common amplified regions and then used expression analysis to identify candidate driver genes in amplicons that spanned <3 Mb. We found genes involved in integrin signaling (TLN1), survival (YAP1, BIRC2), and adhesion and migration (TLN1, LAMA3, MMP7), as well as members of the hedgehog (GLI2) and notch (JAG1, RBPSUH, FJX1) pathways to be amplified and overexpressed. Deregulation of these and other members of the hedgehog and notch pathways (HHIP, SMO, DLL1, NOTCH4) implicates deregulation of developmental and differentiation pathways, cell fate misspecification, in oral SCC development. PMID:15824737

  17. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  18. Evaluation of human gene variant detection in amplicon pools by the GS-FLX parallel Pyrosequencer

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Roberta; Bonnal, Raoul; Rizzi, Ermanno; Carrera, Paola; Benedetti, Sara; Cremonesi, Laura; Stenirri, Stefania; Colombo, Alessio; Montrasio, Cristina; Bonalumi, Sara; Albertini, Alberto; Bernardi, Luigi Rossi; Ferrari, Maurizio; De Bellis, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    Background A new priority in genome research is large-scale resequencing of genes to understand the molecular basis of hereditary disease and cancer. We assessed the ability of massively parallel pyrosequencing to identify sequence variants in pools. From a large collection of human PCR samples we selected 343 PCR products belonging to 16 disease genes and including a large spectrum of sequence variations previously identified by Sanger sequencing. The sequence variants included SNPs and small deletions and insertions (up to 44 bp), in homozygous or heterozygous state. Results The DNA was combined in 4 pools containing from 27 to 164 amplicons and from 8,9 to 50,8 Kb to sequence for a total of 110 Kb. Pyrosequencing generated over 80 million base pairs of data. Blind searching for sequence variations with a specifically designed bioinformatics procedure identified 465 putative sequence variants, including 412 true variants, 53 false positives (in or adjacent to homopolymeric tracts), no false negatives. All known variants in positions covered with at least 30× depth were correctly recognized. Conclusion Massively parallel pyrosequencing may be used to simplify and speed the search for DNA variations in PCR products. Our results encourage further studies to evaluate molecular diagnostics applications. PMID:18842124

  19. Flow cytometry community fingerprinting and amplicon sequencing for the assessment of landfill leachate cellulolytic bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Kinet, R; Dzaomuho, P; Baert, J; Taminiau, B; Daube, G; Nezer, C; Brostaux, Y; Nguyen, F; Dumont, G; Thonart, P; Delvigne, F

    2016-08-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is a high throughput single cell technology that is actually becoming widely used for studying phenotypic and genotypic diversity among microbial communities. This technology is considered in this work for the assessment of a bioaugmentation treatment in order to enhance cellulolytic potential of landfill leachate. The experimental results reveal the relevant increase of leachate cellulolytic potential due to bioaugmentation. Cytometric monitoring of microbial dynamics along these assays is then realized. The flow FP package is used to establish microbial samples fingerprint from initial 2D cytometry histograms. This procedure allows highlighting microbial communities' variation along the assays. Cytometric and 16S rRNA gene sequencing fingerprinting methods are then compared. The two approaches give same evidence about microbial dynamics throughout digestion assay. There are however a lack of significant correlation between cytometric and amplicon sequencing fingerprint at genus or species level. Same phenotypical profiles of microbiota during assays matched to several 16S rRNA gene sequencing ones. Flow cytometry fingerprinting can thus be considered as a promising routine on-site method suitable for the detection of stability/variation/disturbance of complex microbial communities involved in bioprocesses. PMID:27160955

  20. Comparative analyses of amplicon migration behavior in differing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, D. J.; Kemp, D. W.; Sampayo, E. M.; Schmidt, G. W.

    2010-03-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is commonly utilized to identify and quantify microbial diversity, but the conditions required for different electrophoretic systems to yield equivalent results and optimal resolution have not been assessed. Herein, the influence of different DGGE system configuration parameters on microbial diversity estimates was tested using Symbiodinium, a group of marine eukaryotic microbes that are important constituents of coral reef ecosystems. To accomplish this, bacterial clone libraries were constructed and sequenced from cultured isolates of Symbiodinium for the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region. From these, 15 clones were subjected to PCR with a GC clamped primer set for DGGE analyses. Migration behaviors of the resulting amplicons were analyzed using a range of conditions, including variation in the composition of the denaturing gradient, electrophoresis time, and applied voltage. All tests were conducted in parallel on two commercial DGGE systems, a C.B.S. Scientific DGGE-2001, and the Bio-Rad DCode system. In this context, identical nucleotide fragments exhibited differing migration behaviors depending on the model of apparatus utilized, with fragments denaturing at a lower gradient concentration and applied voltage on the Bio-Rad DCode system than on the C.B.S. Scientific DGGE-2001 system. Although equivalent PCR-DGGE profiles could be achieved with both brands of DGGE system, the composition of the denaturing gradient and application of electrophoresis time × voltage must be appropriately optimized to achieve congruent results across platforms.

  1. A Multiplexed Amplicon Approach for Detecting Gene Fusions by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Beadling, Carol; Wald, Abigail I; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya L; Zhong, Shan; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Corless, Christopher L; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2016-03-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that result in oncogenic gene fusions are clinically important drivers of many cancer types. Rapid and sensitive methods are therefore needed to detect a broad range of gene fusions in clinical specimens that are often of limited quantity and quality. We describe a next-generation sequencing approach that uses a multiplex PCR-based amplicon panel to interrogate fusion transcripts that involve 19 driver genes and 94 partners implicated in solid tumors. The panel also includes control assays that evaluate the 3'/5' expression ratios of 12 oncogenic kinases, which might be used to infer gene fusion events when the partner is unknown or not included on the panel. There was good concordance between the solid tumor fusion gene panel and other methods, including fluorescence in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, Sanger sequencing, and other next-generation sequencing panels, because 40 specimens known to harbor gene fusions were correctly identified. No specific fusion reads were observed in 59 fusion-negative specimens. The 3'/5' expression ratio was informative for fusions that involved ALK, RET, and NTRK1 but not for BRAF or ROS1 fusions. However, among 37 ALK or RET fusion-negative specimens, four exhibited elevated 3'/5' expression ratios, indicating that fusions predicted solely by 3'/5' read ratios require confirmatory testing. PMID:26747586

  2. Extracellular DNA amplicon sequencing reveals high levels of benthic eukaryotic diversity in the central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Pearman, John K; Irigoien, Xabier; Carvalho, Susana

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to characterize the benthic eukaryotic biodiversity patterns at a coarse taxonomic level in three areas of the central Red Sea (a lagoon, an offshore area in Thuwal and a shallow coastal area near Jeddah) based on extracellular DNA. High-throughput amplicon sequencing targeting the V9 region of the 18S rRNA gene was undertaken for 32 sediment samples. High levels of alpha-diversity were detected with 16,089 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being identified. The majority of the OTUs were assigned to Metazoa (29.2%), Alveolata (22.4%) and Stramenopiles (17.8%). Stramenopiles (Diatomea) and Alveolata (Ciliophora) were frequent in a lagoon and in shallower coastal stations, whereas metazoans (Arthropoda: Maxillopoda) were dominant in deeper offshore stations. Only 24.6% of total OTUs were shared among all areas. Beta-diversity was generally lower between the lagoon and Jeddah (nearshore) than between either of those and the offshore area, suggesting a nearshore-offshore biodiversity gradient. The current approach allowed for a broad-range of benthic eukaryotic biodiversity to be analysed with significantly less labour than would be required by other traditional taxonomic approaches. Our findings suggest that next generation sequencing techniques have the potential to provide a fast and standardised screening of benthic biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. PMID:26525270

  3. Differential amplicons (ΔAmp)—a new molecular method to assess RNA integrity

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, J.; Švec, D.; Lott, E.; Kubista, M.; Sjöback, R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of the mRNA in clinical samples has major impact on the quality of measured expression levels. This is independent of the measurement technique being next generation sequencing (NGS), Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) or microarray profiling. If mRNA is highly degraded or damaged, measured data will be very unreliable and the whole study is likely a waste of time and money. It is therefore common strategy to test the quality of RNA in samples before conducting large and costly studies. Most methods today to assess the quality of RNA are ignorant to the nature of the RNA and, therefore, reflect the integrity of ribosomal RNA, which is the dominant species, rather than of mRNAs, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, which usually are the species of interest. Here, we present a novel molecular approach to assess the quality of the targeted RNA species by measuring the differential amplification (ΔAmp) of an Endogenous RNase Resistant (ERR) marker relative to a reference gene, optionally combined with the measurement of two amplicons of different lengths. The combination reveals any mRNA degradation caused by ribonucleases as well as physical, chemical or UV damage. ΔAmp has superior sensitivity to common microfluidic electrophoretic methods, senses the integrity of the actual targeted RNA species, and allows for a smoother and more cost efficient workflow. PMID:27077042

  4. Targeted amplicon sequencing (TAS): a scalable next-gen approach to multilocus, multitaxa phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Bybee, Seth M; Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Haynes, Benjamin D; Hermansen, Russell A; Byers, Robert L; Clement, Mark J; Udall, Joshua A; Wilcox, Edward R; Crandall, Keith A

    2011-01-01

    Next-gen sequencing technologies have revolutionized data collection in genetic studies and advanced genome biology to novel frontiers. However, to date, next-gen technologies have been used principally for whole genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing. Yet many questions in population genetics and systematics rely on sequencing specific genes of known function or diversity levels. Here, we describe a targeted amplicon sequencing (TAS) approach capitalizing on next-gen capacity to sequence large numbers of targeted gene regions from a large number of samples. Our TAS approach is easily scalable, simple in execution, neither time-nor labor-intensive, relatively inexpensive, and can be applied to a broad diversity of organisms and/or genes. Our TAS approach includes a bioinformatic application, BarcodeCrucher, to take raw next-gen sequence reads and perform quality control checks and convert the data into FASTA format organized by gene and sample, ready for phylogenetic analyses. We demonstrate our approach by sequencing targeted genes of known phylogenetic utility to estimate a phylogeny for the Pancrustacea. We generated data from 44 taxa using 68 different 10-bp multiplexing identifiers. The overall quality of data produced was robust and was informative for phylogeny estimation. The potential for this method to produce copious amounts of data from a single 454 plate (e.g., 325 taxa for 24 loci) significantly reduces sequencing expenses incurred from traditional Sanger sequencing. We further discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this method, while offering suggestions to enhance the approach. PMID:22002916

  5. Digital fragment analysis of short tandem repeats by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Darby, Brian J; Erickson, Shay F; Hervey, Samuel D; Ellis-Felege, Susan N

    2016-07-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been proposed as a method to genotype microsatellites and overcome the four main technical drawbacks of capillary electrophoresis: amplification artifacts, imprecise sizing, length homoplasy, and limited multiplex capability. The objective of this project was to test a high-throughput amplicon sequencing approach to fragment analysis of short tandem repeats and characterize its advantages and disadvantages against traditional capillary electrophoresis. We amplified and sequenced 12 muskrat microsatellite loci from 180 muskrat specimens and analyzed the sequencing data for precision of allele calling, propensity for amplification or sequencing artifacts, and for evidence of length homoplasy. Of the 294 total alleles, we detected by sequencing, only 164 alleles would have been detected by capillary electrophoresis as the remaining 130 alleles (44%) would have been hidden by length homoplasy. The ability to detect a greater number of unique alleles resulted in the ability to resolve greater population genetic structure. The primary advantages of fragment analysis by sequencing are the ability to precisely size fragments, resolve length homoplasy, multiplex many individuals and many loci into a single high-throughput run, and compare data across projects and across laboratories (present and future) with minimal technical calibration. A significant disadvantage of fragment analysis by sequencing is that the method is only practical and cost-effective when performed on batches of several hundred samples with multiple loci. Future work is needed to optimize throughput while minimizing costs and to update existing microsatellite allele calling and analysis programs to accommodate sequence-aware microsatellite data. PMID:27386092

  6. Swarm v2: highly-scalable and high-resolution amplicon clustering

    PubMed Central

    Quince, Christopher; de Vargas, Colomban; Dunthorn, Micah

    2015-01-01

    Previously we presented Swarm v1, a novel and open source amplicon clustering program that produced fine-scale molecular operational taxonomic units (OTUs), free of arbitrary global clustering thresholds and input-order dependency. Swarm v1 worked with an initial phase that used iterative single-linkage with a local clustering threshold (d), followed by a phase that used the internal abundance structures of clusters to break chained OTUs. Here we present Swarm v2, which has two important novel features: (1) a new algorithm for d = 1 that allows the computation time of the program to scale linearly with increasing amounts of data; and (2) the new fastidious option that reduces under-grouping by grafting low abundant OTUs (e.g., singletons and doubletons) onto larger ones. Swarm v2 also directly integrates the clustering and breaking phases, dereplicates sequencing reads with d = 0, outputs OTU representatives in fasta format, and plots individual OTUs as two-dimensional networks. PMID:26713226

  7. Groundtruthing Next-Gen Sequencing for Microbial Ecology–Biases and Errors in Community Structure Estimates from PCR Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Polson, Shawn W.; Wommack, K. Eric; Williamson, Shannon J.; McDonald, Ian R.; Cary, S. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of microbial communities by high-throughput pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA gene PCR amplicons has transformed microbial ecology research and led to the observation that many communities contain a diverse assortment of rare taxa–a phenomenon termed the Rare Biosphere. Multiple studies have investigated the effect of pyrosequencing read quality on operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness for contrived communities, yet there is limited information on the fidelity of community structure estimates obtained through this approach. Given that PCR biases are widely recognized, and further unknown biases may arise from the sequencing process itself, a priori assumptions about the neutrality of the data generation process are at best unvalidated. Furthermore, post-sequencing quality control algorithms have not been explicitly evaluated for the accuracy of recovered representative sequences and its impact on downstream analyses, reducing useful discussion on pyrosequencing reads to their diversity and abundances. Here we report on community structures and sequences recovered for in vitro-simulated communities consisting of twenty 16S rRNA gene clones tiered at known proportions. PCR amplicon libraries of the V3–V4 and V6 hypervariable regions from the in vitro-simulated communities were sequenced using the Roche 454 GS FLX Titanium platform. Commonly used quality control protocols resulted in the formation of OTUs with >1% abundance composed entirely of erroneous sequences, while over-aggressive clustering approaches obfuscated real, expected OTUs. The pyrosequencing process itself did not appear to impose significant biases on overall community structure estimates, although the detection limit for rare taxa may be affected by PCR amplicon size and quality control approach employed. Meanwhile, PCR biases associated with the initial amplicon generation may impose greater distortions in the observed community structure. PMID:22970184

  8. Ambient temperature detection of PCR amplicons with a novel sequence-specific nucleic acid lateral flow biosensor.

    PubMed

    Ang, Geik Yong; Yu, Choo Yee; Yean, Chan Yean

    2012-01-01

    In the field of diagnostics, molecular amplification targeting unique genetic signature sequences has been widely used for rapid identification of infectious agents, which significantly aids physicians in determining the choice of treatment as well as providing important epidemiological data for surveillance and disease control assessment. We report the development of a rapid nucleic acid lateral flow biosensor (NALFB) in a dry-reagent strip format for the sequence-specific detection of single-stranded polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons at ambient temperature (22-25°C). The NALFB was developed in combination with a linear-after-the-exponential PCR assay and the applicability of this biosensor was demonstrated through detection of the cholera toxin gene from diarrheal-causing toxigenic Vibrio cholerae. Amplification using the advanced asymmetric PCR boosts the production of fluorescein-labeled single-stranded amplicons, allowing capture probes immobilized on the NALFB to hybridize specifically with complementary targets in situ on the strip. Subsequent visual formation of red lines is achieved through the binding of conjugated gold nanoparticles to the fluorescein label of the captured amplicons. The visual detection limit observed with synthetic target DNA was 0.3 ng and 1 pg with pure genomic DNA. Evaluation of the NALFB with 164 strains of V. cholerae and non-V. cholerae bacteria recorded 100% for both sensitivity and specificity. The whole procedure of the low-cost NALFB, which is performed at ambient temperature, eliminates the need for preheated buffers or additional equipment, greatly simplifying the protocol for sequence-specific PCR amplicon analysis. PMID:22705404

  9. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  10. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  11. Strengths and Limitations of 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Sequencing in Revealing Temporal Microbial Community Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Poretsky, Rachel; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Luo, Chengwei; Tsementzi, Despina; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the short-term planktonic microbial community structure and resilience in Lake Lanier (GA, USA) while simultaneously evaluating the technical aspects of identifying taxa via 16S rRNA gene amplicon and metagenomic sequence data. 16S rRNA gene amplicons generated from four temporally discrete samples were sequenced with 454 GS-FLX-Ti yielding ∼40,000 rRNA gene sequences from each sample and representing ∼300 observed OTUs. Replicates obtained from the same biological sample clustered together but several biases were observed, linked to either the PCR or sequencing-preparation steps. In comparisons with companion whole-community shotgun metagenome datasets, the estimated number of OTUs at each timepoint was concordant, but 1.5 times and ∼10 times as many phyla and genera, respectively, were identified in the metagenomes. Our analyses showed that the 16S rRNA gene captures broad shifts in community diversity over time, but with limited resolution and lower sensitivity compared to metagenomic data. We also identified OTUs that showed marked shifts in abundance over four close timepoints separated by perturbations and tracked these taxa in the metagenome vs. 16S rRNA amplicon data. A strong summer storm had less of an effect on community composition than did seasonal mixing, which revealed a distinct succession of organisms. This study provides insights into freshwater microbial communities and advances the approaches for assessing community diversity and dynamics in situ. PMID:24714158

  12. Amplicon-based semiconductor sequencing of human exomes: performance evaluation and optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Damiati, E; Borsani, G; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo

    2016-05-01

    The Ion Proton platform allows to perform whole exome sequencing (WES) at low cost, providing rapid turnaround time and great flexibility. Products for WES on Ion Proton system include the AmpliSeq Exome kit and the recently introduced HiQ sequencing chemistry. Here, we used gold standard variants from GIAB consortium to assess the performances in variants identification, characterize the erroneous calls and develop a filtering strategy to reduce false positives. The AmpliSeq Exome kit captures a large fraction of bases (>94 %) in human CDS, ClinVar genes and ACMG genes, but with 2,041 (7 %), 449 (13 %) and 11 (19 %) genes not fully represented, respectively. Overall, 515 protein coding genes contain hard-to-sequence regions, including 90 genes from ClinVar. Performance in variants detection was maximum at mean coverage >120×, while at 90× and 70× we measured a loss of variants of 3.2 and 4.5 %, respectively. WES using HiQ chemistry showed ~71/97.5 % sensitivity, ~37/2 % FDR and ~0.66/0.98 F1 score for indels and SNPs, respectively. The proposed low, medium or high-stringency filters reduced the amount of false positives by 10.2, 21.2 and 40.4 % for indels and 21.2, 41.9 and 68.2 % for SNP, respectively. Amplicon-based WES on Ion Proton platform using HiQ chemistry emerged as a competitive approach, with improved accuracy in variants identification. False-positive variants remain an issue for the Ion Torrent technology, but our filtering strategy can be applied to reduce erroneous variants. PMID:27003585

  13. Prerequisites for amplicon pyrosequencing of microbial methanol utilizers in the environment

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Steffen; Stacheter, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    The commercial availability of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies facilitated the assessment of functional groups of microorganisms in the environment with high coverage, resolution, and reproducibility. Soil methylotrophs were among the first microorganisms in the environment that were assessed with molecular tools, and nowadays, as well with NGS technologies. Studies in the past years re-attracted notice to the pivotal role of methylotrophs in global conversions of methanol, which mainly originates from plants, and is involved in oxidative reactions and ozone formation in the atmosphere. Aerobic methanol utilizers belong to Bacteria, yeasts, Ascomycota, and molds. Numerous bacterial methylotrophs are facultatively aerobic, and also contribute to anaerobic methanol oxidation in the environment, whereas strict anaerobic methanol utilizers belong to methanogens and acetogens. The diversity of enzymes catalyzing the initial oxidation of methanol is considerable, and comprises at least five different enzyme types in aerobes, and one in strict anaerobes. Only the gene of the large subunit of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH; mxaF) has been analyzed by environmental pyrosequencing. To enable a comprehensive assessment of methanol utilizers in the environment, new primers targeting genes of the PQQ MDH in Methylibium (mdh2), of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent MDH (mdh), of the methanol oxidoreductase of Actinobacteria (mdo), of the fungal flavin adenine nucleotide-dependent alcohol oxidase (mod1, mod2, and homologs), and of the gene of the large subunit of the methanol:corrinoid methyltransferases (mtaC) in methanogens and acetogens need to be developed. Combined stable isotope probing of nucleic acids or proteins with amplicon-based NGS are straightforward approaches to reveal insights into functions of certain methylotrophic taxa in the global methanol cycle. PMID:24046766

  14. Voltammetric detection of sequence-selective DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Gultekin; Erdem, Arzum; Ceylan, Cagdas; Akgöz, Muslum

    2016-03-01

    This work describes the single-use electrochemical DNA biosensor technology developed for voltammetric detection of sequence selective DNA hybridization related to important human and veterinary pathogen; Toxoplasma gondii. In the principle of electrochemical label-free detection assay, the duplex of DNA hybrid formation was detected by measuring guanine oxidation signal occured in the presence of DNA hybridization. The biosensor design consisted of the immobilization of an inosine-modified (guanine-free) probe onto the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE), and the detection of the duplex formation in connection with the differential pulse voltammetry(DPV) by measuring the guanine signal. Toxoplasma gondii capture probe was firstly immobilized onto the surface of the activated PGE by wet adsorption. The extent of hybridization at PGE surface between the probe and the target was then determined by measuring the guanine signal observed at +1.0V. The electrochemical monitoring of optimum DNA hybridization has been performed in the target concentration of 40µg/mL in 50min of hybridization time. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was then tested using non-complementary, or mismatch short DNA sequences. Under the optimum conditions, the guanine oxidation signal indicating full hybridization was measured in various target concentration from 0.5 to 25µg/mL and a detection limit was found to be 1.78µg/mL. This single-use biosensor platform was successfully applied for the voltammetric detection of DNA hybridization related to Toxoplasma gondii in PCR amplicons. PMID:26717837

  15. Use of Amplicon-6 Vectors Derived from Human Herpesvirus 6 for Efficient Expression of Membrane-Associated and -Secreted Proteins in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Ronen; Singer, Oded; Moseri, Adi; Frenkel, Niza

    2004-01-01

    The composite amplicon-6 vectors, which are derived from human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), can target hematopoietic cells. In the presence of the respective helper viruses, the amplicons are replicated by the rolling circle mechanism, yielding defective genomes of overall size 135 to 150 kb, composed of multiple repeats of units, containing the viral DNA replication origin, packaging signals, and the selected transgene(s). We report the use of amplicon-6 vectors designed for transgene expression in T cells. The selected transgenes included the green fluorescent protein marker, the herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D (gD), and the gD gene deleted in the transmembrane region (gDsec). The vectors were tested after electroporation and passage in T cells with or without helper HHV-6A superinfections. The results were as follows. (i)The vectors could be passaged both as cell-associated and as cell-free secreted virions infectious to new cells. (ii)The intact gD accumulated at the cell surface, whereas the gDsec was dispersed at internal locations of the cells or was secreted into the medium. (iii)Analyses of amplicon-6-gD expression by flow cytometry have shown significant expression in cultures with reiterated amplicons and helper viruses. The vector has spread to >60% of the cells, and the efficiency of expression per cell increased 15-fold, most likely due to the presence of concatemeric amplicon repeats. Current studies are designed to test whether amplicon-6 vectors can be used for gene therapy in lymphocytes and whether amplicon-6 vectors expressed in T cells and dendritic cells can induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:15078955

  16. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1/Adeno-Associated Virus rep+ Hybrid Amplicon Vector Improves the Stability of Transgene Expression in Human Cells by Site-Specific Integration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Camp, S. M.; Niwano, M.; Shen, X.; Bakowska, J. C.; Breakefield, X. O.; Allen, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are promising gene delivery tools, but their utility in gene therapy has been impeded to some extent by their inability to achieve stable transgene expression. In this study, we examined the possibility of improving transduction stability in cultured human cells via site-specific genomic integration mediated by adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep and inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). A rep− HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon vector was made by inserting a transgene cassette flanked with AAV ITRs into an HSV-1 amplicon backbone, and a rep+ HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon was made by inserting rep68/78 outside the rep− vector 3′ AAV ITR sequence. Both vectors also had a pair of loxP sites flanking the ITRs. The resulting hybrid amplicon vectors were successfully packaged and compared to a standard amplicon vector for stable transduction frequency (STF) in human 293 and Gli36 cell lines and primary myoblasts. The rep+, but not the rep−, hybrid vector improved STF in all three types of cells; 84% of Gli36 and 40% of 293 stable clones transduced by the rep+ hybrid vector integrated the transgene into the AAVS1 site. Due to the difficulty in expanding primary myoblasts, we did not assess site-specific integration in these cells. A strategy to attempt further improvement of STF by “deconcatenating” the hybrid amplicon DNA via Cre-loxP recombination was tested, but it did not increase STF. These data demonstrate that introducing the integrating elements of AAV into HSV-1 amplicon vectors can significantly improve their ability to achieve stable gene transduction by conferring the AAV-like capability of site-specific genomic integration in dividing cells. PMID:12072515

  17. De novo origin of VCY2 from autosome to Y-transposed amplicon.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng-Rong; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yu-Chao; Yi, Yin-Sha; Qu, Fang; Liu, Tao-Cheng; Lv, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The formation of new genes is a primary driving force of evolution in all organisms. The de novo evolution of new genes from non-protein-coding genomic regions is emerging as an important additional mechanism for novel gene creation. Y chromosomes underlie sex determination in mammals and contain genes that are required for male-specific functions. In this study, a search was undertaken for Y chromosome de novo genes derived from non-protein-coding sequences. The Y chromosome orphan gene variable charge, Y-linked (VCY)2, is an autosome-derived gene that has sequence similarity to large autosomal fragments but lacks an autosomal protein-coding homolog. VCY2 locates in the amplicon containing long DNA fragments that were transposed from autosomes to the Y chromosome before the ape-monkey split. We confirmed that VCY2 cannot be encoded by autosomes due to the presence of multiple disablers that disrupt the open reading frame, such as the absence of start or stop codons and the presence of premature stop codons. Similar observations have been made for homologs in the autosomes of the chimpanzee, gorilla, rhesus macaque, baboon and out-group marmoset, which suggests that there was a non-protein-coding ancestral VCY2 that was common to apes and monkeys that predated the transposition event. Furthermore, while protein-coding orthologs are absent, a putative non-protein-coding VCY2 with conserved disablers was identified in the rhesus macaque Y chromosome male-specific region. This finding implies that VCY2 might have not acquired its protein-coding ability before the ape-monkey split. VCY2 encodes a testis-specific expressed protein and is involved in the pathologic process of male infertility, and the acquisition of this gene might improve male fertility. This is the first evidence that de novo genes can be generated from transposed autosomal non-protein-coding segments, and this evidence provides novel insights into the evolutionary history of the Y chromosome. PMID

  18. A point mutation in the putative TATA box, detected in nondiseased individuals and patients with hereditary breast cancer, decreases promoter activity of the 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 gene 2 (EDH17B2) in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Peltoketo, H.; Piao, Y.; Isomaa, V.

    1994-09-01

    EDH17B2, the gene encoding 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, has been suggested as a candidate for the familial breast cancer gene, BRCA1, located on 17q12-q21. We analyzed the promoter region of EDH17B2 in DNA from 20 control individuals and 40 patients with familial breast cancer. Two frequent (designated vI and vIII) and two rare (vII and vIV) nucleotide variations were present in both the breast cancer patients and the controls, except the alteration vII, which was found only in one patient. Although the data do not support the identification of EDH17B2 as the BRCA1 gene, it is of interest that point mutation vIV (A {yields} C) was located in the putative TATA box of the EDH17B2 gene. Reporter gene analysis showed that the mutation vIV decreases EDH17B2 promoter activity by an average of 45% in in vitro assays, suggesting that nucleotide A at position -27 is significant for efficient transcription. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq): A cost effective SNP genotyping method based on custom amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; Harmon, Stephanie A; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-07-01

    Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) is a method that uses next-generation sequencing of multiplexed PCR products to generate genotypes from relatively small panels (50-500) of targeted single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for thousands of individuals in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. This method uses only unlabelled oligos and PCR master mix in two thermal cycling steps for amplification of targeted SNP loci. During this process, sequencing adapters and dual barcode sequence tags are incorporated into the amplicons enabling thousands of individuals to be pooled into a single sequencing library. Post sequencing, reads from individual samples are split into individual files using their unique combination of barcode sequences. Genotyping is performed with a simple perl script which counts amplicon-specific sequences for each allele, and allele ratios are used to determine the genotypes. We demonstrate this technique by genotyping 2068 individual steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) samples with a set of 192 SNP markers in a single library sequenced in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. Genotype data were 99.9% concordant to previously collected TaqMan(™) genotypes at the same 192 loci, but call rates were slightly lower with GT-seq (96.4%) relative to Taqman (99.0%). Of the 192 SNPs, 187 were genotyped in ≥90% of the individual samples and only 3 SNPs were genotyped in <70% of samples. This study demonstrates amplicon sequencing with GT-seq greatly reduces the cost of genotyping hundreds of targeted SNPs relative to existing methods by utilizing a simple library preparation method and massive efficiency of scale. PMID:25476721

  20. The cytological manifestation of gene amplification in multidrug-resistant mouse leukemia P388 sublines is correlated with amplicon content

    SciTech Connect

    Il`inskaya, G.V.; Kopnin, B.P.; Demidova, N.S.

    1995-10-01

    Previously, we showed that development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in mouse P388 leukemia cells is often associated with the appearance of newly-formed chromosomelike structures that contain amplified copies of the mdr1 gene. In the present study, we compared amplicon content in P388 sublines showing different types of these structures. A strong correlation between the formation of specific acentric markers consisting of two identical arms and the absence of the sorcin gene coamplification was found. In all the sublines containing other types of chromosomelike structures, the sorcin gene is coamplified. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells Transduced by Light-Helper-Dependent Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Amplicon Vector Acquire a Mature Dendritic Cell Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Oz-Arslan, Devrim; Tsitoura, Eliza; Kazazi, Dorothea; Kouvatsis, Vlasis; Epstein, Alberto L; Mavromara, Penelope

    2015-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) turn into the most potent antigen-presenting cells following a complex transforming process, which leads to their maturation. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors represent highly versatile viral vector platforms with the ability to transduce immature DCs at exceedingly high efficiencies, while the efficiency of infection of mature DCs is significantly low. However, the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-dependent (BD) amplicon vectors tested so far do not result in the maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) in vitro. In this study we investigated the effects of light-helper-dependent (LHD) amplicon vectors produced with the replication-defective HSV-1 LaLΔJ helper virus system. First, we observed that transgene expression in BMDC cultures was equally potent between the LHD and the BD amplicon vectors. We determined that the percentage of transduced cells and the duration of transgene expression were negatively influenced by the presence of increasing levels of helper virus. Second, infection by the LHD amplicon vector as well as the helper HSV-1 LaLΔJ virus alone resulted in the phenotypic maturation of BMDCs and the expression of both interferon-stimulated genes and proinflammatory cytokines. Further comparisons of the gene expression of infected DCs showed that while interferon-stimulated genes such as Ifit1, Ifit3, Mx2, Isg15, and Cxcl10 were induced by both BD and LHD amplicon vectors, early proinflammatory cytokine gene expression (Tnfa, Il1a, Il1b, Il6, Il10, Il12b, Cxcl1, and Cxcl16) and DC maturation were mediated only by the LHD amplicons. PMID:26046494

  2. HSV-1 amplicon vectors that direct the in situ production of foot-and-mouth disease virus antigens in mammalian cells can be used for genetic immunization.

    PubMed

    D'Antuono, Alejandra; Laimbacher, Andrea S; La Torre, Jose; Tribulatti, Virginia; Romanutti, Carina; Zamorano, Patricia; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel; Mattion, Nora

    2010-10-28

    HSV-1 amplicon vectors encoding heterologous antigens were capable to mediate in situ generation of protein synthesis and to generate a specific immune response to the corresponding antigens. In this study, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus antigens were used to generate a genetic vaccine prototype. The amplicons were designed to provide a high safety profile as they do not express any HSV-1 genes when packaged using a helper virus-free system, and they are able to encapsidate several copies of the transgene or allow the simultaneous expression of different genes. Virus-like particles were produced after cell processing of the delivered DNA. Inoculation of mice with 5 × 10(5) transducing units of amplicon vectors resulted in FMDV-specific humoral responses in the absence of adjuvants, which were dependent on the in situ de novo production of the vector-encoded antigens. Challenge of mice vaccinated with these amplicons with a high dose of live virus, resulted in partial protection, with a significant reduction of viremia. This work highlights the potential use of a HSV-1 amplicon vector platform for generation of safe genetic vaccines. PMID:20851082

  3. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-01-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  4. A Method for Amplicon Deep Sequencing of Drug Resistance Genes in Plasmodium falciparum Clinical Isolates from India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pavitra N.; Uplekar, Swapna; Kayal, Sriti; Mallick, Prashant K.; Bandyopadhyay, Nabamita; Kale, Sonal; Singh, Om P.; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge to global malaria control and elimination is early detection and containment of emerging drug resistance. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods provide the resolution, scalability, and sensitivity required for high-throughput surveillance of molecular markers of drug resistance. We have developed an amplicon sequencing method on the Ion Torrent PGM platform for targeted resequencing of a panel of six Plasmodium falciparum genes implicated in resistance to first-line antimalarial therapy, including artemisinin combination therapy, chloroquine, and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. The protocol was optimized using 12 geographically diverse P. falciparum reference strains and successfully applied to multiplexed sequencing of 16 clinical isolates from India. The sequencing results from the reference strains showed 100% concordance with previously reported drug resistance-associated mutations. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinical isolates revealed a number of known resistance-associated mutations and other nonsynonymous mutations that have not been implicated in drug resistance. SNP positions containing multiple allelic variants were used to identify three clinical samples containing mixed genotypes indicative of multiclonal infections. The amplicon sequencing protocol has been designed for the benchtop Ion Torrent PGM platform and can be operated with minimal bioinformatics infrastructure, making it ideal for use in countries that are endemic for the disease to facilitate routine large-scale surveillance of the emergence of drug resistance and to ensure continued success of the malaria treatment policy. PMID:27008882

  5. A Systematic Assessment of Accuracy in Detecting Somatic Mosaic Variants by Deep Amplicon Sequencing: Application to NF2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sestini, Roberta; Candita, Luisa; Capone, Gabriele Lorenzo; Barbetti, Lorenzo; Falconi, Serena; Frusconi, Sabrina; Giotti, Irene; Giuliani, Costanza; Torricelli, Francesca; Benelli, Matteo; Papi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The accurate detection of low-allelic variants is still challenging, particularly for the identification of somatic mosaicism, where matched control sample is not available. High throughput sequencing, by the simultaneous and independent analysis of thousands of different DNA fragments, might overcome many of the limits of traditional methods, greatly increasing the sensitivity. However, it is necessary to take into account the high number of false positives that may arise due to the lack of matched control samples. Here, we applied deep amplicon sequencing to the analysis of samples with known genotype and variant allele fraction (VAF) followed by a tailored statistical analysis. This method allowed to define a minimum value of VAF for detecting mosaic variants with high accuracy. Then, we exploited the estimated VAF to select candidate alterations in NF2 gene in 34 samples with unknown genotype (30 blood and 4 tumor DNAs), demonstrating the suitability of our method. The strategy we propose optimizes the use of deep amplicon sequencing for the identification of low abundance variants. Moreover, our method can be applied to different high throughput sequencing approaches to estimate the background noise and define the accuracy of the experimental design. PMID:26066488

  6. RiboFR-Seq: a novel approach to linking 16S rRNA amplicon profiles to metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanming; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-06-01

    16S rRNA amplicon analysis and shotgun metagenome sequencing are two main culture-independent strategies to explore the genetic landscape of various microbial communities. Recently, numerous studies have employed these two approaches together, but downstream data analyses were performed separately, which always generated incongruent or conflict signals on both taxonomic and functional classifications. Here we propose a novel approach, RiboFR-Seq (Ribosomal RNA gene flanking region sequencing), for capturing both ribosomal RNA variable regions and their flanking protein-coding genes simultaneously. Through extensive testing on clonal bacterial strain, salivary microbiome and bacterial epibionts of marine kelp, we demonstrated that RiboFR-Seq could detect the vast majority of bacteria not only in well-studied microbiomes but also in novel communities with limited reference genomes. Combined with classical amplicon sequencing and shotgun metagenome sequencing, RiboFR-Seq can link the annotations of 16S rRNA and metagenomic contigs to make a consensus classification. By recognizing almost all 16S rRNA copies, the RiboFR-seq approach can effectively reduce the taxonomic abundance bias resulted from 16S rRNA copy number variation. We believe that RiboFR-Seq, which provides an integrated view of 16S rRNA profiles and metagenomes, will help us better understand diverse microbial communities. PMID:26984526

  7. A Method for Amplicon Deep Sequencing of Drug Resistance Genes in Plasmodium falciparum Clinical Isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pavitra N; Uplekar, Swapna; Kayal, Sriti; Mallick, Prashant K; Bandyopadhyay, Nabamita; Kale, Sonal; Singh, Om P; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel C; Carlton, Jane M

    2016-06-01

    A major challenge to global malaria control and elimination is early detection and containment of emerging drug resistance. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods provide the resolution, scalability, and sensitivity required for high-throughput surveillance of molecular markers of drug resistance. We have developed an amplicon sequencing method on the Ion Torrent PGM platform for targeted resequencing of a panel of six Plasmodium falciparum genes implicated in resistance to first-line antimalarial therapy, including artemisinin combination therapy, chloroquine, and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. The protocol was optimized using 12 geographically diverse P. falciparum reference strains and successfully applied to multiplexed sequencing of 16 clinical isolates from India. The sequencing results from the reference strains showed 100% concordance with previously reported drug resistance-associated mutations. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinical isolates revealed a number of known resistance-associated mutations and other nonsynonymous mutations that have not been implicated in drug resistance. SNP positions containing multiple allelic variants were used to identify three clinical samples containing mixed genotypes indicative of multiclonal infections. The amplicon sequencing protocol has been designed for the benchtop Ion Torrent PGM platform and can be operated with minimal bioinformatics infrastructure, making it ideal for use in countries that are endemic for the disease to facilitate routine large-scale surveillance of the emergence of drug resistance and to ensure continued success of the malaria treatment policy. PMID:27008882

  8. A portable automatic endpoint detection system for amplicons of loop mediated isothermal amplification on microfluidic compact disk platform.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shah Mukim; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Sayad, Abkar Ahmed; Thiha, Aung; Pei, Koh Xiu; Mohktar, Mas S; Hashim, Uda; Cho, Jongman; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many improvements have been made in foodborne pathogen detection methods to reduce the impact of food contamination. Several rapid methods have been developed with biosensor devices to improve the way of performing pathogen detection. This paper presents an automated endpoint detection system for amplicons generated by loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) on a microfluidic compact disk platform. The developed detection system utilizes a monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) emitter for excitation of fluorescent labeled LAMP amplicons and a color sensor to detect the emitted florescence from target. Then it processes the sensor output and displays the detection results on liquid crystal display (LCD). The sensitivity test has been performed with detection limit up to 2.5 × 10(-3) ng/µL with different DNA concentrations of Salmonella bacteria. This system allows a rapid and automatic endpoint detection which could lead to the development of a point-of-care diagnosis device for foodborne pathogens detection in a resource-limited environment. PMID:25751077

  9. A Portable Automatic Endpoint Detection System for Amplicons of Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification on Microfluidic Compact Disk Platform

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Shah Mukim; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Sayad, Abkar Ahmed; Thiha, Aung; Pei, Koh Xiu; Mohktar, Mas S.; Hashim, Uda; Cho, Jongman; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many improvements have been made in foodborne pathogen detection methods to reduce the impact of food contamination. Several rapid methods have been developed with biosensor devices to improve the way of performing pathogen detection. This paper presents an automated endpoint detection system for amplicons generated by loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) on a microfluidic compact disk platform. The developed detection system utilizes a monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) emitter for excitation of fluorescent labeled LAMP amplicons and a color sensor to detect the emitted florescence from target. Then it processes the sensor output and displays the detection results on liquid crystal display (LCD). The sensitivity test has been performed with detection limit up to 2.5 × 10−3 ng/µL with different DNA concentrations of Salmonella bacteria. This system allows a rapid and automatic endpoint detection which could lead to the development of a point-of-care diagnosis device for foodborne pathogens detection in a resource-limited environment. PMID:25751077

  10. Short-Read Assembly of Full-Length 16S Amplicons Reveals Bacterial Diversity in Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher S.; Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Thomas, Brian C.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    In microbial ecology, a fundamental question relates to how community diversity and composition change in response to perturbation. Most studies have had limited ability to deeply sample community structure (e.g. Sanger-sequenced 16S rRNA libraries), or have had limited taxonomic resolution (e.g. studies based on 16S rRNA hypervariable region sequencing). Here, we combine the higher taxonomic resolution of near-full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the economics and sensitivity of short-read sequencing to assay the abundance and identity of organisms that represent as little as 0.01% of sediment bacterial communities. We used a new version of EMIRGE optimized for large data size to reconstruct near-full-length 16S rRNA genes from amplicons sheared and sequenced with Illumina technology. The approach allowed us to differentiate the community composition among samples acquired before perturbation, after acetate amendment shifted the predominant metabolism to iron reduction, and once sulfate reduction began. Results were highly reproducible across technical replicates, and identified specific taxa that responded to the perturbation. All samples contain very high alpha diversity and abundant organisms from phyla without cultivated representatives. Surprisingly, at the time points measured, there was no strong loss of evenness, despite the selective pressure of acetate amendment and change in the terminal electron accepting process. However, community membership was altered significantly. The method allows for sensitive, accurate profiling of the “long tail” of low abundance organisms that exist in many microbial communities, and can resolve population dynamics in response to environmental change. PMID:23405248

  11. Gene-dosage dependent overexpression at the 13q amplicon identifies DIS3 as candidate oncogene in colorectal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    de Groen, Florence L M; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tijssen, Marianne; Vriend, Lianne E M; Ylstra, Bauke; Hooijberg, Erik; Meijer, Gerrit A; Steenbergen, Renske D M; Carvalho, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development is in most cases marked by the accumulation of genomic alterations including gain of the entire q-arm of chromosome 13. This aberration occurs in 40%-60% of all CRC and is associated with progression from adenoma to carcinoma. To date, little is known about the effect of the 13q amplicon on the expression of the therein located genes and their functional relevance. We therefore aimed to identify candidate genes at the 13q amplicon that contribute to colorectal adenoma to carcinoma progression in a gene dosage-dependent manner. Integrative analysis of whole genome expression and DNA copy number signatures resulted in the identification of 36 genes on 13q of which significant overexpression in carcinomas compared with adenomas was linked to a copy number gain. Five genes showing high levels of overexpression in carcinomas versus adenomas were further tested by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in two independent sample sets of colorectal tumors (n = 40 and n = 47). DIS3 and LRCH1 revealed significant overexpression in carcinomas compared with adenomas in a 13q gain dependent manner. Silencing of DIS3 affected important tumorigenic characteristics such as viability, migration, and invasion. In conclusion, significant overexpression of DIS3 and LRCH1 associated with adenoma to carcinoma progression is linked to the CRC specific gain of 13q. The functional relevance of this copy number aberration was corroborated for DIS3, thereby identifying this gene as novel candidate oncogene contributing to the 13q-driven adenoma to carcinoma progression. PMID:24478024

  12. Quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using amplicon-fusion-site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The amplification of putative oncogenes is a common finding within the genome of various cancer types. Identification and further targeting of specific junction sites within the sequence of genomic amplicons (amplicon fusion sites, AFS) by PCR (AFS-PCR) is suitable for quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD). This approach has recently been developed and described for MYCN amplified neuroblastomas. To compare AFS-PCR directly to routinely used MRD diagnostic strategies, we mapped the amplified genomic regions (ampGR) of an iAMP21-amplicon in high resolution of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Successfully, we established AFS-PCR covering junction sites between ampGR within the iAMP21-amplicon. Quantification of MRD by AFS-PCR was directly comparable to IgH/TCR based real time quantitative PCR and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis in consecutive bone marrow (BM) specimens. Our data give an additional proof of concept of AFS-PCR for quantification of MRD. The method could be taken into account for ALL patients with genomic amplifications as alternative MRD diagnostic, if no or qualitatively poor Ig/TCR-PCRs are available. PMID:23210797

  13. Cloning and physical mapping of DNA sequences encompassing a region in N-myc amplicons of a human neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, K; Nishi, Y

    1991-01-01

    Cloning and physical mapping of DNA sequences encompassing N-myc amplicons of a human neuroblastoma cell line were done. A number of lambda phage clones within this region were isolated using the probes prepared by the phenol emulsion reassociation technique. Based on the restriction mapping, they were integrated into 8 contigs with sizes of 25-60 kb which, in total, encompassed a 330 kb region. Several amplicons, 100, 420, 480 and 520 kb in size as a Notl fragment, were identified using hexagonal field gel electrophoresis, and the contigs were assigned in these Notl fragments. The region encompassed by the contigs was equivalent to some 60-80% of the amplicons identified as a Notl fragment. In order to compare the amplified regions flanking the N-myc gene among the cell lines, the phage clones to cover the whole contigs were used for hybridization as a probe. The results showed that the portions of the whole contigs ranging 18-45% were also amplified in the cell lines examined. These results allowed us to identified the 'rearranged sites' which were rather evenly distributed, one at every 40 kb, through the contigs. These observations lead to the idea that an amplified DNA domain is constructed after the multiple rearrangements and then increases in number, finally resulting in the formation of subsets of amplicons with sequence homogeneity. Images PMID:1762918

  14. Tagging the expressed protein with 6 histidines: rapid cloning of an amplicon with three options.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manika Indrajit; Jain, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    We report the designing of three expression vectors that can be used for rapid cloning of any blunt-end DNA segment. Only a single set of oligonucleotides are required to perform the amplification of the target DNA and its cloning in all three vectors simultaneously. The DNA thus cloned can express a protein either with or without a hexa-histidine tag depending upon the vector used. The expression occurs from T7 promoter when transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). Two of the three plasmids have been designed to provide the expressed protein with either N- or C-terminus 6 histidine amino acids in tandem. The third plasmid, however, does not add any tag to the expressed protein. The cloning is achieved quickly with the requirement of phosphorylation of PCR product without any restriction digestion. Additionally, the generated clones can be confirmed with a single step PCR reaction carried out from bacterial colonies (generally termed as "colony PCR"). We show the cloning, expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as proof-of-concept. Additionally, we also show the cloning and expression of four sigma factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis further demonstrating the utility of the designed plasmids. We strongly believe that the vectors and the strategy that we have developed will facilitate the rapid cloning and expression of any gene in E. coli BL21(DE3) with or without a hexa-histidine tag. PMID:23691118

  15. Quantitative and qualitative differences in celiac disease epitopes among durum wheat varieties identified through deep RNA-amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat gluten is important for the industrial quality of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum wheat (T. turgidum L.). Gluten proteins are also the source of immunogenic peptides that can trigger a T cell reaction in celiac disease (CD) patients, leading to inflammatory responses in the small intestine. Various peptides with three major T cell epitopes involved in CD are derived from alpha-gliadin fraction of gluten. Alpha-gliadins are encoded by a large multigene family and amino acid variation in the CD epitopes is known to influence the immunogenicity of individual gene family members. Current commercial methods of gluten detection are unable to distinguish between immunogenic and non-immunogenic CD epitope variants and thus to accurately quantify the overall CD epitope load of a given wheat variety. Such quantification is indispensable for correct selection of wheat varieties with low potential to cause CD. Results A 454 RNA-amplicon sequencing method was developed for alpha-gliadin transcripts encompassing the three major CD epitopes and their variants. The method was used to screen developing grains on plants of 61 different durum wheat cultivars and accessions. A dedicated sequence analysis pipeline returned a total of 304 unique alpha-gliadin transcripts, corresponding to a total of 171 ‘unique deduced protein fragments’ of alpha-gliadins. The numbers of these fragments obtained in each plant were used to calculate quantitative and quantitative differences between the CD epitopes expressed in the endosperm of these wheat plants. A few plants showed a lower fraction of CD epitope-encoding alpha-gliadin transcripts, but none were free of CD epitopes. Conclusions The dedicated 454 RNA-amplicon sequencing method enables 1) the grouping of wheat plants according to the genetic variation in alpha-gliadin transcripts, and 2) the screening for plants which are potentially less CD-immunogenic. The resulting alpha-gliadin sequence database will

  16. Molecular characterization of a novel amplicon at 1q21-q22 frequently observed in human sarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Forus, A.; Berner, J. M.; Meza-Zepeda, L. A.; Saeter, G.; Mischke, D.; Fodstad, O.; Myklebost, O.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) study of a panel of sarcomas, we detected recurrent amplification of 1q21-q22 in soft tissue and bone tumours. Amplification of this region had not previously been associated with sarcoma development, but occasional amplification of CACY/S100A6 and MUC1 in 1q21 had been reported for melanoma and breast carcinoma respectively. Initial screening by Southern blot analysis showed amplification of S100A6, FLG and SPRR3 in several sarcomas and, in a first attempt to characterize the 1q21-q22 amplicon in more detail, we have now investigated the amplification status of these and 11 other markers in the region in 35 sarcoma samples. FLG was the most frequently amplified gene, and the markers located in the same 4.5-Mb region as FLG showed a higher incidence of amplification than the more distal ones. However, for most of the 14 markers, amplification levels were low, and only APOA2 and the anonymous marker D1S3620 showed high-level amplifications (> tenfold increases) in one sample each. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the amplification patterns of two overlapping yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) covering the region between D1S3620 and FLG (789f2 and 764a1), as well as two more distally located YACs in nine selected samples. Six samples had amplification of the YAC containing D1S3620 and, in three, 764a1 was also included. Five of these tumours showed normal copies of the more distal YACs; thus, it seems likely that an important gene may be located within 789f2, or very close. Two samples had high copy numbers of the most distal YACs. Taken together, FISH and molecular analyses indicate complex amplification patterns in 1q21-q22 with at least two amplicons: one located near D1S3620/789f2 and one more distal. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716033

  17. Fungi Sailing the Arctic Ocean: Speciose Communities in North Atlantic Driftwood as Revealed by High-Throughput Amplicon Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rämä, Teppo; Davey, Marie L; Nordén, Jenni; Halvorsen, Rune; Blaalid, Rakel; Mathiassen, Geir H; Alsos, Inger G; Kauserud, Håvard

    2016-08-01

    High amounts of driftwood sail across the oceans and provide habitat for organisms tolerating the rough and saline environment. Fungi have adapted to the extremely cold and saline conditions which driftwood faces in the high north. For the first time, we applied high-throughput sequencing to fungi residing in driftwood to reveal their taxonomic richness, community composition, and ecology in the North Atlantic. Using pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons obtained from 49 marine logs, we found 807 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on clustering at 97 % sequence similarity cut-off level. The phylum Ascomycota comprised 74 % of the OTUs and 20 % belonged to Basidiomycota. The richness of basidiomycetes decreased with prolonged submersion in the sea, supporting the general view of ascomycetes being more extremotolerant. However, more than one fourth of the fungal OTUs remained unassigned to any fungal class, emphasising the need for better DNA reference data from the marine habitat. Different fungal communities were detected in coniferous and deciduous logs. Our results highlight that driftwood hosts a considerably higher fungal diversity than currently known. The driftwood fungal community is not a terrestrial relic but a speciose assemblage of fungi adapted to the stressful marine environment and different kinds of wooden substrates found in it. PMID:27147245

  18. Simultaneous Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing with Short Overlapping Amplicons Suitable for Degraded DNA Using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; Ralf, Arwin; van Oven, Mannis; Kupiec, Tomasz; Chang, Joseph; Lagacé, Robert; Kayser, Manfred

    2015-12-01

    Whole mitochondrial (mt) genome analysis enables a considerable increase in analysis throughput, and improves the discriminatory power to the maximum possible phylogenetic resolution. Most established protocols on the different massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms, however, invariably involve the PCR amplification of large fragments, typically several kilobases in size, which may fail due to mtDNA fragmentation in the available degraded materials. We introduce a MPS tiling approach for simultaneous whole human mt genome sequencing using 161 short overlapping amplicons (average 200 bp) with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. We illustrate the performance of this new method by sequencing 20 DNA samples belonging to different worldwide mtDNA haplogroups. Additional quality control, particularly regarding the potential detection of nuclear insertions of mtDNA (NUMTs), was performed by comparative MPS analysis using the conventional long-range amplification method. Preliminary sensitivity testing revealed that detailed haplogroup inference was feasible with 100 pg genomic input DNA. Complete mt genome coverage was achieved from DNA samples experimentally degraded down to genomic fragment sizes of about 220 bp, and up to 90% coverage from naturally degraded samples. Overall, we introduce a new approach for whole mt genome MPS analysis from degraded and nondegraded materials relevant to resolve and infer maternal genetic ancestry at complete resolution in anthropological, evolutionary, medical, and forensic applications. PMID:26387877

  19. Evolution of MHC class I genes in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) revealed by 454 amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In evolutionary and conservation biology, parasitism is often highlighted as a major selective pressure. To fight against parasites and pathogens, genetic diversity of the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are particularly important. However, the extensive degree of polymorphism observed in these genes makes it difficult to conduct thorough population screenings. Methods We utilized a genotyping protocol that uses 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize the MHC class I in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) and to investigate their evolution at multiple relevant levels of organization. Results MHC class I genes revealed signatures of trans-species polymorphism across several reptile species. In the studied loggerhead turtle individuals, it results in the maintenance of two ancient allelic lineages. We also found that individuals carrying an intermediate number of MHC class I alleles are larger than those with either a low or high number of alleles. Conclusions Multiple modes of evolution seem to maintain MHC diversity in the loggerhead turtles, with relatively high polymorphism for an endangered species. PMID:23627726

  20. Amplicon-Based Pyrosequencing Reveals High Diversity of Protistan Parasites in Ships' Ballast Water: Implications for Biogeography and Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pagenkopp Lohan, K M; Fleischer, R C; Carney, K J; Holzer, K K; Ruiz, G M

    2016-04-01

    Ships' ballast water (BW) commonly moves macroorganisms and microorganisms across the world's oceans and along coasts; however, the majority of these microbial transfers have gone undetected. We applied high-throughput sequencing methods to identify microbial eukaryotes, specifically emphasizing the protistan parasites, in ships' BW collected from vessels calling to the Chesapeake Bay (Virginia and Maryland, USA) from European and Eastern Canadian ports. We utilized tagged-amplicon 454 pyrosequencing with two general primer sets, amplifying either the V4 or V9 domain of the small subunit (SSU) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene complex, from total DNA extracted from water samples collected from the ballast tanks of bulk cargo vessels. We detected a diverse group of protistan taxa, with some known to contain important parasites in marine systems, including Apicomplexa (unidentified apicomplexans, unidentified gregarines, Cryptosporidium spp.), Dinophyta (Blastodinium spp., Euduboscquella sp., unidentified syndinids, Karlodinium spp., Syndinium spp.), Perkinsea (Parvilucifera sp.), Opisthokonta (Ichthyosporea sp., Pseudoperkinsidae, unidentified ichthyosporeans), and Stramenopiles (Labyrinthulomycetes). Further characterization of groups with parasitic taxa, consisting of phylogenetic analyses for four taxa (Cryptosporidium spp., Parvilucifera spp., Labyrinthulomycetes, and Ichthyosporea), revealed that sequences were obtained from both known and novel lineages. This study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing is a viable and sensitive method for detecting parasitic protists when present and transported in the ballast water of ships. These data also underscore the potential importance of human-aided dispersal in the biogeography of these microbes and emerging diseases in the world's oceans. PMID:26476551

  1. Simultaneous Amplicon Sequencing to Explore Co-Occurrence Patterns of Bacterial, Archaeal and Eukaryotic Microorganisms in Rumen Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Seedorf, Henning; Walters, William A.; Clemente, Jose C.; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Janssen, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Ruminants rely on a complex rumen microbial community to convert dietary plant material to energy-yielding products. Here we developed a method to simultaneously analyze the community's bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, ciliate 18S rRNA genes and anaerobic fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 genes using 12 DNA samples derived from 11 different rumen samples from three host species (Ovis aries, Bos taurus, Cervus elephas) and multiplex 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. We show that the mixing ratio of the group-specific DNA templates before emulsion PCR is crucial to compensate for differences in amplicon length. This method, in contrast to using a non-specific universal primer pair, avoids sequencing non-targeted DNA, such as plant- or endophyte-derived rRNA genes, and allows increased or decreased levels of community structure resolution for each microbial group as needed. Communities analyzed with different primers always grouped by sample origin rather than by the primers used. However, primer choice had a greater impact on apparent archaeal community structure than on bacterial community structure, and biases for certain methanogen groups were detected. Co-occurrence analysis of microbial taxa from all three domains of life suggested strong within- and between-domain correlations between different groups of microorganisms within the rumen. The approach used to simultaneously characterize bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic components of a microbiota should be applicable to other communities occupying diverse habitats. PMID:23408926

  2. Analysis of black fungal biofilms occurring at domestic water taps. I: compositional analysis using Tag-Encoded FLX Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Guido; Hübner, Iris; Schmidt, Carsten K; de Hoog, G Sybren; Haase, Gerhard

    2013-06-01

    Mass growth of dark fungal biofilms on water taps and associated habitats was observed in various German drinking water distribution systems recently. Customers of affected drinking water systems are anxious about potential and unknown health risks. These environments are known to harbour a fungal flora also comprising a variety of fungal opportunists that are well known to cause superficial mycoses in humans (Exophiala equina, Exophiala lecanii-corni) but are not known to establish dark biofilms so far. To gain profound insight on composition of respective biofilms, a metagenomic approach using Tag-Encoded FLX Amplicon Pyrosequencing (TEFAP) of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 region in comparison with a classical cultivation approach using Sabouraud agar with chloramphenicol and erythritol-chloramphenicol-agar was performed. E. lecanii-corni was found to be the major component in 10 of 13 biofilms analysed independently of the method used. Alternaria sp., E. equina, Fusarium spp. and Ochroconis spp. were also relatively abundant. As expected, TEFAP usually revealed a higher diversity than the cultivation approaches. For example, opportunistic species like Candida albicans or Exophiala dermatitidis were detected in very low amounts. In conclusion, TEFAP turned out to be a promising and powerful tool for the semi-quantitative analysis of fungal biofilms. Referring to relevant literature, potential biological hazards caused by fungi of the dark biofilms can be regarded as low. PMID:23385952

  3. Factors That Affect Large Subunit Ribosomal DNA Amplicon Sequencing Studies of Fungal Communities: Classification Method, Primer Choice, and Error

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Teresita M.; Golding, G. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA is widely used in fungal phylogenetics and to an increasing extent also amplicon-based environmental sequencing. The relatively short reads produced by next-generation sequencing, however, makes primer choice and sequence error important variables for obtaining accurate taxonomic classifications. In this simulation study we tested the performance of three classification methods: 1) a similarity-based method (BLAST + Metagenomic Analyzer, MEGAN); 2) a composition-based method (Ribosomal Database Project naïve Bayesian classifier, NBC); and, 3) a phylogeny-based method (Statistical Assignment Package, SAP). We also tested the effects of sequence length, primer choice, and sequence error on classification accuracy and perceived community composition. Using a leave-one-out cross validation approach, results for classifications to the genus rank were as follows: BLAST + MEGAN had the lowest error rate and was particularly robust to sequence error; SAP accuracy was highest when long LSU query sequences were classified; and, NBC runs significantly faster than the other tested methods. All methods performed poorly with the shortest 50–100 bp sequences. Increasing simulated sequence error reduced classification accuracy. Community shifts were detected due to sequence error and primer selection even though there was no change in the underlying community composition. Short read datasets from individual primers, as well as pooled datasets, appear to only approximate the true community composition. We hope this work informs investigators of some of the factors that affect the quality and interpretation of their environmental gene surveys. PMID:22558215

  4. Potential applications of next generation DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons in microbial water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Savio, D; Ley, R E; Mach, R L; Farnleitner, A H; Reischer, G H

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS) methods for water quality assessment has so far not been broadly investigated. This study set out to evaluate the potential of an NGS-based approach in a complex catchment with importance for drinking water abstraction. In this multi-compartment investigation, total bacterial communities in water, faeces, soil, and sediment samples were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons to assess the capabilities of this NGS method for (i) the development and evaluation of environmental molecular diagnostics, (ii) direct screening of the bulk bacterial communities, and (iii) the detection of faecal pollution in water. Results indicate that NGS methods can highlight potential target populations for diagnostics and will prove useful for the evaluation of existing and the development of novel DNA-based detection methods in the field of water microbiology. The used approach allowed unveiling of dominant bacterial populations but failed to detect populations with low abundances such as faecal indicators in surface waters. In combination with metadata, NGS data will also allow the identification of drivers of bacterial community composition during water treatment and distribution, highlighting the power of this approach for monitoring of bacterial regrowth and contamination in technical systems. PMID:26606090

  5. Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electrochemically driven melting to discriminate Yersinia pestis from Y. pseudotuberculosis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms within unpurified polymerase chain reaction amplicons.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Goodchild, Sarah A; Cleary, David W; Weller, Simon A; Gale, Nittaya; Stubberfield, Michael R; Brown, Tom; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-02-01

    The development of sensors for the detection of pathogen-specific DNA, including relevant species/strain level discrimination, is critical in molecular diagnostics with major impacts in areas such as bioterrorism and food safety. Herein, we use electrochemically driven denaturation assays monitored by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to target single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that distinguish DNA amplicons generated from Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, from the closely related species Y. pseudotuberculosis. Two assays targeting SNPs within the groEL and metH genes of these two species have been successfully designed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to produce Texas Red labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) amplicons of 262 and 251 bases for the groEL and metH targets, respectively. These amplicons were used in an unpurified form to hybridize to immobilized probes then subjected to electrochemically driven melting. In all cases electrochemically driven melting was able to discriminate between fully homologous DNA and that containing SNPs. The metH assay was particularly challenging due to the presence of only a single base mismatch in the middle of the 251 base long PCR amplicon. However, manipulation of assay conditions (conducting the electrochemical experiments at 10 °C) resulted in greater discrimination between the complementary and mismatched DNA. Replicate data were collected and analyzed for each duplex on different days, using different batches of PCR product and different sphere segment void (SSV) substrates. Despite the variability introduced by these differences, the assays are shown to be reliable and robust providing a new platform for strain discrimination using unpurified PCR samples. PMID:25551670

  6. Development of a control region-based mtDNA SNaPshot™ selection tool, integrated into a mini amplicon sequencing method.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Natalie E C; de Vries, Gerda; Sijen, Titia

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is regularly applied to forensic DNA samples with limited amounts of nuclear DNA (nDNA), such as hair shafts and bones. Generally, this mtDNA analysis involves examination of the hypervariable control region by Sanger sequencing of amplified products. When samples are severely degraded, small-sized amplicons can be applied and an earlier described mini-mtDNA method by Eichmann et al. [1] that accommodates ten mini amplicons in two multiplexes is found to be a very robust approach. However, in cases with large numbers of samples, like when searching for hairs with an mtDNA profile deviant from that of the victim, the method is time (and cost) consuming. Previously, Chemale et al. [2] described a SNaPshot™-based screening tool for a Brazilian population that uses standard-size amplicons for HVS-I and HVS-II. Here, we describe a similar tool adapted to the full control region and compatible with mini-mtDNA amplicons. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on their relative frequencies in a European population. They showed a high discriminatory power in a Dutch population (97.2%). The 18 SNPs are assessed in two SNaPshot™ multiplexes that pair to the two mini-mtDNA amplification multiplexes. Degenerate bases are included to limit allele dropout due to SNPs at primer binding site positions. Three SNPs provide haplogroup information. Reliability testing showed no differences with Sanger sequencing results. Since mini-mtSNaPshot screening uses only a small portion of the same PCR products used for Sanger sequencing, no additional DNA extract is consumed, which is forensically advantageous. PMID:26976467

  7. Combined Amplicon Pyrosequencing Assays Reveal Presence of the Apicomplexan “type-N” (cf. Gemmocystis cylindrus) and Chromera velia on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Šlapeta, Jan; Linares, Marjorie C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The coral is predominantly composed of the metabolically dependent coral host and the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. The system as a whole interacts with symbiotic eukaryotes, bacteria and viruses. Gemmocystiscylindrus (cf. “type-N” symbiont) belonging to the obligatory parasitic phylum Apicomplexa (Alveolata) is ubiquitous in the Caribbean coral, but its presence in the Great Barrier Reef coral has yet to be documented. Approaches allowing identification of the healthy community from the pathogenic or saprobic organisms are needed for sustainable coral reef monitoring. Methods & Principal Findings We investigated the diversity of eukaryotes associated with a common reef-building corals from the southern Great Barrier Reef. We used three tag encoded 454 amplicon pyrosequencing assays targeting eukaryote small-subunit rRNA gene to demonstrate the presence of the apicomplexan type-N and a photosynthetic sister species to Apicomplexa - Chromeravelia. Amplicon pyrosequencing revealed presence of the small-subunit rRNA genes of known eukaryotic pathogens (Cryptosporidium and Cryptococcus). We therefore conducted bacterial tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assay for small-subunit rRNA gene to support effluent exposure of the coral. Bacteria of faecal origin (Enterobacteriales) formed 41% of total sequences in contrast to 0-2% of the coral-associated bacterial communities with and without C. velia, respectively. Significance This is the first time apicomplexan type-N has been detected in the Great Barrier Reef. Eukaryote tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assays demonstrate presence of apicomplexan type-N and C. Velia in total coral DNA. The data highlight the need for combined approaches for eukaryotic diversity studies coupled with bacterial community assessment to achieve a more realistic goals of defining the holobiont community and assessing coral disease. With increasing evidence of Apicomplexa in coral reef environments, it is

  8. A chromosomal region 7p11.2 transcript map: its development and application to the study of EGFR amplicons in glioblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    Eley, Greg D.; Reiter, Jill L.; Pandita, Ajay; Park, Soyeon; Jenkins, Robert B.; Maihle, Nita J.; James, C. David

    2002-01-01

    Cumulative information available about the organization of amplified chromosomal regions in human tumors suggests that the amplification repeat units, or amplicons, can be of a simple or complex nature. For the former, amplified regions generally retain their native chromosomal configuration and involve a single amplification target sequence. For complex amplicons, amplified DNAs usually undergo substantial reorganization relative to the normal chromosomal regions from which they evolve, and the regions subject to amplification may contain multiple target sequences. Previous efforts to characterize the 7p11.2 epidermal growth factor receptor ) amplicon in glioblastoma have relied primarily on the use of markers positioned by linkage analysis and/or radiation hybrid mapping, both of which are known to have the potential for being inaccurate when attempting to order loci over relatively short (<1 Mb) chromosomal regions. Due to the limited resolution of genetic maps that have been established through the use of these approaches, we have constructed a 2-Mb bacterial and P1-derived artificial chromosome (BAC-PAC) contig for the EGFR region and have applied markers positioned on its associated physical map to the analysis of 7p11.2 amplifications in a series of glioblastomas. Our data indicate that EGFR is the sole amplification target within the mapped region, although there are several additional 7p11.2 genes that can be coamplified and overexpressed with EGFR. Furthermore, these results are consistent with EGFR amplicons retaining the same organization as the native chromosome 7p11.2 region from which they are derived. PMID:11916499

  9. Investigation of Microbial Diversity in Geothermal Hot Springs in Unkeshwar, India, Based on 16S rRNA Amplicon Metagenome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mehetre, Gajanan T; Paranjpe, Aditi; Dastager, Syed G; Dharne, Mahesh S

    2016-01-01

    Microbial diversity in geothermal waters of the Unkeshwar hot springs in Maharashtra, India, was studied using 16S rRNA amplicon metagenomic sequencing. Taxonomic analysis revealed the presence of Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Archeae, and OD1 phyla. Metabolic function prediction analysis indicated a battery of biological information systems indicating rich and novel microbial diversity, with potential biotechnological applications in this niche. PMID:26950332

  10. Investigation of Microbial Diversity in Geothermal Hot Springs in Unkeshwar, India, Based on 16S rRNA Amplicon Metagenome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mehetre, Gajanan T.; Paranjpe, Aditi; Dastager, Syed G.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial diversity in geothermal waters of the Unkeshwar hot springs in Maharashtra, India, was studied using 16S rRNA amplicon metagenomic sequencing. Taxonomic analysis revealed the presence of Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Archeae, and OD1 phyla. Metabolic function prediction analysis indicated a battery of biological information systems indicating rich and novel microbial diversity, with potential biotechnological applications in this niche. PMID:26950332

  11. Very high resolution single pass HLA genotyping using amplicon sequencing on the 454 next generation DNA sequencers: Comparison with Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, F; Höglund, B; Fernandez-Vina, M; Tyan, D; Rastrou, M; Williams, T; Moonsamy, P; Goodridge, D; Anderson, M; Erlich, H A; Holcomb, C L

    2015-12-01

    Compared to Sanger sequencing, next-generation sequencing offers advantages for high resolution HLA genotyping including increased throughput, lower cost, and reduced genotype ambiguity. Here we describe an enhancement of the Roche 454 GS GType HLA genotyping assay to provide very high resolution (VHR) typing, by the addition of 8 primer pairs to the original 14, to genotype 11 HLA loci. These additional amplicons help resolve common and well-documented alleles and exclude commonly found null alleles in genotype ambiguity strings. Simplification of workflow to reduce the initial preparation effort using early pooling of amplicons or the Fluidigm Access Array™ is also described. Performance of the VHR assay was evaluated on 28 well characterized cell lines using Conexio Assign MPS software which uses genomic, rather than cDNA, reference sequence. Concordance was 98.4%; 1.6% had no genotype assignment. Of concordant calls, 53% were unambiguous. To further assess the assay, 59 clinical samples were genotyped and results compared to unambiguous allele assignments obtained by prior sequence-based typing supplemented with SSO and/or SSP. Concordance was 98.7% with 58.2% as unambiguous calls; 1.3% could not be assigned. Our results show that the amplicon-based VHR assay is robust and can replace current Sanger methodology. Together with software enhancements, it has the potential to provide even higher resolution HLA typing. PMID:26037172

  12. Redefining the Human Oral Mycobiome with Improved Practices in Amplicon-based Taxonomy: Discovery of Malassezia as a Prominent Commensal

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Amanda K.; David, Marika S.; Li, Lu; Heider, Thomas N.; Peterson, Jason D.; Montano, Elizabeth A.; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Diaz, Patricia I.; Strausbaugh, Linda D.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are a large, complex group, increasingly recognized as emerging threats. Their roles as modifiers of health mandate accurate portrayals of fungal communities in humans. As an entry point into the airways and gastrointestinal tract, fungi in the mouth are relevant to several biocompartments. We have revised current practices in sequence-based taxonomy assignments and employed the improvements to address the question of the fungal genera present in the healthy human mouth. The human oral mycobiome was surveyed using massively parallel, high throughput sequencing of internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons from saliva following robust extraction methods. Taxonomy was assigned by comparison to a curated reference dataset, followed by filtering with an empirically determined BLAST E-value match statistic (10−42). Nomenclature corrections further refined results by conjoining redundant names for a single fungal genus. Following these curation steps, about two-thirds of the initially identified genera were eliminated. In comparison with the one similar metagenomic study and several earlier culture-based ones, our findings change the current conception of the oral mycobiome, especially with the discovery of the high prevalence and abundance of the genus Malassezia. Previously identified as an important pathogen of the skin, and recently reported as the predominant fungal genus at the nostril and backs of the head and ear, this is the first account of Malassezia in the human mouth. Findings from this study were in good agreement with others on the existence of many consensus members of the core mycobiome, and on unique patterns for individual subjects. This research offered a cautionary note about unconditional acceptance of lengthy lists of community members produced by automated assignments, provided a roadmap for enhancing the likely biological relevance of sequence-based fungal surveys, and built the foundation for understanding the role of fungi in health

  13. Nuclear Species-Diagnostic SNP Markers Mined from 454 Amplicon Sequencing Reveal Admixture Genomic Structure of Modern Citrus Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Curk, Franck; Ancillo, Gema; Ollitrault, Frédérique; Perrier, Xavier; Jacquemoud-Collet, Jean-Pierre; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Most cultivated Citrus species originated from interspecific hybridisation between four ancestral taxa (C. reticulata, C. maxima, C. medica, and C. micrantha) with limited further interspecific recombination due to vegetative propagation. This evolution resulted in admixture genomes with frequent interspecific heterozygosity. Moreover, a major part of the phenotypic diversity of edible citrus results from the initial differentiation between these taxa. Deciphering the phylogenomic structure of citrus germplasm is therefore essential for an efficient utilization of citrus biodiversity in breeding schemes. The objective of this work was to develop a set of species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for the four Citrus ancestral taxa covering the nine chromosomes, and to use these markers to infer the phylogenomic structure of secondary species and modern cultivars. Species-diagnostic SNPs were mined from 454 amplicon sequencing of 57 gene fragments from 26 genotypes of the four basic taxa. Of the 1,053 SNPs mined from 28,507 kb sequence, 273 were found to be highly diagnostic for a single basic taxon. Species-diagnostic SNP markers (105) were used to analyse the admixture structure of varieties and rootstocks. This revealed C. maxima introgressions in most of the old and in all recent selections of mandarins, and suggested that C. reticulata × C. maxima reticulation and introgression processes were important in edible mandarin domestication. The large range of phylogenomic constitutions between C. reticulata and C. maxima revealed in mandarins, tangelos, tangors, sweet oranges, sour oranges, grapefruits, and orangelos is favourable for genetic association studies based on phylogenomic structures of the germplasm. Inferred admixture structures were in agreement with previous hypotheses regarding the origin of several secondary species and also revealed the probable origin of several acid citrus varieties. The developed species-diagnostic SNP

  14. The Histone Variant H3.3 Is Enriched at Drosophila Amplicon Origins but Does Not Mark Them for Activation

    PubMed Central

    Paranjape, Neha P.; Calvi, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication begins from multiple origins. The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds origin DNA and scaffolds assembly of a prereplicative complex (pre-RC), which is subsequently activated to initiate DNA replication. In multicellular eukaryotes, origins do not share a strict DNA consensus sequence, and their activity changes in concert with chromatin status during development, but mechanisms are ill-defined. Previous genome-wide analyses in Drosophila and other organisms have revealed a correlation between ORC binding sites and the histone variant H3.3. This correlation suggests that H3.3 may designate origin sites, but this idea has remained untested. To address this question, we examined the enrichment and function of H3.3 at the origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in the somatic follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary. We found that H3.3 is abundant at these amplicon origins. H3.3 levels remained high when replication initiation was blocked, indicating that H3.3 is abundant at the origins before activation of the pre-RC. H3.3 was also enriched at the origins during early oogenesis, raising the possibility that H3.3 bookmarks sites for later amplification. However, flies null mutant for both of the H3.3 genes in Drosophila did not have overt defects in developmental gene amplification or genomic replication, suggesting that H3.3 is not essential for the assembly or activation of the pre-RC at origins. Instead, our results imply that the correlation between H3.3 and ORC sites reflects other chromatin attributes that are important for origin function. PMID:27172191

  15. Uncultured bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system revealed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Eun; Lee, Jinhwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Myeong, Jeong-In; Kim, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial diversity in a seawater recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) was investigated using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to understand the roles of bacterial communities in the system. The RAS was operated at nine different combinations of temperature (15°C, 20°C, and 25°C) and salinity (20‰, 25‰, and 32.5‰). Samples were collected from five or six RAS tanks (biofilters) for each condition. Fifty samples were analyzed. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were most common (sum of both phyla: 67.2% to 99.4%) and were inversely proportional to each other. Bacteria that were present at an average of ≥ 1% included Actinobacteria (2.9%) Planctomycetes (2.0%), Nitrospirae (1.5%), and Acidobacteria (1.0%); they were preferentially present in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters. The three biofilters showed higher diversity than other RAS tanks (aerated biofilters, floating bed biofilters, and fish tanks) from phylum to operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level. Samples were clustered into several groups based on the bacterial communities. Major taxonomic groups related to family Rhodobacteraceae and Flavobacteriaceae were distributed widely in the samples. Several taxonomic groups like [Saprospiraceae], Cytophagaceae, Octadecabacter, and Marivita showed a cluster-oriented distribution. Phaeobacter and Sediminicola-related reads were detected frequently and abundantly at low temperature. Nitrifying bacteria were detected frequently and abundantly in the three biofilters. Phylogenetic analysis of the nitrifying bacteria showed several similar OTUs were observed widely through the biofilters. The diverse bacterial communities and the minor taxonomic groups, except for Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, seemed to play important roles and seemed necessary for nitrifying activity in the RAS, especially in packed bed biofilters, mesh biofilters, and maturation biofilters. PMID:27033205

  16. Nuclear species-diagnostic SNP markers mined from 454 amplicon sequencing reveal admixture genomic structure of modern citrus varieties.

    PubMed

    Curk, Franck; Ancillo, Gema; Ollitrault, Frédérique; Perrier, Xavier; Jacquemoud-Collet, Jean-Pierre; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Most cultivated Citrus species originated from interspecific hybridisation between four ancestral taxa (C. reticulata, C. maxima, C. medica, and C. micrantha) with limited further interspecific recombination due to vegetative propagation. This evolution resulted in admixture genomes with frequent interspecific heterozygosity. Moreover, a major part of the phenotypic diversity of edible citrus results from the initial differentiation between these taxa. Deciphering the phylogenomic structure of citrus germplasm is therefore essential for an efficient utilization of citrus biodiversity in breeding schemes. The objective of this work was to develop a set of species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for the four Citrus ancestral taxa covering the nine chromosomes, and to use these markers to infer the phylogenomic structure of secondary species and modern cultivars. Species-diagnostic SNPs were mined from 454 amplicon sequencing of 57 gene fragments from 26 genotypes of the four basic taxa. Of the 1,053 SNPs mined from 28,507 kb sequence, 273 were found to be highly diagnostic for a single basic taxon. Species-diagnostic SNP markers (105) were used to analyse the admixture structure of varieties and rootstocks. This revealed C. maxima introgressions in most of the old and in all recent selections of mandarins, and suggested that C. reticulata × C. maxima reticulation and introgression processes were important in edible mandarin domestication. The large range of phylogenomic constitutions between C. reticulata and C. maxima revealed in mandarins, tangelos, tangors, sweet oranges, sour oranges, grapefruits, and orangelos is favourable for genetic association studies based on phylogenomic structures of the germplasm. Inferred admixture structures were in agreement with previous hypotheses regarding the origin of several secondary species and also revealed the probable origin of several acid citrus varieties. The developed species-diagnostic SNP

  17. Screening of male breast cancer and of breast-ovarian cancer families for BRCA2 mutations using large bifluorescent amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Pages, S; Caux, V; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Tosi, M

    2001-01-01

    41 breast cancer or breast-ovarian cancer families, including 12 families with at least one affected first-degree male relative, were screened for mutations in the BRCA2 gene. Mutations had not been found in the BRCA1 gene of these families. Chemical cleavage of Mismatch was used to identify nucleotide changes within large PCR products (average size 1.2 kb) that carried strand-specific fluorescent end-labels. 15 amplicons were sufficient to scan 18 exons, including the large exon 11. The remaining 9 small exons were examined by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. The high sensitivity of this approach was documented by the detection, in these 41 patients, of all 9 exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms reported with heterozygosity >0.1. Truncating BRCA2 mutations were found in 7 of the 41 families. 3 of them were in the group of 12 families comprising cases of male breast cancer. Since the methods used here have no bias for particular types of mutations, these data confirm the high proportion of frameshifts among mutations in BRCA2. However, relevant single nucleotide substitutions were also found: one resulting in a stop codon and another one, present in a male patient, was the previously reported change Asp2723His, that affects a highly conserved region of the BRCA2 protein. This study indicates a BRCA2 contribution of 10% (95% CI 2.5–17.5) to our original cohort of 59 breast-ovarian cancer families, whereas the contribution of BRCA1 had been estimated at 46% (95% CI 33–59). © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11207042

  18. Responses of soil microeukaryotic communities to short-term fumigation-incubation revealed by MiSeq amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Xu, Jianming; Feng, Youzhi; Wang, Juntao; Yu, Yongjie; Brookes, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    In soil microbiology, there is a “paradox” of soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization, which is that even though chloroform fumigation destroys majority of the soil microbial biomass, SOC mineralization continues at the same rate as in the non-fumigated soil during the incubation period. Soil microeukaryotes as important SOC decomposers, however, their community-level responses to chloroform fumigation are not well understood. Using the 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we analyzed the composition, diversity, and C-metabolic functions of a grassland soil and an arable soil microeukaryotic community in response to fumigation followed by a 30-day incubation. The grassland and arable soil microeukaryotic communities were dominated by the fungal Ascomycota (80.5–93.1% of the fungal sequences), followed by the protistan Cercozoa and Apicomplexa. In the arable soil fungal community, the predominance of the class Sordariomycetes was replaced by the class Eurotiomycetes after fumigation at days 7 and 30 of the incubation. Fumigation changed the microeukaryotic α-diversity in the grassland soil at days 0 and 7, and β-diversity in the arable soil at days 7 and 30. Network analysis indicated that after fumigation fungi were important groups closely related to other taxa. Most phylotypes (especially Sordariomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Coccidia, and uncultured Chytridiomycota) were inhibited, and only a few were positively stimulated by fumigation. Despite the inhibited Sordariomycetes, the fumigated communities mainly consisted of Eurotiomycetes and Sordariomycetes (21.9 and 36.5% relative frequency, respectively), which are able to produce hydrolytic enzymes associated with SOC mineralization. Our study suggests that fumigation not only decreases biomass size, but modulates the composition and diversity of the soil microeukaryotic communities, which are capable of driving SOC mineralization by release of hydrolytic enzymes during short-term fumigation-incubation. PMID

  19. Bacterial Community Shift in Treated Periodontitis Patients Revealed by Ion Torrent 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Harks, Inga; Ehmke, Benjamin; Goesmann, Alexander; Stoye, Jens; Harmsen, Dag

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis, one of the most common diseases in the world, is caused by a mixture of pathogenic bacteria and inflammatory host responses and often treated by antimicrobials as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP). Our study aims to elucidate explorative and descriptive temporal shifts in bacterial communities between patients treated by SRP alone versus SRP plus antibiotics. This is the first metagenomic study using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Eight subgingival plaque samples from four patients with chronic periodontitis, taken before and two months after intervention were analyzed. Amplicons from the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced each on a 314 chip. Sequencing reads were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 3% distance), described by community metrics, and taxonomically classified. Reads ranging from 599,933 to 650,416 per sample were clustered into 1,648 to 2,659 non-singleton OTUs, respectively. Increased diversity (Shannon and Simpson) in all samples after therapy was observed regardless of the treatment type whereas richness (ACE) showed no correlation. Taxonomic analysis revealed different microbial shifts between both therapy approaches at all taxonomic levels. Most remarkably, the genera Porphyromonas, Tannerella, Treponema, and Filifactor all harboring periodontal pathogenic species were removed almost only in the group treated with SPR and antibiotics. For the species T. forsythia and P. gingivalis results were corroborated by real-time PCR analysis. In the future, hypothesis free metagenomic analysis could be the key in understanding polymicrobial diseases and be used for therapy monitoring. Therefore, as read length continues to increase and cost to decrease, rapid benchtop sequencers like the PGM might finally be used in routine diagnostic. PMID:22870235

  20. Classification of pmoA amplicon pyrosequences using BLAST and the lowest common ancestor method in MEGAN

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Marc G.; Lüke, Claudia; Deng, Yongcui; Frenzel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The classification of high-throughput sequencing data of protein-encoding genes is not as well established as for 16S rRNA. The objective of this work was to develop a simple and accurate method of classifying large datasets of pmoA sequences, a common marker for methanotrophic bacteria. A taxonomic system for pmoA was developed based on a phylogenetic analysis of available sequences. The taxonomy incorporates the known diversity of pmoA present in public databases, including both sequences from cultivated and uncultivated organisms. Representative sequences from closely related genes, such as those encoding the bacterial ammonia monooxygenase, were also included in the pmoA taxonomy. In total, 53 low-level taxa (genus-level) are included. Using previously published datasets of high-throughput pmoA amplicon sequence data, we tested two approaches for classifying pmoA: a naïve Bayesian classifier and BLAST. Classification of pmoA sequences based on BLAST analyses was performed using the lowest common ancestor (LCA) algorithm in MEGAN, a software program commonly used for the analysis of metagenomic data. Both the naïve Bayesian and BLAST methods were able to classify pmoA sequences and provided similar classifications; however, the naïve Bayesian classifier was prone to misclassifying contaminant sequences present in the datasets. Another advantage of the BLAST/LCA method was that it provided a user-interpretable output and enabled novelty detection at various levels, from highly divergent pmoA sequences to genus-level novelty. PMID:22558000

  1. Microbial Community Composition and Diversity via 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons: Evaluating the Illumina Platform

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Lucas; Osman, Omneya Ahmed; Bertilsson, Stefan; Eiler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    As new sequencing technologies become cheaper and older ones disappear, laboratories switch vendors and platforms. Validating the new setups is a crucial part of conducting rigorous scientific research. Here we report on the reliability and biases of performing bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicon paired-end sequencing on the MiSeq Illumina platform. We designed a protocol using 50 barcode pairs to run samples in parallel and coded a pipeline to process the data. Sequencing the same sediment sample in 248 replicates as well as 70 samples from alkaline soda lakes, we evaluated the performance of the method with regards to estimates of alpha and beta diversity. Using different purification and DNA quantification procedures we always found up to 5-fold differences in the yield of sequences between individually barcodes samples. Using either a one-step or a two-step PCR preparation resulted in significantly different estimates in both alpha and beta diversity. Comparing with a previous method based on 454 pyrosequencing, we found that our Illumina protocol performed in a similar manner – with the exception for evenness estimates where correspondence between the methods was low. We further quantified the data loss at every processing step eventually accumulating to 50% of the raw reads. When evaluating different OTU clustering methods, we observed a stark contrast between the results of QIIME with default settings and the more recent UPARSE algorithm when it comes to the number of OTUs generated. Still, overall trends in alpha and beta diversity corresponded highly using both clustering methods. Our procedure performed well considering the precisions of alpha and beta diversity estimates, with insignificant effects of individual barcodes. Comparative analyses suggest that 454 and Illumina sequence data can be combined if the same PCR protocol and bioinformatic workflows are used for describing patterns in richness, beta-diversity and taxonomic composition. PMID:25647581

  2. The Histone Variant H3.3 Is Enriched at Drosophila Amplicon Origins but Does Not Mark Them for Activation.

    PubMed

    Paranjape, Neha P; Calvi, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication begins from multiple origins. The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds origin DNA and scaffolds assembly of a prereplicative complex (pre-RC), which is subsequently activated to initiate DNA replication. In multicellular eukaryotes, origins do not share a strict DNA consensus sequence, and their activity changes in concert with chromatin status during development, but mechanisms are ill-defined. Previous genome-wide analyses in Drosophila and other organisms have revealed a correlation between ORC binding sites and the histone variant H3.3. This correlation suggests that H3.3 may designate origin sites, but this idea has remained untested. To address this question, we examined the enrichment and function of H3.3 at the origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in the somatic follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary. We found that H3.3 is abundant at these amplicon origins. H3.3 levels remained high when replication initiation was blocked, indicating that H3.3 is abundant at the origins before activation of the pre-RC. H3.3 was also enriched at the origins during early oogenesis, raising the possibility that H3.3 bookmarks sites for later amplification. However, flies null mutant for both of the H3.3 genes in Drosophila did not have overt defects in developmental gene amplification or genomic replication, suggesting that H3.3 is not essential for the assembly or activation of the pre-RC at origins. Instead, our results imply that the correlation between H3.3 and ORC sites reflects other chromatin attributes that are important for origin function. PMID:27172191

  3. Exploring the Gastrointestinal “Nemabiome”: Deep Amplicon Sequencing to Quantify the Species Composition of Parasitic Nematode Communities

    PubMed Central

    Avramenko, Russell W.; Redman, Elizabeth M.; Lewis, Roy; Yazwinski, Thomas A.; Wasmuth, James D.; Gilleard, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections have a considerable impact on global human health as well as animal welfare and production. Although co-infection with multiple parasite species within a host is common, there is a dearth of tools with which to study the composition of these complex parasite communities. Helminth species vary in their pathogenicity, epidemiology and drug sensitivity and the interactions that occur between co-infecting species and their hosts are poorly understood. We describe the first application of deep amplicon sequencing to study parasitic nematode communities as well as introduce the concept of the gastro-intestinal “nemabiome”. The approach is analogous to 16S rDNA deep sequencing used to explore microbial communities, but utilizes the nematode ITS-2 rDNA locus instead. Gastro-intestinal parasites of cattle were used to develop the concept, as this host has many well-defined gastro-intestinal nematode species that commonly occur as complex co-infections. Further, the availability of pure mono-parasite populations from experimentally infected cattle allowed us to prepare mock parasite communities to determine, and correct for, species representation biases in the sequence data. We demonstrate that, once these biases have been corrected, accurate relative quantitation of gastro-intestinal parasitic nematode communities in cattle fecal samples can be achieved. We have validated the accuracy of the method applied to field-samples by comparing the results of detailed morphological examination of L3 larvae populations with those of the sequencing assay. The results illustrate the insights that can be gained into the species composition of parasite communities, using grazing cattle in the mid-west USA as an example. However, both the technical approach and the concept of the ‘nemabiome’ have a wide range of potential applications in human and veterinary medicine. These include investigations of host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions

  4. Polymicrobial Nature of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcer Biofilm Infections Determined Using Bacterial Tag Encoded FLX Amplicon Pyrosequencing (bTEFAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Scot E.; Wolcott, Randall D.; Sun, Yan; McKeehan, Trevor; Smith, Ethan; Rhoads, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background Diabetic extremity ulcers are associated with chronic infections. Such ulcer infections are too often followed by amputation because there is little or no understanding of the ecology of such infections or how to control or eliminate this type of chronic infection. A primary impediment to the healing of chronic wounds is biofilm phenotype infections. Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common, disabling, and costly complications of diabetes. Here we seek to derive a better understanding of the polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic extremity ulcer infections. Methods and Findings Using a new bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) approach we have evaluated the bacterial diversity of 40 chronic diabetic foot ulcers from different patients. The most prevalent bacterial genus associated with diabetic chronic wounds was Corynebacterium spp. Findings also show that obligate anaerobes including Bacteroides, Peptoniphilus, Fingoldia, Anaerococcus, and Peptostreptococcus spp. are ubiquitous in diabetic ulcers, comprising a significant portion of the wound biofilm communities. Other major components of the bacterial communities included commonly cultured genera such as Streptococcus, Serratia, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. Conclusions In this article, we highlight the patterns of population diversity observed in the samples and introduce preliminary evidence to support the concept of functional equivalent pathogroups (FEP). Here we introduce FEP as consortia of genotypically distinct bacteria that symbiotically produce a pathogenic community. According to this hypothesis, individual members of these communities when they occur alone may not cause disease but when they coaggregate or consort together into a FEP the synergistic effect provides the functional equivalence of well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, giving the biofilm community the factors necessary to maintain chronic biofilm infections. Further work is

  5. Within-host competition between Borrelia afzelii ospC strains in wild hosts as revealed by massively parallel amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Strandh, Maria; Råberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Infections frequently consist of more than one strain of a given pathogen. Experiments have shown that co-infecting strains often compete, so that the infection intensity of each strain in mixed infections is lower than in single strain infections. Such within-host competition can have important epidemiological and evolutionary consequences. However, the extent of competition has rarely been investigated in wild, naturally infected hosts, where there is noise in the form of varying inoculation doses, asynchronous infections and host heterogeneity, which can potentially alleviate or eliminate competition. Here, we investigated the extent of competition between Borrelia afzelii strains (as determined by ospC genotype) in three host species sampled in the wild. For this purpose, we developed a protocol for 454 amplicon sequencing of ospC, which allows both detection and quantification of each individual strain in an infection. Each host individual was infected with one to six ospC strains. The infection intensity of each strain was lower in mixed infections than in single ones, showing that there was competition. Rank-abundance plots revealed that there was typically one dominant strain, but that the evenness of the relative infection intensity of the different strains in an infection increased with the multiplicity of infection. We conclude that within-host competition can play an important role under natural conditions despite many potential sources of noise, and that quantification by next-generation amplicon sequencing offers new possibilities to dissect within-host interactions in naturally infected hosts. PMID:26150659

  6. Within-host competition between Borrelia afzelii ospC strains in wild hosts as revealed by massively parallel amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Råberg, Lars

    2015-08-19

    Infections frequently consist of more than one strain of a given pathogen. Experiments have shown that co-infecting strains often compete, so that the infection intensity of each strain in mixed infections is lower than in single strain infections. Such within-host competition can have important epidemiological and evolutionary consequences. However, the extent of competition has rarely been investigated in wild, naturally infected hosts, where there is noise in the form of varying inoculation doses, asynchronous infections and host heterogeneity, which can potentially alleviate or eliminate competition. Here, we investigated the extent of competition between Borrelia afzelii strains (as determined by ospC genotype) in three host species sampled in the wild. For this purpose, we developed a protocol for 454 amplicon sequencing of ospC, which allows both detection and quantification of each individual strain in an infection. Each host individual was infected with one to six ospC strains. The infection intensity of each strain was lower in mixed infections than in single ones, showing that there was competition. Rank-abundance plots revealed that there was typically one dominant strain, but that the evenness of the relative infection intensity of the different strains in an infection increased with the multiplicity of infection. We conclude that within-host competition can play an important role under natural conditions despite many potential sources of noise, and that quantification by next-generation amplicon sequencing offers new possibilities to dissect within-host interactions in naturally infected hosts. PMID:26150659

  7. Allele-specific extension allows base-pair neutral homozygotes to be discriminated by high-resolution melting of small amplicons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanning; Yuan, Yanpeng; Lin, Qingling; Chan, Piu

    2010-11-01

    Not all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be determined using high-resolution melting (HRM) of small amplicons, especially class 3 and 4 SNPs. This is due mainly to the small shift in the melting temperature (Tm) between two types of homozygote. Choosing rs1869458 (a class 4 SNP) as a sample, we developed a modified small amplicon HRM assay. An allele-specific extension (ASE) primer, which ended at an SNP site and matched only one of the alleles, was added to the reaction as well as additional thermal steps for ASE. Following asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis, heterozygotes were easily identified. Two types of homozygote were also distinguishable, indicating that extension primers 11 to 13 bases in length worked efficiently in an allele-specific way. Modification of the limiting amplification primer with locked nucleic acid increased the Tm difference between extension and amplification peaks and facilitated subsequent genotyping. In addition, 194 human genomic DNA samples were genotyped with the developed assay and by direct sequencing, with the different methods providing identical genotyping results. In conclusion, ASE-HRM is a simple, inexpensive, closed-tube genotyping method that can be used to examine all types of SNP. PMID:20599636

  8. Application of PCR amplicon sequencing using a single primer pair in PCR amplification to assess variations in Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The presence of various EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs in the CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to contribute to pathogenesis in adults. In this study, a unique PCR assay and sequencing strategy was developed to establish the number and variation of cagA EPIYA motifs. Findings MDA-DNA derived from gastric biopsy specimens from eleven subjects with gastritis was used with M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primers for amplification of the cagA EPIYA motif region. Automated capillary electrophoresis using a high resolution kit and amplicon sequencing confirmed variations in the cagA EPIYA motif region. In nine cases, sequencing revealed the presence of AB, ABC, or ABCC (Western type) cagA EPIYA motif, respectively. In two cases, double cagA EPIYA motifs were detected (ABC/ABCC or ABC/AB), indicating the presence of two H. pylori strains in the same biopsy. Conclusion Automated capillary electrophoresis and Amplicon sequencing using a single, M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primer pair in PCR amplification enabled a rapid molecular typing of cagA EPIYA motifs. Moreover, the techniques described allowed for a rapid detection of mixed H. pylori strains present in the same biopsy specimen. PMID:20181142

  9. A New Method for Rapid Screening of End-Point PCR Products: Application to Single Genome Amplified HIV and SIV Envelope Amplicons.

    PubMed

    Houzet, Laurent; Deleage, Claire; Satie, Anne-Pascale; Merlande, Laetitia; Mahe, Dominique; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    PCR is the most widely applied technique for large scale screening of bacterial clones, mouse genotypes, virus genomes etc. A drawback of large PCR screening is that amplicon analysis is usually performed using gel electrophoresis, a step that is very labor intensive, tedious and chemical waste generating. Single genome amplification (SGA) is used to characterize the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of virus populations within infected hosts. SGA is based on the isolation of single template molecule using limiting dilution followed by nested PCR amplification and requires the analysis of hundreds of reactions per sample, making large scale SGA studies very challenging. Here we present a novel approach entitled Long Amplicon Melt Profiling (LAMP) based on the analysis of the melting profile of the PCR reactions using SYBR Green and/or EvaGreen fluorescent dyes. The LAMP method represents an attractive alternative to gel electrophoresis and enables the quick discrimination of positive reactions. We validate LAMP for SIV and HIV env-SGA, in 96- and 384-well plate formats. Because the melt profiling allows the screening of several thousands of PCR reactions in a cost-effective, rapid and robust way, we believe it will greatly facilitate any large scale PCR screening. PMID:26053379

  10. Herpes simplex virus amplicon: cleavage of concatemeric DNA is linked to packaging and involves amplification of the terminally reiterated a sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Deiss, L P; Frenkel, N

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-infected cells contain large concatemeric DNA molecules arising from replication of the viral genome. The large concatemers are cleaved to generate unit-length molecules terminating at both ends with the a sequence. We have used constructed defective virus vectors (amplicons) derived from herpes simplex virus to study the mechanism of cleavage of viral DNA concatemers and the packaging of viral DNA into nucleocapsids. These studies revealed that (i) a 248-base-pair a sequence contained the signal(s) required for cleavage-packaging, (ii) the cleavage of viral DNA concatemers was coupled to packaging, (iii) the a sequence contained the information required for its own amplification, and (iv) cleavage-packaging occurred by a novel process involving the amplification of the a sequence. Images PMID:3005637

  11. Bacterial tag encoded FLX titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) based assessment of prokaryotic diversity in metagenome of Lonar soda lake, India

    PubMed Central

    Dudhagara, Pravin; Ghelani, Anjana; Patel, Rajesh; Chaudhari, Rajesh; Bhatt, Shreyas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial diversity and archaeal diversity in metagenome of the Lonar soda lake sediment were assessed by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP). Metagenome comprised 5093 sequences with 2,531,282 bp and 53 ± 2% G + C content. Metagenome sequence data are available at NCBI under the Bioproject database with accession no. PRJNA218849. Metagenome sequence represented the presence of 83.1% bacterial and 10.5% archaeal origin. A total of 14 different bacteria demonstrating 57 species were recorded with dominating species like Coxiella burnetii (17%), Fibrobacter intestinalis (12%) and Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans (11%). Occurrence of two archaeal phyla representing 24 species, among them Methanosaeta harundinacea (35%), Methanoculleus chikugoensis (12%) and Methanolinea tarda (11%) were dominating species. Significant presence of 11% sequences as an unclassified indicated the possibilities for unknown novel prokaryotes from the metagenome. PMID:26484168

  12. 16S rRNA Amplicon Sequencing Demonstrates that Indoor-Reared Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) Harbor a Core Subset of Bacteria Normally Associated with the Wild Host

    PubMed Central

    Meeus, Ivan; Parmentier, Laurian; Billiet, Annelies; Maebe, Kevin; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Wäckers, Felix; Vandamme, Peter; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    A MiSeq multiplexed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the gut microbiota of wild and indoor-reared Bombus terrestris (bumblebees) confirmed the presence of a core set of bacteria, which consisted of Neisseriaceae (Snodgrassella), Orbaceae (Gilliamella), Lactobacillaceae (Lactobacillus), and Bifidobacteriaceae (Bifidobacterium). In wild B. terrestris we detected several non-core bacteria having a more variable prevalence. Although Enterobacteriaceae are unreported by non next-generation sequencing studies, it can become a dominant gut resident. Furthermore the presence of some non-core lactobacilli were associated with the relative abundance of bifidobacteria. This association was not observed in indoor-reared bumblebees lacking the non-core bacteria, but having a more standardized microbiota compared to their wild counterparts. The impact of the bottleneck microbiota of indoor-reared bumblebees when they are used in the field for pollination purpose is discussed. PMID:25923917

  13. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract of carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The microbes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are of high importance for the health of the host. In this study, Roche 454 pyrosequencing was applied to a pooled set of different 16S rRNA gene amplicons obtained from GI content of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to make an inventory of the diversity of the microbiota in the GI tract. Compared to other studies, our culture-independent investigation reveals an impressive diversity of the microbial flora of the carp GI tract. The major group of obtained sequences belonged to the phylum Fusobacteria. Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes and Gammaproteobacteria were other well represented groups of micro-organisms. Verrucomicrobiae, Clostridia and Bacilli (the latter two belonging to the phylum Firmicutes) had fewer representatives among the analyzed sequences. Many of these bacteria might be of high physiological relevance for carp as these groups have been implicated in vitamin production, nitrogen cycling and (cellulose) fermentation. PMID:22093413

  14. Identification and Evaluation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Allotetraploid Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Based on Amplicon Sequencing Combined with High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yanbin; Pandey, Manish K; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Hong; Varshney, Rajeev K; Liang, Xuanqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an allotetraploid (AABB) species derived from the A-genome (Arachis duranensis) and B-genome (Arachis ipaensis) progenitors. Presence of two versions of a DNA sequence based on the two progenitor genomes poses a serious technical and analytical problem during single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and analysis. In this context, we have analyzed 200 amplicons derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genome survey sequences (GSS) to identify SNPs in a panel of genotypes consisting of 12 cultivated peanut varieties and two diploid progenitors representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 18 EST-SNPs and 44 genomic-SNPs were identified in 12 peanut varieties by aligning the sequence of A. hypogaea with diploid progenitors. The average frequency of sequence polymorphism was higher for genomic-SNPs than the EST-SNPs with one genomic-SNP every 1011 bp as compared to one EST-SNP every 2557 bp. In order to estimate the potential and further applicability of these identified SNPs, 96 peanut varieties were genotyped using high resolution melting (HRM) method. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for EST-SNPs ranged between 0.021 and 0.413 with a mean of 0.172 in the set of peanut varieties, while genomic-SNPs ranged between 0.080 and 0.478 with a mean of 0.249. Total 33 SNPs were used for polymorphism detection among the parents and 10 selected lines from mapping population Y13Zh (Zhenzhuhei × Yueyou13). Of the total 33 SNPs, nine SNPs showed polymorphism in the mapping population Y13Zh, and seven SNPs were successfully mapped into five linkage groups. Our results showed that SNPs can be identified in allotetraploid peanut with high accuracy through amplicon sequencing and HRM assay. The identified SNPs were very informative and can be used for different genetic and breeding applications in peanut. PMID:26697032

  15. A new amplicon based approach of whole mitogenome sequencing for phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis: An example of East African white-eyes (Aves, Zosteropidae).

    PubMed

    Meimberg, Harald; Schachtler, Christina; Curto, Manuel; Husemann, Martin; Habel, Jan Christian

    2016-09-01

    Classical Sanger sequencing is still frequently used to generate sequence data for phylogenetic and phylogeographic inference. In this contribution we present a novel approach to genotype whole mitogenomic haplotypes using Illumina MiSeq reads from indexed amplicons. Our new approach reduces preparation time by multiplexing loci within a single or few PCR reactions and by plate format library construction. The use of paired-end reads allows covering amplicons of about 0.5kb and thus no nebulisation and assembly are necessary. We tested the power and effectiveness of this technique by analysing the mitogenomic diversity of East African white-eye bird species (Zosteropidae), a taxonomically highly diverse and complex species flock found in various ecosystems spread across major parts of Africa. We compare the newly generated mitogenomic data set with published data of three mitochondrial genes for a similar set of populations and taxa. The comparison demonstrates that our new procedure represents a cost effective use of NGS for medium throughput phylogenetic analyses. Using this method, we were able to increase the amount of phylogenetic information significantly, while reducing the costs and effort in the laboratory. The mitogenomic data show a higher resolution than previous studies providing higher support and new insights in the relationships of Zosterops species. Our data suggest to split Z. poliogaster into four distinct species, three of which had previously been proposed: Z. silvanus, Z. mbulensis, Z. kikyuensis and Z. kulalensis. Our approach allows the genotyping of whole mitogenomes for a large number of individuals and thus allows more reliable reconstruction of phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationships - also for non-model organisms. PMID:27233440

  16. The Quantification of Representative Sequences pipeline for amplicon sequencing: case study on within-population ITS1 sequence variation in a microparasite infecting Daphnia.

    PubMed

    González-Tortuero, E; Rusek, J; Petrusek, A; Gießler, S; Lyras, D; Grath, S; Castro-Monzón, F; Wolinska, J

    2015-11-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are replacing traditional molecular biology protocols like cloning and Sanger sequencing. However, accuracy of NGS platforms has rarely been measured when quantifying relative frequencies of genotypes or taxa within populations. Here we developed a new bioinformatic pipeline (QRS) that pools similar sequence variants and estimates their frequencies in NGS data sets from populations or communities. We tested whether the estimated frequency of representative sequences, generated by 454 amplicon sequencing, differs significantly from that obtained by Sanger sequencing of cloned PCR products. This was performed by analysing sequence variation of the highly variable first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) of the ichthyosporean Caullerya mesnili, a microparasite of cladocerans of the genus Daphnia. This analysis also serves as a case example of the usage of this pipeline to study within-population variation. Additionally, a public Illumina data set was used to validate the pipeline on community-level data. Overall, there was a good correspondence in absolute frequencies of C. mesnili ITS1 sequences obtained from Sanger and 454 platforms. Furthermore, analyses of molecular variance (amova) revealed that population structure of C. mesnili differs across lakes and years independently of the sequencing platform. Our results support not only the usefulness of amplicon sequencing data for studies of within-population structure but also the successful application of the QRS pipeline on Illumina-generated data. The QRS pipeline is freely available together with its documentation under GNU Public Licence version 3 at http://code.google.com/p/quantification-representative-sequences. PMID:25728529

  17. Identification and Evaluation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Allotetraploid Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Based on Amplicon Sequencing Combined with High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanbin; Pandey, Manish K.; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Hong; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Liang, Xuanqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an allotetraploid (AABB) species derived from the A-genome (Arachis duranensis) and B-genome (Arachis ipaensis) progenitors. Presence of two versions of a DNA sequence based on the two progenitor genomes poses a serious technical and analytical problem during single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and analysis. In this context, we have analyzed 200 amplicons derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genome survey sequences (GSS) to identify SNPs in a panel of genotypes consisting of 12 cultivated peanut varieties and two diploid progenitors representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 18 EST-SNPs and 44 genomic-SNPs were identified in 12 peanut varieties by aligning the sequence of A. hypogaea with diploid progenitors. The average frequency of sequence polymorphism was higher for genomic-SNPs than the EST-SNPs with one genomic-SNP every 1011 bp as compared to one EST-SNP every 2557 bp. In order to estimate the potential and further applicability of these identified SNPs, 96 peanut varieties were genotyped using high resolution melting (HRM) method. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for EST-SNPs ranged between 0.021 and 0.413 with a mean of 0.172 in the set of peanut varieties, while genomic-SNPs ranged between 0.080 and 0.478 with a mean of 0.249. Total 33 SNPs were used for polymorphism detection among the parents and 10 selected lines from mapping population Y13Zh (Zhenzhuhei × Yueyou13). Of the total 33 SNPs, nine SNPs showed polymorphism in the mapping population Y13Zh, and seven SNPs were successfully mapped into five linkage groups. Our results showed that SNPs can be identified in allotetraploid peanut with high accuracy through amplicon sequencing and HRM assay. The identified SNPs were very informative and can be used for different genetic and breeding applications in peanut. PMID:26697032

  18. Promoting Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  19. Promoting Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechanic, David

    1990-01-01

    Argues that culture change or modification of the social structure is necessary for effective health promotion because health behavior is closely tied to basic group structures and processes. Examines the health attitudes of Mormons, low income and minority groups, and developing Islamic nations, emphasizing attitudes towards education and women.…

  20. Oncogenic Role of miR-15a-3p in 13q Amplicon-Driven Colorectal Adenoma-to-Carcinoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    de Groen, Florence L. M.; Timmer, Lisette M.; Menezes, Renee X.; Diosdado, Begona; Hooijberg, Erik; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.; Carvalho, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Progression from colorectal adenoma to carcinoma is strongly associated with an accumulation of genomic alterations, including gain of chromosome 13. This gain affects the whole q arm and is present in 40%–60% of all colorectal cancers (CRCs). Several genes located at this amplicon are known to be overexpressed in carcinomas due to copy number dosage. A subset of these genes, including the mir-17~92 cluster, are functionally involved in CRC development. The present study set out to explore whether apart from mir-17~92, other miRNAs located at the 13q amplicon show a copy number dependent dosage effect that may contribute to 13q-driven colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma progression. Integration of publically available miRNA expression, target mRNA expression and DNA copy number data from 125 CRCs yielded three miRNAs, miR-15a, -17, and -20a, of which high expression levels were significantly correlated with a 13q gain and which influenced target mRNA expression. These results could be confirmed by qRT-PCR in a series of 100 colon adenomas and carcinomas.Functional analysis of both mature miRNAs encoded by mir-15a, i.e. miR-15a-5p and miR-15a-3p, showed that silencing of miR-15a-3p significantly inhibited viability of CRC cells. Integration of miR-15a expression levels with mRNA expression data of predicted target genes identified mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) and COP9 signalosome subunit 2 (COPS2) as candidates with significantly decreased expression in CRCs with 13q gain. Upon silencing of miR-15a-3p, mRNA expression of both genes increased in CRC cells, supporting miR-15a-3p mediated regulation of UPC2 and COPS2 expression. In conclusion, significant overexpression of miR-15a-3p due to gain of 13q is functionally relevant in CRC, with UCP2 and COPS2 as candidate target genes. Taken together our findings suggest that miR-15a-3p may contribute to adenoma-to-carcinoma progression. PMID:26148070

  1. Mosaic structure of p1658/97, a 125-kilobase plasmid harboring an active amplicon with the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase gene blaSHV-5.

    PubMed

    Zienkiewicz, M; Kern-Zdanowicz, I; Gołebiewski, M; Zyliñska, J; Mieczkowski, P; Gniadkowski, M; Bardowski, J; Cegłowski, P

    2007-04-01

    Escherichia coli isolates recovered from patients during a clonal outbreak in a Warsaw, Poland, hospital in 1997 produced different levels of an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) of the SHV type. The beta-lactamase hyperproduction correlated with the multiplication of ESBL gene copies within a plasmid. Here, we present the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid p1658/97 carried by the isolates recovered during the outbreak. The plasmid is 125,491 bp and shows a mosaic structure in which all modules constituting the plasmid core are homologous to those found in plasmids F and R100 and are separated by segments of homology to other known regions (plasmid R64, Providencia rettgeri genomic island R391, Vibrio cholerae STX transposon, Klebsiella pneumoniae or E. coli chromosomes). Plasmid p1658/97 bears two replication systems, IncFII and IncFIB; we demonstrated that both are active in E. coli. The presence of an active partition system (sopABC locus) and two postsegregational killing systems (pemIK and hok/sok) indicates that the plasmid should be stably maintained in E. coli populations. The conjugative transfer is ensured by the operons of the tra and trb genes. We also demonstrate that the plasmidic segment undergoing amplification contains the blaSHV-5 gene and is homologous to a 7.9-kb fragment of the K. pneumoniae chromosome. The amplicon displays the structure of a composite transposon of type I. PMID:17220406

  2. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  3. The Use of Genus-Specific Amplicon Pyrosequencing to Assess Phytophthora Species Diversity Using eDNA from Soil and Water in Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Català, Santiago; Pérez-Sierra, Ana; Abad-Campos, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora is one of the most important and aggressive plant pathogenic genera in agriculture and forestry. Early detection and identification of its pathways of infection and spread are of high importance to minimize the threat they pose to natural ecosystems. eDNA was extracted from soil and water from forests and plantations in the north of Spain. Phytophthora-specific primers were adapted for use in high-throughput Sequencing (HTS). Primers were tested in a control reaction containing eight Phytophthora species and applied to water and soil eDNA samples from northern Spain. Different score coverage threshold values were tested for optimal Phytophthora species separation in a custom-curated database and in the control reaction. Clustering at 99% was the optimal criteria to separate most of the Phytophthora species. Multiple Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs) corresponding to 36 distinct Phytophthora species were amplified in the environmental samples. Pyrosequencing of amplicons from soil samples revealed low Phytophthora diversity (13 species) in comparison with the 35 species detected in water samples. Thirteen of the MOTUs detected in rivers and streams showed no close match to sequences in international sequence databases, revealing that eDNA pyrosequencing is a useful strategy to assess Phytophthora species diversity in natural ecosystems. PMID:25775250

  4. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity in the feces of cattle using 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Scot E; Callaway, Todd R; Wolcott, Randall D; Sun, Yan; McKeehan, Trevor; Hagevoort, Robert G; Edrington, Thomas S

    2008-01-01

    Background The microbiota of an animal's intestinal tract plays important roles in the animal's overall health, productivity and well-being. There is still a scarcity of information on the microbial diversity in the gut of livestock species such as cattle. The primary reason for this lack of data relates to the expense of methods needed to generate such data. Here we have utilized a bacterial tag-encoded FLX 16s rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) approach that is able to perform diversity analyses of gastrointestinal populations. bTEFAP is relatively inexpensive in terms of both time and labor due to the implementation of a novel tag priming method and an efficient bioinformatics pipeline. We have evaluated the microbiome from the feces of 20 commercial, lactating dairy cows. Results Ubiquitous bacteria detected from the cattle feces included Clostridium, Bacteroides, Porpyhyromonas, Ruminococcus, Alistipes, Lachnospiraceae, Prevotella, Lachnospira, Enterococcus, Oscillospira, Cytophage, Anaerotruncus, and Acidaminococcus spp. Foodborne pathogenic bacteria were detected in several of the cattle, a total of 4 cows were found to be positive for Salmonella spp (tentative enterica) and 6 cows were positive for Campylobacter spp. (tentative lanienae). Conclusion Using bTEFAP we have examined the microbiota in the feces of cattle. As these methods continue to mature we will better understand the ecology of the major populations of bacteria the lower intestinal tract. This in turn will allow for a better understanding of ways in which the intestinal microbiome contributes to animal health, productivity and wellbeing. PMID:18652685

  5. Size Matters: Assessing Optimum Soil Sample Size for Fungal and Bacterial Community Structure Analyses Using High Throughput Sequencing of rRNA Gene Amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Penton, C. Ryan; Gupta, Vadakattu V. S. R.; Yu, Julian; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of different soil sample sizes obtained from an agricultural field, under a single cropping system uniform in soil properties and aboveground crop responses, on bacterial and fungal community structure and microbial diversity indices. DNA extracted from soil sample sizes of 0.25, 1, 5, and 10 g using MoBIO kits and from 10 and 100 g sizes using a bead-beating method (SARDI) were used as templates for high-throughput sequencing of 16S and 28S rRNA gene amplicons for bacteria and fungi, respectively, on the Illumina MiSeq and Roche 454 platforms. Sample size significantly affected overall bacterial and fungal community structure, replicate dispersion and the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) retrieved. Richness, evenness and diversity were also significantly affected. The largest diversity estimates were always associated with the 10 g MoBIO extractions with a corresponding reduction in replicate dispersion. For the fungal data, smaller MoBIO extractions identified more unclassified Eukaryota incertae sedis and unclassified glomeromycota while the SARDI method retrieved more abundant OTUs containing unclassified Pleosporales and the fungal genera Alternaria and Cercophora. Overall, these findings indicate that a 10 g soil DNA extraction is most suitable for both soil bacterial and fungal communities for retrieving optimal diversity while still capturing rarer taxa in concert with decreasing replicate variation. PMID:27313569

  6. The RNA binding protein FXR1 is a new driver in the 3q26-29 amplicon and predicts poor prognosis in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jun; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hoeksema, Megan D.; Harris, Bradford K.; Zou, Yong; Chen, Heidi; Lu, Pengcheng; Eisenberg, Rosana; Wang, Jing; Espinosa, Allan; Ji, Xiangming; Harris, Fredrick T.; Rahman, S. M. Jamshedur; Massion, Pierre P.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of RNA-binding proteins has profound implications for cellular physiology and the pathogenesis of human diseases such as cancer. We previously identified the Fragile X-Related 1 gene (FXR1) as one amplified candidate driver gene at 3q26-29 in lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). FXR1 is an autosomal paralog of Fragile X mental retardation 1 and has not been directly linked to human cancers. Here we demonstrate that FXR1 is a key regulator of tumor progression and its overexpression is critical for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo. We identified the mechanisms by which FXR1 executes its regulatory function by forming a novel complex with two other oncogenes, protein kinase C, iota and epithelial cell transforming 2, located in the same amplicon via distinct binding mechanisms. FXR1 expression is a candidate biomarker predictive of poor survival in multiple solid tumors including NSCLCs. Because FXR1 is overexpressed and associated with poor clinical outcomes in multiple cancers, these results have implications for other solid malignancies. PMID:25733852

  7. Evaluation of the immune response to Anaplasma marginale MSP5 protein using a HSV-1 amplicon vector system or recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Carlos; Torioni de Echaide, Susana; Mattion, Nora

    2014-12-01

    Anaplasma marginale is an intraerythrocytic vector-borne infectious agent of cattle. Immunization with the current vaccine, based on parasitized erythrocytes with live Anaplasma centrale, shows some constraints and confers partial protection, suggesting the feasibility for the development of new generation of vaccines. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of sequential immunization of BALB/c mice, with herpesvirus amplicon vector-based vaccines combined with protein-based vaccines, on the quality of the immune response against the major surface protein 5 of A. marginale. The highest antibody titers against MSP5 were elicited in mice that received two doses of adjuvanted recombinant protein (p < 0.0001). Mice treated with a heterologous prime-boost strategy generated sustained antibody titers at least up to 200 days, and a higher specific cellular response. The results presented here showed that sequential immunization with HSV-based vectors and purified antigen enhances the quality of the immune response against A. marginale. PMID:25458492

  8. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byeng R.; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats. PMID:24669219

  9. Size Matters: Assessing Optimum Soil Sample Size for Fungal and Bacterial Community Structure Analyses Using High Throughput Sequencing of rRNA Gene Amplicons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Penton, C. Ryan; Gupta, Vadakattu V. S. R.; Yu, Julian; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-06-02

    We examined the effect of different soil sample sizes obtained from an agricultural field, under a single cropping system uniform in soil properties and aboveground crop responses, on bacterial and fungal community structure and microbial diversity indices. DNA extracted from soil sample sizes of 0.25, 1, 5, and 10 g using MoBIO kits and from 10 and 100 g sizes using a bead-beating method (SARDI) were used as templates for high-throughput sequencing of 16S and 28S rRNA gene amplicons for bacteria and fungi, respectively, on the Illumina MiSeq and Roche 454 platforms. Sample size significantly affected overall bacterial and fungalmore » community structure, replicate dispersion and the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) retrieved. Richness, evenness and diversity were also significantly affected. The largest diversity estimates were always associated with the 10 g MoBIO extractions with a corresponding reduction in replicate dispersion. For the fungal data, smaller MoBIO extractions identified more unclassified Eukaryota incertae sedis and unclassified glomeromycota while the SARDI method retrieved more abundant OTUs containing unclassified Pleosporales and the fungal genera Alternaria and Cercophora. Overall, these findings indicate that a 10 g soil DNA extraction is most suitable for both soil bacterial and fungal communities for retrieving optimal diversity while still capturing rarer taxa in concert with decreasing replicate variation.« less

  10. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  11. Cross-Comparison of Exome Analysis, Next-Generation Sequencing of Amplicons, and the iPLEX(®) ADME PGx Panel for Pharmacogenomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Chua, Eng Wee; Cree, Simone L; Ton, Kim N T; Lehnert, Klaus; Shepherd, Phillip; Helsby, Nuala; Kennedy, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been widely used for analysis of human genetic diseases, but its value for the pharmacogenomic profiling of individuals is not well studied. Initially, we performed an in-depth evaluation of the accuracy of WES variant calling in the pharmacogenes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 by comparison with MiSeq(®) amplicon sequencing data (n = 36). This analysis revealed that the concordance rate between WES and MiSeq(®) was high, achieving 99.60% for variants that were called without exceeding the truth-sensitivity threshold (99%), defined during variant quality score recalibration (VQSR). Beyond this threshold, the proportion of discordant calls increased markedly. Subsequently, we expanded our findings beyond CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 to include more genes genotyped by the iPLEX(®) ADME PGx Panel in the subset of twelve samples. WES performed well, agreeing with the genotyping panel in approximately 99% of the selected pass-filter variant calls. Overall, our results have demonstrated WES to be a promising approach for pharmacogenomic profiling, with an estimated error rate of lower than 1%. Quality filters, particularly VQSR, are important for reducing the number of false variants. Future studies may benefit from examining the role of WES in the clinical setting for guiding drug therapy. PMID:26858644

  12. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  13. Gene-specific amplicons from metagenomes as an alternative to directed evolution for enzyme screening: a case study using phenylacetaldehyde reductases.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuya; Kazama, Miki; Takeuchi, Nami; Isotani, Kentaro; Kurokawa, Junji

    2016-06-01

    Screening gene-specific amplicons from metagenomes (S-GAM) is a highly promising technique for the isolation of genes encoding enzymes for biochemical and industrial applications. From metagenomes, we isolated phenylacetaldehyde reductase (par) genes, which code for an enzyme that catalyzes the production of various Prelog's chiral alcohols. Nearly full-length par genes were amplified by PCR from metagenomic DNA, the products of which were fused with engineered par sequences at both terminal regions of the expression vector to ensure proper expression and then used to construct Escherichia coli plasmid libraries. Sequence- and activity-based screening of these libraries identified different homologous par genes, Hpar-001 to -036, which shared more than 97% amino acid sequence identity with PAR. Comparative characterization of these active homologs revealed a wide variety of enzymatic properties including activity, substrate specificity, and thermal stability. Moreover, amino acid substitutions in these genes coincided with those of Sar268 and Har1 genes, which were independently engineered by error-prone PCR to exhibit increased activity in the presence of concentrated 2-propanol. The comparative data from both approaches suggest that sequence information from homologs isolated from metagenomes is quite useful for enzyme engineering. Furthermore, by examining the GAM-based sequence dataset derived from soil metagenomes, we easily found amino acid substitutions that increase the thermal stability of PAR/PAR homologs. Thus, GAM-based approaches can provide not only useful homologous enzymes but also an alternative to directed evolution methodologies. PMID:27419059

  14. Cross-Comparison of Exome Analysis, Next-Generation Sequencing of Amplicons, and the iPLEX® ADME PGx Panel for Pharmacogenomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eng Wee; Cree, Simone L.; Ton, Kim N. T.; Lehnert, Klaus; Shepherd, Phillip; Helsby, Nuala; Kennedy, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been widely used for analysis of human genetic diseases, but its value for the pharmacogenomic profiling of individuals is not well studied. Initially, we performed an in-depth evaluation of the accuracy of WES variant calling in the pharmacogenes CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 by comparison with MiSeq® amplicon sequencing data (n = 36). This analysis revealed that the concordance rate between WES and MiSeq® was high, achieving 99.60% for variants that were called without exceeding the truth-sensitivity threshold (99%), defined during variant quality score recalibration (VQSR). Beyond this threshold, the proportion of discordant calls increased markedly. Subsequently, we expanded our findings beyond CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 to include more genes genotyped by the iPLEX® ADME PGx Panel in the subset of twelve samples. WES performed well, agreeing with the genotyping panel in approximately 99% of the selected pass-filter variant calls. Overall, our results have demonstrated WES to be a promising approach for pharmacogenomic profiling, with an estimated error rate of lower than 1%. Quality filters, particularly VQSR, are important for reducing the number of false variants. Future studies may benefit from examining the role of WES in the clinical setting for guiding drug therapy. PMID:26858644

  15. The utility of diversity profiling using Illumina 18S rRNA gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect and discriminate Toxoplasma gondii among the cyst-forming coccidia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Madalyn K; Phalen, David N; Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-01-30

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity to screen a single DNA sample and detect pathogen DNA from thousands of host DNA sequence reads, making it a versatile and informative tool for investigation of pathogens in diseased animals. The technique is effective and labor saving in the initial identification of pathogens, and will complement conventional diagnostic tests to associate the candidate pathogen with a disease process. In this report, we investigated the utility of the diversity profiling NGS approach using Illumina small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect Toxoplasma gondii in previously confirmed cases of toxoplasmosis. We then tested the diagnostic approach with species-specific PCR genotyping, histopathology and immunohistochemistry of toxoplasmosis in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to systematically characterise the disease and associate causality. We show that the Euk7A/Euk570R primer set targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene can be used as a species-specific assay for cyst-forming coccidia and discriminate T. gondii. Overall, the approach is cost-effective and improves diagnostic decision support by narrowing the differential diagnosis list with more certainty than was previously possible. Furthermore, it supplements the limitations of cryptic protozoan morphology and surpasses the need for species-specific PCR primer combinations. PMID:26801593

  16. Rapid Drug Susceptibility Testing of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates Directly from Clinical Samples by Use of Amplicon Sequencing: a Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Julia; Lemmer, Darrin; Lehmkuhl, Erik; Georghiou, Sophia B.; Heaton, Hannah; Wiggins, Kristin; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James M.; Catanzaro, Donald G.; Crudu, Valeriu; Cohen, Ted; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Engelthaler, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly complex drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a major global health concern and one of the primary reasons why TB is now the leading infectious cause of death worldwide. Rapid characterization of a DR-TB patient's complete drug resistance profile would facilitate individualized treatment in place of empirical treatment, improve treatment outcomes, prevent amplification of resistance, and reduce the transmission of DR-TB. The use of targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to obtain drug resistance profiles directly from patient sputum samples has the potential to enable comprehensive evidence-based treatment plans to be implemented quickly, rather than in weeks to months, which is currently needed for phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) results. In this pilot study, we evaluated the performance of amplicon sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA from patient sputum samples using a tabletop NGS technology and automated data analysis to provide a rapid DST solution (the Next Gen-RDST assay). One hundred sixty-six out of 176 (94.3%) sputum samples from the Republic of Moldova yielded complete Next Gen-RDST assay profiles for 7 drugs of interest. We found a high level of concordance of our Next Gen-RDST assay results with phenotypic DST (97.0%) and pyrosequencing (97.8%) results from the same clinical samples. Our Next Gen-RDST assay was also able to estimate the proportion of resistant-to-wild-type alleles down to mixtures of ≤1%, which demonstrates the ability to detect very low levels of resistant variants not detected by pyrosequencing and possibly below the threshold for phenotypic growth methods. The assay as described here could be used as a clinical or surveillance tool. PMID:27225403

  17. Parallel tagged amplicon sequencing of transcriptome-based genetic markers for Triturus newts with the Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing platform

    PubMed Central

    Wielstra, B; Duijm, E; Lagler, P; Lammers, Y; Meilink, W R M; Ziermann, J M; Arntzen, J W

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is a fast and cost-effective way to obtain sequence data for nonmodel organisms for many markers and for many individuals. We describe a protocol through which we obtain orthologous markers for the crested newts (Amphibia: Salamandridae: Triturus), suitable for analysis of interspecific hybridization. We use transcriptome data of a single Triturus species and design 96 primer pairs that amplify c. 180 bp fragments positioned in 3-prime untranslated regions. Next, these markers are tested with uniplex PCR for a set of species spanning the taxonomical width of the genus Triturus. The 52 markers that consistently show a single band of expected length at gel electrophoreses for all tested crested newt species are then amplified in five multiplex PCRs (with a plexity of ten or eleven) for 132 individual newts: a set of 84 representing the seven (candidate) species and a set of 48 from a presumed hybrid population. After pooling multiplexes per individual, unique tags are ligated to link amplicons to individuals. Subsequently, individuals are pooled equimolar and sequenced on the Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing platform. A bioinformatics pipeline identifies the alleles and recodes these to a genotypic format. Next, we test the utility of our markers. baps allocates the 84 crested newt individuals representing (candidate) species to their expected (candidate) species, confirming the markers are suitable for species delineation. newhybrids, a hybrid index and hiest confirm the 48 individuals from the presumed hybrid population to be genetically admixed, illustrating the potential of the markers to identify interspecific hybridization. We expect the set of markers we designed to provide a high resolving power for analysis of hybridization in Triturus. PMID:24571307

  18. Rapid Drug Susceptibility Testing of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates Directly from Clinical Samples by Use of Amplicon Sequencing: a Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Colman, Rebecca E; Anderson, Julia; Lemmer, Darrin; Lehmkuhl, Erik; Georghiou, Sophia B; Heaton, Hannah; Wiggins, Kristin; Gillece, John D; Schupp, James M; Catanzaro, Donald G; Crudu, Valeriu; Cohen, Ted; Rodwell, Timothy C; Engelthaler, David M

    2016-08-01

    Increasingly complex drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a major global health concern and one of the primary reasons why TB is now the leading infectious cause of death worldwide. Rapid characterization of a DR-TB patient's complete drug resistance profile would facilitate individualized treatment in place of empirical treatment, improve treatment outcomes, prevent amplification of resistance, and reduce the transmission of DR-TB. The use of targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to obtain drug resistance profiles directly from patient sputum samples has the potential to enable comprehensive evidence-based treatment plans to be implemented quickly, rather than in weeks to months, which is currently needed for phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) results. In this pilot study, we evaluated the performance of amplicon sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA from patient sputum samples using a tabletop NGS technology and automated data analysis to provide a rapid DST solution (the Next Gen-RDST assay). One hundred sixty-six out of 176 (94.3%) sputum samples from the Republic of Moldova yielded complete Next Gen-RDST assay profiles for 7 drugs of interest. We found a high level of concordance of our Next Gen-RDST assay results with phenotypic DST (97.0%) and pyrosequencing (97.8%) results from the same clinical samples. Our Next Gen-RDST assay was also able to estimate the proportion of resistant-to-wild-type alleles down to mixtures of ≤1%, which demonstrates the ability to detect very low levels of resistant variants not detected by pyrosequencing and possibly below the threshold for phenotypic growth methods. The assay as described here could be used as a clinical or surveillance tool. PMID:27225403

  19. The vesicular glutamate transporter-1 upstream promoter and first intron each support glutamatergic-specific expression in rat postrhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Li, Xu; Cao, Haiyan; Zhao, Hua; Geller, Alfred I.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple applications of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to glutamatergic neurons, or specific subclasses of glutamatergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop and analyze promoters that support glutamatergic-specific expression. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are found in different populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. We previously reported on a plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus vector that contains a VGLUT1 promoter. This vector supports long-term expression in VGLUT1-containing glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex, but does not support expression in VGLUT2-containing glutamatergic neurons in the ventral medial hypothalamus. This VGLUT1 promoter contains both the VGLUT1 upstream promoter and the VGLUT1 first intron. In this study, we begin to isolate and analyze the glutamatergic-specific regulatory elements in this VGLUT1 promoter. We show that the VGLUT1 upstream promoter and first intron each support glutamatergic-specific expression. We isolated a small, basal VGLUT1 promoter that does not support glutamatergic-specific expression. Next, we fused either the VGLUT1 upstream promoter or the first intron to this basal promoter. The VGLUT1 upstream promoter or the first intron, fused to the basal promoter, each supported glutamatergic-specific expression in POR cortex. PMID:21172319

  20. Recurrent epimutations activate gene body promoters in primary glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Raman P; Zhang, Bo; Bell, Robert J A; Johnson, Brett E; Olshen, Adam B; Sundaram, Vasavi; Li, Daofeng; Graham, Ashley E; Diaz, Aaron; Fouse, Shaun D; Smirnov, Ivan; Song, Jun; Paris, Pamela L; Wang, Ting; Costello, Joseph F

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant DNA hypomethylation may play an important role in the growth rate of glioblastoma (GBM), but the functional impact on transcription remains poorly understood. We assayed the GBM methylome with MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, adjusting for copy number differences, in a small set of non-glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (non-G-CIMP) primary tumors. Recurrent hypomethylated loci were enriched within a region of chromosome 5p15 that is specified as a cancer amplicon and also encompasses TERT, encoding telomerase reverse transcriptase, which plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Overall, 76 gene body promoters were recurrently hypomethylated, including TERT and the oncogenes GLI3 and TP73. Recurring hypomethylation also affected previously unannotated alternative promoters, and luciferase reporter assays for three of four of these promoters confirmed strong promoter activity in GBM cells. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) ChIP-seq on tissue from the GBMs uncovered peaks that coincide precisely with tumor-specific decrease of DNA methylation at 200 loci, 133 of which are in gene bodies. Detailed investigation of TP73 and TERT gene body hypomethylation demonstrated increased expression of corresponding alternate transcripts, which in TP73 encodes a truncated p73 protein with oncogenic function and in TERT encodes a putative reverse transcriptase-null protein. Our findings suggest that recurring gene body promoter hypomethylation events, along with histone H3K4 trimethylation, alter the transcriptional landscape of GBM through the activation of a limited number of normally silenced promoters within gene bodies, in at least one case leading to expression of an oncogenic protein. PMID:24709822

  1. Illumina MiSeq Phylogenetic Amplicon Sequencing Shows a Large Reduction of an Uncharacterised Succinivibrionaceae and an Increase of the Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii Clade in Feed Restricted Cattle

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Matthew Sean; Cormican, Paul; Keogh, Kate; O’Connor, Aaron; O’Hara, Eoin; Palladino, Rafael Alejandro; Kenny, David Anthony; Waters, Sinéad Mary

    2015-01-01

    Periodic feed restriction is used in cattle production to reduce feed costs. When normal feed levels are resumed, cattle catch up to a normal weight by an acceleration of normal growth rate, known as compensatory growth, which is not yet fully understood. Illumina Miseq Phylogenetic marker amplicon sequencing of DNA extracted from rumen contents of 55 bulls showed that restriction of feed (70% concentrate, 30% grass silage) for 125 days, to levels that caused a 60% reduction of growth rate, resulted in a large increase of relative abundance of Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii clade (designated as OTU-M7), and a large reduction of an uncharacterised Succinivibrionaceae species (designated as OTU-S3004). There was a strong negative Spearman correlation (ρ = -0.72, P = <1x10-20) between relative abundances of OTU-3004 and OTU-M7 in the liquid rumen fraction. There was also a significant increase in acetate:propionate ratio (A:P) in feed restricted animals that showed a negative Spearman correlation (ρ = -0.69, P = <1x10-20) with the relative abundance of OTU-S3004 in the rumen liquid fraction but not the solid fraction, and a strong positive Spearman correlation with OTU-M7 in the rumen liquid (ρ = 0.74, P = <1x10-20) and solid (ρ = 0.69, P = <1x10-20) fractions. Reduced A:P ratios in the rumen are associated with increased feed efficiency and reduced production of methane which has a global warming potential (GWP 100 years) of 28. Succinivibrionaceae growth in the rumen was previously suggested to reduce methane emissions as some members of this family utilise hydrogen, which is also utilised by methanogens for methanogenesis, to generate succinate which is converted to propionate. Relative abundance of OTU-S3004 showed a positive Spearman correlation with propionate (ρ = 0.41, P = <0.01) but not acetate in the liquid rumen fraction. PMID:26226343

  2. Developing a Promotional Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  3. Enhanced cytotoxicity with a novel system combining the paclitaxel-2'-ethylcarbonate prodrug and an HSV amplicon with an attenuated replication-competent virus, HF10 as a helper virus.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Daisuke; Nawa, Akihiro; Tanino, Tadatoshi; Goshima, Fumi; Luo, Chen Hong; Iwaki, Masahiro; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kiyosumi; Yamamoto, Eiko; Ino, Kazuhiko; Tsurumi, Tatsuya; Nishiyama, Yukihiro; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2010-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that HF10, which is a natural, non-engineered HSV-1, has potent oncolytic activity in the treatment of solid malignant tumors in vitro and in vivo [H. Takakuwa, F. Goshima, N. Nozawa, T. Yoshikawa, H. Kimata, A. Nakao, et al., Oncolytic viral therapy using a spontaneously generated herpes simplex virus type 1 variant for disseminated peritoneal tumor in immunocompetent mice, Arch. Virol. 148 (2003) 813-825; S. Kohno, C. Lou, F. Goshima, Y. Nishiyama, T. Sata, Y. Ono, Herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant HF10 oncolytic viral therapy for bladder cancer, Urology 66 (2005) 1116-1121; D. Watanabe, F. Goshima, I. Mori, Y. Tamada, Y. Matsumoto, Y. Nishiyama, Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant melanoma with herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant HF10, J. Dermatol. Sci. 50 (2008) 185-196; A. Nawa, C. Luo, L. Zhang, Y. Ushijima, D. Ishida, M. Kamakura, et al., Non-engineered, naturally oncolytic herpes simplex virus HSV1 HF10: applications for cancer gene therapy, Curr. Gene. Ther. 8 (2008) 208-221]. Previous reports have also shown that a combination of HF10 and paclitaxel (TAX) was more efficacious than either regimen alone for some types of malignant tumors [S. Shimoyama, F. Goshima, O. Teshigahara, H. Kasuya, Y. Kodera, A. Nakao, et al., Enhanced efficacy of herpes simplex virus mutant HF10 combined with paclitaxel in peritoneal cancer dissemination models, Hepatogastroenterology 54 (2007) 1038-1042]. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) using a novel system that combines the paclitaxel-2'-ethylcarbonate prodrug (TAX-2'-Et) and an HSV amplicon expressing rabbit-carboxylesterase (CES) with HF10 as a helper virus. This GDEPT system aims to produce high level of CES at the tumor site, resulting in efficient local conversion of the TAX-2'-Et prodrug into the active drug TAX [A. Nawa, T. Tanino, C. Lou, M. Iwaki, H. Kajiyama, K. Shibata, et al., Gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy for ovarian cancer

  4. Targeted Amplicon Sequencing for Single-Nucleotide-Polymorphism Genotyping of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Cattle Strains via a High-Throughput Library Preparation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Sabine; Bugarel, Marie; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G.; Renter, David G.; den Bakker, Henk C.; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Fach, Patrick; Loneragan, Guy H.

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O26:H11, a serotype within Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) that causes severe human disease, has been considered to have evolved from attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) O26:H11 through the acquisition of a Shiga toxin-encoding gene. Targeted amplicon sequencing using next-generation sequencing technology of 48 phylogenetically informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and three SNPs differentiating Shiga toxin-positive (stx-positive) strains from Shiga toxin-negative (stx-negative) strains were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships of 178 E. coli O26:H11 strains (6 stx-positive strains and 172 stx-negative AEEC strains) from cattle feces to 7 publically available genomes of human clinical strains. The AEEC cattle strains displayed synonymous SNP genotypes with stx2-positive sequence type 29 (ST29) human O26:H11 strains, while stx1 ST21 human and cattle strains clustered separately, demonstrating the close phylogenetic relatedness of these Shiga toxin-negative AEEC cattle strains and human clinical strains. With the exception of seven stx-negative strains, five of which contained espK, three stx-related SNPs differentiated the STEC strains from non-STEC strains, supporting the hypothesis that these AEEC cattle strains could serve as a potential reservoir for new or existing pathogenic human strains. Our results support the idea that targeted amplicon sequencing for SNP genotyping expedites strain identification and genetic characterization of E. coli O26:H11, which is important for food safety and public health. PMID:26567298

  5. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.; Martial Taillefert

    2006-06-01

    The following is a summary of progress in our project ''Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phosphatases'' during the second year of the project. (1). Assignment of microbial phosphatases to molecular classes. One objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and possible contributions of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to the dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Non-specific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. To address this objective we have designed a collection of PCR primer sets based on known microbial acid phosphatase sequences. Genomic DNA is extracted from subsurface FRC isolates and amplicons of the expected sizes are sequenced and searched for conserved signature motifs. During this reporting period we have successfully designed and tested a suite of PCR primers for gram-positive and gram-negative groups of the following phosphatase classes: (1) Class A; (2) Class B; and (3) Class C (gram negative). We have obtained specific PCR products for each of the classes using the primers we have designed using control strains as well as with subsurface isolates.

  6. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice. PMID:18372870

  7. High expression Zymomonas promoters

    DOEpatents

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Tao, Luan; Zhang, Yuying; Caimi, Perry G.; McCole, Laura : Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; McCutchen, Carol M.; Franden, Mary Ann

    2011-08-02

    Identified are mutants of the promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, which direct improved expression levels of operably linked heterologous nucleic acids. These are high expression promoters useful for expression of chimeric genes in Zymomonas, Zymobacter, and other related bacteria.

  8. 77 FR 47820 - Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms Complaints

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms Complaints ACTION: Proposed... concerning invention promoters and responses from the invention promoters to these complaints. An individual may submit a complaint concerning an invention promoter to the USPTO, which will forward the...

  9. Promoting Your Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of ways to promote sites on the World Wide Web focuses on how search engines work and how they retrieve and identify sites. Appropriate Web links for submitting new sites and for Internet marketing are included. (LRW)

  10. Promoting People's Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with communication in rural areas to promote participation in development programs. Suggests that success of such programs depends on continued government policy in favor of citizen participation in agricultural and rural development. (SK)

  11. Promoting Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Winker, Margaret A.; Ferris, Lorraine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of MCH and AIDS (IJMA) is a member of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME). The Editorial Board of IJMA believes it is important that the statement on promoting global health and this accompanying editorial is brought to the attention of our readers. Medical journal editors have a social responsibility to promote global health by publishing, whenever possible, research that furthers health worldwide.

  12. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ivo de Carvalho, Antonio; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Pereira Lima, Vera Lucia Góes

    2007-01-01

    Brazil, a Latin American country of continental proportions and contrasts, demographic inequalities, and social inequities, concomitantly faces the challenge of preventing and controlling infectious diseases, injuries, and non-communicable diseases. The loss of strength of the biomedical paradigm, the change in epidemiological profile, and the sociopolitical and cultural challenges of recent decades have fostered the emergence of new formulations about public health thinking and practice. Among them, are the paradigms of Brazilian Collective Health and Health Promotion. The former provides philosophical support for Brazil's Unified Health System (SUS). The aim of this article is to discuss the development of public health within the country's history, and to analyze and compare the theoretical assumptions of Health Promotion and Collective Health. We conclude that health promotion, based on the principles and values disseminated by the international Charters and concerned with social actors and social determinants of the health-disease process, has significant potential to promote the improvement of living and health conditions of the population. This frame of reference guided the formulation of the National Policy of Health Promotion within the Unified Health System, which was institutionalized by a ministerial decree. The importance and application of evaluating the effectiveness of health promotion processes and methodologies in Brazil have been guided by various frames of reference, which we clarify in this article through describing historical processes. PMID:17596091

  13. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidum repeat) genes (tprE, tprG, and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames (ORFs) with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors (TFs), including four catabolite activator protein (CAP) homologs. In this work, sequences matching the E. coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG, and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homolog, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator which influences tpr promoter activity. PMID:19432808

  14. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidumrepeat) genes (tprE, tprG and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors, including four catabolite activator protein homologues. In this work, sequences matching the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homologue, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator that influences tpr promoter activity. PMID:19432808

  15. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. I. Microbial Diversity Based on 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons and Metagenomic Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Wood, Jason M; Olsen, Millie T; Tank, Marcus; Klatt, Christian G; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    Microbial-mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin at Yellowstone National Park have been studied for nearly 50 years. The emphasis has mostly focused on the chlorophototrophic bacterial organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. In contrast, the diversity and metabolic functions of the heterotrophic community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are not well understood. In this study we analyzed the orange-colored undermat of the microbial community of Mushroom Spring using metagenomic and rRNA-amplicon (iTag) analyses. Our analyses disclosed a highly diverse community exhibiting a high degree of unevenness, strongly dominated by a single taxon, the filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus spp. The second most abundant organisms belonged to the Thermotogae, which have been hypothesized to be a major source of H2 from fermentation that could enable photomixotrophic metabolism by Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus spp. Other abundant organisms include two members of the Armatimonadetes (OP10); Thermocrinis sp.; and phototrophic and heterotrophic members of the Chloroflexi. Further, an Atribacteria (OP9/JS1) member; a sulfate-reducing Thermodesulfovibrio sp.; a Planctomycetes member; a member of the EM3 group tentatively affiliated with the Thermotogae, as well as a putative member of the Arminicenantes (OP8) represented ≥1% of the reads. Archaea were not abundant in the iTag analysis, and no metagenomic bin representing an archaeon was identified. A high microdiversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences was identified for the dominant taxon, Roseiflexus spp. Previous studies demonstrated that highly similar Synechococcus variants in the upper layer of the mats represent ecological species populations with specific ecological adaptations. This study suggests that similar putative ecotypes specifically adapted to different niches occur within the undermat community, particularly for Roseiflexus

  16. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. I. Microbial Diversity Based on 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons and Metagenomic Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Wood, Jason M.; Olsen, Millie T.; Tank, Marcus; Klatt, Christian G.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial-mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin at Yellowstone National Park have been studied for nearly 50 years. The emphasis has mostly focused on the chlorophototrophic bacterial organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. In contrast, the diversity and metabolic functions of the heterotrophic community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are not well understood. In this study we analyzed the orange-colored undermat of the microbial community of Mushroom Spring using metagenomic and rRNA-amplicon (iTag) analyses. Our analyses disclosed a highly diverse community exhibiting a high degree of unevenness, strongly dominated by a single taxon, the filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus spp. The second most abundant organisms belonged to the Thermotogae, which have been hypothesized to be a major source of H2 from fermentation that could enable photomixotrophic metabolism by Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus spp. Other abundant organisms include two members of the Armatimonadetes (OP10); Thermocrinis sp.; and phototrophic and heterotrophic members of the Chloroflexi. Further, an Atribacteria (OP9/JS1) member; a sulfate-reducing Thermodesulfovibrio sp.; a Planctomycetes member; a member of the EM3 group tentatively affiliated with the Thermotogae, as well as a putative member of the Arminicenantes (OP8) represented ≥1% of the reads. Archaea were not abundant in the iTag analysis, and no metagenomic bin representing an archaeon was identified. A high microdiversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences was identified for the dominant taxon, Roseiflexus spp. Previous studies demonstrated that highly similar Synechococcus variants in the upper layer of the mats represent ecological species populations with specific ecological adaptations. This study suggests that similar putative ecotypes specifically adapted to different niches occur within the undermat community, particularly for Roseiflexus

  17. The Dark Side of the Mushroom Spring Microbial Mat: Life in the Shadow of Chlorophototrophs. I. Microbial Diversity Based on 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons and Metagenomic Sequencing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thiel, Vera; Wood, Jason M.; Olsen, Millie T.; Tank, Marcus; Klatt, Christian G.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2016-06-17

    Microbial-mat communities in the effluent channels of Octopus and Mushroom Springs within the Lower Geyser Basin at Yellowstone National Park have been studied for nearly 50 years. The emphasis has mostly focused on the chlorophototrophic bacterial organisms of the phyla Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. In contrast, the diversity and metabolic functions of the heterotrophic community in the microoxic/anoxic region of the mat are not well understood. In this study we analyzed the orange-colored undermat of the microbial community of Mushroom Spring using metagenomic and rRNA-amplicon (iTag) analyses. Our analyses disclosed a highly diverse community exhibiting a high degree of unevenness, stronglymore » dominated by a single taxon, the filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus spp. The second most abundant organisms belonged to the Thermotogae, which have been hypothesized to be a major source of H-2 from fermentation that could enable photomixotrophic metabolism by Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus spp. Other abundant organisms include two members of the Armatimonadetes (OP10); Thermocrinis sp.; and phototrophic and heterotrophic members of the Chloroflexi. Further, an Atribacteria (OP9/JS1) member; a sulfate-reducing Therrnodesulfovibrio sp.; a Planctomycetes member; a member of the EM3 group tentatively affiliated with the Thermotogae, as well as a putative member of the Arrninicenantes (OP8) represented ≥ 1% of the reads. Archaea were not abundant in the iTag analysis, and no metagenomic bin representing an archaeon was identified. A high microdiversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences was identified for the dominant taxon, Roseiflexus spp. Previous studies demonstrated that highly similar Synechococcus variants in the upper layer of the mats represent ecological species populations with specific ecological adaptations. In conclusion, this study suggests that similar putative ecotypes specifically adapted to different niches occur within the undermat community

  18. Act To Promote Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    An act of the German Lower Saxony Parliament to promote adult education is presented. It has 24 general provisions relating to the following: purpose of adult education, principle for promotion, conditions for promotions of establishments, independence of adult education, prerequisites and form of acknowledgement of entitlement to promotion,…

  19. Health Promotion Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; Curie, Carrie J.; Townsend, Stephanie M.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Katz, Richard B.; Sherk, Joseph L.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews four areas from the prevention science field, including: promoting healthy behavior; preventing substance abuse; preventing high-risk sexual behaviors; and preventing child abuse and sexual abuse. Recommendations are made regarding strategies for implementing empirically validated programs, supplementing school programs with ecological…

  20. Promoting La Cultura Hispana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2007-01-01

    Launched in 1985 at Arizona State University, the Hispanic Research Center's (HRC) efforts to promote Latino and Chicano art and issues have flourished in recent years. In 2004, the HRC hosted the Arizona International Latina/o Arts Festival in collaboration with the Mesa Southwest Museum. The HRC has also founded a mentoring institute for…

  1. Promoting Healthy Dietary Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie A.

    This chapter reviews the research on promoting healthy dietary behaviors in all youth, not just those who exhibit problems such as obesity or eating disorders. The first section of this chapter presents a rationale for addressing healthy dietary behavior with children and adolescents, on the basis of the impact of these behaviors on short- and…

  2. Homeopathy: promotion versus evidence.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2006-01-01

    Homeopathy is a biologically implausible form of treatment. The best clinical evidence available to date fails to support its effectiveness. Nevertheless, it is gaining in popularity. One reason for this is that, at least in the UK, it is being promoted by influential people. PMID:19442345

  3. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  4. 50 Practical Promotion Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeyski, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Includes 50 cost-effective ideas for promoting camp in the areas of recruiting new campers, encouraging returning campers, advertising strategies, printing brochures and other written materials, using photographs, targeting groups for camp facility rental, and effectively using the media. (LP)

  5. Pseudorevertants of a lac promoter mutation reveal overlapping nascent promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Karls, R; Schulz, V; Jovanovich, S B; Flynn, S; Pak, A; Reznikoff, W S

    1989-01-01

    Four pseudorevertants of a -10 region lacP mutation were isolated. Three of these mutations were found to activate nascent promoters. These mutations were: a -2 G/C----A/T change (-2A) promoting transcription at position +11, a +1 A/T----T/A change (+1T) promoting transcription initiation at position +13, and a +10 C/G----A/T change (+10A) promoting transcription initiation at a complex series of positions. The fourth mutation [a -12 T/A----A/T change (-12A)] promotes transcription initiation at -1. The promoters activated by mutations -12A, -2A and +1T resembled the canonical sigma 70 promoter sequences. The +10A promoter activity is also dependent upon the sigma 70 holoenzyme but can not be readily assigned to a specific promoter sequence. Images PMID:2499870

  6. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation. PMID:27026555

  7. Human Promoters Are Intrinsically Directional

    PubMed Central

    Duttke, Sascha H.C.; Lacadie, Scott A.; Ibrahim, Mahmoud M.; Glass, Christopher K.; Corcoran, David L.; Benner, Christopher; Heinz, Sven; Kadonaga, James T.; Ohler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Divergent transcription, in which reverse-oriented transcripts occur upstream of eukaryotic promoters in regions devoid of annotated genes, has been suggested to be a general property of active promoters. Here we show that the human basal RNA polymerase II transcriptional machinery and core promoter are inherently unidirectional, and that reverse-oriented transcripts originate from their own cognate reverse-directed core promoters. In vitro transcription analysis and mapping of nascent transcripts in cells revealed that sequences at reverse start sites are similar to those of their forward counterparts. The use of DNase I accessibility to define proximal promoter borders revealed that up to half of promoters are unidirectional and that unidirectional promoters are depleted at their upstream edges of reverse core promoter sequences and their associated chromatin features. Divergent transcription is thus not an inherent property of the transcription process, but rather the consequence of the presence of both forward- and reverse-directed core promoters. PMID:25639469

  8. The promotion of breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Tuluhungwa, R R; Yung, W

    1979-01-01

    To reverse the current trend of a significant decline worldwide in breast feeding means reeducation of medical and health personnel as well as the general public. Programs to promote breast feeding require the commitment of governments, with support from various ministries including health, education, labor, community development and judiciary. Examples of what 3 developing countries--Jamaica, Colombia and Thailand--are doing to promote breast feeding are reported. A large scale breast feeding campaign was launched in Jamaica in October 1977. The 3 phases of the campaign were: 1) preliminary surveys and research and motivation of professional, voluntary and extension groups through training seminars, panel discussions, and meetings; 2) promotion of breast feeding via mass media and motivation of target groups by trained personnel; and 3) evaluation of the campaign. A survey undertaken in 1978 showed that the breast feeding messages had achieved the desired effect--more mothers practiced breast feeding. In Colombia the breast feeding campaign emphasized non-formal education through the use of games and pictures. A game is used which is usually initiated by a health worker in the waiting room of a health center and involves the mothers, the general public, and sometimes the professional personnel. Through reading and interpreting rhymed breast feeding messages, the participants exchange opinions and experiences. Before starting a campaign to encourage low-income urban and semi-urban mothers to breast feed, the National Food and Nutrition Committee of Thailand pretested slogans and posters designed for the promotion of breast feeding. Posters develpoed in accordance with the suggestions made by the women were tested among 126 pregnant and lactating women. The Committee decided which picture to print for low-income and rural audiences and which to print for middle-class audiences. PMID:12336781

  9. Promoter propagation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Matus-Garcia, Mariana; Nijveen, Harm; van Passel, Mark W J

    2012-11-01

    Transcriptional activation or 'rewiring' of silent genes is an important, yet poorly understood, phenomenon in prokaryotic genomes. Anecdotal evidence coming from experimental evolution studies in bacterial systems has shown the promptness of adaptation upon appropriate selective pressure. In many cases, a partial or complete promoter is mobilized to silent genes from elsewhere in the genome. We term hereafter such recruited regulatory sequences as Putative Mobile Promoters (PMPs) and we hypothesize they have a large impact on rapid adaptation of novel or cryptic functions. Querying all publicly available prokaryotic genomes (1362) uncovered >4000 families of highly conserved PMPs (50 to 100 long with ≥80% nt identity) in 1043 genomes from 424 different genera. The genomes with the largest number of PMP families are Anabaena variabilis (28 families), Geobacter uraniireducens (27 families) and Cyanothece PCC7424 (25 families). Family size varied from 2 to 93 homologous promoters (in Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus). Some PMPs are present in particular species, but some are conserved across distant genera. The identified PMPs represent a conservative dataset of very recent or conserved events of mobilization of non-coding DNA and thus they constitute evidence of an extensive reservoir of recyclable regulatory sequences for rapid transcriptional rewiring. PMID:22933716

  10. Bicycle Promotion Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, G. A.

    1981-03-09

    The objective of this Bicycle Promotion Plan is to outline a set of recommendations and supporting strategies for implementation by the US DOE toward increased use of the bicycle for energy conservation. The recommendations are designed in such a way as to function in concert with: (1) bicycle programs administered by other Federal government agencies; and (2) related programs and activities already sponsored by DOE. The approach to preparation of the Plan involved a review of all current and planned bicycle promotion programs at the Federal level as well as a review of the array of lierature on the subject. The UniWorld project staff also interacted with several DOE program offices, in order to determine the extent to which they might appropriately contribute to the implementation of bicycle promotional efforts. A synthesis of all the information gathered was published in January of 1981 as a part of the project (The Bicycle Program Review). Based upon this information and an examination of the barriers to bicycle use identified by bicycle transportation specialists in the field, UniWorld developed a series of the most potentially effective recommendations and program strategies for implementation by DOE. The recommendations address activities that could be undertaken in conjunction with existing DOE programs, new developments that might be considered to fulfill critical needs in the field, and interagency efforts that DOE could play a role in.

  11. Promoter occlusion: transcription through a promoter may inhibit its activity.

    PubMed

    Adhya, S; Gottesman, M

    1982-07-01

    Induction of prophage lambda inhibits the expression of the gal operon from its cognate promoters. The effect is observed only in cis, and is due to frequent transcription of the gal promoter region by RNA polymerase molecules initiating upstream at the prophage PL promoter. The frequency of transcription initiation at PL is some 30 times greater than that at the gal promoter, Pg1. PL is one of the strongest procaryotic promoters. This "promoter occlusion" is essentially complete when the distance between gal and PL is small (less than or equal to 10 kb); and when PL is fully active (that is, in the absence of the cl or cro repressors). We discuss the possibility that promoter occlusion at two lambda promoters, Pint and PR', might play a role in the sequential expression of viral functions. PMID:6217898

  12. Amplicon DNA Melting Analysis for the Simultaneous Detection of Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex. Potential Use in Rapid Differential Diagnosis between Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis and Focal Complications of Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuan-Jimenez, Rocio; Colmenero, Juan D.; Bermúdez, Pilar; Alonso, Antonio; Morata, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Some sites of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis are very difficult to differentiate clinically, radiologically, and even histopathologically. Conventional microbiological methods for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated brucellosis not only lack adequate sensitivity, they are also time consuming, which could lead to an unfavourable prognosis. The aim of this work was to develop a multiplex real-time PCR assay based on SYBR Green I to simultaneously detect Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and evaluate the efficacy of the technique with different candidate genes. The IS711, bcsp31 and omp2a genes were used for the identification of Brucella spp and the IS6110, senX3-regX3 and cfp31 genes were targeted for the detection of the M. tuberculosis complex. As a result of the different combinations of primers, nine different reactions were evaluated. A test was defined as positive only when the gene combinations were capable of co-amplifying both pathogens in a single reaction tube and showed distinguishable melting temperatures for each microorganism. According to the melting analysis, only three combinations of amplicons (senX3-regX3+bcsp31, senX3-regX3+IS711 and IS6110+IS711) were visible. Detection limits of senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 were of 2 and 3 genome equivalents for M. tuberculosis complex and Brucella while for IS6110+IS711 they were of 200 and 300 genome equivalents, respectively. The three assays correctly identified all the samples, showing negative results for the control patients. The presence of multicopy elements and GC content were the components most influencing the efficiency of the test; this should be taken into account when designing a multiplex-based SYBR Green I assay. In conclusion, multiplex real time PCR assays based on the targets senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 using SYBR Green I are highly sensitive and reproducible. This may therefore be a

  13. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  14. Promoting women's health.

    PubMed

    Doyal, L

    1991-01-01

    The male-dominated medical establishment continues to make health promotion policies for women. Women must have access to a more accurate information base about women's health and the link between their health and socioeconomic roles. They must be full partners in formulating and implementing health promotion strategies. Yet, such a database does not exist due to systemic bias in research. For example, research shows alcoholism affects men and women differently, but prevention and treatment strategies and evaluation of their outcomes do not take this into account. Further, men do not understand subjective aspects of female conditions. In addition, even though women provide most care in our society, health promotion policies do not incorporate their knowledge. Moreover, care of the sick can damage the health of the care giver. Statistics on women's health are lacking, e.g., exhaustion and depression as consequences of child care and housework, especially among poor women. Developed countries continue to use maternal mortality as a means of measuring reproductive hazard, but maternal death is a rarity. In fact, a reproductive mortality rate would be more applicable, which would include deaths from abortions, pregnancy, and contraception. Besides, birth control has real disadvantages, e.g., a painful medical procedure is needed to insert IUDs and they increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. Paid employment has positive and negative effects depending on whether women are alone or have a partner and have children, their income, and educational level. Women in industry face considerable health hazards, e.g., textile workers at increased risk of several lung diseases. Appropriate expenditure on health and social services and sound economic policies at the central level will benefit women's health. Besides, when society values and supports all aspects of women's work and roles, women's health will achieve its potential. PMID:1817541

  15. Promoting healthy sleep.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2016-03-01

    Nurses are accustomed to helping others with their sleep problems and dealing with issues such as pain that may delay or interrupt sleep. However, they may be less familiar with what constitutes a healthy night's sleep. This article examines what is known about the process and purpose of sleep, and examines the ways in which factors that promote wakefulness and sleep combine to help establish a normal circadian rhythm. Theories relating to the function of sleep are discussed and research is considered that suggests that sleep deficit may lead to metabolic risks, including heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and several types of cancer. PMID:26959472

  16. TUMOR PROMOTION IN RAT LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An initiation promotion bioassay for chemical carcinogens and tumor promoters has been developed in rat liver using presumed preneoplastic lesions, foci of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGTase)-positive hepatocytes, as the endpoint. To evaluate the tumor-promoting activity of phe...

  17. TAp73 promotes anabolism

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Antonov, Alexey A.; Catani, Maria Valeria; Massoud, Renato; Bernassola, Francesca; Knight, Richard A.; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation has emerged as a hallmark of cancer and a promising therapeutic target, as rapidly proliferating cancer cells adapt their metabolism increasing nutrient uptake and reorganizing metabolic fluxes to support biosynthesis. The transcription factor p73 belongs to the p53-family and regulates tumorigenesis via its two N-terminal isoforms, with (TAp73) or without (ΔNp73) a transactivation domain. TAp73 acts as tumor suppressor, at least partially through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and through regulation of genomic stability. Here, we sought to investigate whether TAp73 also affects metabolic profiling of cancer cells. Using high throughput metabolomics, we unveil a thorough and unexpected role for TAp73 in promoting Warburg effect and cellular metabolism. TAp73-expressing cells show increased rate of glycolysis, higher amino acid uptake and increased levels and biosynthesis of acetyl-CoA. Moreover, we report an extensive TAp73-mediated upregulation of several anabolic pathways including polyamine and synthesis of membrane phospholipids. TAp73 expression also increases cellular methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), possibly influencing methylation and epigenetics, and promotes arginine metabolism, suggestive of a role in extracellular matrix (ECM) modeling. In summary, our data indicate that TAp73 regulates multiple metabolic pathways that impinge on numerous cellular functions, but that, overall, converge to sustain cell growth and proliferation. PMID:25514460

  18. Gut-Colonizing Bacteria Promote C. elegans Innate Immunity by Producing Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Zhigang; Tang, Jie; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-02-16

    Many commensal bacteria in the gut are beneficial to the host immune system, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. Using culture-independent Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we show that bacterial diversity in the intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans, the free-living nematode, is distinct from that in soil. Of these bacteria, Bacillus subtilis is the most prominent species in the worm gut. We demonstrate that B. subtilis confers worm resistance to infection by pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Enterococcus faecalis, by producing nitric oxide (NO). Deletion of the nos gene, which encodes an NO synthase, reduces the protective effect. NO promotes innate immune responses to P. aeruginosa PA14 by activating a conserved p38 mitogen protein kinase (MAPK) in C. elegans. Our work provides an example of antagonism of commensal bacteria against pathogens and illustrates the importance of commensal bacteria in host immunity. PMID:26854225

  19. Tryptophan promotes charitable donating

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2014-01-01

    The link between serotonin (5-HT) and one of the most important elements of prosocial behavior, charity, has remained largely uninvestigated. In the present study, we tested whether charitable donating can be promoted by administering the food supplement L-Tryptophan (TRP), the biochemical precursor of 5-HT. Participants were compared with respect to the amount of money they donated when given the opportunity to make a charitable donation. As expected, compared to a neutral placebo, TRP appears to increase the participants’ willingness to donate money to a charity. This result supports the idea that the food we eat may act as a cognitive enhancer modulating the way we think and perceive the world and others. PMID:25566132

  20. 7 CFR 1219.22 - Promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.22 Promotion. Promotion means any action to advance the image, desirability, or marketability of Hass...

  1. 7 CFR 1219.22 - Promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.22 Promotion. Promotion means any action to advance the image, desirability, or marketability of Hass...

  2. 7 CFR 1219.22 - Promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.22 Promotion. Promotion means any action to advance the image, desirability, or marketability of Hass...

  3. 7 CFR 1219.22 - Promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.22 Promotion. Promotion means any action to advance the image, desirability, or marketability of Hass...

  4. 7 CFR 1219.22 - Promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.22 Promotion. Promotion means any action to advance the image, desirability, or marketability of Hass...

  5. 7 CFR 1216.23 - Promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.23 Promotion. Promotion..., including domestic and international markets, and to stimulate sales of peanuts....

  6. Oxytocin promotes human ethnocentrism.

    PubMed

    De Dreu, Carsten K W; Greer, Lindred L; Van Kleef, Gerben A; Shalvi, Shaul; Handgraaf, Michel J J

    2011-01-25

    Human ethnocentrism--the tendency to view one's group as centrally important and superior to other groups--creates intergroup bias that fuels prejudice, xenophobia, and intergroup violence. Grounded in the idea that ethnocentrism also facilitates within-group trust, cooperation, and coordination, we conjecture that ethnocentrism may be modulated by brain oxytocin, a peptide shown to promote cooperation among in-group members. In double-blind, placebo-controlled designs, males self-administered oxytocin or placebo and privately performed computer-guided tasks to gauge different manifestations of ethnocentric in-group favoritism as well as out-group derogation. Experiments 1 and 2 used the Implicit Association Test to assess in-group favoritism and out-group derogation. Experiment 3 used the infrahumanization task to assess the extent to which humans ascribe secondary, uniquely human emotions to their in-group and to an out-group. Experiments 4 and 5 confronted participants with the option to save the life of a larger collective by sacrificing one individual, nominated as in-group or as out-group. Results show that oxytocin creates intergroup bias because oxytocin motivates in-group favoritism and, to a lesser extent, out-group derogation. These findings call into question the view of oxytocin as an indiscriminate "love drug" or "cuddle chemical" and suggest that oxytocin has a role in the emergence of intergroup conflict and violence. PMID:21220339

  7. Environmental Health Promotion: Bridging Traditional Environmental Health and Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Elizabeth H.; Baldwin, Grant T.; Kegler, Michelle Crozier

    2004-01-01

    This article highlights the juncture between environmental health and health promotion and underscores the need for health promotion involvement in environmental health practice. It begins with a synopsis of current issues in environmental public health and deficiencies in environmental public health practice that could be partly ameliorated by an…

  8. Health-promoting schools: an opportunity for oral health promotion.

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Stella Y. L.; Petersen, Poul Erik; Pine, Cynthia M.; Borutta, Annerose

    2005-01-01

    Schools provide an important setting for promoting health, as they reach over 1 billion children worldwide and, through them, the school staff, families and the community as a whole. Health promotion messages can be reinforced throughout the most influential stages of children's lives, enabling them to develop lifelong sustainable attitudes and skills. Poor oral health can have a detrimental effect on children's quality of life, their performance at school and their success in later life. This paper examines the global need for promoting oral health through schools. The WHO Global School Health Initiative and the potential for setting up oral health programmes in schools using the health-promoting school framework are discussed. The challenges faced in promoting oral health in schools in both developed and developing countries are highlighted. The importance of using a validated framework and appropriate methodologies for the evaluation of school oral health projects is emphasized. PMID:16211159

  9. Evaluation of INK4A promoter methylation using pyrosequencing and circulating cell-free DNA from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jason L.; Merwat, Shehzad N.; Ju, Hyunsu; Soloway, Roger D.; Wieck, Lucas R.; Li, Albert; Okorodudu, Anthony O.; Petersen, John R.; Abdulla, Nihal E.; Duchini, Andrea; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana; Hu, Peter C.; Dong, Jianli

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyper-methylation of CpG dinucleotides in the promoter region of inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A (INK4A) has been reported in 60%–80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As INK4A promoter hypermethylation event occurs early in HCC progression, the quantification of INK4A promoter methylation in blood sample may represent a useful biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis and prediction of response to therapy. Methods We examined INK4A promoter methylation using circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) in a total of 109 serum specimens, including 66 HCC and 43 benign chronic liver diseases. Methylation of the individual seven CpG sites was examined using pyrosequencing. Results Our results showed that there were significantly higher levels of methylated INK4A in HCC specimens than controls and that the seven CpG sites had different levels of methylation and might exist in different PCR amplicons. The area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.82, with 65.3% sensitivity and 87.2% specificity at 5% (LOD), 39.0% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity at 7% LOD, and 20.3% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity at 10% LOD, respectively. Conclusions Our results support additional studies incorporating INK4A methylation testing of ccfDNA to further validate the diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic characteristics of this biomarker in HCC patients. The knowledge of the existence of epi-alleles should help improve assay design to maximize detection. PMID:24406287

  10. Promoting Reading in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaney, Vincent, Ed.

    With the intention of illuminating the many obstacles involved with literacy promotion in the developing nations of Africa, Asia, and South America, the authors of the 10 articles in this collection share their knowledge and experience of literacy promotion in the developing world--including the unique challenges faced by those who publish, print,…