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Sample records for 183-dr sedimentation basin

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-50:5 Process Sewers (183-DR Sedimentation Basin Drains), Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-025

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-11-06

    The 100-D-50:5 subsite encompasses the southern process sewers formerly servicing the 183-DR coagulation and sedimentation basins and proximate surface runoff collection drains. The results of confirmatory sampling of pipeline sediments and underlying soils at the 100-D-50:5 subsite demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. Characterization Activities Conducted at the 183-DR Site in Support of an In Situ Gaseous Reduction Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Edward C.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2001-03-30

    In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) is a technology developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. This document presents information associated with characterization activities conducted at the 183-DR site at Hanford, which is associated with a significant groundwater contaminant plume and was formerly a water treatment facility that utilized chromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Geotechnical and chemical data were collected during the excavation of trenches and the drilling of two vadose zone boreholes to support a possible ISGR demonstration at 183-DR. Although elevated total chromium and trace levels of hexavalent chromium were identified from one of the trenches and one of the boreholes, it appears that the boreholes missed the vadose zone contaminant source responsible for the chromium groundwater plume located downgradient of the 183-DR site. Recommendations are provided, however, for future work at 183-DR that may serve to identify the source for the groundwater plume and possibly provide an opportunity for an ISGR demonstration.

  3. Description of Work for Drilling at the 183-DR Site in Support of the In Situ Gaseous Reduction Test

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Edward C.; Olsen, Khris B.; Schalla, Ronald

    2000-06-26

    In Situ Gaseous Reduction is a technology currently being developed by DOE for the remediation of soil waste sites contaminated with hexavalent chromium. Prior work suggests that a candidate for application of this approach is the 183-DR site at Hanford. However, deep vadose zone drilling is needed to verify the presence of a hexavalent chromium source and to determine the concentration levels and spatial distribution of contamination. This document presents the requirements associated with drilling one to two vadose zone boreholes at the 183-DR site to obtain this information. If hexavalent chromium is determined to be present at levels of at least 10 ppm in the vadose zone in one of the initial boreholes, this hole will be completed for gas injection and six additional gas extraction boreholes will be drilled and completed. This network will be used as a flowcell for performing a gas treatment test at the site.

  4. Modeling a mountain basin sediment cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Georgie; Molnar, Peter; McArdell, Brian; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Mountain basins are most sensitive to climate change because of the dependence of snow and ice melt processes, surface weathering and erosion on air temperature, combined with their rapid rainfall-runoff response. Consequently, sediment yield from mountain basins will also likely be related to climate variability. Constructing sediment budgets is the first step towards understanding the interaction of climate and earth-surface processes. Recently, mountain basin sediment transfer has been conceptualized as a sediment cascade in which, following erosion, sediment travels through multiple cycles of storage and remobilization before exiting the basin. However, few studies have extended this concept beyond the identification and quantification of individual processes and storage units. In this study we have developed a probabilistic sediment cascade model based on a sediment budget spanning more than 4 decades in the Illgraben, an active, debris-flow prone basin in the Swiss Alps. We use this model to investigate the role of thresholds and hydrological and sediment storage dynamics in the transformation of the observed probability distribution of slope failures into that of debris flows. The sediment cascade model consists of a hydrological and sediment module, both of which are based on a spatially lumped storage reservoir representation of the involved physical processes. Water and sediment are generated and routed according to conceptual rules and thresholds which we define and calibrate based on observations. We run simulations with stochastic sediment input drawn from the power-law distribution of slope failures and observed climatic variables (precipitation and air temperature) at the daily resolution for the period 2000-2009, and investigate the outputs of the model in terms of (1) the probability distribution and (2) the timing of sediment discharge events compared to observed debris flows. The triggering of debris flows in our model is conditioned by the

  5. Stormwater detention basin sediment removal

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, stormwater runoff from landfills has been treated mainly by focusing on reducing the peak storm discharge rates so as not to hydraulically impact downstream subsheds. However, with the advent of stricter water quality regulations based on the Federal Clean Water Act, and the related NPDES and SPDES programs, landfill owners and operators are now legally responsible for the water quality of the runoff once it leaves the landfill site. At the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, the world`s largest covering over 2000 acres, landfilling activities have been underway since 1945. With the main objective at all older landfill sites having focused on maximizing the available landfill footprint in order to obtain the most possible airspace volume, consideration was not given for the future siting of stormwater basin structures. Therefore, when SCS Engineers began developing the first comprehensive stormwater management plan for the site, the primary task was to locate potential sites for all the stormwater basins in order to comply with state regulations for peak stormwater runoff control. The basins were mostly constructed where space allowed, and were sized to be as large as possible given siting and subshed area constraints. Seventeen stormwater basins have now been designed and are being constructed to control the peak stormwater runoff for the 25-year, 24-hour storm as required by New York State. As an additional factor of safety, the basins were also designed for controlled discharge of the 100-year, 24 hour storm.

  6. Sediment fluxes in transboundary Selenga river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerova, Ekaterina

    2013-04-01

    Gathering reliable information on transboundary river systems remains a crucial task for international water management and environmental pollution control. Countries located in the lower parts of the river basins depend on water use and management strategies in adjacent upstream countries. One important issue in this context is sediment transport and associated contaminant fluxes across the state borders. The mass flows of dissolved ions, biogens, heavy metal concentrations, as far as suspended sediment concentration (SSC, mg/l) along upper Selenga river and its tributaries based on the literature review and results of field campaigns 2011-2012 were estimated. Based on the water discharges measurements Q, suspended load WR (t/day) and dissolved loads WL were calculated. In the Selenga basin the minimal WR (1,34-3,74 t/day) were found at small rivers. Maximal sediment loads (WR = 15 000 t/day) were found at the upper Orkhon river during flood event. The downstream point (Mongolia-Russia border) was characterized 2 220 t/day in 2011. Generally the prevalence of the accumulation is found through calculating sediment budget for all rivers (ΔW = WR (downstream) - WR (upstream) < 0). Downstream of Orkhon river (below confluence with Tuul) ΔW = - 1145 t/day. Below Selenga-Orkhon confluence sediment yield reached 2515 t/day, which is corresponded to transboundary sediment flux. Silt sediments (0,001 - 0,05 mm) form the main portion of the transported material. The maximal value of sand flux (302 t/day) was reported for middle stream station of Selenga river (upstream from confluence with Orkhon). The increase of human activities (mining and pastures) increases the portion of clay particles in total sediment load (e.g. at the downstream point of most polluted Orkhon river it reached 207,8 t/day). The existed estimates are compared with distribution of the main matter sources within basin: mining and industry, river-bank erosion and slope wash. The heaviest increase of

  7. Sedimentation basin performance at highway construction sites.

    PubMed

    Kalainesan, Sujaya; Neufeld, Ronald D; Quimpo, Rafael; Yodnane, Precha

    2009-02-01

    Sedimentation basins (SBs) are commonly used during highway construction for erosion and sedimentation pollution control as well as for attenuation of overland storm waters. In order to evaluate the sediment removal capacity of these SBs, four basins were selected for monitoring from a new highway construction that extends I-99 to I-80, in Pennsylvania. Between September 2004 and August 2005, ten sampling trips were conducted during which basin inlet and outlet water samples were obtained. The SB samples were analyzed for pH, color, turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), total and dissolved iron, magnesium, manganese, aluminum, calcium, sulfate and phosphate. The data showed peaks in concentrations of TSS, total aluminum, total manganese, total iron and total phosphate that closely correlated to localized rainfall peaks. For certain samples, the concentration of TSS in the outlet was higher than the TSS concentration at the basin inlet, suggesting sediment re-suspension. In general SBs managed high flows during wet weather events, but were not effective in capturing particulates. This paper discusses the need for Best Management Practices (BMPs) for the design of SBs that reflect contemporary concerns for management of particle removal and to control the release of particulate-bound metals. This paper also evaluates the water quality impacts of naturally occurring acidic drainages into SBs, as several acidic seeps with pH in the range of 5-6 and having high dissolved concentrations of metals (Fe, Mn, Mg and Ca), sulfate and phosphate were observed draining into the SBs. PMID:18362049

  8. Sedimentation in Canada Basin, Western Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, D. C.; Shimeld, J.; Jackson, R.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Chapman, B.; Chian, D.; Childs, J. R.; Mayer, L. A.; Edwards, B. D.; Verhoef, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Canada Basin of the western Arctic Ocean is the least studied ocean basin on Earth. Marine seismic field programs were conducted during the past 5 years in order to study the geology, sedimentary history and geomorphology of the region. As part of this program, five annual icebreaker expeditions acquired bathymetric, seismic reflection and seismic refraction data on a regional scale. More than 12,000 km of multi-channel seismic reflection data and 120 sonobuoy seismic refraction records over abyssal plain and continental rise regions of Canada Basin, Northwind Ridge and Alpha Ridge were acquired. The success of these programs was achieved through novel technical modifications to equipment to permit towing in heavy ice conditions and through collaboration between multiple Canadian and US agencies and institutions, enabling utilization of two ice breakers during seismic and multibeam data acquisition in heavy ice. The seafloor of the Canada Basin is remarkably flat-lying in its central region, with little bathymetric change over most of its extent. The sedimentary succession is generally flat lying with reflections extending over hundreds of km. These reflections onlap bathymetric highs, such as Alpha and Northwind ridges. The sedimentary succession is thickest in the Beaufort Sea region, reaching more than 6.5 km, and generally thins to the north and west. Reflection characteristics suggest that sediment volume input to the Arctic Ocean has been high and dominated by turbidity current deposition, similar to Amundsen and Nansen Basins of the eastern Arctic. These turbidites originate from the eastern and southern continental margins. There is no evidence of contemporaneous or post-depositional reworking by bottom currents. Additionally, there is little evidence of tectonic deformation after primary basin-forming events except in the NE quadrant, nearer Alpha Ridge. In this area, there is significant normal faulting propagating from basement through much of the

  9. Sediment Transport in Streams in the Umpqua River Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Onions, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    This report presents tables of suspended-sediment data collected from 1956 to 1967 at 10 sites in the Umpqua River basin. Computations based on these data indicate that average annual suspended-sediment yields at these sites range from 137 to 822 tons per square mile. Because available data for the Umpqua River basin are generally inadequate for accurate determinations of sediment yield and for the definition of characteristics of fluvial sediments, recommendations are made for the collection and analysis of additional sediment data.

  10. Suspended sediment dynamics in the Mississippi River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, K.; Cullis, J. D.; Xu, X.; More, M.; Hassan, M. A.; Simon, A.; Donner, S. D.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated sediment trends in a heavily managed basin influenced by substantial human impacts. Spatial and temporal patterns of suspended sediment dynamics were examined in the Mississippi River basin by utilizing all available USGS suspended-sediment data with a minimum of 30 matching samples of suspended-sediment concentration and water discharge. These spatial trends were related to the land use change which has occurred over the last century and this includes dams, soil conservation measures and channelization. Sediment sources and sinks along the main stem of the Mississippi River and its main tributaries were identified and mapped. Three main trends were identified. 1) Sediment yields decreasing with increasing drainage area imply systematically increasing sediment storage downstream the landscape. 2) Sediment yields increasing with drainage area indicate net recruitment of sediment along the main valleys from banks and floodplain erosion. 3) Sediment yields showing no relationship with drainage area are attributed to the complexity arising from diverse climate, geology and land use of the basin. Based on the results, regional scale sediment yield maps were prepared and linked to the land use and the history of the basin.

  11. Sedimentation retention basin utilization for best management practice.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Iqbal; Cui, Guang-Bai; Zhang, Li-Qiong

    2003-09-01

    Approaches to the artificial impoundment and theoretical design of sedimentation retention basin are reviewed with particular attention to best management practice (BMP) to control agriculture and surface runoff. Sediments retention basins are the small version of farm pond used where a criteria of farm pond is not met. Such basin traps the pollutants and suspended solids prior to entry into streams and lakes. The study is focused with special reference to the assessment and control of non-point source pollution (NPSP) from the sub-basin area of Tai Lake in the Xishan County of Wuxi City of China. The author suggested two different approaches to conduct this study including theoretical design for sedimentation retention basin and computation of flow, sediment transport and deposition during the artificial impoundment of retention basin for BMP's utilization. Theoretical design will provide a useful function as a first line defense against the movement of sediments and transport of pollutants into the Tai Lake while the assessment of sediments deposition will help to make its proper use and periodic cleanup. PMID:14562928

  12. COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN CONTAMINANT AQUATIC BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have been done to determine the levels of chemical contaminants in fish and sediment in the Columbia River Basin. These studies were done because of concern that releases of toxic Chemicals into the Columbia River Basin may be impacting health and the environment...

  13. Flocculated sediments can reduce the size of sediment basin at construction sites.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jihoon; King, Scott E; McLaughlin, Richard A

    2016-01-15

    Due to stringent water quality regulations on stormwater discharges, there is increasing interest in chemically-assisted settling of suspended sediments at construction sites. This study investigated settling characteristics of flocculated sediment by polyacrylamide (PAM) in a top-loading settling tube. Studied sediment materials were obtained from construction sites in North Carolina, USA: Coastal Plain loamy sand (CPLS), Piedmont sandy clay loam (PSCL), Piedmont silt loam (PSL), and Mountain clay loam (MCL). The four different sediment suspensions mixed with and without dissolved PAM were introduced to the top of the column individually. During a 1-h settling period, samples were taken at 1-m depth from surface at various times and analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS). Flocculated sediment by PAM greatly increased its settled TSS fraction up to 95-97% only in 1-min settling period compared to those of unflocculated sediment (16-72%). The settling improvement by PAM was profound in the finer-textured soils (PSL and MCL) by increasing their median particle settling velocity (>2 cm s(-1)) compared to unflocculated counterparts (<1.1 cm s(-1)). Estimated surface area requirement of sediment basin suggested that the basins receiving flocculated sediment could be reduced in size (surface area) by 2- to 4-times compared to those receiving unflocculated sediment. Our results suggests that current sediment basin design could be modified when chemically-assisted settling is implemented, taking up less space and cost in construction sites. PMID:26555101

  14. Mesozoic and Early Cenozoic sediment influx in the Mozambique basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelino, Jude; Reichert, Christian; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Aslanian, Daniel; Jokat, Wilfried

    2015-04-01

    Mozambique Basin is together with the Somali Basin the oldest rifted sedimentary basin developed along the eastern African margin in Jurassic times. The basin hosts a continuous record of sediments since Jurassic times, when Antarctica separated from Africa. The primary objectives of this study were to extend the regional stratigraphic framework north of the Zambezi Delta and to review geological events documented in the Mozambique Basin. Nine Multi-Channel seismic reflection profiles are used to extend the regional stratigraphy in to the deep abyssal plains of the basin. We identify six major stratigraphic units that correlate to Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous, Paleogene, Neogene and Quaternary periods. Mesozoic sedimentation rates of 3-5 cm/kyr are observed in the deeper basin and 1-2 cm /kyr during Paleogene (neither compensated for compaction). The presence of Domo shales from existing wells point to a restricted circulation in the basin until mid-Cretaceous. Mesozoic sediments have a high velocity that exceed 4.5 km/s with an exception of a distinct low-velocity zone of 3.7 km/s in the mid-Cretaceous that may indicate under-compacted overpressured shales. Higher sedimentation rate in Late Cretaceous can be attributed to rapid denudation of the African continent after a major tectonic uplift episode at approximately 90 Ma and simultaneous increase in the catchment area of the proto-Zambezi. Increased sediment influx into the basin from the Zambezi in Late Cretaceous resulted in the formation a submarine delta fan lobe progressing into the Mozambique Channel around the northern periphery of Beira High. Strong north-south bottom currents commenced within the channel in Late Cretaceous that forced the aggradation of sediments of the submarine fan lobe on the southern flank. In addition, we observe several current-controlled drift bodies in the deeper basin that are influenced by the north-south bottom current. Low sedimentation rates in Paleogene are

  15. Sedimentation, accretion, and subsidence in marshes of Barataria Basin, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, R.S.; DeLaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Vertical accretion and sediment accumulation rates were determined from the distribution of /sup 137/Cs in cores collected from fresh water, intermediate, brackish, and salt marshes in the Barataria Basin, Louisiana. Vertical accretion rates vary from about 1.3 cm.yr/sup -1/ in levee areas to 0.7 in backmarshes. Mineral sediment content of the marsh soil profile decreased with distance from the coast. Except in natural levee areas, marsh accretion rates are less than subsidence measured by water level data, however this alone cannot account for observed land-loss patterns in the basin area.

  16. Chronologic Analysis of Terrestrial Sediments and Basin Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbank, D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of magnetic-polarity stratigraphy to provide detailed chronologies of numerous areas within a sedimentary basin is discussed. Sediments suitable for magnetostratigraphic studies are identified. Sets of figures intended to illustrate some of the applications of magnetic-polarity stratigraphy to various aspects of basin analysis are given. Most of the examples are drawn from the Himalayan molasse (Indo-Gangetic foredeep) in northern Pakistan and northwestern India. Each of the figures illustrates an example of how detailed chronologies can be utilized in enhancing and refining models of basin analysis and tectonic deformation.

  17. Contaminants in suspended sediment from the Fraser River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Sekela, M.; Baldazzi, C.; Moyle, G.; Brewer, R.

    1995-12-31

    The concentrations of trace organic contaminants were measured in suspended sediment samples collected upstream and downstream of six pulp mills located in the Fraser River basin. Sampling occurred at three hydrological periods; fall low flow, winter base flow (under ice) and spring freshet. Suspended sediments were analyzed for dioxins, furans, chlorinated phenolics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Initial results indicate that (i) trace organic contaminants are detectable in suspended sediments collected over 265 river kilometers downstream of the nearest pulp mill; (ii) the 1992 to 1994 levels of 2,3,7,8-TCD-dioxin and 2,3,7,8-TCD-furan in Fraser river suspended sediments are lower than the levels measured in 1990; (iii) there is a measurable increase in trace organic contaminant levels in Fraser River suspended sediments associated with the initial rise in the Fraser River hydrograph at freshet.

  18. A sediment budget for the Transkei Basin, Southwest Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Clift, Peter D.

    2015-12-01

    Deep sea sediment budgets can be used to constrain erosion rates in the neighboring continents from which the material was derived. Here we construct a sediment budget for the Transkei Basin, offshore South Africa using an existing seismic reflection survey and dated by correlation of seismic attributes to dated sections in nearby basins. Backstripping of the sections reveals that sediment accumulation rates fell from 110 to 11 Ma, with a possible period of rapid accumulation from 36 to 34 Ma that may be driven by strengthening of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). The long term trend is linked to erosional degradation of the onshore continental escarpment, formed as a consequence of continental break-up. No change is noted at 30 Ma, coincident with proposed uplift of southern Africa driven by plume activity. The basin shows a significant increase in sediment accumulation after 11 Ma, which we interpret to reflect strengthening and rerouting of the AABW from the south into Transkei Basin, as a far field effect of the start of closure of the Indonesian Throughflow.

  19. Suspended sediment and sediment-source areas in the Fountain Creek drainage basin upstream from Widefield, southeastern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Guerard, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Suspended-sediment samples were collected from synoptic-sampling sites to determine suspended-sediment concentrations, loads, yields, and sediment-source areas in the Fountain Creek drainage basin upstream from Widefield, Colorado. Suspended-sediment yields ranged from 0.004 to 278 tons/sq mi/day. Twenty-four sites were sampled that represent urban and rural land use. The median suspended-sediment yield from urban drainage basins was 7.7 tons/sq mi/day and the median suspended-sediment yield from rural drainage basins was 0.46 ton/sq mi/day. Sediment-transport equations were derived for total suspended-sediment discharge and suspended-sand discharge at seven periodic-sampling sites. Annual suspended-sediment loads and yields were computed for the 1985 water year. Urbanization in the downstream parts of the Monument Creek drainage basin, the main tributary to Fountain Creek, affected sediment loads. The downstream 14% of the Monument Creek drainage basin contributed about 61% of the annual suspended-sediment load transported at the mouth of Monument Creek. About 73% of the annual suspended-sediment load for Fountain Creek at Colorado Springs was contributed by Monument Creek. Abandoned mill tailings along Fountain Creek contributed little to total suspended sediment load. Contributions of streambank erosion to basin sediment yields were not quantified. However, the measured rate of streambank erosion at a site on Fountain Creek has increased during a 37-year period. (USGS)

  20. Evaluation of sediment yield and sediment data-collection network in the Piceance basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kircher, J.E.; Von Guerard, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Statistical relationships were developed between suspended-sediment discharge and several regional factors of climate, physiography, and land use in the Piceance basin, northwestern Colorado. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the existing sediment collection network, especially in regard to detecting changes in suspended-sediment discharge due to the development in the basin. Spatial- and time variability were examined using multiple linear regression techniques. Because of the short period of record, monthly mean sediment loads were used to determine shifts or changes in trends due to mining and related activities in the basin. Dummy variable analysis was used to detect these premining and postmining differences in the regression lines and also to detect seasonal differences in the sediment discharge. Differences did exist in the sediment discharge from season to season and before and after mining; however, due to the variability and short period of record the cause of these differences could not be adequately determined. Part of the high variability in sediment discharge was due to variability in the water discharge. Therefore, if the network is to be improved, the emphasis needs to be on improvement of the water-discharge. The results of the monthly mean regression analysis were used in the mean monthly and mean annual analysis for determination of initial network design equations. These were only preliminary in nature and could be improved with additional data. (USGS)

  1. Quaternary Faults and Basin-fill Sediments of the Las Vegas Basin, Southern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, W. J.; Fossett, E.; Luke, B.; Snelson, C.; Rasmussen, T.; McCallen, D.; Rodgers, A.; Louie, J.

    2003-12-01

    The N-S elongated extensional Las Vegas basin, southern Nevada, contains 100's of meters of Cenozoic basin-fill sediments that are cut by several Quaternary (Q) faults. These faults define or influence the basin geometry. The basin is generally an asymmetrical half graben defined by the W-dipping, Q Frenchman Mountain fault (FMF) along its E side and a series of smaller offset E-dipping faults to the W. The N terminus of the basin is controlled by the Las Vegas Valley shear zone, along which the majority of the offset occurred prior to the Q. Here, we asses the influence of the Q faults on the distribution of the sedimentary units. Well, exposure, seismic reflection and seismic refraction data show that sedimentary units of different grain sizes or seismic velocity dominate different parts of the basin. Sections dominated by coarse clastic deposits occupy a narrow area along the E side of the basin. Coarse clastic sediments are mixed with finer grained sediments in a broader area along the W side of the basin. Based on provenance and alluvial fan distribution, the coarse deposits along the E side of the basin appear to be trapped in close proximity to the W-dipping FMF. The coarse-grained deposits along the opposite, W side of the basin, are sourced from the nearby Spring Mountains. Because of the structural asymmetry of the basin, these sediments traveled farther from their source area than those on the E side. Some of these E-dipping faults influence the depth to Paleozoic bedrock and some faults form small sub-basins filled with finer grained sediments. Along a WNW trend near the center of the basin and near the present-day Las Vegas Wash, a change in the grain size distribution occurs up stratgraphic section: continuous clay layers are less common and coarse-grained deposits are more common. This difference may reflect a change from internal drainage early in the basin history to external drainage through the Las Vegas Wash in the latter history of the basin

  2. 105-N basin sediment disposition phase-two sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. C.

    1997-03-14

    The sampling and analysis plan for Phase 2 of the 105-N Basin sediment disposition task defines the sampling and analytical activities that will be performed to support characterization of the sediment and selection of an appropriate sediment disposal option.

  3. Mercury profiles in sediments of the Arctic Ocean basins

    SciTech Connect

    Gobeil, C.; MacDonald, R.W.; Smith, J.N.

    1999-12-01

    Total Hg distribution shave been measured for seven sediment cores collected from the major basins of the Arctic Ocean during the Arctic Ocean Section in 1994. Hg determinations were performed on the top 10 cm of the sectioned cores using gold amalgamation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. In five cores, Jg concentrations decrease downward from 34 to 116 ng g{sup {minus}1} at the sediment surface to 10--65 ng g{sup {minus}1} at 5 cm depth and then remain almost constant with increasing depth. In the other two cores, the Hg decrease with depth is interrupted by a maximum (96--107 ng g{sup {minus}1}) at 7--8 cm. The obvious inference--pervasive Hg contamination from anthropogenic sources even at the North Pole--is discounted after a careful evaluation of sediment geochemistry. The evidence suggests that these Hg profiles have been produced by Hg redistribution during diagenesis. In all seven cores, strong similarities are observed between the Hg and the reactive Fe profiles, implying that a portion of the total Hg deposited is recycled along with Fe during redox changes. Intense redox processing in these cores is demonstrated by sharp decreases in organic content with depth and by vertical profiles showing surface enrichments for Mn and Fe. The crucial factors governing surface Hg enrichments in Arctic basin sediments are the low sedimentation rates and sediment mixing rates that permit even minor Hg fluxes to have a significant cumulative effect.

  4. Influence of basin connectivity on sediment source, transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. R.; Mackin, G.; Lechler, P.; Lord, M.; Lorentz, S.

    2012-09-01

    The management of sediment and other non-point source (NPS) pollution has proven difficult, and requires a sound understanding of particle movement through the drainage system. The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain an understanding of NPS sediment source(s), transport, and storage within the Mkabela basin, a representative agricultural catchment within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands of southeastern South Africa, by combining geomorphic, hydrologic and geochemical fingerprinting analyses. The Mkabela Basin can be subdivided into three distinct subcatchments that differ in their ability to transport and store sediment along the axial valley. Headwater (upper catchment) areas are characterized by extensive wetlands that act as significant sediment sinks. Mid-catchment areas, characterized by higher relief and valley gradients, exhibit few wetlands, but rather are dominated by a combination of alluvial and bedrock channels that are conducive to sediment transport. The lower catchment exhibits a low-gradient alluvial channel that is boarded by extensive riparian wetlands that accumulate large quantities of sediment (and NPS pollutants). Fingerprinting studies suggest that silt- and clay-rich layers found within wetland and reservoir deposits are derived from the erosion of fine-grained, valley bottom soils frequently utilized as vegetable fields. Coarser-grained deposits within both wetlands and reservoirs result from the erosion of sandier hillslope soils extensively utilized for sugar cane, during relatively high magnitude runoff events that are capable of transporting sand-sized sediment off the slopes. Thus, the source of sediment to the axial valley varies as a function of sediment size and runoff magnitude. Sediment export from the basin was limited until the early 1990s, in part because the upper catchment wetlands were hydrologically disconnected from lower parts of the watershed during low- to moderate flood events. The construction of a

  5. Linked basin sedimentation and orogenic uplift: The Neogene Barinas basin sediments derived from the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erikson, Johan P.; Kelley, Shari A.; Osmolovsky, Peter; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    2012-11-01

    The Venezuelan Andes are an asymmetric, doubly vergent orogen that is flanked on its southeastern side by the Barinas basin. Analyses of sedimentary facies, sandstone petrography, apatite fission-tracks, and magnetostratigraphy were completed on a 1750-m section of the syn-orogenic Neogene Parángula and Río Yuca formations in the Barinas side foothills of the Venezuelan Andes. Our sedimentary facies analyses record a progression of sedimentary environments from floodplain and floodplain channel deposits through the 560-m thick Parángula Formation transitioning to distal alluvial fan deposits in the lower Río Yuca Formation and finally to an alternation of distal alluvial fan and two, ˜100-m thick organic-rich lacustrine deposits in the upper third of the section. Major- and minor-mineral petrographic analysis reveals unroofing of the Venezuelan Andes, with quartz arenite composition low in the section succeeded by metamorphic and igneous clasts and potassium feldspar appearing near the base of the Río Yuca Formation. Apatite fission-track (AFT) analysis of sandstones and pebbles generated ages of 11.2 ± 1.3 - 13.8 ± 2.0 Ma over ˜1100 m of stratigraphic section. Thermal modeling of the detrital AFT and vitrinite data from the lower Río Yuca Formation indicates exhumation of the source area was occurring by 12-13 Ma, surface exposure at 10-9 Ma, maximum burial by 4-2 Ma and exhumation of the sedimentary package starting 3-2 Ma. Accumulation of the Río Yuca Formation is contemporaneous with a basinward migration of the deformation front. Regional considerations indicate that the Venezuelan Andes evolved from a primarily singly vergent orogen to its current double vergence over the interval of Neogene-Quaternary sedimentation.

  6. Tectonics and sedimentation in the Curitiba Basin, south of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamuni, Eduardo; Ebert, Hans Dirk; da Silva Borges, Mauricio; Hasui, Yociteru; Costa, João Batista Sena; Salamuni, Riad

    2003-03-01

    The Curitiba Basin, Paraná, lies parallel to the west side of the Serra do Mar range and is part of a continental rift near the Atlantic coast of southeastern Brazil. It bears unconsolidated and poorly consolidated sediments divided in two formations: the lower Guabirotuba Formation and the overlying Tinguis Formation, both developed over Precambrian basement. Field observations, water well drill cores, and interpretations of satellite images lead to the inference that regional tectonic processes were responsible for the origin of the Basin in the continental rift context and for morphotecatonic evolution through block tilting, dissection, and erosion. The structural framework of the sediments and the basement is characterized by NE-SW-trending normal faults (extensional tectonic D 1 event) reactivated by NE-SW-trending strike-slip and reverse oblique faults (younger transtensional tectonic D 2' to transpressional tectonic D 2″ event). This tectonic event, which started in the Paleogene and controlled the basin geometry, began as a halfgraben and was later reactivated as a pull-apart basin. D 2 is a neotectonic event that controls the current morphostructures. The Basin is connected to the structural rearrangement of the South American platform, which underwent a generalized extensional or trantensional process and, in late Oligocene, changed to a compressional to transpressional regime.

  7. Influence of basin connectivity on sediment source, transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. R.; Mackin, G.; Lechler, P.; Lord, M.; Lorentz, S.

    2013-02-01

    The management of sediment and other non-point source (NPS) pollution has proven difficult, and requires a sound understanding of particle movement through the drainage system. The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain an understanding of NPS sediment source(s), transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, a representative agricultural catchment within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands of eastern South Africa, by combining geomorphic, hydrologic and geochemical fingerprinting analyses. The Mkabela Basin can be subdivided into three distinct subcatchments that differ in their ability to transport and store sediment along the axial valley. Headwater (upper catchment) areas are characterized by extensive wetlands that act as significant sediment sinks. Mid-catchment areas, characterized by higher relief and valley gradients, exhibit few wetlands, but rather are dominated by a combination of alluvial and bedrock channels that are conducive to sediment transport. The lower catchment exhibits a low-gradient alluvial channel that is boarded by extensive riparian wetlands that accumulate large quantities of sediment (and NPS pollutants). Fingerprinting studies suggest that silt- and clay-rich layers found within wetland and reservoir deposits of the upper and upper-mid subcatchments are derived from the erosion of fine-grained, valley bottom soils frequently utilized as vegetable fields. Coarser-grained deposits within these wetlands and reservoirs result from the erosion of sandier hillslope soils extensively utilized for sugar cane, during relatively high magnitude runoff events that are capable of transporting sand-sized sediment off the slopes. Thus, the source of sediment to the axial valley varies as a function of sediment size and runoff magnitude. Sediment export from upper to lower catchment areas was limited until the early 1990s, in part because the upper catchment wetlands were hydrologically disconnected from lower parts of the watershed during

  8. Toxicity assessment of sediments from three European river basins using a sediment contact test battery.

    PubMed

    Tuikka, A I; Schmitt, C; Höss, S; Bandow, N; von der Ohe, P C; de Zwart, D; de Deckere, E; Streck, G; Mothes, S; van Hattum, B; Kocan, A; Brix, R; Brack, W; Barceló, D; Sormunen, A J; Kukkonen, J V K

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of four polluted sediments and their corresponding reference sediments from three European river basins were investigated using a battery of six sediment contact tests representing three different trophic levels. The tests included were chronic tests with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a sub-chronic test with the midge Chironomus riparius, an early life stage test with the zebra fish Danio rerio, and an acute test with the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The endpoints, namely survival, growth, reproduction, embryo development and light inhibition, differed between tests. The measured effects were compared to sediment contamination translated into toxic units (TU) on the basis of acute toxicity to Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas, and multi-substance Potentially Affected Fractions of species (msPAF) as an estimate for expected community effects. The test battery could clearly detect toxicity of the polluted sediments with test-specific responses to the different sediments. The msPAF and TU-based toxicity estimations confirmed the results of the biotests by predicting a higher toxic risk for the polluted sediments compared to the corresponding reference sediments, but partly having a different emphasis from the biotests. The results demonstrate differences in the sensitivities of species and emphasize the need for data on multiple species, when estimating the effects of sediment pollution on the benthic community. PMID:20833427

  9. Diphytanyl glycerol ether distributions in sediments of the Orca Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, T.K.; VanVleet, E.S.; Barre, J.S. )

    1992-09-01

    Archaebacterially produced diphytanyl glycerol ether (DPGE) was examined in core sediments from the Orca Basin, an anoxic hypersaline basin in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, to observe its spatial variability and potential origin. A differential extraction protocol was employed to quantify the isopranyl glycerol ethers associated with unbound, intermediate-bound, and kerogen-bound lipid fractions. Archaebacterial lipids were evident at all depths for the unbound and intermediate-bound fractions. Concentrations of DPGE ranged from 0.51 to 2.91 [mu]g/g dry sediment at the surface and showed secondary maxima deeper in basin sediments. Intermediate-bound DPGE concentrations exhibited an inverse relationship to unbound DPGE concentrations. Kerogen-bound DPGE concentrations were normally below detection limits. Earlier studies describing the general homogeneity of lipid components within the overlying brine and at the brine/seawater interface suggest that the large-scale sedimentary DPGE variations observed in this study result from spatial and temporal variations in in-situ production by methanogenic or extremely halophilic archaebacteria.

  10. Diphytanyl glycerol ether distributions in sediments of the Orca Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Tamara K.; Van Vleet, Edward S.; Barre, Jill S.

    1992-09-01

    Archaebacterially produced diphytanyl glycerol ether (DPGE) was examined in core sediments from the Orca Basin, an anoxic hypersaline basin in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, to observe its spatial variability and potential origin. A differential extraction protocol was employed to quantify the isopranyl glycerol ethers associated with unbound, intermediate-bound, and kerogen-bound lipid fractions. Archaebacterial lipids were evident at all depths for the unbound and intermediate-bound fractions. Concentrations of DPGE ranged from 0.51 to 2.91 μg/g dry sediment at the surface and showed secondary maxima deeper in basin sediments. Intermediate-bound DPGE concentrations exhibited an inverse relationship to unbound DPGE concentrations. Kerogen-bound DPGE concentrations were normally below detection limits. Earlier studies describing the general homogeneity of lipid components within the overlying brine and at the brine/seawater interface suggest that the large-scale sedimentary DPGE variations observed in this study result from spatial and temporal variations in in situ production by methanogenic or extremely halophilic archaebacteria.

  11. Diphytanyl glycerol ether distributions in sediments of the Orca Basin.

    PubMed

    Pease, T K; Van Vleet, E S; Barre, J S

    1992-09-01

    Archaebacterially produced diphytanyl glycerol ether (DPGE) was examined in core sediments from the Orca Basin, an anoxic hypersaline basin in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, to observe its spatial variability and potential origin. A differential extraction protocol was employed to quantify the isopranyl glycerol ethers associated with unbound, intermediate-bound, and kerogen-bound lipid fractions. Archaebacterial lipids were evident at all depths for the unbound and intermediate-bound fractions. Concentrations of DPGE ranged from 0.51 to 2.91 micrograms/g dry sediment at the surface and showed secondary maxima deeper in basin sediments. Intermediate-bound DPGE concentrations exhibited an inverse relationship to unbound DPGE concentrations. Kerogen-bound DPGE concentrations were normally below detection limits. Earlier studies describing the general homogeneity of lipid components within the overlying brine and at the brine/seawater interface suggest that the large-scale sedimentary DPGE variations observed in this study result from spatial and temporal variations in in situ production by methanogenic or extremely halophilic archaebacteria. PMID:11540108

  12. Irregular plate boundary controls on Foreland Basin sedimentation (Miocene, Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin, SE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Murat; Gürbüz, Kemal; Cronin, Bryan T.

    2015-11-01

    The northern movement of the Arabian Plate led to the development of a compressional regime in the south-eastern part of Turkey after the Late Cretaceous. The collision of the Arabian Plate with the Anatolide-Taurides Platform and subsequent development of the Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin at the beginning of the Miocene evolved as a result of this movement. An irregular plate geometry or promontory of the Arabian Plate caused partitioning of the plate margin (precollision-collision-postcollision). This irregular plate boundary was delimited by western and northern boundary faults and an interior basin fault. The NW-oriented small wedge top basins on the overlying Anatolide-Taurides Platform obliquely cut through the foredeep basin. The region (across the wedge top basin) on the irregular promontory of the underlying Arabian Plate contains different sedimentation depocentres. Small fining-upward submarine fan deposits (including pebbly channel deposits and coarsening-upward lobe sequences) are located at the centre of the irregular part of the plate (in the Tanır region) and overlie planktic foraminifera-bearing claystones. These submarine fan sediments pass outboard into distal interbedded turbidite claystones and siltstones in a downdip direction (S-SE). The boundary fault intersection of the promontory led to the development of a submarine slope environment with irregular sea-floor topography in the Fırnız area (4-5 km south-east of the Tanır region). The slump deposits, sandy debrites, and fine-grained thin-bedded turbidites filled this region. Structural alignments and seismicity associated with the plate margin were the main controlling factors on the geometry of the depocentre, sediment quantity, sediment input, sedimentary facies, local sea level changes, and post-sedimentary deformation in the Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin.

  13. Hydrology and sedimentation of Bixler Run Basin, central Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Lloyd A.

    1976-01-01

    Rainfall, streamflow, stream chemical, and sediment discharge data were collected from Bixler Run near Loysville, Pa., during the period from February 1954 to September 1969 as part of a project to evaluate sediment discharge from an agricultural area in which soil-conservation techniques were being adopted at a moderate rate. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, State Conservation Commission. Sediment yields from the basin averaged 64 tons per square mile (22 tonnes per square kilometre) per year, approximately 25 percent less than yields from the surrounding area. The relation between water discharge and suspended-sediment discharge remained constant during the study. Suspended-sediment concentrations in the streamflow were less than 10 milligrams per litre 70 percent of the time. The concentration of chloride ions in the streamflow increased from 1959 to 1969. Ground water maintained flows at the gaging location at a rate of 1.9 cubic feet per second (0.054 cubic metres per second) during the period of data collection.

  14. Catastrophic flood sediments in Chryse Basin, Mars, and Quincy Basin, Washington: Application of sandar facies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, James W., Jr.; Edgett, Kenneth S.

    Viking visible and thermal infrared observations and terrestrial catastrophic flood deposits provide clues to identify the outflow channel sediments that went into Chryse Basin on Mars. On Earth, sandar (outwash plains formed by coalescence of many jökulhlaup floods) are described in terms of three laterally adjacent facies: proximal, midfan, and distal. The Missoula Flood sediments deposited in Quincy Basin, Washington, comprise a miniature analog of Chryse Basin. The terminology and general characteristics of the sandar facies model are applied to Quincy Basin, although the depositional environment and clast sizes are somewhat different (higher-energy flood, larger clasts, subaqueous rather than subaerial deposition). For example, the Ephrata Fan (a deposit of boulders, cobbles, and pebbles) forms the midfan facies analog; a downfan sandy deposit (reworked into a dune field) comprises the distal facies analog. In Chryse Basin the midfan is defined by a heterogeneous rocky (0-25%), intermediate-albedo (0.21-0.26), intermediate thermal inertia (260-460Jm-2s-0.5K-1) surface, while the distal facies has a low albedo (0.14-0.16) and higher thermal inertia (340-700Jm-2s-0.5K-1). The Chryse midfan unit has rocks and windblown dust exposed at the surface. The sand of the distal facies in Chryse/Acidalia is reworked by the wind, as in Quincy Basin. The Viking 1 and Mars Pathfinder landing sites are located on the midfan unit. Observations that can be made at the Mars Pathfinder site might help in reevaluating whether or not Viking 1 landed on outflow channel sediments.

  15. Transient electromagnetic study of basin fill sediments in the Upper San Pedro Basin, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bultman, M.W.; Gray, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Upper San Pedro River Basin in Mexico and the United States is an important riparian corridor that is coming under increasing pressure from growing populations and the associated increase in groundwater withdrawal. Several studies have produced three-dimensional maps of the basin fill sediments in the US portion of the basin but little work has been done in the Mexican portion of the basin. Here, the results of a ground-based transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey in the Upper San Pedro Basin, Mexico are presented. These basin fill sediments are characterized by a 10-40 m deep unsaturated surficial zone which is composed primarily of sands and gravels. In the central portion of the basin this unsaturated zone is usually underlain by a shallow clay layer 20-50 m thick. Beneath this may be more clay, as is usually the case near the San Pedro River, or interbedded sand, silt, and clay to a depth of 200-250 m. As you move away from the river, the upper clay layer disappears and the amount of sand in the sediments increases. At 1-2 km away from the river, sands can occupy up to 50% of the upper 200-250 m of the sediment fill. Below this, clays are always present except where bedrock highs are observed. This lower clay layer begins at a depth of about 200 m in the central portion of the basin (250 m or more at distances greater than 1-2 km from the river) and extends to the bottom of most profiles to depths of 400 m. While the depth of the top of this lower clay layer is probably accurate, its thickness observed in the models may be overestimated due to the relatively low magnetic moment of the TEM system used in this study. The inversion routine used for interpretation is based on a one-dimensional geologic model. This is a layer based model that is isotropic in both the x and y directions. Several survey soundings did not meet this requirement which invalidates the inversion process and the resulting interpretation at these locations. The results from these

  16. Episodic Emplacement of Sediment + Carbon within Large Tropical River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R.; Aufdenkampe, A.

    2012-04-01

    Application of advanced methods for imaging (sub-bottom sonar and ERGI), dating (high resolution 210-Pb and 14-C from deep cores), and biogeochemical analysis have facilitated the characterization and inter-comparison of floodplain sedimentation rates, styles, and carbon loading across disparate large river basins. Two examples explored here are the near-pristine 72,000 km2 Beni River basin in northern Bolivia and the similarly natural 36,000 km2 Strickland River basin in Papua New Guinea - that are located on either side of the Equatorial Pacific warm pool that drives the ENSO phenomenon. Our published research suggests that large, rapid-rise, cold-phase ENSO floods account for the preponderance of sediment accumulation within these two tropical systems. New results to be presented at EGU further clarify the extent of modern deposits (~100 yrs) within both systems and add a deeper perspective into how these extensive floodplains developed over the Holocene, both in response to external forcing (climate and base level) and internal system morphodynamics. The vast scale of these temporally discrete deposits (typically 100s of millions of tonnes over relatively short time periods) involved equate to high burial rates, which in turn support the high carbon loadings sequestered within the resulting sedimentary deposits. We have identified the principal source of this carbon and sedimentary material to be extensive landslides throughout the high-relief headwaters - failures that deliver huge charges of pulverized rock and soil directly into canyons (in both the Bolivian Andes and the PNG Highlands), where raging floodwaters provide efficient transport to lowland depocentres. We present recent results from our research in these basins, providing insight into the details of such enormous mass budgets that result in a signicant carbon sink within the floodplains. Processes, timing, and rates are compared between the two systems, providing insight into the nature of

  17. Arsenic Incorporation Into Authigenic Pyrite, Bengal Basin Sediment, Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Lowers, H.A.; Breit, G.N.; Foster, A.L.; Whitney, J.; Yount, J.; Uddin, Md.N.; Muneem, Ad.A.; /Geological Survey, Denver /Geological Survey, Menlo Park

    2007-07-10

    Sediment from two deep boreholes ({approx}400 m) approximately 90 km apart in southern Bangladesh was analyzed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), total chemical analyses, chemical extractions, and electron probe microanalysis to establish the importance of authigenic pyrite as a sink for arsenic in the Bengal Basin. Authigenic framboidal and massive pyrite (median values 1500 and 3200 ppm As, respectively), is the principal arsenic residence in sediment from both boreholes. Although pyrite is dominant, ferric oxyhydroxides and secondary iron phases contain a large fraction of the sediment-bound arsenic between approximately 20 and 100 m, which is the depth range of wells containing the greatest amount of dissolved arsenic. The lack of pyrite in this interval is attributed to rapid sediment deposition and a low sulfur flux from riverine and atmospheric sources. The ability of deeper aquifers (>150 m) to produce ground water with low dissolved arsenic in southern Bangladesh reflects adequate sulfur supplies and sufficient time to redistribute the arsenic into pyrite during diagenesis.

  18. Arsenic mobility in sediments from Paracatu River Basin, MG, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Patrícia Sueli; Costa, Letícia Malta; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho

    2015-04-01

    Paracatu River Basin, Minas Gerais, Brazil, houses long areas of irrigated agriculture and gold-, lead-, and zinc-mining activities. This region has a prevalence of sulfide minerals and a natural occurrence of high levels of arsenopyrite. In this work, surface water, groundwater, sediments and local vegetable samples were collected in October 2010 and November 2011 and were analyzed to evaluate arsenic (As) distribution, mobility, and transport in these environmental compartments. All sediment samples (738-2,750 mg kg(-1)) and 37 % of the water samples [less than the limit of detection (LOD) to 110 µg L(-1)] from the rivers and streams of Paracatu had As concentrations greater than the quality standards established by national and international environmental organizations (5.9 mg kg(-1) for sediments and 10 µg L(-1) for water). Most vegetable samples had As concentrations within the normal range for plants (lower than the LOD to 120 mg kg(-1)). A correlation among As concentrations in water, sediment, and vegetable samples was verified. PMID:25672271

  19. Arsenic incorporation into authigenic pyrite, Bengal Basin sediment, Bangladesh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowers, H.A.; Breit, G.N.; Foster, A.L.; Whitney, J.; Yount, J.; Uddin, Md. N.; Muneem, Ad. A.

    2007-01-01

    Sediment from two deep boreholes (???400 m) approximately 90 km apart in southern Bangladesh was analyzed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), total chemical analyses, chemical extractions, and electron probe microanalysis to establish the importance of authigenic pyrite as a sink for arsenic in the Bengal Basin. Authigenic framboidal and massive pyrite (median values 1500 and 3200 ppm As, respectively), is the principal arsenic residence in sediment from both boreholes. Although pyrite is dominant, ferric oxyhydroxides and secondary iron phases contain a large fraction of the sediment-bound arsenic between approximately 20 and 100 m, which is the depth range of wells containing the greatest amount of dissolved arsenic. The lack of pyrite in this interval is attributed to rapid sediment deposition and a low sulfur flux from riverine and atmospheric sources. The ability of deeper aquifers (>150 m) to produce ground water with low dissolved arsenic in southern Bangladesh reflects adequate sulfur supplies and sufficient time to redistribute the arsenic into pyrite during diagenesis.

  20. Paleotectonic controls on sedimentation in northern Williston basin area, Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, D.M.

    1983-08-01

    The Williston basin lies within the so-called stable cratonic interior and would not be expected to have had the same intensity of tectonic activity as is generally considered to be characteristic of cratonic margin sedimentary basins. From time to time, however, other structural features appear to have been effective controls on sediment distribution patterns. In southern Saskatchewan, one of the most active of these was the Swift current platform. This feature appears to have been sufficiently positive during early Paleozoic time to have caused a distinct thinning of those sediments over it. The platform was mildly positive during other periods of sedimentation, as well as during periods of erosion. It was a site of widespread salt solution during Mesozoic time, which was also its time of major tectonic fluctuation, as well as being the period when it had the most significant influence on sedimentation. Southeastern Saskatchewan is the locale for some significant regional gravity and magnetic anomalies which appear related to exposed structural zones in the Precambrian Shield. A major gravity anomaly on the extreme eastern side of the province is on trend with the Nelson River zone of Manitoba and a magnetic anomaly (Camfield-Gough conductor zone) can be traced to the Wollaston trend in north-central Saskatchewan. The Camfield-Gough zone is particularly significant in that it lies along the axis of the Hummingbird trough, an area affected by basement-controlled early salt solution, and it extends southward into the United States, where it is flanked by a number of local multizone oil-producing structures in North Dakota and Montana.

  1. Polyphase basin evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from 3D visualization of sedimentation setting and quantitative subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzed and visualized data from 210 wells using a MATLAB-based program (BasinVis 1.0) for 3D visualization of sediment distribution, thickness, and quantitative subsidence of the northern and central Vienna Basin. The sedimentation settings for selected horizons were visualized to 3D sediment distribution maps, isopach maps, and cross-sections. Subsidence of the study area resulted in 3D subsidence depth and rate maps of basement and tectonic subsidences. Due to the special position of the Vienna Basin, the basin evolution was influenced by the regional tectonics of surrounding units. The 2D/3D maps provided insights into the polyphase evolution of the Vienna Basin, which is closely related to changes in the changing regional stress field and the paleoenvironmental setting. In the Early Miocene, the sedimentation and subsidence were shallow and E-W/NE-SW trending, indicating the development of piggy-back basins. During the late Early Miocene, maps show wider sedimentation and abruptly increasing subsidence by sinistral strike-slip faults, which initiated the Vienna pull-apart basin system. The sediments of the Early Miocene were supplied through a small deltaic system entering from the south. After thin sedimentation and shallow subsidence of the early Middle Miocene, the development of the Vienna Basin was controlled and accelerated mainly by NE-SW trending synsedimentary normal faults, especially the Steinberg fault. From the Middle Miocene, the subsidence was decreasing overall, however the tectonic subsidence show regionally different patterns. This study suggests that a major tensional regime change, from transtension to E-W extension, caused laterally varying subsidence across the Vienna Basin. The Late Miocene was characterized by the slowing down of basement and tectonic subsidence. From the middle Middle to Late Miocene, enormous amount of sediments supplied by a broad paleo-Danube delta complex on the western flank of the basin. The latest

  2. Campano-Maastrichtian foraminifera from onshore sediments in the Rio del Rey Basin, Southwest Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njoh, Oliver Anoh; Victor, Obiosio; Christopher, Agyingi

    2013-03-01

    Campanian-Maastrichtian marine sediments outcrop in five genetically linked sedimentary basins along the West African coast in the Gulf of Guinea, from the Douala Basin in Cameroon to the Anambra Basin in Nigeria. These sediments in the more centrally located Rio del Rey Basin have been the least studied. Therefore, the geologic history of this region has merely been speculative. The Rio del Rey Basin like the adjacent Niger Delta is producing hydrocarbon from the offshore Tertiary sedimentary interval in which all studies have been focused, neglecting the onshore Cretaceous sediments. Outcrops in the basin are rare, small and highly weathered. Samples from some of these sediments have yielded a few Planktonic and dominantly benthonic foraminiferal assemblages. The long-ranging heterohelix and hedbergellids characterized the planktics while the species Afrobolivina afra which is a well known diagnostic taxon for Campanian-Maastrichtian sediments in West African basins clearly dominate the benthic assemblage. Its occurrence in association with other Upper Cretaceous forms such as Bolivina explicata, Praebulimina exiqua, Gabonita lata, Ammobaculites coprolithiformis amongst others, formed the basis on which this age was assigned to the sediments sampled from the Rio del Rey Basin. Hence, this work has undoubtedly established the much needed link in this regional geologic history and correlates these sediments with the Logbaba and Nkporo Formations in the Douala Basin in Cameroon and the southeastern Nigerian Sedimentary Basins. Thus, these units were all deposited during this same geologic period and probably controlled by the same geologic event.

  3. Trends in chlorinated hydrocarbon levels in Hudson River basin sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, R F; Chillrud, S N; Shuster, E L; Simpson, H J; Estabrooks, F D

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of sections from dated sediment cores were used to establish geographic distributions and temporal trends of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant levels in sediments from natural waters of the Hudson River basin. Radiometric dating was based primarily on the depth distribution of 137(Cs) in the cores and on the occurrence of detectable levels of 7(Be) in surface sediment samples. Eighteen sampling sites included several along the main stem of the Hudson, its major tributaries, and components of the New York/New Jersey (NY/NJ) harbor complex. Drinking-water reservoirs were sampled to place upper limits on atmospheric inputs. Core sections were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT)-derived compounds, chlordane, and dioxins. Sediment concentrations of most contaminants at most sites have decreased significantly since the mid-1960s. The data provide a basinwide perspective on major point-source inputs of PCBs to the upper Hudson River and of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and DDT to the lower Passaic River. Evidence was found for significant but poorly characterized sources of PCBs and chlordane to the western NY/NJ harbor, and of highly chlorinated dioxins to the upstream sites on the main stem of the Hudson. The results indicate that analysis of dated sediment samples is a most effective and efficient monitoring tool for the study of large-scale geographic and temporal trends in levels of particle-associated contaminants. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9703496

  4. Comparative hydrocarbon geology of two Mesozoic Circum-Pacific foreland basins as function of sediment provenance: Surat basin, eastern Australia and western Canada basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hawlader, H.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The Surat basin in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia, is a foreland basin formed in response to a magmatic arc during Early Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous time. It has a maximum basin-fill of about 2.5 km of Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous sediments. The first commercial production of oil in Australia came from this basin in the early 1960s. The Western Canada basin is a retro-arc foreland basin with up to 3.5 km of sediments deposited during the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. The basin was developed on the cratonward side of an arc/cordillera by plate convergence. It is a composite basin with sediments ranging in age from Devonian to Tertiary and is one of the prolific petroliferous basins of the world. The famous Athabasca-Peace River-Lloydminister tar sands alone contain a reserve of about 3 {times} 10{sup 12} barrels of oil, which exceeds three times the recoverable reserves of the world's known oil. The main sediment source was, in both basins, a rising arc/cordillera that shed a cratonward tapering clastic wedge into the flanking foreland basins. Sedimentation, in both cases, was episodic and the patterns of sedimentation in each present striking similarities. During the waxing phase of magmatism/orogeny in the arc/cordillera, the foreland subsided in response to flexural loading of the foreland fold-thrust belt and downward drag by the subducting plate. Continental synorogenic sediments were rapidly emplaced in mainly terrestrial environments into the subsiding foreland. These sediments are lithic-labile in nature and because of their physical and chemical reactivity are prone to be tight and thus of little hydrocarbon reservoir potential. During the waning phase of the arc/orogen the foreland gently rose in response partly to the cessation of drag (decoupling) by the subducting plate and to isostatic rebound (tectonic relaxation).

  5. Regional variations in magnetic properties of surface sediments in the Qaidam Basin and their paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Dawen

    2015-11-01

    The Qaidam Basin is the largest intermontane basin on the northeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau. At present, systematic rock magnetic studies of surface sediments in this basin are scarce because of the vast area and poor accessibility. In this paper, multi-parameter rock magnetic investigations of surface sediments from a wide area in the Qaidam Basin have been conducted. We find that pseudo-single domain and multidomain ferrimagnetic minerals (i.e. magnetite and maghemite) dominate the magnetic properties of surface sediments in the basin. Surface sediments from the western part of the basin exhibit the lowest magnetic concentration values χ, χARM and SIRM. In contrast, samples from the upwind sides of the basin and the eastern margin of the basin show the highest magnetic concentration values. The spatial distribution of magnetic parameters in the Qaidam Basin suggest that wind environments and the supply of clastic sediments possibly provide the main control on the regional variations of magnetic parameters. Our results also provide new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic variations of late Pliocene lacustrine sediments in the western Qaidam Basin.

  6. Accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon dating of Pleistocene lake sediments in the Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.S.; Toolin, L.J.; Forester, R.M.; Spencer, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Pleistocene lake sediments in the Great Basin typically contain little organic carbon, and thus are difficult to date reliably by conventional radioccarbon methods. Paleoenvironmental data are abundant in these sediments, but are of limited value without adequate age controls. With the advent of accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon dating, it is now possible to date these paleolacustrine sediments. AMS dates were obtained on sediment cores from the Bonneville, Franklin, and Lahontan Basins. In the Bonneville Basin, the AMS-based chronology compares well with other chronologies constructed from dated shore-zone features. In the Bonneville and Franklin basins, AMS dates delimit unconformities not apparent by other means. We found that dispersed organic carbon from sediments deposited during relatively freshwater intervals provided apparently reliable AMS radiocarbon dates. Carbonate microfossils from the Lahontan Basin also produced results that appear reasonable, while bulk carbonate yielded erroneous results. ?? 1990.

  7. Characterization of the efficiency of sedimentation basins downstream of harvested peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson-Do, Myriam; St-Hilaire, André

    2015-04-01

    Peat harvesting is a very lucrative industry in the provinces of Quebec and New-Brunswick (Canada). Peat enters in many potting mix used for horticulture. However, harvesting this resource has some impacts on the environment. First, industries need to drain the peat bog to dry the superficial layer. Then, it is harvested with industrial vacuums and the underlying layer is allowed to dry. The drained water is laden with suspended sediments (mostly organic peat fibers) that may affect biota of the stream where it is discharged. To counter the problem, this water does not go directly on the stream but first flows through a sedimentation basin, built to reduce suspended sediment loads. This work focuses on characterizing and eventually modeling the efficiency of those sedimentation basins. Seven basins were studied in Rivière-du-Loup, St-Valère and Escoumins (Quebec, Canada). They each have a different ratio basin area/drained area (4.7 10-4 to 20.3 10-4). To continuously monitor the sediment loads (calculated from sediment concentrations and discharge) entering and leaving basins, a nephelometer and a level logger were installed in the water column upstream and downstream of sedimentation basins. Their trapping efficiency was measured during the ice-free period (May to October) and for each significant rain event, since it is known that the rain and subsequent runoff induce most of the peat transport in and out of the basin. Results show that the event efficiency decreases as the basin is filled up with trapped sediments. For one basin, the efficiency was 85August. Trapping efficiency can be used as a tool to estimate basin dimensions. This has been done for municipal sedimentation ponds that trap minerals and will be adapted to the current context, where the dominant sediment is organic.

  8. Suspended Sediment Transport Dynamics and Sediment Yields in Relation to Watershed Characteristics, Upper Green River Basin, Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otoo, J.; Kentworthy, S.; Florea, L.; May, M.; Meier, Q.; Hollon, C.

    2008-12-01

    Sediment delivery is a major problem in the Green River, Kentucky, home of 71 of the state's 103 known mussel species and 151 fish species. The river also provides water for many of its surrounding counties. This research focuses on how suspended sediment loads, grain size, and the temporal co-variation of flow rate and sediment concentration during runoff events are related to watershed characteristics. The link between sediment load and watershed characteristics can help in the planning and development of effective strategies to minimize sediment load and suspended sediment concentration in the Green River, thereby improving the water quality of the river. The primary research objectives were on suspended sediment loads from two watersheds namely: Pitman Creek and Brush Creek in the Upper Green River Basin. Water quality was monitored using data sondes positioned at selected sites in the two watersheds. Water samples were collected and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediments. The suspended sediments data was then linked to watershed characteristics to determine what factors affect or influence suspended sediment concentration in the Upper Green River Basin. Thus, the research reveals the relationships between suspended sediment loads, grain size, flow rate and the watershed characteristics of interest. We will present hydrologic monitoring results combined with field investigations which indicate that suspended sediment in the Green River is affected by an discharge, relief, geology, watershed area, landuse, and cover conditions.

  9. Characterization of Stream Morphology and Sediment Yield for the Big Black and Tombigbee River Basins, Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three segments within the Big Black River Basin, and nine within the Tombigbee River Basin are on the Mississippi 303d list of water bodies as having impaired conditions for aquatic life due to sediment. An additional 56 reaches of channel are listed for biologic impairment between the two basins. ...

  10. Provenance and sediment dispersal of the Triassic Yanchang Formation, southwest Ordos Basin, China, and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    The Ordos Basin in north central China records a transition from marine to non-marine deposition during the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. As a result, the northern and southern regions of the Ordos Basin show different tectonic histories and very distinctive sedimentation styles. Two deformation belts, the Qinling orogenic belt to the south and the Liupanshan thrust and fold belt to the west, controlled the structural evolution of the southern Ordos Basin during the early Mesozoic. Paleocurrent analysis, net-sand ratio maps, sandstone modal analysis, and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology were used to document sediment sources and dispersal patterns of the Triassic Yanchang Formation in the southwest Ordos Basin. Paleocurrent measurements suggest that the sediments were mainly derived from the Liupanshan and the Qinling orogenic belts. Net-sand ratio maps show that several fan delta systems controlled sediment delivery in the south Ordos Basin. Both sandstone modal analysis and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology suggest that the Yanchang Formation is locally sourced from both of the basin marginal deformation belts; the lower and middle sections are recycled Paleozoic sedimentary rocks mainly derived from the north Qinling orogenic belt, whereas for the upper section, the Qilian-Qaidam terranes and possibly the west Qinling orogenic belt began to shed sediments into the southwest Ordos Basin. Results have important implications for basin marginal tectonics and its controls on sedimentation of intracratonic basins in China and similar settings.

  11. Event sedimentation in low-latitude deep-water carbonate basins, Anegada passage, northeast Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaytor, Jason D.; ten Brink, Uri S.

    2015-01-01

    The Virgin Islands and Whiting basins in the Northeast Caribbean are deep, structurally controlled depocentres partially bound by shallow-water carbonate platforms. Closed basins such as these are thought to document earthquake and hurricane events through the accumulation of event layers such as debris flow and turbidity current deposits and the internal deformation of deposited material. Event layers in the Virgin Islands and Whiting basins are predominantly thin and discontinuous, containing varying amounts of reef- and slope-derived material. Three turbidites/sandy intervals in the upper 2 m of sediment in the eastern Virgin Islands Basin were deposited between ca. 2000 and 13 600 years ago, but do not extend across the basin. In the central and western Virgin Islands Basin, a structureless clay-rich interval is interpreted to be a unifite. Within the Whiting Basin, several discontinuous turbidites and other sand-rich intervals are primarily deposited in base of slope fans. The youngest of these turbidites is ca. 2600 years old. Sediment accumulation in these basins is low (−1) for basin adjacent to carbonate platform, possibly due to limited sediment input during highstand sea-level conditions, sediment trapping and/or cohesive basin walls. We find no evidence of recent sediment transport (turbidites or debris flows) or sediment deformation that can be attributed to the ca. M7.2 1867 Virgin Islands earthquake whose epicentre was located on the north wall of the Virgin Islands Basin or to recent hurricanes that have impacted the region. The lack of significant appreciable pebble or greater size carbonate material in any of the available cores suggests that submarine landslide and basin-wide blocky debris flows have not been a significant mechanism of basin margin modification in the last several thousand years. Thus, basins such as those described here may be poor recorders of past natural hazards, but may provide a long-term record of past oceanographic

  12. Sediment conditions in the San Antonio River Basin downstream from San Antonio, Texas, 2000-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Banta, J. Ryan; Crow, Cassi L.; Opsahl, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment plays an important role in the ecological health of rivers and estuaries and consequently is an important issue for water-resource managers. To better understand sediment characteristics in the San Antonio River Basin, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio River Authority, completed a two-part study in the San Antonio River Basin downstream from San Antonio, Texas, to (1) collect and analyze sediment data to characterize sediment conditions and (2) develop and calibrate a watershed model to simulate hydrologic conditions and suspended-sediment loads during 2000–12.

  13. Diatoms in late Quaternary sediment from the Orca Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Klas, M.; Burckle, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Diatoms and clays were studied in core EN32-PC6 from the Orca Basin. This core contains oxygen isotope evidence for increased melt-water outflow from the Mississippi River during the post-Wisconsin deglaciation. Diatoms are present in two intervals: the period of increased melt-water outflow at about 15,000 to 12,000 years BP and during the past 5000 years. The earlier interval (the melt-water spike) contains fresh and brackish water diatoms and open ocean forms that prefer lower salinities while the youngest interval is characterized by open ocean forms. The melt-water spike interval also contains fewer reworked Cretaceous and Paleogene coccoliths and has little or no quartz. A decrease in smectite in the core at about 22,000 years BP may be related to a similar decrease in the Morton loess due to the blocking and diversion of the ancient Mississippi by the advancing Woodfordian glacier of the Lake Michigan lobe. After this diversion, the Mississippi took its present-day course and continued to take outwash away from the receding glacier. In Orca Basin sediments, this is indicated by an increase in smectite. The interval of the melt-water spike seems to be characterized by increased rainfall and sheet flooding.

  14. A sediment trap intercomparison experiment in the Panama Basin, 1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honjo, Susumu; Spencer, Derek W.; Gardner, Wilford D.

    1992-02-01

    In order to compare the collection efficiency of settling particles among sediment traps in a variety of design concepts, 28 sediment traps of 11 different designs were deployed at six depths ranging from 665 to 3769 m along five rigid mooring anchored in a sill-protected marginal basin about 3865 m deep for about 4 months from August to November 1979. The traps represented three basic designs: (1) cylinders with an aspect ratio between 2 and 3; (2) funnels with a large opening covered by a baffle with a small grid and (3) open boxes whose openings were covered by a baffle. All but two of these types of participating traps had a mechanism to isolate the collected sample. Monitoring instruments indicate that all moorings provided a stable platform throughout the duration of Sediment Trap Intercomparison Experiment (STIE) with relatively low current velocity at the middle layers and very low velocity at the deep layers. Total mass flux, fluxes of three size fractions after water sieving, carbonate, combustible and noncombustible fractions, organic carbon, nitrogen and other sedimentary constituents in the individual samples were determined and evaluated with regard to the relative consistency in terms of depth and statistical tests on the similarity of the constituents. Under the conditions tested, the trapping efficiency of settling particles between a large funnel trap with baffle and an intermediate-sized cylinder trap was nearly identical considering the laboratory analytical errors. This conclusion might be extended to cylinder traps with diameters as small as 7 cm and a large aspect ratio when deployed rigidly in a low energy ocean environment. A funnel-type trap with a more effective baffle had a higher collecting efficiency than the other traps. Because of mechanical problems, comparison of the box-type traps to the other types was inconclusive.

  15. Indus Basin sediment provenance constrained using garnet geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizai, Anwar; Clift, Peter D.; Still, John

    2016-08-01

    The chemical and mineralogical diversity of western Himalayan rivers is the result of each of them draining different tectonic and lithologic units, whose character is partly transferred to the sediments carried by those rivers. Garnet geochemistry was employed to discriminate provenance in the Indus River system. We characterized the geochemistry of garnet sediment grains from the modern Indus and all its major tributaries, as well as the related but ephemeral Ghaggar-Hakra River and dune sand from the Thar Desert. Garnet geochemistry displays a unique signature for the Himalayan rivers on the east of the Indus drainage compared to those in the western drainage. The trunk Indus remains distinct because of the dominant arc-type pyrope-garnet derived from Kohistan and the Karakoram. The Jhellum, which lies just east of the modern Indus has modest concentrations of arc-type pyrope garnets, which are more depleted in the other eastern tributaries. Their presence in the Jhellum reflects recycling of trunk Indus garnets through the Miocene Siwalik Group foreland sedimentary rocks. The Thar Desert dune sample contains significant numbers of grains similar to those in the trunk Indus, likely reworked by monsoon winds from the SW. Our data further indicate the presence of a Himalayan river channel east of the present Indus, close to the delta, in the Nara River valley during the middle Holocene. Sands from this channel cannot be distinguished from the Indus on the basis of their garnet geochemistry alone but we favour their sedimentation from an Indus channel rather than reworking of desert sands by another stream. The garnet geochemistry shows some potential as a provenance tool, but cannot be used alone to uniquely discriminate Indus Basin provenance.

  16. Channel evolution and hydrologic variations in the Colorado River basin: Factors influencing sediment and salt loads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.; Hereford, R.; Schumm, S.A.; Hayes, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Suspended-sediment and dissolved-solid (salt) loads decreased after the early 1940s in the Colorado Plateau portion of the Colorado River basin, although discharge of major rivers - the Colorado, Green and San Juan - did not change significantly. This decline followed a period of high sediment yield caused by arroyo cutting. Reduced sediment loads have previously been explained by a change in sediment sampling procedures or changes in climate, land-use and conservation practices. More recent work has revealed that both decreased sediment production and sediment storage in channels of tributary basins produced the decline of sediment and salt loads. Sediment production and sediment storage are important components of incised-channel evolution, which involves sequential channel deepening, widening and finally floodplain formation. Accordingly, the widespread arroyo incision of the late nineteenth century resulted initially in high sediment loads. Since then, loads have decreased as incised channels (arroyos) have stabilized and begun to aggrade. However, during the 1940s, a period of low peak discharges permitted vegetational colonization of the valley floors, which further reduced sediment loads and promoted channel stabilization. This explanation is supported by experimental studies and field observations. Both geomorphic and hydrologic factors contributed to sediment storage and decreased sediment and salt loads in the upper Colorado River basin. ?? 1991.

  17. A reconnaissance of stream sediment in the Erie-Niagara basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archer, R.J.; La Sala, A.M., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    This reconnaissance study of erosion and deposition of sediment in the Erie-Niagara basin indicates that the highest sediment yields, on the order of 1,000 tons per square mile per year, occur in streams that drain upland areas. In contrast, for example, from the lowland part of the Tonawanda Creek basin, the annual sediment yields are on the order of 100 tons per square mile per year. The estimated average annual sediment yields of streams in the basin range from 50 tons per square mile for Little Tonawanda Creek at Linden, to 1,500 tons per square mile for Cazenovia Creek at Ebenezer. These estimates are based on measured instantaneous sediment discharge at selected stream stations, the sediment loads of which ranged from 1,100 tons per year for Little Tonawanda Creek at Linden to 610,000 tons per year for Cattaraugus Creek at Gowanda. The accuracy of the estimates of average annual sediment discharge could be considerably improved by the collection of additional data. Nevertheless, the estimates are believed to be indicative of the magnitude of sediment yields and provide a general description of stream-sediment movement in the study area. Peak suspended-sediment concentrations in the range of 2,600 to 5,300 ppm (parts per million) were observed at three stations in the Cattaraugus Creek basin, as well as at Buffalo Creek at Gardenville, Cazenovia Creek at Ebenezer, and Cayuga Creek near Lancaster.

  18. Mapping Buried Impact Craters in the Chryse Basin to Understand the Distribution of Outflow Channel Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Moira; Frey, Herbert V.

    2016-01-01

    The Chryse Basin's location in the northern hemisphere of Mars allowed it to collect water from a number of major outflow channels. These outflows likely deposited significant amounts of sediment within the Basin. This project's goal was to see if mapping buried impact craters, revealed as Quasi-Circular Depressions (QCDs) in Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data, could be used to determine the distribution and variation of sediment thickness within the Basin. QCDs, including likely buried impact craters, were mapped to test the hypothesis that further into the basin there would be fewer smaller craters because thicker sediments would have preferentially covered them. Mapping was done using Gridview, an interactive graphics program that manipulates data, in this case topographic data from MOLA. It should be possible to estimate the thickness of the sediment from the smallest buried craters found in a given area, and therefore map out the change in sediment thickness across the basin. The smallest QCDs beginning to be completely covered by sediment were just below 30 km in diameter. The minimum sediment needed to cover a QCD of this size was calculated to be between 1-2km. Therefore, the absence of QCDs below 30 km in the NE corner of Chryse could be explained by sediment at least that thick. Lower thickness is expected elsewhere in the basin, especially in the SW, where more QCDs with smaller diameters were found. The method of mapping buried impact craters provides a way to determine variations in sediment thickness within the Chryse Basin. This method could be used on other sediment-covered areas to learn about past water flow.

  19. Sediment structures and sediment ages of the Chukchi region, Amerasia Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegewald, A.; Jokat, W.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008, the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) of Germany, using the RV Polarstern, collected multichannel seismic reflection data in the eastern Arctic Ocean (73-79°N and 170°E-165°W), namely the East Siberian Shelf, the Chukchi Shelf, - Plateau, and - Abyssal Plain, and the southern part of the Mendeleev Ridge. For the seismic data acquisition an air gun array with up to six air guns (48 ltr. total volume fired at 200 bar) was used. With a 3000 m long streamer including 240 active channels and a 600 m long streamer including 96 active channels the seismic signals were recorded. Obtaining the ages of the sediments, the information of five exploration wells near the coast of Alaska were correlated into the new seismic lines. For this correlation an existing network of more than 200 seismic reflection lines on the East Siberian Shelf and Chukchi Shelf from the USGS, TGS-NOPEC and ION-GX Technology were used. The research area is dominated by two different sediment packages ranging from the Paleocene to the Jurassic. The upper part is an undisturbed unit with low amplitudes and flat-lying reflections. In contrast, the lower package is dominated by an undulated stratification with many fractures and faults. Moreover, the lower unit consists of higher amplitudes with strong reflection bands. The sedimentary thickness varied from the East Siberian Shelf to the Chukchi Plateau from more than 8 km to 4 km. In the basin between the Chukchi Plateau and the Mendeleev Ridge the sedimentary thickness is about 2 km. Furthermore, a series of prograding sequences at the continental margin of the Chukchi Shelf with ages of 65 Ma and younger were analysed. These sequences are the result of an enormous sediment influx from Siberia and Alaska and can be explained by variations in the sedimentation rate over time.

  20. Multistate Evaluation of Microbial Water and Sediment Quality from Agricultural Recovery Basins.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Melissa L; Bond, Ronald F; Chase, Jennifer A; Kiger, Luana; Atwill, Edward R

    2016-03-01

    Agricultural recovery basins are an important conservation practice designed to provide temporary storage of sediment and water on farms before low-volume discharge. However, food safety concerns have been raised regarding redistribution of captured sediment and water to fields used for human food production. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential microbiological risk that recovery basins may contribute to nearby produce fields and to evaluate characteristics that may influence or mitigate those risks. Water and sediment samples were collected from participating farms in three states and evaluated for bacterial indicators and pathogens over several months. Overall, 45% ( = 48) of water samples and less than 15% ( = 13) of sediment samples were positive for spp. In water samples, the occurrence of was positively associated with the use of surface water as a source of irrigation compared with groundwater as well as log-scale increases in concentration. In sediment samples, was associated with basin location (region) and basin fill levels. Sediment exposed to drying during dewatering had lower concentrations of indicator and a lower proportion of positives than submerged sediment from the same pond. Surrounding landscape characteristics, including vegetative coverage, proximity to livestock operations, and evidence of wildlife, were not correlated with pathogen occurrence in either sediment or water samples, suggesting that although habitat surrounding ponds may be an attractant to wildlife, those features may not contribute to increased pathogen occurrence in agricultural recovery basins. PMID:27065413

  1. Microbial Breakdown of Organic Carbon in the Diverse Sediments of Guaymas Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, A.; Snider, R.; Arnosti, C.

    2015-12-01

    Guaymas Basin is characterized by sediments under conditions ranging from hemipelagic to hydrothermal. This wide range in geochemical contexts results in diverse microbial communities that may have varying abilities to access organic matter. We can address these functional differences by comparing enzyme activities initializing the breakdown of organic matter across these sediment types; however, previous direct measurements of the extracellular hydrolysis of complex organic carbon in sediments are sparse. We measured this first step of heterotrophic processing of organic matter in sediments at 5-10cm and 55-60cm depth from a wide range of environmental settings in Guaymas Basin. Sediment sources included sulfidic seeps on the Sonora Margin, hemipelagic ridge flank sediments, and hydrothermically altered Sonora Margin sediments bordering a methane seep site. Hydrolysis of organic substrates varied by depth and by sediment source, but despite high energy potential and organic carbon load in sulfidic sediments, activity was not highest where hydrothermal influence was highest. These results suggest that heterotrophic breakdown of organic carbon in Guaymas Basin sediments may be sensitive to factors including varying composition of organic carbon available in different sediment types, or differences in microbial community capacities to access specific organic substrates.

  2. Part I: Integrated water quality management: river basin approach. Geochemical techniques on contaminated sediments--river basin view.

    PubMed

    Förstner, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The big flood in the upper Elbe River catchment area has revealed a wide spectrum of problems with contaminated sediments. So far, an effective strategy for managing contaminated sediments on a river basin scale is still missing and it seems that not much has been learned from the lessons received during the last decade. In the following overview, special emphasis is given to the utilization of geochemically-based techniques for sediment remediation, which can be applied in different parts of a river basin. The examples presented here are mostly from the Elbe River catchment area. In general, new technical problem solutions need a set of practical process knowledge that uses a wide range of simulation techniques, as well as models in different spatial and temporal scales. The evaluation of recent flood events clearly demonstrates the importance of chemical expertise in the decision-making process for the sustainable development in river basins. PMID:12635960

  3. Early Holocene basinal sediments of the Dakhleh Oasis region, south central Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Ian A.

    1989-09-01

    Twenty samples of artifactual ostrich eggshell and hearth charcoal, firmly to loosely associated with basinal lacustrine, playa, and sand sheet sediments in the Dakhleh Oasis region of south-central Egypt, yield radiocarbon ages between ca. 8800 and ca. 4700 yr B.P. The sediments record variable sedimentary responses to an early Holocene pluvial interval in this virtually rainless region. Differences of hydrogeology and morphometry among and within basin types complicate paleoclimatic interpretation.

  4. ALARA Review for the Sediment Relocation and Removal from the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    This as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA) review revision provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure, control contamination levels, and airborne radioactivity concentrations during sediment relocation and removal in the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin. This document updates and supercedes the ALARA review of the sediment-related activities contained in 100-N Basin Stabilization Project As Low As Reasonably Achievable Plan (BHI 1995).

  5. Sediment yields in a thick loess region: The Missouri River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bettis, E.A. III

    1995-12-31

    Sediment yields in the thick loess region of the Missouri River basin are among the highest in North America. The combination of high local relief, easily eroded loessal surficial deposits, entrenched stream systems, and a humid climate foster high erosion rates and sediment yields. Stratigraphic investigations in over twenty watersheds within the thick loess region have documented the magnitude of several episodes of Holocene sediment movement and storage. Spatial and temporal patterns of sediment storage vary within a given drainage basin, but are similar in like-size elements of different basins. These patterns suggest that intrinsic controls are as important a climate in the long-term behavior of this fluvial system. The magnitude and pattern of Holocene sediment accumulation during the Historic period is similar to that which occurred on at least one occasion during the prehistoric period when the landscape was little modified by human activity.

  6. Current-controlled, abyssal microtopography and sedimentation in Mozambique Basin, southwest Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolla, V.; Eittreim, S.; Sullivan, L.; Kostecki, J.A.; Burckle, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    The Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) activity and the variations in the abundance and grain size of the terrigenous sediments, derived from Africa and Madagascar land masses, are reflected in different types of microtopography in the Mozambique Basin. In southerly areas, where the sediment supply is much less, the bottom-current activity has resulted in the presence of manganese nodules, a thin veneer of sediments, and the absence of sediment waves. Farther north, along the marginal areas of the basin where the fine-grained sediments from the Africa-Madagascar source have been supplied in abundance, wavy bedforms have been generated by AABW. Wavy bedforms do not exist even in the northerly areas if coarse-grained, turbidite sediments are present on the sea floor. The continuation of acoustic reflectors from the zone of turbidites in the central areas of the basin into the zone of sediment waves along the margins, and the lithology and structures in sediment cores from these zones suggest that the turbidity-current-fed, fine-grained sediments were deposited as wavy bedforms by AABW flow. Thus, sediment waves formed readily during Pleistocene times. The enrichment of quartz and displaced Antarctic diatoms, and the relatively low kaolinite/chlorite ratios in the sediments, the north-pointing current lineations on the sea floor, the lack of any perceptible sedimentary fill in the troughs of waves, and the dense nepheloid layer in the westerly areas of the Mozambique Basin, attest to the current-controlled sedimentation and generation of wavy bedforms during Holocene time also. The formation of sediment waves in the Mozambique Basin can be modeled after a fluvial antidune mechanism. This model envisages that internal waves, focussed on a benthic boundary layer cap, have been locked in phase with sediment waves in the presence of an 8-10 cm/sec current in the Mozambique Basin. A density contrast of 2??10-6 g/cm3 appears to exist at the tops of benthic boundary layers in the

  7. Present and potential sediment yields in the Yampa River Basin, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Edmund D.

    1978-01-01

    Average annual suspended- and total-sediment loads in streamflow were determined by the flow-duration sediment-transport-curve method at 18 sites in the Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming. These computations indicate that about 2.0 million tons of sediment are carried by the Yampa River at Deerlodge Park during an average year. Significant areal differences in the sediment yield from various parts of the basin also were determined. The lower Little Snake River subbasin contributes about 60 percent of the total basin sediment yield, although it represents less than 35 percent of the area and supplies less than 3 percent of the streamflow. In contrast, the upland (eastern) one-third of the basin contributes only about 14 percent of the sediment yield but 76 percent of the streamflow. Projected economic development of the basin, especially surface mining of coal, will impact the physical environment. Depending upon the amount and location of land disturbed, an estimated 10 ,000 to 30,000 tons per year of additional sediment will be contributed to the main-stem Yampa River. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Unraveling burial heating and sediment recycling in retroarc foreland basins: Detrital thermochronologic insights from the northern Magallanes Basin, Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosdick, J. C.; Grove, M. J.; Graham, S. A.; Hourigan, J. K.; Lovera, O. M.; Romans, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment recycling is expected in many tectonic settings, such as foreland basins, where the path followed by grains initially derived from erosion of a basement source region typically involves significant intermediate stages of crustal evolution before the detritus is finally incorporated into tectonically stable basin strata. The shallow-crustal thermal histories experienced by eroded sediment may go undetected by traditional provenance methods but are potentially recoverable by thermochronologic methods. The Patagonian Magallanes retroarc foreland basin affords an excellent case study of sediment burial and recycling within a thrust belt setting. Combined detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and (U-Th)/He thermochronology data and thermal modeling results confirm delivery of both rapidly cooled, first-cycle volcanogenic sediments from the Patagonian magmatic arc and recycled sediment from deeply buried and exhumed Cretaceous foredeep strata to the Cenozoic Magallanes basin depocenter. Numerical models of temperature-time histories indicate that ca. 54-45 Ma burial of the Maastrichtian Dorotea Formation produced 164-180°C conditions and heating to within the zircon He partial retention zone. Such deep burial is unusual for Andean foreland basins and may have resulted from combined effects of high basal heat flow and high sediment accumulation within a rapidly subsiding foredeep that was floored by basement weakened by previous Late Jurassic rifting. In this interpretation, Cenozoic thrust-related deformation deeply eroded the Dorotea Formation and underlying strata from ~5 km burial depths and may be associated with the development of a regionally extensive Paleogene unconformity. Results from the Cenozoic Río Turbio and Santa Cruz formations confirm that they contain both Cenozoic first-cycle zircon from the Patagonian magmatic arc and highly outgassed recycled zircon. This work suggests that Middle Miocene sediments were most likely derived from recycling of

  9. Sedimentation and tectonics in the southern Bida Basin, Nigeria: depositional response to varying tectonic context

    SciTech Connect

    Braide, S.P. )

    1990-05-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Bida basin of central Nigeria is sandwiched between the Precambrian schist belts of the Northern Nigerian massif and the West African craton. Of interest is the southern part of the basin, which developed in continental settings, because the facies architecture of the sedimentary fill suggests a close relation between sedimentation dynamics and basin margin tectonics. This relationship is significant to an understanding of the basin's origin, which has been controversial. A simple sag and rift origin has been suggested, and consequently dominated the negative thinking on the hydrocarbon prospects of the basin which were considered poor. This detailed study of the facies indicates rapid basin-wide changes from various alluvial fan facies through flood-basin and deltaic facies to lacustrine facies. Paleogeographic reconstruction suggests lacustrine environments were widespread and elongate. Lacustrine environments occurred at the basin's axis and close to the margins. This suggests the depocenter must have migrated during the basin's depositional history and subsided rapidly to accommodate the 3.5-km-thick sedimentary fill. Although distinguishing pull-apart basins from rift basins, based solely on sedimentologic grounds, may be difficult, the temporal migration of the depocenter, as well as the basin architecture of upward coarsening cyclicity, show a strong tectonic and structural overprint that suggests a tectonic framework for the Southern Bida basin similar in origin to a pull-apart basin.

  10. Thermal alteration of organic matter in recent marine sediments. 2: Isoprenoids. [Tanner Basin off Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikan, R.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1974-01-01

    A series of isoprenoid compounds were isolated from a heat treated marine sediment (from Tanner Basin) which were not present in the original sediment. Among the compounds identified were: phytol, dihydrophytol, c-18-isoprenoid ketone, phytanic and pristanic acids, c-19 and c-20-monoolefines, and the alkanes pristane and phytane. The significance and possible routes leading to these compounds is discussed.

  11. Redox processes as revealed by voltammetry in the surface sediments of the Gotland Basin, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Mustafa; Dale, Andy; Sommer, Stefan; Pfannkuche, Olaf

    2014-05-01

    Sulfur cycling in marine sediments undergoes dramatic changes with changing redox conditions of the overlying waters. The upper sediments of the anoxic Gotland Basin, central Baltic Sea represent a dynamic redox environment with extensive mats of sulfide oxidizing bacteria covering the seafloor beneath the chemocline. In order to investigate sulfur redox cycling at the sediment-water interface, sediment cores were sampled over a transect covering 65 - 174 m water depth in August-September 2013. High resolution (0.25 mm minimum) vertical microprofiles of electroactive redox species including dissolved sulfide and iron were obtained with solid state Au-Hg voltammetric microelectrodes. This approach enabled a fine-scale comparison of porewater profiles across the basin. The steepest sulfide gradients (i.e. the highest sulfide consumption) occurred within the upper 10 mm in sediments covered by surficial mats (2.10 to 3.08 mmol m-2 day-1). In sediments under permanently anoxic waters (>140m), voltammetric signals for Fe(II) and aqueous FeS were detected below a subsurface maximum in dissolved sulfide, indicating a Fe flux originating from older, deeper sedimentary layers. Our results point to a unique sulfur cycling in the Gotland basin seafloor where sulfide accumulation is moderated by sulfide oxidation at the sediment surface and by FeS precipitation in deeper sediment layers. These processes may play an important role in minimizing benthic sulfide fluxes to bottom waters around the major basins of the Baltic Sea.

  12. Modeling sedimentation-filtration basins for urban watersheds using Soil and Water Assessment Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sedimentation-filtration (SedFil) basins are one of the storm-water best management practices (BMPs) that are intended to mitigate water quality problems in urban creeks and rivers. A new physically based model of variably saturated flows was developed for simulating flow and sediment in SedFils wi...

  13. Historical suspended sediment data in the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.T. ); Carey, W.P. . Water Resources Div.)

    1989-07-01

    This report summarizes the available daily suspended sediment data for the Tennessee and Cumberland river basins. These historical data provide an overview of sediment yield and stream transport of suspended sediment (SS) from a variety of watersheds and stream locations within these river basins. Almost all of these data were collected by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) or the United States Geological Survey (USGS) during the past 50 years. The monthly summaries of these daily data presented in this report are intended to: document the period of record for the sampling sites, show the strong effects of hydrologic conditions on sediment yield and transport patterns, and demonstrate similarities in sediment response among the different watersheds sampled. Many other stations have been sampled periodically for suspended sediment. This report documents only the daily records because these provide the most accurate estimates of average concentrations and loads. 15 refs., 116 figs., 111 tabs.

  14. Neogene-recent sedimentation and development of the Anada-Cilician basin

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.; Goeruer, N.; Alavi, N.

    1988-08-01

    The Adana-Cilician basin formed by interaction between the African, Arabian, and Anatolian plates. The basin has been filled asymmetrically from the north and northeast with the northeastern extremity having been completely filled to form the Adana basin beneath the plain of the Seyhan delta. There is no direct borehole evidence from the submarine areas, but coastal boreholes have revealed the presence of at least 6 km of Neogene sediment. The Burdigalian-Serravalian interval is dominated by turbidites and deep-water shales in the center of the Adana basin, with shallow-water clastics and carbonates around the margins. A layer of Messinian evaporite appears to underlie much of the basin. The Serravalian-Pleistocene sedimentation was dominated by shallow marine and terrestrial sedimentation in the Adana basin, the only part known. Today, the Turkish rivers have built up several deltaic complexes. Quaternary sea level and climatic changes and the movement of river mouths have complicated the pattern of shelf sediments. Away from the immediate vicinity of river mouths, the sediments are rich in the remains of macrobenthos and microbenthos, and on tectonically controlled highs coralline algal mounds occur. The sediments of the deeper water areas (/approx/ 1,000 m) show evidence of downslope movement of shelf sediments and anoxic periods, and they contain an impoverished molluscan and foraminiferal fauna. Sediment dispersal appears to have been confined by submarine tectonic barriers. Continuous uplift and faulting along some margins together with flow of evaporites away from the depocenters on the Turkish coast appear to be actively affecting the most recently deposited sediments.

  15. Basins and Sedimentation Within the Martian Northern Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; MacKinnon, D. J.

    1999-03-01

    MOLA data show that six basins and sedimentary plains make up the northern plains of Mars. Four types of plains units are deposited in them, in the following stratigraphic order: marginal, level-top, basin-floor, and downslope units.

  16. Coarse-grained deltaic sedimentation in the Miocene Cuyama strike-slip basin, California coast ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Bartow, J.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The Cuyama basin, located in the southern Coast Ranges southwest of the San Andreas fault developed early in the history of the San Andreas transform system. The Miocene marine basin formed in a transtensional setting along a dextral strike-slip fault of the transform system, the San Juan-Chimineas fault following Oligocene nonmarine basin formation in an extensional setting. The lower and middle Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the northwestern part of the basin, which represents the first of two transgressive-regressive cycles, consists of eight facies making up two depositional systems. The 400-m-thick Soda Lake Shale Member constitutes a basinal system consisting of deep-basin and starved-basin facies. The overlying 2,200-m-thick Painted Rock Sandstone Member consists mostly of coarse-grained, pebbly sandstone and constitutes a deltaic depositional system of prodelta, slope channel, delta front, tidal channel, interdistributary bay, and fluvial channel facies. The basinal depositional system consists of turbidite sand and mud, and hemipelagic and pelagic sediments that were deposited in a rapidly subsiding basin. The deltaic depositional system prograded into the deep basin and had a steep prodelta slope that extended to bathyal depths. The delta is inferred to be a river-dominated fan delta in which coarse sediment was transported down the prodelta slope into deep water by sediment gravity flows. The overall basin history and geometry of the northwestern Cuyama basin are typical of strike-slip basins. The initial rapid subsidence to bathyal depths at rates of more than 500 m/m.y. in the early Miocene is interpreted to be a result of extension at the releasing bend of a dextral strike-slip fault.

  17. Metamorphism of Triassic sediments from the Dunbarton Basin, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Snipes, D.S.; Warner, R.D. . Earth Sciences Dept.); Price, V. Jr. ); Thayer, P. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Modal analyses and microprobe studies were performed on eight core samples obtained from the US Geological Survey Well A1 324. The well is situated in the southern part of the buried Triassic Dunbarton Basin, about 1 km south of the US Department of Energy's Westinghouse Savannah River Company Site. The samples came from an interval of 407.0--413.4 m beneath the land surface. At the well site, Triassic red beds are overlain by Late Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments which have an aggregate thickness of 408 m. The sample from a depth of 407 m is a weathered, poorly sorted, clayey sandstone from the basal portion of the Late Cretaceous Cape Fear Formation. This specimen is not metamorphosed; whereas, the Triassic specimens taken from an interval of 411.6--413.4 m exhibit evidence of thermal metamorphism as well as hydrothermal alteration. In hand specimen, three of the samples (412.8--413.4 m) resemble hornfelses. These samples exhibit decussate texture. Results of modal analyses of the two deepest specimens follow: plagioclase (43-52%), quartz (9-23%), chlorite (22-29%), epidote (1-6%), hematite (3-4%), and magnetite (2-3%). Relict detrital quartz grains, especially the finer ones, are mostly angular-to-subangular and the grain boundaries show little evidence of rounding. The authors feel that hydrothermal alteration was the principal metamorphic process. This belief is supported by the fact that most of the plagioclase has undergone extensive sericitization. In addition, the presence of abundant chlorite together with a minor amount of epidote supports this interpretation. The alteration halo extends upward for 1.8 m. This interpretation is based on the observation that two Triassic arkose sandstone specimens (411.6 m, 412.2 m) contain clouded, slightly sericitized K-feldspar and plagioclase grains in a matrix of red-colored smectite.

  18. Reconnaissance of sedimentation in the Rio Pilcomayo Basin, May 1975, Argentina, Bolivia, and Paraguay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.

    1977-01-01

    The Rio Pilcomayo ' Alto ' (Bolivia) and ' Superior ' (Bolivia, Argentina, and Paraguay) transport large quantities of sediment for the size of the basin. The Rio Pilcomayo ' Inferior ' (Argentina and Paraguay) carries little sediment. The large loads of the ' Alto ' and ' Superior ' must be considered before dams or irrigation projects are started. The shifting channel and flooding of the Rio Pilcomayo ' Superior ' also are problems to be considered before development. The Rio Pilcomayo ' Alto ' basin has relatively little sediment deposition whereas the ' Superior ' basin has considerable deposition. A part of the ' Superior ' channel is filled with sediment to the top of its banks. The upstream limit of filling is moving farther upstream each year causing the place of overbank flooding to move upstream also. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Paleomagnetic isochrons, unsteadiness, and uniformity of sedimentation in Miocene intermontane basin sediments at Salla, eastern Andean cordillera, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, L.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Fine-scaled stratigraphic data are combined with chronologic information provided by paleomagnetic stratigraphy to document and analyze chronostratigraphic variability of the Salla Beds, a sequence of distal floodplain and lacustrine intermontane basin sediments within the eastern Andean cordillera of Bolivia. Unsteadiness in sediment accumulation is identified using a conceptual model of episodic accumulation in which simulated accumulation histories are constructed using estimated rates for various fluvial facies and taking into account gaps in deposition and possible effects of erosion. Variability in the Salla Beds is compared to that in sequence of Miocene fluvial sediments in northern Pakistan to evaluate controls on spatial and temporal stratigraphic variability. Sedimentation in the Salla sequence was generally steady over short time scales, but over longer intervals infrequent carbonates, associated with unusually long hiatuses, served to reduce the net sediment accumulation rate. In the Chinji sequence of Pakistan, unsteady accumulation evolved into a pattern of steadier sediment accumulation as recurring cycles of unsteadiness were superimposed on the overall sequence. The controls on sediment accumulation over time in these two sequences may be similarly related to the presence and extent of atypical and infrequent events of deposition, non-deposition, or erosion that exert a significant effect on net sediment accumulation. The discrepancy of short-term episodic and long-term net stratigraphic accumulation rates in both these sequences suggests that the decrease in net sediment accumulation rate with increasing time reflects the superimposed effects of different levels of local geomorphic and extrabasinal controls.

  20. Analysis of sediment production from two small semiarid basins in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Data were collected at two small, semiarid basins in Wyoming to determine the relation between rainfall, runoff, and sediment production. The basins were Dugout Creek tributary and Saint Marys Ditch tributary. Sufficient rainfall and runoff data were collected at Dugout Creek tributary to determine the source of sediment and the dominant sediment production processes. Because runoff from only one storm occurred in Saint Marys Ditch tributary, emphasis of the study was placed on the analysis of data collected at Dugout Creek tributary. At Dugout Creek tributary, detailed measurements were made to establish the source of sediment. To determine the quantity of material removed from headcuts during the study, two headcuts were surveyed. Aerial photographs were used to define movement of all headcuts. The total quantity of sediment removed from all headcuts between September 26, 1982, and September 26, 1983, was estimated to be 1,220 tons, or 15%-25% of the estimated total sediment load passing the streamflow-gaging station. A soil plot was used to sample upland erosion. A rainfall and runoff modeling system was used to evaluate the interaction between the physical processes which control sediment production. The greatest change in computed sediment load was caused by changing the parameter values for equations used to compute the detachment of sediment particles by rainfall and overland flow resulted in very small changes in computed sediment load. The upland areas were the primary source of sediment. A relationship was developed between the peak of storm runoff and the total sediment load for that storm runoff. The sediment concentration used to compute the total sediment load for the storm runoff was determined from sediment samples collected by two automatic pumping samplers. The coefficient of variation of the relationship is 34% with a 0.99 correlation coefficient. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Morphology and Late Quaternary sedimentation in the Gulf of Oman Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchupi, Elazar; Swift, S. A.; Ross, D. A.

    The morphology of the Gulf of Oman Basin, a 3,400 m deep oceanic basin between Oman and southern Pakistan and southern Iran, ranges from a convergent margin (Makran margin) along the north side, a passive type (Oman margin) along the south side, translation types along the basin's west (Zendan Fault-Oman Line) and east (Murray Ridge) sides and a narrow continental rise and a wide abyssal plain in the centre of the basin. Sediment input into the basin during the Late Quaternary has been mainly from the north as a result of the uplift of the Coast Makran Mountains in the Late Miocene-Pliocene. Today most of this detritrus is deposited on the shelf and upper continental slope and perched basins behind the fold/fault ridges on the lower slope. The presence of fans and channels on the continental rise on the north side of the basin indicate, however, that continental derived debris was, and possibly is, being transported to the deep-sea by turbidity currents via gaps in the ridges on the lower slope. In addition to land derived terrigenous sediments, the basin deposits also contain biogenic (organic matter and calcium carbonate), eolian detritus and hydrates and authigenic carbonates from the tectonic dewatering of the Makran accretionary wedge. The eolian sediment is carried into the Gulf of Oman Basin from Arabia and the Mesopotamia Valley by the northwesterly Shamal winds. This type of detritus was particularly abundant during the glacial arid periods 21,000-20,000 and 11,000 (Younger Dryas) years ago when exposure of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf increased the area of dust entrainment and shifted the position of the source of the eolian sediments closer to the basin.

  2. Erosion, sediment discharge, and channel morphology in the Upper Chattahoochee River basin, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Carey, W.R.; Stamer, J.K.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Average annual rates of sheet erosion and sediment discharge were computed for several watersheds in the Upper Chattahoochee River basin in Georgia. Erosion yields ranged from about 900 to 6,000 tons per year per square mile in nine watersheds and were greatest where land use is largely agricultural or transitional. Suspended sediment yields from the same watershed ranged from about 300 to 800 tons per year per square mile and were greatest from urban areas and least from mostly forested watersheds. The impact of suspended sediment on stream quality was evaluated for 14 watersheds. In general, 60 percent or more of the total annual discharge of trace metals and phosphorus was contributed by suspended sediment. Yields of trace metals and nutrients in suspension were consistently greater in urban watersheds. Turbidity in basin streams increased geometrically with increasing concentrations of suspended sediment. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediment cores from the southern basin of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.; Andren, A.W.

    1991-10-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediments of the southern basin of Lake Michigan have planktonic, terrigenous, and petroleum residue origins. Surficial sediments collected near the eastern shore in 60-80 m of water contained more petroleum residue and planktonic hydrocarbons and exhibited less terrigenous character than sediments collected from the deepest location in the basin. Petroleum residue inputs have increased since 1900 as evidenced by a change in the flux of an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of hydrocarbons from 6 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr to a flux of approximately 100 ng/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}yr in 1980. Sediment profiles of the UCM exhibited subsurface concentration maxima that may be due to reduced inputs of combustion products or feeding by oligochaetes. Profiles of n-C{sub l7} and pristane indicated that planktonic n-alkanes undergo degradation in the aerobic, mixed zone of the sediments.

  4. Impact of Placer Mining on Sediment Transport in Headwaters of the Lake Baikal Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietron, J.; Jarsjo, J.; Chalov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Adverse practices in alluvial surface mining (placer mining) can lead to shifts in sediment transport regimes of rivers. However, some placer mines are located in remote parts of river basins, which constrain data availability in mining impact assessments. One such mining area is the Zaamar Goldfield (Northern Mongolia) which stretches 60 km along the Tuul River. The area is located in the headwaters of the Lake Baikal Basin, and may impact the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Lake Baikal. Previous studies indicate that the mining industry in the Zaamar Goldfield loads the river system with considerable amount of contaminated sediments (heavy metals). Still, transport processes and possible changes in local to regional sediment transport need to be better understood. In this work, we use snapshot field measurements and various flow and transport modelling techniques to analyze (1) the impact of placer mining in the sediment delivery to the river system and (2) the dynamics of further sediment transport to downstream Tuul River. Our results indicate that surface mining operations and waste management have considerable impact on the sediment input from the landscape. Furthermore, dynamic in-channel storage of sediments can act as intermittent sources of mining sediments. These effects occur in addition to impacts of on-going changes in hydro-climatic conditions of the area. We hope that our methodology and results will aid in studying similar unmonitored and mining-affected river basins.

  5. Seepage basin radionuclide transport in sediments and vegetation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Jerome, K.M.

    1993-12-31

    Radionuclide concentrations were measured in soil and vegetation growing adjacent to and in the Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins as part of the plan for closure of the basin system. The results of the measurements provide some information about the mobility of the radionuclides introduced into the basins. {sup 90}Sr is the most mobile of the radionuclides in soil. Its high mobility and high relative uptake by vegetation cause {sup 90}Sr to be distributed throughout the basin system. {sup 137}Cs is not as mobile in the basin soil, limiting its uptake by vegetation growing on the edge of the seepage basins; however, it is readily taken up by the vegetation growing in the basins. Soil mobility and vegetation uptake is relatively low for all of the transuranic radionuclides. For the most part these radionuclides remain near the surface of the basin soils where they were absorbed from the waste-water. The relative role of soil mobility and vegetation uptake on the distribution of radionuclide at the basins was futher evaluated by comparing the vegetation concentration ratio and the half-depth of penetration of the radionuclides in the basin soil. The results suggest that vegetation processes dominate in determining the concentration of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs in the vegetation. The influences of soil and vegetation are more balanced for {sup 90}Sr. The other radionuclides exhibit both low soil mobility and low vegetation uptake. The lack of soil mobility is seen in the lower concentrations found in vegetation growing on the edge of the basin compared to those growing in the basin.

  6. Statistical modelling of suspended sediment load in small basin located in the tropical Andes of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, L. J.; Barco, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sedimentation is a complex process that varies with watershed characteristics, climate dynamics, human watershed intervention, etc. The sediment load is a concern as it reduces the operating capacity of reservoirs. In this study a statistical modelling for the estimation of sediment yield based on observations of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration was performed. A multivariate model was used to analyze a 33 years period of daily suspended sediments load available at the La Garrucha gauging station. A regional analysis was conducted to develop a non-dimensional sediment load duration curves. These duration curves were used to estimate flow and sediments regimen at other inner point at the basin where there are located the Calderas reservoir, scaling the suspended sediment load by the basin area. The observed data of sediments in the reservoir were used to validate the model results. The obtained non-dimensional sediment load duration curve was used to estimate the sediment concentration during high flow regimen (10% of time the values were met or exceeded).A periodical reservoir flushing, by the opening of the bottom gate, it is necessary to maintain it at the best operating capacity. The sediment concentration during high flows has been assumed as a concentration that allows an 'environmental flushing'. The sediment transport capacity for the sediment load was verified with a 1D model in order to include the environmental constraints downstream of the dam. Field data were collected to understand the physical phenomena involved in flushing dynamics into the reservoir and downstream of the dam. The model allows to define an operation rules for the flushing to minimize the environmental effects.

  7. Sediment and nutrient accumulation within lowland bottomland ecosystems: An example from the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.; Noe, G.B.

    2006-01-01

    Sediment and nutrient deposition, storage, and transformations are important environmental functions of riverine forested wetland ecosystems, yet documentation and interpretation of sedimentation/nutrient processes remain incomplete. Our studies located in the Coastal Plain of southeastern USA, including the Atchafalaya Basin, La. (a distributary of the Mississippi River) serve as example for detailed discussion of sediment and nutrient accumulation in lowland systems. The Atchafalaya Basin is the largest contiguously forested riparian wetland in North America and is incurring high sediment loads and hypoxic zones in backswamp settings. We established several floodplain transects, located to reflect major depositional environments within the Basin, to monitor general and local sediment deposition patterns over a multi-year period. Deposition rate and loss on ignition (LOI) data were collected above artificial markers (clay pads) at multiple stations along each transect. Mean floodplain sedimentation rates ranged from about 2 to 42 mm/yr and mean percent organic material ranged from about 7 to 28 percent. The transects were categorized into statistically different deposition groups based on sedimentation rate; most of these groups could be coherently interpreted based on a suite of parameters that includes hydroperiod (elevation), source(s) of sediment-laden water, hydraulic connectivity, flow stagnation, and location in transect (levee versus backswamp). Low elevatic (long hydroperiod), high hydraulic connectivity to multiple sources of sediment-laden water, and hydraulic damming (flow stagnation) lead to the highest amounts of sediment trapping; the converse in any of these factors may diminish sediment trapping. Based on aerial extent of deposition groups, the study area (about 500 km 2) potentially traps 6.72+109 kg of sediment, annually, of which 12 percent or 8.20.108 kg are organic material. This accumulated sediment contains a coarsely estimated 5% and 27

  8. Sediment flux and recent paleoclimate in JordanBasin, Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keigwin, Lloyd D.; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.

    2015-03-01

    We report planktonic foraminiferal fluxes (accumulation rates) and oxygen isotopes (δ18O) from a nine-month sediment trap deployment, and δ18O from three sediment cores in Jordan Basin, Gulf of Maine. The sediment trap was deployed at 150 m, about halfway to the basin floor, and samples were collected every three weeks between August 2010 and May 2011. The planktonic foraminiferal fauna in the trap is dominated by Neogloboquadrina incompta that reached a maximum flux in the second half of October. Oxygen isotope ratios on that species indicate that on average during the collecting period it lived in the surface mixed layer, when compared to predicted values based on data from a nearby hydrographic buoy from the same period. New large diameter piston cores from Jordan Basin are 25 and 28 m long. Marine hemipelagic sediments are 25 m thick, and the sharp contact with underlying red deglacial sediments is bracketed by two radiocarbon dates on bivalves that indicate ice-free conditions began 16,900 calibrated years ago. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera indicates that the basin floor sediments (270-290 m) accumulated at >3 m/kyr during the Holocene, whereas rates were about one tenth that on the basin slope (230 m). In principle, Jordan Basin sediments have the potential to provide time series with interannual resolution. Our results indicate the Holocene is marked by ~2°C variability in SST, and the coldest events of the 20th century, during the mid 1960s and mid 1920s, appear to be recorded in the uppermost 50 cm of the seafloor.

  9. Fate and Transport of Cohesive Sediment and HCB in the Middle Elbe River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshenberg, Kari; Heise, Susanne; Calmano, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Chemical contamination of waterways and floodplains is a pervasive environmental problem that threatens aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Due to extensive historical contamination and redistribution of contaminated sediments throughout the basin, the Elbe River transports significant loads of contaminants downstream, particularly during flood events. This study focuses on Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a persistent organic pollutant that has been identified as a contaminant of concern in the Elbe Basin. To better understand the fate and transport of cohesive sediments and sediment-sorbed HCB, a hydrodynamic, suspended sediment, and contaminated transport model for the 271-km reach of the Elbe River basin between Dresden and Magdeburg was developed. Additionally, trends in suspended sediment and contaminant transport were investigated in the context of the recent high frequency of floods in the Elbe Basin. This study presents strong evidence that extreme high water events, such as the August, 2002 floods, have a permanent effect on the sediment transport regime in the Elbe River. Additionally, results indicate that a significant component annual HCB loads are transported downstream during floods. Additionally, modeled results for suspended sediment and HCB accumulation on floodplains are presented and discussed. Uncertainty and issues related to model development are also addressed. A worst case analysis of HCB uptake by dairy cows and beef cattle indicate that significant, biologically relevant quantities of sediment-sorbed HCB accumulate on the Elbe floodplains following flood events. Given both the recent high frequency of floods in the Elbe Basin, and the potential increase in flood frequency due to climate change, an evaluation of source control measures and/or additional monitoring of floodplain soils and grasses is recommended.

  10. Sediment supply as a driver of river evolution in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Joshua; Constantine, José Antonio; Dunne, Thomas; Legleiter, Carl; Lazarus, Eli D.

    2015-04-01

    The Amazon represents the only large river basin in the world where there is a sufficient range of sediment supplies and a lack of engineering controls to assess how sediment supply drives the evolution of meandering rivers. Despite recent analytical advances (Asahi et al., 2013; Pittaluga and Seminara, 2011), modern theory does not yet identify or explain the effects of externally imposed sediment supplies, a fundamental river characteristic, on meandering river evolution. These sediment supplies would be radically reduced by the construction of large dams proposed for the Amazon Basin (Finer and Jenkins, 2012). Here, we demonstrate that the sediment loads imposed by their respective drainage basins determine planform changes in lowland rivers across the Amazon. Our analysis, based on Landsat image sequences, indicates that rivers with high sediment loads draining the Andes and associated foreland basin experience annual migration rates that are on average four times faster than rivers with lower sediment loads draining the Central Amazon Trough and shields. Incidents of meander cutoff also occur more frequently along the rivers of the Andes and foreland basin, where the number of oxbows in the floodplains is more than twice that observed in the floodplains of the Central Amazon Trough and shields. Our results, which cannot be explained by differences in channel slope or hydrology, highlight the importance of sediment supply in modulating the ability of meandering alluvial rivers to reshape the floodplain environment through river migration. Asahi, K., Shimizu, Y., Nelson, J., Parker, G., 2013. Numerical simulation of river meandering with self-evolving banks. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 118(4), 2013JF002752. Finer, M., Jenkins, C.N., 2012. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity. PLOS One, 7(4), e35126. Pittaluga, M.B., Seminara, G., 2011. Nonlinearity and unsteadiness in river

  11. Sediment supply as a driver of river meandering and floodplain evolution in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, José Antonio; Dunne, Thomas; Ahmed, Joshua; Legleiter, Carl; Lazarus, Eli D.

    2014-12-01

    The role of externally imposed sediment supplies on the evolution of meandering rivers and their floodplains is poorly understood, despite analytical advances in our physical understanding of river meandering. The Amazon river basin hosts tributaries that are largely unaffected by engineering controls and hold a range of sediment loads, allowing us to explore the influence that sediment supply has on river evolution. Here we calculate average annual rates of meander migration within 20 reaches in the Amazon Basin from Landsat imagery spanning 1985-2013. We find that rivers with high sediment loads experience annual migration rates that are higher than those of rivers with lower sediment loads. Meander cutoff also occurs more frequently along rivers with higher sediment loads. Differences in meander migration and cutoff rates between the study reaches are not explained by differences in channel slope or river discharge. Because faster meander migration and higher cutoff rates lead to increased sediment-storage space in the resulting oxbows, we suggest that sediment supply modulates the reshaping of floodplain environments by meandering rivers. We conclude that imposed sediment loads influence planform changes in lowland rivers across the Amazon.

  12. Gully development in Pavon Creeks: Downstream sediment supply and sub-basin restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, S.; McKee, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Sediment supply in watersheds is a function of geology, climate, and land use. Small watersheds in the Coast Ranges of California can provide large volumes of sediment to downstream waterbodies due to the active tectonic setting, the Mediterranean climate, and the history of intense land use. The Pavon Creeks sub-basin, a 1.1 km2 tributary to Pinole Creek which drains to San Francisco Bay, California, currently provides a large supply of fine-grained sediment to the detriment of creek function and native species habitat. The sub-basin is situated near the active Hayward Fault Zone, is underlain by highly erosive shales and siltstones, and has experienced over 100 years of cattle grazing. Despite only comprising 3% of the total watershed area, the Pavon Creeks sub-basin has been identified as one of the largest sources of fine sediment within the Pinole Creek watershed. To protect creek function and habitat, watershed stakeholders have prioritized preventing excess fine sediment delivery to Pinole Creek. The sub-basin includes four small ephemeral gully channels that are primarily actively eroding, downcutting, and extending over their length, and secondarily aggrading over a shorter localized reach. Field-based geomorphic data including channel cross-sections, longitudinal profiles, bank pins, and headcut monitoring have documented channel incision, erosion, and lengthening of the channel network over six years. During Water Year 2006, the first and wettest year of measurements, we observed maximum rates of incision of 0.75 m, lateral bank erosion of 2.5 m, and gully extension of 16.3 m. Annual repeat surveys show continued gully evolution, and allowed for quantitative assessment of incision, aggradation, and extension rates over this time period, as well as eroded sediment volume. We found that the largest storm events of a season cause the greatest instantaneous amount of change in the sub-basin, but cumulative seasonal rainfall determines the total amount and

  13. Stable carbon isotope ratio variations of organic matter in Orca Basin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northam, Mark A.; Curry, David J.; Scalan, Richard S.; Parker, Patrick L.

    1981-02-01

    Orca Basin is a highly reducing basin on the slope of the Gulf of Mexico. Stable carbon isotope ratios and total organic carbon percentages were determined for two cores within the basin and one control core outside the basin. The results show that the organic carbon content of the basin cores is consistently 2-3 times greater than that of the control core. The Pleistocene-Holocene boundary, indicated by a break in the δ13C depth profile, occurs at a greater sediment depth in the basin cores than in the control core. A small sampling interval has made it possible to detect an unexplained fine structure in the δ13C profile not previously observed.

  14. Physical and geoacoustic properties of surface sediments in the southwestern Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G.; Kim, S. P.; Bae, S.

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the physical and geoacoustic properties of surface sediments in the southwestern Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea, eighty-two piston cores and sixty-six box cores were analyzed for sediment texture (grain size, sand, silt and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, grain density and shear strength), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation). We conducted mapping the distribution of sediment texture, each physical properties, and compressional wave velocity. According to the distribution map of sediment texture, the inner shelf area is consists of fine-grained sediments that are interpreted as recent sediments deposited under the present environment condition. Ulleung Basin also dominated fine-grained sediments consist of hemi-pelagic mud. On the mid-shelf, fine materials are mixed with fine-grained sediments and relict coarse sediments. Some part of the relict sediments on the mid-shelf were continuously reworked under the present environmental conditions forming the palimpsest sediments. The outer shelf area is composed of very coarse-grained sediments that are considered relict sediments deposited during the last glacial periods when the sea level was lower than the present. Based on geoacoustic property analyzed from this study, the study area is divided into five different geoacoustic provinces: (1) Province I is composed of muddy sediments that are directly affected by the Nakdong River discharge (1486 m/s, 8.1Φ, 1.32 g/cm3, and 80 %), (2) Province II is generally characterized by hemi-pelagic muds and partially mixed with intermittent sandy sediments originated from the outer shelf and upper slope (1495 m/s, 8.4Φ, 1.27 g/cm3, and 82 %), (3) Province III is comprised of muddy sand sediments that are corresponding to the boundary between recent sediments and relict sediments (1539 m/s, 5.8Φ, 1.52 g/cm3, and 69 %), (4) Province IV is dominated by coarse-grained relict sediments

  15. Stream Sediment Sources in Midwest Agricultural Basins with Land Retirement along Channel.

    PubMed

    Williamson, T N; Christensen, V G; Richardson, W B; Frey, J W; Gellis, A C; Kieta, K A; Fitzpatrick, F A

    2014-09-01

    Documenting the effects of agricultural land retirement on stream-sediment sources is critical to identifying management practices that improve water quality and aquatic habitat. Particularly difficult to quantify are the effects from conservation easements that commonly are discontinuous along channelized streams and ditches throughout the agricultural midwestern United States. Our hypotheses were that sediment from cropland, retired land, stream banks, and roads would be discernible using isotopic and elemental concentrations and that source contributions would vary with land retirement distribution along tributaries of West Fork Beaver Creek in Minnesota. Channel-bed and suspended sediment were sampled at nine locations and compared with local source samples by using linear discriminant analysis and a four-source mixing model that evaluated seven tracers: In, P, total C, Be, Tl, Th, and Ti. The proportion of sediment sources differed significantly between suspended and channel-bed sediment. Retired land contributed to channel-bed sediment but was not discernible as a source of suspended sediment, suggesting that retired-land material was not mobilized during high-flow conditions. Stream banks were a large contributor to suspended sediment; however, the percentage of stream-bank sediment in the channel bed was lower in basins with more continuous retired land along the riparian corridor. Cropland sediments had the highest P concentrations; basins with the highest cropland-sediment contributions also had the highest P concentrations. Along stream reaches with retired land, there was a lower proportion of cropland material in suspended sediment relative to sites that had almost no land retirement, indicating less movement of nutrients and sediment from cropland to the channel as a result of land retirement. PMID:25603248

  16. Coarse-grained deltaic sedimentation in the Miocene Cuyama strike-slip basin, California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alan, Bartow J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cuyama basin, located in the southern Coast Ranges of California southwest of the San Andreas fault, developed early in the history of the San Andreas transform system. The Miocene marine basin formed in a transtensional setting along a dextral strike-slip fault of the transform system following Oligocene non-marine basin formation in an extensional setting. The lower and middle Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the northwestern part of the basin, which represents the first of two transgressive-regressive cycles, is described here in terms of nine facies in two broad facies groups. The 400-m-thick Soda Lake Shale Member (of the Vaqueros) comprises deep-basin and starved-basin facies. A thin transgressive facies occurs locally at the base of the formation. The overlying Painted Rock Sandstone Member (of the Vaqueros), which is more than 2200 m thick and consists mostly of coarse-grained sandstone and pebbly sandstone, constitutes a delta complex of prodelta, slope channel, delta front, tide-influenced distributary channel, interdistributary bay, and fluvial channel facies. The basinal depositional system consisted of turbidite mud and sand, and hemipelagic and pelagic sediments of the basinal facies deposited in a rapidly subsiding basin. The delta depositional system consisted of the delta complex facies that prograded into the deep basin and had a steep prodelta slope that extended to bathyal depths. The delta is inferred to be a mixed fluvial-wave-dominated fan delta, analogous in its delta-front morphology and processes to a fjord delta, in which coarse sediment delivered to the delta front by braided streams was transported down the prodelta slope into deep water by sediment gravity flows. Transgression and rapid deepening of the basin in the early Miocene coincided with rapid tectonic subsidence. Deepening culminated with deposition of a starved-basin facies or condensed section at the time of maximum transgression, which was followed by the beginning of a

  17. Sediment budget in the Ucayali River basin, an Andean tributary of the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, W.; Martinez, J.-M.; Espinoza-Villar, R.; Cochonneau, G.; Vauchel, P.; Moquet, J.-S.; Baby, P.; Espinoza, J.-C.; Lavado, W.; Carranza, J.; Guyot, J.-L.

    2015-03-01

    Formation of mountain ranges results from complex coupling between lithospheric deformation, mechanisms linked to subduction and surface processes: weathering, erosion, and climate. Today, erosion of the eastern Andean cordillera and sub-Andean foothills supplies over 99% of the sediment load passing through the Amazon Basin. Denudation rates in the upper Ucayali basin are rapid, favoured by a marked seasonality in this region and extreme precipitation cells above sedimentary strata, uplifted during Neogene times by a still active sub-Andean tectonic thrust. Around 40% of those sediments are trapped in the Ucayali retro-foreland basin system. Recent advances in remote sensing for Amazonian large rivers now allow us to complete the ground hydrological data. In this work, we propose a first estimation of the erosion and sedimentation budget of the Ucayali River catchment, based on spatial and conventional HYBAM Observatory network.

  18. Estimation of Streamflow and Fluvial Sediment Loads in the White Volta Basin under Future Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumor, M.; Amisigo, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The White Volta Basin is one of the major sub-catchments of the Volta Basin of West Africa, covers an estimated 106,000 km2 and is shared between Burkina Faso and Ghana. The basin currently faces many challenges such as flooding, drought, high temporal and spatial variation of rainfall, deforestation, land degradation, climate change and high population growth rate. These challenges put pressure on the quantity and quality of the water resources in the basin. Current infrastructure developments in the basin have already impacted on the hydrological cycle, and future development plans potentially pose a threat to the sustainability of the resources if not appropriately managed. Information on runoff and sediment loads is a very important requirement for sustainable management of the water resources in the basin. This study therefore seeks to assess runoff and sediment loads in the White Volta Basin using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and provide understanding of how climate change impacts on future runoff and sediment loads in the basin.The model was calibrated for the period 1991 to 2003 and validated for the period 2004 to 2013.The model was also validated at one gauging station on the main river and another on a tributary. Analysis of the water balance of the basin shows that 4.90% of the simulated mean annual precipitation is converted to surface runoff while 84.37% evapotranspires. The results also show that the White Volta Basin contributes approximately 5.68x106tonnes/yr of sediment load into the Volta Lake. The calibrated model was used to simulate the water balance for the present time slice (1975-2005) as the basis for comparing with the future (2025-2055) water balance in the WhiteVolta Basin. The results show that annual surface runoff and sediment loads could increase by 56% and 70% respectively. A projected reduction by 0.54% in actual evapotranspiration is however estimated for the selected time period in the basin.

  19. Adapting SWAT hillslope erosion model to predict sediment concentrations and yields in large Basins.

    PubMed

    Vigiak, Olga; Malagó, Anna; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean

    2015-12-15

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is used worldwide for water quality assessment and planning. This paper aimed to assess and adapt SWAT hillslope sediment yield model (Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation, MUSLE) for applications in large basins, i.e. when spatial data is coarse and model units are large; and to develop a robust sediment calibration method for large regions. The Upper Danube Basin (132,000km(2)) was used as case study representative of large European Basins. The MUSLE was modified to reduce sensitivity of sediment yields to the Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) size, and to identify appropriate algorithms for estimating hillslope length (L) and slope-length factor (LS). HRUs gross erosion was broadly calibrated against plot data and soil erosion map estimates. Next, mean annual SWAT suspended sediment concentrations (SSC, mg/L) were calibrated and validated against SSC data at 55 gauging stations (622 station-years). SWAT annual specific sediment yields in subbasin reaches (RSSY, t/km(2)/year) were compared to yields measured at 33 gauging stations (87station-years). The best SWAT configuration combined a MUSLE equation modified by the introduction of a threshold area of 0.01km(2) where L and LS were estimated with flow accumulation algorithms. For this configuration, the SSC residual interquartile was less than +/-15mg/L both for the calibration (1995-2004) and the validation (2005-2009) periods. The mean SSC percent bias for 1995-2009 was 24%. RSSY residual interquartile was within +/-10t/km(2)/year, with a mean RSSY percent bias of 12%. Residuals showed no bias with respect to drainage area, slope, or spatial distribution. The use of multiple data types at multiple sites enabled robust simulation of sediment concentrations and yields of the region. The MUSLE modifications are recommended for use in large basins. Based on SWAT simulations, we present a sediment budget for the Upper Danube Basin. PMID:26356993

  20. Spatio-temporal patterns of soil erosion and suspended sediment dynamics in the Mekong River Basin.

    PubMed

    Suif, Zuliziana; Fleifle, Amr; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra, Oliver

    2016-10-15

    Understanding of the distribution patterns of sediment erosion, concentration and transport in river basins is critically important as sediment plays a major role in river basin hydrophysical and ecological processes. In this study, we proposed an integrated framework for the assessment of sediment dynamics, including soil erosion (SE), suspended sediment load (SSL) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC), and applied this framework to the Mekong River Basin. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model was adopted with a geographic information system to assess SE and was coupled with a sediment accumulation and a routing scheme to simulate SSL. This framework also analyzed Landsat imagery captured between 1987 and 2000 together with ground observations to interpolate spatio-temporal patterns of SSC. The simulated SSL results from 1987 to 2000 showed the relative root mean square error of 41% and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.89. The polynomial relationship of the near infrared exoatmospheric reflectance and the band 4 wavelength (760-900nm) to the observed SSC at 9 sites demonstrated the good agreement (overall relative RMSE=5.2%, R(2)=0.87). The result found that the severe SE occurs in the upper (China and Lao PDR) and lower (western part of Vietnam) regions. The SSC in the rainy season (June-November) showed increasing and decreasing trends longitudinally in the upper (China and Lao PDR) and lower regions (Cambodia), respectively, while the longitudinal profile of SSL showed a fluctuating trend along the river in the early rainy season. Overall, the results described the unique spatio-temporal patterns of SE, SSL and SSC in the Mekong River Basin. Thus, the proposed integrated framework is useful for elucidating complex process of sediment generation and transport in the land and river systems of large river basins. PMID:27338846

  1. Geoacoustic model of surface sediments in the southwestern Ulleung basin, the East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G. S.; Kim, S. P.; Bae, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    To realization of geoacoustic model in the southwestern Ulleung basin, the East Sea of Korea, eighty-two piston core samples and sixty-six box core samples were collected. Sediment texture (mean grain size and sand, silt, and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, and grain density), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation) were measured using surface sediments below 40 cm from the surface. As the results, the study area is divided into five sub-areas based on acoustic property of sediments: (1) Area I is composed of muddy sediments that affected directly by the Nakdong River discharge. The velocity is almost 1490 m/s. (2) Area II is generally characterized by hemi-pelagic muds and partially mixed with intermittent sandy sediments originated from the outer shelf and upper slope. The velocity approximately ranges from 1490 to 1500 m/s. (3) Area III is comprised of muddy sand sediments that are corresponds to the boundary between recent sediments and relict sediments. The velocity ranges from 1500 to 1600 m/s. (4) Area IV is dominated by coarse-grained relict sediments. The velocity ranges from 1600 to 1700 m/s. And (5) Area V consists of very coarser sediments. The velocity is higher than 1700 m/s. The sediment velocity generally decreases with increasing porosity or decreasing mean grain size and bulk density.

  2. Transfer of fine sediments and particulate heavy metals in large river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Ulrike; Reid, Lucas; Fuchs, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    For heavy metals and other particulate contaminants erosion is an important emission pathway into surface waters. Emissions via erosion can strongly vary depending on land use, morphology, erodibility of the soils and the heavy metal content in the topsoil layer of the source areas. A high spatial resolution of input data is thus necessary to identify hotspots of heavy metal emissions via erosion in large river basins. In addition a part of the suspended solid load which is emitted to surface waters from the catchment areas can be deposited in the river system during transportation. The retention of sediments mainly takes place in lakes, reservoirs and river barrages. Former modelling studies in large river basins of Germany revealed, that the observed suspended sediment loads at monitoring stations were strongly overestimated, if retention processes in the river system were neglected. The objective of this study was therefore to test whether the consideration of sedimentation rates in lakes, reservoirs and river barrages can improve the prediction of observed suspended sediment loads in large river basins. We choose the German/Austrian part of the Danube basin until Passau (77 156 km²) for this analysis, as the alpine tributaries in the South of the Danube basin deliver high annual sediment rates (i.e. Inn and Isar) which are not fully recovered at the monitoring stations located further upstream of the Danube due to retention processes. The sediment input was quantified for all tributaries and added up along the flow path of the river system. Due to the large scale, sediment production within the catchments was calculated using the USLE for cultivated land and naturally covered areas and specific erosion rates for alpine areas without vegetation cover. Sediment delivery was estimated using an approach based on the location of the sediment source areas in the catchments and the morphology on the way to the surface waters. The location of the lakes, reservoirs and

  3. Occurrence and distribution of hexabromocyclododecane in sediments from seven major river drainage basins in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Honghua; Shang, Hongtao; Wang, Pu; Wang, Yawei; Zhang, Haidong; Zhang, Qinghua; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations and geographical distribution of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were investigated in 37 composite surface sediments from seven major river drainage basins in China, including Yangtze River, Yellow River, Pearl River, Liaohe River, Haihe River, Tarim River and Ertix River. The detection frequency of HBCD was 54%, with the concentrations ranged from below limit of detection (LOD) to 206 ng/g dry weight. In general, the geographical distribution showed increasing trends from the upper reaches to the lower reaches of the rivers and from North China to Southeast China. Compared to other regions in the world, the average concentration of HBCD in sediments from Yangtze River drainage basin was at relatively high level, whereas those from other six river drainage basins were at lower or similar level. The highest HBCD concentration in sediment from Yangtze River Delta and the highest detection frequency of HBCD in Pearl River drainage basins suggested that the industrial and urban activities could evidently affect the HBCD distribution. HBCD diastereoisomer profiles showed that gamma-HBCD dominated in most of the sediment samples, followed by alpha- and beta-HBCD, which was consistent with those in the commercial HBCD mixtures. Further risk assessment reflected that the average inventories of HBCD were 18.3, 5.87, 3.92, 2.50, 1.77 ng/cm2 in sediments from Pearl River, Haihe River, Tarim River, Yellow River and Yangtze River, respectively. PMID:23586301

  4. Geochemistry of sediments in the modern Aral Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, G. N.; Zavjalov, P. O.; Friedrich, J.

    2015-03-01

    The study presents the first geochemical data on the bottom sediments from the modern desiccating Aral Sea, which allowed a direct comparison between the compositions of the sediments collected during the pre- and postdesiccation periods. This study revealed the differences and similarities in the major and trace element composition of the sediments collected from the former bottom of the Large Aral Sea, the present-day sea bottom, the desiccated sea bottom, and the Amu Darya suspended sediments with respect to the average shale composition. The euxinic sediments from the western deep-water depression are characterized by high concentrations of U, Mo, and organic matter. The precipitation of evaporite salts occurs at the shallowest depths and in the western depression. The salt deposits exposed by the shrinking sea tend to be desalinated due to intense weathering. The mercury detected at high levels in the river suspended sediments of the former Amu Darya discharge was found to be absent in the modern marine sediments due to reductions in the river flow and the possible migration to the atmosphere. Many other trace elements, besides uranium, may also accumulate in seawater.

  5. Sediment Bacterial Communities Reflect the History of a Sea Basin

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Christina; Sinkko, Hanna; Rantanen, Matias; Paulin, Lars; Kotilainen, Aarno

    2013-01-01

    How entire microbial communities are structured across stratified sediments from the historical standpoint is unknown. The Baltic Sea is an ideal research object for historical reconstruction, since it has experienced many fresh- and brackish water periods and is depleted of dissolved oxygen, which increases the sediment's preservation potential. We investigated the bacterial communities, chemical elements (e.g. Cr, Pb Na, P, Sr and U) and sediment composition in a stratified sediment core dated by radiocarbon and spanning 8000 years of Baltic Sea history, using up-to-date multivariate statistics. The communities were analysed by 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. The communities of the deep Early Litorina and surface Late Litorina Sea laminae were separated from the communities of the middle Litorina Sea laminae, which were associated with elevated concentrations of U and Sr trace elements, palaeo-oxygen and palaeosalinity proxies. Thus, the Litorina Sea laminae were characterized by past oxygen deficiency and salinity increase. The communities of the laminae, bioturbated and homogeneous sediments were differentiated, based on the same historical sea phases, with correct classifications of 90%. Palaeosalinity was one of the major parameters that separated the bacterial communities of the stratified sediments. A discontinuous spatial structure with a surprising increase in community heterogeneity was detected in Litorina Sea sediments from 388 to 422 cm deep, which suggests that a salinity maximum occurred in the central Gulf of Finland app. 6200–6600 years ago. The community heterogeneity decreased from the surface down to 306 cm, which reflected downcore mineralization. The plateau of the decrease was in the app. 2000-year-old sediment layers. Bacterial community data may be used as an additional tool in ocean-drilling projects, in which it is important to detect mineralization plateaus both to determine historically comparable

  6. Quantifying spatial patterns and timescales of fine sediment redistribution in river basins: application of a sediment budget model with fallout radionuclide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh; Blake, William; Taylor, Alex

    2013-04-01

    Improved understanding of fine sediment and associated contaminant redistribution within river basins requires information on the sources and rates of sediment supply alongside the timescales of downstream sediment transfer. Sediment budgets are an effective tool for examining these patterns. While small, intensively monitored research catchments may provide such information, the examination of larger scale patterns of sediment transfer often requires the use of modelling-based approaches. Furthermore, knowledge of timescales of fine sediment transfer in river basins is limited. Few studies link sediment budgets with explicit information on the residence or travel times of fine sediment. This information is essential for understanding contemporary patterns of river basin sediment redistribution, and has implications for predicting possible recovery times of rivers affected by contaminated sediment from historic or recent pollution. Against this background, we aim to quantify the spatial patterns and timescales of suspended sediment transfer through a river basin (917 km2) situated in south-west England. We apply a spatially-distributed sediment budget model (SedNet) in conjunction with high-resolution spatial data and long-term rainfall and river flow measurements. Model outputs provide an indication of mean annual patterns of sediment redistribution and yields, which were computed for three land cover surveys. This modelling was coupled with techniques for estimating fine sediment residence times, which are based on differences in the decay rates of three fallout radionuclides (Be-7, excess Pb-210 and Cs-137). Findings from this study demonstrate the need for more integrated approaches to better understand spatial patterns and timescales of sediment redistribution in river basins.

  7. Miocene sedimentation and subsidence during continent-continent collision, Bengal basin, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ashraf; Lundberg, Neil

    2004-02-01

    The Bengal basin, a complex foreland basin south of the eastern Himalayas, exhibits dramatic variability in Neogene sediment thickness that reflects a complicated depositional and tectonic history. This basin originally formed as a trailing margin SE of the Indian continental crust, complicated by convergence with Asia to the north and oblique convergence with Burma to the east. Newly compiled isopach data and previously reported seismic data show evidence of thickening of basin fill toward the south, opposite of the pattern typically seen in foreland basins. This is presumably due to sedimentary loading of voluminous deltaic sediments near the continent-ocean boundary and basinward downfaulting analogous to that in the Gulf of Mexico. Isopach data show that there is considerable vertical relief along the base of the Miocene stratigraphic sequence, probably due to down-to-the-basin faulting caused by focused deltaic sedimentation and associated crustal flexure. In contrast, when viewed in east-west profile, basin shape is more typical of a foreland basin, with strata thickening eastward toward the Indo-Burman ranges, which reflects east-west convergence with Southeast Asia. Comparison of the lateral and vertical extent of the Bhuban and Boka Bil Formations with the Bouguer anomaly map of Bangladesh suggests that considerable subsidence of the Sylhet trough (in the northeastern part of the Bengal basin), which has the lowest gravity value of the region, had not taken place by the end of the Miocene. This post-Miocene subsidence is attributed to tectonic loading from southward thrusting of the Shillong Plateau along the Dauki fault. Relatively uniform Miocene isopachs across the Sylhet trough confirm that this began in the Pliocene, consistent with results of recent research on sediment provenance. In the northwest, in the region south of the Siwalik foreland basin, continental crust has not as yet been loaded, allowing relatively little accommodation space for

  8. Short and long term sediment flux in an inner-alpine sedimentary basin (Hohe Tauern, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Joachim; Schrott, Lothar

    2015-04-01

    Combined analyses of short and long term sediment fluxes in mountain environments have been rarely carried out until now. However, the relation of integrated postglacial landform volumes to single events (e.g. debris flows) provide the opportunity to establish meaningful frequency-magnitude-relationships, to evaluate present day geomorphic activity more reasonable, and to complement time series data typically covering only a short period of time. In this study we investigate recent and postglacial sediment flux in a small-scale denudation-accumulation system in the Hohe Tauern Range (Austrian Alps) using a complementary multi method approach including surface, subsurface and temporal analyses. We reconstructed the infill history and sedimentary architecture of the almost closed Gradenmoos basin, which has been filled up with sediments from different source areas delivered by mainly debris flows, rockfall and avalanche activity, and fluvial processes. In former times, glacial, glacio-fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation contributed to the basin fill as well. This process diversity led to a variety of interfingering and nested sediment storage landforms with a complex postglacial stratigraphy. Most important landforms include floodplain and peat bog deposits in the basin center as well as debris cones and talus sheets adjacent to the surrounding rockwalls. Postglacial basin sedimentation started after Younger Dryas deglaciation as indicated by radiocarbon ages of early-Holocene sediment core samples taken in the basin. For the following 7500 years, trap efficiency was maximised due to the presence of a former lake which is proved by morphometric, palynologic and stratigraphic data. Peat bog development finally began around 3500 years ago in the distal part of the basin. We interpolated the bedrock interface below the basin fill deposits using bedrock coordinates derived from core-drilling, geophysical prospection (electrical resistivity tomography, refraction seismic

  9. The legacy of lead (Pb) in fluvial bed sediments of an urban drainage basin, Oahu, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Hotton, Veronica K; Sutherland, Ross A

    2016-03-01

    The study of fluvial bed sediments is essential for deciphering the impact of anthropogenic activities on water quality and drainage basin integrity. In this study, a systematic sampling design was employed to characterize the spatial variation of lead (Pb) concentrations in bed sediment of urban streams in the Palolo drainage basin, southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. Potentially bioavailable Pb was assessed with a dilute 0.5 N HCl extraction of the <63 μm grain-size fraction from the upper bed sediment layer of 169 samples from Palolo, Pukele, and Waiomao streams. Contamination of bed sediments was associated with the direct transport of legacy Pb from the leaded gasoline era to stream channels via a dense network of storm drains linked to road surfaces throughout the basin. The Palolo Stream had the highest median Pb concentration (134 mg/kg), and the greatest road and storm drain densities, the greatest population, and the most vehicle numbers. Lower median Pb concentrations were associated with the less impacted Pukele Stream (24 mg/kg), and Waiomao Stream (7 mg/kg). The median Pb enrichment ratio values followed the sequence of Palolo (68) > Pukele (19) > Waiomao (8). Comparisons to sediment quality guidelines and potential toxicity estimates using a logistic regression model (LRM) indicated a significant potential risk of Palolo Stream bed sediments to bottom-dwelling organisms. PMID:26573308

  10. Oblique-slip sedimentation and deformation in Nonacho basin (early Proterozoic), Northwest Territories, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Aspler, L.B.; Donaldson, J.A.

    1984-04-01

    The Nonacho basin shares several traits with molassoid basins formed in oblique-slip settings: great thickness (about 9 km, 6 mi) of siliciclastic sediments deposited in alluvial fan, fan-delta, braided stream, beach, deltaic, and lacustrine environments; synsedimentary faults which activated nearby sources; rapid sedimentation and subsidence; telescoped facies transitions, particularly adjacent to active faults; extremely variable thickness of lithostratigraphic units; diachronous sedimentation resulting from the migration of source areas and sites of sedimentation along deformation fronts; mobility of deposition and deformation such that early sediments were uplifted, cannibalized, and redeposited; paleocurrents directed basinward near basin margins, and longitudinally in axial regions; lower greenschist facies metamorphism; paucity of volcanic rocks; and complicated structural geometries. However, these features alone are not diagnostic of qbique slip origin; all are compatible with rift, aulacogen, impactogen, retroarc, peripheral, intramontane, and broken foreland settings. More reliable indicators or an oblique-slip tectonic setting for the Nonacho basin are: anastomosing pattern of near-vertical, en echelon faults which delineate rhomb-, wedge, and rectangular-shaped semi-independent subbasins and basement uplifts; stretching lineations of shallow to moderate plunge along shear zones; folds and near-vertical penetrative fabrics, related to shear zones, but at angles of 20/sup 0/-30/sup 0/ to these zones. The Nonacho basin fill is interpreted as a foreland molasse of the Trans-Hudson orogene. Deposition and deformation probably occurred in response to convergence accommodated by oblique slip, analogous to the Tarim and Tsaidam basins of China, which developed in the late stages of India-Eurasia collision, north of the Tibetan Plateau.

  11. Suspended sediment fluxes in an Indonesian river draining a rainforested basin subject to land cover change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschman, F. A.; Hoitink, A. J. F.; de Jong, S. M.; Hoekstra, P.

    2011-07-01

    Forest clearing for reasons of timber production, open pit mining and the establishment of oil palm plantations generally results in excessively high sediment loads in the tropics. The increasing sediment fluxes pose a threat to coastal marine ecosystems such as coral reefs. This study presents observations of suspended sediment fluxes in the Berau river (Indonesia), which debouches into a coastal ocean that can be considered the preeminent center of coral diversity. The Berau is an example of a small river draining a mountainous, relatively pristine basin that receives abundant rainfall. Flow velocity was measured over a large part of the river width at a station under the influence of tides, using a Horizontal Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (HADCP). Surrogate measurements of suspended sediment concentration were taken with an Optical Backscatter Sensor (OBS). Tidally averaged suspended sediment concentration increases with river discharge, implying that the tidally averaged suspended sediment flux increases non-linearly with river discharge. Averaged over the 6.5 weeks observations covered by the benchmark survey, the tidally averaged suspended sediment flux was estimated at 2 Mt y-1. Considering the wet conditions during the observation period, this figure may be considered as an upper limit of the yearly averaged flux. This flux is significantly smaller than what could have been expected from the characteristics of the catchment. The consequences of ongoing clearing of rainforest were explored using a plot scale erosion model. When rainforest, which still covered 50-60 % of the basin in 2007, is converted to production land, soil loss is expected to increase with a factor between 10 and 100. If this soil loss is transported seaward as suspended sediment, the increase in suspended sediment flux in the Berau river would impose a severe sediment stress on the global hotspot of coral reef diversity. The impact of land cover changes will largely depend on the

  12. Suspended sediment fluxes in an Indonesian river draining a rainforested basin subject to land cover change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschman, F.; Hoitink, A.; de Jong, S.; Hoekstra, P.

    2011-12-01

    Forest clearing in the tropics for reasons of timber production, open pit mining and the establishment of oil palm plantations generally results in excessively high sediment loads. The increasing sediment fluxes pose a threat to coastal marine ecosystems such as coral reefs. This study presents observations of suspended sediment fluxes in the Berau river (Indonesia), which debouches into a coastal ocean that can be considered the preeminent center of coral diversity. The Berau is an example of a small river draining a mountainous, relatively pristine basin that receives abundant rainfall. Flow velocity was measured over a large part of the river width at a station under the influence of tides, using a Horizontal Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (HADCP). Surrogate measurements of suspended sediment concentration were taken with an Optical Backscatter Sensor (OBS). Tidally averaged suspended sediment concentration increases with river discharge, implying that the tidally averaged suspended sediment flux increases non-linearly with river discharge. Averaged over the 6.5 weeks covered by the benchmark survey, the tidally averaged suspended sediment flux was estimated at 2 Mt/y. Considering the wet conditions during the observation period, this figure may be considered as an upper limit of the yearly averaged flux. This flux is significantly smaller than what could have been expected from the characteristics of the catchment. Furthermore, the consequences of ongoing clearing of rainforest were explored using a plot scale erosion model. When rainforest, which still covered 50 - 60 % of the basin in 2007, is converted to production land, soil loss is expected to increase with a factor between 10 and 100. If this soil loss is transported seaward as suspended sediment, the increase in suspended sediment flux in the Berau river would impose a severe sediment stress on the global hotspot of coral reef diversity. The impact of land cover changes will largely depend on the

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of uranium in evaporation basin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. C.; Morris, D. E.; Hunter, D. B.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2000-05-01

    Evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), CA, used for the containment of irrigation drainage waters contain elevated levels of uranium (U) resulting from the extensive leaching by carbonate-rich irrigation waters of the local agricultural soils that contain low levels of naturally-occurring U. The SJV ponds are subjected to changes in redox chemistry with cycles of drying and flooding. Our past studies have shown that U in the SJV Pond 14 surface sediments is present as mostly the oxidized and soluble form, U(VI). However, we were uncertain whether the U in the soil was only present as a U oxide of mixed stoichiometry, such as U 3O 8(s) (pitchblende) or other species. Here we present characterization information, which includes wet chemical and in situ spectroscopic techniques (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and low temperature time-resolved luminescence spectroscopies) for samples from two SJV Pond sediments. Surface sediments from SJV Pond 16 were characterized for average oxidation state of U with XANES spectroscopy. The fraction of U(VI) to U(IV) in the Pond 16 sediments decreased with depth with U(IV) being the dominant oxidation state in the 5 cm to 15 cm depth. Two luminescent U(VI) species were identified in the surface sediments from Pond 14; a U(VI)-tricarbonate phase and another phase likely comprised of U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate. The luminescent U(VI) population in the Pond 16 sediments is dominated by species with comparable spectral characteristics to the U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate species found in the Pond 14 sediments. The luminescence spectroscopic results were complemented by wet chemical U leaching methods, which involved the use of carbonate and sulfuric acid solutions and oxidizing solutions of peroxide, hypochlorite and Mn(IV). Leaching was shown to decrease the total U concentration in the sediments in all cases. However, results from luminescence studies of the residual fraction in the leached

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of flow and particulate contaminants sedimentation in an urban stormwater detention and settling basin.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hexiang; Lipeme Kouyi, Gislain; Gonzalez-Merchan, Carolina; Becouze-Lareure, Céline; Sebastian, Christel; Barraud, Sylvie; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2014-04-01

    Sedimentation is a common but complex phenomenon in the urban drainage system. The settling mechanisms involved in detention basins are still not well understood. The lack of knowledge on sediment transport and settling processes in actual detention basins is still an obstacle to the optimization of the design and the management of the stormwater detention basins. In order to well understand the sedimentation processes, in this paper, a new boundary condition as an attempt to represent the sedimentation processes based on particle tracking approach is presented. The proposed boundary condition is based on the assumption that the flow turbulent kinetic energy near the bottom plays an important role on the sedimentation processes. The simulated results show that the proposed boundary condition appears as a potential capability to identify the preferential sediment zones and to predict the trapping efficiency of the basin during storm events. PMID:24390197

  15. Simulation of contaminated sediment transport in White Oak Creek basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Clapp, R.B.; Brenkert, A.L.; Moore, T.D.; Fontaine, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a systematic approach to management of the contaminated sediments in the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The primary contaminant of concern is radioactive cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which binds to soil and sediment particles. The key components in the approach include an intensive sampling and monitoring system for flood events; modeling of hydrological processes, sediment transport, and contaminant flux movement; and a decision framework with a detailed human health risk analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling of watershed rainfall-runoff and contaminated sediment transport during flooding periods using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- Fortran (HSPF) model. Because a large number of parameters are required in HSPF modeling, the major effort in the modeling process is the calibration of model parameters to make simulation results and measured values agree as closely as possible. An optimization model incorporating the concepts of an expert system was developed to improve calibration results and efficiency. Over a five-year simulation period, the simulated flows match the observed values well. Simulated total amount of sediment loads at various locations during storms match with the observed values within a factor of 1.5. Simulated annual releases of {sup 137}Cs off-site locations match the data within a factor of 2 for the five-year period. The comprehensive modeling approach can provide a valuable tool for decision makers to quantitatively analyze sediment erosion, deposition, and transport; exposure risk related to radionuclides in contaminated sediment; and various management strategies.

  16. Role of river bank erosion in sediment budgets of catchments within the Loire river basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Aurore; Cerdan, Olivier; Poisvert, Cecile; Landemaine, Valentin

    2014-05-01

    Quantifying volumes of sediments produced on hillslopes or in channels and transported or stored within river systems is necessary to establish sediment budgets. If research efforts on hillslope erosion processes have led to a relatively good understanding and quantification of local sources, in-channel processes remain poorly understood and quasi inexistent in global budgets. However, profound landuse changes and agricultural practices have altered river functioning, caused river bank instability and stream incision. During the past decades in France, river channelization has been perfomed extensively to allow for new agricultural practices to take place. Starting from a recent study on the quantification of sediment fluxes for catchments within the Loire river basin (Gay et al. 2013), our aim is to complete sediment budgets by taking into account various sources and sinks both on hillslope and within channel. The emphasis of this study is on river bank erosion and how bank erosion contributes to global budgets. A model of bank retreat is developed for the entire Loire river basin. In general, our results show that bank retreat is on average quite low with approximately 1 cm.yr-1. However, a strong variability exists within the study area with channels displaying values of bank retreat up to ~10 cm.yr-1. Our results corroborate those found by Landemaine et al. in 2013 on a small agricultural catchment. From this first step, quantification of volumes of sediment eroded from banks and available for transport should be calculated and integrated in sediment budgets to allow for a better understanding of basin functioning. Gay A., Cerdan O., Delmas M., Desmet M., Variability of sediment yields in the Loire river basin (France): the role of small scale catchments (under review). Landemaine V., Gay A., Cerdan O., Salvador-Blanes S., Rodriguez S. Recent morphological evolution of a headwater stream in agricultural context after channelization in the Ligoire river (France

  17. Simulating Spatial Variability of Fluvial Sediment Fluxes Within the Magdalena Drainage Basin, Colombia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, A. J.; Syvitski, J. P.; Restrepo, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    This study explores the application of an empirical sediment flux model BQART, to simulate long-term sediment fluxes of major tributaries of a river system based on a limited number of input parameters. We validate model results against data of the 1612 km long Magdalena River, Colombia, South America, which is well monitored. The Magdalena River, draining a hinterland area of 257,438 km2, of which the majority lies in the Andes before reaching the Atlantic coast, is known for its high sediment yield, 560 t kg- 2 yr-1; higher than nearby South American rivers like the Amazon or the Orinoco River. Sediment fluxes of 32 tributary basins of the Magdalena River were simulated based on the following controlling factors: geomorphic influences (tributary-basin area and relief) derived from high-resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data, tributary basin-integrated lithology based on GIS analysis of lithology data, 30year temperature data, and observed monthly mean discharge data records (varying in record length of 15 to 60 years). Preliminary results indicate that the simulated sediment flux of all 32 tributaries matches the observational record, given the observational error and the annual variability. These simulations did not take human influences into account yet, which often increases sediment fluxes by accelerating erosion, especially in steep mountainous area similar to the Magdalena. Simulations indicate that, with relatively few input parameters, mostly derived from remotely-sensed data or existing compiled GIS datasets, it is possible to predict: which tributaries in an arbitrary river drainage produce relatively high contributions to sediment yields, and where in the drainage basin you might expect conveyance loss.

  18. An investigation of element ratios for assessing suspended-sediment sources in small agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, K.

    2012-01-01

    Various sediment properties previously have been investigated for the purpose of determining sources of suspended sediment. A remaining research need is an assessment of element ratios for the determination of suspended-sediment sources in different terrestrial environments. In this study, 253 element ratios were assessed to determine which, if any, were potentially useful for sediment-source determinations in six small agricultural basins in northeastern Kansas, USA. Samples of surface soils (cropland and grassland), channel banks, and reservoir bottom sediments were collected, analyzed for 23 elements, and compared. Of the 253 element ratios assessed, only the Co/Pb and Co/Zn ratios were substantially and consistently different between the channel banks and surface soils for all six basins. For three of four reservoirs for which data were available, sediment-source estimates provided by Co/Pb ratios were in agreement with estimates previously provided using 137Cs. For two of the four reservoirs, sediment-source estimates provided by Co/Zn ratios were consistent with the 137Cs estimates. Thus, the Co/Pb ratio potentially may be more useful. Additional research is needed to ascertain whether or not the use of Co/Pb and Co/Zn ratios as tracers is widely applicable or restricted to specific terrestrial environments.

  19. Historical trends in organochlorine compounds in river basins identified using sediment cores from reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Callender, E.; Fuller, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    This study used chemical analyses of dated sediment cores from reservoirs to define historical trends in water quality in the influent river basins. This work applies techniques from paleolimnology to reservoirs, and in the process, highlights differences between sediment-core interpretations for reservoirs and natural lakes. Sediment cores were collected from six reservoirs in the central and southeastern United States, sectioned, and analyzed for 137Cs and organochlorine compounds. 137Cs analyses were used to demonstrate limited post-depositional mixing, to indicate sediment deposition dates, and to estimate sediment focusing factors. Relative lack of mixing, high sedimentation rates, and high focusing factors distinguish reservoir sediment cores from cores collected in natural lakes. Temporal trends in concentrations of PCBs, total DDT (DDT + DDD + DDE), and chlordane reflect historical use and regulation of these compounds and differences in land use between reservoir drainages. PCB and total DDT core burdens, normalized for sediment focusing, greatly exceed reported cumulative regional atmospheric fallout of PCBs and total DDT estimated using cores from peat hogs and natural lakes, indicating the dominance of fluvial inputs of both groups of compounds to the reservoirs.This study used chemical analyses of dated sediment cores from reservoirs to define historical trends in water quality in the influent river basins. This work applies techniques from paleolimnology to reservoirs, and in the process, highlights differences between sediment-core interpretations for reservoirs and natural lakes. Sediment cores were collected from six reservoirs in the central and southeastern United States, sectioned, and analyzed for 137Cs and organochlorine compounds. 137Cs analyses were used to demonstrate limited post-depositional mixing, to indicate sediment deposition dates, and to estimate sediment focusing factors. Relative lack of mixing, high sedimentation rates, and high

  20. Using SWAT to target critical source sediment and phosphorus areas in the Wister Lake Basin, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wister Lake is located in the San Bois Mountains in southeastern Oklahoma, USA. The reservoir is primarily used as a water supply and flood storage to over 40,000 residents in the area. Due to high levels of phosphorus and sediment, Wister Lake is listed as a high priority basin for the State of Okl...

  1. Spatial distribution of soil erosion and suspended sediment transport rate for Chou-Shui river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Ping; Chen, Ching-Nuo; Wang, Yu-Min; Tsai, Chih-Heng; Tsai, Chang-Tai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a Physiographic Soil Erosion-Deposition Model (PSED) is applied for better management of a watershed. The PSED model can effectively evaluate the key parameters of watershed management: surface runoff discharge, suspended sediment transport rate, quantity of soil erosion, and spatial distribution of soil erosion and deposition. A basin usually contains multiple watersheds. These watersheds may have complex topography and heterogeneous physiographic properties. The PSED model, containing a physiographic rainfall-runoff model and a basin scale erosion-deposition model, can simulate the physical mechanism of the entire erosion process based on a detailed calculation of bed-load transportation, surface soil entrainment, and the deposition mechanism. With the assistance of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the PSED model can handle and analyze extremely large hydrologic and physiographic datasets and simulate the physical erosion process without the need for simplification. We verified the PSED model using three typhoon events and 40 rainfall events. The application of PSED to Chou-Shui River basin shows that the PSED model can accurately estimate discharge hydrographs, suspended sediment transport rates, and sediment yield. Additionally, we obtained reasonable quantities of soil erosion as well as the spatial distribution of soil erosion and deposition. The results show that the PSED model is capable of calculating spatially distributed soil erosion and suspended sediment transport rates for a basin with multiple watersheds even if these watersheds have complex topography and heterogeneous physiographic properties.

  2. Characterization of Channel Morphology and Sediment Loads for the Yazoo River Basin, Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main purpose of this report was to provide the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) with geomorphic evaluations of previously visited biological sampling locations and update ‘reference’ suspended-sediment transport conditions within the Yazoo River Basin. This information wou...

  3. Simulating sediment loading into the major reservoirs in Trinity River Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Upper Trinity Basin supplies water to about one-fourth of Texas' population. The anticipated rapid growth of North Central Texas will certainly increase regional demands for high quality drinking water. This has increased concerns that sediment and nutrient loads received by drinking water reser...

  4. Dating of the oldest continental sediments from the Himalayan foreland basin.

    PubMed

    Najman, Y; Pringle, M; Godin, L; Oliver, G

    2001-03-01

    A detailed knowledge of Himalayan development is important for our wider understanding of several global processes, ranging from models of plateau uplift to changes in oceanic chemistry and climate. Continental sediments 55 Myr old found in a foreland basin in Pakistan are, by more than 20 Myr, the oldest deposits thought to have been eroded from the Himalayan metamorphic mountain belt. This constraint on when erosion began has influenced models of the timing and diachrony of the India-Eurasia collision, timing and mechanisms of exhumation and uplift, as well as our general understanding of foreland basin dynamics. But the depositional age of these basin sediments was based on biostratigraphy from four intercalated marl units. Here we present dates of 257 detrital grains of white mica from this succession, using the 40Ar-39Ar method, and find that the largest concentration of ages are at 36-40 Myr. These dates are incompatible with the biostratigraphy unless the mineral ages have been reset, a possibility that we reject on the basis of a number of lines of evidence. A more detailed mapping of this formation suggests that the marl units are structurally intercalated with the continental sediments and accordingly that biostratigraphy cannot be used to date the clastic succession. The oldest continental foreland basin sediments containing metamorphic detritus eroded from the Himalaya orogeny therefore seem to be at least 15-20 Myr younger than previously believed, and models based on the older age must be re-evaluated. PMID:11242076

  5. Late Miocene and Pliocene synorogenic sedimentation in northern Livermore basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, K.A.; Andersen, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    Late Tertiary synorogenic sedimentation in the northern Livermore basin, Contra Costa County, California, has recorded two major changes in provenance. Changes in clast composition of fluvial conglomerates reflect regional tectonic reorganization as the San Andreas fault system began to evolve at this latitude. Shallow marine deposition of Sierran andesitic sediment gave way at approximately 8 Ma to fluvially dominated deposition of sediment from a local, graywacke-rich, Coast Range source. Deposition of reworked andesitic material prior to 5.5 Ma records development of anticlinal uplifts along trends of the present Altamont Hills and Calaveras fault system. By 4 Ma, the areal extent of the subsiding basin had increased; the Altamont Hills continued to be uplifted, but the Calaveras fault region began to subside rapidly. Late Miocene and Pliocene deformation of the Livermore basin area extended over a broad zone east of the developing transform fault system. Structures that developed included broad synclinal basins and gentle anticlinal uplifts that had topographic expression but were not deeply incised. Intense deformation of the basin and uplift of Mount Diablo occurred after 3 Ma.

  6. Sediment Transportation Induced by Deep-Seated Landslides in a Debris Flow Basin in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meei Ling; Chen, Te Wei; Chen, Yong Sheng; Sin Jhuang, Han

    2016-04-01

    Typhoon Morakot brought huge amount of rainfall to the southern Taiwan in 2009 and caused severe landslides and debris flow hazard. After Typhoon Morakot, it was found that the volume of sediment transported by the debris flow and its effects on the affected area were much more significant compared to previous case history, which may due to the huge amount of rainfall causing significant deep-seated landslides in the basin. In this study, the effects and tendency of the sediment transportation in a river basin following deep-seated landslides caused by typhoon Morakot were evaluated. We used LiDAR, DEM, and aerial photo to identify characteristics of deep-seated landslides in a debris flow river basin, KSDF079 in Liuoguey District, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. Eight deep-seated landslides were identified in the basin. To estimate the potential landslide volume associated with the deep-seated landslides, the stability analysis was conducted to locate the critical sliding surface, and the potential landside volume was estimated based on the estimation equation proposed by the International Geotechnical Societies' UNESCO Working Party on World Landslide Inventory (WP/WLI, 1990). The total potential landslide volume of the eight deep-seated landslides in KSDF079 basin was about 28,906,856 m3. Topographic analysis was performed by using DEM before and LiDAR derived DEM after typhoon Morakot to calculate the landslide volume transported. The result of erosion volume and deposition volume lead to a run out volume of 5,832,433 m3. The results appeared to consist well with the field condition and aerial photo. Comparing the potential landslide volume and run out volume of eight deep-seated landslides, it was found that the remaining potential landslide volume was about 80%. Field investigation and topographic analysis of the KSDF079 debris flow revealed that a significant amount of sediment deposition remained in the river channel ranging from the middle to the downstream

  7. Sediment concentration rating curves for a monsoonal climate: upper Blue Nile Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moges, M. A.; Zemale, F. A.; Alemu, M. L.; Ayele, G. K.; Dagnew, D. C.; Tilahun, S. A.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    Information on sediment content in rivers is important for design of reservoirs and for environmental applications. Because of scarcity of continuous sediment data, methods have been developed to predict sediment loads based on few discontinuous measurements. Traditionally, loads are being predicted using rating curves that relate sediment load to discharge. The relationship assumes inherently a unique relationship between concentration and discharge and therefore although performing satisfactorily in predicting loads, it may be less suitable for predicting concentration. This is especially true in the Blue Nile basin of Ethiopia where concentrations decrease for a given discharge with the progression of the rainy monsoon phase. The objective of this paper is to improve the sediment concentration predictions throughout the monsoon period for the Ethiopian highlands with a modified rating type equation. To capture the observed sediment concentration pattern, we assume that the sediment concentration was at the transport limit early in the rainy season and then decrease linearly with effective rainfall towards source limited concentration. The modified concentration rating curve was calibrated for the four main rivers in the Lake Tana basin where sediment concentrations affect fish production and tourism. Then the scalability of the rating type equation was checked in three 100-ha watersheds for which historic data was available. The results show, that for predicting sediment concentrations, the (modified) concentration rating curve was more accurate than the (standard) load rating curve as expected. In addition loads were predicted more accurately for three of the four rivers. We expect that after more extensive testing over a wider geographical area, the proposed concentration rating curve will offer improved predictions of sediment concentrations in monsoonal climates.

  8. Arsenic associations in sediments from shallow aquifers of northwestern Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deng, Y.; Wang, Y.; Ma, T.; Yang, H.; He, J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of arsenic mobilization from sediments to groundwater is important for water quality management in areas of endemic arsenic poisoning, such as the Hetao Basin in Inner Mongolia, northern China. Aquifer geochemistry was characterized at three field sites (SH, HF, TYS) in Hangjinhouqi County of northwestern Hetao Basin. The results of bulk geochemistry analysis of sediment samples indicated that total As concentrations have a range of 6. 8-58. 5 mg/kg, with a median of 14. 4 mg/kg. The highest As concentrations were found at 15-25 m depth. In the meanwhile, the range of As concentration in the sediments from background borehole is 3-21. 8 mg/kg, with a median value of 9 mg/kg. The As sediments concentrations with depth from the SH borehole were correlated with the contents of Fe, Sb, B, V, total C and total S. Generally, the abundance of elements varied with grain size, with higher concentrations in finer fractions of the sediments. Distinct lithology profile and different geochemical characteristics of aquifer sediments indicate the sediments are associated with different sources and diverse sedimentary environments. Up to one third of arsenic in the sediments could be extracted by ammonium oxalate, suggesting that Fe oxyhydroxides may be the major sink of As in the aquifer. Sequential extraction results indicate that arsenic occurs as strongly adsorbed on and/or co-precipitated with amorphous Fe oxyhydroxides in sediments accounting for 35 and 20%, respectively, of the total contents of arsenic. The release of As into groundwater may occur by desorption from the mineral surface driven by reductive dissolution of the Fe oxide minerals. Furthermore, small proportions of As associated with iron sulfides occur in the reductive sediments. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Application of Sediment Backstripping Corrections for Basin Analysis Using Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Marlon Scott; Hsui, Albert Tong-Kwan

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a program created to serve as an instructional tool for teaching basin analysis. Described is the use of the program for interpreting plots resulting from backstripping methods. Included in the discussion are implementation, applications and availability of the "Subside!" program. (CW)

  10. Geochemical and geophysical properties of gas-rich sediment in the Arkona Basin (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thießen, O.; Mathys, M.; Qian, Y.; Klein, G.; Schmidt, M.; Theilen, F.

    2003-04-01

    Free gas zones with "seismic turbidity" were detected in shallow marine sediments of the Arkona Basin, Baltic Sea, by seismic reflection investigations. These sites were used in a combined geochemical and geophysical approach as a "Natural Laboratory" (NATLAB) to study physical and chemical properties of marine sediment in relation to gas content in pore water. The knowledge of the sedimentological parameters contributes to the understanding of the nature of seismic reflectors as well as of compressional (P-) and shear- (S-) wave reflectors in terms of physical sediment properties. Gravity cores were used to recover up to 10m of muddy and clayey sediment in gas-rich areas from the center of the basin and in areas with low gas content from the basin rim. The geological data were completed by the acquisition of seismic P- and S-wave data in the sampling areas. Mean gas content of about 180ml/l pore water was measured in organic-rich sediment samples (0.5-4 m sediment depth) of the central basin. Methane, usually the main component, was formed by bacterial CO_2 reduction at anoxic conditions indicated by δ13C-CH_4 values of about -90 ppm and δD-CH_4 values of about -150 ppm, respectively. Free gas bubble formation in the uppermost anoxic sediment (0.4-0.6 cm) was confirmed by calculating the methane solubility equilibrium using in-situ temperature and pressure conditions. Furthermore, "BSR"-like reflectors have been identified in seismic profiles at the same sediment depth where free gas was assumed by solubility calculations. Gas bubble imaging was strongly frequency dependent indicated by changes of the reflection characteristics of the gas reflectors for different seismic sources. Susceptibility, bulk density and (P-) wave velocity of sediment cores were measured using a MSCL core logger. P-wave velocities showed reduced values in the muddy gas-rich surface sediment compared to the underlying consolidated clay. Adjusting sedimentological stratigraphy to boomer

  11. Provenance Analysis of Surface Sediments in the Chew Bahir Basin (Ethiopia) using Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesche, N.; Trauth, M.

    2012-04-01

    Provenance analysis is an essential discipline for describing the generation and dispersal of sediments and yields a fundamental understanding of hydrological and sedimentological processes. Chew Bahir basin is a hardly accessible terrain in southern Ethiopia, which is barely investigated by sedimentological studies until today. In this work, those studies were conducted via remotely sensed digital image analysis (ASTER, Landsat ETM+, Worldview-1 and SRTM) combined with a climatological approach through precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Besides remote sensing, sedimentological investigations were achieved from a highly resolved paleo-climate record through a short drill-core from Chew Bahir basin. In order to identify and localize potential source areas and to describe the dispersal of sediments, different processing methodologies were applied (achievement of sediment composition, land-surface classification, digital terrain analysis and generation of remote sensing time series). The result of this work demonstrates two different source rocks, which belong to two distinct source localities. Hence, the analysis of remote sensed digital imaginary provides an effective tool for studying the provenance of sediments, especially in remote regions such as Chew Bahir basin. Moreover, remotely sensed time series provide important insights into climatologically induced variations in the uppermost sediment-layer. However, fully automated analysis of remotely sensed imaginary cannot replace fieldwork, but provides outstanding contributions to interdisciplinarity.

  12. Soft sediment deformation structures in the Maastrichtian Ajali Formation Western Flank of Anambra Basin, Southern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olabode, Solomon Ojo

    2014-01-01

    Soft sediment deformation structures were recognized in the Maastrichtian shallow marine wave to tide influenced regressive sediments of Ajali Formation in the western flank of Anambra basin, southern Nigerian. The soft sediment deformation structures were in association with cross bedded sands, clay and silt and show different morphological types. Two main types recognised are plastic deformations represented by different types of recumbent folds and injection structure represented by clastic dykes. Other structures in association with the plastic deformation structures include distorted convolute lamination, subsidence lobes, pillars, cusps and sand balls. These structures are interpreted to have been formed by liquefaction and fluidization mechanisms. The driving forces inferred include gravitational instabilities and hydraulic processes. Facies analysis, detailed morphologic study of the soft sediment deformation structures and previous tectonic history of the basin indicate that the main trigger agent for deformation is earthquake shock. The soft sediment deformation structures recognised in the western part of Anambra basin provide a continuous record of the tectonic processes that acted on the regressive Ajali Formation during the Maastrichtian.

  13. Suspended-sediment characteristics for the Johnson Creek basin, Oregon, water years 2007-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Bragg, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant Findings An analysis of suspended-sediment transport in the Johnson Creek basin, Oregon, during water years 2007–10 indicated that: Streamflow characteristics for the 4 years of study were not extremely dry or wet, and represented near-average conditions. Computed average annual suspended-sediment loads were 1,890 and 4,640 tons at the Gresham and Milwaukie stations, respectively. More than 70 percent of suspended-sediment transport in the watershed occurred during the high-flow months of November, December, and January. Less than 10 percent of suspended-sediment transport in the watershed occurred during April–October. About 50 percent of all suspended-sediment load is transported during the highest 1 percent of streamflows. The January 2009 streamflow peak was the third highest in the 70-year record for Johnson Creek. About 50 percent of suspended-sediment transport in water year 2009 occurred in January. The drainage area upstream of the Gresham streamflow-gaging station constitutes about 30 percent of the drainage area at the Milwaukie station, but accounted for about 40 percent of the suspended sediment and 45 percent of the streamflow at the Milwaukie station. On an annual basis, most of the higher sediment yield at the Gresham station, relative to the Milwaukie station, can be explained by the higher streamflow yield at the Gresham station rather than by higher suspended-sediment concentration.

  14. Carbon dioxide production in surface sediments of temporarily anoxic basins (Baltic Sea) and resulting sediment-water interface fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M. E.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Winde, V.; Lenz, C.; Dellwig, O.; Leipe, T.; Segl, M.; Struck, U.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter is mineralized in marine sediments by microbial activity using predominantly oxygen, sulfate, and metal oxides as electron acceptors. Modern euxinic basins as found in the Baltic Sea or the Black Sea are of particular importance because they may serve as type systems for anoxia in Earth's history. We present here results from biogeochemical investigations carried out in the Baltic deeps (Gotland Basin, Landsort Deep) during the first scientific cruise of RV M.S. MERIAN in 2006, additionally during RV Prof. Penck cruises in 2006 and 2007. Short sediment cores were obtained with a multi-corer and analyzed for particulate and dissolved main, minor and trace elements, pH, DIC, methane alkalinity, besides the stable carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Microsensors were applied to analyze steep gradients of oxygen, sulphide and sulphate. Pore water profiles are evaluated in terms of process rates and associated element fluxes using the PROFILE software (Berg et al., 1998, L&O). Gross and net anaerobic mineralization rates were additionally obtained from core incubations with 35S. Steep gradients in DIC are associated with a strong enrichment of the light stable isotope resulting in the Gotland basin from oxidized OM. Element fluxes across the sediment-water interface are compared with literature data and show for the Baltic Sea a dependence from bottom water redox conditions, and sediment compositions and formation conditions (e.g., accumulation rates). DIC in the anoxic part of the water column in the Landsort Deep and the Gotland Deep show relatively similar isotope values, close to the bottom water value, but steep gradients towards heavier values above the pelagic redoxcline. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by Leibniz IO Warnemünde, DFG (Cruise RV MSM MERIAN 01), and MPG. Thanks to B. Schneider and F. Pollehne stimulating discussions, and S. Lage and A. Schipper for technical support.

  15. Initial Sediment Transport Model of the Mining-Affected Aries River Basin, Romania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.; Linard, Joshua I.

    2008-01-01

    The Romanian government is interested in understanding the effects of existing and future mining activities on long-term dispersal, storage, and remobilization of sediment-associated metals. An initial Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was prepared using available data to evaluate hypothetical failure of the Valea Sesei tailings dam at the Rosia Poieni mine in the Aries River basin. Using the available data, the initial Aries River Basin SWAT model could not be manually calibrated to accurately reproduce monthly streamflow values observed at the Turda gage station. The poor simulation of the monthly streamflow is attributed to spatially limited soil and precipitation data, limited constraint information due to spatially and temporally limited streamflow measurements, and in ability to obtain optimal parameter values when using a manual calibration process. Suggestions to improve the Aries River basin sediment transport model include accounting for heterogeneity in model input, a two-tier nonlinear calibration strategy, and analysis of uncertainty in predictions.

  16. Sedimentation settings and evolution history of the Kuril Basin (Sea of Okhotsk) in the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, E. P.; Tsoy, I. B.; Vashchenkova, N. G.; Mozherovskii, A. V.; Gorovaya, M. T.

    2008-08-01

    A study of the rocks from the Cenozoic sedimentary cover of the Kuril Basin slopes revealed two sedimentation stages in this area: the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene and Late Miocene-Pleistocene, which are separated by erosion in the Middle Miocene. They are characterized by dominant siliceous and terrigenous sediments, respectively. The former largely accumulated in neritic settings, while the latter were deposited in the bathyal zone under a strong influence of explosive volcanism. The change in the sedimentation regime probably occurred in the Middle-Late Miocene during the formation of the slopes of the present-day Kuril Basin. The rocks constituting crustal blocks with a granite-metamorphic layer served as a source of terrigenous material for the Cenozoic sedimentary cover, which indicates the sialic nature of the underlying basement.

  17. ARSENIC SEDIMENTATION ALONG THE SLOPE OF A LAKE BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Lansing, Michigan was treated with sodium arsenite for macrophyte control in 1957. even 1.5-m sediment cores were taken along a line through the littoral zone to the deepest portion of the lake and analyzed for arsenic. n each core, arsenic concentrations going from the surf...

  18. Channel morphometry, sediment transport, and implications for tectonic activity and surficial ages of Titan basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cartwright, R.; Clayton, J.A.; Kirk, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial features on Titan and drainage basins on Earth are remarkably similar despite differences in gravity and surface composition. We determined network bifurcation (Rb) ratios for five Titan and three terrestrial analog basins. Tectonically-modified Earth basins have Rb values greater than the expected range (3.0-5.0) for dendritic networks; comparisons with Rb values determined for Titan basins, in conjunction with similarities in network patterns, suggest that portions of Titan's north polar region are modified by tectonic forces. Sufficient elevation data existed to calculate bed slope and potential fluvial sediment transport rates in at least one Titan basin, indicating that 75mm water ice grains (observed at the Huygens landing site) should be readily entrained given sufficient flow depths of liquid hydrocarbons. Volumetric sediment transport estimates suggest that ???6700-10,000 Titan years (???2.0-3.0??105 Earth years) are required to erode this basin to its minimum relief (assuming constant 1m and 1.5m flows); these lowering rates increase to ???27,000-41,000 Titan years (???8.0-12.0??105 Earth years) when flows in the north polar region are restricted to summer months. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Tectonically controlled sedimentation in the Mesozoic basins of the Antarctic Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.I.M.; Butterworth, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The Antarctica Peninsula (AP) lies on a medium-size block of continental crust and is one of a mosaic of west Antarctica coastal block that underwent a complex tectonic evolution during Gondwana breakup. The peninsula represents the eroded roots of a microcontinental volcanic arc; this arc lay above the easterly subducting proto-Pacific plate, and was active throughout the Mesozoic. The exposed Mesozoic basins display a complex stratigraphy, reflecting local tectonic and volcanic events. There are a few general trends. Almost all basins are post-late Oxfordian, their fill is entirely clastic, and is largely derived from the Antarctica peninsula volcanic arc. Most basins were affected by a period of arc expansion in the latest Jurassic or earliest Cretaceous, which manifests itself as inputs of lava or coarse volcaniclastic sediment overlying mudstones with an open marine fauna. Barriasian and older mudstones are generally finer grained and darker than mudstones from post-Berriasian strata. However, it must be emphasized that these are only general trends. Deformation is variable, commonly progressive. No lithostratigraphic units can be correlated between any two basins, nor are there any interregional unconformities. No matching is possible with basins of equivalent age in formerly contiguous areas of Gondwana. There is evidence that some global eustatic events are recorded in the sedimentary records of at least two of the AP Mesozoic basins, but these have effect only in periods of local tectonic quiescence. The dominant control on sedimentation in this large segment of the Pacific rim was arc tectonics.

  20. An evaluation of selenium concentrations in water, sediment, invertebrates, and fish from the Solomon River Basin.

    PubMed

    May, Thomas W; Fairchild, James F; Petty, Jim D; Walther, Michael J; Lucero, Jeff; Delvaux, Mike; Manring, Jill; Armbruster, Mike

    2008-02-01

    The Solomon River Basin is located in north-central Kansas in an area underlain by marine geologic shales. Selenium is an indigenous constituent of these shales and is readily leached into the surrounding groundwater. Portions of the Basin are irrigated primarily through the pumping of selenium-contaminated groundwater from wells onto fields in agricultural production. Water, sediment, macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected from various sites in the Basin in 1998 and analyzed for selenium. Selenium concentrations were analyzed spatially and temporally and compared to reported selenium toxic effect thresholds for specific ecosystem components: water, sediments, food-chain organisms, and wholebody fish. A selenium aquatic hazard assessment for the Basin was determined based on protocol established by Lemly. Throughout the Basin, water, macroinvertebrate, and whole fish samples exceeded levels suspected of causing reproductive impairment in fish. Population structures of several fish species implied that successful reproduction was occurring; however, the influence of immigration of fish from low-selenium habitats could not be discounted. Site-specific fish reproduction studies are needed to determine the true impact of selenium on fishery resources in the Basin. PMID:17587192

  1. Eustatic and tectonic control of sedimentation in the Pennsylvanian strata of the Central Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.R. Jr. . Kentucky Geological Survey)

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the Breathitt Group of the Central Appalachian Basin reveals three orders of depositional cycles or trends. The Breathitt coarsening-upward trend (20 million years (my)) represents increasing intensity of the Alleghenian Orogeny. The major transgression (MT) cycle (2.5 my) was controlled by an unknown eustatic or tectonic mechanism. The major coal beds and intervening strata make up the coal-clastic cycle (CC cycle) (=Appalachian cyclothem) which has a 0.4 my periodicity. This periodicity supports eustatic control of sedimentation modulated by an orbital periodicity. Extensive coastal peats deposited at lowstand (CC cycle) were preserved as coals, whereas highstand peats were eroded during the subsequent drop in sea level. Autocyclic processes such as delta switching and avulsion occurred within CC cycles. An Early Pennsylvanian unconformity represents uplift and erosion of mid-Carboniferous foreland basin deposits. Alluvial deposits (Breathitt Group) derived from the highlands were transported to the northwest toward the forebulge. During lowstand, the only outlet available to further sediment transport (Lee sandstones) was toward the southwest (Ouachita Trough), along the Black Warrior-Appalachian foreland basins. The Middle Pennsylvanian marks a period of intermittent overfilling of the foreland basin and cresting of the forebulge. Marine transgressions entered through the foreland basins and across saddles in the forebulge. After the Ouachita Trough was destroyed during the late Middle Pennsylvanian, marine transgressions migrated only across saddles in the forebulge. In the Late Pennsylvanian, marine waters entered the basin only across the diminished forebulge north of the Jessamine Dome.

  2. An evaluation of selenium concentrations in water, sediment, invertebrates, and fish from the Solomon River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Fairchild, J.F.; Petty, J.D.; Walther, M.J.; Lucero, J.; Delvaux, M.; Manring, J.; Armbruster, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Solomon River Basin is located in north-central Kansas in an area underlain by marine geologic shales. Selenium is an indigenous constituent of these shales and is readily leached into the surrounding groundwater. Portions of the Basin are irrigated primarily through the pumping of selenium-contaminated groundwater from wells onto fields in agricultural production. Water, sediment, macroinvertebrates, and fish were collected from various sites in the Basin in 1998 and analyzed for selenium. Selenium concentrations were analyzed spatially and temporally and compared to reported selenium toxic effect thresholds for specific ecosystem components: water, sediments, food-chain organisms, and wholebody fish. A selenium aquatic hazard assessment for the Basin was determined based on protocol established by Lemly. Throughout the Basin, water, macroinvertebrate, and whole fish samples exceeded levels suspected of causing reproductive impairment in fish. Population structures of several fish species implied that successful reproduction was occurring; however, the influence of immigration of fish from low-selenium habitats could not be discounted. Site-specific fish reproduction studies are needed to determine the true impact of selenium on fishery resources in the Basin. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  3. 10Be variation in surficial sediments of the Central Indian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagender Nath, B.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Selvaraj, K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M. B. L.; Chen, C. T. A.

    2007-06-01

    Distribution of 10Be in systematically collected (degree × degree interval at 10 to 16 °S; 73.5 to 76.5 °E) surficial siliceous ooze, siliceous clay and pelagic clay sediments (top 2 cm) from the abyssal Central Indian Basin and the Andaman Sea is used to evaluate sources and to decipher the transport pathways of sediment particles, demarcate sediment depocenters and erosional areas. While 10Be concentrations display a wide variation (0.12-5.56 × 109 atoms g-1) with an average of 3.58 × 109 atoms g-1 in the Central Indian Basin, the values in the Andaman Sea are uniform with an average of 1.49 × 109 atoms g-1. The 10Be/9Be values in the Central Indian Basin sediments range between 0.06 and 2.99 × 10-8 atoms atoms-1 and average to ∼1.56 × 10-8 atoms atoms-1. Correlation of 10Be data with some selected major (Al, Mn, Ti) and trace (Rb and Ba) elements suggest that large part of the isotope has been supplied through direct atmospheric fallout from the water column and minor part from lithogenic detrital flux. Significantly lower 10Be accumulation rates in the Central Indian Basin and an order of magnitude higher in the Andaman Sea sediments compared to the estimated global average production rates indicate removal of the isotopes at the continental margins. Bottom topography seems to exert control on local 10Be variation, where sediments deposited in valleys or topographic depressions contain higher 10Be concentrations in contrast to the probably erosion-dominated areas at the slopes and troughs.

  4. When sink becomes source: Importance of sediment recycling in linked orogen-basin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romans, Brian W.; Fosdick, Julie C.; Hubbards, Stephen M.; Fildani, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Much of the recent research on sedimentary system dynamics has focused on extant systems where the linkage of sediment production from eroding highlands can be directly linked to deposition in lowlands and/or offshore basins. Studies of such systems, typically late Pleistocene to Holocene in age, are especially valuable for quantitative constraints such as system morphometrics (e.g., longitudinal profiles, basin volumes, etc.) and rates of processes (e.g., erosion/denudation, sediment accumulation, etc.), which can be measured directly or estimated with relatively high certainty. Moreover, information about climate and tectonic forcings that are independent to the system is explicitly known for extant systems. However, an understanding of longer-term (>105 yr) evolution can only be gained through the investigation of ancient systems. Such systems are either buried in the subsurface, which requires geophysical remote sensing and/or drilling, or exposed at the Earth's surface as outcrops as the result of uplift and exhumation. The dynamic linkage of mountain belt and adjacent basin makes foreland basin systems ideal natural laboratories to address long-term sedimentary system evolution. In this presentation, we highlight important issues and challenges that sedimentary systems research is currently facing, with an emphasis on sediment recycling during progressive stages of basin development. In this context, we focus on sedimentary systems in which multiple episodes of uplift and erosion of the primary depocenter led to a history whereby basin material was repeatedly recycled. The spatial and temporal aspects of sediment recycling have implications for how provenance signals (based on composition, crystallization or metamorphic age information, thermal history, etc.) are used. Additionally, improved constraints regarding the timescales and magnitude of sediment recycling have implications for system-scale modeling. Key parameters such as total sediment volumes and

  5. Paleomagnetic secular variation as an intra-basinal and extra-basinal correlation tool for Pleistocene lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, R.M.; Erbes, D.B. . Dept. of Physics and Geology); Roberts, A.P.; Verosub, K.L.

    1993-04-01

    High-resolution age control is a serious problem encountered by those studying middle to late Pleistocene lake sediments, especially saline lake deposits which commonly are low in organic content obviating the use of bulk sediment radiocarbon dating. Paleomagnetic secular variation, the low amplitude variation in the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field, can be recorded accurately in lake sediments. In this case if offers a high-resolution correlation tool which can be used for intra- and extra-basinal correlations. In principal, this could extend geographically as far away as marine environments enabling on to tie non-marine stratigraphy into the well-dated chronology common to marine sediment records. Examples are given of correlations based on this technique. The examples, in turn, are based on ongoing paleomagnetic and lithostratigraphic studies in the sediments of Pleistocene Lakes Chewaucan, Lahontan and previously-published paleomagnetic records from Pleistocene Lake Russell and from two un-named Pleistocene lakes. Intrabasinal correlations in Lake Chewaucan support the contention that secular variation can be used to correlate outcrop exposures (three samples per horizon) on a depth scale of several centimeters which probably corresponds to a temporal resolution of a few hundred years or less.

  6. Sediment discharge from an area of highway construction, Applemans Run basin, Columbia County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckhardt, David A.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of highway construction on stream sediment loads were studied in Applemans Run basin, Columbia County, Pa., from October 1971 to May 1974. During the investigations, about 5,200 tons of suspended-sediment were discharged from the basin. Of this amount, about 2,700 tons, or about half the total sediment discharge, as derived from the highway construction area. Annual suspended-sediment yields from 17.5 acres under construction ranged from 40,000 to 66,000 tons/sq mi in the 1972 and 1973 water years, respectively. In the 1972 and 1973 er years of active construction, 83 percent of the sediment transported from the construction site was eroded each year in storms from January to June. Seasonal trends in sediment discharge for 1972 show that 69 percent of that year 's suspended-load was transported in April, May, and June, whereas less than 1 percent was transported in July, August, and September. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Tectonic development, sedimentation and paleoceanography of the Scan Basin (southern Scotia Sea, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Lodolo, Emanuele; Maldonado, Andrés; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Bohoyo, Fernando; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Lobo, F. José; Burca, Mihai

    2014-12-01

    The N-S trending Scan Basin is the easternmost deep basin north of the South Scotia Ridge, which is a geologically complex structural elevation that hosts the strike-slip boundary between the Scotia and Antarctic plates. We characterized the main morpho-structural features of the basin by analyzing the available multichannel seismic reflection profiles. The reconstruction of the seismo-stratigraphy reveals the growth patterns of the Scan Basin. Seismic data and gravity modeling support the interpretation that the basin is mainly floored by oceanic crust, however its northern and southern provinces exhibit different seismic attributes. Stratigraphic calibrations with adjacent regions together with the distribution of sedimentary units indicate that this basin was formed by rifting processes and subsequent spreading accretion from the Oligocene to the Miocene. This age attribution suggests that the Scan Basin might be one of the oldest oceanic basins of the southern Scotia Sea-possibly coeval with the Eocene-Oligocene opening of the Drake Passage. The basin is the most direct connection between the Weddell Sea and the Scotia Sea, whereas the stratigraphic features reveal the occurrence of major paleoceanographic changes. The initial phases of the evolution were influenced by mass-transport and turbidite processes of sediment supply from the nearby continental margins of the eastern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. From the Middle Miocene to the Present-day, the eastward motion of the basin due to plate tectonic and the connection with the Weddell Sea through gateways enabled instauration of the overflow of Weddell Sea Deep Water (WSDW) into the Scan Basin. The WSDW forced the northward migration of the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) and became progressively dominant, controlling depositional patterns. The results that we report here should prove essential for understanding the formation of the Scotia Sea, the beginning of the Scotia Arc fragmentation, and the increasing

  8. Widespread, Off-axis Magmatism at a Young Oceanic Rift, the Sedimented Guaymas Basin Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, S.; Lizarralde, D.; Seewald, J.; Proskurowski, G.

    2010-12-01

    A thick layer of sediment commonly blankets spreading centers within young rifted margins such as the Guaymas Basin within the Gulf of California. The shallow oceanic crust in these environments differs significantly from deep-water, unsedimented ridges in that there is little to no extrusive volcanism, and crust is accreted by the intrusion of magmatic sills into sediments. From initial observations at the seafloor and through drill holes in the S. Guaymas Basin, a model of magmatic accretion similar to that of deep-water mid-ocean ridges was proposed wherein sills are intruded at the rift axis and subsequently buried by sediments as they are rafted off axis. Seismic reflection data collected throughout the N. Guaymas basin in 2002, however, found that sills do not deepen with off-axis distance suggesting that sill intrusion to shallow levels within the sediment pile occurs throughout the basin out to 50 km from the plate boundary (spreading age of 2 Ma). This suggests that magmatic accretion within the shallow crust is active over a very wide area (10-20 times larger than at deep-water mid-ocean ridges) independent of spreading age. During a cruise to the Guaymas Basin in 2009, we collected deep-towed sidescan sonar, sub-bottom imaging, multibeam bathymetry, near-bottom photographs, and bottom water samples across the N. Guaymas Basin to test this hypothesis. Acoustic backscatter imagery revealed nearly 100 localized, acoustically bright seafloor reflectors scattered throughout the survey area. Some of these backscatter anomalies were investigated with a deep-towed camera system and found to contain authigenic carbonate, tubeworms, clams, bacterial mats, and indurated sediment outcrops. Some sites showed small thermal anomalies in near-bottom waters, methane concentrations well in excess of background, and high 3He anomalies. Where coverage overlaps, these sites correlate with the position of seismically imaged subsurface sills. In this presentation, we present

  9. Lead exposure of waterfowl ingesting Coeur d?Alene River Basin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Audet, D.J.; Morton, Alexandra; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.

    1998-01-01

    Feces from tundra swans (Cygnus columbianus [Ord]), Canada geese (Branta canadensis [L.]) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos [L.]) were collected from the Coeur d?Alene River Basin and two reference areas to estimate exposure to lead from mining activities and to relate that exposure to the ingestion of contaminated sediments. The average acid-insoluble ash content of the feces, a measure of sediment, was 18% for Canada geese and tundra swans, and 12% for ducks. The 18% value corresponded to an estimated 9% sediment ingestion rate (dry weight). The 90th percentile for acid-insoluble ash in feces of tundra swans corresponds to an estimated 22% sediment in the diet. The average lead concentration (dry weight) of tundra swan feces from all Coeur d?Alene River Basin wetlands sampled was 880 mg/kg, compared to 2.1 mg kg1 from reference wetlands. The 90th percentile of lead in tundra swan feces from the Coeur d?Alene River Basin sites was 2700 mg kg1. Fecal lead concentrations of tundra swans from Harrison Slough, the wetland studied in most detail, were correlated (Spearman?s rho = 0.74, p < 0.05) with the acid-insoluble ash content of the feces. The very low lead concentrations in feces having low acid-insoluble ash contents established that the sediment was the primary source of the lead ingested by waterfowl. Sediment lead concentrations at 11 wetland sites were closely correlated (r = 0.91, p < 0.05) with average fecal lead concentrations for all waterfowl, corrected for the average percent acid-insoluble ash in the feces. The regression equation describing this relation, along with estimates of sediment ingestion, provides a straight-forward means of estimating the current exposure of waterfowl to lead and of predicting the potential exposure of waterfowl to lead under plans to clean up the contaminated sites.

  10. Modeling of soil erosion and sediment transport in the East River Basin in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiping; Chen, Ji

    2012-12-15

    Soil erosion is a major global environmental problem that has caused many issues involving land degradation, sedimentation of waterways, ecological degradation, and nonpoint source pollution. Therefore, it is significant to understand the processes of soil erosion and sediment transport along rivers, and this can help identify the erosion prone areas and find potential measures to alleviate the environmental effects. In this study, we investigated soil erosion and identified the most seriously eroded areas in the East River Basin in southern China using a physically-based model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We also introduced a classical sediment transport method (Zhang) into SWAT and compared it with the built-in Bagnold method in simulating sediment transport process along the river. The derived spatial soil erosion map and land use based erosion levels can explicitly illustrate the identification and prioritization of the critical soil erosion areas in this basin. Our results also indicate that erosion is quite sensitive to soil properties and slope. Comparison of Bagnold and Zhang methods shows that the latter can give an overall better performance especially in tracking the peak and low sediment concentrations along the river. We also found that the East River is mainly characterized by sediment deposition in most of the segments and at most times of a year. Overall, the results presented in this paper can provide decision support for watershed managers about where the best management practices (conservation measures) can be implemented effectively and at low cost. The methods we used in this study can also be of interest in sediment modeling for other basins worldwide. PMID:23137981

  11. Mercury in bottom sediment and aquatic invertebrates, Carson and Truckee River Basins, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, S.J.; Bevans, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    Bottom sediment and aquatic invertebrates were sampled for trace-element analyses at 11 sites in the Carson and Truckee River Basins during September 1 992 as part of the US Geological Survey`s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Composite bottom-sediment samples from inundated depositional areas were wet-sieved through a 63-micrometer nylon mesh and composite aquatic invertebrate samples were allowed to depurate prior to analyses. In the Carson River Basin, mercury concentrations increased downstream from 0.24 microgram per gram, dry weight ({mu}g/g), in both bottom sediment and western crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) samples from the East Fork Carson River near Markleeville, Calif., to 5.9 {mu}g/g in bottom sediment in the Carson River near Fallon, Nev., and to 48 {mu}g/g in western crayfish in the river near Fort Churchill, Nev. Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) from the Carson River at Fort Churchill and near Fallon had 6.1 and 1.4 {mu}g/g of mercury, respectively. In the Truckee River Basin, mercury concentrations increased downstream from 0.02 {mu}g/g in bottom sediment and 0.17--0.21 {mu}g/g in western crayfish at sites upstream of Reno, Nev., to 0.58 {mu}g/g in bottom sediment and 0.49 {mu}g/g in western crayfish at Clark, Nev. Downstream patterns of mercury concentration in bottom sediment and western crayfish are similar. Possible sources of mercury include historical gold and silver ore-milling activities, acid mine drainage, mineral deposits, and urban activities.

  12. Modeling of soil erosion and sediment transport in the East River Basin in southern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yping; Chen, Ji

    2012-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major global environmental problem that has caused many issues involving land degradation, sedimentation of waterways, ecological degradation, and nonpoint source pollution. Therefore, it is significant to understand the processes of soil erosion and sediment transport along rivers, and this can help identify the erosion prone areas and find potential measures to alleviate the environmental effects. In this study, we investigated soil erosion and identified the most seriously eroded areas in the East River Basin in southern China using a physically-based model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We also introduced a classical sediment transport method (Zhang) into SWAT and compared it with the built-in Bagnold method in simulating sediment transport process along the river. The derived spatial soil erosion map and land use based erosion levels can explicitly illustrate the identification and prioritization of the critical soil erosion areas in this basin. Our results also indicate that erosion is quite sensitive to soil properties and slope. Comparison of Bagnold and Zhang methods shows that the latter can give an overall better performance especially in tracking the peak and low sediment concentrations along the river. We also found that the East River is mainly characterized by sediment deposition in most of the segments and at most times of a year. Overall, the results presented in this paper can provide decision support for watershed managers about where the best management practices (conservation measures) can be implemented effectively and at low cost. The methods we used in this study can also be of interest in sediment modeling for other basins worldwide.

  13. Morphotectonics and sedimentation in convergent margin basins: An example from juxtaposed marginal sea basin and foreland basin, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ho-Shing; Huang, Zehn-Yin

    2009-03-01

    Using reflection seismic profiles and bathymetric mapping this paper reveals the tectonic-sedimentary characteristics of the convergent margins in the northern South China Sea, where it is strongly related to flexure of Chinese rifted margin and overthrust of Taiwan orogen. Convergent margin tectonics of the South China Sea near southern Taiwan is characterized by a progressively northward transition from oceanic subduction along the Manila Trench to the incipient collision zone offshore southern Taiwan where the continental crust of the Eurasian plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. North of 21°N, dip angles of the Benioff zone increase up to 80° in the incipient collision zone where the Manila Trench becomes shallower, gradually loses its morphological identity and finally merges into the nearly N-S trending Penghu Canyon. Convergent margin tectonics in the initial collision zone in SW Taiwan is manifested by the beginning of flexure of the Chinese margin under the westward migrating overthrust belt of Taiwan, forming two distinct basins. On the passive Chinese margin, the marginal sea basin becomes smaller and is underlain by the South China Sea Slope, while on the active Taiwan margin, a wedge-top basin has formed above the frontal thrust sheets of the Taiwan orogenic wedge. Sediments derived from the Taiwan orogen progressively overlie the strata of the passive Chinese margin, resulting in sediment thickening and basin shallowing from south to north. Sedimentary facies shows that offshore deep-water mud is gradationally overlain by shallow marine sediments. Sediments of the wedge-top basin are being actively deformed into mud diapiric intrusions and a series of west-vergent thrusts and folds with their associated piggy-back basins, resulting in irregular topography of the sea floor with alternating sea ridges and troughs. Pliocene-Quaternary strata of the passive Chinese margin are a little deformed under the westward compression induced by the

  14. Assessing sedimentation rates at Usumacinta and Grijalva river basin (Southern Mexico) using OSL and suspended sediment load analysis: A study from the Maya Classic Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Salinas, E.; Castillo, M.; Sanderson, D.; Kinnaird, T.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.

    2013-12-01

    Studying sedimentation rates on floodplains is key to understanding environmental changes occurred through time in river basins. The Usumacinta and Grijalva rivers flow most of their travel through the southern part of Mexico, forming a large river basin, crossing the states of Chiapas and Tabasco. The Usumacinta-Grijalva River Basin is within the 10 major rivers of North America, having a basin area of ~112 550 km2. We use the OSL technique for dating two sediment profiles and for obtaining luminescence signals in several sediment profiles located in the streambanks of the main trunk of the Usumacinta and Grijalva rivers. We also use mean annual values of suspended sediment load spanning ~50 years to calculate the sedimentation rates. Our OSL dating results start from the 4th Century, when the Maya Civilization was at its peak during the Classic Period. Sedimentation rates show a notable increase at the end of the 19th Century. The increase of the sedimentation rates seems to be related to changes in land uses in the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and Altos de Chiapas, based on deforestation and land clearing for developing new agrarian and pastoral activities. We conclude that the major environmental change in the basin of the Usumacinta and Grijalva Rivers since the Maya Classic Period was generated since the last Century as a result of an intense anthropogenic disturbance of mountain rain forest in Chiapas.

  15. Variability of suspended sediment yields within the Loire river basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, A.; Cerdan, O.; Delmas, M.; Desmet, M.

    2014-11-01

    Suspended sediment fluxes and their variability in time and space have received much attention over the past decades. Large databases compiling suspended sediment load (SL) data are often used to serve these purposes. Analyses of these databases have highlighted the following two major limitations: (i) the role of lowland areas in sediment production and transfer has been minimised, and studies on small-scale catchments (with a drainage area of ⩽102 km2) are practically non-existent in the literature; and (ii) inhomogeneous data and calculation methods are used to estimate and compare the SL values. In this context, the present study aims to complete the existing studies by providing a reliable comparison of SL values for various catchments within lowland river basins. Therefore, we focused on the Loire and Brittany river basins (France). 111 small to large catchments covering 78% of this area and representative of the basins landscape diversity were chosen. We first present a large database of area-specific suspended sediment yields (SY) calculated from the suspended sediment concentration and flow discharge data over 7-40 yr of measurements at gauging stations. Two calculation methods are used, and the calculated loads are confined within a factor of 0.60-1.65 of the real values. Second, we analyse the temporal and spatial variability of the calculated SY values. Finally, using a nested catchment approach, we provide insight into sediment transport from upstream to downstream gauging stations and into the role of small- and medium- scale catchments in sediment production and transfers. The SL values at the outlet of the catchments range from 2.5 * 102 to 8.6 * 105 t yr-1, and the SY values range from 2.9 to 32.4 t km-2 yr-1. A comparison with the limited values available in the literature for this region corroborates our estimations. Sediment exports from the Loire and Brittany river basins are very low compared with mountainous regions and European exports

  16. The link between tectonics and sedimentation in back-arc basins: New genetic constraints from the analysis of the Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, A.; Matenco, L.; Magyar, I.; Horváth, F.; Cloetingh, S.

    2016-06-01

    The architecture of sedimentary basins reflects the relationship between accommodation space and sediment supply, their rates and localization being variable during basin evolution. The mechanisms driving the interplay between tectonics and sedimentation in extensional back-arc basins overlying rheological weak zones inherited from an earlier orogenic evolution are less understood. A typical example is the Pannonian back-arc basin of Central Europe. It is floored by continental lithosphere and was affected by large amounts of extension driven by the subduction rollback that took place in the Carpathians and/or Dinarides. A novel kinematic and seismic sequence stratigraphic interpretation calibrated by wells allows the quantification of the link between the formation of half grabens and coeval sedimentation in the Great Hungarian Plain part of the basin. While the lower order tectonic-induced cycles characterize the main phases of extension in various subbasins, the higher-order cyclicity and associated unconformities define individual moments of fault (re)activation. Our novel interpretation of a temporal and spatial migration of extension during Miocene times explains the contrasting present-day strike of various subbasins as a result of their gradual clockwise rotation. Incorporating the observed asymmetry, in particular the associated footwall exhumation, infers that the amount of extension is much larger than previously thought. The quantitative link between tectonics and sedimentation has allowed the definition of a novel model of sedimentation in asymmetric basins that can be ported to other natural scenarios of similarly hyperextended back-arc basins observed elsewhere.

  17. Reef to basin sediment transport using Halimeda as a sediment tracer, Grand Cayman Island, West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Hilary D.; Moore, Clyde H.

    1988-03-01

    Fragments of the calcareous green alga Halimeda form a large part of the sediment in the fringing reef system and adjacent deep marine environments of Grand Cayman Island, West Indies. Nine species combine to form three depth-related assemblages that are characteristic of the major reef-related environments (lagoonpatch reef, reef terraces, and deep reef). These modern plant assemblages form the basis of the use of Halimeda as a sediment tracer. Halimeda-based tracer studies of Holocene sediments indicate that only sediments containing deep reef species of Halimeda are presently being transported through the reef system by sediment creep and being deposited at the juncture of the upper and lower island slope. Sediments containing shallow reef Halimeda are retained within the reef and lithified by marine carbonate cements. Tracer studies of Pleistocene sediment indicate large amounts of reef-derived carbonate sand containing deep water Halimeda were produced during interglacial high stands of sea level. Much of this material was removed by turbidity currents moving out of the reef system to the island slope down submarine channels perpendicular to the reef trend. These channels may still be identified on bathymetric profiles, but are no longer receiving coarse reef debris and are veneered with a blanket of pelagic carbonate mud.

  18. Tectonic controls on sedimentation in Mesozoic convergent margin basin of Baja California (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.; Smith, D.P.; Morris, W.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Mesozoic rocks of the Baja California peninsula form one of the most extensive, best exposed, oldest (160 m.y.), and least-tectonized and metamorphosed convergent margin basin complexes in the world. Much of the fill of these basins consist of coarse-grained volcaniclastic and epiclastic sequences that directly reflect the tectonic evolution of the region. The early history of the convergent margin was dominated by sedimentation in small, steep-sided basins within oceanic island arc systems. The Triassic and Jurassic convergent margin basins probably represent proto-Pacific terranes that traveled from another area. These terranes were assembled by the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, and underlie the forearc region of a medial Cretaceous oceanic island arc system. Tbis system fringed the Mesoamerican continental margin and underwent regional-scale extension during subduction of old, dense lithosphere. The latest phases of sedimentation in the convergent margin occurred in broad, relatively stable forearc basins of a mature continental arc, during the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene. Nonetheless, intrabasinal faults provided some controls on depositional systems and bathymetry. The authors speculate that these faults formed in response to oblique convergence which ultimately resulted in 10-19{degree} northward displacement of Baja California relative to the North American craton, from the latitude of Central America to northern Mexico. The fill of oceanic island arc basins in Baja California is dominated by coarse-grained marine wedges including (1) arc apron deposits, consisting of pyroclastic and/or volcanic epiclastic debris deposited in intra-arc or back-arc basins, and (2) slope apron deposits, consisting of epiclastic debris shed from local fault scarps and more distally derived arc volcaniclastics, deposited in forearc basins.

  19. Bacterial biogeography influenced by shelf-basin exchange in the Arctic surface sediment at the Chukchi Borderland.

    PubMed

    Han, Dukki; Nam, Seung-Il; Ha, Ho Kyung; Kim, Hyoungjun; Sadowsky, Michael J; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-02-01

    It has been known that continental shelves around the Arctic Ocean play a major role in the ventilation of the deep basins as a consequence of shelf-basin exchange. In the present study, we found that bacterial assemblage of the surface sediment was different from that of seawater while seawater harboured local bacterial assemblages in response to the Arctic hydrography. This finding suggests that the Arctic seafloor sediments may have distinctive bacterial biogeography. Moreover, the distribution of bacterial assemblages and physicochemical properties in surface sediments changed gradually from the Arctic continental shelf to deep-sea basin. Based on the results, bacterial biogeography in the Arctic seafloor sediments may be influenced by winnowing and re-deposition of surface sediments through the sediment gravity flow. The present study offers a deeper understanding of shelf convection and its role for the construction of bacterial assemblages in the Arctic Ocean. PMID:26411339

  20. Temporal variation of streamflow, sediment load and their relationship in the Yellow River basin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangju; Mu, Xingmin; Strehmel, Alex; Tian, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Variation of streamflow and sediment load in the Yellow River basin has received considerable attention due to its drastic reduction during the past several decades. This paper presents a detailed investigation on the changes of streamflow and sediment load from 1952 to 2011 using monthly observations at four gauging stations along the Yellow River. The results show significant decreasing trends for both streamflow and sediment load at all four gauging stations over the past 60 years. The wavelet transform demonstrated discontinuous periodicities from 1969 to 1973 and after 1986 due to the construction of large reservoirs and implementation of numerous soil and water conservations practices. The sediment rating curves with the power-law function was applied to investigate the relationship between discharge and sediment load. The results indicate distinct variations of the relationship between streamflow and sediment and implied significant hydro-morphological changes within different periods. The reducing sediment supply from the source region and the increased erosive power of the river are detected at Lanzhou station, while the decrease of the transport capacity at Toudaoguai is caused by severe siltation. Significant changes in the relationship between streamflow and sediment load are found at Huayuankou and Gaocun stations, which are largely induced by evident sediment income and trapping effects of large reservoirs. It is estimated that numerous reservoirs have strongly altered the regime and magnitude of streamflow and trapped large amount of sediment, leading to severe siltation and evident reduction of their total volumes. A decrease in precipitation, incoming water from the upper reaches, soil and water conservation measures as well as water consumption contribute most to the significant reduction of streamflow. The decrease of sediment load mainly resulted from various soil and water conservation measures and trapping in reservoirs from 1986 to 2011. PMID

  1. Integrative neural networks model for prediction of sediment rating curve parameters for ungauged basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atieh, M.; Mehltretter, S. L.; Gharabaghi, B.; Rudra, R.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most uncertain modeling tasks in hydrology is the prediction of ungauged stream sediment load and concentration statistics. This study presents integrated artificial neural networks (ANN) models for prediction of sediment rating curve parameters (rating curve coefficient α and rating curve exponent β) for ungauged basins. The ANN models integrate a comprehensive list of input parameters to improve the accuracy achieved; the input parameters used include: soil, land use, topographic, climatic, and hydrometric data sets. The ANN models were trained on the randomly selected 2/3 of the dataset of 94 gauged streams in Ontario, Canada and validated on the remaining 1/3. The developed models have high correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.86 for α and β, respectively. The ANN model for the rating coefficient α is directly proportional to rainfall erosivity factor, soil erodibility factor, and apportionment entropy disorder index, whereas it is inversely proportional to vegetation cover and mean annual snowfall. The ANN model for the rating exponent β is directly proportional to mean annual precipitation, the apportionment entropy disorder index, main channel slope, standard deviation of daily discharge, and inversely proportional to the fraction of basin area covered by wetlands and swamps. Sediment rating curves are essential tools for the calculation of sediment load, concentration-duration curve (CDC), and concentration-duration-frequency (CDF) analysis for more accurate assessment of water quality for ungauged basins.

  2. Holocene depocenter migration and sediment accumulation in Delaware Bay: a submerging marginal marine sedimentary basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, C. H., III; Knebel, H. J.; Kraft, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Holocene transgression of the Delaware Bay estuary and adjacent Atlantic coast results from the combined effect of regional crustal subsidence and eustasy. Together, the estuary and ocean coast constitute a small sedimentary basin whose principal depocenter has migrated with the transgression. A millenial time series of isopach and paleogeographic reconstructions for the migrating depocenter outlines the basin-wide pattern of sediment distribution and accumulation. Upland sediments entering the basin through the estuarine turbidity maximum accumulate in tidal wetland or open water sedimentary environments. Wind-wave activity at the edge of the tidal wetlands erodes the aggraded Holocene section and builds migrating washover barriers. Along the Atlantic and estuary coasts of Delaware, the area of the upland environment decreases from 2.0 billion m2 to 730 million m2 during the transgression. The area of the tidal wetland environment increases from 140 million to 270 million m2, and due to the widening of the estuary the area of open water increases from 190 million to 1.21 billion m2. Gross uncorrected rates of sediment accumulation for the tidal wetlands decrease from 0.64 mm/yr at 6 ka to 0.48 mm/yr at 1 ka. In the open water environments uncorrected rates decrease from 0.50 mm/yr to 0.04 mm/yr over the same period. We also present data on total sediment volumes within the tidal wetland and open water environments at specific intervals during the Holocene. ?? 1992.

  3. Pb isotopes and toxic metals in floodplain and stream sediments from the Volturno river basin, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeVivo, B.; Somma, R.; Ayuso, R.A.; Calderoni, G.; Lima, A.; Pagliuca, S.; Sava, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present results of a stratigraphic and environmental geochemistry study of the eastern sector of the Volturno river basin (Italy) using stream sediment and floodplain drill core samples. The cores, dated back to 7,000 years B.P., have been used to evaluate background (baseline) values. Pb isotopic compositions and toxic metal abundances have been determined to discriminate natural versus anthropogenic sources. The Pb isotopic compositions of the stream sediments overlap the values of Pb in petrol. The results from both stream sediment and drill core samples plot along a mixing line between the field that characterizes the volcanic rocks outcropping in the area (the natural component) and the Pb isotopic composition of petrol used in western Europe. Results suggest a prevalent contribution of the natural component for the Pb in the drill core samples and a prevailing anthropogenic component for the Pb isotopic compositions in the active stream sediments samples.

  4. Fluvial sediment study of Fishtrap and Dewey Lakes drainage basins, Kentucky - Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, William F.; Flint, Russell F.; George, Frederick H.; Santos, John F.

    1978-01-01

    Fourteen drainage basins above Fishtrap and Dewey Lakes in the Levisa Fork and Johns Creek drainage basins of eastern Kentucky and southwestern Virginia were studied to determine sedimentation rates and origin of sediment entering the two lakes. The basins ranged in size from 1.68 to 297 square miles. Sediment yields ranged from 2,890 to 21,000 tons per square mile where surface-mining techniques predominated, and from 732 to 3 ,470 tons per square mile where underground mining methods predominated. Yields, in terms of tons per acre-foot of runoff, ranged from 2.2 to 15 for surface-mined areas, and from 0.5 to 2.7 for underground-mined areas. Water and sediment discharges from direct runoff during storms were compared for selected surface-mined and underground-mined areas. Data points of two extensively surface-mined areas, one from the current project and one from a previous project in Beaver Creek basin, McCreary County, Kentucky, grouped similarly in magnitude and by season. Disturbed areas from mining activities determined from aerial photographs reached 17 percent in one study area where extensive surface mining was being practiced. For most areas where underground mining was practiced, percentage disturbed area was almost negligible. Trap efficiency of Fishtrap Lake was 89 percent, and was 62 percent for Dewey Lake. Average annual deposition rates were 464 and 146 acre-feet for Fishtrap and Dewey Lakes, respectively. The chemical quality of water in the Levisa Fork basin has been altered by man 's activities. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Latest Cretaceous-Paleogene basin development and resultant sedimentation patterns in the thrust belt and broken foreland of central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, T.F. ); Franczyk, K.J.; Pitman, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    Latest Cretaceous tectonism in central and east-central Utah formed several intermontane basins both atop thrust sheets and between the thrust front and basement-involved uplifts in the former foreland basin. The upper Campanian Castlegate Sandstone and its inferred western equivalents were the last strata deposited prior to segmentation of the foreland basin. Thereafter, eastward transport of the thrust allochthon uplifted the most proximal part of the Castlegate depositional wedge. West of the thrust front, small intermontane basins formed on the allochthon. Sediment was transported into these basins from both eastern and western sources. In each basin, facies grade from basin-margin conglomeratic alluvial fan deposits to basin-interior flood-plain and lacustrine deposits within a few kilometers. These intermontane basins existed from latest Campanian through the late Paleocene, and may have been transported a short distance eastward as they formed. East of the thrust front in the latest Campanian and contemporaneous with basin formation on the allochthon, a northward-northeastward-flowing big river system transported sediment into the foreland basin from feldspar-rich source areas southwest of the study area. Subsequently, major movement of the San Rafael uplift in the very late Campanian or early Maastrichtian gave rise to an intermontane basin between the thrust front and the San Rafael uplift. Northwestward-flowing, pebble-bearing braided rivers deposited the oldest sediments in this basin prior to an influx from the south and southwest of sediment that formed a thick Maastrichtian clastic sequence. In contrast to deposition in basins on the allochthon, deposition east of the thrust front in the Paleocene was intermittent and restricted to rapidly shifting centers of basin subsidence.

  6. Importance of Anammox to the Nitrogen Removal in Deep Cascadian Basin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, P.; Penton, C. R.; Devol, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    Anammox is a recently discovered N2 producing pathway where NH4+ is oxidized by NO2- to form N2. Before anammox was discovered in a waste water treatment plant in the mid 1990-ties, denitrification was considered the only removal mechanism for bio-available N in the ocean. In marine sediments, the importance of anammox is suggested to increase with water depth. At the deepest site reported (700 m), anammox account for 67-79 percent of total N2 production. If these estimates are consistent for sediments at depths >700 m, anammox would be responsible for at least 2/3 of the total N2 production in deep sediments which suggest this pathway to be highly significant in global N cycling. We investigated the role of anammox in deep sea sediments of the Cascadian basin using microbiological and biogeochemical techniques. Anammox and denitrification rates were measured at depths 2700-3200 m at eight sites in August 2006. Sediments were collected with a Multicorer and 15N isotope pairing was used together with analyses of solute pore water distribution of inorganic N and O2 to estimate activity rates and distribution of anammox and denitrification in the sediment. Pore water profiles of NO2-, NO3-, NH4+ and O2 at all sites show a removal of ammonium in the suboxic zone that strongly suggest an anaerobic ammonium oxidation by nitrite or nitrate. Minimum ammonium removal rates were estimated to vary between 1.7-31 umol NH4+ m-2 day-1 among the 8 stations. The thickness of the ammonium removal zone suggesting anammox activity increased at sites further off the coast (from 1-11 cm) and correlated to the NO2-+NO3- distribution in the sediment. Preliminary results strongly suggest an extensive anammox activity in these sediments responsible for at least 20-60 percent of total benthic N2 production in the Cascadian basin.

  7. Provenance and Dispersal of Quaternary Sediments in the Gaxun Nur Basin, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, S.; Diekmann, B.; Hartmann, K.; Wuennemann, B.; Zhang, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Gaxun Nur Basin is an intramontane accumulation area with one of the biggest continental alluvial fans in the world. It is situated in the western part of Inner Mongolia and its origin is the result of the interplay between tectonic activity and climate dynamics. Due to the endorheic character of the basin, it is predestined as a terrestrial longtime-archive of climate and environmental change. The sediments in the Gaxun Nur basin were deposited during the last 250 kyr by the Hei River System with a catchment size of roughly 130.000 km2. To understand the sedimentary processes of this huge sediment cascade from the Qilian Mountains in the south to the terminal lakes in the north, sources of sediments have to be investigated. Sediment provenance can be deduced from mineralogical fingerprints of modern sediments deposited along the recent pathways from the sources (Qilian Mountains) to the sink (Gaxun Nur Basin). The resulting spatial variation serves as a reference for the mineralogical data from a drilling core in the distal part of the Gaxun Nur Basin. Inferring spatial and temporal variation of sediment provenance provides important information for reconstructing sediment input by fluvial, eolian, lacustrine, and glacial processes. The methodical approach focusses on the analysis of clay and heavy minerals, using XRD and petrographic techniques. Other methods involve geochemistry of heavy mineral grains, using computer-controlled scanning electron microscope (CCSEM), as well as bulk geochemistry, XRF element scanning and a statistical data processing. In this poster we present geochemical and mineralogical data of a 20 m long sediment core (GN100) combined with the results of about 200 surface sediment samples from different archives of the whole Hei River catchment. Lithological changes in the drilling core reveal temporal variations in the depositional environment. These variations are related to alternating phases of fluvial and eolian activity supported

  8. Assessing Li and other leachable geochemical proxies for paleo-salinity in lake sediments from the Mono Basin, CA (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahajpal, Rahul; Zimmerman, Susan R. H.; Datta, Saugata; Hemming, N. Gary; Hemming, Sidney R.

    2011-12-01

    Regional climate-driven hydrological changes are accompanied by salinity changes in closed basin lakes. We have investigated acid leachable Li, along with other leachable ions including Mg, Ca and Sr, as geochemical proxies of salinity in lake sediments in the Mono Basin, California. All the elements in the acid leachable suite show a strong correlation with paleo-lake level estimates based on physical and stratigraphic evidence. The CaCO 3 content of lake sediments, which has been shown to be a reliable proxy for lake level changes in the Mono basin and the adjoining Owens Lake basin, corresponds well with our acid-leachable proxy data.

  9. Three cycles of sedimentation in ancient sedimentary basins of southern Ireland: insights from detrital zircon U-Pb ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairey, Brenton; Kerrison, Aidan; Meere, Patrick; Mulchrone, Kieran; Linnemann, Ulf; Hofmann, Mandy; Gaertner, Andreas; Sonntag, Benita-Lisette; Byrne, Keith

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that sedimentary rocks from the Lower Devonian Dingle Basin were uplifted and recycled by Acadian orogenic activity into the Upper Devonian Munster Basin. This is particularly applicable for sediments deposited in the western part of the Munster Basin. In the present study, a new dataset of U-Pb ages for detrital zircons has been established that spans a large geographic area which includes the Dingle and Munster basins as well as the offshore Mesozoic North Celtic Sea, South Celtic Sea, 'Goban Spur' and Fastnet basins. The study is the first of its kind in any of these sedimentary basins. The aim is to investigate whether sediments deposited in the offshore basins during the Mesozoic reflect three erosion-deposition cycles. Detritus that has undergone three sedimentary cycles would yield super-mature sediments suitable for hydrocarbon storage. Detrital zircon age spectra for Lower Devonian Dingle Basin samples indicate strong sediment input from Avalonian (~600 Ma) and Laurentian (~1.7 Ga and ~1.1 Ga) sources with some input from Caledonian orogenic sources (400-480 Ma). Detrital zircon age spectra in the western Munster Basin largely reflect input from Caledonian-aged igneous crustal input (400-480 Ma) and Laurentian sources. An Avalonian component is not detected in any of the samples from the western Munster Basin. In the central and eastern parts of the Munster Basin, detrital zircon age spectra indicate that the dominant sources of detritus are derived from Laurentia and from Caledonian igneous rocks. In contrast to the western part of the basin, age components around 600 Ma are present in some samples and represent an Avalonian source. These signals are echoed, at varying degrees, in detrital age spectra from Jurassic and Cretaceous samples of the central North Celtic Sea Basin. These age spectra also indicate a significant contribution of detritus from Avalonian terrane. The Avalonian signature is completely absent from Jurassic

  10. New chronology for the southern Kalahari Group sediments - implications for sediment-cycle dynamics and basin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matmon, Ari; Hidy, Alan; Vainer, Shlomy; Crouvi, Onn; Fink, David; Erel, Yigal; Aster Team; Horwitz, Liora; Chazan, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Kalahari Group sediments accumulated in the Kalahari basin, which started forming during the breakup of Gondwana in the early Cretaceous. These sediments cover an extensive part of southern Africa and form a low-relief landscape. Current models assume that the Kalahari Group accumulated throughout the entire Cenozoic. However, chronology has been restricted to early-middle Cenozoic biostratigraphic correlations and to OSL dating of only the past ~300 ka. We present a new chronological framework that reveals a dynamic nature of sedimentation in the southern Kalahari. Cosmogenic burial ages obtained from a 55 m section of Kalahari Group sediments from the Mamatwan Mine, southern Kalahari, indicate that the majority of deposition at this location occurred rapidly at 1-1.2 Ma. This Pleistocene sequence overlies the Archaean basement, forming a significant hiatus that permits the possibility of many Phanerozoic cycles of deposition and erosion no longer preserved in the sedimentary record. Our data also establish the existence of a shallow early-middle Pleistocene water body that persisted for >450 ka prior to this rapid period of deposition and suggesting an Okavango-like environment. Evidence from neighboring archaeological excavations in southern Africa suggests an association of high-density hominin occupation with this water body.

  11. Chromium isotope composition of reducing and anoxic sediments from the Peru Margin and Cariaco Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueguen, B.; Planavsky, N.; Wang, X.; Algeo, T. J.; Peterson, L. C.; Reinhard, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium isotope systematics in marine sediments are now being used as a new redox proxy of the modern and ancient Earth's surface. Chromium is primarily delivered to the oceans by riverine inputs through weathering of Cr(III)-rich minerals present in the continental crust and oxidation of insoluble Cr(III) to soluble Cr(VI) species. Since oxidation-reduction reactions fractionate Cr isotopes whereby oxidized Cr(VI) species are preferentially enriched in heavy Cr isotopes, the Cr isotope composition of marine sediments may be useful tracers of redox conditions at the Earth's surface through geological time. Chromium is quantitatively removed in organic-rich sediments where reducing conditions prevail and promote reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and thus, these sediments should capture the ambient seawater Cr isotope composition. However, the isotopic composition of modern organic-rich sediments is poorly documented so far, and this step is essential for further modeling the global oceanic Cr isotope mass balance and assessing the effects of sedimentation and post-depositional processes on the marine Cr isotopes archive. In this study, we have characterized modern marine organic-rich sediments for their Cr isotope composition (δ53/52Cr) from two different settings, the Peru margin upwelling zone and the anoxic Cariaco Basin (Venezuela). Chromium isotopes were measured on a MC-ICP-MS (Nu Plasma) using a double-spike correction method. The authigenic fraction of shallow samples from the Peru margin sedimentary sequence with a high Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content (>10 wt%) yield an average δ53/52Crauthigenic value of +0.67 ±0.05 ‰ (2sd). However, although this value is close to the seawater value (Atlantic Ocean) and to Cariaco basin sediments (~ +0.6 ‰), reducing sediments from the Peru margin are on average isotopically slightly heavier, especially in samples having a low authigenic fraction and a low TOC content (δ53/52Crauthigenic values up to +1.30

  12. The Nordkapp Basin, Norway: Development of salt and sediment interplays for hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, I.; Toerudbakken, B.O.

    1996-12-31

    Investigation of a particular salt diapir in the Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea has revealed the following sequence of events: (1) salt started to rise when approximately 1.5 {+-} 0.3 km of sedimentary cover was present (Carboniferous/Permian time); (2) salt reached the sediment surface when about 3.5 {+-} 0.7 km of sediment had been deposited (Triassic time); (3) the mushroom cap on the salt stock top developed over a period of about 75--100 Ma (i.e. during the time when about another km of sediment had been deposited) (Triassic through Base Cretaceous time); (4) the mushroom cap started to dip down significantly ({approximately}1 km) into the sediments around Cretaceous to Tertiary erosion time; (5) oil generation started in the deep sediments of the Carboniferous around the time that salt reached the surface (Triassic time) and continues to the present day at sedimentary depths between about 4 to 7 km (currently Triassic and deeper sediments); (6)gas generation started around mushroom cap development time and continues to the present day at sedimentary depths greater than about 6--7 km (Permian/Carboniferous); (7) the salt stock is currently 3--4 km wide, considerably less than the mushroom cap which is 9 km wide and 1 km thick. The relative timing of mushroom cap development, bed upturning, and hydrocarbon generation makes the salt diapir an attractive exploration target, with suggested reservoir trapping under the downturned mushroom cap on the deep basin side of the salt. In addition, rough estimates of rim syncline fill suggest the basin had an original salt thickness of 2.4--3.3 km, depending upon the amount of salt removed at the Tertiary erosion event.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Heavy Metals in Stormwater Detention Basin Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schifman, L. A.; Kasaraneni, V. K.; Boving, T. B.; Craver, V.

    2015-12-01

    Stormwater runoff is a conduit for several pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into surface and ground water bodies. The control of runoff and pollutants is typically addressed by best management practices, such as retention/detention ponds. While the effectiveness of catchment basins in runoff volume reduction and removal of some contaminants has been established, very little is known about contaminant fate within these structures. Particularly in coastal regions and places with shallow groundwater tables PAH accumulation in the bottom sediments poses a potential threat for groundwater contamination. The concentrations of PAHs accumulated in the sediments of these catchment basins will primarily depend on the sources of runoff origin and the surrounding land use. Here, five stormwater catchment basins along the I-95 corridor in Rhode Island were selected based on the stormwater runoff origin and land use (industrial, urban, highway, and commercial). To study the stratification of PAHs one foot sediment cores were collected and analyzed for 17 PAHs (16 EPA parent PAH and Retene). The concentrations of PAHs in sediments of detention ponds in urban and industrial land use areas ranged from 20 μg/g to 200 μg/g. Generally higher concentrations of contaminants were found in sediments near the pond inlet and a decreasing concentration gradient is observed laterally and vertically throughout the pond. To compare stormwater ponds in various land use settings a new index based on sediment contamination, pond size and age, and catchment area will be presented. Further, it will be investigated whether BMP maintenance has to be targeted towards pollutant removal to maintain an effective stormwater treatment system.

  14. Microbial Communities in Methane- and Short Chain Alkane-Rich Hydrothermal Sediments of Guaymas Basin.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Frederick; Cardman, Zena; Dasarathy, Srishti; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Lipp, Julius S; Ruff, S Emil; Biddle, Jennifer F; McKay, Luke J; MacGregor, Barbara J; Lloyd, Karen G; Albert, Daniel B; Mendlovitz, Howard; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal sediments of Guaymas Basin, an active spreading center in the Gulf of California (Mexico), are rich in porewater methane, short-chain alkanes, sulfate and sulfide, and provide a model system to explore habitat preferences of microorganisms, including sulfate-dependent, methane- and short chain alkane-oxidizing microbial communities. In this study, hot sediments (above 60°C) covered with sulfur-oxidizing microbial mats surrounding a hydrothermal mound (termed "Mat Mound") were characterized by porewater geochemistry of methane, C2-C6 short-chain alkanes, sulfate, sulfide, sulfate reduction rate measurements, in situ temperature gradients, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and V6 tag pyrosequencing. The most abundantly detected groups in the Mat mound sediments include anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea of the ANME-1 lineage and its sister clade ANME-1Guaymas, the uncultured bacterial groups SEEP-SRB2 within the Deltaproteobacteria and the separately branching HotSeep-1 Group; these uncultured bacteria are candidates for sulfate-reducing alkane oxidation and for sulfate-reducing syntrophy with ANME archaea. The archaeal dataset indicates distinct habitat preferences for ANME-1, ANME-1-Guaymas, and ANME-2 archaea in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments. The bacterial groups SEEP-SRB2 and HotSeep-1 co-occur with ANME-1 and ANME-1Guaymas in hydrothermally active sediments underneath microbial mats in Guaymas Basin. We propose the working hypothesis that this mixed bacterial and archaeal community catalyzes the oxidation of both methane and short-chain alkanes, and constitutes a microbial community signature that is characteristic for hydrothermal and/or cold seep sediments containing both substrates. PMID:26858698

  15. Lead exposure of waterfowl ingesting Coeur d`Alene River Basin sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.; Morton, A.; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.

    1998-11-01

    Feces from tundra swans [Bygnus columbianus (Ord)], Canada geese [Branta canadensis (L.)], and mallards [Anas platrhynchos (L.)] were collected from the Coeur d`Alene River Basin and two reference areas in Idaho to estimate exposure to lead from mining activities and relate that exposure to the ingestion of contaminated sediments. The average acid-insoluble ash content of the feces, a measure of sediment ingestion, was 18% for Canada geese and tundra swans, and 12% for ducks. The 18% value corresponded to an estimated 9% sediment ingestion rate (dry weight). The 90th percentile for acid-insoluble ash in feces of tundra swans-corresponded to an estimated 22% sediment in the diet. The average lead concentration (dry weight) of tundra swan feces from all Coeur d`Alene River Basin wetlands sampled was 880 mg/kg, compared to 2.1 mg kg{sup {minus}1} from reference areas. the 90th percentile of lead in tundra swan feces from the Coeur d`Alene River Basin sites was 2700 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. Fecal lead concentrations of tundra swans were correlated with the acid-insoluble ash content of the feces. The very low lead concentrations in feces having low acid-insoluble ash contents established that the sediment was the primary source of the lead ingested by waterfowl. Sediment lead concentrations at 11 wetland sites were closely correlated with average fecal lead concentrations for all waterfowl, corrected for the average percent acid-insoluble ash in the feces.

  16. Microbial Communities in Methane- and Short Chain Alkane-Rich Hydrothermal Sediments of Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Frederick; Cardman, Zena; Dasarathy, Srishti; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Lipp, Julius S.; Ruff, S. Emil; Biddle, Jennifer F.; McKay, Luke J.; MacGregor, Barbara J.; Lloyd, Karen G.; Albert, Daniel B.; Mendlovitz, Howard; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal sediments of Guaymas Basin, an active spreading center in the Gulf of California (Mexico), are rich in porewater methane, short-chain alkanes, sulfate and sulfide, and provide a model system to explore habitat preferences of microorganisms, including sulfate-dependent, methane- and short chain alkane-oxidizing microbial communities. In this study, hot sediments (above 60°C) covered with sulfur-oxidizing microbial mats surrounding a hydrothermal mound (termed “Mat Mound”) were characterized by porewater geochemistry of methane, C2–C6 short-chain alkanes, sulfate, sulfide, sulfate reduction rate measurements, in situ temperature gradients, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and V6 tag pyrosequencing. The most abundantly detected groups in the Mat mound sediments include anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea of the ANME-1 lineage and its sister clade ANME-1Guaymas, the uncultured bacterial groups SEEP-SRB2 within the Deltaproteobacteria and the separately branching HotSeep-1 Group; these uncultured bacteria are candidates for sulfate-reducing alkane oxidation and for sulfate-reducing syntrophy with ANME archaea. The archaeal dataset indicates distinct habitat preferences for ANME-1, ANME-1-Guaymas, and ANME-2 archaea in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments. The bacterial groups SEEP-SRB2 and HotSeep-1 co-occur with ANME-1 and ANME-1Guaymas in hydrothermally active sediments underneath microbial mats in Guaymas Basin. We propose the working hypothesis that this mixed bacterial and archaeal community catalyzes the oxidation of both methane and short-chain alkanes, and constitutes a microbial community signature that is characteristic for hydrothermal and/or cold seep sediments containing both substrates. PMID:26858698

  17. Turbidity and suspended-sediment transport in the Russian River Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.; Brown, William M., III

    1971-01-01

    The Russian River in north coastal California has a persistent turbidness, which has reportedly caused a decline in the success of the sports fishermen. As a consequence, the number of sports fishermen angling in the river has declined, and industries dependent on their business have suffered. To determine the source of the turbidity and the rate of sediment transport in the basin, a network of sampling station was established in February 1964 along the river, on some of its tributaries, and near Lake Pillsbury in the upper Eel River basin.

  18. Sediment flux history of Pearl River mouth basin, North margin of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.

    2004-12-01

    This work estimates the solid sediment flux in Pearl River mouth basin from Cenozoic (42Ma). The estimates were derived from isopach maps, seismic reflection profiles and drill holes. Average solid sediment fluxes were calculated for six epochs approximately corresponding to geological periods: Eocene-Lower Oligocene (42-29.3), Upper Oligocene (29.3-23.8), Lower Miocene (23.8-16.4), Middle Miocene (16.4-11.2), Upper Miocene (11.2-5.32), and Pliocene-Pleistocene (5.32-0). The total sediment flux from 42 Ma is 392071.3 km3 and 0.89 km of erosion formed from the onshore drainage basin area. The average erosion rate is 22 m/ Ma. The sediment flux curve shows 3 episodes massive increase in sediment supply, i.e. Upper Oligocene, Middle Miocene and Pliocene-Pleistocene. The first increase related to the break up activity and is the product of elevated rift shoulder. The other two increase peak link to the changing of climate.

  19. Radionuclide concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue within the Rio Grande drainage basin

    SciTech Connect

    Booher, J.L.; Fresquez, P.R.; Carter, L.F.; Gallaher, B.M.; Mullen, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    In 1992-93, Los Alamos National Laboratory collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey in an effort to characterize radionuclide concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue within the Rio Grande drainage basin from Colorado to Texas. Bed sediment was sampled from 18 locations for cesium ({sup 137}Cs), tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu), americium ({sup 241}Am), total uranium ({sup tot}U) and alpha, beta, and gamma activity. Fish tissue was sampled from 12 locations for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu and {sup tot}U.

  20. Abundant Atribacteria in deep marine sediment from the Adélie Basin, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephanie A.; Orcutt, Beth N.; Mandernack, Kevin W.; Spear, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the newly classified candidate phylum “Atribacteria” (formerly referred to as “OP9” and “JS1”) are common in anoxic methane-rich sediments. However, the metabolic functions and biogeochemical role of these microorganisms in the subsurface remains unrealized due to the lack of pure culture representatives. In this study of deep sediment from Antarctica’s Adélie Basin, collected during Expedition 318 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Atribacteria-related sequences of the 16S rRNA gene were abundant (up to 51% of the sequences) and steadily increased in relative abundance with depth throughout the methane-rich zones. To better understand the metabolic potential of Atribacteria within this environment, and to compare with phylogenetically distinct Atribacteria from non-deep-sea environments, individual cells were sorted for single cell genomics from sediment collected from 97.41 m below the seafloor from IODP Hole U1357C. As observed for non-marine Atribacteria, a partial single cell genome suggests a heterotrophic metabolism, with Atribacteria potentially producing fermentation products such as acetate, ethanol, and CO2. These products may in turn support methanogens within the sediment microbial community and explain the frequent occurrence of Atribacteria in anoxic methane-rich sediments. This first report of a single cell genome from deep sediment broadens the known diversity within the Atribacteria phylum and highlights the potential role of Atribacteria in carbon cycling in deep sediment. PMID:26379647

  1. Delineating incised stream sediment sources within a San Francisco Bay tributary basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Paul; Benda, Lee; Pearce, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Erosion and sedimentation pose ubiquitous problems for land and watershed managers, requiring delineation of sediment sources and sinks across landscapes. However, the technical complexity of many spatially explicit erosion models precludes their use by practitioners. To address this critical gap, we demonstrate a contemporary use of applied geomorphometry through a straightforward GIS analysis of sediment sources in the San Francisco Bay Area in California, USA, designed to support erosion reduction strategies. Using 2 m lidar digital elevation models, we delineated the entire river network in the Arroyo Mocho watershed (573 km2) at the scale of ˜ 30 m segments and identified incised landforms using a combination of hillslope gradient and planform curvature. Chronic erosion to the channel network was estimated based on these topographic attributes and the size of vegetation, and calibrated to sediment gage data, providing a spatially explicit estimate of sediment yield from incised channels across the basin. Rates of erosion were summarized downstream through the channel network, revealing patterns of sediment supply at the reach scale. Erosion and sediment supply were also aggregated to subbasins, allowing comparative analyses at the scale of tributaries. The erosion patterns delineated using this approach provide land use planners with a robust framework to design erosion reduction strategies. More broadly, the study demonstrates a modern analysis of important geomorphic processes affected by land use that is easily applied by agencies to solve common problems in watersheds, improving the integration between science and environmental management.

  2. Scales of colluvial sediment transfer and coupling in formerly glaciated mountain drainage basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brardinoni, F.; Hassan, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    We examine basin-wide colluvial sediment dynamics through the compilation of a 70-year landslide inventory in mountain environments of coastal British Columbia. In particular, we document the colluvial sediment cascade by characterizing the dominant sediment sources, and by identifying preferential sites of colluvial delivery and storage across landscape scales. Results reveal that open-slope landslides evacuating material to ephemeral or permanent streams and fluvial terraces are the preferential source-to-sink pathways. This pattern suggests high instability of the headmost channel network and its ongoing re-organization after generalized sediment recharge occurred during the last glacial maximum. In the study period, the colluvial sediment budget calculated across geomorphic process domains indicates net volume loss on planar slopes and source colluvial channels, whereas unchannelled valleys, sink colluvial channels and fluvially-dominated channels have been aggrading. In this context, we propose a novel approach to represent colluvial sediment yield as a function of drainage area. This scaling relation appears to be controlled by the spatial organization of geomorphic process domains, as imposed by the morphometry of the glacial palimpsest. It follows that colluvial yield is highest in unchannelled topography, decreases at the scale of channel initiation, and remains constant for drainage areas where source colluvial and hanging fluvial domains overlap. Colluvial sediment injections start declining consistently beyond areas larger than 0.6 km2, where fluvial environments are still partially coupled. Evaluation of the colluvial scaling trend in conjunction with British Columbia fluvial sediment yield, allows us to identify landscape scales of sediment aggradation and degradation, hence to infer preferential scales of contemporary sediment storage.

  3. Evaluation of the effects of agricultural conservation practices on sediment yield in the Colusa Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzke, S. E.; Zhang, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to assess the impact of agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on sediment runoff from almond orchards in the lower Colusa Basin Drain watershed in the Sacramento Valley, California. This study used modeling techniques that include varying hydrologic parameters for both upland areas and small channels to quantify the effects of BMPs water quality. The BMPs simulated in this study are commonly used in almond orchards and include strip cropping, cover cropping, vegetative filter strips, grassed waterways and channel stabilization. The effectiveness of each BMP was simulated for an above average, below average and average rainfall year. Comparison of annual total watershed sediment loads for each BMP simulation showed that overall, channel stabilization and grassed waterways, which target in stream sediment erosion and transport, are the most effective BMPs with an estimated respective reduction in sediment load of 18% and 35% for a below average precipitation year, 13% and 26% for an above average precipitation year, and 17% and 30% for an average precipitation year. Simulations of BMPs designed to reduce sediment transport in upland areas, which include strip cropping and vegetative filter strips, estimated a reduction in total annual sediment load of less than 1% at the watershed outlet. These results indicated that in-stream sediment transport is the dominant sediment transport process in this watershed. Implementation of channel stabilization measures or grassed waterways on almond orchards is estimated to result in an annual reduction of total sediment load of 41,874 kg or 72,753 kg of sediment per square kilometer of almond orchard for an above average precipitation year.

  4. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Lacustrine Sediments in the Great Salt Lake Desert: An Analog Study for Martian Paleolake Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. L.; Munkata Marr, J.; Horgan, B. H.; Hanley, J.; Rey, K. A.; Schneider, R. J.; Jackson, W. A.; Ritter, S. M.; Spear, J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Spectroscopic mineral identification of lacustrine sediments from Pilot Valley, Utah are compared to ground truth methods to evaluate VNIR spectroscopy as a characterization tool, and gain contextual insight into terrestrial paleolake basins.

  5. Fine-grained suspended sediment source identification for the Kharaa River basin, northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Michael; Theuring, Philipp; Collins, Adrian L.

    2015-04-01

    Fine sediment inputs into river systems can be a major source of nutrients and heavy metals and have a strong impact on the water quality and ecosystem functions of rivers and lakes, including those in semiarid regions. However, little is known to date about the spatial distribution of sediment sources in most large scale river basins in Central Asia. Accordingly, a sediment source fingerprinting technique was used to assess the spatial sources of fine-grained (<10 microns) sediment in the 15 000 km2 Kharaa River basin in northern Mongolia. Five field sampling campaigns in late summer 2009, and spring and late summer in both 2010 and 2011, were conducted directly after high water flows, to collect an overall total of 900 sediment samples. The work used a statistical approach for sediment source discrimination with geochemical composite fingerprints based on a new Genetic Algorithm (GA)-driven Discriminant Function Analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis H-test and Principal Component Analysis. The composite fingerprints were subsequently used for numerical mass balance modelling with uncertainty analysis. The contributions of the individual sub-catchment spatial sediment sources varied from 6.4% (the headwater sub-catchment of Sugnugur Gol) to 36.2% (the Kharaa II sub-catchment in the middle reaches of the study basin) with the pattern generally showing higher contributions from the sub-catchments in the middle, rather than the upstream, portions of the study area. The importance of riverbank erosion was shown to increase from upstream to midstream tributaries. The source tracing procedure provides results in reasonable accordance with previous findings in the study region and demonstrates the general applicability and associated uncertainties of an approach for fine-grained sediment source investigation in large scale semi-arid catchments. The combined application of source fingerprinting and catchment modelling approaches can be used to assess whether tracing estimates are

  6. Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Feedbacks of sedimentation on crustal heat flow - New insights from the Vøring Basin, Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, S.; Ruepke, L. H.

    2009-04-01

    Information on the nature and origin of rift basins is preserved in the presently observed stratigraphy. Basin modeling aims at recovering this information with the goal of quantifying a basin's structural and thermal evolution. Decompaction and backstripping analysis is a classic and still popular approach to basin reconstruction [Steckler and Watts, 1978]. The total and tectonic subsidences, as well as sedimentation rates are calculated by the consecutive decompaction and removal of individual layers. The thermal history has to be computed separately using forward thermal models. An alternative is coupled forward modeling, where the structural and thermal history is computed simultaneously. A key difference between these reconstruction methods is that feedbacks of sedimentation on crustal heat flow are often neglected in backstripping methods. In this work we use the coupled basin modeling approach presented by Rüpke et al. [2008] to quantify some of the feedbacks between sedimentation and heat flow and to explore the differences between both reconstruction approaches in a case study from the Vøring Basin, Norwegian Sea. In a series of synthetic model runs we have reviewed the effects of sedimentation on basement heat flow. These example calculations clearly confirm the well-known blanketing effect of sedimentation and show that it is largest for high sedimentation rates. Recovery of sedimentation rates from the stratigraphy is, however, not straightforward. Decompaction-based methods may systematically underestimate sedimentation rates as sediment thickness is assumed to not change/thin during stretching. We present a new method for computing sedimentation rates based on forward modeling and demonstrate the differences between both methods in terms of rates and thermal feedbacks in a reconstruction of the Vøring basin (Euromargin transect 2). We find that sedimentation rates are systematically higher in forward models and heat flow is clearly depressed during

  8. Sediment from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small dams in the Yuba basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, L. Allan

    2005-10-01

    Recent initiatives to find ways to reintroduce anadromous fish to the Central Valley of California have identified the Yuba River as one of the best potential watersheds for expanding spawning habitat of spring-run chinook salmon and steelhead trout. Salmon spawning in the Yuba River would require substantial modifications or removal of Englebright Dam, a large dam (86 million m3 capacity) built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1941. An extensive on-going feasibility study by local, state, and federal organizations, therefore, is examining aspects of various dam-treatment scenarios that range from no action to complete dam removal. This paper examines the extraordinary history of the watershed and resulting conditions pertinent to the feasibility of altering Englebright Dam. It seeks to accomplish four goals. First, historical geomorphic changes in the watershed are outlined that influence the physical context of the feasibility study. The Yuba watershed is centered in the hydraulic gold-mining region made famous by G.K. Gilbert (Gilbert, G.K., 1917. Hydraulic-mining débris in the Sierra Nevada. U.S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 105 154 pp.), and Englebright Dam was built as a débris dam to control the sediment from hydraulic mining. Second, recent findings of high concentrations of mercury in sediment and fish tissues in the watershed are briefly reviewed. Much mercury was applied during the 20th century. Third, historic data on 20th century hydraulic mining are presented that document numerous small dams built in the Yuba basin to detain mining sediment. Finally, field measurements of the texture and lithology of modern bed materials in the Yuba River basin are presented that demonstrate reworked sediment from mining is an important component of the modern sediment load and fine spawning gravels. The complex anthropogenic geomorphic changes in the Yuba basin present a challenge with regards to responsible treatment of Englebright Dam. If toxic sediment is

  9. Walker Lake, Nevada: sedimentation in an active, strike-slip related basin

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Roberts, M.T.

    1984-04-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, is in an active fault-controlled basin related to the right-lateral, northwest-trending Walker Lane Shear Zone on the western side of the Basin and Range province. The lake occurs in a half graben bounded on its west side by a high-angle normal fault zone along the Wassuk Range front. This fault zone may merge to the north into the Walker Lane fault system, which forms the northeast boundary of the basin. To the south of Walker Lake, the Wassuk front fault merges with an east-northeast trending left-lateral fault. The Walker Lake basin is interpreted to be a pull-apart basin formed within the triangular zone bounded by the Wassuk front, the Walker Lane, and left-lateral faults. The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km/sup 2/ (3800 mi/sup 2/) in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system that drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake. Walker Lake trends north-northwest and is 27.4 km (17 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide with water depths exceeding 30 m (100 ft). Lake Lahontan (Wisconsinian) shorelines ring Walker Lake and suggest water depths of 150 m (500 ft) above the present lake level. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and gentle, areally more extensive fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). The Walker River delta enters the lake from the north and is a major sediment point source for the basin. Older dissected shoreline, alluvial fan, Gilbert delta, and beach ridge deposits were built largely of coarse-grained, locally derived materials. Stromatolites, oncolites, and tufas formed along the shorelines, whereas mud and organic sediments accumulated in the lake on the west side of the basin. Extensive submerged sand flats and local sand dunes occur on the east side of the basin.

  10. Gravel sediment routing from widespread, low-intensity landscape disturbance, Current River basin, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.B.; Gran, K.B.

    1999-01-01

    During the last 160 years, land-use changes in the Ozarks have had the potential to cause widespread, low-intensity delivery of excess amounts of gravel-sized sediment to stream channels. Previous studies have indicated that this excess gravel bedload is moving in wave-like forms through Ozarks drainage basins. The longitudinal, areal distribution of gravel bars along 160 km of the Current River, Missouri, was evaluated to determine the relative effects of valley-scale controls, tributary basin characteristics, and lagged sediment transport in creating areas of gravel accumulations. The longitudinal distribution of gravel-bar area shows a broad scale wave-like form with increases in gravel-bar area weakly associated with tributary junctions. Secondary peaks of gravel area with 1.8-4.1 km spacing (disturbance reaches) are superimposed on the broad form. Variations in valley width explain some, but not all, of the short-spacing variation in gravel-bar area. Among variables describing tributary drainage basin morphometry, present-day land use and geologic characteristics, only drainage area and road density relate even weakly to gravel-bar areal inventories. A simple, channel network-based sediment routing model shows that many of the features of the observed longitudinal gravel distribution can be replicated by uniform transport of sediment from widespread disturbances through a channel network. These results indicate that lagged sediment transport may have a dominant effect on the synoptic spatial distribution of gravel in Ozarks streams; present-day land uses are only weakly associated with present-day gravel inventories; and valley-scale characteristics have secondary controls on gravel accumulations in disturbance reaches.

  11. Dam sediment tracking using spectrometry and Landsat 8 satellite image, Taleghan Basin, Iran.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Sirous; Shamsai, Abolfazl; Saghafian, Bahram

    2016-02-01

    Sedimentation in reservoirs, in addition to reducing water storage capacity, causes serious environmental impacts including intensification of river erosion. Detection of sediment origins plays a determining role in control and prevention of sedimentation. Nowadays, with the help of studies on sedimentation and erosion, sediment origins can be detected with high accuracy. This research integrated geographic information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) techniques to detect the primary source of sediment to Taleghan Dam in northern Iran. After collecting samples of sediment from the basin outlet, they were divided into two parts. One part was sent to the Mineralogy Laboratory in order to determine the percentage of each mineral in the samples using X-ray. A few were sent to the Spectroscopy Laboratory to determine their spectral signature using the spectrometer. The laboratory test results determined the wavelength of the minerals. In the next step, those spots on the satellite image whose spectral reflectance fell within the spectral signature of the minerals were detected and enhanced by mixture-tuned matched filtering (MTMF) method. These spots were overlapped with the map of geological formations. Accordingly, the origin of the minerals was detected. The greatest proportion of trace minerals was found in sample 4 including 6% of Illite trace mineral, while sample 2 contains only 2% of trace minerals. Accordingly, the origin of the minerals was detected. The obtained results revealed that mudstone, red siltstone, and conglomerate formations, Karaj formation in section Poldokhtar, acidic tuffs, alcanic lavas of Karaj Formation, mudstone and gypsum of upper red formation, and Cambrian dolomites were recognized as the most possible origins of the dam sediments. These formations are vulnerable to erosion and should be conserved so as to substantially prevent the volume of sedimentation in the reservoir. PMID:26790431

  12. Phosphorus burial in Cariaco Basin sediments through the last glacial - interglacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehill, A. R.; Ruttenberg, K. C.; Briggs, R.; Lyons, T. W.; Colman, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    On geologic timescales, phosphate availability in the oceans limits global organic carbon burial rates in marine sediments. The phosphate inventory of the oceans is strongly influenced by early diagenetic regeneration of phosphate in marine sediments. Oxic conditions are generally thought to favor phosphate retention in marine sediments, whereas anoxic conditions permit a greater fraction of reactive particulate phosphate to be released to pore waters and return to the overlying water column. Feedbacks with the marine phosphorus cycle can act to stabilize ocean anoxic events and control atmospheric oxygen concentrations. We analyzed phosphorus phase associations in Cariaco Basin sediments through the transition from oxidized sediments that characterized deposition during the last glacial period through laminated anoxic sediments that characterize Holocene deposition. We have used a sequential extraction technique (SEDEX) on samples from ODP core 1002 in order to target adsorbed phosphate, ferric iron associated P, authigenic and biogenic P phases, detrital apatite, and organic P. Preliminary results show a correlation between total organic carbon and reactive phosphate in the sediments. The anoxic sediments are dominated by the authigenic and biogenic P pool, which typically represents 60-80% of the total P. These values, coupled with high C-org/P-org (> 600) and C-org/P- reactive (> 300) ratios, suggest post-depositional redistribution of P from organic matter to authigenic carbonate fluorapatite and substantial regeneration of phosphate to the overlying water column. C/P ratios are much lower in the oxic sediments, though the authigenic and biogenic P pool remains quantitatively most significant. Throughout the core, changes in C:P ratios and the concentration of authigenic P appear to correlate with changes in the Mo/Al ratio, further linking P burial and diagenesis to water column anoxia.

  13. Riparian Vegetation, Sediment Dynamics and Hydrologic Change in the Minnesota River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batts, V. A.; Triplett, L.; Gran, K. B.; Lenhart, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    In the last three decades the Minnesota River Basin (MRB) has experienced increased precipitation and anthropogenic alteration to the drainage network, which contributes to higher flows and increased sediment loading. From field and laboratory approaches, this study investigates the implications of hydrologic change on the colonization of riparian vegetation on pointbars, and of vegetation loss on near-channel sediment storage within the lower Minnesota River. Field surveys consisted of vegetation surveys along pointbars, which were then related to flow records. Surveys revealed a dominance of woody seedlings over older established saplings, and high frequencies of species with alternative forms of propagation that tolerate high flows such as sandbar willow (Salix interior), and beggarticks (Bidens sp.). Surveys also showed in increase in elevation of plant establishment from measurements taken in 1979, resulting in higher area of exposed pointbar and easier mobilization of sediment. Geospatial analysis completed at each sampling location found decreased area of exposed pointbar in association with increases in pointbar vegetation between lower flow years and increased area of exposed pointbar in association with decreased pointbar vegetation between higher flow years. An experimental approach addresses implications of vegetation loss on pointbar sediment storage. In a 1.5m x 6m flume, we are conducting experiments to measure the efficiency of bar vegetation in trapping fine sediment as a function of stem density. Self-formed pointbars are vegetated at varying densities with Medicago sativa (alfalfa) sprouts to represent riparian woody saplings, then flooded with fine sediment-rich water to simulate summer flooding. Sediment deposited at each stem density is then measured to estimate efficiency. While results of these experiments are currently ongoing, we hypothesize that a threshold density exists at which trapping efficiency declines substantially. Preliminary

  14. (210)Pb and compositional data of sediments from Rondonian lakes, Madeira River basin, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bonotto, Daniel Marcos; Vergotti, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    Gold exploration has been intensive in Brazilian Amazon over the last 40 years, where the use of mercury as an amalgam has caused abnormal Hg concentrations in water bodies. Special attention has been directed to Madeira River due to fact it is a major tributary of Amazon River and that since 1986, gold exploration has been officially permitted along a 350km sector of the river. The (21)(0)Pb method has been used to date sediments taken from nine lakes situated in Madeira River basin, Rondônia State, and to verify where anthropogenic Hg might exist due to gold exploitation in Madeira River. Activity profiles of excess (21)(0)Pb determined in the sediment cores provided a means to evaluate the sedimentation rates using a Constant Flux: Constant Sedimentation (CF:CS) and Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) of unsupported/excess (21)(0)Pb models. A significant relationship was found between the CF:CS sedimentation rates and the mean values of the CRS sedimentation rates (Pearson correlation coefficient r=0.59). Chemical data were also determined in the sediments for identifying possible relationships with Hg occurring in the area. Significant values were found in statistical correlation tests realized among the Hg, major oxides and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content in the sediments. The TOC increased in the sediment cores accompanied by a loss on ignition (LOI) increment, whereas silica decreased following a specific surface area raising associated to the TOC increase. The CRS model always provided ages within the permitted range of the (21)(0)Pb-method in the studied lakes, whereas the CF:CS model predicted two values above 140 years. PMID:25699663

  15. Transtensional arm of the early Mesozoic Fundy rift basin: Penecontemporaneous faulting and sedimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.E.; Schlische, R.W. )

    1990-08-01

    Formed as a major right-lateral fault zone during Paleozoic collisional orogenies and reactivated as a left-oblique system during the early Mesozoic, the east-striking Minas fault zone of Atlantic Canada controlled adjacent sedimentation in the Fundy rift basin, producing a series of synsedimentary microbasins. Northeast-striking boundary faults of the Fundy basin underwent mostly early Mesozoic normal slip and are reactivated Paleozoic thrusts. The adjacent basin has a much thicker section, transverse folds, and synthetic rider blocks. Contrasts in structural and stratigraphic styles are a response to local deformation controlled by reactivated fault zones of differing orientation under consistent northwest-southeast early Mesozoic extension rather than responses to a sequence of changing stress patterns.

  16. Morrowan sedimentation in the Orogrande basin, west Texas and south-central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, W.M.; Stanton, R.J. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    Morrowan strata in the Hueco and Franklin Mountains reflect deposition within a shallow, gradually subsiding, carbonate shelf lagoon. Postulated environments fluctuated between open shelf lagoon with localized shoaling, restricted inner shelf lagoon, and peritidal settings. Variations in depth were slight, probably not exceeding several tens of meters within the photic zone. The La Tuna Formation (Franklin Mountains) was deposited near the axis (center) of the Orogrande basin; the lower division of the Magdalena limestone (Hueco Mountains), 30 mi east, was deposited 20-30 mi west of the paleoshoreline. Physiographically, the Orogrande sea was a small gulf, offering a certain degree of protection from the Morrowan seaway to the south. Sedimentologically, it was a wide expanse of predominantly quiet-water carbonate sedimentation with subordinate argillaceous influex and coarser peripheral clastics. The Orogrande basin, a stratigraphic feature, corresponds to a blanket deposit of shallow epeiric carbonates. Climatic and orographic effects are invoked to explain the contrasting style of clastic sedimentation in the Delaware and orogrande basins, east and west of the Pedernal uplift. Analysis of Morrowan carbonates reveals no evidence of cyclicity, major transgressions or regressions, or local tectonic activity. Deposition was stable and in equilibrium with a gradually subsiding shallow basin. Based on lithologic, faunal, biostratigraphic, and paleogeographic criteria, the lower division is both laterally and temporally equivalent with the La Tuna Formation. Accordingly, the latter term is advocated in favor of the former, which lacks both priority and formal status.

  17. Benthic protists and fungi of Mediterranean deep hypsersaline anoxic basin redoxcline sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Joan M.; Kormas, Konstantinos; Pachiadaki, Maria G.; Rocke, Emma; Beaudoin, David J.; Morrison, Colin; Visscher, Pieter T.; Cobban, Alec; Starczak, Victoria R.; Edgcomb, Virginia P.

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most extreme marine habitats known are the Mediterranean deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs; water depth ∼3500 m). Brines of DHABs are nearly saturated with salt, leading many to suspect they are uninhabitable for eukaryotes. While diverse bacterial and protistan communities are reported from some DHAB water-column haloclines and brines, the existence and activity of benthic DHAB protists have rarely been explored. Here, we report findings regarding protists and fungi recovered from sediments of three DHAB (Discovery, Urania, L’ Atalante) haloclines, and compare these to communities from sediments underlying normoxic waters of typical Mediterranean salinity. Halocline sediments, where the redoxcline impinges the seafloor, were studied from all three DHABs. Microscopic cell counts suggested that halocline sediments supported denser protist populations than those in adjacent control sediments. Pyrosequencing analysis based on ribosomal RNA detected eukaryotic ribotypes in the halocline sediments from each of the three DHABs, most of which were fungi. Sequences affiliated with Ustilaginomycotina Basidiomycota were the most abundant eukaryotic signatures detected. Benthic communities in these DHABs appeared to differ, as expected, due to differing brine chemistries. Microscopy indicated that only a low proportion of protists appeared to bear associated putative symbionts. In a considerable number of cases, when prokaryotes were associated with a protist, DAPI staining did not reveal presence of any nuclei, suggesting that at least some protists were carcasses inhabited by prokaryotic scavengers. PMID:25452749

  18. Benthic protists and fungi of Mediterranean deep hypsersaline anoxic basin redoxcline sediments.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Joan M; Kormas, Konstantinos; Pachiadaki, Maria G; Rocke, Emma; Beaudoin, David J; Morrison, Colin; Visscher, Pieter T; Cobban, Alec; Starczak, Victoria R; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most extreme marine habitats known are the Mediterranean deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs; water depth ∼3500 m). Brines of DHABs are nearly saturated with salt, leading many to suspect they are uninhabitable for eukaryotes. While diverse bacterial and protistan communities are reported from some DHAB water-column haloclines and brines, the existence and activity of benthic DHAB protists have rarely been explored. Here, we report findings regarding protists and fungi recovered from sediments of three DHAB (Discovery, Urania, L' Atalante) haloclines, and compare these to communities from sediments underlying normoxic waters of typical Mediterranean salinity. Halocline sediments, where the redoxcline impinges the seafloor, were studied from all three DHABs. Microscopic cell counts suggested that halocline sediments supported denser protist populations than those in adjacent control sediments. Pyrosequencing analysis based on ribosomal RNA detected eukaryotic ribotypes in the halocline sediments from each of the three DHABs, most of which were fungi. Sequences affiliated with Ustilaginomycotina Basidiomycota were the most abundant eukaryotic signatures detected. Benthic communities in these DHABs appeared to differ, as expected, due to differing brine chemistries. Microscopy indicated that only a low proportion of protists appeared to bear associated putative symbionts. In a considerable number of cases, when prokaryotes were associated with a protist, DAPI staining did not reveal presence of any nuclei, suggesting that at least some protists were carcasses inhabited by prokaryotic scavengers. PMID:25452749

  19. Clay minerals in basin of Mexico lacustrine sediments and their influence on ion mobility in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, C. J.; Rudolph, D. L.

    1997-09-01

    Semiconfined aquifers used as the principal water supply within the Basin of Mexico are overlain by lacustrine deposits that provide a degree of protection from contamination associated with metropolitan Mexico City. Solute transport behavior and the nature of chemical interactions with mineral components in these sediments is poorly understood. The objectives of this paper were to identify the clay mineral phases of the lacustrine sediments and to determine the significance of the exchange properties of the day minerals on contaminant transport processes. Samples obtained from two cores were separated into sand, silt, and clay-size fractions. The clay-size fraction was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and for specific surface area and pH-dependent cation and anion exchange capacity. The clay-sized fraction averaged 56% of the sediment. Analyses indicated that the clay was predominantly composed of a Si-rich allophane with approximately 30% montmorillonite. Halloysite was also present to a depth of about 1.5 m, but was absent deeper in the sediment. Kaolinite and illite, reported in previous studies, and imogolite were not found in the samples. Solute transport in the sediment was modeled to demonstrate the impact of exchange properties imparted by the allophane compared to other possible clay mineral assemblages. The predominance of allophane in the Basin of Mexico sediments is responsible for many of the fundamental characteristics of the material including: high porosity (0.8-0.9), high water content (200-400%), and an extremely high and pH-dependent cation exchange capacity. The pH of the pore water within the lacustrine sediments of the Basin of Mexico is typically between 6.5 and 12. Measured cation exchange values ranged from ≈ 450 meq kg -1 at pH 6.5 to ≈ 650 meq kg -1 at pH 12 which could produce variable cation mobility in the semiconfining aquitard. The simulations illustrated that allophane is very effective

  20. Metal bioavailability in freshwater sediment samples and their influence on ecological status of river basins.

    PubMed

    Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Nieto, Elena; Gallego, Elena Pérez; Schuhmacher, Marta; Blasco, Julián

    2016-01-01

    The general aim of this work has been to check the ecological impact of metals on the Ebro river basin. In order to evaluate this, metal behavior considering water, sediment as well as metal bioaccumulation in fish has been studied. Total concentrations of metals, as well as the potentially bioavailable fraction of metals in sediment has also been analyzed by the application of the sequential extraction method (BCR method). In order to evaluate the influence of metal pollution on the river ecological status, according to the Water Framework Directive (WFD), diverse biological indices such as macroinvertebrates (IBMWP), diatoms (IPS) and macrophytes (IVAM), have been considered from an integrated point of view. Considering both water and sediment, metals which contributed in higher extend to the reduction of biological quality have been demonstrated to be Pb and Zn, as they presented a negative influence on macroinvertebrates, diatoms and macrophytes communities. As and Cr that seemed to have a significant influence on macroinvertebrates and diatoms too, while Ni negatively influenced only diatom communities. This study also demonstrated that monitoring programs only based on total metal determination in water are inefficient, as metals present even at undetectable concentrations in water are strongly accumulated in fish. Moreover, the high concentrations of Hg found in sediments indicated that this river basin may present pollution problems regarded to this metal, as demonstrated by the high Hg levels found in fish. PMID:26148425

  1. Seismic stratigraphy and sediment thickness of the Nansen Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engen, Øyvind; Gjengedal, Jakob Andreas; Faleide, Jan Inge; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Eldholm, Olav

    2009-03-01

    A Norwegian expedition to the western Nansen Basin, Yermak Plateau and the Hinlopen margin in 2001 acquired about 1100 km of 2-D multichannel seismic profiles and 50 wide-angle sonobuoy record sections. Analysis of these data establishes a regional seismic stratigraphic framework for the western Nansen Basin integrating previously published stratigraphic schemes. P-wave velocities and sediment thickness were derived within 7-8 per cent uncertainty from 2-D seismic ray tracing models of each sonobuoy section. Sediment thickness reaches 2 km in the studied area and increases towards the depocentre of the giant Franz-Victoria fan on the Barents-Kara continental margin. High-relief oceanic crystalline crust with 3.7 km s-1 average near-top velocity is infilled by four seismic sediment units with typical velocities 2.4, 2.2, 2.0 and 1.8 km s-1. A prominent regional seismic horizon between units 2 and 3 is tentatively correlated by basement onlap and sedimentation rates to a Miocene (~10 Ma) palaeoceanographic event, possibly the opening of the Fram Strait. The youngest unit is correlated to prograding sequences on the margin and to the onset of major slope failure caused by intensified glacio-fluvial drainage and ice sheet erosion during Northern Hemisphere glaciations (2.6-0.01 Ma).

  2. Sr and Nd isotopes of suspended sediments from rivers of the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatting, Karina; Santos, Roberto V.; Sondag, Francis

    2014-05-01

    The Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systems are important tools to constrain the provenance of sediment load in river systems. This study presents the isotopic composition of Sr and Nd isotopes and major and minor elements in suspended sediments from the Marañón-Solimões, Amazonas and Beni-Madeira rivers. The data were used to constrain the source region of the sediments and to better understand the main seasonal and spatial transport processes within the basin based on the variations of the chemical and isotopic signals. They also allow establishing a relationship between sediment concentrations and flow rate values. The study presents data collected during a hydrological year between 2009 and 2010. The Marañón-Solimões River presents low Sr isotopic values (0.7090-0.7186), broad EpslonNd(0) range (-15.17 to -8.09) and Nd model (TDM) ages varying from 0.99 to 1.81 Ga. Sources of sediments to the Marañón-Solimões River include recent volcanic rocks in northern Peru and Ecuador, as well as rocks with long crustal residence time and carbonates from the Marañón Basin, Peru. The Beni-Madeira River has more radiogenic Sr isotope values (0.7255-0.7403), more negative EpslonNd(0) values (-20.46 to -10.47), and older Nd isotope model ages (from 1.40 to 2.35 Ga) when compared to the Marañón-Solimões River. These isotope data were related to the erosion of Paleozoic and Cenozoic foreland basins that are filled with Precambrian sediments derived from the Amazonian Craton. These basins are located in Bolivian Subandina Zone. The Amazon River presents intermediate isotopic values when compared to those found in the Marañón-Solimões and Beni-Madeira rivers. Its Sr isotope ratios range between 0.7193 and 0.7290, and its EpslonNd(0) values varies between -11.09 and -9.51. The Nd isotope model ages of the suspended sediments vary between 1.28 and 1.77 Ga. Concentrations of soluble and insoluble elements indicate a more intense weathering activity in sediments of the Beni

  3. Effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in southern San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Maurice E.

    1979-01-01

    A reconnaissance was made of some of the effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in the southern San Juan Basin, where uranium development is concentrated. In general, the effects of exploration on erosion are minor, although erosion may be accelerated by the building of access roads, by activities at the drilling sites, and by close concentration of drilling sites. Areas where the greatest effects on erosion and sedimentation from mining and milling operations have occurred are: (1) in the immediate vicinity of mines and mills, (2) near waste piles, and (3) in stream channels where modifications, such as changes in depth have been caused by discharge of excess mine and mill water. Collapse of tailings piles could result in localized but excessive erosion and sedimentation.

  4. Distribution of maximum burial temperatures across northern Appalachian Basin and implications for Carboniferous sedimentation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Clay-mineral diagenesis and apatite fission-track age data indicate that the maximum burial temperatures to which the Middle Devonian Tioga metabentonite was exposed rise abruptly from low values in western New York State to higher values in the east. The highest temperatures, which approach 175/sup 0/C, were reached just west of Syracuse. Neither the pattern nor the magnitude of burial temperatures can be explained solely by burial of the metabentonite beneath Upper Devonian sediments. Although spatial variations in the geothermal gradient could have produced the observed pattern of burial temperatures, it is more likely that Carboniferous sediments, no longer preserved in the area, were responsible for the indicated burial. The inferred presence of thick Carboniferous sequences in western New York State suggests that the Allegheny orogeny had a stronger influence on sedimentation in the northern Appalachian Basin than has been previously recognized. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Long-term suspended sediment transport in the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed and Salt River Basin, Missouri, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1992, efforts have been conducted in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed to assess sediment transport from this 72-km2 Missouri watershed located in the Salt River Basin, the Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research site in the Central Mississippi River Basin. This effort was complemented by field...

  6. Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Riboulleau, A.; ChâTelet, E. Armynot; Lorenzoni, L.; Tribovillard, N.; Murray, R. W.; Müller-Karger, F.; Astor, Y. M.

    2013-02-01

    The mineralogical composition of 95 surface sediment samples from the Cariaco Basin continental shelf and Orinoco delta was investigated in order to constrain the clay-mineral main provenance and distribution within the Cariaco Basin. The spatial variability of the data set was studied using a geo-statistical approach that allows drawing representative clay-mineral distribution maps. These maps are used to identify present-day dominant sources for each clay-mineral species in agreement with the geological characteristics of the main river watersheds emptying into the basin. This approach allows (1) identifying the most distinctive clay-mineral species/ratios that determine particle provenance, (2) evaluating the respective contribution of local rivers, and (3) confirming the minimal present-day influence of the Orinoco plume on the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. The Tuy, Unare, and Neveri Rivers are the main sources of clay particles to the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. At present, the Tuy River is the main contributor of illite to the western part of the southern Cariaco Basin continental shelf. The Unare River plume, carrying smectite and kaolinite, has a wide westward propagation, whereas the Neveri River contribution is less extended, providing kaolinite and illite toward the eastern Cariaco Basin. The Manzanares, Araya, Tortuga, and Margarita areas are secondary sources of local influence. These insights shed light on the origin of present-day terrigenous sediments of the Cariaco Basin and help to propose alternative explanations for the temporal variability of clay mineralogy observed in previously published studies.

  7. History of suspended-sediment data collection and inventory of available data for the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, William P.; Brown, Russell T.; Chatham, Carrie G.

    1988-01-01

    In 1934 and 1935, the Tennessee Valley Authority established 51 daily record suspended-sediment stations on the Tennessee River and its major tributaries. Most of these stations were operated for 8 years. From 1962 to 1965, the Tennessee Valley Authority again collected daily sediment record at 10 of the original 49 stations. In addition to the data sets collected on the major rivers, the Tennessee Valley Authority has conducted several intensive studies of small watersheds throughout the Tennessee River basin. In the Cumberland River basin, daily sediment records have been collected primarily by the Survey. Daily stations have been operated for various periods on 17 basins ranging in size from 0.67 to 1,977 sq mi, with the earliest data of daily record being October 1953. All of these daily stations are located in the upper Cumberland River basin upstream of any major impoundments. Periodic sediment data have been collected by the Survey at 194 stations in the Tennessee River basin and at 106 stations in the Cumberland River basin, however; the number of samples/station is quite low. 86% of the periodic stations in the Tennessee River basin and 91% of the periodic stations in the Cumberland River basin have 30 samples or less. (USGS)

  8. Impacts of sewage of a pulp and paper industry on the sediments of Vigozero water basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalia, Belkina

    2010-05-01

    The studies of sediments of Vigozero reservoir with 1969 for 2009 are presented. Vigozero water basin belongs to pool of the White Sea. It's watershed area is 16 800 km2, water surface area is 1140 km2, volume of lake - 6,46 km3, average depth - 6,2 m, the maximum depth - 23 m, the water residence time -1,14 years. Northern part of Vigozero reservoir tests influence of sewage of Segeja pulp and paper mill, operating since 1938. Zones of pollution of a bottom are allocated: 1- solid waste; 2 - active silt, lignin, cellulose; 3 - transformed suspended solids. Distribution and stratification of deposits, their physical and chemical parameters is investigated. It is shown, that change of a chemical compound of sediments is connected with volume and qualitative of sewage. The tendency to the extension of polluted zones and to spreading of organic pollution all the bottom is considered. Maximum settling velocity was fixed in 1980 -1985. Accumulation of the organic compounds in sediments at that time resulted in the development of high internal loading. Change of an ecological situation in Vigozero water basin, connected with falling volumes of manufacture last 20 years, has affected sediment genesis processes, therefore the concentrations of organic substances and biogenic elements have decreased in a superficial layer of sediments, concentration of iron has increased. Now, transformation of the organic substances, which have been saved up earlier, demands significant amounts of oxygen. Variability of pH and Eh of sediments indicates unstable oxidation-reduction conditions. Ore formations on a redox-barrier interfere with transport of substances from deposits in water. The work was supported in part by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant № 08-05-98811).

  9. Managing flow, sediment, and hydropower regimes in the Sre Pok, Se San, and Se Kong Rivers of the Mekong basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Thomas B.; Loucks, Daniel P.

    2014-06-01

    The Lancang/Mekong River Basin is presently undergoing a period of rapid hydropower development. In its natural undeveloped state, the river transports about 160 million metric tons of sediment per year, maintaining the geomorphologic features of the basin, sustaining habitats, and transporting the nutrients that support ecosystem productivity. Despite the importance of sediment in the river, currently little attention is being paid to reservoir sediment trapping. This study is devoted to assessing the potential for managing sediment and its impact on energy production in the Se San, Sre Pok, and Se Kong tributaries of the Mekong River. These tributaries drain a set of adjacent watersheds that are important with respect to biodiversity and ecological productivity, and serve as a significant source of flow and sediment to the mainstream Mekong River. A daily sediment transport model is used to assess tradeoffs among energy production and sediment and flow regime alteration in multiple reservoir systems. This study finds that eventually about 40%-80% of the annual suspended sediment load may be trapped in reservoirs. Clearly, these reservoirs will affect the rivers' sediment regimes. However, even after 100 years of simulated sedimentation, reservoir storage capacities and hydropower production at most reservoir sites are not significantly reduced. This suggests that the strongest motivation for implementing measures to reduce trapped sediment is their impact not on hydropower production but on fish migration and survival and on sediment-dependent ecosystems such as the Vietnam Delta and Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake.

  10. Changes in sediment volume in Alder Lake, Nisqually River Basin, Washington, 1945-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Gish, Casey C.

    2012-01-01

    The Nisqually River drains the southwest slopes of Mount Rainier, a glaciated stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of western Washington. The Nisqually River was impounded behind Alder Dam when the dam was completed in 1945 and formed Alder Lake. This report quantifies the volume of sediment deposited by the Nisqually and Little Nisqually Rivers in their respective deltas in Alder Lake since 1945. Four digital elevation surfaces were generated from historical contour maps from 1945, 1956, and 1985, and a bathymetric survey from 2011. These surfaces were used to compute changes in sediment volume since 1945. Estimates of the volume of sediment deposited in Alder Lake between 1945 and 2011 were focused in three areas: (1) the Nisqually River delta, (2) the main body of Alder Lake, along a 40-meter wide corridor of the pre-dam Nisqually River, and (3) the Little Nisqually River delta. In each of these areas the net deposition over the 66-year period was 42,000,000 ± 4,000,000 cubic meters (m3), 2,000,000 ± 600,000 m3, and 310,000 ± 110,000 m3, respectively. These volumes correspond to annual rates of accumulation of 630,000 ± 60,000 m3/yr, 33,000 ± 9,000 m3/yr, and 4,700 ± 1,600 m3/yr, respectively. The annual sediment yield of the Nisqually (1,100 ± 100 cubic meters per year per square kilometer [(m3/yr)/km2]) and Little Nisqually River basins [70 ± 24 (m3/yr)/km2] provides insight into the yield of two basins with different land cover and geomorphic processes. These estimates suggest that a basin draining a glaciated stratovolcano yields approximately 15 times more sediment than a basin draining forested uplands in the Cascade Range. Given the cumulative net change in sediment volume in the Nisqually River delta in Alder Lake, the total capacity of Alder Lake since 1945 decreased about 3 percent by 1956, 8 percent by 1985, and 15 percent by 2011.

  11. Fate of copper complexes in hydrothermally altered deep-sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Sander, Sylvia G; Jayachandran, Saranya; Nath, B Nagender; Nagaraju, G; Chennuri, Kartheek; Vudamala, Krushna; Lathika, N; Mascarenhas-Pereira, Maria Brenda L

    2014-11-01

    The current study aims to understand the speciation and fate of Cu complexes in hydrothermally altered sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin and assess the probable impacts of deep-sea mining on speciation of Cu complexes and assess the Cu flux from this sediment to the water column in this area. This study suggests that most of the Cu was strongly associated with different binding sites in Fe-oxide phases of the hydrothermally altered sediments with stabilities higher than that of Cu-EDTA complexes. The speciation of Cu indicates that hydrothermally influenced deep-sea sediments from Central Indian Ocean Basin may not significantly contribute to the global Cu flux. However, increasing lability of Cu-sediment complexes with increasing depth of sediment may increase bioavailability and Cu flux to the global ocean during deep-sea mining. PMID:25108489

  12. Sediment supply, tectonic subsidence, and basin-filling patterns across the southwestern South China Sea during Pliocene to recent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Mychal R.; Dorobek, Steven L.

    Sediment flux to southwestern parts of the South China Sea (SCS) during late Cenozoic time reflects contributions from eastern Tibet, western Borneo, and smaller drainages of central Indochina, Vietnam, the Malay Peninsula, and western Indonesia, although little work has been done to evaluate the significance of each source. Regional seismic-reflection data and well logs from the southwestern SCS were used in this study to evaluate sediment flux and dispersal across the area. Regional seismic-stratigraphic patterns across the southwestern SCS, however, show that Pliocene to Recent sediment accumulation within individual basins was also strongly influenced by long-term changes in tectonic subsidence. More updip basins (e.g., Malay, Cuu Long, and West Natuna basins) became filled after Miocene inversion and an abrupt slowing of tectonic subsidence. Once they became filled, sediment could bypass the updip basins. In contrast, the eastern part of the Nam Con Son Basin (NCSB) has experienced much greater subsidence since early Miocene time and continues to receive sediment that bypasses the updip basins. The paleo-Mekong River and a second depositional system with probable headwaters on the Malay Peninsula began supplying large volumes of sediment to the NCSB during late Miocene and Pliocene time, respectively. Filling of updip basins allowed Pliocene to Recent fluvial and shelf facies to shift progressively eastward across the southwestern SCS. This study shows that Pliocene to Recent sediment dispersal and paleogeographic evolution of the southwestern SCS are as strongly influenced by subsidence patterns as they are by sediment supply from continental drainage systems.

  13. Modelling sediment transport in shallow microtidal basins: comparison with point observations and satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniello, L.; Defina, A.; D'Alpaos, L.; Volpe, V.; Silvestri, S.; Marani, M.

    2012-12-01

    Field data and mathematical modeling have demonstrated that the morphological evolution of shallow tidal basins is the result of the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves. A mathematical model has been developed which describes sediment entrainment, transport and deposition due to the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves in shallow lagoons. The sediment transport model describes sediments by the way of a bi-granular mixtures composed by both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. Moreover, the model describes the bed evolution and evaluates the variation of bed sediment composition considering also the transition between cohesive and non-cohesive behavior. The model is applied to the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) and the results of different simulations are compared, with good agreement, to a series of in situ point turbidity measurements. In situ point observations provide precise information on the temporal evolution of the local turbidity but can hardly provide information on its spatial variation. Remote sensing techniques can overcome these spatial limitations potentially allowing access to a wider range of scales, and can be applied for the spatially-distributed calibration and validation of sediment transport models. A simplified radiative transfer model to multispectral data from different sensors (Landsat, ASTER and ALOS Avnir) is used to produce suspended sediment concentration maps for the Venice lagoon from available satellite images. These maps are compared with the results of the sediment transport model. Such a comparison also provide a useful tool to investigate the stabilizing effect of benthic vegetation that, otherwise, could be studied only at laboratory and punctual scale.

  14. Influence of rift basin geometry on the subsequent postrift sedimentation and basin inversion: The Organyà Basin and the Bóixols thrust sheet (south central Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencos, Joana; Carrera, Núria; Muñoz, Josep Anton

    2015-07-01

    The extensional period in the Bay of Biscay-Pyrenean domain during the Early Cretaceous influenced subsequent Upper Cretaceous contractional Alpine structures of the Pyrenean orogen. In the Pyrenees, the Lower Cretaceous rift system shows en echelon geometries for different basins, with the Organyà Basin being one of the most important. This basin is located in the southern central Pyrenees, and the inversion of its W-E southern margin has been related to the development of the Bóixols thrust sheet, the northernmost of the south Pyrenean thrust sheets. Detailed interpretation of outcrop and seismic reflection data has revealed the presence of a NNW-SSE trending relay area, which corresponds to the western boundary of the Organyà Basin. The postrift facies belts parallel this boundary. The geometry of the contractional structures shows related variations such as changes in the structural relief and the plunge and the wavelength across this relay area. The synorogenic sediments also show characteristic thickness variations and onlap geometries perpendicular to thrust-transport direction. These evidences highlight the presence of this extensional margin and corroborate its influence in the subsequent stages of the evolution of the area. Seismic, well, and field data have been incorporated into a 3-D structural model in order to better understand the 3-D geometry of the study area.

  15. Tectonics and sedimentation of Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation, Soledad basin, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, E.D.

    1987-05-01

    The nonmarine Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation represents the earliest sedimentation within the Soledad basin. Basin analysis of this unit provides important clues to the tectonic regimen during the convergent/transform-margin transition in southern California during the mid-Tertiary. The Vasquez crops out in three separate subbasins or depocenters; from south to north, these are the Vasquez Rocks, Texas Canyon, and Charlie Canyon subbasins. Basaltic-andesitic volcanism and rapid subsidence punctuated the initial rifting event which generated the Vasquez Rocks half-graben and Texas Canyon graben. Small, thick alluvial fans were shed into these two subbasins, with sediment derived via erosion of local plutonic, metamorphic, and volcanic source terranes. A minimum of four discrete uplift events generated development of 250 to 600-m thick, upward-fining alluvial megacycles in both the Vasquez Rocks and Texas Canyon depocenters. In the absence of biostratigraphic control, these allocyclic megasequences provide a tangible means of lithostratigraphic correlation between these separate subbasins. A major uplift and drainage basin reorganization event subsequently modified the Vasquez depositional system, facilitating physical interconnection of the two southern subbasins. The northernmost subbasin, Charlie Canyon, is characterized by a single, thick, upward-coarsening alluvial fan sequence. There are no megacycles or clast suites to suggest interconnection with or evolutionary similarities to the other two depocenters. This sedimentologic uniqueness may support a mid-Tertiary palinspastic reconstruction which places the Charlie Canyon region 80-100 km northwest of its current location. Soledad basin rifting and Vasquez sedimentation are consistent with a tectonic model involving lithospheric extension north of the unstable Mendocino triple junction.

  16. Seismic Velocity and Thickness of Sediments Beneath the Aleutian Basin, Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirer, D. S.; Barth, G. A.; Sliter, R. W.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The thickness and seismic velocity structure of sediments of the Aleutian Basin were mapped during a 2011 multichannel seismic (MCS) cruise of the R/V Langseth. Combined with legacy MCS, sonobuoy, and scientific drilling data, the Langseth observations allowed us to study the history of sedimentation in this area. Semblance velocity analyses from common-depth-point gathers of the 8-km-long streamer data were conducted at-sea every 6.25 km. Post-cruise, these semblance analyses were refined and supplemented with new analyses where significant basement topography is present. The flat-lying nature of both the seafloor and the within-sediment reflectors allowed determination of interval velocity and thickness values with high precision using the Dix equation. Two prominent bottom-simulating reflections (BSRs) are common within the sediment column: a shallower one inferred to represent the base of gas hydrate stability, and a deeper one inferred to represent the diagenetic transformation from opal-A to opal-CT. This latter transition was reached by the one deep hole (Site 190, DSDP Leg19) drilled into the Aleutian Basin, where the lithologic contrast prevented further penetration. The gas hydrate BSR is associated with subvertical velocity-amplitude anomalies, and the opal A/CT transition is associated with a large decrease in reflector amplitudes beneath it, indicating the decrease in acoustic impedance contrasts associated with diagenetic dewatering. Seismic interval velocities range from 1600 m/sec at the top of the sediment column to 2800-3500 m/sec at its base. The largest step in interval velocity occurs at the opal A/CT transition. Interval velocities are laterally continuous over many tens of kilometers, and this continuity allows the generation of seismic travel-time vs. sediment thickness relationships across the basin. A second-degree polynomial relationship between time and thickness, developed by regression of all of the semblance velocity analyses from the

  17. Variability of effective discharge for suspended sediment transport in a large semi-arid river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuanxu; Huang, He Qing; Xu, Jiongxin; Brierley, Gary J.; Yao, Zhijun

    2010-07-01

    SummaryThe variability of effective discharge is analysed for three geomorphological zones (gullied hilly loess, valley-hill loess and eolian sand) in the Wuding River basin, China, based on mean daily flow discharge and mean daily suspended sediment discharge from 1959 to 1969, a period when human disturbance in this catchment was less intensive. A modified approach to the determination of discharge class intervals is developed, framed in terms of equal arithmetic intervals of the standard deviation S for all the discharges, such as S, 0.75 S, 0.5 S, and 0.25 S. The average flow duration of effective discharge in the river basin ranges primarily from 0.026% to 3.16% in the two loess regions (corresponding to large flood events), and from 18.75% to 91.51% in the eolian sand region (corresponding to low or moderate flows). The average flow duration of effective discharge is significantly influenced by the size of class intervals and by characteristics of the flow and sediment regime. Using the most appropriate class interval of 0.25 S, the average flow duration of effective discharge is about 0.026% in the two loess regions (other than 0.104% at Hengshan), but in the eolian sand region it reaches 24.50% at Yulin and 52.66% at Hanjiamao, respectively. Histograms of suspended sediment transport indicate that there is a bimodal dominant discharge for suspended sediment transport, with one peak in the range of low flows and the other in the range of large floods. Drainage density and specific sediment yields are lower in the eolian sand region, where effective discharge events occur more frequently and suspended sediment concentration is much lower than that carried by events of the same discharge in the loess region. In contrast, drainage density is higher in the two loess regions, where infrequent hyperconcentrated flows generate high specific sediment yields. Effective discharge differs significantly from bankfull discharge across the whole Wuding River basin.

  18. INAA for determination of trace elements in bottom sediments of the Selenga river basin in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baljinnyam, N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Aleksiayenak, Yu. V.

    2014-03-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used for the determination of major, minor and trace elements in samples of bottom sediments of the inflows of the Selenga river basin to assess the impact of the contamination from the industrial complex Erdenet and other industrial enterprises in Mongolia. A total of 42 elements (Na, Mg, Cl, K, Ca, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Sr, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Tm, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Th, and U) was determined by combination of conventional and epithermal neutron activation analysis at the IBR-2 reactor, FLNP JINR, Dubna. For the first time such a large set of elements was used for characterization of the bottom sediments as accumulating media which may reflect industrial contamination of the water basin. The concentrations of heavy metals and other trace elements in the samples from three inflows of the Selenga river basin were compared with data from the previous studies. It was shown that the industrial zone of the Erdenet Mining Corporation (EMC) and gold mining zone Zaamar are the sources of strong environmental contamination. The concentrations of Cu and Sb determined in sediment samples of the River Khangal and Govil near the EMC exceed average crustal rock and soil values by factors of 50 and 15, respectively. In the area of the gold mining zone Zaamar concentrations of Au, As, and Sb exceed crustal rock and soil values by factors of 4, 25, and 6, respectively. The relatively high levels of As, V, Zn, V, and Sr in the sediments of the studied rivers are obviously due to the discharges of untreated wastewater of desalination plant, electrical power station, textile industry and mining activities as well as domestic wastewater.

  19. Hydrologic and sediment data collected from selected basins at the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation, Missouri--2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Joseph M.; Rydlund, Paul H.; Barr, Miya N.

    2012-01-01

    Commercial and residential development within a basin often increases the amount of impervious area, which changes the natural hydrologic response to storm events by increasing runoff. Land development and disturbance combined with increased runoff from impervious areas potentially can increase sediment transport. At the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation in Missouri, there has been an increase in population and construction activities in the recent past, which has initiated an assessment of the hydrology in selected basins. From April 2010 to December 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center at the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation, collected hydrologic and suspended-sediment concentration data in six basins at Fort Leonard Wood. Storm-sediment concentration, load, and yield varied from basin to basin and from storm to storm. In general, storm-sediment yield, in pounds per square mile per minute, was greatest from Ballard Hollow tributary (06928410) and Dry Creek (06930250), and monthly storm-sediment yield, in tons per square mile, estimates were largest in Ballard Hollow tributary (06928410), East Gate Hollow tributary (06930058), and Dry Creek (06930250). Sediment samples, collected at nine sites, primarily were collected using automatic samplers and augmented with equal-width-increment cross-sectional samples and manually collected samples when necessary. Storm-sediment load and yield were computed from discharge and suspended-sediment concentration data. Monthly storm-sediment yields also were estimated from the total storm discharge and the mean suspended-sediment concentration at each given site.

  20. Distribution of subglacial sediments across the Wilkes Subglacial Basin, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Bruce C.; Young, Duncan A.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Richter, Thomas G.; Kempf, Scott D.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Siegert, Martin J.

    2016-04-01

    Topography, sediment distribution, and heat flux are all key boundary conditions governing the dynamics of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). EAIS stability is most at risk in Wilkes Land across vast expanses of marine-based catchments including the 1400 km × 600 km expanse of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB) region. Data from a recent regional aerogeophysical survey (Investigating the Cryospheric Evolution of the Central Antarctic Plate (ICECAP)/IceBridge) are combined with two historical surveys (Wilkes basin/Transantarctic Mountains System Exploration-Ice-house Earth: Stability or DYNamism? (WISE-ISODYN) and Wilkes Land Transect (WLK)) to improve our understanding of the vast subglacial sedimentary basins impacting WSB ice flow and geomorphology across geologic time. Analyzing a combination of gravity, magnetic and ice-penetrating radar data, we present the first detailed subglacial sedimentary basin model for the WSB that defines distinct northern and southern subbasin isopachs with average sedimentary basin thicknesses of 1144 m ± 179 m and 1623 m ± 254 m, respectively. Notably, more substantial southern subbasin sedimentary deposition in the WSB interior supports a regional Wilkes Land hypothesis that basin-scale ice flow and associated glacial erosion is dictated by tectonic basement structure and the inherited geomorphology of preglacial fluvial networks. Orbital, temperate/polythermal glacial cycles emanating from adjacent alpine highlands during the early Miocene to late Oligocene likely preserved critical paleoclimatic data in subglacial sedimentary strata. Substantially thinner northern WSB subglacial sedimentary deposits are generally restricted to fault-controlled, channelized basins leading to prominent outlet glacier catchments suggesting a more dynamic EAIS during the Pliocene.

  1. Profile of trace metals accumulation in core sediment from Seine river estuary (docks basin).

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Mariam; Ouddane, Baghdad; El-Daye, Mirna; Halwani, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    The Seine is one of the most polluted rivers in Europe with respect to potentially harmful elements. It receives effluents from the upstream Paris urban and industrial area, and also local inputs from the heavily industrialized Rouen and Le Havre regions. The present study deals with this environmental topic and the concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb, Hg, Zn and Cu were determined in sediment cores collected in the docks basin of Rouen harbour in 2008. The intensity of metal pollution during recent decades was evaluated using an enrichment factor (EF) and a geoaccumulation index (Igeo). The results of vertical distribution showed that the metal pollution in the past is much higher than in the surface sediment. Mercury was found to be the heaviest pollutant (with Igeo and EF exceeding 4 and 20, respectively), and Cd and Pb were the second most important pollutants. A slight contamination in Ni was observed with very low Igeo values. To estimate the sediment toxicity, simultaneously extracted metals/acid volatile sulfides ratio (SEM/AVS) was calculated. Low values of the toxicity index SEM/AVS were observed in the core sediments indicating the inexistence of metal potential toxicity. Also the concentrations of these trace metals were lower than the probable effect concentration values reported as consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for fresh water ecosystems. PMID:24191442

  2. Screening of currently used pesticides in water, sediments and biota of the Guadalquivir River Basin (Spain).

    PubMed

    Masiá, Ana; Campo, Julián; Vázquez-Roig, Pablo; Blasco, Cristina; Picó, Yolanda

    2013-12-15

    The occurrence of 50 currently used pesticides and their transformation products in surface and waste waters, sediment and fish in the Guadalquivir River Basin was determined in 2010 and 2011. After selective sample extraction, pesticides were identified and quantified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The contamination profile in water and sediments is marked by the presence of organophosphorus and triazines. Transformation products were even at higher concentrations than parent pesticides. A wider range of pesticides was present in water than in sediments but none of them were detected in fish. The mean concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 13.0 ng/L in water and from 0.1 to 13.2 ng/g d.w. in sediment. The spatial distribution of most pesticides was consistent with the agricultural activities of the area or their urban applications. The waste water treatment plant effluents that impact the river are minor sources for few pesticides but for most of them run-off would be the most important contribution. The temporal distribution showed differences between both sampling campaigns related to the river flow. The low-flow produced a pesticide concentration effect, generating higher levels in water and accumulation in sediments. This forecasts a hazard in future scenarios if the current situation of the climate change and water scarcity evolves to more critical conditions highlighting the need of these monitoring studies. PMID:24140087

  3. Assessing sediment yield for selected watersheds in the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin under future agricultural scenarios.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yang; Lunetta, Ross S; Macpherson, Alexander J; Luo, Junyan; Chen, Guo

    2013-01-01

    In the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin (GLB), corn acreage has been expanding since 2005 in response to high demand for corn as an ethanol feedstock. This study integrated remote sensing-derived products and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) within a geographic information system (GIS) modeling environment to assess the impacts of cropland change on sediment yield within four selected watersheds in the GLB. The SWAT models were calibrated during a 6 year period (2000-2005), and predicted stream flows were validated. The R(2) values were 0.76, 0.80, 0.72, and 0.81 for the St. Joseph River, the St. Mary River, the Peshtigo River, and the Cattaraugus Creek watersheds, respectively. The corresponding E (Nash and Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient) values ranged from 0.24 to 0.79. The average annual sediment yields (tons/ha/year) ranged from 0.12 to 4.44 for the baseline (2000 to 2008) condition. Sediment yields were predicted to increase for possible future cropland change scenarios. The first scenario was to convert all "other" agricultural row crop types (i.e., sorghum) to corn fields and switch the current/baseline crop rotation into continuous corn. The average annual sediment yields increased 7-42 % for different watersheds. The second scenario was to further expand the corn planting to hay/pasture fields. The average annual sediment yields increased 33-127 % compared with baseline conditions. PMID:22791140

  4. Assessing Sediment Yield for Selected Watersheds in the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin Under Future Agricultural Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yang; Lunetta, Ross S.; Macpherson, Alexander J.; Luo, Junyan; Chen, Guo

    2013-01-01

    In the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin (GLB), corn acreage has been expanding since 2005 in response to high demand for corn as an ethanol feedstock. This study integrated remote sensing-derived products and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) within a geographic information system (GIS) modeling environment to assess the impacts of cropland change on sediment yield within four selected watersheds in the GLB. The SWAT models were calibrated during a 6 year period (2000-2005), and predicted stream flows were validated. The R 2 values were 0.76, 0.80, 0.72, and 0.81 for the St. Joseph River, the St. Mary River, the Peshtigo River, and the Cattaraugus Creek watersheds, respectively. The corresponding E (Nash and Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient) values ranged from 0.24 to 0.79. The average annual sediment yields (tons/ha/year) ranged from 0.12 to 4.44 for the baseline (2000 to 2008) condition. Sediment yields were predicted to increase for possible future cropland change scenarios. The first scenario was to convert all "other" agricultural row crop types (i.e., sorghum) to corn fields and switch the current/baseline crop rotation into continuous corn. The average annual sediment yields increased 7-42 % for different watersheds. The second scenario was to further expand the corn planting to hay/pasture fields. The average annual sediment yields increased 33-127 % compared with baseline conditions.

  5. Major Sterol Fluxes in Sinking Particles and Surface Sediments in the Cariaco Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, M. P.; Goni, M. A.; Thunell, R.; Tappa, E.; Astor, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Sterols in sediments are used to trace past ecosystem dynamics in the upper ocean. It is therefore important to know what factors control the creation of sterol fluxes, degradation of sterols in the water column and eventual burial in the sediments. To this end we examined the major sterols fluxes in sediment traps during 1996-1997 (at depths of 275, 455 and 975m) and surface sediments in the Cariaco Basin. Sterol flux data in the sediment traps were compared with hydrographic data collected as part of the CARIACO Project. Diatom sterols 24-methylcholesta-5,22-dien-3b-ol (brassicasterol), 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3b-ol (24methlyene-cholesterol) fluxes were greatest during upwelling. 24methlyene-cholesterol was well correlated with biogenic opal flux (r2 = 0.88) suggesting that 24methlyene-cholesterol is an excellent biomarker for diatom production. 4a,23,24-trimethyl-5a(H)-cholest-22-en-3b-ol (dinosterol) exhibited a post upwelling maximum indicating that fluxes of dinoflagellate-derived materials were dominant during stratified conditions. Sterols were degraded with depth but the relative composition of the major sterols remained fairly constant. There is a sharp decrease in the magnitude of total sterol fluxes between the sediment traps (955m; 143 ug m-2 d-1) and the surface sediments (core depth 460m; 11.7 ug m-2 -1) indicating that a large portion of the flux is lost at the sediment water interface. It is at this transition in which the relative compositions of the sterols are also altered. Dinosterol, which is a minor component of the sediment trap fluxes, is 3 to 4 times greater than that of cholesterol in the sediment. While the ratio of dinosterol to cholesterol changed significantly, the ratio between the two diatom sterol fluxes, brassicasterol and 24methlyene-cholesterol, and cholesterol remained within the range of values observed in the sediment traps.

  6. Spatial distribution and potential toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from Liaohe River Basin, China.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Meng, Wei; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Changsheng

    2016-03-01

    The distribution and potential toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the sediments of Liaohe River Basin were investigated in this study. Total concentrations of 16 PAHs (∑PAH16) ranged from 82.5 to 25374.4 μg/kg averaging 3149.2 μg/kg. Three predominant PAHs were fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. In Liao River, two-to-three-ring PAHs were dominant taking up 67.2-92.5% of ∑PAH16, whereas sediments in Daliao River system mainly contained four-to-six-ring PAHs ranging from 47.8 to 83.7%. Both petrogenic and pyrogenic sources contributed to the PAH pollution based on diagnostic ratios. The empirical and mechanistic sediment quality guidelines were used to estimate the toxicity risk of PAHs to benthic organisms. The ∑PAH16 in all sediments were significantly lower than probable effect concentrations (PEC), while ∑PAH16 at nine sites of the Daliao River system were between threshold effect concentrations (TEC) and PEC, suggesting that adverse effects were possible at the nine sites. The only individual PAH was acenaphthene whose concentrations were above PEC at some sites, indicating its potential toxicity. Based upon equilibrium partitioning theory and narcosis model, the obtained toxic units for PAH mixtures at all sites were far less than one, implying that the levels of PAH mixtures were acceptable for the protection of benthic fauna. The two evaluation methods lead to the consistent results that benthic organisms inhabiting in the sediments of Liaohe River Basin have no or low risk of adverse effects resulting from exposure to PAHs. PMID:26915741

  7. Contaminant residues in fish and sediments from lakes in the Atchafalaya River Basin (Louisiana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Andreasen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Conversion of bottomland hardwood forests agricultural land has reduced habitat and water quality in many lakes in the floodplain of the lower Mississippi River. The objectives of this study were to ascertain current contaminant residue concentrations in fish and sediment from lakes in the Atchafalaya River Basin and to determine the influence of overflow and agricultural land use on contaminant levels. Fish and sediment samples were collected from eight lakes that differed in overflow (no overflow, headwater overflow, backwater overflow) and land-use characteristics (presence or absence of agricultural land). Residue analysis of 24 sediment and 82 fish samples collected from the study lakes showed that contaminant residues were uniformly low. Total DDT concentrations, consisting mainly of DDE, were found in 98% of the fish samples and generally were the highest residues though they rarely exceeded 0.50 ug/g. Dieldrin, -BHC and -BHC, in concentrations rarely exceeding 0.05 ug/g, were detected in about 50% of the fish samples. Total organochlorine pesticide and PCB residues were less than 2.00 ug/g in all fish from all lakes, except for a 3.46 ug/g total in spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) from one lake. Sediments were free from pesticide residues except for occasional traces (0.01 ug/g) of -BHC. Metal residue concentrations in fish and sediment samples were typical of uncontaminated areas. Lake systems in the Atchafalaya River Basin appeared to be relatively uncontaminated by agricultural pesticides, but metal and organic residues in fish were similar from lakes with the same land-use and overflow characteristics.

  8. Examining the Colonization and Survival of E. coli from Varying Host Sources in Drainage Basin Sediments and Stormwater.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kyle; Michael Trapp, J

    2016-08-01

    It is widely understood that stormwater drainage has a significant impact on the health of tidal creek systems via regular inputs of runoff from the surrounding watershed. Due to this hydrologic connection, contamination of the upstream drainage basin will have a direct effect on estuaries and tidal creeks that often act as receiving waters. This study focuses on the importance of drainage basin sediments as they enhance the persistence and transport of the fecal indicator bacteria E. coli within a watershed. Experiments presented use microcosm environments with drainage basin sediments and stormwater to investigate E. coli colonization of stagnant waters and to examine the importance of host sources to bacterial survival. A novel method for establishing microcosms using environmental sediments with in situ bacterial populations and sterile overlying waters is used to examine E. coli colonization of the water column in the absence of flow. Colonization of sterile sediment environments also is examined using two common host sources (human and avian). Each experiment uses sediments of varying grain size and organic content to examine the influence of physical characteristics on bacterial prevalence. Results suggest host source of bacteria may be more important to initial bacterial colonization while physical characteristics of drainage basin sediments better explains extended E. coli persistence. Findings also suggest an indirect control of water column bacterial concentration by sediment type and erodibility. PMID:27282707

  9. Modern sediment yield compared to geologic rates of sediment production in a semi-arid basin, New Mexico: Assessing the human impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.C.; Pavich, M.J.; Bierman, P.R.; Clapp, E.M.; Ellevein, A.; Aby, S.

    2004-01-01

    In the semi-arid Arroyo Chavez basin of New Mexico, a 2.28 km2 sub-basin of the Rio Puerco, we contrasted short-term rates (3 years) of sediment yield measured with sediment traps and dams with long-term, geologic rates (???10 000 years) of sediment production measured using 10Be. Examination of erosion rates at different time-scales provides the opportunity to contrast the human impact on erosion with background or geologic rates of sediment production. Arroyo Chavez is grazed and we were interested in whether differences in erosion rates observed at the two time-scales are due to grazing. The geologic rate of sediment production, 0-27 kg m-2 a -1 is similar to the modern sediment yields measured for geomorphic surfaces including colluvial slopes, gently sloping hillslopes, and the mesa top which ranged from 0.12 to 1.03 kg m -2 a-1. The differences between modern sediment yield and geologic rates of sediment production were most noticeable for the alluvial valley floor, which had modern sediment yields as high as 3.35 kg m-2 a-1. The hydraulic state of the arroyo determines whether the alluvial valley floor is aggrading or degrading. Arroyo Chavez is incised and the alluvial valley floor is gullied and piped and is a source of sediment. The alluvial valley floor is also the portion of the basin most modified by human disturbance including grazing and gas pipeline activity, both of which serve to increase erosion rates. ?? 2004 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  10. The linkage between longitudinal sediment routing systems and basin types in the northern South China Sea in perspective of source-to-sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming; Hsiung, Kan-Hsi; Zhang, Cuimei; Xie, Xinong; Yu, Ho-Shing; Wang, Zhenfeng

    2015-11-01

    Using bathymetric and seismic data, this study describes the morpho-sedimentary features in Qiongdongnan basin and southwest Taiwan collision basin, northern South China Sea and reveals the linkages between sediment routing system and basin types. The modern Central Canyon in the Qiongdongnan basin is located along the rift margin, and subparallel to the shelf-break southeast of Hainan Island. The modern Central Canyon develops along the basin axis (i.e., Xisha Trough) and longitudinally transports sediments eastward which are mainly supplied by northern continental slope. The Penghu Canyon in the southwest Taiwan collision basin is located along the collision boundary parallel to the strike of the adjacent uplifted Taiwan orogen. The Penghu Canyon develops along the tilting basin axis transporting sediments longitudinally southward to the deep-sea basin and Manila Trench. The Penghu Canyon is supplied with sediments from both flank Kaoping and South China Sea slopes where tributary canyons and channels transport sediments down-slope and feed the axial canyon. The certain basin types may be occupied by particular styles of sediment routing system. By comparing the morpho-sedimentary features and basin characteristics associated with the modern Central Canyon to that of the Valencia Channel in NW Mediterranean Sea, the longitudinal sediment routing system in rift basin type can be determined. In contrast, the longitudinal sediment routing systems in collision setting can be represented by the comparable examples of Penghu Canyon in southwest Taiwan collision basin and Markham Canyon in western Solomon Sea. The rift type sediment routing system is characterized by an axial canyon with a single sediment supply from land drainage margin. In contrast, sediment routing system in collision type basins consists of an axial canyon and dual sediment supplies from flank adjacent slopes. The axial canyons in collision basins are more active than that of the rift basin due to

  11. Water and sediment transport modeling of a large temporary river basin in Greece.

    PubMed

    Gamvroudis, C; Nikolaidis, N P; Tzoraki, O; Papadoulakis, V; Karalemas, N

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this research was to study the spatial distribution of runoff and sediment transport in a large Mediterranean watershed (Evrotas River Basin) consisting of temporary flow tributaries and high mountain areas and springs by focusing on the collection and use of a variety of data to constrain the model parameters and characterize hydrologic and geophysical processes at various scales. Both monthly and daily discharge data (2004-2011) and monthly sediment concentration data (2010-2011) from an extended monitoring network of 8 sites were used to calibrate and validate the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. In addition flow desiccation maps showing wet and dry aquatic states obtained during a dry year were used to calibrate the simulation of low flows. Annual measurements of sediment accumulation in two reaches were used to further calibrate the sediment simulation. Model simulation of hydrology and sediment transport was in good agreement with field observations as indicated by a variety of statistical measures used to evaluate the goodness of fit. A water balance was constructed using a 12 year long (2000-2011) simulation. The average precipitation of the basin for this period was estimated to be 903 mm yr(-1). The actual evapotranspiration was 46.9% (424 mm yr(-1)), and the total water yield was 13.4% (121 mm yr(-1)). The remaining 33.4% (302 mm yr(-1)) was the amount of water that was lost through the deep groundwater of Taygetos and Parnonas Mountains to areas outside the watershed and for drinking water demands (6.3%). The results suggest that the catchment has on average significant water surplus to cover drinking water and irrigation demands. However, the situation is different during the dry years, where the majority of the reaches (85% of the river network are perennial and temporary) completely dry up as a result of the limited rainfall and the substantial water abstraction for irrigation purposes. There is a large variability in the

  12. Soft-Sediment Deformation Structures Interpreted as Seismites in the Kolankaya Formation, Denizli Basin (SW Turkey)

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Savaş; Özkul, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The NW-trending Denizli basin of the SW Turkey is one of the neotectonic grabens in the Aegean extensional province. It is bounded by normal faults on both southern and northern margins. The basin is filled by Neogene and Quaternary terrestrial deposits. Late Miocene- Late Pliocene aged Kolankaya formation crops out along the NW trending Karakova uplift in the Denizli basin. It is a typical fluviolacustrine succession that thickens and coarsens upward, comprising poorly consolidated sand, gravelly sand, siltstone and marl. Various soft-sediment deformation structures occur in the formation, especially in fine- to medium grained sands, silts and marls: load structures, flame structures, clastic dikes (sand and gravely-sand dike), disturbed layers, laminated convolute beds, slumps and synsedimentary faulting. The deformation mechanism and driving force for the soft-sediment deformation are related essentially to gravitational instability, dewatering, liquefaction-liquidization, and brittle deformation. Field data and the wide lateral extent of the structures as well as regional geological data show that most of the deformation is related to seismicity and the structures are interpreted as seismites. The existence of seismites in the Kolankaya Formation is evidence for continuing tectonic activity in the study area during the Neogene and is consistent with the occurrence of the paleoearthquakes of magnitude >5. PMID:25152909

  13. Soft-sediment deformation structures interpreted as seismites in the Kolankaya Formation, Denizli Basin (SW Turkey).

    PubMed

    Topal, Savaş; Özkul, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The NW-trending Denizli basin of the SW Turkey is one of the neotectonic grabens in the Aegean extensional province. It is bounded by normal faults on both southern and northern margins. The basin is filled by Neogene and Quaternary terrestrial deposits. Late Miocene- Late Pliocene aged Kolankaya formation crops out along the NW trending Karakova uplift in the Denizli basin. It is a typical fluviolacustrine succession that thickens and coarsens upward, comprising poorly consolidated sand, gravelly sand, siltstone and marl. Various soft-sediment deformation structures occur in the formation, especially in fine- to medium grained sands, silts and marls: load structures, flame structures, clastic dikes (sand and gravely-sand dike), disturbed layers, laminated convolute beds, slumps and synsedimentary faulting. The deformation mechanism and driving force for the soft-sediment deformation are related essentially to gravitational instability, dewatering, liquefaction-liquidization, and brittle deformation. Field data and the wide lateral extent of the structures as well as regional geological data show that most of the deformation is related to seismicity and the structures are interpreted as seismites. The existence of seismites in the Kolankaya Formation is evidence for continuing tectonic activity in the study area during the Neogene and is consistent with the occurrence of the paleoearthquakes of magnitude >5. PMID:25152909

  14. Mobility of metals over the redox boundary in Peru Basin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stummeyer, Jens; Marchig, Vesna

    Downcore variations and phase distribution of metals in the Quaternary sediments from six areas of the Peru Basin were investigated. The sediments are characterised by a 5-20 cm thick, oxic layer at the water/sediment interface formed under the influence of dissolved oxygen in the bottom water. In deeper sediment sections, suboxic conditions are found due to the degradation of organic matter. Variations in the downcore abundance of metals (e.g., Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, V, Mo, Cr) were determined by bulk chemical methods. A significant accumulation of manganese is observed at the depth of the manganese redox boundary, caused by diagenetic remobilisation under suboxic conditions and reprecipitation under oxic conditions. To investigate their phase distributions, partitioning of elements in selected samples over the sediment column was carried out in sequential leaching experiments. A comparison between the surface layer and deeper sediment layers shows a distinct change in the element distribution between operationally defined host phases (carbonates, oxy-hydroxides, detrital components). Above the redox boundary at the sediment surface, transition metals are enriched in the reducible Mn-oxide fraction. When the horizontal position of the Mn-redox boundary moves upward, influenced by naturally occurring enhancement of surface-water productivity, these elements are mobilised and available to the manganese nodule accretion process if the redox boundary reaches the level of growth of the nodules. In contrast to the naturally induced mobilisation of metals, a technical impact (e.g., mining of manganese nodules) would be a rapid event occurring under completely different redox conditions. Metals would be released into the bottom water, an oxic environment, where scavenging of dissolved metals and resedimentation takes place in relatively short periods of time. Presumably, a long-distance transport of contaminants will not happen.

  15. Dams in the Mekong River Basin: Options for Improved Sediment and Fish Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, T. B.; Loucks, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Mekong River and its tributaries comprise one of the most productive fish habitats in the world today. The economic value of the Mekong fishery in Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam is among the highest in the world, providing income and food security to tens of millions of people. However, the construction of multiple dams in the basin will reduce sediment discharge, which will adversely impact nutrient transport and habitat quality and availability, and disrupt fish migration routes. Thus, of considerable interest is the identification of alternatives to the location, design and operation of planned hydropower dams that could improve sediment passage, enable migratory fish passage, and sustain fish production for local use. This paper describes the results of simulation studies designed to identify and evaluate such alternatives, as well as their potential impact on hydropower production. Dam sites in Cambodia and Lao PDR on tributaries and on the mainstream Mekong River will be discussed. Evaluations of sediment management techniques such as flushing, sluicing and bypassing will be discussed. This study is intended to inform decision makers in Cambodia, Lao PDR and Vietnam about potential alternatives to current plans as they prepare decisions regarding the development of over 100 hydropower dams throughout the basin.

  16. Arsenic release by indigenous bacteria Bacillus cereus from aquifer sediments at Datong Basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli

    2011-03-01

    Endemic arsenic poisoning due to long-term drinking of high arsenic groundwater has been reported in Datong Basin, northern China. To investigate the effects of microbial activities on arsenic mobilization in contaminated aquifers, Bacillus cereus ( B. cereus) isolated from high arsenic aquifer sediments of the basin was used in our microcosm experiments. The arsenic concentration in the treatment with both bacteria and sodium citrate or glucose had a rapid increase in the first 18 d, and then, it declined. Supplemented with bacteria only, the concentration could increase on the second day. By contrast, the arsenic concentration in the treatment supplemented with sodium citrate or glucose was kept very low. These results indicate that bacterial activities promoted the release of arsenic in the sediments. Bacterial activities also influenced other geochemical parameters of the aqueous phase, such as pH, Eh, and the concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al that are important controls on arsenic release. The removal of Fe, Mn, and Al from sediment samples was observed with the presence of B. cereus. The effects of microbial activities on Fe, Mn, and Al release were nearly the same as those on As mobilization. The pH values of the treatments inoculated with bacteria were lower than those without bacteria, still at alkaline levels. With the decrease of Eh values in treatments inoculated with bacteria, the microcosms became more reducing and are thus favorable for arsenic release.

  17. Sediment-transport characteristics and effects of sediment transport on benthic invertebrates in the Fountain Creek drainage basin upstream from Widefield, southeastern Colorado, 1985-88

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Guerard, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Sediment and benthic-invertebrate data were collected during water years 1985 through 1988 in the Fountain Creek drainage basin upstream from Widefield, Colorado. Sediment data collected include suspended-sediment concentrations and particle size analysis of suspended sediment, bedload, and bed material. Sediment-transport equations were derived for total suspended-sediment discharge and suspended-sand discharge at seven periodic sampling sites. Annual suspended-sediment loads for water years 1985 through 1988 and mean suspended-sediment yields were computed for the seven periodic sampling sites. Mean annual suspended-sediment yield for 1985 through 1988 increased about 73% downstream in the Fountain Creek drainage basin primarily as a result of sediment discharging from Monument Creek. Bedload discharge was computed at six of the periodic sampling sites and ranged from 2.6 to 3,570 tons/day. Bedload discharge, as a percentage of total sediment discharge, ranged from 6 to 92%, and the smaller values occurred during rainfall runoff. Number of taxa, species density, and similarity indices were determined for benthic invertebrates at five of the periodic sampling sites. Multiple comparison tests were used to test for similarity of benthic invertebrates between the five sites. Multiple-regression analysis was done to determine the effects of sediment transport on benthic-invertebrate densities. Median grain size of bed material collected in conjunction with benthic- invertebrate samples and flooding during the 30 days prior to sampling consistently accounted for the most variation in mean densities of total organisms and major taxa groups sampled. (USGS)

  18. Sediment Dynamics in the Upper McKenzie River Basin, Central Oregon Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallman, J. D.; Bowers, R. J.; Cabrera, N. C.; Real de Asua, R.; Wooster, J. K.

    2005-12-01

    Reference and current sediment budgets were developed to evaluate the extent to which hydroelectric dams alter sediment dynamics in the upper McKenzie River basin of central Oregon. The 647 km2 study area straddles the western boundary of the High Cascades graben separating the High Cascades and Western Cascades geologic terrains. Permeable Quaternary volcanics forming the low-gradient High Cascades plateau promote surface hydrologic disconnection, nearly constant discharge controlled by groundwater emergence, and low sediment yield. In contrast, deeply weathered Tertiary volcanics, rugged topography, and a dense network of steep channels in the Western Cascades terrain promote peaked storm responses and high sediment yield by deep-seated mass movement, debris slides, and debris flows. Three independent estimates of sediment yield (application of published surface process rates, extrapolation of regional suspended load and bedload flux rates, and extrapolation of reservoir sedimentation rates) illustrate the dominant role of geologic terrains in determining the longitudinal pattern of sediment supply to the McKenzie River. Average reference yields from High Cascades and Western Cascades sources were 9 t km-2y-1 and 200 t km-2y-1, respectively. Downstream of Trail Bridge Dam, High Cascades sources (241 km2) account for 12% of the total reference yield, while Western Cascades sources (67 km2) account for 62%. Estimates of current sediment yield illustrate the offsetting effects of reservoir sediment trapping and accelerated yield related to forest management. Average current yields from High Cascades and Western Cascades sources were 17 t km-2y-1 and 300 t km-2y-1, respectively. Current yield to the McKenzie River arm of Trail Bridge Reservoir (42 km2 sourced in High Cascades terrain) was 17 t km-2y-1, while current yield to Smith Reservoir (48 km2 sourced in Western Cascades terrain) was 251 t km-2y-1. The relation between hydroelectric project effects and forest

  19. Development and Interpretation of New Sediment Rating Curve Considering the Effect of Vegetation Cover for Asian Basins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration of a river can provide very important perspective on erosion or soil loss of one river basin ecosystem. The changes of land use and land cover, such as deforestation or afforestation, affect sediment yield process of a catchment through changing the hydrological cycle of the area. A sediment rating curve can describe the average relation between discharge and suspended sediment concentration for a certain location. However, the sediment load of a river is likely to be undersimulated from water discharge using least squares regression of log-transformed variables and the sediment rating curve does not consider temporal changes of vegetation cover. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can well be used to analyze the status of the vegetation cover well. Thus long time monthly NDVI data was used to detect vegetation change in the past 19 years in this study. Then monthly suspended sediment concentration and discharge from 1988 to 2006 in Laichau station were used to develop one new sediment rating curve and were validated in other Asian basins. The new sediment model can describe the relationship among sediment yield, streamflow, and vegetation cover, which can be the basis for soil conservation and sustainable ecosystem management. PMID:24453795

  20. Development and interpretation of new sediment rating curve considering the effect of vegetation cover for Asian basins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Ishidaira, Hiroshi; Sun, Wenchao; Ning, Shaowei

    2013-01-01

    Suspended sediment concentration of a river can provide very important perspective on erosion or soil loss of one river basin ecosystem. The changes of land use and land cover, such as deforestation or afforestation, affect sediment yield process of a catchment through changing the hydrological cycle of the area. A sediment rating curve can describe the average relation between discharge and suspended sediment concentration for a certain location. However, the sediment load of a river is likely to be undersimulated from water discharge using least squares regression of log-transformed variables and the sediment rating curve does not consider temporal changes of vegetation cover. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can well be used to analyze the status of the vegetation cover well. Thus long time monthly NDVI data was used to detect vegetation change in the past 19 years in this study. Then monthly suspended sediment concentration and discharge from 1988 to 2006 in Laichau station were used to develop one new sediment rating curve and were validated in other Asian basins. The new sediment model can describe the relationship among sediment yield, streamflow, and vegetation cover, which can be the basis for soil conservation and sustainable ecosystem management. PMID:24453795

  1. Quantifying and identifying the sources of fine sediment input in a typical Mongolian river basin, the Kharaa River case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuring, Phillip

    2013-04-01

    Mongolia is facing a tremendous change of land-use intensification due to expansions in the agricultural sector, an increase of cattle and livestock and a growth of urban settlements by migration of the rural population to the cities. With most of its area located in a semiarid to arid environment, Mongolia is vulnerable to climatic changes that are expected to lead to higher temperatures and increased evapotranspiration. It is expected that this may lead to unfavorable changes in surface water quality caused by increased nutrients and sediment bound pollutants emissions. Increased fine sediment load is associated with nutrient, heavy metal and pollutant input and therefore affects water quality. Previous studies using radionuclide fallout isotope sediment source fingerprinting investigations identified riverbank erosion as the main source of suspended sediment in the Kharaa River. Erosion susceptibility calculations in combination with suspended sediment observations showed strong seasonal and annual variabilities of sediment input and in-stream transport, and a strong connection of erosional behaviour with land-use.The objective of this study is to quantify the current water quality threats by fine sediment inputs in the 15,000 km2 Kharaa River basin in Northern Mongolia by delineating the sources of the fine sediments and estimating the sediment budget.To identify the spatial distribution of sediment sources within the catchment, more than 1000 samples from the river confluences at the outlet of each sub basin into the main tributary were collected during 5 intensive grab sediment sampling campaigns in 2009-11. The fine sediment fraction (<10μm) has been analysed using geochemical tracer techniques for spatial source identification, based on major elements (e.g. Si, Al, Mg, Fe, Na, K, P) and trace elements (e.g. Ba, Pb, Sr, Zn). The contribution of suspended sediment of each sub basin in the main tributary has been evaluated with help of a mixing model. To

  2. Runoff and sediment production in a Mediterranean basin under two different land uses after forest maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Edinson; Rallo, Elena; Úbeda, Xavier; Farguell, Joaquim; Outeiro, Luís

    2013-04-01

    This study analyses the influence of two different land uses on the hydrology of the Vernegà experimental basin between the years 1993 and 2012. The basin is located in the Northeast of the Iberian Peninsula and it is influenced by a Mediterranean climate, with an average annual rainfall of 688 mm. The study of rainfall distribution shows that the majority occurs during autumn and spring, with a 34% and 25% of total annual rainfall respectively. Surface runoff flows from October to June. In this catchment, flash floods may represent 70% of the total water yield, though they only occur 6% of the time. It is important to emphasize that agricultural practices within the study area have been maintained, which is the contrary to the general trend in Mediterranean rural areas. The introduction of forest management practices between 2003 and 2005 has resulted in important hydrological changes in the watershed: Between 2005 and 2012 an increase of the runoff coefficient has been detected. In Bosc the increase represents 38% while in Campàs is 12% in relation with the 1993-2005 period. Campàs yields a greater total runoff than Bosc as a consequence of a greater catchment surface, greater agricultural surface and the existence of forest roads and forest management practices. Part of this phenomenon may be due to the decrease of interception of rainfall and plant biomass in the forested area of the basin. In relation to the sediment yield, it is concentrated during floods (more than 80%) and there is an increase of available sediment after extraordinary events, as it is the case of October 2005 flood, where the total sediment yield was 7 Tkm¯²yr¯¹ and in November 2005 it was 10 Tkm¯²yr¯¹.

  3. Trace elements and organic contaminants in stream sediments from the Red River of the North Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, M.E.; Tornes, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    To assess the presence and distribution of a variety of hydro-phobic chemicals in streams in the Red River of the North Basin, bottom sediments were analyzed for trace elements, organochlorines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Glaciolacustrine clays and carbonate minerals are common in fine sediments of the region, and can help explain the distribution of many elements. Aluminum (Al), an indicator of glaciolacustrine clay minerals, correlates strongly (r>0.75, p<0.05) with Cr, Co, Fe, La, Li, K, Sc, and Ti; and moderately (0.55Basin, Eu, Nb, Ce, La, Nd, and Ni also have strong correlations with Al. Al correlates negatively with major elements associated with carbonate minerals (Ca, Mg, and inorganic carbon). No significant correlations with Al, Ca, or Mg were observed for As, Pb, Mn, Hg, Se, or Ag, which implies that these elements have different environmental sources or behaviors than glaciolacustrine clays or carbonate minerals. Reduction-oxidation processes may influence Mn distribution. Lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) are known to be anthropogenically enriched in the environment--their distribution may indicate environmental enrichment in Red River of the North Basin streams. Organochlorines detected are limited to traces of DDT and its metabolites (mostlyp,p'-DDE). Fourteen PAHs, which are constituents of fossil fuels and of combustion byproducts, were detected in at least halfthe sediment samples; pyrene and fluoranthene were detected in about 90 percent of samples. The contaminants detected in this study were present at low levels, likely indicative of diffuse or remote sources; they occur widely in the environment. 

  4. Assessment of the environmental conditions of the Sarno river basin (south Italy): a stream sediment approach.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Stefano; Iavazzo, Pietro; Adamo, Paola; Lima, Annamaria; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2013-06-01

    The Sarno river basin covers an area of 500 km(2) collecting the waters of Solofrana and Cavaiola tributaries. Originally it manly represents a source of livelihood for inhabitants by fishing and transporting goods; currently, the Sarno river, still partially used for irrigation, is affected by an extreme environmental degradation as a result of uncontrolled outflow of industrial waste. Within the framework of a wider geochemical prospecting project aiming at characterizing the whole territory of the Campania region, 89 stream sediment samples with a sampling density of 1 sample per 5 km(2) were collected in the river basin and analyzed by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in order to assess the environmental conditions at a regional scale. A GIS-aided technique, based on both the actual distribution of potentially harmful elements and their regional background values, was used to generate the maps of the contamination factors and of the contamination degrees for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn. Furthermore, a factor analysis was performed to assess the nature and the extent of contamination sources for the river sediments. Results showed that the Sarno river basin could be divided in two "environmental status" units: one, low contaminated, corresponding to the hilly and mountain areas, and the second, from moderately to very highly contaminated, corresponding to the economically developed areas of the valley floor characterized by a high population density. This work was developed within a project that aims to investigate the relationships between environmental pollution and human health by analyzing environmental media (stream sediments, water, soil and vegetation) together with human hair of resident population. In this context, the spatial correlation between the extremely compromised environmental conditions of developed areas and the incidence rate of liver cancer in the same area was also explored posing the need of a careful costs

  5. Ecological risk assessment and sources of heavy metals in sediment from Daling River basin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Mi, Dong; Chen, Yifu; Wang, Luo; Sun, Yeqing

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the distribution, source, and ecological risk of heavy metals in Daling River basin, 28 surface sediments collected in this region were analyzed by experimental and theoretical methods. Seven heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Hg, Cu, As, Cd, and Zn, were detected in all samples. Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess the ecological risks of these heavy metals. It was found that the pollution of Cd was the most serious; the ecological risks in Daling River and Bohai Bay were significantly higher than those in estuary, Bohai Sea, and wetland, but overall, the ecological risks of these heavy metals were low to aquatic organisms in Daling River basin at present. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis showed that these heavy metals might originate from the same pollution sources located near Daling River and Bohai Bay. PMID:25378031

  6. Annual suspended sediment and trace element fluxes in the Mississippi, Columbia, Colorado, and Rio Grande drainage basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Suspended sediment, sediment-associated, total trace element, phosphorus (P), and total organic carbon (TOC) fluxes were determined for the Mississippi, Columbia, Rio Grande, and Colorado Basins for the study period (the 1996, 1997, and 1998 water years) as part of the US Geological Survey's redesigned National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) programme. The majority (??? 70%) of Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Ba, P, As, Fe, Mn, and Al are transported in association with suspended sediment; Sr transport seems dominated by the dissolved phase, whereas the transport of Li and TOC seems to be divided equally between both phases. Average dissolved trace element levels are markedly lower than reported during the original NASQAN programme; this seems due to the use of 'clean' sampling, processing, and analytical techniques rather than to improvements in water quality. Partitioning between sediment and water for Ag, Pb, Cd, Cr, Co, V, Be, As, Sb, Hg, and Ti could not be estimated due to a lack of detectable dissolved concentrations in most samples. Elevated suspended sediment-associated Zn levels were detected in the Ohio River Basin and elevated Hg levels were detected in the Tennessee River, the former may affect the mainstem Mississippi River, whereas the latter probably do not. Sediment-associated concentrations of Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Co, Ba, Mo, Sb, Hg, and Fe are markedly elevated in the upper Columbia Basin, and appear to be detectable (Zn, Cd) as far downstream as the middle of the basin. These elevated concentrations seem to result from mining and/or mining-related activities. Consistently detectable concentrations of dissolved Se were found only in the Colorado River Basin. Calculated average annual suspended sediment fluxes at the mouths of the Mississippi and Rio Grande Basins were below, whereas those for the Columbia and Colorado Basins were above previously published annual values. Downstream suspended sediment-associated and total trace element fluxes

  7. Rift border system: The interplay between tectonics and sedimentation in the Reconcavo basin, northeastern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Magnavita, L.P.; Silva, T.F. da

    1995-11-01

    A geometric and depositional model is proposed to explain the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the main border of the Reconcavo basin. The architecture of the rift margin is characterized by a rift border system constituted by (1) a master fault, (2) a step, and (3) a clastic wedge. This footwall-derived clastic wedge is interpreted as alluvial fans and fan deltas composed of conglomerates that interfinger with hanging-wall strata. The analysis of the vertical distribution of coarse-grained components of this wedge suggests that its composition is geographically controlled, and no regular inverted stratigraphy is commonly described for this type of succession. During an initial lacustrine phase, turbidites accumulated farther from and parallel to the rift margin. The mapping of marker beds that bound these lacustrine turbidite deposits may be used to infer major periods of clastic influx and, therefore, to correlate with periods of fault-related subsidence or climatic fluctuations in the depositional basin and erosion of the sediment source area. Periods of limited back-faulting and basin expansion toward the main border are distinguished through patterns of progradation and aggradation indicating progressive retreat of the rift border and younging; in the footwall direction. The overall evolution of the rift border seems to be related to extension, block rotation, hanging-wall subsidence, and footwall uplift associated with the initial master fault, with limited propagation of faults away from the basin into the footwall.

  8. Linking Late Pleistocene alpine glacial erosion and continental margin sedimentation: Insights from 40Ar/39Ar dating of silt-sized sediment, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaseñor, Tania; Jaeger, John M.; Foster, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary climatic and eustatic cycles in mid-latitude regions have led to more extensive alpine glaciations and continental shelf progradation, respectively. However, the glacial influence on sediment fluxes to the ocean creating continental margin strata is poorly documented. This contribution analyzes the provenance of fine sediment accumulating on the continental shelf during the Late Pleistocene to evaluate the influence of glacial cycles on sediment erosion and routing to the continental shelf. Taking advantage of the contrasting bedrock ages exposed across the Southern Alps, New Zealand, we perform 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating on the bulk silt-size sediment from three drill sites of IODP Expedition 317, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand. The results suggest that a large proportion of sediment accumulating on the continental shelf results from erosion within the Main Divide fault zone of the Southern Alps. Sediment 40Ar/39Ar age fluctuations over this time period suggest that bedrock with various 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages has been differentially eroded in the upper Waitaki River catchment and mixed in the Waitaki-Canterbury sediment-routing system. Across-shelf variations in sediment 40Ar/39Ar age reflect changing modes of sediment dispersal on the continental shelf. Fluvial material, likely derived from the main drainage divide zone, preferentially accumulates in the middle continental shelf, whereas material representing erosion of older bedrock (Torlesse Terrane), located lower in the drainage basin, is dispersed uniformly across the shelf. The age signature of the muddy sediment accumulating on the continental shelf reflects Late Pleistocene landscape evolution of the Southern Alps and its influence on sediment dispersal to the continental shelf.

  9. Soil conservation and the reduction of erosion and sedimentation in the Coon Creek basin, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, S.W.; Lund, S.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Coon Creek basin, in the Driftless Area of Wisconsin, has been strikingly transformed by soil conservation measures since the 1930's. Comparison of sheet and rill erosion by use of the Universal Soil Loss Equation, shows 1975 erosion rates on upland fields to be about one-fourth those of 1934. Average annual sedimentation accumulation in small reservoirs declined from about 5,000 megagrams per square kilometer in 1936-45 to about 50 megagrams per square kilometer in 1962-75. Analysis of deposition in tributary valleys suggests that annual rates declined from about 3,700 megagrams per square kilometer in the 1930 's to about 35-70 megagrams per square kilometer in recent years. These reductions in erosion and sedimentation are due principally to improvements in land management and, to a lesser degree, to changes in land use. (USGS)

  10. Distribution of trace elements in sediment and soil from river Vardar Basin, Macedonia/Greece.

    PubMed

    Popov, Stanko Ilić; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Tănăselia, Claudiu

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study was carried out to investigate the distribution of 59 elements in the sediment and soil samples collected from the river Vardar (Republic of Macedonia and Greece) and its major tributaries. The samples were collected from 28 sampling sites. Analyses were performed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. R-mode factor analysis (FA) was used to identify and characterise element associations. Seven associations of elements were determined by the method of multivariate statistics. Every factor (Factors 1-3 and 6 and 7 as geogenic and Factors 4 and 5 as anthropogenic associations of elements) are examined and explained separately. The distribution of various elements showed that there is a presence of anthropogenic elements (Ag, Cd, Cu, Ge, Pb, Sn and Zn) introduced in the river sediments and soils from the mining, metallurgical, industrial and agricultural activities in Vardar River Basin, which covers most of the Republic of Macedonia and Central-northern part of Greece. PMID:26422060

  11. Nannofossils in upper quaternary bottom sediments of back-arc basins in the southwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, O. B.

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of calcareous nannoplankton assemblages in bottom sediments sampled during Cruise 21 of the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in three areas located in back-arc basins of the southwestern Pacific (western Woodlark in the Solomon Sea, Manus in the Bismarck Sea, Central Lau) reveal that they belong to the Emiliania huxleyi Acme Zone, the most detailed one in the Gartner's scale of 1977. The content of coccoliths and their taxonomic composition indicate warm subtropical-tropical conditions. Long cores demonstrate a decrease in species diversity reflecting the transition from the cold late Pleistocene to the Holocene. The changes in species diversity and presence/absence of thermophilic representatives indicate transformation of depositional environments with unstable conditions in the water column and bottom layer, seismic activity, and widely developed processes of sediment redistribution and reworking.

  12. Geochemistry of volcanogenic clayey marine sediments from the Hazar-Maden Basin (Eastern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkoca, Dicle Bal; Kürüm, Sevcan; Huff, Warren D.

    2013-12-01

    The Hazar-Madeıı Basin sediments were deposited along the southern branch of the Neotethys Ocean margin during Late Maastrichtian-Middle Eocene times. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ICP-AES, ICP-MS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed on samples of the Upper Maastrichtian-Middle Eocene Hazar Group and the Middle Eocene Maden Complex from the Hazar-Maden Basin to investigate the main effects of depositional envi- ronmental parameters in three sections belonging to deeper marine (slope), proximal arc volcanic (Mastarhill and Yukaribag sections) and shallow platform marine (Sebken section) settings. Marine sediments contain clay minerals (smectite, smectite/chlorite, chlorite, illite, interstratified illite/smectite, illite/chlorite, palygorskite), clinoptilolite, quartz, feldspar, calcite, dolomite, opal-CT and hematite. The clays are dominated by iron-rich smectites. La, Zr and Th concentrations are high in the shallow marginal Sebken section where the terrestrial detrital contribution is significant, while Sc and Co are more dominant in the deeper marine (slope) Yukaribag section, which is represented by basic-type volcanism and a higher contribution of hydrothermal phases. In a chondrite-normalized REE diagram, the negative Eu anomaly in samples from Sebken, the section which was deposited in a shallow marine environment, is less significant than that of the other two sections indicating the presence of a high terrestrial contribution in that part of the basin. A decrease in LREE v/HREEiV and Lajv/Ybv, LaiV/Sin v ratios from Sebken to Mastarhill and the Yukaribag sections indi- cates deepening of the basin and an increasing contribution of volcanism in that direction.

  13. Hydrocarbons in surface sediments from a Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bazylinski, D.A.; Farrington, J.W.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    Petroleum-like materials found at the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site (Gulf of California) are derived from pyrolysis of organic matter. Two characteristics surface sediment cores differing in temperature profiles and other parameters were collected by DSV ALVIN, sectioned, and analyzed for hydrocarbons. The quantitative and qualitative composition of alkanes, steranes, diasteranes, and triterpanes differed between these cores as well as within sections of the same core. These differences, apparent for scales of tens of centimeters, are related to interactive physical, chemical, and microbial processes as well as the influence of multiple sources for the petroleum.

  14. Calculating Hillslope Contributions to River Basin Sediment Yield Using Observations in Small Watersheds and an Index-based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinner, D. A.; Kinner, D. A.; Stallard, R. F.

    2001-12-01

    Detailed observations of hillslope erosion are generally made in < 1 km2 watersheds to gain a process-level understanding in a given geomorphic setting. In addressing sediment and nutrient source-to-sink questions, a broader, river basin ( > 1000 km2) view of erosion and deposition is necessary to incorporate the geographic variability in the factors controlling sediment mobilization and storage. At the river basin scale, floodplain and reservoir storage become significant in sediment budgets. In this study, we used observations from USDA experimental watersheds to constrain an index-based model of hillslope erosion for the 7270 km2 Nishnabotna River Basin in the agricultural, loess-mantled region of southwest Iowa. Spatial and time-series measurements from two watersheds near Treynor, Iowa were used to calibrate the model for the row-cropped fields of the basin. By modeling rainfall events over an 18-year period, model error was quantified. We then applied the model to calculate basin-wide hillslope erosion and colluvial storage. Soil maps and the National Land-Cover Dataset were used to estimate model soil erodibility and land-use factors. By comparing modeled hillslope yields with observed basin sediment yields, we calculated that hillslope contributions to sediment yield were < 50% for the period 1974-1992. A major uncertainty in modeling is the percentage of basin area that is terraced. We will use the isotopes Cs137 and Pb210 to distinguish bank (isotope-poor) and hillslope (isotope-rich) contributions in flood plain deposits. This independent estimate of the relative hillslope contribution to sediment yield will reduce modeling uncertainty.

  15. The link between tectonic and sedimentation in an asymmetric extensional basin: the late Miocene evolution of the Sarajevo-Zenica basin, Bosnia and Hercegovina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andric, Nevena; Sant, Karin; Matenco, Liviu; Tomljenovic, Bruno; Pavelic, Davor; Mandic, Oleg; Hrvatovic, Hazim; Demir, Vedad

    2015-04-01

    Extensional back-arc basins develop in overriding tectonic plates during the slab retreat, as often observed for instance in the Panonian, Aegean or Western Mediterranean domains. In this type of basins, pre-existing major thrusts or nappe contacts inherited from the earlier orogenic evolution provide contrasts in rheology and localize the extensional deformation along large-scale asymmetric detachments. Their footwall exhumation is associated with the formation of asymmetric extensional basins in the hanging-wall controlled by normal faults forming half-graben geometries. In such tectonically active basins, the architecture of the sedimentary infill is controlled dominantly by the balance between pulses of tectonic subsidence along normal faults driving accommodation space and coeval moments of tectonic exhumation controlling the variations in sediment supply. In such systems, deformation migrates in space and time in the direction of the extensional transport affecting the spatial architecture of the basin infill. One optimal place to study the interplay between tectonic and sedimentation in asymmetric extensional basins is the Dinarides orogenic area, where the back-arc extension was responsible for the creation of a large number of small-scale basins that are part of the Oligo-Miocene Dinaride lake system. The Sarajevo-Zenica basin is the largest basin in this intra-mountain system and is located near the transition between the External and Internal Dinarides. The basin formed in the hanging-wall of a large-scale top-NNE detachment associated with the exhumation of the Mid-Bosnian Schists Mountains in its footwall. The basin was filled with Upper Oligocene - Pliocene alluvial-fluvial and lacustrine sediments characterized by an endemic fossil fauna. The study of basin normal faults and associated syn-kinematic sedimentation has demonstrated that the deformation migrates SW-wards in time. This is indicated by the NE-tapering syn-kinematic wedges, the migration

  16. Geochemical investigation and characterisation of Neogene sediments from Valjevo-Mionica Basin (Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šajnović, Aleksandra; Stojanović, Ksenija; Jovančićević, Branimir; Golovko, Anatoly

    2009-02-01

    Sediments from the Valjevo-Mionica Basin of Neogene age were investigated in this study using different geochemical methods. The results of the inorganic part analyses suggest that during genesis of the sediments, the contents of Na2O, B and As changed the most, which indicates that genesis of the investigated sediments was followed by climate changes and volcanic activity. The quantity of other macro- and microelements did not vary significantly. Investigations of the organic substance showed that it is native organic matter, which has been preserved to a significant extent, formed predominantly of algal precursor organisms, which provided good quality, deposited under reducing conditions and that it is at a low maturity level. As it has been established that genesis of the investigated sediments was mostly affected by an arid climate with more intensive salinity, the aim of this study, was also to identify the processes which were the most affected by the change in salinity, as well as biomarkers which are the most sensitive to this change. The results led to the conclusion that the salinity increase in the depositional environment had a primary effect on the preservation of the organic substance and the formation of the mineral searlesite. In addition, it was noticed that besides the Sq/ nC26 ratio, the parameters nC17/ nC27, CPI and Ph/ nC18, are also significantly sensitive to salinity change in a depositional environment in case of immature organic substance deposited under reducing conditions.

  17. Modeling suspended sediment sources and transport in the Ishikari River Basin, Japan using SPARROW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, W.; He, B.; Takara, K.; Luo, P.; Nover, D.; Hu, M.

    2014-10-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms that control suspended sediment (SS) fate and transport in rivers as high suspended sediment loads have significant impacts on riverine hydroecology. In this study, the watershed model SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed Attributes) was applied to estimate the sources and transport of SS in surface waters of the Ishikari River Basin (14 330 km2), the largest watershed on Hokkaido Island, Japan. The final developed SPARROW model has four source variables (developing lands, forest lands, agricultural lands, and stream channels), three landscape delivery variables (slope, soil permeability, and precipitation), two in-stream loss coefficients including small stream (streams with drainage area < 200 km2), large stream, and reservoir attenuation. The model was calibrated using measurements of SS from 31 monitoring sites of mixed spatial data on topography, soils and stream hydrography. Calibration results explain approximately 95.96% (R2) of the spatial variability in the natural logarithm mean annual SS flux (kg km-2 yr-1) and display relatively small prediction errors at the 31 monitoring stations. Results show that developing-land is associated with the largest sediment yield at around 1006.27 kg km-2 yr-1, followed by agricultural-land (234.21 kg km-2 yr-1). Estimation of incremental yields shows that 35.11% comes from agricultural lands, 23.42% from forested lands, 22.91% from developing lands, and 18.56% from stream channels. The results of this study improve our understanding of sediments production and transportation in the Ishikari River Basin in general, which will benefit both the scientific and the management community in safeguarding water resources.

  18. Modeling suspended sediment sources and transport in the Ishikari River basin, Japan, using SPARROW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, W. L.; He, B.; Takara, K.; Luo, P. P.; Nover, D.; Hu, M. C.

    2015-03-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms that control the fate and transport of suspended sediment (SS) in rivers, because high suspended sediment loads have significant impacts on riverine hydroecology. In this study, the SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed Attributes) watershed model was applied to estimate the sources and transport of SS in surface waters of the Ishikari River basin (14 330 km2), the largest watershed in Hokkaido, Japan. The final developed SPARROW model has four source variables (developing lands, forest lands, agricultural lands, and stream channels), three landscape delivery variables (slope, soil permeability, and precipitation), two in-stream loss coefficients, including small streams (streams with drainage area < 200 km2) and large streams, and reservoir attenuation. The model was calibrated using measurements of SS from 31 monitoring sites of mixed spatial data on topography, soils and stream hydrography. Calibration results explain approximately 96% (R2) of the spatial variability in the natural logarithm mean annual SS flux (kg yr-1) and display relatively small prediction errors at the 31 monitoring stations. Results show that developing land is associated with the largest sediment yield at around 1006 kg km-2 yr-1, followed by agricultural land (234 kg km-2 yr-1). Estimation of incremental yields shows that 35% comes from agricultural lands, 23% from forested lands, 23% from developing lands, and 19% from stream channels. The results of this study improve our understanding of sediment production and transportation in the Ishikari River basin in general, which will benefit both the scientific and management communities in safeguarding water resources.

  19. Large-scale patterns of recent sedimentation along the Cayman Troughpull-apart basin, Caribbean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Debalko, D.; Mann, P. )

    1990-05-01

    The North American-Caribbean plate boundary zone consists of a broad zone of active strike-slip deformation that extends 3,200 km from Middle America to the Lesser Antilles. An 1,100-km-long, 100-km-wide pull-apart basin the Cayman Trough is the dominant structural element of the submerged central part of the plate boundary zone between Jamaica and Honduras. In order to investigate large-scale patterns of recent sedimentation in a fully marine pull-apart setting, the authors surveyed a 90,000-km{sup 2} area along the southern edge of the Cayman Trough using SeaMARC II side-scan sonar, 3.5 KHz, and digital single-channel reflection techniques. These data allow them to divide the southern margin of the Cayman Trough pull-apart into three provinces of recent sedimentation: (1) an eastern terrigenous province characterized by straight short canyon systems (average 1-3 km wide and 10-15 km long) and associated small, lobate fans; canyon-fan systems are sourced by clastic spillover from filled borderland-type basins and by erosion of emergent fault-block islands; (2) a central carbonate province characterized by periplatform carbonate detritus fringing four isolated carbonate banks which collectively make up the Nicaraguan Rise; canyon systems (1-3 km wide, 15-80 km long) are highly meandering when unfaulted and straight when faulted; and (3) an eastern carbonate and terrigenous province characterized by both carbonate sediments shed off the easternmost bank of the Nicaraguan Rise bank and by terrigenous sediment derived from Jamaica.

  20. Beyond Colorado's Front Range - A new look at Laramide basin subsidence, sedimentation, and deformation in north-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, James C.; Trexler, James H., Jr.; Cashman, Patricia H.; Miller, Ian M.; Shroba, Ralph R.; Cosca, Michael A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.

    2010-01-01

    This field trip highlights recent research into the Laramide uplift, erosion, and sedimentation on the western side of the northern Colorado Front Range. The Laramide history of the North Park?Middle Park basin (designated the Colorado Headwaters Basin in this paper) is distinctly different from that of the Denver basin on the eastern flank of the range. The Denver basin stratigraphy records the transition from Late Cretaceous marine shale to recessional shoreline sandstones to continental, fluvial, marsh, and coal mires environments, followed by orogenic sediments that span the K-T boundary. Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene strata in the Denver basin consist of two mega-fan complexes that are separated by a 9 million-year interval of erosion/non-deposition between about 63 and 54 Ma. In contrast, the marine shale unit on the western flank of the Front Range was deeply eroded over most of the area of the Colorado Headwaters Basin (approximately one km removed) prior to any orogenic sediment accumulation. New 40Ar-39Ar ages indicate the oldest sediments on the western flank of the Front Range were as young as about 61 Ma. They comprise the Windy Gap Volcanic Member of the Middle Park Formation, which consists of coarse, immature volcanic conglomerates derived from nearby alkalic-mafic volcanic edifices that were forming at about 65?61 Ma. Clasts of Proterozoic granite, pegmatite, and gneiss (eroded from the uplifted core of the Front Range) seem to arrive in the Colorado Headwaters Basin at different times in different places, but they become dominant in arkosic sandstones and conglomerates about one km above the base of the Colorado Headwaters Basin section. Paleocurrent trends suggest the southern end of the Colorado Headwaters Basin was structurally closed because all fluvial deposits show a northward component of transport. Lacustrine depositional environments are indicated by various sedimentological features in several sections within the >3 km of sediment

  1. Provenance analysis and tectonic setting of the Neoproterozoic sediments within the Taoudeni Basin, Northern Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Graeme; Straathof, Gijs; Tait, Jenny; Lo, Khalidou; Ousmane, N'diaye; El Moctar Dahmada, Mohamed; Berndt, Jasper; Key, Roger

    2010-05-01

    We have dated over 800 detrital zircon grains from the Neoproterozoic sediments within the Taoudeni Basin of Mauritania on the West African craton. This sequence of sediments preserves a relatively condensed mixed continental and marine succession as well as Neoproterozoic glacial and glacially influenced deposits. The underlying Archaean and Birimian basement of the West African craton is exposed on the Reguibat shield in the north, and on the Leo shield in the south although smaller inliers occur scattered along the Bassaride and Mauritanide belts, as well as in the core of the Anti-Atlas belt. The large West African craton is totally surrounded by Pan-African fold belts. Sedimentation within the Taoudeni basin started around 1000Ma and lasted until the end of the Carboniferous. The basin is 1000-1500 km in diameter and the sedimentary pile is on average 3000 m thick. All dated zircons in the stratigraphically lowest Char and Atar Groups are older than ~1800Ma. These groups show a strong input of 2950 and 2075Ma ages, indicating sourcing from the local underlying granitic and gneissic basement. These basal sediments also include a large input from a rare 2475Ma source. Samples from the upper Assebet El Hassiane Group contain numerous zircons of 2000-900Ma. While the Neoproterozoic Marinoan glaciogenic "Triad" Jbeliat Group and stratigraphically above formations show a large range of 3200-595Ma ages. We have also undertaken a detailed Carbon isotope profile study through the carbonates which cap the Glacial Jbeliat Group. The upper part of the Jbeliat cap carbonate displays a distinct and pronounced rise from -4.3 to +3.8 13C, followed by the final demise of carbonate productivity. This positive trend is consistent with the upper part of the globally extensive Ghaub/Nantuo/Marinoan cap carbonate sequences. This world-wide sequence is characterized by composite negative-to-positive trends up section and so this isotope stratigraphy along with the zircon data helps

  2. Sediment yield along the Andes: continental budget, regional variations, and comparisons with other basins from orogenic mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Restrepo, Juan D.

    2014-07-01

    We assess the sediment yield at 119 gauging stations distributed from Colombia to Patagonia, covering the different morphotectonic and morphoclimatic settings of the Andes. The most productive areas are the Meta River basin within the northern Andes and the Bolivian and northern Argentina-Chaco systems, which produce an average of 3345, 4909 and 2654 t km2 y- 1 of sediment, respectively. The rivers of the northern and central Andes (excluding the Pacific watersheds of Peru, northern Chile, and central Argentina) have a weighted mean sediment yield of 2045 t km- 2 y- 1 and produce 2.25 GTy- 1 of total sediment. A major constraint estimating the Andean continental budget of sediment yield lies in the lack of gauging data for the Peruvian region. Using the available gauge stations, the regional sediment yield appears underestimated. Assuming a higher value of sediment yield for the Peruvian Andes, the total budget for the whole central Andes could range between 2.57 GT y- 1 and 3.44 GT y- 1. A minimum of ~ 0.55 GT y- 1 and a probable maximum of ~ 1.74 GT y- 1 of sediment are deposited in the intramontane and surrounding proximal sedimentary basins. The magnitude of sediment yield in the Andes is comparable to other rivers draining orogenic belts around the world.

  3. Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (D-025): Summary of closure under Rules Governing Hazardous Waste Management in Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.E.

    1989-07-01

    On February 29, 1988, the Revised Closure Plan for Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin,'' Y/TS-390 (Reference 1) was submitted to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for review and transmittal to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE). The closure activities described in the closure plan have been performed. The purpose of this document is to summarize the closure activities for the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal (CRSDB). The closure of CRSDB is a final closure. The Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB), Unit D-025, was an unlined, man-made sediment disposal facility on Chestnut Ridge, south of New Hope Pond (NHP). The CRSDB was constructed during 1972--73 for the disposal of sediments hydraulically dredged from NHP. It was designed to hold approximately 30,000 cubic yards of sediments. Since 1973, the basin had been used for the periodic disposal of sediments excavated from NHP and its appurtenant structures. NHP has previously received discharges form RCRA-related waste streams. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Biogeochemical Insights into B-Vitamins in the Coastal Marine Sediments of San Pedro Basin, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteverde, D.; Berelson, W.; Baronas, J. J.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal marine sediments support a high abundance of mircoorganisms which play key roles in the cycling of nutrients, trace metals, and carbon, yet little is known about many of the cofactors essential for their growth, such as the B-vitamins. The suite of B-vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B7, B12) are essential across all domains of life for both primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore, studying sediment concentrations of B-vitamins can provide a biochemical link between microbial processes and sediment geochemistry. Here we present B-vitamin pore water concentrations from suboxic sediment cores collected in September 2014 from San Pedro Basin, a silled, low oxygen, ~900 m deep coastal basin in the California Borderlands. We compare the B-vitamin concentrations (measured via LCMS) to a set of geochemical profiles including dissolved Fe (65-160 μM), dissolved Mn (30-300 nM), TCO2, solid phase organic carbon, and δ13C. Our results show high concentrations (0.8-3nM) of biotin (B7), commonly used for CO2 fixation as a cofactor in carboxylase enzymes. Thiamin (B1) concentrations were elevated (20-700nM), consistent with previous pore water measurements showing sediments could be a source of B1 to the ocean. Cobalamin (B12), a cofactor required for methyl transfers in methanogens, was also detected in pore waters (~4-40pM). The flavins (riboflavin [B2] and flavin mononucleotide[FMN]), molecules utilized in external electron transfer, showed a distinct increase with depth (10-90nM). Interestingly, the flavin profiles showed an inverse trend to dissolved Fe (Fe decreases with depth) providing a potential link to culture experiments which have shown extracellular flavin release to be a common trait in some metal reducers. As some of the first B-vitamin measurements made in marine sediments, these results illustrate the complex interaction between the microbial community and surrounding geochemical environment and provide exciting avenues for future research.

  5. Final report for 105-N Basin sediment disposition task, phase 2 -- samples BOMPC8 and BOMPC9

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1998-02-05

    This document is the final report deliverable for Phase 2 analytical work for the 105-N Basin Sediment Disposition Task. On December 23, 1997, ten samples were received at the 222-S Laboratory as follows: two (2) bottles of potable water, six (6) samples for process control testing and two (2) samples for characterization. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Letter of Instruction for Phase 2 Analytical Work for the 105-N Basin Sediment Disposition Task (Logan and Kessner, 1997) (Attachment 7) and 105-N Basin Sediment Disposition Phase-Two Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) (Smith, 1997). The analytical results are included in Table 1. This document provides the values of X/Qs for the onsite and offsite receptors, taking into account the building wake and the atmospheric stability effects. X/Qs values for the potential fire accident were also calculated. In addition, the unit dose were calculated for the mixtures of isotopes.

  6. Basin formation and Neogene sedimentation in a backarc setting, Halmahera, eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R. ); Nichols, G.J. )

    1991-03-01

    It has been proposed that basins in backarc setting form in association with subduction by thinning of continental crust, backarc spreading in oceanic crust, compression, or trapping of pieces of oceanic plate behind an arc. The Halmahera basin in eastern Indonesia developed in a backarc setting but does not fall into these categories; it formed by subsidence of thickened crust made up of imbricated Mesozoic-Paleogene arc and ophiolite rocks. Halmahera lies at the western edge of the Philippine Sea Plate in a complex zone of convergence between the Eurasian margin, the oceanic plates of the West Pacific, and the Australian/Indian Plate to the south. The basement is an imbricated complex of Mesozoic to Paleogene ophiolite, arc, and arc-related rocks. During the Miocene this basement complex formed an area of thickened crust upon which carbonate reef and reef-associated sediments were deposited. The authors interpret this shallow marine region to be similar to many of the oceanic plateaus and ridges found within the Philippine Sea Plate today. In the Late Miocene, convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian margin resulted in the formation of the Halmahera Trench to the west of this region of thickened crust. Subduction of the Molucca Sea Plate caused the development of a volcanic island arc. Subsidence in the backarc area produced a broad sedimentary basin filled by clastics eroded from the arc and from uplifted basement and cover rocks. The basin was asymmetric with the thickest sedimentary fill on the western side, against the volcanic arc. The Halmahera basin was modified in the Plio-Pleistocene by east-west compression as the Molucca Sea Plate was eliminated by subduction.

  7. Cryogenic structure and ice content of lacustrine sediments in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Shur, Y.; O'Donnell, J.; Harden, J. W.; Fortier, D.

    2009-12-01

    Lacustrine sediments often present a significant part of the upper permafrost of plains and lowlands of Alaska. Lacustrine sediments in their contemporary state vary from ice-poor to extremely ice-rich. The ice content depends on initial conditions of freezing and further history of permafrost development, which can include partial degradation and recovery of permafrost. In Alaska, the primary mechanism of freezing and cryogenic structure formation of lacustrine sediments is para-syngenetic (term by E.M. Katasonov, 1978), typical of sediments accumulated in lakes surrounded by permafrost. Though the freezing of such sediments occurs before or immediately after the termination of sedimentation (similar to syngenetic permafrost), the freezing conditions and cryogenic structure of para-syngenetic permafrost are similar to epigenetic permafrost. The ice lenses in para-syngenetic sediments are often inclined, and the ice content is relatively small in the central parts of refrozen taliks. This type of ice distribution is generally governed by the migration of water to multidirectional fronts of freezing. We studied the cryogenic structure of lacustrine sediments across different regions of the Yukon River Basin, Alaska, including Koyukuk Flats (Hozatka Lake area), Innoko Lowlands, and Tanana-Kuskokwim Lowlands (Lake Minchumina area). Study sites are located in the discontinuous permafrost zone, where permafrost was encountered mainly within uplifted peat plateaus. Field work included study of natural exposures and drilling. The upper part of studied sections is formed by frozen organic soils up to 2-3 -m -thick underlain by lacustrine silt, which is mostly ice-rich. Volume of visible ice in silt reaches at places 40% and more. A combination of layered and reticulate cryostructures is the most typical and common cryostructure assemblage. The thickness of ice lenses generally varies from 1 to 5 cm and occasionally reaches 10 cm. Aggradation of ice during the freezing of

  8. Diatom distribution as an environmental indicator in surface sediments of the West Philippine Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Linnan; Chen, Min; Lan, Binbin; Qi, Hongshuai; Zhang, Aimei; Lan, Dongzhao; Fang, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The distribution of diatoms from surface sediments of the West Philippine Basin was analyzed, with 68 species and varieties of diatoms from 26 genera identified. Diatom abundance varied spatially, with the absolute abundance of diatoms ranging from 0 to 3.4×104 frustules/g. The seven tropical pelagic diatoms were Alveus marinus, Azpeitia africana, Azpeitia nodulifera, Hemidiscus cuneiformis, Hemidiscus cuneiformis var. ventricosus, Roperia tesselata and Rhizosolenia bergonii. The relative abundance of these species was greater than 20%, and their distribution pattern in the sediments was overlaid by the flow of the Kuroshio Current. Ethmodiscus rex was present at 159 stations, formed the most abundant and dominant species in the diatomaceous ooze, and thus referred to as Ethmodiscus ooze. Ethmodiscus rex was also a major contributor to primary production in the region. A principal component analysis was employed to explain the relationship between samples and variations in diatom species from the WPB. Four diatom assemblages were distinguished, representing different oceanographic conditions; their spatial distributions were closely related with the North Equatorial Current and Kuroshio Current patterns in the region. These diatom assemblages can therefore be useful in deciphering late Quaternary palaeoceanographic reconstructions of the West Philippine Basin.

  9. Coupling a basin erosion and river sediment transport model into a large scale hydrological model: an application in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buarque, D. C.; Collischonn, W.; Paiva, R. C. D.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents the first application and preliminary results of the large scale hydrodynamic/hydrological model MGB-IPH with a new module to predict the spatial distribution of the basin erosion and river sediment transport in a daily time step. The MGB-IPH is a large-scale, distributed and process based hydrological model that uses a catchment based discretization and the Hydrological Response Units (HRU) approach. It uses physical based equations to simulate the hydrological processes, such as the Penman Monteith model for evapotranspiration, and uses the Muskingum Cunge approach and a full 1D hydrodynamic model for river routing; including backwater effects and seasonal flooding. The sediment module of the MGB-IPH model is divided into two components: 1) prediction of erosion over the basin and sediment yield to river network; 2) sediment transport along the river channels. Both MGB-IPH and the sediment module use GIS tools to display relevant maps and to extract parameters from SRTM DEM (a 15" resolution was adopted). Using the catchment discretization the sediment module applies the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation to predict soil loss from each HRU considering three sediment classes defined according to the soil texture: sand, silt and clay. The effects of topography on soil erosion are estimated by a two-dimensional slope length (LS) factor which using the contributing area approach and a local slope steepness (S), both estimated for each DEM pixel using GIS algorithms. The amount of sediment releasing to the catchment river reach in each day is calculated using a linear reservoir. Once the sediment reaches the river they are transported into the river channel using an advection equation for silt and clay and a sediment continuity equation for sand. A sediment balance based on the Yang sediment transport capacity, allowing to compute the amount of erosion and deposition along the rivers, is performed for sand particles as bed load, whilst no

  10. Fungi in deep-sea sediments of the Central Indian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damare, Samir; Raghukumar, Chandralata; Raghukumar, S.

    2006-01-01

    Although a great amount of information is available on bacteria inhabiting deep-sea sediments, the occurrence of fungi in this environment has been poorly studied and documented. We report here the occurrence of fungi in deep-sea sediments from ˜5000 m depth in the Central Indian Basin (9-16°S and 73-76°E). A total of 181 cultures of fungi, most of which belong to terrestrial sporulating species, were isolated by a variety of isolation techniques. Species of Aspergillus and non-sporulating fungi were the most common. Several yeasts were also isolated. Maximum species diversity was observed in 0-2 cm sections of the sediment cores. Direct staining of the sediments with Calcofluor, a fluorescent optical brightener, revealed the presence of fungal hyphae in the sediments. Immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies raised against a deep-sea isolate of Aspergillus terreus (# A 4634) confirmed its presence in the form of hyphae in the sub-section from which it was isolated. A total of 25 representative species of fungi produced substantial biomass at 200 bar pressure at 30° as well as at 5 °C. Many fungi showed abnormal morphology at 200 bar/5 °C. A comparison of terrestrial isolates with several deep-sea isolates indicated that the former could grow at 200 bar pressure when growth was initiated with mycelial inocula. However, spores of a deep-sea isolate A. terreus (# A 4634), but not the terrestrial ones, showed germination at 200 bar pressure and 30 °C. Our results suggest that terrestrial species of fungi transported to the deep sea are initially stressed but may gradually adapt themselves for growth under these conditions.

  11. Global Overview On Delivery Of Sediment To The Coast From Tropical River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Kettner, A. J.; Brakenridge, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Depending on definition, the tropics occupy between 16% and 19% of the earth's land surface, and discharge ~18.5% of the earth's fluvial water runoff. These flow regimes are driven by three types of sub-regional climate: rainforest, monsoon, and savannah. Even though the tropics include extreme precipitation events, particularly for the SE Asian islands, the general rainfall pattern alternates between wet and dry seasons as the ITCZ follows the sun and where annual monsoonal rain occurs. ITCZ convective rainfall is the dominant style of precipitation but this can be influenced by rare intra-tropical cyclone events, and by atmospheric river events set up by strong monsoonal conditions. Though a rainy season is normal (for example, portions of India discharge in summer may reach 50 times that of winter), the actual rainfall events are in the form of short bursts of precipitation (hours to days) separated by periods of dry (hours to weeks). Some areas of the tropics receive more than 100 thunderstorms per year. Rivers respond to this punctuated weather by seasonal flooding. For the smaller island nations and locales (e.g. Indonesia, Philippines, Borneo, Hainan, PNG, Madagascar, Hawaii, Taiwan) flash floods are common. Larger tropical river systems (Niger, Ganges, Brahmaputra, Congo, Amazon, Orinoco, Magdalena) show typical seasonally modulated discharges. The sediment flux from tropical rivers is approximately 17% to 19% of the global total - however individual river basins offer a wide range in sediment yields reflecting highly variable differences in their hinterland lithology, tectonic activity and volcanism, land-sliding, and relief. Human influences also greatly influence the range for tropical river sediment yield. Some SE Asian Rivers continue to be greatly affected by deforestation, road construction, and monoculture plantations. Sediment flux is more than twice the pre-Anthropocene flux in many of these SE Asian countries, especially where dams and reservoir

  12. Uncertainty in flow and sediment projections due to future climate scenarios for the 3S Rivers in the Mekong Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bikesh; Cochrane, Thomas A.; Caruso, Brian S.; Arias, Mauricio E.; Piman, Thanapon

    2016-09-01

    Reliable projections of discharge and sediment are essential for future water and sediment management plans under climate change, but these are subject to numerous uncertainties. This study assessed the uncertainty in flow and sediment projections using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) associated with three Global Climate Models (GCMs), three Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and three model parameter (MP) sets for the 3S Rivers in the Mekong River Basin. The uncertainty was analyzed for the short term future (2021-2040 or 2030s) and long term future (2051-2070 or 2060s) time horizons. Results show that dominant sources of uncertainty in flow and sediment constituents vary spatially across the 3S basin. For peak flow, peak sediment, and wet seasonal flows projection, the greatest uncertainty sources also vary with time horizon. For 95% low flows and for seasonal and annual flow projections, GCM and MP were the major sources of uncertainty, whereas RCPs had less of an effect. The uncertainty due to RCPs is large for annual sediment load projections. While model parameterization is the major source of uncertainty in the short term (2030s), GCMs and RCPs are the major contributors to uncertainty in flow and sediment projections in the longer term (2060s). Overall, the uncertainty in sediment load projections is larger than the uncertainty in flow projections. In general, our results suggest the need to investigate the major contributing sources of uncertainty in large basins temporally and at different scales, as this can have major consequences for water and sediment management decisions. Further, since model parameterization uncertainty can play a significant role for flow and sediment projections, there is a need to incorporate hydrological model parameter uncertainty in climate change studies and efforts to reduce the parameter uncertainty as much as possible should be considered through a careful calibration and validation process.

  13. Interim report on streamflow, sediment discharge, and water quality in the Calabazas Creek Basin, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.; Pederson, G.L.; Middelburg, Robert F.

    1978-01-01

    Streamflow, sediment-discharge, and water-quality data are being collected in the Calabazas Creek basin, Santa Clara County, Calif., to determine annual water and sediment discharge at base-line conditions that are representative of a basin prior to urbanization. Results of the first 3 years of the study (1973-75) are given in this report. Climatic conditions during this period were representative of a very wet year (1973) and 2 years of above-average rainfall (1974 and 1975). Daily water and sediment discharge were monitored at three primary stations, and periodic measurements were made at five secondary stations during selected storms. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station was transported during a few days each year. Maximum daily sediment discharge in a given year ranged from 23 to 62 percent of the annual total. Daily water discharge at the gaging station Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive, near Cupertino, ranged from no flow to 3.31 cubic meters per second. Streamflow at this location was significantly augmented during low flow by diversion of water from the South Bay Aqueduct. Annual sediment discharge at Calabazas Creek at Rainbow Drive was 4,900 t in 1974 and 9,570 t in 1975. A large quantity of sediment was trapped in a debris basin at Comer Drive upstream from this station during both years. If this sediment had not been trapped, sediment discharge at the station would have been about 35 percent greater in 1974 and 30 percent greater in 1975. Most of the trapped sediment consists of sand and gravel that would probably have been deposited in the Calabazas Creek channel downstream from the station. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. The isotopic composition of authigenic chromium in anoxic marine sediments: A case study from the Cariaco Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Wang, Xiangli; Fischer, Woodward W.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) isotopes are an emerging proxy for tracking redox processes at the Earth's surface. However, there has been limited exploration of the Cr isotope record of modern and recent marine sediments. The basic inorganic chemistry of Cr suggests that anoxic marine basins should factor prominently in the global Cr cycle and that sediments deposited within anoxic basins may offer a valuable Cr isotope archive throughout Earth's history. Here, we present δ53Cr data from sediments of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela-a 'type' environment for large, perennially anoxic basins with a relatively strong hydrological connection to the global oceans. We document a marked positive shift in bulk δ53Cr values following the termination of the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by relative stasis. Based on a suite of independent redox proxies, this transition marks a switch from oxic to persistently anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) depositional conditions within the basin. We find good agreement between two independent approaches toward estimating the δ53Cr composition of authigenic Cr in euxinic Cariaco Basin sediments and that these estimates are very similar to the δ53Cr composition of modern open Atlantic Ocean seawater. These data, together with considerations of reaction kinetics and mass balance within the Cariaco Basin, are consistent with the hypothesis that anoxic marine settings can serve as a chemical archive of first-order trends in seawater δ53Cr composition. Additionally, the Cariaco Basin data suggest that there has been secular stability in the average δ53Cr value of Atlantic seawater over the last ∼15 kyr.

  15. Landscape response to late Pleistocene climate change in NW Argentina: Sediment flux modulated by basin geometry and connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildgen, Taylor F.; Robinson, Ruth A. J.; Savi, Sara; Phillips, William M.; Spencer, Joel Q. G.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Scherler, Dirk; Tofelde, Stefanie; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Kubik, Peter W.; Binnie, Steven A.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-02-01

    Fluvial fill terraces preserve sedimentary archives of landscape responses to climate change, typically over millennial timescales. In the Humahuaca Basin of NW Argentina (Eastern Cordillera, southern Central Andes), our 29 new optically stimulated luminescence ages of late Pleistocene fill terrace sediments demonstrate that the timing of past river aggradation occurred over different intervals on the western and eastern sides of the valley, despite their similar bedrock lithology, mean slopes, and precipitation. In the west, aggradation coincided with periods of increasing precipitation, while in the east, aggradation coincided with decreasing precipitation or more variable conditions. Erosion rates and grain size dependencies in our cosmogenic 10Be analyses of modern and fill terrace sediments reveal an increased importance of landsliding compared to today on the west side during aggradation, but of similar importance during aggradation on the east side. Differences in the timing of aggradation and the 10Be data likely result from differences in valley geometry, which causes sediment to be temporarily stored in perched basins on the east side. It appears as if periods of increasing precipitation triggered landslides throughout the region, which induced aggradation in the west, but blockage of the narrow bedrock gorges downstream from the perched basins in the east. As such, basin geometry and fluvial connectivity appear to strongly influence the timing of sediment movement through the system. For larger basins that integrate subbasins with differing geometries or degrees of connectivity (like Humahuaca), sedimentary responses to climate forcing are likely attenuated.

  16. Reconnaissance assessment of erosion and sedimentation in the Canada de los Alamos Basin, Los Angeles and Ventura counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    An assessment of present erosion and sedimentation conditions in the Canada de Los Alamos basin, Calif., was made to aid in estimating the impact of off-road-vehicle use on the sediment yield of the basin. Evaluations were made by reconnaissance techniques and by comparing the study area with other off-road-vehicle sites in California. Major-storm sediment yields for the basin were estimated, using empirical equations developed for the Transverse Ranges and measurements of gully erosion in a representative off-road vehicle basin. Normal major-storm yields of 73,200 cubic yards would have to be increased to about 98,000 cubic yards to account for the existing level of accelerated erosion caused by off-road vehicles. Long-term sediment yield of the Canada de Los Alamos basin upstream from its confluence with Gorman Creek, under present conditions of off-road-vehicle use, is approximately 420 cubic yards per square mile per year--a rate that is considerably lower than a previous estimate of 1,270 cubic yards per square mile per year for the total catchment area above Pyramid Lake. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Reconnaissance assessment of erosion and sedimentation in the Canada de los Alamos basin, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    An assessment of present erosion and sedimentation conditions in the Ca?ada de los Alamos basin was made to aid in estimating the impact of off-road-vehicle use on the sediment yield of the basin. Impacts of off-road vehicles were evaluated by reconnaissance techniques and by comparing the study area with other offroad-vehicle sites in California. Major-storm sediment yields for the basin were estimated using empirical equations developed for the Transverse Ranges and measurements of gully erosion in a representative off-road-vehicle basin. Normal major-storm yields of 73,200 cubic yards would have to be increased to about 98,000 cubic yards to account for the existing level of accelerated erosion caused by off-road vehicles. Long-term sediment yield of the Ca?ada de los Alamos basin upstream from its confluence with Gorman Creek, under present conditions of off-road-vehicle use, is approximately 420 cubic yards per square mile per year--a rate that is considerably lower than a previous estimate of 1,270 cubic yards per square mile per year for the total catchment area above Pyramid Lake.

  18. Structure and sediment budget of Yinggehai-Song Hong basin, South China Sea: Implications for Cenozoic tectonics and river basin reorganization in Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chao; Ren, Jianye; Sternai, Pietro; Fox, Matthew; Willett, Sean; Xie, Xinong; Clift, Peter D.; Liao, Jihua; Wang, Zhengfeng

    2015-08-01

    The temporal link between offshore stratigraphy and onshore topography is of key importance for understanding the long-term surface evolution of continental margins. Here we present a grid of regional, high-quality reflection seismic and well data to characterize the basin structure. We identify fast subsidence of the basin basement and a lack of brittle faulting of the offshore Red River fault in the Yinggehai-Song Hong basin since 5.5 Ma, despite dextral strike-slip movement on the onshore Red River fault. We calculate the upper-crustal, whole-crustal, and whole-lithospheric stretching factors for the Yinggehai-Song Hong basin, which show that the overall extension observed in the upper crust is substantially less than that observed for the whole crust or whole lithosphere. We suggest that fast basement subsidence after 5.5 Ma may arise from crustal to lithospheric stretching by the regional dynamic lower crustal/mantle flow originated by collision between India-Eurasia and Indian oceanic subduction below the Eurasian margin. In addition, we present a basin wide sediment budget in the Yinggehai-Song Hong basin to reconstruct the sedimentary flux from the Red River drainage constrained by high-resolution age and seismic stratigraphic data. The sediment accumulation rates show a sharp increase at 5.5 Ma, which suggests enhanced onshore erosion rates despite a slowing of tectonic processes. This high sediment supply filled the accommodation space produced by the fast subsidence since 5.5 Ma. Our data further highlight two prominent sharp decreases of the sediment accumulation at 23.3 Ma and 12.5 Ma, which could reflect a loss of drainage area following headwater capture from the Paleo-Red River. However, the low accumulation rate at 12.5 Ma also correlates with drier and therefore less erosive climatic conditions.

  19. Trace elements in lake sediment, macrozoobenthos, and fish near a coal ash disposal basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, Charles O.; Ogawa, Roann E.; Poe, Thomas P.; French, John R. P., III

    1992-01-01

    Of the 29 trace elements examined, arsenic and cobalt were significantly (p <0.05) more concentrated in sediment nearest the coal ash basin except in spring, when little or no difference was detected. Arsenic and bromine were significantly higher in oligochaetes, and selenium was significantly higher in both oligochaetes and chironomids taken from proximal stations than in those taken from reference stations. Selenium, bromine, cobalt, nickel, and chromium were higher in young-of-the-year brown bullheads taken nearer the disposal basin in fall 1983. Selenium was higher in adult spottail shiners taken at the proximal station in spring 1984, and bromine was higher in yearling white bass from the proximal station in fall 1983 and 1984. None of the trace elements was higher in adult yellow perch or adult brown bullheads at any time. Fewer spottail shiners and yearling white bass were caught close to the disposal basin than far away, which may indicate avoidance by these fish of increased concentrations of trace elements contained within the ash effluent.

  20. Biosphere frontiers of subsurface life in the sedimented hydrothermal system of Guaymas Basin

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; Callaghan, Amy V.; LaRowe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is one of the key constraints on the spatial extent, physiological and phylogenetic diversity, and biogeochemical function of subsurface life. A model system to explore these interrelationships should offer a suitable range of geochemical regimes, carbon substrates and temperature gradients under which microbial life can generate energy and sustain itself. In this theory and hypothesis article, we make the case for the hydrothermally heated sediments of Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California as a suitable model system where extensive temperature and geochemical gradients create distinct niches for active microbial populations in the hydrothermally influenced sedimentary subsurface that in turn intercept and process hydrothermally generated carbon sources. We synthesize the evidence for high-temperature microbial methane cycling and sulfate reduction at Guaymas Basin – with an eye on sulfate-dependent oxidation of abundant alkanes – and demonstrate the energetic feasibility of these latter types of deep subsurface life in previously drilled Guaymas Basin locations of Deep-Sea Drilling Project 64. PMID:25132832

  1. Benthic foraminifera records in marine sediments during the Holocene from Pescadero basin, Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, M.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Roy, P.; Monreal, M.; Fenero, R.

    2013-05-01

    Gravity core T-56 (256 cm length) was collected in Pescadero Basin located on the western side of the Gulf of California within the oxygen minim zone (OMZ) at 597 cm depth, aboard of the R/V "El Puma". Pescadero basin is located at mouth of the gulf; because of its location is sensitive to record the changes in the gulf and in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The sedimentary sequence is analyzed to contribute to the understanding the oceanographic variability in the southern part of the gulf of California during the Holocene using benthic foraminifera assemblages and organic carbon as proxies of organic matter flux and bottom water oxygenation. In general, the core is characterized by silty-clay sediments, and it exhibits a turbidite between 198 and 134 cm, distinguished by sandy sediments and reworking material. From 134 cm to the top shows a visible laminated structure. The initial chronology is based on three AMS radiocarbon dates, and estimated sedimentation rates are 0.22 and 0.19 mm/yr for the first 32 cm of the core. Six radiocarbon dates are in progress. Preliminary results of benthic foraminiferal assemblages showed that species of Bolivina are dominated, mainly megalospheric forms, from 134 cm to top of the core. They are small and thin-shelled forms (e.g., Bolivina subadvena, Bolivina minuta, Bolivina seminuda, Bolivina plicata), and also Buliminella, Cassidulina and Epistominella are abundant. In particular, species of Bolivina are environmental indicators and exhibit a typical reproductive dimorphism. The predominance of the genus Bolivina suggest organic flux variations, because of the productivity changes that might be related to changes in ocean circulation and in the environmental variability in the region.

  2. Radiolarian polycystine in holocenic sediments from Carmen Basin, Gulf of California—their paleoenvironment significant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzon, O.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Barbara, L.; Schmidt, S.

    2013-05-01

    In this study radiolarian assemblages are analyzed in a sedimentary sequence from Carmen Basin in order to reconstruct the paleoenvironment conditions in the study area during the past 200 (?) years. The sequence sediment (core C53) was collected using a box core in western sector of Carmen Basin, at 560 m depth, aboard the R/V El Puma. The core C53 it has 34 cm length and is characterized by silty-clays sediments and fine laminated structure throughout the core.The age model is based on 210Pb and radiocarbon AMS methods (now in progress). According with the 210Pb the sedimentation rate in the first 15 cm of the core is ca. 1.75 mm/yr. Radiolarians are counted and identified in 114 continuous samples along the core. Radiolarians are used as proxies of temperature, nutrients and ocean circulation. Here preliminary results are presented. Two hundred and ten taxa were identified in all samples, belong to Spumellaria and Nassellaria orders, 90 and 120 taxa, respectively. Twenty seven were dominant (e. g. Druppatractus variabilis, Larcopyle buetschlii, Phorticium pylonium, Tetrapyle octacantha, Arachnocorallium calvata, Clathrocircus stapedius, Cladoscenuim ancoratum, Lithomelissa pentacantha, Lithomelissa setosa, Pseudocubus obeliscus and Pseudodyctiophimus gracilipes). They are in more than 1% in average in all samples. The stratigraphy distribution of the dominant species throughout the core suggests two general environments. 1) High productivity conditions from 34.5 to 16 cm, based on the abundance of Lithomelissa pentacantha and L. setosa (surface dwelling taxa associated by upwelling processes), and 2) Less productivity and stratified conditions from16 cm to top, were Tetrapyle octacantha group and Phorticium pylonium group are dominant.

  3. Shelf-to-basin iron shuttling enhances vivianite formation in deep Baltic Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal hypoxia is a growing and persistent problem largely attributable to enhanced terrestrial nutrient (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) loading. Recent studies suggest phosphorus removal through burial of iron (II) phosphates, putatively vivianite, plays an important role in nutrient cycling in the Baltic Sea - the world's largest anthropogenic dead zone - yet the dynamics of iron (II) phosphate formation are poorly constrained. To address this, a reactive-transport model was used to reconstruct the diagenetic and depositional history of sediments in the Fårö basin, a deep anoxic and sulphidic region of the Baltic Sea where iron (II) phosphates have been observed. Simulations demonstrate that transport of iron from shelf sediments to deep basins enhances vivianite formation while sulphide concentrations are low, but that pyrite forms preferentially over vivianite when sulphate reduction intensifies due to elevated organic loading. Episodic reoxygenation events, associated with major inflows of oxic waters, encourage the retention of iron oxyhydroxides and iron-bound phosphorus in sediments, increasing vivianite precipitation as a result. Results suggest that artificial reoxygenation of the Baltic Sea bottom waters could sequester up to 3% of the annual external phosphorus loads as iron (II) phosphates, but this is negligible when compared to potential internal phosphorus loads due to dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides when low oxygen conditions prevail. Thus, enhancing vivianite formation through artificial reoxygenation of deep waters is not a viable engineering solution to eutrophication in the Baltic Sea. Finally, simulations suggest that regions with limited sulphate reduction and hypoxic intervals, such as eutrophic estuaries, could act as important phosphorus sinks by sequestering vivianite. This could potentially alleviate eutrophication in shelf and slope environments.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water, sediment and soil of the Songhua River Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Qi, Hong; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Song, Wei-Wei; Shen, Ji-Min; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Ren, Nan-Qi; Grabuski, Josey; Li, Yi-Fan

    2013-10-01

    The Songhua River is the third largest river in China and the primary source of drinking and irrigation water for northeastern China. The distribution of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water [dissolved water (DW) and suspended particulate matter (SPM)], sediment, and soil in the river basin was investigated, and the associated risk of cancer from these PAHs was also assessed. The total concentration of PAHs ranged from 13.9 to 161 ng L(-1) in DW, 9.21 to 83.1 ng L(-1) in SPM, 20.5 to 632 ng g(-1) dw (dry weight) in sediment, and from 30.1 to 870 ng g(-1) dw in soil. The compositional pattern of PAHs indicated that three-ring PAHs were predominant in DW and SPM samples, while four-ring PAHs dominated in sediment and soil samples. The spatial distribution of PAHs revealed some site-specific sources along the river, with principal component analysis indicating that these were from pyrogenic sources (such as coal and biomass combustion, and vehicle emissions) and coke oven emission distinguished as the main source of PAHs in the Songhua River Basin. Based on the ingestion of PAH-contaminated drinking water from the Songhua River, cancer risk was quantitatively estimated by combining the Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk assessment model and BaP-equivalent concentration for five age groups of people (adults, teenagers, children, toddlers, and infants). Overall, the results suggest that the estimated integrated lifetime cancer risk for all groups was in acceptable levels. This study is the first attempt to provide information on the cancer risk of PAHs in drinking water from the Songhua River. PMID:23564413

  5. Land-use effects on erosion, sediment yields, and reservoir sedimentation: a case study in the Lago Loiza Basin, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.C.; Webb, R.M.T.; McIntyre, S.C.; Wolfe, W.J.

    2006-01-01

     Lago Loíza impounded in 1953 to supply San Juan, Puerto Rico, with drinking water; by 1994, it had lost 47% of its capacity. To characterize sedimentation in Lago Loíza, a study combining land-use history, hillslope erosion rates, and subbasin sediment yields was conducted. Sedimentation rates during the early part of the reservoir’s operation (1953– 1963) were slightly higher than the rates during 1964–1990. In the early history of the reservoir, cropland comprised 48% of the basin and erosion rates were high. Following economic shifts during the 1960s, cropland was abandoned and replaced by forest, which increased from 7.6% in 1950 to 20.6% in 1987. These land-use changes follow a pattern similar to the northeastern United States. Population in the Lago Loíza Basin increased 77% from 1950 to 1990, and housing units increased 194%. Sheetwash erosion measured from 1991 to 1993 showed construction sites had the highest sediment concentration (61,400 ppm), followed by cropland (47,400 ppm), pasture (3510 ppm), and forest (2050 ppm). This study illustrates how a variety of tools and approaches can be used to understand the complex interaction between land use, upland erosion, fluvial sediment transport and storage, and reservoir sedimentation

  6. Development of a time-stepping sediment budget model for assessing land use impacts in large river basins.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S N; Dougall, C; Kinsey-Henderson, A E; Searle, R D; Ellis, R J; Bartley, R

    2014-01-15

    The use of river basin modelling to guide mitigation of non-point source pollution of wetlands, estuaries and coastal waters has become widespread. To assess and simulate the impacts of alternate land use or climate scenarios on river washload requires modelling techniques that represent sediment sources and transport at the time scales of system response. Building on the mean-annual SedNet model, we propose a new D-SedNet model which constructs daily budgets of fine sediment sources, transport and deposition for each link in a river network. Erosion rates (hillslope, gully and streambank erosion) and fine sediment sinks (floodplains and reservoirs) are disaggregated from mean annual rates based on daily rainfall and runoff. The model is evaluated in the Burdekin basin in tropical Australia, where policy targets have been set for reducing sediment and nutrient loads to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon from grazing and cropping land. D-SedNet predicted annual loads with similar performance to that of a sediment rating curve calibrated to monitored suspended sediment concentrations. Relative to a 22-year reference load time series at the basin outlet derived from a dynamic general additive model based on monitoring data, D-SedNet had a median absolute error of 68% compared with 112% for the rating curve. RMS error was slightly higher for D-SedNet than for the rating curve due to large relative errors on small loads in several drought years. This accuracy is similar to existing agricultural system models used in arable or humid environments. Predicted river loads were sensitive to ground vegetation cover. We conclude that the river network sediment budget model provides some capacity for predicting load time-series independent of monitoring data in ungauged basins, and for evaluating the impact of land management on river sediment load time-series, which is challenging across large regions in data-poor environments. PMID:23968738

  7. Tectonic controls on sedimentation in the Eel River Basin: high-resolution CHIRP seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogarth, L. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Babcock, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution CHIRP seismic data reveal the details of shore-parallel variations in Late-Pleistocene and Holocene sediments along the tectonically active Eel River Basin region, offshore Northern California. Shore- perpendicular deformation due to the northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction creates a tectonic signal with varying sign and amplitude oriented parallel to the coastline. This geometry provides an ideal opportunity to examine how tectonic deformation affects stratigraphic architecture and facies assemblages. Sediments are thinnest over the Little Salmon Anticline and systematically thicken towards the Eel Syncline. Seismic reflectors diverge into the syncline where sedimentary sections are expanded indicating tectonic deformation has been concurrent with sedimentation since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM ~21,000 ka). We also observe offset on the transgressive surface above the thrust fault of the Little Salmon Anticline indicating fault displacement has occurred post transgression. While previous multi-channel seismic data sets from this region have detailed variation in the arrangement of facies and associated stratal geometry over the last several million years, this high-resolution CHIRP data set provides an opportunity to observe with greater resolution the formation of strata during the most recent deformation along this active margin.

  8. Connectivity and colluvial sediment dynamics in the Saldur River basin, Eastern Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brardinoni, Francesco; Scotti, Riccardo; Cavalli, Marco; Mair, Volkmar

    2015-04-01

    We present an integrated approach that aims to: (i) document the spatial distribution of mass-wasting activity and sediment production in the Saldur River basin (97 km2); (ii) detect causal linkages between mass-wasting intensity and the potential spatial distribution of discontinuous permafrost; (iii) identify source-to-sink colluvial sedimentary pathways as modulated by the spatial organization of active and relict glacial and periglacial depositional landforms; and (iv) test the reliability of a geomorphometry-based index of sediment connectivity. In so doing we compare spatial patterns of process-based and structural geomorphic connectivity. To these ends, we map rock glaciers, protalus ramparts and moraines, and compile a field- and air photo-based multi-temporal (1959-1969-1982-1997-2000-2006-2008-2011) inventory of colluvial sediment sources. We then combine these data with two historical datasets of debris flow and landslide events (both implemented and maintained by the Autonomous Province of Bolzano) and analyse mass-wasting spatial distribution and intensity in relation to proximity to glacier fronts, intact and relict periglacial landforms, and a permafrost index map (i.e., PermaNET; http://www.permanet-alpinespace.eu/). This work is part of SedAlp (www.sedalp.eu), a project funded through the Alpine Space Programme.

  9. Characterization and mobility of geogenic chromium in soils and river bed sediments of Asopos basin.

    PubMed

    Lilli, Maria A; Moraetis, Daniel; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P; Karatzas, George P; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    A field and laboratory study was conducted to assess the origin and mobility of CrVI in Asopos basin in Greece. Sampling was designed in such way as to capture the spatial variability of chromium occurring in sediments and soils in different lithological units in the area. Physicochemical and geochemical characterization of surface agricultural soils obtained from river terraces and river bed sediments was conducted in order to determine the natural background of chromium. Lithologies with strong calcareous, siliceous and ultramafic components were identified using principal component analysis. Laboratory mobility studies quantified the rates of chromium sorption and release from soils and their capacity to adsorb chromium. Heavy metal analysis and local geology study support the hypothesis that the main source of chromium is of geogenic origin. Chromium distribution in Asopos river bed was influenced from the eroded products derived from extensive areas with ultramafic rocks the last 5Ma. The mobility studies showed that leaching process was very fast and sorption capacity was significant and capable to retain chromium in case of waste release in the river. Finally the mobility of chromium release is limited due to existing attenuation capacity controlled by ferric oxides coatings on the soil and sediments. PMID:25103879

  10. Integrated ecotoxicological assessment of bottom sediments from the Paraná basin, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Leticia; Abelando, Mariana; Apartín, Carina D; Almada, Pablo; Ronco, Alicia E

    2013-12-01

    Paraná River, the six largest in the world, is receptor of pollution loads from tributaries traversing urban and industrialized areas, and extensive agriculture, particularly in its middle and low stretch along the Argentinean sector, where most of the productive activities of the country develop. Within the frame of monitoring surveys, the quality of bottom sediments from distal positions of twenty tributaries and three of the main course was evaluated. The assessment covered testing lethal and sublethal effects with the Hyalella curvispina based toxicity test, a benthic macrofauna survey and physicochemical variables of sediment matrix composition. A multivariate statistical analysis approach permitted integrating the obtained data from the different survey lines of evidence, explaining potential causes of the measured biological effects. The main perturbations detected were associated to tributaries in the middle sector of the basin, where anoxic conditions with high sulfide contents prevail mostly related to organic matter inputs of diverse combined activities, where sediments induce high lethality, and a consequent strong reduction of the benthic community population and diversity. The integrated survey approach proved being a robust tool in the assessment of causative-adverse effects relationships. PMID:24070775

  11. Phenols in hydrothermal petroleums and sediment bitumen from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneit, B. R.; Leif, R. N.; Ishiwatari, R.

    1996-01-01

    The aliphatic, aromatic and polar (NSO) fractions of seabed petroleums and sediment bitumen extracts from the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal system have been analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (free and silylated). The oils were collected from the interiors and exteriors of high temperature hydrothermal vents and represent hydrothermal pyrolyzates that have migrated to the seafloor by hydrothermal fluid circulation. The downcore sediments are representative of both thermally unaltered and thermally altered sediments. The survey has revealed the presence of oxygenated compounds in samples with a high degree of thermal maturity. Phenols are one class of oxygenated compounds found in these samples. A group of methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethyl-isoprenoidyl phenols (C27-C29) is present in all of the seabed NSO fractions, with the methyl- and dimethyl-isoprenoidyl phenols occurring as major components, and a trimethyl-isoprenoidyl phenol as a minor component. A homologous series of n-alkylphenols (C13-C33) has also been found in the seabed petroleums. These phenols are most likely derived from the hydrothermal alteration of sedimentary organic matter. The n-alkylphenols are probably synthesized under hydrothermal conditions, but the isoprenoidyl phenols are probably hydrothermal alteration products of natural product precursors. The suites of phenols do not appear to be useful tracers of high temperature hydrothermal processes.

  12. Seismic stratigraphy and sedimentation of Magdalena Fan, Southern Colombian Basin, Caribbean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, V.; Buffler, R.T.; Ladd, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    Analysis of all available seismic data from the Magdalena Fan in the southern Colombian basin, Caribbean Sea, allows subdivision of the sedimentary section into six seismic sequences (units). Although sediments were deposited in the present-day Magdalena Fan region since about Late Cretaceous, terrigenous sedimentation became significant only in the late Cenozoic during deposition of the upper three sequences associated with the uplifts of the Andes. These upper three sequences comprise the Magdalena Fan proper. The uppermost sequence probably represents the last main phase of sedimentation subsequent to the major uplift of the Andes in the Pliocene. The morphologic and shallow acoustic (3.5 kHz) characteristics of this fan unit are: upper fan, 1:60-1:110 gradients, channels having well-developed levees, and several subbottom reflectors in all areas except in channels; middle fan, 1:110-1:200 gradients, numerous channels with very subdued levees, and several to few subbottom reflectors; lower fan, < 1:250 gradients, small channels, relatively smooth sea floor, and few or no subbottom reflectors.

  13. Cable Bacteria Control Iron-Phosphorus Dynamics in Sediments of a Coastal Hypoxic Basin.

    PubMed

    Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Seitaj, Dorina; Meysman, Filip J R; Schauer, Regina; Polerecky, Lubos; Slomp, Caroline P

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for life. The release of phosphorus from sediments is critical in sustaining phytoplankton growth in many aquatic systems and is pivotal to eutrophication and the development of bottom water hypoxia. Conventionally, sediment phosphorus release is thought to be controlled by changes in iron oxide reduction driven by variations in external environmental factors, such as organic matter input and bottom water oxygen. Here, we show that internal shifts in microbial communities, and specifically the population dynamics of cable bacteria, can also induce strong seasonality in sedimentary iron-phosphorus dynamics. Field observations in a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin demonstrate that the long-range electrogenic metabolism of cable bacteria leads to a dissolution of iron sulfides in winter and spring. Subsequent oxidation of the mobilized ferrous iron with manganese oxides results in a large stock of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus below the oxic zone. In summer, when bottom water hypoxia develops and cable bacteria are undetectable, the phosphorus associated with these iron oxides is released, strongly increasing phosphorus availability in the water column. Future research should elucidate whether formation of iron-oxide-bound phosphorus driven by cable bacteria, as observed in this study, contributes to the seasonality in iron-phosphorus cycling in aquatic sediments worldwide. PMID:26720721

  14. Discharge and sediment loads in the Boise River drainage basin, Idaho 1939-40

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, S.K.; Benedict, Paul Charles

    1948-01-01

    The Boise River project is a highly developed agricultural area comprising some 520 square miles of valley and bench lands in southwestern Idaho. Water for irrigation is obtained from the Boise River and its tributaries which are regulated by storage in Arrow Rock and Deer Flat reservoirs. Distribution of water to the farms is effected by 27 principal canals and several small farm laterals which divert directly from the river. The- New York Canal, which is the largest, not only supplies water to smaller canals and farm laterals, but also is used to fill Deer Flat Reservoir near Nampa from which water is furnished to farms in the lower valley. During the past 15 years maintenance costs in a number of those canals have increased due to deposition of sediment in them and in the river channel itself below the mouth of Moore Creek. Interest in determining the runoff and sediment loads from certain areas in the Boise River drainage basin led to an investigation by the Flood Control Coordinating Committee of the Department of Agriculture. Measurements of daily discharge and sediments loads were made by the Geological Survey at 13 stations in the drainage basin during the 18-month period ended June 30, 1940. The stations were on streams in areas having different kinds of vegetative cover and subjected to different kinds of land-use practice. Data obtained during the investigation furnish a basis for certain comparisons of runoff and sediment loads from several areas arid for several periods of time. Runoff measured at stations on the. Boise River near Twin Springs and on Moore Creek near Arrow Rock was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and was below the average annual runoff for the period of available record. Runoff measured at the other stations on the project also was smaller during 1939 than during 1940 and probably did not exceed the average for the previous 25 years. The sediment loads measured during the spring runoff in 1939 were smaller at most stations than

  15. Bridging the gap between small and large scale sediment budgets? - A scaling challenge in the Upper Rhone Basin, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Anna; Blöthe, Jan; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schrott, Lothar

    2016-04-01

    A large number of sediment budgets have been compiled on different temporal and spatial scales in alpine regions. Detailed sediment budgets based on the quantification of a number of sediment storages (e.g. talus cones, moraine deposits) exist only for a few small scale drainage basins (up to 10² km²). In contrast, large scale sediment budgets (> 10³ km²) consider only long term sediment sinks such as valley fills and lakes. Until now, these studies often neglect small scale sediment storages in the headwaters. However, the significance of these sediment storages have been reported. A quantitative verification whether headwaters function as sediment source regions is lacking. Despite substantial transport energy in mountain environments due to steep gradients and high relief, sediment flux in large river systems is frequently disconnected from alpine headwaters. This leads to significant storage of coarse-grained sediment along the flow path from rockwall source regions to large sedimentary sinks in major alpine valleys. To improve the knowledge on sediment budgets in large scale alpine catchments and to bridge the gap between small and large scale sediment budgets, we apply a multi-method approach comprising investigations on different spatial scales in the Upper Rhone Basin (URB). The URB is the largest inneralpine basin in the European Alps with a size of > 5400 km². It is a closed system with Lake Geneva acting as an ultimate sediment sink for suspended and clastic sediment. We examine the spatial pattern and volumes of sediment storages as well as the morphometry on the local and catchment-wide scale. We mapped sediment storages and bedrock in five sub-regions of the study area (Goms, Lötschen valley, Val d'Illiez, Vallée de la Liène, Turtmann valley) in the field and from high-resolution remote sensing imagery to investigate the spatial distribution of different sediment storage types (e.g. talus deposits, debris flow cones, alluvial fans). These sub

  16. Risk Evaluation of Multiple Hazards during Sediment and Water Related Disasters in a Small Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanoi, Kazuki; Fujita, Masaharu

    2016-04-01

    To reduce human damage due to sediment and water related disasters induced by heavy rainfall, warning and evacuation system is very important. In Japan, the Meteorological Agency issues the sediment disaster alert when the potential of sediment disaster increases. Following the alert, local government issues evacuation advisory considering the alert and premonitory phenomena. However, it is very difficult for local people to perceive the dangerousness around them because the alert and advisory do not contain any definite information. Therefore, they sometimes misjudge the evacuation action. One reason of this is not only crucial hazards but also relatively small-scale multiple hazards take place and rise evacuation difficulties during sediment and water related disaster. Examples of small-scale hazards include: rainfall-associated hazards such as poor visibility or road submergence; landslide-associated hazards such as slope failure or sediment inflow; and flood-associated hazards such as overtopping of river dike, inundation, or destruction of bridges. The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of multiple hazards during disaster events by numerical simulation. We applied the integrated sediment runoff model on unit channels, unit slopes, and slope units to an actual sediment and water related disaster occurred in a small basin in Tamba city, Hyogo, Japan. The maximum rainfall per hour was 91 mm (17/09/2014 2:00˜3:00) and the maximum daily precipitation was 414mm. The integrated model contains semi-physical based landslide prediction (sediment production) model, rainfall runoff model employing the kinematic wave method, model of sediment supply to channels, and bedload and suspended sediment transport model. We evaluated the risk of rainfall-associated hazards in each slope unit into 4 levels (Level I ˜ IV) using the rainfall intensity Ir [mm/hour]. The risk of flood- associated hazards were also estimated using the ratio of calculated water level and

  17. Erosion processes, fluvial sediment transport, and reservoir sedimentation in a part of the Newell and Zayante Creek basins, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, W. M., III

    1973-01-01

    The drainage basins upstream from Loch Lomond, a water-supply reservoir on Newell Creek, and a proposed reservoir site on Zayante Creek were investigated for their characteristics with respect to the erosion, transportation, and deposition of sediment. The study area is underlain predominantly by sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Tertiary age that decompose readily into moderately deep soils, friable colluvium, and easily transported sediment particles. The Rices Mudstone and Twobar, Shale Members of the San Lorenzo Formation of Brabb (1964) underlie steep dip slopes in the study area, and probably are the most highly erodible of the several geologic units present there. However, nearly all of the geologic units have shown a propensity for accelerated erosion accompanying the disturbance of the land surface by the roadbuilding practices that predominate over other types of sediment-producing land-use activities in the study area. Sediment transport in the study area was estimated from (1) a reservoir survey of Loch Lomond in 1971 that was compared with a preconstruction survey of 1960, and (2) sampling of sediment transported in suspension by Zayante Creek during the 1970 and 1971 water years. At least 46 acre-feet of sediment accumulated in Loch Lomond in a 10-year period, and an unmeasured quantity of very fine sediment in the form of a thin layer over much of the reservoir bottom was observed. The measured quantity of deposited sediment in a 10-year period represented a sediment yield of about 1,100 tons annually per square mile of drainage basin upstream from the reservoir arms where the major deposition occurred. This sediment occupied less than i percent of the original capacity of Loch Lomond, but the volume of measured sediment deposition is probably conservative in view of the unmeasured deposits observed and a reservoir trap efficiency of about 95 percent. Sediment sampling on Zayante Creek indicated suspended-sediment yields of about 4,570 and 570 tons

  18. Sensitivity analysis of a sediment dynamics model applied in a Mediterranean river basin: global change and management implications.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Canales, M; López-Benito, A; Acuña, V; Ziv, G; Hamel, P; Chaplin-Kramer, R; Elorza, F J

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and land-use change are major factors influencing sediment dynamics. Models can be used to better understand sediment production and retention by the landscape, although their interpretation is limited by large uncertainties, including model parameter uncertainties. The uncertainties related to parameter selection may be significant and need to be quantified to improve model interpretation for watershed management. In this study, we performed a sensitivity analysis of the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs) sediment retention model in order to determine which model parameters had the greatest influence on model outputs, and therefore require special attention during calibration. The estimation of the sediment loads in this model is based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). The sensitivity analysis was performed in the Llobregat basin (NE Iberian Peninsula) for exported and retained sediment, which support two different ecosystem service benefits (avoided reservoir sedimentation and improved water quality). Our analysis identified the model parameters related to the natural environment as the most influential for sediment export and retention. Accordingly, small changes in variables such as the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfall events could cause major changes in sediment dynamics, demonstrating the sensitivity of these dynamics to climate change in Mediterranean basins. Parameters directly related to human activities and decisions (such as cover management factor, C) were also influential, especially for sediment exported. The importance of these human-related parameters in the sediment export process suggests that mitigation measures have the potential to at least partially ameliorate climate-change driven changes in sediment exportation. PMID:25302447

  19. Paleomagnetism and rock magnetism of the Lago Lungo sediments (Rieti basin, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo; Florindo, Fabio; Mensing, Scott; Noble, Paula; Piovesan, Gianluca; Tunno, Irene

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of a high-resolution rock magnetic and paleomagnetic study of the sedimentary sequence of Lago Lungo, in the Rieti basin of the central Apennines (Italy). The Rieti Plain is an intramontane basin with an area about 90 km2, located about 80 km north of Rome, filled by alluvial sediments and bordered by mountains composed of carbonate and siliciclastic deposits. The basin has been nearly continuously utilized for agriculture for >2,300 years and it is characterized by the diffuse occurrence of springs along the plain border. It presently includes a few shallow lakes which represent the remnants of a larger ancient lake (known as "Lacus Velinus"), that was partially drained by the Romans in 272 BCE through the drainage system of the "Cascata delle Marmore". The basin is characterized by very high sedimentation rates during historical times, with preservation of a lacustrine sequence suitable for reconstruction of past environmental change at decadal resolution. In this study, we analyzed the rock magnetic and paleomagnetic properties measured at 1-cm spacing on u-channel samples collected from four distinct and partly overlapping cores retrieved from Lago Lungo, in a water depth of 4.4 m. The composite section that we analyzed spans a total sedimentary thickness of about 15 m. The cores were also analyzed for their pollen and diatom content, as well as for geochemical proxies, with the aim of reconstructing a detailed record of forest and land use changes, flood occurrence and erosion history in the Rieti basin catchment. The trends in the rock magnetic and paleomagnetic parameters can be correlated at high resolution between the overlapping sections of the different cores. The variation in the concentration of magnetic minerals in the Lago Lungo sequence - as indicated by the trends in the magnetic susceptibility (k), natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) values - shows some distinct sharp features

  20. Analysis of suspended-sediment concentrations and radioisotope levels in the Wild Rice River basin, northwestern Minnesota, 1973-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Mark E.; McCullough, Carolyn J.; Wilkinson, Philip M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined historical suspended-sediment data and activities of fallout radioisotopes (lead-210 [210Pb], cesium-137 [137Cs], and beryllium-7 [7Be]) associated with suspended sediments and source-area sediments (cultivated soils, bank material, and reference soils) in the Wild Rice River Basin, a tributary to the Red River of the North, to better understand sources of suspended sediment to streams in the region. Multiple linear regression analysis of suspended-sediment concentrations from the Wild Rice River at Twin Valley, Minnesota indicated significant relations between suspended-sediment concentrations and streamflow. Flow-adjusted sediment concentrations tended to be slightly higher in spring than summer-autumn. No temporal trends in concentration were observed during 1973-98. The fallout radioisotopes were nearly always detectable in suspended sediments during spring-summer 1998. Mean 210Pb and 7Be activities in suspended sediment and surficial, cultivated soils were similar, perhaps indicating little dilution of suspended sediment from low-isotopic-activity bank sediments. In contrast, mean 137Cs activities in suspended sediment indicated a mixture of sediment originating from eroded soils and from eroded bank material, with bank material being a somewhat more important source upstream of Twin Valley, Minnesota; and approximately equal fractions of bank material and surficial soils contributing to the suspended load downstream at Hendrum, Minnesota. This study indicates that, to be effective, efforts to reduce sediment loading to the Wild Rice River should include measures to control soil erosion from cultivated fields.

  1. Effects of hydrology, watershed size, and agricultural practices on sediment yields in two river basins in Iowa and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Gustavo Henrique; Welch, Heather L.; Tomer, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    The specific sediment yield (SSY) from watersheds is the result of the balance between natural, scale-dependent erosion and deposition processes, but can be greatly altered by human activities. In general, the SSY decreases along the course of a river as sediments are trapped in alluvial plains and other sinks. However, this relation between SSY and basin area can actually be an increasing one when there is a predominance of channel erosion relative to hillslope erosion. The US Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study of suspended sediment in the Iowa River basin (IRB), Iowa, and the Yazoo River basin (YRB), Mississippi, from 2006 through 2008. Within each river basin, the SSY from four largely agricultural watersheds of various sizes (2.3 to 35,000 km2 [0.9 to 13,513 mi2]) was investigated. In the smallest watersheds, YRB sites had greater SSY compared to IRB sites due to higher rain erosivity, more erodible soils, more overland flow, and fluvial geomorphological differences. Watersheds in the YRB showed a steady decrease in SSY with increasing drainage basin area, whereas in the IRB, the maximum SSY occurred at the 30 to 500 km2 (11.6 to 193 mi2) scale. Subsurface tile drainage and limits to channel downcutting restrict the upstream migration of sediment sources in the IRB. Nevertheless, by comparing the SSY-basin size scaling relationships with estimated rates of field erosion under conservation and conventional tillage treatments reported in previous literature, we show evidence that the SSY-basin size relationship in both the IRB and YRB remain impacted by historical erosion rates that occurred prior to conservation efforts.

  2. Impact of climate change and anthropogenic activities on stream flow and sediment discharge in the Wei River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Geissen, V.; Ritsema, C. J.; Mu, X.-M.; Wang, F.

    2013-03-01

    Reduced stream flow and increased sediment discharge are a major concern in the Yellow River basin of China, which supplies water for agriculture, industry and the growing populations located along the river. Similar concerns exist in the Wei River basin, which is the largest tributary of the Yellow River basin and comprises the highly eroded Loess Plateau. Better understanding of the drivers of stream flow and sediment discharge dynamics in the Wei River basin is needed for development of effective management strategies for the region and entire Yellow River basin. In this regard we analysed long-term trends for water and sediment discharge during the flood season in the Wei River basin, China. Stream flow and sediment discharge data for 1932 to 2008 from existing hydrological stations located in two subcatchments and at two points in the Wei River were analysed. Precipitation and air temperature data were analysed from corresponding meteorological stations. We identified change-points or transition years for the trends by the Pettitt method and, using double mass curves, we diagnosed whether they were caused by precipitation changes, human intervention, or both. We found significant decreasing trends for stream flow and sediment discharge during the flood season in both subcatchments and in the Wei River itself. Change-point analyses further revealed that transition years existed and that rapid decline in stream flow began in 1968 (P < 0.01), and that sediment discharge began in 1981 (P < 0.01) in the main river. In the two subcatchments, the transition years were 1985 (P < 0.01) and 1994 (P < 0.05) for water discharge, and 1978 and 1979 for sediment discharge (P < 0.05), respectively. The impact of precipitation or human activity on the reduction amount after the transition years was estimated by double mass curves of precipitation vs. stream flow (sediment). For reductions in stream flow and sediment discharge, the contribution rate of human activity was found

  3. Multiple ash layers in late Quaternary sediments from the Central Indian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenhas-Pereira, M. B. L.; Nagender Nath, B.; Iyer, S. D.; Borole, D. V.; Parthiban, G.; Jijin, R.; Khedekar, V.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated three sediment cores collected from water depths > 5000 m along the transect 76°30‧E in close proximity to a fracture zone in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). The cores yielded five volcanic horizons of which four have visual and dispersed shards. Rhyolitic glass shards of bubble wall, platy, angular and blocky types were retrieved from various stratigraphic horizons in the cores. The abundance of glass shards, composition of bulk sediments, and 230Thexcess ages of the host sediments were used to distinguish the volcanic horizons. Of the four volcanic horizons, three are now newly reported and correspond to ages of ~ 85, 107-109 and 142-146 ka while the fourth horizon is of 70-75 ka. By using trace element ratios and Cr and Nb-based normative calculations, cryptotephra has been identified for the first time from the CIB sediment. The cryptotephra forms the fifth ash horizon and is of ~ 34 ka. A comparison with the published data on volcanic tephra in and around the Indian Ocean indicate the shard rich horizon (SRH) of 70-75 ka to resemble the Younger Toba Tuffs (YTT), while the other volcanic horizons that were deposited during different time periods do not correlate with any known marine or terrestrial records. These tephra layers have produced a tephrostratigraphic framework across the tectonically and volcanically complex regions of the CIB. Due to the lack of terrestrial equivalents of these tephra, it is hypothesized that the newly found volcanic horizons may have been derived from submarine volcanic eruptions. Multiple layers of submarine volcaniclastic deposits found at water depths as great as 5300 m reaffirm the growing belief that submarine phreatomagmatic eruptions are much more common in the intraplate region of the Indian Ocean than previously reported.

  4. Fungal diversity from deep marine subsurface sediments (IODP 317, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redou, V.; Arzur, D.; Burgaud, G.; Barbier, G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest regarding micro-eukaryotic communities in extreme environments as a third microbial domain after Bacteria and Archaea. However, knowledge is still scarce and the diversity of micro-eukaryotes in such environments remains hidden and their ecological role unknown. Our research program is based on the deep sedimentary layers of the Canterbury Basin in New Zealand (IODP 317) from the subsurface to the record depth of 1884 meters below seafloor. The objectives of our study are (i) to assess the genetic diversity of fungi in deep-sea sediments and (ii) identify the functional part in order to better understand the origin and the ecological role of fungal communities in this extreme ecosystem. Fingerprinting-based methods using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography were used as a first step to raise our objectives. Molecular fungal diversity was assessed using amplification of ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacer 1) as a biomarker on 11 samples sediments from 3.76 to 1884 meters below seafloor. Fungal molecular signatures were detected throughout the sediment core. The phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were revealed with DNA as well as cDNA. Most of the phylotypes are affiliated to environmental sequences and some to common fungal cultured species. The discovery of a present and metabolically active fungal component in this unique ecosystem allows some interesting first hypotheses that will be further combined to culture-based methods and deeper molecular methods (454 pyrosequencing) to highlight essential informations regarding physiology and ecological role of fungal communities in deep marine sediments.

  5. Thermal alteration of organic matter in recent marine sediments. 1: Pigments. [photosynthetic pigments from Tanner Basin off Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikan, R.; Aizenshtat, Z.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1974-01-01

    Sediment from Tanner Basin, the outer continental shelf off Southern California, was analyzed for photosynthetic pigments and their derivatives, namely carotenes and chlorins. Samples of the sediment were also exposed to raised temperatures (65, 100, 150 C) for various periods of time (1 week, 1 month, 2 months). Analysis of the heat-treated sediment revealed the presence of alpha-ionene and 2,6-dimethylnapthalene, thermal degradation products of Betacarotente. Chlorins were converted to nickel porphyrins of both DPEP and etio series. Possible mechanisms of these transformations are presented.

  6. Global Climate Change and Sedimentation Patterns in the Neogene Baringo Basin, Central Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A. L.; Kingston, J. D.; Wilson, K. E.; Hill, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Tugen Hills are part of a ~100 km N-S tilted fault block, just west of Lake Baringo within the Central Kenyan Rift Valley. Sediments exposed in this block span the last 16 Ma and have yielded abundant and diverse fossil assemblages including a number of hominoid and hominid specimens. Much research has also focused on documenting the paleoecology of the succession through analyses of fossil floral, faunal, and biogeochemical proxies. Data from the Tugen Hills have revealed a complex evolutionary history of ecosystems characterized by spatial and temporal heterogeneity with no clear evidence of any long-term trends. While these studies suggest that the patterns of heterogeneity may be shifting at short time-scales (104-105 ka), limited temporal resolution has until now generally precluded assessments of environmental change at these scales. Recently published investigations in the Baringo Basin have provided evidence of orbitally mediated environmental change over periods which include hominid fossil localities (Deino et al., 2006; Kingston et al., 2007). The Baringo data represent the only empirical evidence for significant local environmental shifts that can directly be correlated with insolation patterns in equatorial Africa. Sedimentation patterns in the Baringo Basin between ca. 2.70 and 2.55 Ma, controlled by climatic factors, provide a detailed paleoenvironmental record including a sequence of diatomites that record rhythmic cycling of major freshwater lake systems consistent with ~23 kyr Milankovitch precessional periodicity modulated by eccentricity. The timing of the paleolakes most closely approximates insolation maximum for the June/July 30○N insolation curve, suggesting that precipitation patterns in the region are controlled by the African monsoon system. More recent fieldwork has identified older sequences that similarly demonstrate rhythmic cycling of freshwater lake systems. Preliminary 40Ar/39Ar dating of intercalated tephra reveals that

  7. A Geochronological Study of Paleogene -Neogene Foreland Basin Sediments Western Nepal Himalaya: Implication of Provenance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baral, U.; Lin, D.; Chamlagain, D.

    2015-12-01

    After the collision between the Indian and Asian plates, during early Cenozoic several south propagating thrusts were active and the sediments deposited at the northern tip of the Greater India have been reworked, recycled and metamorphosed, and were subsequently exhumed and transported to the foreland basin. Petrography, detrital zircon (DZ) dating and Lu-Hf isotope analysis, and trace element analysis were conducted from two sections of Nepal Himalaya for the determination of change in provenance, and constrain the possible timing of Indo-Asiacollision. The U-Pb ages of the DZ grains from Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene Amile Formation are older than early Mesoproterozoic with dominant number of grains showing ƐHf (t) value between 0 to +10. The trace element data shows that the sediments are from passive margin with northward paleoflow direction. These finding conclude that the sediments during this time was sourced from northern margin of Indian Plate that elucidate the possibility of the Ind0-Asia collisionsomewhere between late Paleocene to early Eocene (~58-50 Ma).The U-Pb ages from the marine Eocene Bhainskati Formation dominantly clusters between ~1000 and 500 Ma and the ƐHf (t) values ranges from -10 to +10. The trace element result shows that the sediments were from both the passive and active continental margin. The transition of deposition from marine Bhainskati Formation to continental Dumri Formation is marked by 3-4 m thick Oxisol layer with a ~10-15 Mya deposition gap during the Oligocene. The U-Pb ages of detritus from Early to mid-Miocene Dumri Formation have a wide range of detritus ranging from Archean to Mesozoic age with dominant numbers resembling the age of the Tethys Himalaya (TH) and Upper Lesser Himalaya (ULH). The presence of younger grains of Cenozoic age (~80-50 Ma) put the possibility of the Gangdase arc source deposited directly in Dumri Formation or first deposited in the TH and later transported to it. The ƐHf (t) value ranges

  8. Phosphorus geochemistry of recent sediments in the South Basin of Lake Winnipeg

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayer, T.; Simpson, S.L.; Thorleifson, L.H.; Lockhart, W.L.; Wilkinson, Philip M.

    2006-01-01

    Lake Winnipeg supports the largest commercial fishery on Canadian Prairies. It has been influenced by a variety of environmental forces and anthropogenic activities. To gain a better understanding of recent changes in nutrient status of the lake, it is important to reconstruct its previous history from sedimentary records. Lacustrine sediments are known to be an important sink of many dissolved and suspended substances, including phosphorus, hence, they provide a permanent historical record of changes occurring in the lake. These changes may be induced by natural factors or by anthropogenic activities in the watershed. Phosphorus profiles from dated sediment cores collected in 1999 and 1994 from the South Basin of Lake Winnipeg were investigated to determine phosphorus enrichment in recent sediments. To interpret the nutrient status and depositional conditions responsible for the trends in total phosphorus, three operationally defined forms of phosphorus (P) were determined: non-apatite inorganic P, apatite P, and organic P. Significant increases in sediment phosphorus concentrations were observed in the uppermost 20 cm of the cores and several anomalies were observed at depth. A doubling in total phosphorus relative to aluminum over the last fifty years is largely due to increases in the non-apatite inorganic fraction, suggesting that much of sedimentary phosphorus increase is attributable to changes in the nutrient status of the water column related to anthropogenic inputs. Organic phosphorus exhibits a subtle increase in the upper 20 cm of the gravity cores, likely due to increases in the primary productivity of the lake. Except for the slight increase in deeper sediments, apatite phosphorus, which is thought to be of detrital origin, remained fairly constant over the length of the cores. Anomalous spikes in phosphorus concentrations deeper in the cores, comprised mainly of the non-apatite inorganic phosphorus fraction, likely resulted from natural variation in

  9. Suspended sediment and carbonate transport in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska: Fluxes and potential future responses to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Loads and yields of suspended sediment and carbonate were measured and modeled at three locations on the Yukon, Tanana, and Porcupine Rivers in Alaska during water years 2001-2005 (1 October 2000 to 30 September 2005). Annual export of suspended sediment and carbonate upstream from the Yukon Delta averaged 68 Mt a-1 and 387 Gg a-1, respectively, with 50% of the suspended sediment load originating in the Tanana River Basin and 88% of the carbonate load originating in the White River Basin. About half the annual suspended sediment export occurred during spring, and half occurred during summer-autumn, with very little export in winter. On average, a minimum of 11 Mt a-1 of suspended sediment is deposited in floodplains between Eagle, Alaska, and Pilot Station, Alaska, on an annual basis, mostly in the Yukon Flats. There is about a 27% loss in the carbonate load between Eagle and Yukon River near Stevens Village, with an additional loss of about 29% between Stevens Village and Pilot Station, owing to a combination of deposition and dissolution. Comparison of current and historical suspended sediment loads for Tanana River suggests a possible link between suspended sediment yield and the Pacific decadal oscillation.

  10. Inter-comparison of the potentially active prokaryotic communities in the halocline sediments of Mediterranean deep-sea hypersaline basins.

    PubMed

    Kormas, Konstantinos A; Pachiadaki, Maria G; Karayanni, Hera; Leadbetter, Edward R; Bernhard, Joan M; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2015-09-01

    The sediment microbiota of the Mediterranean deep-sea anoxic hypersaline basins (DHABs) are understudied relative to communities in the brines and halocline waters. In this study, the active fraction of the prokaryotic community in the halocline sediments of L' Atalante, Urania, and Discovery DHABs was investigated based on extracted total RNA and 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Bacterial and archaeal communities were different in the sediments underlying the halocline waters of the three habitats, reflecting the unique chemical settings of each basin. The relative abundance of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was also different between deep-sea control sediments and sediments underlying DHAB haloclines, suggesting adaptation to the steep DHAB chemical gradients. Only a few OTUs were affiliated to known bacterial halophilic and/or anaerobic groups. Many OTUs, including some of the dominant ones, were related to aerobic taxa. Archaea were detected only in few halocline samples, with lower OTU richness relative to Bacteria, and were dominated by taxa associated with methane cycling. This study suggests that, while metabolically active prokaryotic communities appear to be present in sediments underlying the three DHABs investigated, their diversity and activity are likely to be more reduced in sediments underlying the brines. PMID:26174531

  11. Eddy-driven sediment transport in the Argentine Basin: Is the height of the Zapiola Rise hydrodynamically controlled?

    SciTech Connect

    Weijer, Wilbert; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Homoky, William B.; Polzin, Kurt L.; Maas, Leo R. M.

    2015-03-27

    In this study, we address the question whether eddy-driven transports in the Argentine Basin can be held responsible for enhanced sediment accumulation over the Zapiola Rise, hence accounting for the existence and growth of this sediment drift. To address this question, we perform a 6 year simulation with a strongly eddying ocean model. We release two passive tracers, with settling velocities that are consistent with silt and clay size particles. Our experiments show contrasting behavior between the silt fraction and the lighter clay. Due to its larger settling velocity, the silt fraction reaches a quasisteady state within a few years, with abyssal sedimentation rates that match net input. In contrast, clay settles only slowly, and its distribution is heavily stratified, being transported mainly along isopycnals. Yet, both size classes display a significant and persistent concentration minimum over the Zapiola Rise. We show that the Zapiola Anticyclone, a strong eddy-driven vortex that circulates around the Zapiola Rise, is a barrier to sediment transport, and hence prevents significant accumulation of sediments on the Rise. We conclude that sediment transport by the turbulent circulation in the Argentine Basin alone cannot account for the preferred sediment accumulation over the Rise. We speculate that resuspension is a critical process in the formation and maintenance of the Zapiola Rise.

  12. Eddy-driven sediment transport in the Argentine Basin: Is the height of the Zapiola Rise hydrodynamically controlled?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weijer, Wilbert; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Homoky, William B.; Polzin, Kurt L.; Maas, Leo R. M.

    2015-03-27

    In this study, we address the question whether eddy-driven transports in the Argentine Basin can be held responsible for enhanced sediment accumulation over the Zapiola Rise, hence accounting for the existence and growth of this sediment drift. To address this question, we perform a 6 year simulation with a strongly eddying ocean model. We release two passive tracers, with settling velocities that are consistent with silt and clay size particles. Our experiments show contrasting behavior between the silt fraction and the lighter clay. Due to its larger settling velocity, the silt fraction reaches a quasisteady state within a few years,more » with abyssal sedimentation rates that match net input. In contrast, clay settles only slowly, and its distribution is heavily stratified, being transported mainly along isopycnals. Yet, both size classes display a significant and persistent concentration minimum over the Zapiola Rise. We show that the Zapiola Anticyclone, a strong eddy-driven vortex that circulates around the Zapiola Rise, is a barrier to sediment transport, and hence prevents significant accumulation of sediments on the Rise. We conclude that sediment transport by the turbulent circulation in the Argentine Basin alone cannot account for the preferred sediment accumulation over the Rise. We speculate that resuspension is a critical process in the formation and maintenance of the Zapiola Rise.« less

  13. Characterizing and simulating sediment loads and transport in the lower part of the San Antonio River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, J. Ryan; Ockerman, Darwin J.; Crow, Cassi; Opsahl, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    This extended abstract is based on the U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Reports by Crow et al. (2013) and Banta and Ockerman (2014). Suspended sediment in rivers and streams can play an important role in ecological health of rivers and estuaries and consequently is an important issue for water-resource managers. The quantity and type of suspended sediment can affect the biological communities (Wood and Armitage, 1997), the concentration and movement of natural constituents and anthropogenic contaminants (Moran and others, 2012), and the amount of sediment deposition in coastal environments (Milliman and Meade, 1983). To better understand suspended-sediment characteristics in the San Antonio River Basin, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the San Antonio River Authority and Texas Water Development Board, conducted a two-phase study to (1) collect and analyze sediment data to characterize sediment conditions in the San Antonio River downstream of San Antonio, Texas, and (2) develop and calibrate a watershed model to simulate hydrologic conditions and suspended-sediment loads for four watersheds in the San Antonio River Basin, downstream from San Antonio, Texas.

  14. Measurement Of Diatom Oxygen Isotopes From The Guaymas Basin Using A Sediment Trap Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menicucci, A. J.; Spero, H. J.; Thunell, R.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate fossils are found abundantly in marine sediments throughout the world. However, there are a number of regions such as high latitude areas, coastal upwelling zones and the deep ocean below the CCD, where carbonates are poorly preserved or absent. The dominant microfossils found in these regions are typically from plankton that secrete biogenic opal, such as diatoms. Traditional methods for measuring the δ18O of biogenic opal are difficult and hazardous in comparison to measurements of carbonate minerals. This difficulty has resulted in a paucity of published diatom oxygen isotope data. We have developed a new microfluorination technique (Menicucci et al., 2013) that permits rapid analyses of diatom oxygen isotopes using easily accessible continuous flow IRMS systems. Utilizing this technique we have analyzed a set of sediment trap diatom samples collected in the Guaymas Basin (GB, 27o53'N, 111o40'W), Gulf of California. The GB sediment time series is moored at approximately 500m water depth. Samples analyzed were collected in the late fall/early winter (1993, 1994, and 1996). Diatom δ18O ranged between 35 and 36.2‰ (VSMOW) (n=7). Measured δ18O was converted to water column temperature yielding temperatures with the relationship by Labeyrie (1974) between 22-27oC. Five of these samples yielding a narrow temperature range between 25-27oC. Our data suggest the diatom δ18O data does not track sea surface temperatures through the year, but instead are representative of mixed later temperatures during diatom bloom conditions (i.e. peak opal flux, occurring in mid November). These data may indicate diatom opal collected from the GB experienced slow decent through the pycnocline prior to collection sedimentation on the basin floor. Therefore diatom opal δ18O at this location appears to have a seasonally bias. Refs: Menicucci, A.J., Matthews, J., and Spero, H.J., 2013, Oxygen Isotope Analyses of Biogenic Opal and Quartz Using a Novel Microfluorination

  15. Autocatalyst-derived platinum, palladium and rhodium (PGE) in infiltration basin and wetland sediments receiving urban runoff.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, J D; Murray, F

    2005-04-01

    The emission of platinum group elements (PGE) from automobile catalytic converters has led to rapid increases in Pt, Pd and Rh concentrations in roadside media. Significant quantities of the PGE may enter and accumulate in fluvial systems via road runoff. This paper examines the occurrence and spatial distribution of autocatalyst-derived PGE in surface sediments of infiltration basin and wetland sediments receiving road-runoff in Perth, Western Australia. Samples were analysed by ICP-MS following microwave digestion and cation exchange. PGE concentrations ranged between 1.5-17.2 Rh, 5.4-61.2 Pd and 9.0-103.8 ng g(-1) Pt. The highest levels of PGE were generally found at basin topographic low points and these concentrations were found to be strongly related to the area of road surface drained and the traffic volume. PGE ratios in infiltration basin and wetland sediments were within the typical range of catalytic converter compositions. However, comparisons of PGE ratios between parent road dusts and infiltration basin sediments revealed a systematic shift in Pt/Pd ratios, suggesting that PGE fractionation can occur during transport through the drainage system and that a small portion of Pd in road dust may be solubilised under natural conditions. PMID:15833252

  16. The flux and recovery of bioactive substances in the surface sediments of deep basins off southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, R.A.

    1990-06-11

    Sediment microbial community biomass and activity in Santa Monica Basin, a nearshore basin in the California Continental Borderland, were examined in October 1985, 1986 and 1987, May 1986, April 1987 and January 1990. Millimeter-scale ATP profiles and incubation of intact cores with {sup 3}H-adenine indicated a high-biomass interface microbial population in the low-oxygen central basin, which was absent in samples from the basin slope sediments. A majority of microbial activity and organic matter mineralization occurred in the top cm of sediment. Comparison of measured ATP and total organic carbon profiles suggest that the C:ATP ratio (wt:wt) ranges between 47:1 and 77:1 in central basin interfacial populations, substantially lower than reported for other aquatic environments. Carbon production estimated from DNA synthesis measurements via {sup 3}H-adenine incorporation was compared with TCO{sub 2} fluxes measured by in situ benthic chamber experiments. Within the uncertainty of the C:ATP ratio, an overall microbial carbon assimilation efficiency of 75--90% was indicated. The low C:ATP ratios and high carbon assimilation efficiencies significantly affect estimates of microbial growth and respiration and are substantially different than those often assumed in the literature. These results suggest that without independent knowledge of these ratios, the uncertainty in tracer-derived microbial growth and respiration rates may be larger than previously reported. 66 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Simulation studies of flow and sediment transport using a mathematical model, Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, M.E.; Land, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    Simulation studies were made of flow and sediment transport for the Atchafalaya River basin, Louisiana using a mathematical model calibrated and supplied by the Hydrologic Engineering Center and the New Orleans District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study results are based on three, 50-year computer simulations for the following alternatives: (1) no-action alternative, (2) channelization with a center-channel flow area of 80,000 sq ft, and (3) channelization with a center-channel flow area of 100,000 sq ft. Analyses of the simulated data base for depth-frequency, inundated-area, floodway cross-section and water-surface profile relationships were made for 10 flow rates. The analyses indicate a general trend of aggradation in the lower part of the floodway with a consequent trend toward increasing the inundated area, especially at higher flood flows. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Erodibility of selected soils and estimates of sediment yields in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Summer, Rebecca M.

    1981-01-01

    Onsite rainfall-simulation experiments were conducted to derive field-erodibility indexes for rangeland soils and soils disturbed by mining in coal fields of northwestern New Mexico. Mean indexes on rangeland soils range from 0 grams (of detached soil) on dune soil to 121 grams on wash-transport zones. Mean field-erodibility-index values of soils disturbed by mining range from 16 to 32 grams; they can be extrapolted to nearby coal fields where future mining is expected. Because field-erodibility-index data allow differentiation of erodibilities across a variable landscape, these indexes were used to adjust values of K, the erodibility factor of the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Estimates of soil loss and sediment yield were then calculated for a small basin following mining. (USGS)

  19. The grain size of fluvial and hillslope sediments across an erosion gradient in the Feather River Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, Simon; Attal, Mikael; Hurst, Martin; Yoo, Kyungsoo; Weinman, Beth; Naylor, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Grain size in hillslope sediments is conditioned by erosion rates and processes, and these sediments are then delivered to channels. How the channels respond to and modify these characteristics dictate whether rivers aggrade or erode their substrate. We investigate how the grain size of hillslope and fluvial sediments respond to an erosion gradient within the Feather River basin in northern California. Studied basins are underlain exclusively by tonalite lithology. Erosion rates vary over an order of magnitude, from >250 mm ka‑1 in the Feather River canyon to <15 mm ka‑1 on an adjacent low-relief plateau. Hillslope particle size increases with increasing steepness, a proxy for erosion rate. We hypothesise that, in our soil samples, the measured 10-fold increase in D50 and doubling of the amount of fragments larger than 1 mm when slope increases from 0.38 to 0.83 m m‑1 is due to a decrease in the residence time of rock fragments, causing particles to be exposed for shorter periods of time to processes that can reduce grain size. For slopes in excess of 0.7 m m‑1, landslides and scree cones supply much coarser sediment to rivers, with D50 and D84 more than one order of magnitude larger than in soils. In the tributary basins of the Feather River, a prominent knickpoint separates the rapidly eroding canyon from the slowly eroding plateau. Downstream of the break in slope, fluvial sediment grain size increases, due to an increase in flow competence (mostly driven by channel steepening) as well as a change in sediment source and in sediment dynamics: on the plateau, rivers transport easily mobilized fine-grained sediment derived exclusively from soils. In the Feather River Canyon, mass wasting processes supply a wide range of grain sizes that rivers entrain selectively, depending on the competence of their flow.

  20. Chronology and stratigraphy of Late Quaternary sediments in the Konya Basin, Turkey: Results from the KOPAL Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, N.; Black, S.; Boyer, P.; Eastwood, W. J.; Griffiths, H. I.; Lamb, H. F.; Leng, M. J.; Parish, R.; Reed, J. M.; Twigg, D.; Yiǧitbaşioǧlu, H.

    1999-04-01

    The Late Quaternary environmental history of the Konya plain, in south central Turkey, is used to examine sediment facies changes in a shallow non-outlet basin which has experienced major climatically driven changes in lake extent. Two principal types of sedimentary archive are used to reconstruct a palaeoenvironmental record, namely alluvial sequences on the Çarşamba alluvial fan and sediments from residual lakes. The latter have been used to investigate broader climatic and vegetational histories via palaeolimnological techniques including pollen, diatom and stable isotope analysis. These changes are dated here by radiometric techniques including radiocarbon (AMS and conventional), OSL, and U-Th. Chronological agreement is generally good between the different dating techniques, although typically there is greatly reduced precision beyond ca. 25 ka. Lake sediment cores investigated have basal ages beyond the range of 14C dating, but contain hiatuses as a result of subsequent alternation between phases of lacustrine sedimentation and aeolian deflation. In contrast to most deepwater non-outlet lake systems, the Konya basin may have been occupied by a single extensive lake for as little as 10% of Late Quaternary time, mainly around the time of the LGM. This lake highstand was followed by an important arid interval. In the absence of unbroken chronostratigraphic sequences, palaeohydrological investigation of shallow non-outlet lakes may require analysis of basin-wide changes in sedimentation rather than reliance on single core records. Stratigraphic continuity in such sedimentary environments cannot be assumed, and requires independent chronological control through radiometric dating.

  1. The Role of Source Material in Basin Sedimentation, as Illustrated within Eureka Valley, Death Valley National Park, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, M. J.; Yin, A.; Rhodes, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Steep landscapes are known to provide sediment to sink regions, but often petrological factors can dominate basin sedimentation. Within Eureka Valley, in northwestern Death Valley National Park, normal faulting has exposed a steep cliff face on the western margin of the Last Chance range with four kilometers of vertical relief from the valley floor and an angle of repose of nearly 38 degrees. The cliff face is composed of Cambrian limestone and dolomite, including the Bonanza King, Carrara and Wood Canyon formations. Interacting with local normal faulting, these units preferentially break off the cliff face in coherent blocks, which result in landslide deposits rather than as finer grained material found within the basin. The valley is well known for a large sand dune, which derives its sediment from distal sources to the north, instead of from the adjacent Last Chance Range cliff face. During the Holocene, sediment is sourced primary from the northerly Willow Wash and Cucomungo canyon, a relatively small drainage (less than 80 km2) within the Sylvan Mountains. Within this drainage, the Jurassic quartz monzonite of Beer Creek is heavily fractured due to motion of the Fish Valley Lake - Death Valley fault zone. Thus, the quartz monzonite is more easily eroded than the well-consolidated limestone and dolomite that forms the Last Change Range cliff face. As well, the resultant eroded material is smaller grained, and thus more easily transported than the limestone. Consequently, this work highlights an excellent example of the strong influence that source material can have on basin sedimentation.

  2. Reconstructing the small river basin sediment budget and associated particle-bound contaminants redistribution (Chern River, European Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Vladimir; Aseeva, Elena; Golosov, Valentin

    2015-04-01

    Reconstruction of the basin-scale sediment budget and associated particle-bound pollutants redistribution was carried out within the upper part of the Chern River basin (133 km2). It involved application of integrated approach based on use of several independent techniques. The study river basin is located on the border between the Orel and Kursk Regions of the Central European Russia nearby the Mikhailovskiy opencast iron ore mine and processing plant, which are believed to be the main local sources of air-borne pollutants. In addition, the basin was contaminated by radionuclide fallout after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Combination of geomorphic, geochemical, soil survey and geodetic methods has allowed authors to evaluate dynamics of sediment and contaminants redistribution for the last 50 years (since the beginning of a mining activity) within the upper part of the basin upstream from the reservoir, located in the middle reach of the main valley. Main techniques applied were field description of soil or sediment sections, the 137Cs radioactive tracer (for estimation average soil loss rates from eroding cultivated hillslopes and for reconstruction of accumulation rates and sediment microstratigraphy for deposition locations such as main river floodplain and bottoms of small dry valleys), chemical analysis (content of selected heavy metals and As - both in mobile forms by atomic absorption spectroscopy and total by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, organic C content, pH), geomorphic and detailed geodetic survey of selected key sections of the Chern River floodplain, calculation of average soil erosion rates for cultivated area of the studied part of the basin by the empirical model. In addition, two detailed bottom sediment cores were taken from the reservoir bottom which intercepts practically all the sediment delivered from the upper part of the basin. Integrating the obtained data, it has been found out that substantial changes of the sediment budget took

  3. Methane-derived authigenic carbonates from the Ulleung basin sediments, East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dhongil; Choi, Jinyong; Xu, Zhaokai; Kim, Moonkoo; Choi, Donglim; Jung, Hoisoo; Lee, Panmook

    2009-06-01

    Authigenic carbonates were sampled in methane-enriched piston core sediments collected from gas venting sites on the western continental slope of the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea. Multidisciplinary investigations on these carbonates, including the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) observations and mineralogical-geochemical compositions, were carried out to identify the carbon and oxygen sources and the forming mechanism of these carbonates. The authigenic carbonates from the study area correspond to semi-consolidated, compact concretions or nodules ranging from 2 to 9 cm in size. X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses showed that most of the sampled carbonate concretions were composed of almost purely authigenic high-Mg calcite (10.7-14.3 mol% MgCO 3). Characteristically, microbial structures such as filaments and rods, which were probably associated with the authigenic minerals, were abundantly observed within the carbonate matrix. The carbonates were strongly depleted in δ13C (-33.85‰ to -39.53‰ Peedee Belemnite (PDB)) and were enriched in δ18O (5.16-5.60‰ PDB), indicating that the primary source of carbon is mainly derived from the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Such methane probably originated from the destabilization of the underlying gas hydrates as strongly supporting from the enriched 18O levels. Furthermore, the strongly depleted δ13C values (-60.7‰ to -61.6‰ PDB) of the sediment void gases demonstrate that the majority of the gas venting at the Ulleung Basin is microbial methane by CO 2 reduction. This study provides another example for the formation mechanism of methane-derived authigenic carbonates associated with gas-hydrate decomposition in gas-seeping pockmark environments.

  4. Provenance and sediment-dispersal system in tectonically active rapidly evolving foreland basin, Western Interior

    SciTech Connect

    Khandaker, N.I.; Vondra, C.F.

    1989-03-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation, along the mobile edge of the Western Interior foreland basin, is composed mainly of clastic sediments and was deposited during the initial Late Cretaceous transgressive-regressive phases of the Western Interior seaway across Wyoming. The formation contains many persistent bentonite beds and several sandstone packages in its lower part and a thin, lenticular lithic wacke-polymictic conglomerate association at its upper contact (Torchlight Sandstone Member). Abundant granule to cobble-sized clasts of andesite, granite, chert, and quartzite are set in a poorly sorted sand-to-granule grade volcaniclastic matrix. There is a lithologic continuity of this volcaniclastic unit across the Bighorn Mountains into the Powder River basin. A high-energy distributary complex of sizable areal extent is invoked for the deposition of this linear conglomerate facies. Geochemical investigations of the whole-rock andesite clasts and bentonite allowed more precise definition of character, tectonic setting, and evolutionary stages of sedimentary distributive provinces. Bentonites and andesites are strongly enriched in strontium and barium, but only mildly enriched in heavy rare earth elements and high field-strength elements. These analyzed rocks have trace element characteristics similar in a general way to those of typical orogenic volcanics; they show some significant differences in detail. Composition of volcaniclasts and paleocurrent data indicate a proximal sediment source for the extrabasinal detritus within the Frontier Formation. The possibility of a contribution from a Mesozoic volcanic center in the neighborhood of southwestern Montana is strongly favored. The products of this volcanism constitute an assemblage of deep crustal to mantle( ) derived rocks, and their composition record time-integrated enrichment in light over heavy rare earth elements.

  5. Zinc, cadmium, and copper mobility and accumulation in reeds (Phragmites australis) in urban sediments from two stormwater infiltration basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedell, J.-P.; Saulais, S.; Delolme, C.

    2012-04-01

    Infiltration basins are stormwater management techniques that are widely used to reduce stormwater volume. The settling of stormwater particles leads to a contaminated sediment layer at the basin surface. Phragmites australis used in constructed wetlands are widely present in infiltration basins. Such plant can play a role on the fate of heavy metals either directly by their uptake or indirectly by modification of physico-chemical characteristics of the sediment. The aim of this study is to assess Zn, Cd and Cu potential mobility and their bioaccumulation by reeds during plant's growth in urban sediments offering two different geochemical contexts. Methodology is based on the monitoring (in june, august and december) of physico-chemical characteristics of sediment deposit in two basins. These basins, "Minerve" and "Grézieu", located on both sides of Lyon city are characteristic of two different geochemical context. "Minerve" is in the east and "Grézieu" in the west part. The geology of the eastern part of Lyon is characterized by carbonated fluvio-glacial deposits. In the western part, the subsoil is mainly composed of gneiss and granit. Moreover, 20 cm of gravel and a sand layer were initially added at the surface of the "Grézieu" basin. In "Minerve", a clay material was initially added and a filter trench was built along the basin to allow water infiltration. We characterized the sediment deposit by the identification of their geochemical characteristics (Zn, Cu, Cd, total content, pH, CEC, C/N, carbonates and major elements contents …). Then we studied the potential mobility of the three metals by single chemical extraction (CaCl2 for the exchangeable phase, acetate buffer for the acido-soluble phase and diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) for the fraction associated to the organic matter). The accumulation of Zn, Cd and Cu in aerial parts and roots of the reeds was also measured. The results show clearly that "Grézieu" sediment is more enriched in

  6. A consistent magnetic polarity stratigraphy of Plio-Pleistocene fluvial sediments from the Heidelberg Basin (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, Stephanie; Hambach, Ulrich; Rolf, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Deep drillings in the Heidelberg Basins provide access to one of the thickest and most complete successions of Quaternary and Upper Pliocene continental sediments in Central-Europe [1]. In absence of any comprehensive chronostratigraphic model, these sediments are so far classified by lithological and hydrogeological criteria. Therefore the age of this sequence is still controversially discussed ([1], [2]). In spite of the fact that fluvial sediments are a fundamental challenge for the application of magnetic polarity stratigraphy we performed a thorough study on four drilling cores (from Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen and nearby Viernheim). Here, we present the results from the analyses of these cores, which yield to a consistent chronostratigraphic framework. The components of natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) were separated by alternating field and thermal demagnetisation techniques and the characteristic remanent magnetisations (ChRM) were isolated by principle component analysis [3]. Due to the coring technique solely inclination data of the ChRM is used for the determination of the magnetic polarity stratigraphy. Rock magnetic proxies were applied to identify the carriers of the remanent magnetisation. The investigations prove the NRM as a stable, largely primary magnetisation acquired shortly after deposition (PDRM). The Matuyama-Gauss boundary is clearly defined by a polarity change in each core, as suggested in previous work [4]. These findings are in good agreement with the biostratigraphic definition of the base of the Quaternary ([5], [6], [7]). The Brunhes-Matuyama boundary could be identified in core Heidelberg UniNord 1 and 2 only. Consequently, the position of the Jaramillo and Olduvai subchron can be inferred from the lithostratigraphy and the development of fluvial facies architecture in the Rhine system. The continuation of the magnetic polarity stratigraphy into the Gilbert chron (Upper Pliocene) allows alternative correlation schemes for the cores

  7. Mars Global Surveyor tests the Elysium Basin controversy: It's lava, not lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Edgett, K. S.; Malin, M. C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Lanagan, P.

    1998-10-01

    The Elysium Basin is a low, flat area that extends ~3000 km E-W and up to 700 km N-S, centered at 5 N, 195 W. Altimetric profiles reveal this to be one of the very flattest regions on Mars (Smith et al. 1998, Science 279, 1686). A controversy over the nature of the basin's surface and history has developed during the 1990s. This controversy has direct implications in the search for evidence of martian life and the selection of landing sites for upcoming Mars missions. Crater densities in the basin are among the very lowest on Mars, indicating a relatively young surface. Plescia (1990, Icarus, v. 88, p. 465-490) proposed that the plains were covered by low-viscosity volcanic flows, which filled previous water-cut channels. Scott and Chapman (1991, Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci., v. 21, p. 669-677) proposed that the basin was filled by a 1.5-km deep lake of water subsequent to the volcanism. To test the hypotheses about the recent geologic history of Elysium Basin, the Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) acquired images (3.6 to 20 m/pixel) in regions that were poorly resolved (>200 m/pixel) during the Viking mission. The MOC images were obtained during 8 orbits in April and June, 1998. The new images reveal what appears to be the surface of an extensive lava plains with ponded, flood-like flows. The surface in several locations (separated by 100s of km) is characterized by relatively dark plates that have separated from more extensive dark surfaces and moved laterally. The plates can be reconstructed like a jigsaw puzzle. There are also sinuous pressure ridges up to 10 meters wide and a few meters high (with slopes > 50 degrees) and shear structures. The surface appears pristine at this scale, unmodified by wind or water, although the color properties and thermal inertia indicate a coating of dust. The platey-textured lavas are also seen to extend well into the Marte Vallis channel system. The images show no evidence for lacustrine sediment or shorelines. These results confirm that

  8. Magnetic mineralogy analyses on greigite-bearing sediments with inconsistent magnetic polarity (Adana Basin, Southern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucifora, S.; Cifelli, F.; Mattei, M.; Cosentino, D.; Sagnotti, L.; Roberts, A.

    2012-04-01

    A paleomagnetic study has been carried out, in the framework of the VAMP (Vertical Anatolian Movement Project) project, on 4 stratigraphic sections and 1 site from the Adana basin in the southern margin of the Anatolian Plateau. About 300 standard cylindrical samples have been analysed for paleomagnetism and rock magnetism. All the sections have been deposited in the upper Messinian"lago-mare" post-evaporitic event, which occurred in the Mediterranean basin, during the reverse polarity Chron C3r. Paleomagnetic results, presented in this work, are in contrast with these data, showing both normal and reverse polarities along the sections. Standard magnetic mineralogy investigations, integrated with SEM analyses and FORC diagrams, show that magnetite and ferrimagnetic iron sulphides (greigite) are the main magnetic carriers. Moreover, we find an interesting correlation between the magnetic mineralogy of the sediments and the magnetic polarities, being magnetite the magnetic carrier in the normal polarity samples and greigite in the reverse ones. Reversal and fold tests demonstrate that normal polarity samples have been subjected to a pervasive magnetic overprint and acquired their remanent magnetization after bedding tilt. Whereas samples with a reverse polarity acquired their remanent magnetization before bedding tilt, but after syn-sedimentary soft deformation. This work is proposed as a contribution aimed to improve the understanding of the relationship between the magnetic mineralogy and the remagnetization phenomena in order to avoid misinterpretation of magnetostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data.

  9. Interpreting the suspended sediment dynamics in a mesoscale river basin of Central Mexico using a nested watershed approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvert, C.; Némery, J.; Gratiot, N.; Prat, C.; Collet, L.; Esteves, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Cointzio river basin is located within the Mexican Transvolcanic Belt, in the Michoacán state. Land-use changes undergone over last decades lead to significant erosion processes, though affecting limited areas of the basin. Apart from generating a minor depletion of arable land by incising small headwater areas, this important sediment delivery contributed to siltation in the reservoir of Cointzio, situated right downstream of the basin. During 2009 rainy season, a detailed monitoring of water and sediment fluxes was undertaken in three headwater catchments located within the Cointzio basin (Huertitas, Potrerillos and La Cortina, respectively 2.5, 9.3 and 12.0 km2), as well as at the outlet of the main river basin (station of Santiago Undameo, 627 km2). Preliminary tests realized in 2008 underlined the necessity of carrying out a high-frequency monitoring strategy to assess the sediment dynamics in the basins of this region. In each site, water discharge time-series were obtained from continuous water-level measurements (5-min time-step), and stage-discharge rating curves. At the river basin outlet, Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) was estimated every 10 minutes through turbidity measurements calibrated with data from automatic sampling. In the three sub-catchments, SSC time-series were calculated using stage-triggered automatic water samplers. The three upland areas monitored in our study present distinct landforms, morphology and soil types. La Cortina is underlain by andisols, rich in organic matter and with an excellent microstructure under wet conditions. Huertitas and Potrerillos both present a severely gullied landscape, bare and highly susceptible to water erosion in degraded areas. As a result, suspended sediment yields in 2009 were expectedly much higher in these two sub-catchments (≈320 t.km-2 in Huertitas and ≈270 t.km-2 in Potrerillos) than in La Cortina (≈40 t.km-2). The total suspended sediment export was approximately of 30 t.km-2

  10. Effects of coal mining on the water quality and sedimentation of Lake Tuscaloosa and selected tributaries, North River basin, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    Lake Tuscaloosa, a reservoir on North River, is the primary source of water supply for the city of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and surrounding areas. Between October 1982 and September 1983, 14 sites in the North River basin were sampled to determine if surface coal mining has impacted the quality of water in the lake and selected tributaries. Water draining mined basins showed increases in specific conductance, sulfate concentrations , and dissolved and total recoverable iron and manganese concentrations after mining started in 1975. Although water in the reservoir has become more mineralized with only an estimated 5 percent of the basin mined, total dissolved solids concentrations are still very low, ranging from 28 to 35 milligrams per liter at the dam. The quality of water at most sites was, except for pH, iron, and manganese, within secondary drinking water standards. The pH of water from streams draining either mined or unmined basins was generally less than 6.5. Sedimentation has occurred at most measured lake cross sections since impoundment. However, natural factors such as steep overland and channel slopes, may cause more sedimentation in the lake from unmined basins than from coal mining in a different basin. (USGS)

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of methane at different temperature regimes in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments.

    PubMed

    Biddle, Jennifer F; Cardman, Zena; Mendlovitz, Howard; Albert, Daniel B; Lloyd, Karen G; Boetius, Antje; Teske, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was investigated in hydrothermal sediments of Guaymas Basin based on δ(13)C signatures of CH(4), dissolved inorganic carbon and porewater concentration profiles of CH(4) and sulfate. Cool, warm and hot in-situ temperature regimes (15-20 °C, 30-35 °C and 70-95 °C) were selected from hydrothermal locations in Guaymas Basin to compare AOM geochemistry and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), mcrA and dsrAB genes of the microbial communities. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the cool and hot AOM cores yielded similar archaeal types such as Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group, Thermoproteales and anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME)-1; some of the ANME-1 archaea formed a separate 16S rRNA lineage that at present seems to be limited to Guaymas Basin. Congruent results were obtained by mcrA gene analysis. The warm AOM core, chemically distinct by lower porewater sulfide concentrations, hosted a different archaeal community dominated by the two deep subsurface archaeal lineages Marine Benthic Group D and Marine Benthic Group B, and by members of the Methanosarcinales including ANME-2 archaea. This distinct composition of the methane-cycling archaeal community in the warm AOM core was confirmed by mcrA gene analysis. Functional genes of sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea, dsrAB, showed more overlap between all cores, regardless of the core temperature. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries with Euryarchaeota-specific primers detected members of the Archaeoglobus clade in the cool and hot cores. A V6-tag high-throughput sequencing survey generally supported the clone library results while providing high-resolution detail on archaeal and bacterial community structure. These results indicate that AOM and the responsible archaeal communities persist over a wide temperature range. PMID:22094346

  12. Allogenic processes, sediment flux, and Carboniferous stratigraphy in the Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, C.B.; Dulong, F.T.; Edgar, N.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The origin of Carboniferous strata in the central Appalachian basin is being evaluated as a function of paleoclimatic, eustatic, and tectonic processes. Of these processes, paleoclimate has, in the past, received the least attention but appears to be of primary importance as a control on stratigraphy. For example, Upper Mississippian strata include both marine carbonates and marine dark gray to black shales. The marine carbonate units are underlain and overlain by paleosols that contain calcic peds, pseudomorphs of gypsum, and rhizoconcretions with vertical root structures suggesting low soil moisture. The marine limestone generally is in sharp contact with an underlying paleosol. The lithostratigraphy of such a sequence is consistent with a transgressive-regressive cycle under relatively dry (semiarid) climatic conditions, which limits siliciclastic influx. In contrast, the marine gray and black shales are bounded by leached paleosols containing horizontal rhizomorphs and coal beds suggestive of wet soil conditions. Terrestrial organic matter in marine shales indicate relatively high terrestrial organic productivity, and the shale units are in gradational contact with underling strata. The lithostratigraphy of the marine shale sequences is consistent with deposition under relatively wet climatic regimes (probably seasonal and subhumid), which increased siliciclastic and terrestrial organic matter input. Relatively short-term climate cycles were a primary control on sediment flux within Carboniferous deposystems in the Appalachian basin. Long-term climate change also occurred as eastern North America moved from relatively dry latitudes of the southern hemisphere through the tropical rainy belt into drier latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Long-term tectonic change provided accommodation space. Such controls can readily be observed throughout Carboniferous strata in the Appalachian basin.

  13. Paleohydrogeology of the Cretaceous sediments of the Williston Basin using stable isotopes of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, M. Jim; Barbour, S. L.; Novakowski, K.; Wassenaar, L. I.

    2013-08-01

    Hydraulic and isotopic data collected from aquifers are routinely used to characterize hydrogeological conditions within sedimentary basins, but similar data from confining units are generally not collected despite their ability to provide insights on important water/solute transport controls. We characterized paleogroundwater flow and solute transport mechanisms across 384 m of Cretaceous shale (aquitard) in the Williston Basin, Canada, using high-resolution depth profiles of water isotopes (δ18O, δ2H). Water samples were also collected from wells installed in the underlying regional sandy aquifer (Mannville Fm; 93 m thick) and from seepage inflows into potash mine shafts (to 825 m below ground). The 1-D numerical transport modeling of δ18O profiles provided insight into large-scale/long-term solute transport in both Cretaceous sediments and the basin. Despite the potential for significant advective migration during glaciations, molecular diffusion appears to be the dominant solute transport mechanism through the aquitard. Simulations suggest average vertical groundwater velocities of <0.05 m/10 ka and an average excess hydraulic head of <10 m; these values are much less than anticipated by successive glaciations. The dominant paleoevent reflected in present-day profiles is introduction during the Pleistocene of glaciogenic meteoric water to the aquifer underlying the shale, likely along an aquifer outcrop area east of the site or through local vertical conduits. Simulations suggest these recharge events occurred during one or more glacial periods. The isotopic profile over the upper 25 m of Pleistocene till and shale is consistent with glacial deposition and transport processes within these units over the Holocene (past 10 ka).

  14. Palaeo-hydrogeology of the Cretaceous Sediments of the Williston Basin using Stable Isotopes of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Michael J.; Barbour, S. Lee; Novakowski, Kent; Wassenaar, Len I.

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic and isotopic data collected from aquifers are typically used to characterize hydrogeological conditions within sedimentary basins. Similar data from confining units are generally not collected despite their ability to provide insights into important water/solute transport controls. In this study, we characterized palaeo-groundwater flow and solute transport mechanisms across 384 m of a Cretaceous shale aquitard in the Williston Basin, Canada, using high-resolution depth profiles of water isotopes (δ18O and δ2H). Water samples were also collected from wells installed in the underlying regional aquifer (Mannville Fm; 93 m thick) and from seepage inflows into potash mine shafts (to 825 m below ground). 1-D numerical transport modeling of isotopic profiles yielded insight into large-scale/long-term solute transport in both Cretaceous sediments and the Basin. Molecular diffusion was determined to be the dominant solute transport mechanism through the aquitard. Transport model simulations suggest average vertical groundwater velocities of <0.05 m/10 ka and an average excess hydraulic head of <10 m. These values are less than anticipated by successive glaciations. The dominant palaeo-event reflected in present-day profiles is introduction during the Pleistocene of glaciogenic meteoric water to the aquifer underlying the aquitard, likely along an aquifer outcrop area east of the site or through local vertical conduits in the aquitard. Simulations suggest these recharge events occurred during one or more glacial periods. The isotopic profile over the upper 25 m of Pleistocene till and shale is consistent with glacial deposition and transport processes within these units during the Holocene (past 10 ka).

  15. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. ); Richert, J.P. )

    1994-07-01

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  16. Channel erosion and sediment transport in Pheasant Branch basin near Middleton, Wisconsin; a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, R. Stephen; Goddard, Gerald

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this 5-year study is to (1) evaluate the sediment transport, streamflow characteristics, and stream-channel morphology, (2) relate the above to land-use practices; and (3) evaluate the effect that changes in land-use practices will have on Pheasant Branch basin near Middleton, Wis. This report presents findings of sediment transport, streamflow characteristics, and stream-channel morphology from the first year of the study and documents historical erosion. The study is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Middleton and the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey. Pheasant Branch, a tributary to Lake Mendota, drains 23.1 square miles of glacial drift. Channel erosion is severe within Middleton, requiring extensive use of erosion-control structures. Occasionally, channel dredging near the mouth and into Lake Mendota is required for boating. Comparison of stream-channel surveys of 1971 and 1977 shows the lowest part of the channel lowered 3 to 4 feet at some sites in the urban reach from U.S. Highway 12 downstream to Century Avenue. Downstream from Century Avenue, channel width increased from about 35 to 48 feet and channel cross-section area increased about 86 percent. A survey of Pheasant Branch in 1971 provided data for quantification of stream-channel changes since that time. Six erosion-control structures previously installed appear to have had some benefit in controlling head cutting in the channel. (USGS).

  17. Active microbial community structure of deep subsurface sediments within Baltic Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, B. K.; Zinke, L.; Carvalho, G.; Lloyd, K. G.; Marshall, I.; Shumaker, A.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Baltic Sea Basin (BSB) is a unique depositional setting that has experienced periods of glaciation and deglaciation as a result of climatic fluctuations over past tens of thousands of years. This has resulted in laminated sediments formed during periods with strong permanent salinity stratification. The high sedimentation rates make this an ideal setting to understand the microbial structure of a deep biosphere community in a relatively high carbon, and thus high-energy environment, compared to other deep subsurface sites. Samples were collected through scientific drilling during the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 347 on board the Greatship Manisha, September-November 2013. We examined the active microbial community structure using the 16S rRNA gene transcript and active functional genes through metatranscriptome sequencing. Major biogeochemical shifts have been observed in response to the depositional history between the limnic, brackish, and marine phases. The active microbial community structure in the BSB is diverse and reflective of the unique changes in the geochemical profile. These data further refine our understanding of the existence life in the deep subsurface and the survival mechanisms required for this extreme environment.

  18. The magnetic properties of Rio Tinto Basin sediments (Spain): a step towards Martian enviromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, G.; Hernandez, F. M.; Remolar, D. F.; de La Presa, P.; Marin, P.; Marcos, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Exploration by the NASA rover Opportunity revealed sulphate-and haematite-rich sedimentary rocks exposed in surface features of Meridiani Planum, Mars. Sediments of the Rio Tinto Basin, Spain, provide at least a partial analog of Meridiani rocks, thereby facilitating an understanding of mineral precipitation and diagenesis on the Martian surface. Here we present the results of a mineral magnetic study of river terrace deposits of the Rio Tinto system, the deposits ranging from Modern to Plio-Pleistocene in age. A broad range of temperature- and field-dependent measurements have been made which have identified the presence of goethite, haematite and sulphides. Seasonally driven processes are thought to lead to the precipitation of nano-phase goethite which increases in crystallinity with age, eventually being replaced by haematite. Diverse micro-organism populations inhabit the acidic and seasonally dry environments, although organic matter does not persist in the sediments. However, biosignatures are left as casts and molds in the iron oxide minerals. The potential for recognizing their characteristic magnetic signatures, and their extrapolation to Martian environments, will be discussed.

  19. Manganese(II)-Oxidizing Bacillus Spores in Guaymas Basin Hydrothermal Sediments and Plumes

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Gregory J.; Lee, Yifan E.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial oxidation and precipitation of manganese at deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important oceanic biogeochemical processes, yet nothing is known about the types of microorganisms or mechanisms involved. Here we report isolation of a number of diverse spore-forming Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus species from Guaymas Basin, a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment in the Gulf of California, where rapid microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation was previously observed. mnxG multicopper oxidase genes involved in Mn(II) oxidation were amplified from all Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus spores isolated, suggesting that a copper-mediated mechanism of Mn(II) oxidation could be important at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and mnxG genes revealed that while many of the deep-sea Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus species are very closely related to previously recognized isolates from coastal sediments, other organisms represent novel strains and clusters. The growth and Mn(II) oxidation properties of these Bacillus species suggest that in hydrothermal sediments they are likely present as spores that are active in oxidizing Mn(II) as it emerges from the seafloor. PMID:16672456

  20. Impact of discharge and sediment flux on basin margin architecture: an experimental approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg van Saparoea, A. P. H.; Postma, G.

    2003-04-01

    In most cases it is very difficult to evaluate the stratigraphic record in terms of causality. Important parameters in fluvial-deltaic settings are relative sea level and the ratio of discharge (Q) and solid load (Qs). We use analogue modelling for unravelling the role of each in strata formation over long time spans. The changes in the modelled system are monitored by means of digital elevation maps (DEM's) of the surface, and are calibrated against the last glacial cycle stratigraphic record of the Colorado (Texas, USA) fluvial-delta-shelf system. The influence of relative sea level at constant Q/Qs ratio has been investigated in a previous series of experiments [1]. In the experiments described here Q/Qs ratio is varied, while the rate of change in relative sea level is kept constant. Our preliminary results indicate that the efficiency of sediment transport increases with higher Q/Qs ratios. A system with high Q/Qs ratio is predominantly progradational, while a system with a low Q/Qs ratio shows progradation and aggradation over the entire shelf. Secondly there is a clear relation between the Q/Qs ratio and the cone shaped distribution of sediment over the shelf. The lower the Q/Qs ratio, the higher the spreading angle due to increase in avulsion frequency in the apex of the delta with increasing sediment load. Thirdly, the amount of incision into the original shelf material depends both on the ability of the system to erode (the discharge) and the amount of sediment available for deposition. As a consequence, at low Q/Qs ratios there is a minimum of shelf incision and cannibalisation of shelf stratigraphy, while sediments deposited in the falling stage systems tract are continuously reworked and redeposited. Hence, the lowstand fans contain high amounts of fluvial material transported during the sea-level fall. This is in contrast with high Q/Qs ratios that lead to shelf incision and increased headward erosion rates in the fluvial valleys. The connection time

  1. Patterns and processes of fluvial discontinuity and sediment residence times on the lower Macquarie River, Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Zacchary; Ralph, Timothy; Hesse, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The supply, transport and deposition of fine-grained sediment are important factors determining the morphology of lowland rivers that experience channel breakdown and have wetlands on their lower reaches. Sediment supply and residence time determine whether reaches accumulate sediment (wetland areas) or erode sediment (channelised areas). This research investigated how processes of sedimentation and erosion drive channel breakdown and reformation in the Macquarie Marshes, a large anastomosing wetland system in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. Channel breakdown is attributed to a dominance of in-stream sedimentation that leads to a point where single-thread river channels cannot be maintained and so avulsion and floodout processes create smaller distributary channels and wetlands. Avulsions may reconnect channels, changing the sediment supply regime in those particular channels. Channel reformation occurs on the trunk stream where the floodplain gradient steepens enough to allow convergence of small tributaries, locally increasing stream power (and erosive energy in channels). As each river reach reforms following channel breakdown, the channel is smaller, shallower and straighter than the previous reach. One reach in this system recently (in the 1970s) became connected with a parallel channel through avulsion and has morphological characteristics that indicate a significant change in flow and sediment supply. In a pilot study using uranium-series disequilibrium methods and OSL dating, a sediment residence time of 58 +/- 2 ka was determined for sediment in the base of the active channel and a sediment residence time of 153 +/- 5 ka was determined for sediment buried in an adjacent meander that was cut off from the main channel 1,000 years ago. The apparent dramatic decrease in sediment residence time to this active channel poses an interesting question about the role of relatively new channels in transporting and depositing sediment more rapidly than the

  2. Geochemistry of rare and minor elements in sediments from Brazil Basin of Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina; Dubinin, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    This paper reviews the features of the rare and minor elements in the sediment samples recovered from the Brazil Basin at the location of the Station No. 1537 in the Atlantic Ocean during the 18th cruise of the Research Vessel "Akademik Sergey Vavilov". The depth of the sediment column is 470 cm. The sediments are represented by the oxidized miopelagic clay (0-305 cm) which are underlain by the thin bedded Ethmodiscus diatom oozes (305-470 cm). The brown miopelagic clay (0.09-1.25% СаСО3, 0.05-0.28% Сorganic) predominately consist of the clay minerals (91-97%). The top section sediments also include some terrigenous clastic sandy-silt minerals (1-5%), diatoms (up to 2%), manganese micronodules (approx. 1%), occasional spicules, radiolarian, coccoliths and marine fossil fragments. The transition to the lower diatom oozes is associated with the lens-shape structures and increase in the content of diatoms in clay. The age of sediments at the station No. 1537 is Late Pleistocene. Presence of thin bedded Ethmodiscus oozes is an indirect evidence of re-deposition of the sediments in the central part of the Brazil Basin The chemical composition has been analyzed on 37 core samples recovered from the column. These core samples have been used to define the content of the chemical composition as well as the rare and minor elements. The manganese content in the top section of the miopelagic clay varies insignificantly and value is close 0.46%. The rare and minor elements content in the miopelagic clay is quite stable. The sharp increase in manganese content (to 1.16%) as well as in that of the minor elements such as Co, Cu, Ni, Mo and Tl are observed at the 305-308 cm horizon which corresponds to the bottom of the miopelagic clay. Than, the manganese content decreases to reach its minimum value (0.20%) immediately below this horizon. With further depth increase, the content of manganese starts rising again reaces its maximum value of 2.31% at the 405-407 cm horizon. The

  3. Sediment delivery ratio of single flood events and the influencing factors in a headwater basin of the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mingguo; Liao, Yishan; He, Jijun

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the sediment delivery of single flood events although it has been well known that the sediment delivery ratio at the inter-annual time scale is close to 1 in the Chinese Loess Plateau. This study examined the sediment delivery of single flood events and the influencing factors in a headwater basin of the Loess Plateau, where hyperconcentrated flows are dominant. Data observed from plot to subwatershed over the period from 1959 to 1969 were presented. Sediment delivery ratio of a single event (SDRe) was calculated as the ratio of sediment output from the subwatershed to sediment input into the channel. It was found that SDRe varies greatly for small events (runoff depth <5 mm or rainfall depth <30 mm) and remains fairly constant (approximately between 1.1 and 1.3) for large events (runoff depth >5 mm or rainfall depth >30 mm). We examined 11 factors of rainfall (rainfall amount, rainfall intensity, rainfall kinetic energy, rainfall erosivity and rainfall duration), flood (area-specific sediment yield, runoff depth, peak flow discharge, peak sediment concentration and flood duration) and antecedent land surface (antecedent precipitation) in relation to SDRe. Only the peak sediment concentration significantly correlates with SDRe. Contrary to popular belief, channel scour tends to occur in cases of higher peak sediment concentrations. Because small events also have chances to attain a high sediment concentration, many small events (rainfall depth <20 mm) are characterized by channel scour with an SDRe larger than 1. Such observations can be related to hyperconcentrated flows, which behave quite differently from normal stream flows. Our finding that large events have a nearly constant SDRe is useful for sediment yield predictions in the Loess Plateau and other regions where hyperconcentrated flows are well developed. PMID:25389752

  4. Sediment Delivery Ratio of Single Flood Events and the Influencing Factors in a Headwater Basin of the Chinese Loess Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingguo; Liao, Yishan; He, Jijun

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the sediment delivery of single flood events although it has been well known that the sediment delivery ratio at the inter-annual time scale is close to 1 in the Chinese Loess Plateau. This study examined the sediment delivery of single flood events and the influencing factors in a headwater basin of the Loess Plateau, where hyperconcentrated flows are dominant. Data observed from plot to subwatershed over the period from 1959 to 1969 were presented. Sediment delivery ratio of a single event (SDRe) was calculated as the ratio of sediment output from the subwatershed to sediment input into the channel. It was found that SDRe varies greatly for small events (runoff depth <5 mm or rainfall depth <30 mm) and remains fairly constant (approximately between 1.1 and 1.3) for large events (runoff depth >5 mm or rainfall depth >30 mm). We examined 11 factors of rainfall (rainfall amount, rainfall intensity, rainfall kinetic energy, rainfall erosivity and rainfall duration), flood (area-specific sediment yield, runoff depth, peak flow discharge, peak sediment concentration and flood duration) and antecedent land surface (antecedent precipitation) in relation to SDRe. Only the peak sediment concentration significantly correlates with SDRe. Contrary to popular belief, channel scour tends to occur in cases of higher peak sediment concentrations. Because small events also have chances to attain a high sediment concentration, many small events (rainfall depth <20 mm) are characterized by channel scour with an SDRe larger than 1. Such observations can be related to hyperconcentrated flows, which behave quite differently from normal stream flows. Our finding that large events have a nearly constant SDRe is useful for sediment yield predictions in the Loess Plateau and other regions where hyperconcentrated flows are well developed. PMID:25389752

  5. Sedimentation and chemical quality of surface water in the Heart River drainage basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maderak, Marion L.

    1966-01-01

    The Heart River drainage basin of .southwestern North Dakota comprises an area of 3,365 square miles and lies within the Missouri Plateau of the Great Plains province. Streamflow of the Heart River and its tributaries during 1949-58 was directly proportional to .the drainage area. After the construction of Heart Butte Dam in 1949 and Dickinson Dam in 1950, the mean annual streamflow near Mandan was decreased an estimated 10 percent by irrigation, evaporation from the two reservoirs, and municipal use. Processes that contribute sediment to the Heart River are mass wasting, advancement of valley heads, and sheet, lateral stream, and gully erosion. In general, glacial deposits, terraces, and bars of Quaternary age are sources of sand and larger sediment, and the rocks of Tertiary age are sources of clay, silt. and sand. The average annual suspended-sediment discharges near Mandan were estimated to be 1,300,000 tons for 1945-49 and 710,000 tons for 1970-58. The percentage composition of ions in water of the Heart River, based on average concentrations in equivalents per million for selected ranges of streamflow, changes with flow and from station to station. During extremely low flows the water contains a large percentage of sodium and about equal percentages of bicarbonate and .sulfate, and during extremely high flows the water contains a large percentage of calcium plus magnesium and bicarbonate. The concentrations, in parts per million, of most of the ions vary inversely with flow. The water in the reservoirs--Edward Arthur Patterson Lake and Lake Tschida--during normal or above-normal runoff is of suitable quality for public use. Generally, because of medium or high salinity hazards, the successful long-term use of Heart River water for irrigation will depend on a moderate amount of leaching, ,adequate drainage, ,and the growing of crops that have moderate or good salt tolerance.

  6. 210Pb-derived chronology in sediment cores evidencing the anthropogenic occupation history at Corumbataí River basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonotto, D. M.; de Lima, J. L. N.

    2006-07-01

    Activity profiles of excess 210Pb combined with chemical data determined in two sediment cores from Corumbataí River basin, São Paulo State, Brazil, provided new insights into the reconstruction of historical inputs of anthropogenic constituents, contributing to improving management strategies of the hydrological resources in the basin since most of the municipalities extensively utilize the waters of Corumbataí River and tributaries for drinking purposes, among other uses. Excellent significant relationships between loss on ignition (LOI) and organic matter were found for sediments of both analyzed profiles. Silica was found to be inversely related to organic matter at both analyzed profiles: its decrease accompanied an increase in the specific surface of the sediments. This relationship was confirmed by a great number of inverse significant correlations among silica and oxides Na2O, K2O, CaO, MgO, Al2O3, P2O5, Fe2O3, MnO, and TiO2. It was possible to identify the role of organic matter on adsorption of several oxides/elements in the core sediments profiles. Apparent sediment mass accumulation rates corresponding to 224 and 802 mg cm-2 year-1 were obtained, and are compatible with field evidence, indicating a higher value associated with sand mining activities interfering with the natural/normal sedimentation process, due to modifications of the channel drainage.

  7. Assessment of sediments in the riverine impoundments of national wildlife refuges in the Souris River Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Gleason, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated sedimentation of reservoirs and riverine impoundments is a major concern throughout the United States. Sediments not only fill impoundments and reduce their effective life span, but they can reduce water quality by increasing turbidity and introducing harmful chemical constituents such as heavy metals, toxic elements, and nutrients. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service national wildlife refuges in the north-central part of the United States have documented high amounts of sediment accretion in some wetlands that could negatively affect important aquatic habitats for migratory birds and other wetland-dependent wildlife. Therefore, information pertaining to sediment accumulation in refuge impoundments potentially is important to guide conservation planning, including future management actions of individual impoundments. Lands comprising Des Lacs, Upper Souris, and J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuges, collectively known as the Souris River Basin refuges, encompass reaches of the Des Lacs and Souris Rivers of northwestern North Dakota. The riverine impoundments of the Souris River Basin refuges are vulnerable to sedimentation because of the construction of in-stream dams that interrupt and slow river flows and because of post-European settlement land-use changes that have increased the potential for soil erosion and transport to rivers. Information regarding sediments does not exist for these refuges, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service personnel have expressed interest in assessing refuge impoundments to support refuge management decisions. Sediment cores and surface sediment samples were collected from impoundments within Des Lacs, Upper Souris, and J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuges during 2004–05. Cores were used to estimate sediment accretion rates using radioisotope (cesium-137 [137Cs], lead-210 [210Pb]) dating techniques. Sediment cores and surface samples were analyzed for a suite of elements and agrichemicals, respectively. Examination of

  8. Drainage architecture and sediment routing in erosive catchments within the Ebro Eiver sedimentary basin (NE Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelltort, Xavier; Colombo, Ferran; Carles Balasch Solanes, Josep

    2016-04-01

    The Ebro Basin (EB) is the result of filling a foreland basin located between active mountain ranges during the Paleogene compressive phases, and later affected by phases of distension in the Neogene. The arrangement of filler material is monocline in the eastern margin and in the contact with the Catalan Coastal Range (CCR). This has repercussions on the model of emptying the erosive basins and in the drainage that took place in the margins of the original sedimentary basin. One can speak of a drainage architecture and sediment routing associated to a monocline erosive basin model. The monocline topography in the original margin of EB encouraged the formation of a string of erosive basins around the contact with CCR, which are the result of headward erosion towards the center of the EB of the rivers draining the CCR towards the Valencia Trough. At the time, the transition from the EB in its initial condition of endorheic to exorheic was through one of these monocline erosive basins. The erosive basins emptied by means of two vectors. On the one hand, growth in surface of the basin by deepening anaclinal streams through resistant beds of monocline stratigraphic succession that empty and link small depressions that increase laterally on the less resistant lithologic member. Moreover, the new drainage system entrenches as the exit point of the basin does, thanks to gradients created by distensional movements of the Neogene Valencia Trough. Growth and entrenchment model of river basins, as well as, sedimentary deposits and landforms generated by these processes are described and analyzed.

  9. Predicting Monsoonal-Driven Stream Discharge and Sediment Yield in Himalaya Mountain Basins with Changing Climate and Deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, R. P.; White, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Short and long term effects of site water availability impacts the spectrum of management outcomes including landslide risk, hydropower generation, and sustainable agriculture in mountain systems heavily influenced by climate and land use changes. Climate change and land use may predominantly affect the hydrologic cycle of mountain basins as soil precipitation interception is affected by land cover. Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, we estimated stream discharge and sediment yield associated with climate and land use changes for two Himalaya basins located at eastern and western margins of Nepal that included drainages of the Tamor and Seti Rivers. Future climate change was modeled using average output of temperature and precipitation changes derived from Special Report on Emission Scenarios (B1, A1B & A2) of 16 global circulation models for 2080 as meteorological inputs into SWAT. Land use change was modeled spatially and included 1) deforestation, 2) expansion of agricultural land, and 3) increased human settlement that were produced by considering current land use with projected changes associated with viability of elevation and slope characteristics of the basins capable of supporting different land use types. We found higher annual stream discharge in all GCM-derived scenarios compared to the baseline with maximum increases of 13 and 8% in SRES-A2 and SRES-A1B for the Tamor and Seti basins, respectively. With 7% of original forest land removed, sediment yield for Tamor basin was estimated to be 65% higher, but increased to 124% for the SRES-B1 scenario. For the Seti basin, 4% deforestation yielded 33% more sediment for the SRES-A1B scenario. Our results indicated that combined effects of future, intensified monsoon rainfall with deforestation lead to dramatic potential for increased stream discharge and sediment yield as rainfall on steep slopes with thin exposed soils increases surface runoff and soil erosion in the Himalayas. This effect appears to

  10. Stratigraphic and structural analysis of the Neogene sediments of the offshore portion of the Salina del Istmo Basin, southeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Cabrera, Pedro Tomas

    2003-10-01

    Southeastern Mexico has been affected by regional and local tectonic events. Regional tectonic events are the Gulf of Mexico opening and the lateral movement of micro-plates on the Pacific margin. The local tectonic events are related to salt tectonics. Autochthonous Jurassic salt serves as the detachment level for the main compressional event in the late Miocene. Jurassic salt was allochthonously emplaced in the late Miocene, then partially displaced by a huge quantity of terrigenous sediments during the Plio-Pleistocene. This research is a study of the main geological processes that have influenced the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the Neogene sediments in the offshore portion of the Salina del Istmo basin known as the Marbella area. Owing to data availability, the project was divided into regional and local studies. The regional study is based on 2D multi-channel seismic reflection data, and the local study is based on a 3D seismic streamer survey. Structural analysis in the regional study permits the recognition of four buried fold belts (Agua Dulce, Catemaco, Marbella, and Marbella Norte) trending roughly NE. These fold belts are the result of tectonic convergence in the pacific margin during late Miocene. The Agua Dulce and Marbella Norte fold belts are separated by an enormous salt withdrawal basin called the Pescadores basin. The Pescadores basin is bounded on the north by a spectacular stepped, counter-regional structure. Beyond the Pescadores basin, a salt mini-basin area is recognized in the upper continental slope. Another important structural element is the Sal Somera canopy in the southern part of the study area. Sedimentation-rate analysis, based on isochore mapping in the local study area, indicates that from SB-2.4 to SB-2.6 Ma, deposition rate peaked with a maximum of 7.5 mm/yr. Regional and local structural restorations show that, in general, the maximum allochthonous salt mobilization was during the Plio-Pleistocene because of the

  11. Control of sedimentation by active tectonics, glaciation and contourite-depositing currents in Endurance Basin, South Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Matthew J.; Day, Simon J.; Leat, Philip T.; Tate, Alex J.; Martin, Tara J.

    2014-12-01

    Endurance Basin is an elongate broadly WNW-ESE trending basin located on the northern margin of the Scotia Sea, adjacent to the southern margin of the South Georgia micro-continent. Bathymetric and TOPAS sub-bottom profile data acquired in 2010 by the British research ship RRS James Clark Ross map this basin and its sedimentology for the first time. Endurance Basin contains a number of sub-basins and a substantial glaciogenic fan. The northern margin of Endurance Basin is formed by a series of steep slopes and intervening troughs. These are interpreted as a left-stepping en echelon array of oblique, strike-slip faults whilst the sub-basins are separated by compressional dip-slip faults. It appears that South Georgia is moving NW with respect to the basin. We interpret five seismic facies from TOPAS data, which are associated with distinct sedimentologies. The most striking units in the basin fill are: substantial contourite drifts located in the NW of the basin and on its southern margin; and two distinct mass transport deposits that pond in the centre of the basin. Combined with the known regional oceanographic setting, the contourites provide evidence of broadly eastward flowing bottom currents, entering the basin from at least two locations. Although landslide scars are present on the steep northern basin margin, the imaged mass transport deposits are interpreted to have been sourced from the glaciogenic fan, located in the SE of the basin, and from a contourite unit located on the basin's southern margin. Sediments from these events are transported at least 40 km. The contourite drift sequence is at least 100 m thick in the west of the basin and may contain a palaeoenvironmental archive of Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) flow and the climate of South Georgia extending to the Pliocene. Such an archive would allow the reconstruction of ACC flow through the Pleistocene glaciations and provide a means of linking ocean circulation and climate records in the sub

  12. Global Warming and Mass Extinctions Caused by Sediment Degassing of Volcanic Basins: Status Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik

    2010-05-01

    We have for the past decade worked on a hypothesis linking major environmental changes in Earth History to the eruption of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). It is well known that there are temporal correlations between LIPs and periods of global warming and/or mass extinctions. However, there are several problems explaining the environmental changes by extrusive volcanism. In particular, (1) there is no correlation between the size of a LIP and the environmental impact, (2) it is not possible to explain observed increases in isotopically light carbon by degassing of mafic magma, and (3) it is not sufficient carbon in mafic magma to explain the mass of atmospheric carbon needed to trigger global warming. Our hypothesis, initially published in 2004, stresses the emplacement environment. Sedimentary basins contain large volumes of volatiles or rocks that can be devolatized by heating. Magma intruding sedimentary basins will heat the host rock, causing massive degassing of the contact metamorphic aureoles. The type volatiles that are formed in the aureoles are strongly dependent on the host rock lithologies. Greenhouse gases, such as CH4 and CO2, are formed when organic-rich rocks or carbonates are heated, whereas poisonous gases (SO2, halocarbons, etc.) are formed when evaporate-rich sequences are heated. In contrast, only boiling (or formation of supercritical water) is taking place when barren sandstones or shales are heated. The sediment degassing hypothesis has been tested by focused studies of (1) the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and the Northeast Atlantic Igneous Province, (2) the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and the Karoo LIP, and (3) the end-Permian extinction and the Siberian Traps LIP. Borehole studies of aureole rocks in all three igneous provinces reveal a very high production potential of greenhouse gases. Heating experiments of petroleum-bearing evaporates from the Tunguska Basin in Siberia document that ozone-destroying halocarbons may have

  13. Orbital forcing in the early Miocene alluvial sediments of the western Ebro Basin, Northeast Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M.; Larrasoaña, J. C.; Muñoz, A.; Margalef, O.; Murelaga, X.

    2009-04-01

    Paleoclimatic reconstructions from terrestrial records are crucial to assess the regional variability of past climates. Despite the apparent direct connection between continental sedimentary environments and climate, interpreting the climatic signature in ancient non-marine sedimentary sequences is often overprinted by source-area related signals. In this regard, foreland basins appear as non-ideal targets as tectonically-driven subsidence and uplift play a major control on the distribution and evolution of sedimentary environments and facies. Foreland basins, however, often yield among the thickest and most continuous stratigraphic records available on continents. The Ebro Basin (north-eastern Spain) is of particular interest among the circum-mediterranean alpine foreland basins because it evolved into a land-locked closed basin since the late Eocene, leading to the accumulation of an exceptionally thick (>5500 m) and continuous sequence of alluvial-lacustrine sediments over a period of about 25 Myr. In this paper we present a detailed cyclostratigraphic study of a 115 m thick section in the Bardenas Reales de Navarra region (western Ebro Basin) in order to test orbital forcing in the Milankovitch frequency band. The study section corresponds to the distal alluvial-playa mud flats which developed in the central sector of the western Ebro Basin, with sediments sourced from both the Pyrenean and Iberian Ranges. Sediments consist of brown-red alluvial clay packages containing minor fine-grained laminated sandstones sheet-beds and channels, grey marls and thin bedded lacustrine limestones arranged in 10 to 20 m thick fining-upwards sequences. Red clayed intervals contain abundant nodular gypsum interpreted as representing a phase of arid and low lake level conditions, while grey marls and limestones indicate wetter intervals recording the expansion of the inner shallow lakes. A magnetostratigraphy-based chronology indicates that the Peñarroya section represents a

  14. Eutrophication-driven sediment microbial processes can explain the regional variation in phosphorus concentrations between Baltic Sea sub-basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtoranta, Jouni; Ekholm, Petri; Pitkänen, Heikki

    2008-11-01

    Despite the ecological significance of microbial iron and sulphate reduction in aquatic environments, the processes involved have been poorly studied in Baltic Sea sediments. On the basis of indirect evidence, we conclude that the bottom sediments of the non-stratified and oligotrophic northernmost, and the poorly stratified and mesotrophic next northern, sub-basins of the Baltic have tolerated the external nutrient load rather well, as they are still in a state in which iron reduction and coupled cycling of iron and phosphorus prevail in the surface sediments. Since iron-reducing bacteria are unable to reduce ferric oxides completely, part of the iron-bound phosphorus may be permanently buried in the sediments. The good ability of the sediment to retain phosphorus results in low concentrations of phosphorus in water, a state that in turn promotes phosphorus limitation of primary production. In contrast, the sediments of the nutrient-loaded and stratified sub-basins, the Gulf of Finland (the most eutrophied sub-basin) and the Baltic Proper, appeared to have reached a state in which sulphate reduction is the dominant mineralisation pathway. Sulphate reduction followed by sulphide formation leads to efficient reduction of ferric oxides. Subsequently, iron-bound phosphorus dissolves into the pore water and is transported to the overlying water, whereas iron is buried as sulphides (uncoupled iron and phosphorus cycling). The capacity of sediments to retain phosphorus is limited; high amounts of bioavailable phosphate exist in the water column, primary production tends to be nitrogen limited and extensive blue-green algal blooms are common. We maintain that the decisive factors controlling the above regional distribution of iron and sulphate reduction are the flux of labile organic matter to the sediments and the variation in hydrodynamics. Sulphate reduction will be triggered when the flux of organic matter reaches a critical threshold value, resulting in anoxia at the

  15. Provenance of eastern Magallanes foreland basin sediments: Heavy mineral analysis reveals Paleogene tectonic unroofing of the Fuegian Andes hinterland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, Khandaker M.; Barbeau, David L., Jr.

    2010-07-01

    Documenting variations in the composition of foreland basin detrital sediments is a useful tool for reconstructing the kinematic history of associated orogenic systems. Herein we report the results of our SEM-EDS heavy mineral analysis of the Late Cretaceous to early Miocene eastern Magallanes basin of southernmost Argentina. Our data indicate that Campanian to middle Eocene sediments had a mafic/ophiolitic provenance, which we interpret as being derived from the Patagonian-Fuegian magmatic arc and the mafic floor of the preceding Rocas Verdes marginal basin. Upper middle Eocene to lower Miocene heavy minerals, on the other hand, indicate a metamorphic/metasedimentary provenance, which we interpret as being derived from the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex. Together, these data indicate an abrupt shift in sediment provenance in middle to late Eocene time, thereby corroborating recent interpretations of the basin's detrital-zircon geochrononology, and providing further support for temporal and possibly genetic relationships between development of the Patagonian orocline, the opening of Drake Passage and the Oi-1 glaciation of Antarctica.

  16. Sediment dynamics in the restored reach of the Kissimmee River Basin, Florida: A vast subtropical riparian wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, E.R.; Hupp, C.R.; Gellis, A.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the Kissimmee River Basin consisted of a broad nearly annually inundated riparian wetland similar in character to tropical Southern Hemisphere large rivers. The river was channelized in the 1960s and 1970s, draining the wetland. The river is currently being restored with over 10 000 hectares of wetlands being reconnected to 70 river km of naturalized channel. We monitored riparian wetland sediment dynamics between 2007 and 2010 at 87 sites in the restored reach and 14 sites in an unrestored reference reach. Discharge and sediment transport were measured at the downstream end of the restored reach. There were three flooding events during the study, two as annual flood events and a third as a greater than a 5-year flood event. Restoration has returned periodic flood flow to the riparian wetland and provides a mean sedimentation rate of 11.3 mm per year over the study period in the restored reach compared with 1.7 mm per year in an unrestored channelized reach. Sedimentation from the two annual floods was within the normal range for alluvial Coastal Plain rivers. Sediment deposits consisted of over 20% organics, similar to eastern blackwater rivers. The Kissimmee River is unique in North America for its hybrid alluvial/blackwater nature. Fluvial suspended-sediment measurements for the three flood events indicate that a majority of the sediment (70%) was sand, which is important for natural levee construction. Of the total suspended sediment load for the three flood events, 3%–16% was organic and important in floodplain deposition. Sediment yield is similar to low-gradient rivers draining to the Chesapeake Bay and alluvial rivers of the southeastern USA. Continued monitoring should determine whether observed sediment transport and floodplain deposition rates are normal for this river and determine the relationship between historic vegetation community restoration, hydroperiod restoration, and sedimentation.

  17. Sediment source areas of earthquake-triggered megaturbidites in marine or lacustrine confined basins: implications for regional paleoseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    emmanuel, Chapron; Hervé, Guyard; Flavio, Anselmetti; Giuseppe, Siani

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake triggered megaturbidites documented in different confined Mediterranean confined basins are bearing several similarities with so-called seiche deposits induced by earthquakes in several large and deep Alpine lakes. Both of these mega beds are resulting from coeval subaquatic slope failures and the propagation of violent waves developing erosive currents along shore lines and shallow water depths but also locally within deep waters. They have a similar acoustic signature (i.e. a decimetric to plurimetric transparent acoustic facies ponded in the deepest part of confined basins with a high-amplitude basal reflection) and are characterized by maximal thicknesses ranging between 0.2 and 1.6 % of the basin's water depth. While lacustrine megaturbidites are essentially resulting from the remobilization of fine-grained clastic sediments (either deltaic depot-centers or slopes loaded by sediment plumes during deglaciation) and shallow water coarser particles by waves and bottom currents; little is known about the soft-sediment source areas of megaturbidites in the Mediterranean. Based on our understanding of sedimentary process associated with seiche deposits in lakes and taking into consideration the oceanographic characteristics of the Mediterranean Sea, multiples soft-sediment source areas can be identified and a new conceptual depositional model can be proposed for the development of tsunamigenic earthquake-triggered megaturbidites.

  18. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran concentration profiles in sediment and fish tissue of the Willamette Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonn, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) are highly hydrophobic compounds that have been implicated as carcinogens and, more recently, as estrogen disrupters. An occurrence and distribution study of these compounds in the Willamette Basin, Oregon, was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Bed sediment was collected from 22 sites; fish tissue was collected from eight sites. PCDD/F were found to be ubiquitous in Willamette Basin sediment. A distinct homolog profile, dominated by octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, was observed in sediment throughout the basin. The PCDD homolog profile was consistent at all sites, regardless of total PCDD/F concentration, presence of point sources, subbasin size, geographic location or land use. Principal components analysis revealed a gradient among the homolog profiles that showed increasing dominance of highly chlorinated congeners where human and industrial activity increased. Tissue and bed sediment obtained from the same site did not have similar PCDD/F concentrations or homolog profiles. Fish tissue showed enrichment in less chlorinated congeners and congeners with chlorine substitutions in the 2, 3, 7 and 8 positions.

  19. Seafloor structure and uppermost sedimentation in the Pigafetta Basin, Magellan Seamount Chain, and East Mariana Basin of the Central-Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, N. J.; Oakley, A. J.; Lizarralde, D.; Tominaga, M.; Tivey, M.; Sager, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a marine geophysical survey of the Central-Western Pacific seafloor in 2011 aboard the R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN272). Our survey imaged some of the oldest seafloor on the planet in a region of sparse data coverage. We present new (3.5 kHz) and bathymetry data from the Mesozoic Hawaiian magnetic lineations (Jurassic Quiet Zone) and a transect from the south end of the Pigafetta Basin (PB), west across the Magellan Seamount Chain (MSC) and the East Mariana Basin (EMB) to the Mariana Trench. The Chirp system penetrates the overlying sediment cover to a depth of ~50 meters below seafloor (mbsf). The deepest part of the Chirp record is marked by a strongly reflecting horizon, which occasionally crops out at the seafloor near volcanic peaks or bathymetric highs. Correlation of these data to DSDP/ODP drill sites (801C, 802, 199, 585) enables us to compare seafloor structure and uppermost sedimentation in the Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ), Pigafetta Basin, Magellan Seamounts, and the East Mariana Basin. Within the JQZ, and at the southern end of the PB, a 30- to 50-m-thick, acoustically-transparent sediment layer uniformly overlies the strongly reflecting horizon observed at water depths ranging from 4400m-5900m. We interpret this unit to be composed of pelagic abyssal clay and radiolarian oozes ubiquitous in the central-western Pacific. The basal horizon in this region is most likely formed by a layer of chert-porcelanite. In the southeastern PB (161.3 E, 17 N), this horizon reaches the seafloor at a depth of 5650 m and the transparent sediment package is truncated. In the region of the MSC, ~115 km north of drill sites 199 and 585, Chirp data show numerous volcanic peaks and a 50-m-thick sequence of stratified reflections. Volcaniclastics likely contribute to the layering. We first observe the stratified sediment package near 156.7 E, 15 N after a gap in data coverage. The sediment layer thins to the west and onlaps the basal horizon near the base of a seamount

  20. Paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental implications of magnetofossil occurrences in late Miocene marine sediments from the Guadalquivir Basin, SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Larrasoaña, Juan C; Liu, Qingsong; Hu, Pengxiang; Roberts, Andrew P; Mata, Pilar; Civis, Jorge; Sierro, Francisco J; Pérez-Asensio, José N

    2014-01-01

    Although recent studies have revealed more widespread occurrences of magnetofossils in pre-Quaternary sediments than have been previously reported, their significance for paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental studies is not fully understood. We present a paleo- and rock-magnetic study of late Miocene marine sediments recovered from the Guadalquivir Basin (SW Spain). Well-defined paleomagnetic directions provide a robust magnetostratigraphic chronology for the two studied sediment cores. Rock magnetic results indicate the dominance of intact magnetosome chains throughout the studied sediments. These results provide a link between the highest-quality paleomagnetic directions and higher magnetofossil abundances. We interpret that bacterial magnetite formed in the surface sediment mixed layer and that these magnetic particles gave rise to a paleomagnetic signal in the same way as detrital grains. They, therefore, carry a magnetization that is essentially identical to a post-depositional remanent magnetization, which we term a bio-depositional remanent magnetization. Some studied polarity reversals record paleomagnetic directions with an apparent 60-70 kyr recording delay. Magnetofossils in these cases are interpreted to carry a biogeochemical remanent magnetization that is locked in at greater depth in the sediment column. A sharp decrease in magnetofossil abundance toward the middle of the studied boreholes coincides broadly with a major rise in sediment accumulation rates near the onset of the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), an event caused by interruption of the connection between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. This correlation appears to have resulted from dilution of magnetofossils by enhanced terrigenous inputs that were driven, in turn, by sedimentary changes triggered in the basin at the onset of the MSC. Our results highlight the importance of magnetofossils as carriers of high-quality paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental signals even in

  1. Paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental implications of magnetofossil occurrences in late Miocene marine sediments from the Guadalquivir Basin, SW Spain

    PubMed Central

    Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Liu, Qingsong; Hu, Pengxiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Mata, Pilar; Civis, Jorge; Sierro, Francisco J.; Pérez-Asensio, José N.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent studies have revealed more widespread occurrences of magnetofossils in pre-Quaternary sediments than have been previously reported, their significance for paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental studies is not fully understood. We present a paleo- and rock-magnetic study of late Miocene marine sediments recovered from the Guadalquivir Basin (SW Spain). Well-defined paleomagnetic directions provide a robust magnetostratigraphic chronology for the two studied sediment cores. Rock magnetic results indicate the dominance of intact magnetosome chains throughout the studied sediments. These results provide a link between the highest-quality paleomagnetic directions and higher magnetofossil abundances. We interpret that bacterial magnetite formed in the surface sediment mixed layer and that these magnetic particles gave rise to a paleomagnetic signal in the same way as detrital grains. They, therefore, carry a magnetization that is essentially identical to a post-depositional remanent magnetization, which we term a bio-depositional remanent magnetization. Some studied polarity reversals record paleomagnetic directions with an apparent 60–70 kyr recording delay. Magnetofossils in these cases are interpreted to carry a biogeochemical remanent magnetization that is locked in at greater depth in the sediment column. A sharp decrease in magnetofossil abundance toward the middle of the studied boreholes coincides broadly with a major rise in sediment accumulation rates near the onset of the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), an event caused by interruption of the connection between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. This correlation appears to have resulted from dilution of magnetofossils by enhanced terrigenous inputs that were driven, in turn, by sedimentary changes triggered in the basin at the onset of the MSC. Our results highlight the importance of magnetofossils as carriers of high-quality paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental signals even in

  2. Salt diffusion in interstitial waters and halite removal from sediments: Examples from the Red Sea and Illinois basins

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganathan, V. )

    1991-06-01

    Large thicknesses of bedded halite can be removed in subsiding sedimentary basins by verticla diffusion of dissolved salt in interstitial waters over geologic time scales. Calculations show that at least 10 m to 40 m of halite may have dissolved and diffused through the Red Sea sediments overlying the salt beds, since cessation of salt deposition approximatley 5.3 million years ago. The total amount of salt diffused out of the sediment column over geologic time is five to twenty times the amount of salt that currently exists in the porewater column. If upward flow in the past occurred at even small rates, 10{sup {minus}3} m/yr, the amount of halite removed could have been ten times as great, 500 m. Unlike the Red Sea Basin, no halite beds are known in the Illinois Basin in spite of the fact that interstitial waters with as much as 200{per thousand} TDS (approximately 220 g/L) occur. Calculations show that if a halite bed had been deposited at the base of the Illinois Basin in Cambrian time, it would have been completely removed from the stratigraphic record had it initially been less than 60 m to 130 m in thickness. A significant thickness of halite deposited in sedimentary basins may thus be removed during active burial of salt beds, and before exhumation and exposure of the salt beds to shallow meteoric waters.

  3. Effects of urbanization on streamflow and sediment transport in the Rock Creek and Anacostia River basins, Montgomery County, Maryland, 1962-74

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yorke, Thomas H.; Herb, William J.

    1978-01-01

    Land use, precipitation, streamflow, and sediment discharge data were collected from nine small drainage basins in Montgomery County, Maryland, to evaluate runoff and sediment response to sediment-control practices in areas undergoing urban development. Drainage basins ranged in size from 0.35 to 21.1 sq mi and land use ranged from rural to 60 percent urban. Urbanization did not affect low and medium flows, but it did result in increased storm runoff and peak flows. Suspended sediment transported from one of the basins that underwent urban development, the 21.1 sq mi Anacostia River basin, averaged 15 ,400 tons/yr between 1962 and 1974. Bedload was estimated as 5 to 11 percent of the total load. Cropland, urban land, and construction sites were the major sources of sediment. Average annual sediment yields ranged from 065 to 4.3 tons/acre for cropland, 3.7 tons/acre for urban land, and 7 to 100 tons/acre for urban construction sites. The magnitude of the yields from construction sites was significantly affected by (1) the slope of the sites, (2) the proximity of stream channels, (3) buffer zones of natural vegetation, and (4) sediment-control measures. Sediment controls, particularly those enforced under a 1971 sediment-control ordinance, apparently decreased construction-site sediment yields by 60 to 80 percent. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Sedimentation of shelf sandstones in Queen Formation, McFarland and Means fields, central basin platform of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.; Holley, C.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Queen Formation is a sequence of carbonates, evaporites, and sandstones of Permian (Guadalupian) age that is found across the subsurface of the Central Basin platform of the Permian basin. The formation is a major hydrocarbon reservoir in this region, and its primary reservoir facies are porous shelf sandstones and dolomites. Cores and well logs from McFarland and Means fields (on the northwest margin of the Central Basin platform) were examined to determine the sedimentary history of the shelf sandstones.

  5. [Analysis of ecological risk and the content situation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediments from Northeast China River Basin].

    PubMed

    Nie, Hai-Feng; Cheng, Hang-Xin; Zhao, Chuan-Dong; Liu, Ying-Han; Yang, Ke; Li, Kuo; Peng, Min; Liu, Fei

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) pollution status, sediment samples were collected from major rivers in northeast China. Contents of 41 PBDEs congeners in sediments were measured using GC-NCI-MS. BDE209 was not detected, measured level of total PBDEs (excluding BDE209) ranged from 0.91 to 17.67 ng.g-1 dry weight, the highest concentrations of PBDEs were detected in the sediment samples from upstream and downstream of Jilin City in the Second Songhua River Basin, with 15.86 and 17.67 ng.g-1. BDE207 and BDE47 were the predominant PBDE congeners, with their concentrations accounting for 86. 5% and 76. 6% of the total PBDEs concentration measured in the samples. Each congener content difference was not obvious in other river sediments. PBDEs levels monitored in the present study were compared to those reported recently for districts located at home and abroad, and with ecological risk analysis. PBDEs content is at a low level in sediments of Northeast China River Basin and there is no ecological risk. PMID:24364299

  6. Trace metal fractionation as a mean to improve on the management of contaminated sediments from runoff water in infiltration basins.

    PubMed

    Al Husseini, Amelène El-Mufleh; Béchet, Béatrice; Gaudin, Anne; Ruban, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The management of stormwater sediment is a key issue for local authorities due to the pollution load and significant tonnages. In view of reuse, for example for civil engineering, the environmental evaluation of these highly aggregated sediments requires the study of the fractionation and mobility of trace metals. The distribution of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) and their level of lability in three French stormwater sediments was determined using sequential and kinetic extractions (EDTA reagent) associated with mineralogical analysis and scanning electron microscopy observations. Using microanalysis, new data were acquired on the evolution of aggregate state during extractions, and on its significant role in the retention of trace metals. Trace metals were, in particular, observed to be very stable in small aggregates (10-50 microm). Comparison of the two extraction methods revealed that EDTA extraction was not convenient for evaluating the stable fraction of Cr, Ni and Zn. Moreover, the results were relevant for basins presenting similar sources of trace metals, whatever the physicochemical conditions in basins. The results suggest that the management of stormwater sediments could be improved by a better knowledge of metal mobility, as chemical extractions could highlight the localization of the mobile fraction of trace metals. Treatment could be therefore avoided, or specific treatment could be applied to a reduced volume of sediments. PMID:24191459

  7. Elemental composition in sediments and water in the Trancão river basin. A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, F.; Pinheiro, T.; Alves, L. C.; Valério, P.; Gaspar, F.; Alves, J.

    1998-03-01

    The Trancão river basin, located in the Lisbon area shows preoccupying pollution levels, that constitute a threat to public health and the ecological system. This work reports on the results obtained in the analysis of surface sediments (EDXRF) and water (PIXE) collected in the wet and dry season during 1996. In general, bulk sediments and water show high concentration levels for some heavy metals like Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb. The elemental contents variation of samples collected at the different sites of the river basin were large, owing apparently to pollution sources, seasonal variabilities and grain size distribution (sediments). In the dry season, effluents (industrial and domestic) showed a stronger influence on the sediment composition. High levels of As and Br were found in the water that can be attributed to extended sources like sewage sludge and fertilizers. In some locations, the metals, Ca and organic matter enrichment could be associated with a paper mill and metal processing industry (high levels of Cr). At the estuary, the decrease of metal content determined in the sampled water indicates the flocculation of dissolved organic and inorganic materials. However, no effects were found for the surface sediment metal content, probably due to a dilution with materials from the Tagus inner estuary (the largest in Portugal).

  8. Enhanced sediment delivery in a changing climate in semi-arid mountain basins: Implications for water resource management and aquatic habitat in the northern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, Jaime R.; Luce, Charles H.; Buffington, John M.

    2012-02-01

    The delivery and transport of sediment through mountain rivers affects aquatic habitat and water resource infrastructure. While climate change is widely expected to produce significant changes in hydrology and stream temperature, the effects of climate change on sediment yield have received less attention. In the northern Rocky Mountains, we expect climate change to increase sediment yield primarily through changes in temperature and hydrology that promote vegetation disturbances (i.e., wildfire, insect/pathogen outbreak, drought-related die off). Here, we synthesize existing data from central Idaho to explore (1) how sediment yields are likely to respond to climate change in semi-arid basins influenced by wildfire, (2) the potential consequences for aquatic habitat and water resource infrastructure, and (3) prospects for mitigating sediment yields in forest basins. Recent climate-driven increases in the severity and extent of wildfire suggest that basin-scale sediment yields within the next few years to decades could be greater than the long-term average rate of 146 T km - 2 year - 1 observed for central Idaho. These elevated sediment yields will likely impact downstream reservoirs, which were designed under conditions of historically lower sediment yield. Episodic erosional events (massive debris flows) that dominate post-fire sediment yields are impractical to mitigate, leaving road restoration as the most viable management opportunity for offsetting climate-related increases in sediment yield. However, short-term sediment yields from experimental basins with roads are three orders of magnitude smaller than those from individual fire-related events (on the order of 10 1 T km - 2 year - 1 compared to 10 4 T km - 2 year - 1 , respectively, for similar contributing areas), suggesting that road restoration would provide a relatively minor reduction in sediment loads at the basin-scale. Nevertheless, the ecologically damaging effects of fine sediment (material < 6 mm

  9. Asymmetric geometry of a half-graben basin as indicated by sediment character: An example from the Diligencia Basin, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, C.M.; Law, R.D.; Eriksson, K.A. . Dept. of Geological Science)

    1992-01-01

    Sedimentation on the northern side of the basin is characterized by the development of a large scale apron of coallesced alluvial fan deposits. The northern part of the apron is composed of gently dipping, matrix supported, oligomictic granite boulder breccias. Traced southwards, these deposits appear to pass into well-rounded clast-supported cobble-boulder conglomerates containing lensoidal sandbodies as well as examples of clast alignment and imbrication. In contrast, on the southern margin of the Diligencia Basin the steeply dipping Diligencia Formation is composed of fluvial cross-bedded sandstones with minor pebble-cobble conglomerates. The deposits exhibit a notable along-strike grain size variation. The very coarse nature of the sediments on the northern margin indicates deposition along an extremely steep elevation gradient. Some of the blocks may measure tens to hundreds of meters in dimension and represent catastrophic gravity glide events. On the southern side of the basin, although much of the fans have been removed by subsequent erosion, the coarsest deposits are debris flow deposits which must represent a relatively proximal position on the fan. The contrasting character of the lower units of the Diligencia Formation suggests the primary geometric asymmetry of a developing, half-graben basin. The high-gradient deposits in the north are interpreted to represent deposition along the escarpment of a basinward-dipping detachment fault system, whereas the finer sediments of the southern margin must represent low-gradient alluvial fans forming on the gently sloping hanging wall of the half-graben.

  10. Global Sea-level Changes Revealed in the Sediments of the Canterbury Basin, New Zealand: IODP Expedition 317

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, C. M.; Fulthorpe, C.; Blum, P.; Rios, J.; Chow, Y.; Mishkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Continental margins are composed of thick sedimentary sections that preserve the record of local processes modulated by global sea-level (eustatic) changes and climate. Understanding this regional variability permits us to extract the eustatic record. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 317 drilled four sites in the offshore Canterbury Basin, eastern South Island of New Zealand, in water depths of 85 m to 320 m. One of the objectives of the expedition was to understand the influence of eustasy on continental margins sedimentation and to test the concepts of sequence stratigraphy. A high-resolution multiproxy approach that involves geochemical elemental analyses, lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy is applied to understand the margin's sedimentation for the past ~5 million years. Multichannel seismic data (EW00-01 survey) provide a seismic sequence stratigraphic framework against which to interpret the multiproxy data. The mid- to late Pleistocene sedimentation is characterized by variable lithologies and changing facies. However, elemental compositions and facies follow predictable patterns within seismic sequences. Oxygen isotope measurements for the latest Pleistocene indicate that 100 ky Milankovich astronomical forcing controlled this variability. In contrast, Pliocene and early Pleistocene sediments are composed of repetitive siliciclastic and carbonate mud lithologies with less facies variability. Results of our analyses suggest that repetitive alternations of green and gray mud were deposited during warmer and cooler periods, respectively. Oxygen isotopes suggest that this cyclicity may reflect 40 ky Milankovich forcing. Ocean Drilling Program Legs 150 and 174A drilled on the New Jersey continental margin with similar objectives to those of Expedition 317. Results from this northern and southern hemisphere drilling reveal that eustasy, controlled by Milankovich forcing, strongly influences margin sedimentation and the formation of basin

  11. Zinc mobility in an infiltration basin (Lyon city, France): constraints from Zn stable isotope ratios in the plant and sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queyron, M.; Aucour, A.-M.; Pichat, S.; Saulais, M.; Bedell, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Infiltration basins are stormwater management techniques that are widely used. The settling of stormwater particles leads to a contaminated sediment layer. Wild plants can colonize these basins. They can play a role on the fate of heavy metals either directly by uptake or indirectly by modifying the forms of the metal in the sediment. Plant interactions with metals depend on a large number of factors, including the type of metal, the plant species and plant's growth stage. Moreover, during the dormant period of each year, the shoots die back. The resulting dead matter is returned to the basin substrate where it gradually decomposes through a combination of leaching and biological action that implicates a complete cycle for metal mobility. In order to model the metal cycle in the system, we consider the plant root, aerial part, litter deposits, sediments as the main Zn pools. The aim of this study is to assess the Zn mobility between these pools. The Zn concentration and isotope ratios were analyzed in the different Zn pools for two dominant species of the studied infiltration basin (Phalaris arundinaceae, Typha latifolia) and for a complete biological cycle from spring to winter. Zn stable isotopes are expected to fractionate with plant uptake and translocation and thus can help to assess the effect of the plant biochemical processes on Zn mobility. Whilst the sediments (1100-1400 ppm Zn DW) and litter (600 ppm) are highly concentrated in Zn, the plant aerial parts (100-250 ppm) are less concentrated than the roots (200-400 ppm). The ^66Zn significantly differ between the sediment (0.15 to 0.19‰) and aerial parts of the plants (-0.03 to -0.08‰) hence confirming the occurrence of depletion in heavy isotopes with plant uptake and translocation to shoot. The ^66Zn of roots fall close to the sediment. The roots show a small depletion in heavy isotopes between mid-summer (0.18‰) and winter (0.27‰). This observation and the fact that the litter is enriched in

  12. Reconnaissance of pharmaceuticals and wastewater indicators in streambed sediments of the lower Columbia River basin, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, Elena; Furlong, Edward T.; Rosenbauer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    One by-product of advances in modern chemistry is the accumulation of synthetic chemicals in the natural environment. These compounds include contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), some of which are endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) that can have detrimental reproductive effects. The role of sediments in accumulating these types of chemicals and acting as a source of exposure for aquatic organisms is not well understood. Here we present a small-scale reconnaissance of CECs in bed sediments of the lower Columbia River and several tributaries and urban streams. Surficial bed sediment samples were collected from the Columbia River, the Willamette River, the Tualatin River, and several small urban creeks in Oregon. Thirty-nine compounds were detected at concentrations ranging from 1,000 ng [g sediment]-1 dry weight basis. Columbia River mainstem, suggesting a higher risk of exposure to aquatic life in lower order streams. Ten known or suspected EDCs were detected during the study. At least one EDC was detected at 21 of 23 sites sampled; several EDCs were detected in sediment from most sites. This study is the first to document the occurrence of a large suite of CECs in the sediments of the Columbia River basin. A better understanding of the role of sediment in the fate and effects of emerging contaminants is needed.

  13. Stratigraphic architecture, bedload extraction, and mass balance of Holocene fluvial sediments in a tectonically subsiding basin within the Ganges-Brahmaputra River delta, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sincavage, R.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Pickering, J.; Wilson, C.; Paola, C.; Hossain, S.; Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Brahmaputra River occupied the tectonically active Sylhet Basin in eastern Bangladesh three times during the Holocene. With samples from more than 200 closely-spaced (3-5 km) boreholes, we take advantage of these discrete channel occupations and the high trapping efficiency of the subsiding basin to investigate dispersal of fluvial sediments. Experiment and theory suggest that depositional units transition from channels to lobes as transported sediment mass declines below ~30% of the total measured at the basin head. We test these ideas by reconstructing the geometry and grain size distributions of a large (30 m thick x 80 km wide) sand lobe formed during the mid-Holocene occupation (~7000-4000 years BP) of Sylhet Basin. Based on estimates of modern sediment discharge in the system, the volume of this sediment lobe is insufficient to account for the entire sediment budget. The smaller sediment volume is likely a consequence of reduced sediment discharge during a weakened monsoon. Additional sediment is likely to have also been routed out of the basin via an outlet located approximately along the modern Meghna River channel. Facies within Sylhet Basin can be characterized as stacked braidbelt sands in the proximal portion of the system, with isolated sand lenses further downstream, indicating a transition from a highly mobile braidbelt to a less mobile distributary system. The majority of bed load is extracted within a distance of ~150 km from the avulsion node, approximately coincident with the regional backwater reach of the Bengal Basin, suggesting a link between the hydraulic and "morphodynamic" backwater reaches of the system. Downstream fining is more rapid in sediments associated with the long-term occupation of Sylhet Basin, for which sediment is trapped over a relatively short distance within the sand wedge of central Sylhet Basin, than those from the early- and late-Holocene occupations, for which sediment is distributed over a longer path that follows

  14. Large Sanjiang basin groups outside of the Songliao Basin Meso-Senozoic Tectonic-sediment evolution and hydrocarbon accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The basis geological problem is still the bottleneck of the exploration work of the lager Sanjiang basin groups. In general terms, the problems are including the prototype basins and basin forming mechanism of two aspects. In this paper, using the field geological survey and investigation, logging data analysis, seismic data interpretation technical means large Sanjiang basin groups and basin forming mechanism of the prototype are discussed. Main draw the following conclusions: 1. Sanjiang region group-level formation can be completely contrasted. 2. Tension faults, compressive faults, shear structure composition and structure combination of four kinds of compound fracture are mainly developed In the study area. The direction of their distribution can be divided into SN, EW, NNE, NEE, NNW, NWW to other groups of fracture. 3. Large Sanjiang basin has the SN and the EW two main directions of tectonic evolution. Cenozoic basins in Sanjiang region in group formation located the two tectonic domains of ancient Paleo-Asian Ocean and the Pacific Interchange. 4. Large Sanjiang basin has experienced in the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of two-stage and nine times. The first stage, developmental stage basement, they are ① Since the Mesozoic era and before the Jurassic; ② Early Jurassic period; The second stage, cap stage of development, they are ③ Late Jurassic depression developmental stages of compression; ④ Early Cretaceous rifting stage; ⑤ depression in mid-Early Cretaceous period; ⑥ tensile Early Cretaceous rifting stage; ⑦ inversion of Late Cretaceous tectonic compression stage; ⑧ Paleogene - Neogene; ⑨ After recently Ji Baoquan Sedimentary Ridge. 5. Large Sanjiang basin group is actually a residual basin structure, and Can be divided into left - superimposed (Founder, Tangyuan depression, Hulin Basin), residual - inherited type (Sanjiang basin), residual - reformed (Jixi, Boli, Hegang basin). there are two developed depression and the mechanism

  15. Sea-level responses to erosion and deposition of sediment in the Indus River basin and the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Ken L.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Giosan, Liviu; Clift, Peter D.

    2015-04-01

    Changes in sea level are of wide interest because they shape the sedimentary geologic record, modulate flood-related hazards, and reflect Earth's climate. One driver of sea-level change is the erosion and deposition of sediment, which induces changes in sea level by perturbing Earth's crust, gravity field, and rotation axis. Here we use a gravitationally self-consistent global model to explore how sediment erosion and deposition affected sea level during the most recent glacial-interglacial cycle in the northeastern Arabian Sea and the Indus River basin, where fluvial sediment fluxes are among the highest on Earth. We drive the model with a widely used reconstruction of ice mass variations over the last glacial cycle and a sediment loading history that we constructed from published erosion and deposition rate measurements. Our modeling suggests that sediment fluxes from the Indus River are large enough to produce meter-scale changes in sea level near the Indus delta in as little as a few thousand years. These sea-level perturbations are largest closest to the center of the Indus delta, and they grow larger over time as sediment deposition increases. This implies that the elevation of sea-level markers near the Indus delta will be significantly altered by sediment transfer over millennial timescales, and that such deformation should be accounted for in studies that use paleo-sea-level markers to infer past ice sheet volume or explore local processes such as sediment compaction. Our analysis highlights the role that massive fluvial sediment fluxes play in driving sea-level changes over >1000-yr timescales from the Indus River, and, by implication, from other rivers with large sediment fluxes.

  16. Paleo-basin hydrology and sediment transport in the Pisco Valley, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    bekaddour, toufik; schlunegger, fritz

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative data on sediment transport and climatic changes allow the understanding of alluvial river processes such as aggradation, degradation, vertical and lateral incision and valley widening. Here, we focus on the ca. 4.5*103 km^2-large Pisco drainage basin on the western Pacific side of the Andes, central Peru, which is currently a desert with precipitation rates decreasing form 800 mm/yr on the Altiplano, to 10 mm/yr at the coast. While higher precipitation rates than at present have been inferred from lake level highstands on the Altiplano between 48 and 36 Ka PB (Minchin period), no quantitative estimates about water budgets for that time have been presented so far. Here we use the stratigraphic archives from the Pisco Valley and explore relationships between: (i) the particle size of bedload and the shear stress conditions needed for their entrainment, and (ii) the basin hydrology and channel adjustment for the present time and the Minchin pluvial period between 48 to 36 ka BP when sediment aggradation resulting in the build-up of ca. 50 km-thick terrace sequences. We find that the bedload material is generally more coarse-grained in the terrace deposits than in modern longitudinal bars. In particular, grain size measurements reveal that the mean D50 and D84 of the modern deposits are about 100 and 170 mm, respectively. Meanwhile the mean D50 and D84 inferred from measurements of the terrace deposits are ca. 150 and 310 mm. Our results reveal that the current mean annual discharge Q=60 m^3/s of the Pisco River is just refreshing the flat middle reaches and transporting the coarse particles in the steep higher reaches at near critical threshold. On the other hand, the hydraulic analyses based on the D50 of the Pisco River reveal that a critical discharge of Q=300 m^3/s is required to transport the D84 along the entire channel, and a discharge of this magnitude could rearrange the entire channel morphology except for the downstream reaches where the coarse

  17. Erosion in the Western Alps (Dora Baltea basin). 1. Quantifying sediment provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Giovanni; Garzanti, Eduardo; Monguzzi, Stefano

    2004-10-01

    Sourced in the M. Bianco, the highest mountain of the Alps, the Dora Baltea River cuts across the arc of the Western Alps, drains all major Alpine tectonic units from the Helvetic domain to the South alpine domain, and finally joins the Po River. Petrographic composition of clastic detritus carried by the Dora Baltea River and its tributaries faithfully mirrors the complex geology of the Western Alps. High-resolution modal analysis of Dora Baltea sands allowed us to distinguish seven end-member metamorphoclastic provenances. River sands from the M. Bianco External Massif are dominated by quartz, feldspars, and hornblende. Detritus from basement and cover rocks of the Briançonnais zone includes low-grade metasedimentary lithic fragments, epidote, chloritoid, and garnet. Sands from the Internal Penninic Massifs include quartz and subordinate feldspars, garnet, and epidote. Abundant metabasite and serpentine-schist lithic grains, along with epidote, actinolite, and few pyroxenes, characterize detritus from the calcschists and meta-ophiolites of the oceanic Piemonte zone. Sands from the Austroalpine zone include quartz, abundant metamorphic lithic fragments, garnet, and locally significant sillimanite (Dent Blanche kinzigites). The relative contribution of each end member to the Dora Baltea sediment flux was assessed with forward modelling of end-member mixing. Our estimates, calculated from the entire petrographic and mineralogical data set, indicate that the main sources of bed load in the Dora Baltea mountain basin are the granitoid to gneissic rocks exposed in the M. Bianco Massif and in the Austroalpine zone. In order to make allowance for the contribution of a particular bedrock constituent in a compound source area to the derivative sand, the original concept of sand generation index (SGI) was modified to assess the relative contribution of the seven end-member sources of detritus. The highest total-basin SGI indices are calculated for the M. Bianco Massif (SGI

  18. An Integrated Geochemical and Facies Analysis of Paleogene Aged Fluvio-Lacustrine Sediments in the Petrockstow and Bovey Basins, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaanda, Mohammed S.; Jerrett, Rhodri; Grimes, Stephen T.; Price, Gregory D.; Anderson, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The Petrockstow and Bovey basins are two similar pull apart (strike slip) basins belonging to the Sticklepath - Lustleigh Fault Zone (SLFZ) in Devon, SW England. The SLFZ is one of the several faults on the Cornubian Peninsula and may be linked to Variscan structures rejuvenated in Palaeogene times. The bulk of the basins' fill consists of clays, silts, lignites and sands of Palaeogene age, comparable to the Lough Neagh Basin (Northern Ireland), which is also thought to be part of the SLFZ. The greater part of the British Isles was a land area throughout the Palaeogene. The basin-fills therefore, provide rare, potentially expanded sections through the Palaeocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), and the Eocene-Oligocene (Oi-1) cooling event in the U.K. Facies analysis has been undertaken on sediments of the Petrockstow and Bovey basins in order to provide a tectonic and palaeoenvironmental context for palaeoclimate reconstructions using palynology, organic geochemistry Methylation Branched Tetraethers/Cyclisation Branched Tetraethers and carbon isotope analyses which have identified the Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) associated with the PETM. The following lithofacies types from two boreholes from the Petrockstow Basin (boreholes 1A and 1B) and from outcrop exposed in the Bovey Basin. The lithofacies identified are (a): Silty clay; (b): Red mottled and sideritic clay; (c): laminated silty clay; (d): Minor sand and gravel; (e): Major coarse sand and granules and (f): Lignite. Our new facies model involves: firstly Sand filled fluvial channels, secondly a lake with ready supply of organic debris, and thirdly a lake prone to drying-out. The abrupt transition from sand filled fluvial channels to Lake Facies is coincident with the recognition of the CIE. The possible effect of the Oi-1 glaciation may be linked to the third phase of a lake prone to drying-out facies which is ambiguous in the Bovey Basin. Repeated sub aerial exposure suggests that the lakes present in both

  19. A review of tectonics and sedimentation in a forearc setting: Hellenic Thrace Basin, North Aegean Sea and Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelis, A. G.; Boutelier, D.; Catuneanu, O.; Seymour, K. St.; Zelilidis, A.

    2016-04-01

    Exposure of the forearc region of the North Aegean Sea, Greece, offers insight into evolving convergent margins. The sedimentary fill of the Thrace Basin during the Late Eocene to Oligocene time provides a record of subduction-driven processes, such as growth of magmatic arcs and construction of accretionary complexes. This large sediment repository received sediment from two sources. The southern (outboard) basin margin reflects the active influence of the exhumed accretionary prism (e.g. Pindic Cordillera or Biga peninsula), while the northern (inboard) margin records the effect of the magmatic arc in the Rhodope region. The forearc basin sedimentary fills shoal upward into shallow-marine strata but are dominated mainly by deep-marine facies. The depositional trend and stacking pattern are dominated by progradational patterns. This trend, which is observed in both basin margins, is related to tectonic deformation rather than sea-level fluctuations. Additional evidence for this tectonic uplift comes from the backstripping analysis. The accretionary complex provided material into the forearc basin. This material was transported northeast and formed a sand-rich turbidity system that evolved upslope into shallow-marine deposits. Stratigraphic data indicate that this turbidity system exhibits a successive landward (inboard) migration of the depocenter. Provenance data utilizing sandstone petrography, conglomerate clast composition, and bulk-rock geochemistry suggest that this system reflects an increased influx of mafic material into the basin. Volcanic arc-derived material was transported south and east and accumulated in deep-marine settings. Both stratigraphic and provenance data indicate a seaward (outboard) migration of the basin depocenter and a significant increase in felsic detritus into the forearc.

  20. Crustal fluid and ash alteration impacts on the biosphere of Shikoku Basin sediments, Nankai Trough, Japan.

    PubMed

    Torres, M E; Cox, T; Hong, W-L; McManus, J; Sample, J C; Destrigneville, C; Gan, H M; Gan, H Y; Moreau, J W

    2015-11-01

    We present data from sediment cores collected from IODP Site C0012 in the Shikoku Basin. Our site lies at the Nankai Trough, just prior to subduction of the 19 Ma Philippine Sea plate. Our data indicate that the sedimentary package is undergoing multiple routes of electron transport and that these differing pathways for oxidant supply generate a complex array of metabolic routes and microbial communities involved in carbon cycling. Numerical simulations matched to pore water data document that Ca(2+) and Cl(1-) are largely supplied via diffusion from a high-salinity (44.5 psu) basement fluid, which supports the presence of halophile Archean communities within the deep sedimentary package that are not observed in shallow sediments. Sulfate supply from basement supports anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at a rate of ~0.2 pmol cm(-3) day(-1) at ~400 mbsf. We also note the disappearance of δ-Proteobacteria at 434 mbsf, coincident with the maximum in methane concentration, and their reappearance at 463 mbsf, coinciding with the observed deeper increase in sulfate concentration toward the basement. We did not, however, find ANME representatives in any of the samples analyzed (from 340 to 463 mbsf). The lack of ANME may be due to an overshadowing effect from the more dominant archaeal phylotypes or may indicate involvement of unknown groups of archaea in AOM (i.e., unclassified Euryarchaeota). In addition to the supply of sulfate from a basement aquifer, the deep biosphere at this site is also influenced by an elevated supply of reactive iron (up to 143 μmol g(-1)) and manganese (up to 20 μmol g(-1)). The effect of these metal oxides on the sulfur cycle is inferred from an accompanying sulfur isotope fractionation much smaller than expected from traditional sulfate-reducing pathways. The detection of the manganese- and iron-reducer γ-Proteobacteria Alteromonas at 367 mbsf is consistent with these geochemical inferences. PMID:26081483

  1. The record of India-Asia collision preserved in Tethyan ocean basin sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, Yani; Jenks, Dan; Godin, Laurent; Boudagher-Fadel, Marcelle; Bown, Paul; Horstwood, Matt; Garzanti, Eduardo; Bracialli, Laura; Millar, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The timing of India-Asia collision is critical to the understanding of crustal deformation processes, since, for example, it impacts on calculations regarding the amount of convergence that needs to be accommodated by various mechanisms. In this research we use sediments originally deposited in the Tethyan ocean basin and now preserved in the Himalayan orogeny to constrain the timing of collision. In the NW Himalaya, a number of workers have proposed a ca 55-50 Ma age for collision along the Indus suture zone which separates India from the Kohistan-Ladakh Intraoceanic Island arc (KLA) to the north. This is based on a number of factors including the age of youngest marine sediments in the Indus suture (e.g. Green et al. 2008), age of eclogites indicative of onset of Indian continental subduction (e.g. de Sigoyer et al. 2000), and first evidence of detritus from north of the suture zone deposited on the Indian plate (e.g. Clift et al. 2002). Such evidence can be interpreted as documenting the age of India-Asia collision if one takes the KLA to have collided with the Asian plate prior to its collision with India (e.g. Petterson 2010 and refs therein). However, an increasing number of workers propose that the KLA collided with Asia subsequent to its earlier collision with India, dated variously at 85 Ma (Chatterjee et al. 2013), 61 Ma (Khan et al. 2009) and 50 Ma (Bouilhol et al. 2013). This, plus the questioning of earlier provenance work (Clift et al. 2002) regarding the validity of their data for constraining timing of earliest arrival of material north of the suture deposited on the Indian plate (Henderson et al. 2011) suggests that the time is right for a reappraisal of this topic. We use a provenance-based approach here, using combined U-Pb and Hf on detrital zircons from Tethyan ocean basin sediments, along with petrography and biostratigraphy, to identify first arrival of material from north of the Indian plate to arrive on the Indian continent, to constrain

  2. Suspended sediment dynamics in a large drainage basin: the River Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselman, Nathalie E. M.

    1999-07-01

    The behaviour of suspended sediment in rivers is often a function of energy conditions, i.e. sediment is stored at low flow and transported under high discharge conditions. The timing of maximum sediment transport can, however, also be related to mixing and routing of water and sediment from different sources. In this study suspended sediment transport was studied in the River Rhine between Kaub and the German-Dutch border. As concentrations decrease over a runoff season and as the relationship between water discharge and suspended sediment concentrations during most floods is characterized by clockwise hysteresis, it is concluded that sediment depletion occurs during a hydrological year and during individual floods. However, analyses of the sediment contribution from the River Mosel indicate that clockwise hysteresis may result from sediment depletion as well as from early sediment supply from a tributary. Thus, although the suspended sediment behaviour in the downstream part of the River Rhine is partly a transport phenomenon related to energy conditions, mixing and routing of water from different sources also plays an important role.Suspended sediment transport during floods was modelled using a supply-based model. Addition of a sediment supply term to the sediment rating curve leads to a model that produces better estimates of instantaneous suspended sediment concentrations during high discharge events. A major constriction of the model is that it cannot be used to predict suspended sediment concentrations as long as the amount of sediment in storage and the timing of sediment supply are unknown.

  3. Sub-MIlankovitch millennial and decadal cyclicity in Middle Eocene deep-marine laminated sediments, Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotchman, J. I.; Pickering, K. T.; Robinson, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    James I. Scotchman1, Kevin T. Pickering1 & Stuart A. Robinson1 1Department of Earth Sciences, UCL (University College London), Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, U.K. Climate variability on the scale of millennia has become conspicuous within Quaternary records with far fewer such records existing within the pre-Pleistocene geological record. We identify millennial and decadal cyclicity in deep-marine siliciclastic (turbiditic and hemipelagic) sediments from a core in the middle Eocene Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees. Outcrop spectral gamma-ray data from laterally adjacent and age-equivalent strata to the core, together with a re-analysis of bioturbation data from the core, identifies the three main Milankovitch orbital periods. From this data, we derive a robust sediment accumulation rate for these sediments of 27.5 cm/kyr. Spectral analysis of data from high-resolution multi-element XRF scanning of a ~10 m-thick stratigraphic interval of fine-grained laminated sediments reveals the presence of various high-frequency cycles mainly above the 99% confidence level. Applying our derived sediment accumulation rate yields sub-Milankovitch millennial-scale cycles (~5,400, ~2,800, and ~1,000 yr) and decadal (~90, ~50, and ~30 yr) cycles split between allogenic and authigenic deposition. These cycles are manifest in the core as grain-size variations. The ~5,400 and ~2,800 yr cycles, recorded by elemental (Al, K, Ca and Fe) and element/Al ratios (Si/Al, Ca/Al and Zr/Al) are interpreted as representing climatically-driven variation in sediment supply to the deep-marine Ainsa basin. Higher-frequency decadal cycles are coincident with well-known Gleissberg solar cycles or possible multiples of the 11-year Schwabe cycle although how these cycles are expressed within these sediments remains unclear.

  4. Organochlorine compounds in bed sediment and fish tissue in the South Platte River Basin, USA, 1992-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tate, C.M.; Heiny, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were collected in the South Platte River Basin to determine the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds in the basin. During August-November 1992 and August 1993, bed sediment (23 sites) and fish tissue (subset of 19 sites) were sampled and analyzed for 32 organochlorine compounds in bed sediment and 27 compounds in fish tissue. More types of organochlorine compounds were detected in fish tissue than in bed sediment. Total DDT, p,p???-DDE, o,p???-DDE, p,p???-DDD, total PCS, Dacthal??, dieldrin, cis-chlordane, cis-nonachlor, trans-nonachlor, and p,p???-DDT were detected in fish tissue at >25% of the sites; p,p???-DDE, total DDT, cis-chlordane, and trans-chlordane were detected in bed sediment at >25% of the sites. Organochlorine concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue were related to land-use settings. Few organochlorine compounds were detected at minimally impacted sites located in rangeland, forest, and built-up land-use settings. Chlordane-related compounds and p,p???-methoxychlor in bed sediment and fish tissue, endrin in fish tissue, and endosulfan I in bed sediment were associated with urban and mixed (urban and agricultural) sites. Dacthal?? in bed sediment and fish tissue was associated with agricultural sites. The compounds HCB, ??-HCH, PCA, and toxaphene were detected only at mixed land-use sites. Although DDT and DDT-metabolites, dieldrin, and total PCB were detected in urban, mixed, and agricultural land-use settings, highest mean concentrations were detected at mixed land-use sites. Mixed land-use sites had the greatest number of organochlorine compounds detected in fish tissue, whereas urban and mixed sites had the greatest number of organochlorine compounds detected in bed sediment. Measuring concentrations of organochlorine compounds in bed sediment and fish tissue at the same site offers a more complete picture of the persistence of organochlorine compounds in the environment and their

  5. Direct measurements of bed sediment entrainment and basal stress from the headwaters of a natural debris-flow basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, S. W.; Kean, J. W.; Coe, J. A.; Tucker, G. E.; Staley, D. M.; Wasklewicz, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    When mixtures of soil, rock and water flow down slope as a debris flow they can entrain and transport large amounts of bed sediment and erode underlying bedrock. Although sediment entrainment and bedrock scour by debris flows are commonplace in steep terrain, there are few measurements to constrain key terms in event-scale debris-flow routing models or longer-term landscape evolution models that include the effects of bedrock erosion by debris-flows. Particularly conspicuous are the lack of bed sediment entrainment measurements and measurements of the evolving stress state at the flow-bedrock interface as the shielding layer of sediment is removed and sediment entrainment gives way to bedrock erosion. Here we present data from the headwaters of a debris-flow basin at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, where we directly measured entrainment of channel sediment and the evolving stress state at the bedrock interface during three debris-flow events. We made these measurements through the combined the use of a novel sediment entrainment sensor and a force plate with more commonly used video imagery and instrumentation, to measure pore-fluid pressure, flow stage, soil moisture, and rainfall during the three debris-flow events. We extended these at-a-point process measurements to evaluate the reach-scale response using pre- and post-event terrestrial laser scans. During the three separate debris-flow events approximately 1.1 m, 0.5 m, and 0.4 m of unconsolidated bed sediment were entrained. Following entrainment of the sediment, bedrock was scoured by flows that ranged from water-poor coarse-grained surge fronts to water-rich turbulent flows with vigorous bedload transport. In all cases, entrainment of bed sediment was progressive, rather than by a single en masse failure of the sediment at the sediment-bedrock interface. The measured rates were dependent on bed sediment water content. When the bed sediment was unsaturated, entrainment was relatively slow, generally taking several

  6. Multiple evidence for methylotrophic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway in hypersaline sediments from the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Guang-Chao; Elling, Felix J.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Samarkin, Vladimir; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Among the most extreme habitats on Earth, dark, deep, anoxic brines host unique microbial ecosystems that remain largely unexplored. As the terminal step of anaerobic degradation of organic matter, methanogenesis is a potentially significant but poorly constrained process in deep-sea hypersaline environments. We combined biogeochemical and phylogenetic analyses with incubation experiments to unravel the origin of methane in the hypersaline sediments of Orca Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial concentrations of methane, up to 3.4 mM, coexisted with high concentrations of sulfate from 16 to 43 mM in two sediment cores retrieved from the northern and southern parts of Orca Basin. The strong depletion of 13C in methane (-77‰ to -89‰) points towards a biological source. While low concentrations of competitive substrates limited the significance of hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, the presence of non-competitive methylated substrates (methanol, trimethylamine, dimethyl sulfide, dimethylsulfoniopropionate) supported the potential for methane generation through methylotrophic methanogenesis. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were unlikely to occur under in situ conditions, while methylotrophic methanogenesis from a variety of substrates was highly favorable. Likewise, carbon isotope relationships between methylated substrates and methane suggested methylotrophic methanogenesis was the major source of methane. Stable and radio-isotope tracer experiments with 13C-labeled bicarbonate, acetate and methanol and 14C-labeled methylamine indicated that methylotrophic methanogenesis was the predominant methanogenic pathway. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, halophilic methylotrophic methanogens related to the genus Methanohalophilus dominated the benthic archaeal community in the northern basin and also occurred in the southern basin. High abundances of methanogen lipid biomarkers such as

  7. An evaluation of selenium concentrations in water, sediment, invertebrates, and fish from the Republican River Basin: 1997-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Walther, M.J.; Petty, J.D.; Fairchild, J.F.; Lucero, J.; Delvaux, M.; Manring, J.; Armbruster, M.; Hartman, D.

    2001-01-01

    The Republican River Basin of Colorado, Nebraska, and Kansas lies in a valley which contains Pierre Shale as part of its geological substrata. Selenium is an indigenous constituent in the shale and is readily leached into surrounding groundwater. The Basin is heavily irrigated through the pumping of groundwater, some of which is selenium-contaminated, onto fields in agricultural production. Water, sediment, benthic invertebrates, and/or fish were collected from 46 sites in the Basin and were analyzed for selenium to determine the potential for food-chain bioaccumulation, dietary toxicity, and reproductive effects of selenium in biota. Resulting selenium concentrations were compared to published guidelines or biological effects thresholds. Water from 38% of the sites (n = 18) contained selenium concentrations exceeding 5 ??g L-1, which is reported to be a high hazard for selenium accumulation into the planktonic food chain. An additional 12 sites (26% of the sites) contained selenium in water between 3-5 ??g L-1, constituting a moderate hazard. Selenium concentrations in sediment indicated little to no hazard for selenium accumulation from sediments into the benthic food chain. Ninety-five percent of benthic invertebrates collected exhibited selenium concentrations exceeding 3 ??g g-1, a level reported as potentially lethal to fish and birds that consume them. Seventy-five percent of fish collected in 1997, 90% in 1998, and 64% in 1999 exceeded 4 ??g g-1 selenium, indicating a high potential for toxicity and reproductive effects. However, examination of weight profiles of various species of collected individual fish suggested successful recruitment in spite of selenium concentrations that exceeded published biological effects thresholds for health and reproductive success. This finding suggested that universal application of published guidelines for selenium may be inappropriate or at least may need refinement for systems similar to the Republican River Basin

  8. Mismatch between sediment metal distribution and pollution source gradient: a case study of a small-size drainage basin (Southeastern Brazil).

    PubMed

    Molisani, Mauricio Mussi; Noronha, Frederico Ricardo C; Schultz, Mario Sergio; de Rezende, Carlos Eduardo; de Almeida, Marcelo Gomes; Silveira, Carla Semiramis

    2015-06-01

    Metal contamination in aquatic environments may occur when the anthropogenic emission exceeds the natural contribution although other factors might influence the metal distribution. In the small-size Macaé river basin, most of the metal emission was originated from anthropogenic sources suggesting a contamination status. Total and exchangeable metal concentrations were determined in sediments from the pristine upstream to the urban estuary and compared to the metal content in rocks to establish contamination and background concentrations. The enrichment of Pb in sediments compared to the regional background and high exchangeable concentrations suggest the influence of anthropogenic sources on Pb distribution. Al, Fe Mn, Zn, Ba, Cu, Cr, Ni concentrations in sediments were similar to the rock content and the values were considered regional background. Spatial distribution did not follow the whole-basin emission source gradient suggesting that despite actual anthropogenic sources, the sediment mineralogy and basin geomorphology might influence the sediment metal distribution. PMID:25792107

  9. SeamountFlux: Pore water geochemistry and sediment characteristics (Guatemala Basin, East Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Poonchai, W.; Schmidt-Schierhorn, F.; Villinger, H. W.

    2011-12-01

    The scientific goal of the project "SeamountFlux" is to study a process, which can possibly contribute significantly to large scale cooling of the oceanic crust. The focus of the study is to investigate the exchange of matter and energy between the ocean and the upper young oceanic crust in the vicinity of unexplained circular depressions in the sedimentary cover, which are widely spread in the equatorial Pacific. A possible model for the formation of these so-called "hydrothermal pits" is the dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals by upward flowing warm fluids, which are under-saturated in CaCO3. Seamounts are suspected to act as an entrance point for cold seawater, which then equilibrates with the basaltic oceanic crust prior to exiting through the pits. Such a process should affect the thermal structure in and around the pits as well as the geochemistry of the pore water. During cruise SO207 (June/July 2010 on the German RV Sonne) in the vicinity of ODP/IODP Site 1256 and ODP site 844 (Guatemala Basin, eastern equatorial Pacific) we collected 24 gravity cores varying in length between 3.3 m and 10.6 m from 3 distinct working areas. The cores were generally taken along a transect, starting in the center of a pit, across the pit slope to the surrounding seafloor. From these cores a total of 451 pore water samples were collected and analyzed onboard (pH, Eh, Fe, NH4 and alkalinity), as well as in the laboratory (Cl, SO4, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Sr and Mn). First results do not show any obvious evidence for the "hydrothermal" hypotheses. Pore water profiles were more or less identical, whether collected from within or from outside a pit. Chloride, SO4, Na, Mg, K, Ca, and Sr concentrations were identical to those in seawater. Particularly higher Ca and Sr concentrations were to be expected if calcium carbonate dissolution took place within the sediments. With respect to sediment composition and physico-chemical conditions in the pore waters, we observed larger

  10. Modeling the Responses of Water and Sediment Discharge to Climate Change in the Upper Yellow River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Xie, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Yellow River flows through nine provinces and provides water for 30% of China's population. It is the largest sandy river in the world and its annual transport capacity is about 1.6 billion tons. Water availability and soil erosion in this basin have continuously obtained great concern. The upper Yellow River basin (UYRB) above the Tangnaihai hydrological station contributes over one-third water discharge to the entire Yellow River basin. This contribution and hydrological regime may have been substantially altered over the past decades due to climate change and human activities. Understanding the streamflow regime and sediment transport in the UYRB, especially in the context of climate change, is crucial for sustainable water resource management and soil-water conservation. In this study, we attempt to quantify the responses of water and sediment discharge to climate change in the UYRB. We employed a distributed hydrological model, i.e., the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), to simulate the runoff and sediment load under different scenarios, including climate change and detrended climate conditions. To predict the future trend, we designed scenarios with Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3) down scaled forcing data. The results indicate that the SWAT model successfully reproduced the historical patterns of water and sediment dischargewith calibration and validation. As a response to the decreased precipitation and increased temperature during 1966-2009, annual runoff and sediment load have significantly decreased with the trends of -11.6 mm/decade and -1.3 million ton/decade, respectively. But precipitation plays a dominate role in reshaping these trends, with the contribution over four times larger than that of temperature. In the near future (2049-2064), however, runoff and sediment load wouldrise to some degree. Especially in the A2 scenario, runoff and sediment load exceed more than double in summer relative to current climate

  11. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian-Barremian) sediments of the Zagros basin (SW of Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afghah, Massih; Abtahiyan, Ali-Reza; Saberi, Amir

    2016-09-01

    Parts of Early Cretaceous sediments of the Zagros basin (SW of Iran) is nominated as the Gadvan Formation. To facilitate biostratigraphy study, four stratigraphic sections of this rock unit are selected around Shiraz named as Fahliyan, Kamal abad, Garm abad, and Hossien abad stratigraphic columns. These stratigraphic sections are sandwiched between the Fahliyan and Dariyan formations. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of these sections have supported two biozones in the three of studied sections and one section is marked by one biozone. Normally established biozones of the studied section are described as Pseudocyclammina lituus-Trocholina assemblage zone (Hauterivian) and Choffatella decipiens- Praechrysalidina infracretacea assemblage zone (Barremian). Two established biozones are recognizable in Fahliyan, Garm abad, and Kamal abad stratigraphic sections as Hauterivian to Barremian age and Hossien abad stratigraphic section is described by one which marks Barremian. Biostratigraphy of the studied stratigraphic sections of the Gadvan reveals different lower biostratigraphic limit whereas; the upper biostratigraphic limit of the Gadvan is synchronous across the entire studied area. Biostratigraphic data of studied stratigraphic sections fully supported the dominant agglutinated foraminifera in Gadvan Formation. Also dasycladacea are recorded in all the studied stratigraphic sections.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy of lacustrine sediments in the Great Salt Lake Desert: An analog study for Martian paleolake basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Kennda L.; Horgan, Briony H.; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Hanley, Jennifer; Schneider, Robin J.; Rey, Kevin A.; Spear, John R.; Jackson, W. Andrew; Ritter, Scott M.

    2015-03-01

    The identification and characterization of aqueous minerals within ancient lacustrine environments on Mars are a high priority for determining the past habitability of the red planet. Terrestrial analog studies are useful both for understanding the mineralogy of lacustrine sediments, how the mineralogy varies with location in a lacustrine environment, and for validating the use of certain techniques such as visible-near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy. In this study, sediments from the Pilot Valley paleolake basin of the Great Salt Lake desert were characterized using VNIR as an analog for Martian paleolake basins. The spectra and subsequent interpretations were then compared to mineralogical characterization by ground truth methods, including X-ray diffraction, automated scanning electron microscopy, and several geochemical analysis techniques. In general, there is good agreement between VNIR and ground truth methods on the major classes of minerals present in the lake sediments and VNIR spectra can also easily discriminate between clay-dominated and salt-dominated lacustrine terrains within the paleolake basin. However, detection of more detailed mineralogy is difficult with VNIR spectra alone as some minerals can dominate the spectra even at very low abundances. At this site, the VNIR spectra are dominated by absorption bands that are most consistent with gypsum and smectites, though the ground truth methods reveal more diverse mineral assemblages that include a variety of sulfates, primary and secondary phyllosilicates, carbonates, and chlorides. This study provides insight into the limitations regarding the use of VNIR in characterizing complex mineral assemblages inherent in lacustrine settings.

  13. Final report on the sampling and analysis of sediment cores from the L-Area oil and chemical basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Nine vibracores were collected in the L-Area oil and chemical basin (904-83G) during late March and early April 1985. These cores were collected for analysis of the sludge on the basin floor and the underlying sediment. Several different field and laboratory analyses were performed on each three inch segment of all the cores. These included: (1) Sediment characterization; (2) Percent moisture; (3) Dry weight; (4) Spectral gamma analysis; (5) Gross alpha and beta analysis. Detailed chemical analysis were measured on selected intervals of 2 cores (LBC-5 and 6) for complete chemical characterization of the sediments. This sampling program was conducted to provide information so that a closure plan for the basin could be developed. This report describes the methods employed during the project and provide a hard copy of the analytical results from the sample analyses. Included in the appendices are copies of all field and laboratory notes taken during the project and copies of the gas chromatograms for the petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. All chemical results were also submitted on a 5-inch floppy disk.

  14. Constraints on microbial biogeography in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments: energetic limits, thermal stress, and upward compression of metabolic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckay, L. J.; Klokman, V.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Subsurface hydrothermal temperatures and flow cause upward compression of geochemical and metabolic zones in Guaymas Basin seafloor sediments. The Guaymas hydrothermal system can be viewed as an accessible seafloor analog to deep, geothermally heated sedimentary microbial ecosystems. Using push core samples collected by the Alvin submersible (Cruises AT15-40 and 56 in 2008 and 2009) we are investigating thermal limits and substrate concentration ranges and their influence on microbial biogeography. Hydrothermally active sediments at Guaymas Basin host a wide range of shallow subsurface temperatures: from 3°C to 200°C in the upper 45 centimeters. A combination of extreme temperatures and compressed geochemical zonation limits the depth range of microbial colonization in Guaymas sediments. Microbial abundance is relatively high in Guaymas surface sediments, peaking around 10^10 cells/ml and decreasing to below detection at very hot temperatures. Our data describe how the biogeography of physiological modes—in particular anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) —is shaped by localized physicochemical conditions in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments. Microbial oxidation changes the δ13C signature of porewater methane (CH4) from its baseline value of -43‰ (Welhan, 1988; Pearson et al., 2005) towards heavier values within a temperature window up to ca. 80°C; at higher temperatures, no CH4 oxidation imprint can be detected. δ13C values for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) indicate that bacterial remineralization of organic carbon may occur up to 100°C. 13C depleted DIC correlates well with 13C enriched CH4 in situ pinpointing zones of AOM between, for example, 20 and 40 cm below seafloor and 30°C and 50°C. 16S rDNA clone libraries support these suggested zones with the regular occurrence of (AN)aerobic (ME)thanotrophic Archaea. Given its high temperature tolerance, AOM can occur widely in the geothermally and hydrothermally heated subsurface.

  15. Comparison of Methylmercury Production and Accumulation in Sediments of the Congaree and Edisto River Basins, South Carolina, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Journey, Celeste A.

    2009-01-01

    Fish-tissue mercury concentrations (approximately 2 micrograms per gram) in the Edisto River basin of South Carolina are among the highest recorded in the United States. Substantially lower mercury concentrations (approximately 0.2 microgram per gram) are reported in fish from the adjacent (about 30 kilometer) Congaree River basin and the Congaree National Park. In contrast, concentrations of total mercury were statistically higher in sediments from the Congaree River compared with those in sediments from the Edisto River. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference was observed in concentrations of methylmercury or net methylation potential in sediments collected from various Edisto and Congaree hydrologic settings. In both systems, the net methylation potential was low (0-0.17 nanogram per gram per day) for in-stream sediments exposed to continuously flowing water but substantially higher (about 1.8 nanograms per gram per day) in wetland sediments exposed to standing water. These results are not consistent with the hypothesis that differences in fish-tissue mercury between the Edisto and Congaree basins reflect fundamental differences in the potential for each system to methylate mercury. Rather, the significantly higher ratios of methylmercury to total mercury observed in the Edisto system suggest that the net accumulation and(or) preservation of methylmercury are greater in the Edisto system. The marked differences in net methylation potential observed between the wetland and in-stream settings suggest the hypothesis that methylmercury transport from zones of production (wetlands) to points of entry into the food chain (channels) may contribute to the observed differences in fish-tissue mercury concentrations between the two river systems.

  16. Concentrations and profiles of PCDD/Fs in sediments of major Polish rivers and the Gdansk Basin--Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Niemirycz, Elżbieta; Jankowska, Daria

    2011-10-01

    The present state of contamination of bottom sediments in southern part of the Baltic Sea with PCDD/Fs was compared to the findings made for the north-western and eastern Baltic Sea coastal areas of Finland, Sweden and Denmark. The extent of the study area--from marine the Gdańsk Basin, the lower Oder and Vistula Rivers up till Włocławek reservoir--allowed to obtain the sediment samples with diversified properties. Dioxin's concentrations in sediments examined in the Polish costal area allows us to evaluate this zone as relatively less contaminated. Higher dioxin concentration has been found in Wloclawek Dam Reservoir. Differences in congener patterns and temporal changes in marine sediment profiles were examined. The highest concentrations of tetra- and penta-congeners still remain in the surface layer of Gdansk Deep, whereas the decline in concentrations of these most toxic congeners, have been observed in the sediments from some other parts of the Baltic coast. Excess concentration of dioxins in sediments has a great impact on human being due to special ability of accumulation in the trophic chain as well as in water (fishes) and land (milk, meat). PMID:21917292

  17. Investigations of the Origin of the Magnetic Remanence in Late Pleistocene Lacustrine Sediments in the Mono Basin, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, N.; Corley, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    In the Mono Basin, CA, fine sand, silt, and volcanic ash deposited in Pleistocene Lake Russell is exposed on the margin of Mono Lake, and on Paoha Island in the lake. The silt records the Mono Lake Excursion (MLE: Denham and Cox, 1971) and several tens of thousands of years of paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV: Denham and Cox, 1971; Liddicoat, 1976; Lund et al., 1988). The sediment is believed to be an accurate recorder of PSV because the MLE has the same signal at widely separated localities in the basin (Denham, 1974; Liddicoat and Coe, 1979; Liddicoat, 1992) with the exception at wave-cut cliffs on the southeast side of the lake (Coe and Liddicoat, 1994). Magnetite, titanomagnetite, and titanomaghemite are present in the sediment (Denham and Cox, 1971; Liddicoat, 1976; Liddicoat and Coe, 1979), which is glacial flour from the adjacent Sierra Nevada (Lajoie, 1968). X-rays of the sediment and lineation measurements show patterns of normal bedding with layers aligned such that the minimum axes are within 5-10 degrees of normal bedding, with 10 percent foliation and 1 percent lineation (Coe and Liddicoat, 1994). We explore reasons for the difference in part of the PSV record at the wave-cut cliffs beyond the interpretation of Coe and Liddicoat (1994) that paleomagnetic field strength is a controlling factor. Possibilities include the sedimentation rate - at localities on the margin of Mono Lake the rate is about 60 percent less than at the wave-cut cliffs - and lithology of the sediment. At Mill Creek on the northwest side of Mono Lake, the non-magnetic sediment fraction is coarser-grained than at the wave-cut cliffs by a factor of about two, and there is a similar difference in the total inorganic carbon (TIC) percentage by weight for the two localities. (Spokowski et al., 2011) Studies of the sediment at two localities in the basin where the Hilina Pali Excursion (Teanby et al., 2002) might be recorded (Wilson Creek and South Shore Cliffs; Liddicoat and Coe

  18. Authigenic molybdenum formation in marine sediments: A link to pore water sulfide in the Santa Barbara Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Yen; Anderson, Robert F.; VanGeen, A.; Kuwabara, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pore water and sediment Mo concentrations were measured in a suite of multicores collected at four sites along the northeastern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin to examine the connection between authigenic Mo formation and pore water sulfide concentration. Only at the deepest site (580 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations rise to >0.1 ??M right below the sediment water interface, was there active authigenic Mo formation. At shallower sites (550,430, and 340 m), where pore water sulfide concentrations were consistently <0.05 ??M, Mo precipitation was not occuring at the time of sampling. A sulfide concentration of ???0.1 ??M appears to be a threshold for the onset of Mo-Fe-S co-precipitation. A second threshold sulfide concentration of ???100 ??M is required for Mo precipitation without Fe, possibly as Mo-S or as particle-bound Mo. Mass budgets for Mo were constructed by combining pore water and sediment results for Mo with analyses of sediment trap material from Santa Barbara Basin as well as sediment accumulation rates derived from 210Pb. The calculations show that most of the authigenic Mo in the sediment at the deepest site is supplied by diffusion from overlying bottom waters. There is, however, a non-lithogenic particulate Mo associated with sinking particles that contributes ???15% to the total authigenic Mo accumulation. Analysis of sediment trap samples and supernant brine solutions indicates the presence of non-lithogenic particulate Mo, a large fraction of which is easily remobilized and, perhaps, associated with Mn-oxides. Our observations show that even with the very high flux of organic carbon reaching the sediment of Santa Barbara Basin, active formation of sedimentary authigenic Mo requires a bottom water oxygen concentration below 3 ??M. However, small but measurable rates of authigenic Mo accumulation were observed at sites where bottom water oxygen ranged between 5 and 23 ??M, indicating that the formation of authigenic Mo occured in the

  19. Validation of a simple distributed sediment delivery approach in selected sub-basins of the River Inn catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lucas; Kittlaus, Steffen; Scherer, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    For large areas without highly detailed data the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) is widely used to quantify soil loss. The problem though is usually the quantification of actual sediment influx into the rivers. As the USLE provides long-term mean soil loss rates, it is often combined with spatially lumped models to estimate the sediment delivery ratio (SDR). But it gets difficult with spatially lumped approaches in large catchment areas where the geographical properties have a wide variance. In this study we developed a simple but spatially distributed approach to quantify the sediment delivery ratio by considering the characteristics of the flow paths in the catchments. The sediment delivery ratio was determined using an empirical approach considering the slope, morphology and land use properties along the flow path as an estimation of travel time of the eroded particles. The model was tested against suspended solids measurements in selected sub-basins of the River Inn catchment area in Germany and Austria, ranging from the high alpine south to the Molasse basin in the northern part.

  20. Cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in Guaymas Basin sediments.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Biddle, Jennifer F; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the biodegradation of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the diversity and function of these organisms in deep-sea sediment. Here we used stable-isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria under aerobic conditions in sediments from Guaymas Basin with uniformly labeled [(13)C]-phenanthrene (PHE). The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from (13)C-enriched bacterial DNA (from PHE enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Cycloclasticus. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus to determine their abundance in sediment incubations amended with unlabeled PHE and showed substantial increases in gene abundance during the experiments. We also isolated a strain, BG-2, representing the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus sequence (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity), and used this strain to provide direct evidence of PHE degradation and mineralization. In addition, we isolated Halomonas, Thalassospira, and Lutibacterium sp. with demonstrable PHE-degrading capacity from Guaymas Basin sediment. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea. PMID:26217326

  1. A mid-Permian chert event: widespread deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murchey, B.L.; Jones, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Radiolarian and conodont of Permian siliceous rocks from twenty-three areas in teh the circum-Pacific and Mediterranean regions reveal a widespread Permian Chert Event during the middle Leonardian to Wordian. Radiolarian- and (or) sponge spicule-rich siliceous sediments accumulated beneath high productivity zones in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins. Most of these deposits now crop out in fault-bounded accreted terranes. Biogenic siliceous sediments did not accumulate in terranes lying beneath infertile waters including the marine sequences in terranes of northern and central Alaska. The Permian Chert Event is coeval with major phosphorite deposition along the western margin of Pangea (Phosphoria Formation and related deposits). A well-known analogue for this event is middle Miocene deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments beneath high productivity zones in many parts of the Pacific and concurrent deposition of phosphatic as well as siliceous sediments in basins along the coast of California. Interrelated factors associated with both the Miocene and Permian depositional events include plate reorientations, small sea-level rises and cool polar waters. ?? 1992.

  2. Tectonic control on sediment sources in the Jaca basin (Middle and Upper Eocene of the South-Central Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roigé, Marta; Gómez-Gras, David; Remacha, Eduard; Daza, Raquel; Boya, Salvador

    2016-03-01

    The Eocene clastic systems of the Jaca foreland Basin (southern Pyrenees) allow us to identify changes in sediment composition through time. We provide new data on sediment composition and sources of the northern Jaca basin, whose stratigraphic evolution from Middle Lutetian deep-marine to Priabonian alluvial systems record a main reorganization in the active Pyrenean prowedge. Petrological analysis shows that the Banastón and the Lower Jaca turbidite systems (Middle-Upper Lutetian) were fed from an eastern source, which dominated during the sedimentation of the Hecho Group turbidites. In contrast, the upper part of the Jaca turbidite systems (Lutetian-Bartonian transition) records an increase in the number of subvolcanic rock and hybrid-sandstone fragments (intrabasinal and extrabasinal grains) being the first system clearly fed from the north. This change is interpreted as associated with an uplifting of the Eaux-Chaudes/Lakora thrust sheet in the northern Axial Zone. The Middle Bartonian Sabiñánigo sandstone derives from eastern and northeastern source areas. In contrast, the overlying Late Bartonian-Early Priabonian Atarés delta records sediment input from the east. The Santa Orosia alluvial system records a new distinct compositional change, with a very high content of hybrid-sandstone clasts from the Hecho Group, again from a northern provenance. Such cannibalized clasts were sourced from newly emerged areas of the hinterland, associated with the basement-involved Gavarnie thrust activity in the Axial Zone.

  3. Effects of oxygen on recycling of biogenic elements from sediments of a stratified coastal Baltic Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekeroth, Nils; Kononets, Mikhail; Walve, Jakob; Blomqvist, Sven; Hall, Per O. J.

    2016-02-01

    Benthic nutrient dynamics in the coastal basin Kanholmsfjärden, NW Baltic proper, were studied by in situ flux measurements and sediment samplings in 2010-2013. The benthic release of NH4 and DIP from anoxic sediments in Kanholmsfjärden were calculated to renew the standing stock inventories of DIN and DIP in the overlying water in roughly 1 year. Starting in summer 2012, mixing of oxygen-rich water into the deep part of the basin temporarily improved the oxygen conditions in the deep water. During the 1 year oxygenated period, the total phosphorus inventory in the surficial sediment increased by 0.4 g P m- 2 or 65%. This was most likely due to stimulated bacterial P assimilation under oxygenated conditions. By July 2013, the bottom water had again turned anoxic, and DIP and DSi fluxes were even higher than earlier in the study period. These high fluxes are attributed to degradation of sedimentary pools of P and Si that had accumulated during the bottom water oxygenation in 2012. The strong correlation between DIP and DSi fluxes and the similar dynamics of DIP and DSi in the sediment pore water and near bottom water, suggest a similar redox dependency of benthic-pelagic exchange for these nutrients.

  4. Cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent characterization of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in Guaymas Basin sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Tony; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the biodegradation of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the diversity and function of these organisms in deep-sea sediment. Here we used stable-isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria under aerobic conditions in sediments from Guaymas Basin with uniformly labeled [13C]-phenanthrene (PHE). The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from PHE enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Cycloclasticus. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus to determine their abundance in sediment incubations amended with unlabeled PHE and showed substantial increases in gene abundance during the experiments. We also isolated a strain, BG-2, representing the SIP-identified Cycloclasticus sequence (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity), and used this strain to provide direct evidence of PHE degradation and mineralization. In addition, we isolated Halomonas, Thalassospira, and Lutibacterium sp. with demonstrable PHE-degrading capacity from Guaymas Basin sediment. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea. PMID:26217326

  5. Impacts of lake water environmental condition on bioavailable-phosphorus of surface sediments in Lixia River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, L.; Lu, C.

    2015-05-01

    Bioavailable-phosphorus (BAP) fractions of the lake surface sediments (the upper 0-5cm depth) and environmental indicators of the related lake water column were investigated in five lakes in Lixia River basin during three seasons in order to evaluate the impacts of environmental indicators of the water column on the BAP fractions of surface sediments. The concentration of BAP varied significantly in different seasons. Factor analysis was used to identify the factors which influence sedimentary BAP significantly in the different seasons. The results showed that AAP and Olsen-P were significantly affected by the chemical oxygen demand through the bacterial activity in summer. The high intensity of bacterial activity and density of algae, and low concentrations of NO3-N and dissolved oxygen under high temperature enhanced the BAP released from anaerobic sediment and significantly contributed to the eutrophication of the lake, especially in summer. In addition, macrophyte roots were beneficial to absorption of AAP and Olsen-P.

  6. The record of India-Asia collision preserved in Tethyan ocean basin sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, Yani; Jenks, Dan; Godin, Laurent; Boudagher-Fadel, Marcelle; Bown, Paul; Horstwood, Matt; Garzanti, Eduardo; Bracialli, Laura; Millar, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The timing of India-Asia collision is critical to the understanding of crustal deformation processes, since, for example, it impacts on calculations regarding the amount of convergence that needs to be accommodated by various mechanisms. In this research we use sediments originally deposited in the Tethyan ocean basin and now preserved in the Himalayan orogeny to constrain the timing of collision. In the NW Himalaya, a number of workers have proposed a ca 55-50 Ma age for collision along the Indus suture zone which separates India from the Kohistan-Ladakh Intraoceanic Island arc (KLA) to the north. This is based on a number of factors including the age of youngest marine sediments in the Indus suture (e.g. Green et al. 2008), age of eclogites indicative of onset of Indian continental subduction (e.g. de Sigoyer et al. 2000), and first evidence of detritus from north of the suture zone deposited on the Indian plate (e.g. Clift et al. 2002). Such evidence can be interpreted as documenting the age of India-Asia collision if one takes the KLA to have collided with the Asian plate prior to its collision with India (e.g. Petterson 2010 and refs therein). However, an increasing number of workers propose that the KLA collided with Asia subsequent to its earlier collision with India, dated variously at 85 Ma (Chatterjee et al. 2013), 61 Ma (Khan et al. 2009) and 50 Ma (Bouilhol et al. 2013). This, plus the questioning of earlier provenance work (Clift et al. 2002) regarding the validity of their data for constraining timing of earliest arrival of material north of the suture deposited on the Indian plate (Henderson et al. 2011) suggests that the time is right for a reappraisal of this topic. We use a provenance-based approach here, using combined U-Pb and Hf on detrital zircons from Tethyan ocean basin sediments, along with petrography and biostratigraphy, to identify first arrival of material from north of the Indian plate to arrive on the Indian continent, to constrain

  7. Presence and diversity of anammox bacteria in cold hydrocarbon-rich seeps and hydrothermal vent sediments of the Guaymas Basin.

    PubMed

    Russ, Lina; Kartal, Boran; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Sollai, Martina; Le Bruchec, Julie; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Godfroy, Anne; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Jetten, Mike S M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally active sediments are highly productive, chemosynthetic areas which are characterized by the rapid turnover of particulate organic matter under extreme conditions in which ammonia is liberated. These systems might be suitable habitats for anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria but this has not been investigated in detail. Here we report the diversity and abundance of anammox bacteria in sediments that seep cold hydrocarbon-rich fluids and hydrothermal vent areas of the Guaymas Basin in the Cortés Sea using the unique functional anammox marker gene, hydrazine synthase (hzsA). All clones retrieved were closely associated to the "Candidatus Scalindua" genus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clusters of hzsA sequences (Ca. Scalindua hzsA cluster I and II). Comparison of individual sequences from both clusters showed that several of these sequences had a similarity as low as 76% on nucleotide level. Based on the analysis of this phylomarker, a very high interspecies diversity within the marine anammox group is apparent. Absolute numbers of anammox bacteria in the sediments samples were determined by amplification of a 257 bp fragment of the hszA gene in a qPCR assay. The results indicate that numbers of anammox bacteria are generally higher in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments compared to the vent areas and the reference zone. Ladderanes, lipids unique to anammox bacteria were also detected in several of the sediment samples corroborating the hzsA analysis. Due to the high concentrations of reduced sulfur compounds and its potential impact on the cycling of nitrogen we aimed to get an indication about the key players in the oxidation of sulfide in the Guaymas Basin sediments using the alpha subunit of the adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (aprA). Amplification of the aprA gene revealed a high number of gammaproteobacterial aprA genes covering the two sulfur-oxidizing bacteria aprA lineages as well as sulfate-reducers. PMID

  8. Characterization of submarine canyon bathymetries in northern Ionian Sea, Italy, using sediment geochemical variation induced by transportation distance and basin depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesco, Perri; Tohru, Ohta; Salvatore, Critelli

    2015-07-01

    Geochemical data of marine mud sediments collected from the Esaro, Neto and Corigliano canyons in the northern Ionian Sea (southern Italy) were investigated in order to characterize canyon bathymetry types. Mud sample compositions analyzed by the principal component analysis (PCA) provided useful information for the morphology of the depositional area of the northern Ionian Sea. The use of sediment geochemical data as well as transportation distance and depth as input variables for PCA enabled the extraction of following latent variables: basin depth (PC1), sedimentation rate (PC2) and transportation distance (PC3). Based on these results, we further developed geochemical indices that can estimate basin depth (F1), sedimentation rate (F2) and transportation distance (F3); these functions can be solely calculated from the elemental concentration data of the mud samples. Since these F1, F2 and F3 functions are mathematically independent variables, they facilitate more precise characterization of individual canyon types. That is, the Esaro Canyon is regarded as a sediment-starved deep canyon characterized by a single source area; the Neto Canyon can be seen as a deeply sloped submarine apron system and sediments are mainly supplied by the sediment gravity flows; the Corigliano Canyon is characterized by multiple sources and moderately sloped system, whose sediments disperse mainly by traction currents. These interpretations are concordant with the basin bathymetry of the studied area. Therefore, F1, F2 and F3 functions might be applicable to any oceanic basins.

  9. Impact of the Hoa Binh dam (Vietnam) on water and sediment budgets in the Red River basin and delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinh, V. D.; Ouillon, S.; Thanh, T. D.; Chu, L. V.

    2014-10-01

    The Hoa Binh dam (HBD), located on a tributary of the Red River in Vietnam, has a capacity of 9.45 × 109 m3 and was commissioned in December 1988. Although it is important for flood prevention, electricity production and irrigation in northern Vietnam, the Hoa Binh dam has also highly influenced the suspended sediment distribution in the lower Red River basin, in the delta and in the coastal zone. Its impact was analysed from a 50-year data set of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration (1960-2010), and the distribution of water and sediment across the nine mouths of the delta was simulated using the MIKE11 numerical model before and after the dam settlement. Although water discharge at the delta inlet decreased by only 9%, the yearly suspended sediment flux dropped, on average, by 61% at Son Tay near Hanoi (from 119 to 46 × 106 t yr-1). Along the coast, reduced sedimentation rates are coincident with the lower sediment delivery observed since the impoundment of the Hoa Binh dam. Water regulation has led to decreased water discharge in the wet season (-14% in the Red River at Son Tay) and increased water discharge in the dry season (+12% at the same station). The ratios of water and suspended sediment flows, as compared to the total flows in the nine mouths, increased in the northern and southern estuaries and decreased in the central, main Ba Lat mouth. The increasing volume of dredged sediments in the Haiphong harbour is evidence of the silting up of the northern estuary of Cam-Bach Dang. The effect of tidal pumping on enhanced flow occurring in the dry season and resulting from changed water regulation is discussed as a possible cause of the enhanced siltation of the estuary after Hoa Binh dam impoundment.

  10. Sonobuoy-based velocity functions for sediment thickness calculation in the deep Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, N. N.; Hart, P. E.; Chian, D.; Shimeld, J.; Lizarralde, D.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Mosher, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The deep Canada Basin, which occupies much of the western (Amerasian) Arctic Ocean, is one of the most unexplored and difficult areas on Earth for marine seismic acquisition due to permanent sea ice cover. It extends northward from the Alaskan and Canadian margins for ~500 km and is characterized by a remarkably flat sea floor at 3.6-3.8 km below sea level (bsl) and covers ~500,000 km^2. A set of 143 sonobuoy records were collected during 2007-2010 over the Canada Basin by US-Canada collaborative expeditions. The sonobuoys were deployed along short streamer multi-channel seismic (MCS) lines for estimating seismic velocities in the sediments. A spatial coverage of sonobuoys at every ~80 km on MCS lines provides data for robust average empirical time-depth conversion functions.Sediments are nearly sub-horizontal and sub-parallel, mostly undisturbed with maximum two-way travel time (TWTT)thicknesses of ~5 s, but not greater than ~2.5-3.0 s TWTT closer to the Alpha Ridge and the Chukchi Borderland. Semblance velocity analysis has been applied to the sonobuoy records to determine sediment thickness and depth using the Dix equation. Assuming flat-lying sediments, the normal-moveout (NMO) velocity is approximately equal to the root-mean-square (RMS) average velocity from the sea surface to the reflection horizon. A dip of 5 degrees effects velocity less than 0.5%. Semblance velocity analyses were completed for 128 of 143 sonobuoy records in the deep Canada Basin; 25 records were excluded from later analysis due to bad quality or location on the slope. Results were also converted to interval velocities and depths.The RMS velocities were consistently picked from clear high-coherency events to yield only increasing interval velocities.Picking stopped at or above the bright reflection interpreted as basement on the MCS. Velocities were not picked on dipping reflections surfaces, along the margins where the seafloor was dipping, nor for sedimentary horizons characterized by

  11. Effects of limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations on runoff and sediment yields in the Upper Permanente Creek basin, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Hill, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    High sediment loads below headwater areas of the Permanente Creek drainage basin, Santa Clara County, California, have caused flood-control problems in downstream lowland areas. Measured sediment yields in Permanente Creek, which drains areas affected by limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations, were 14 times greater than yields from the West Fork Permanente Creek, which primarily drains parkland. Part of this large disparity in yields is the result of higher runoff/unit of drainage area in the Permanente Creek Basin. Results of rainfall-runoff modeling indicate that the tendency for higher runoff from Permanente Creek results from natural differences in basin physiography. Runoff during periods of high streamflow (when most sediment is transported) is dominated by subsurface flow, which is not affected by human activities. Although artificial features created by human activities seem to have had only minor effects on runoff, they apparently have had major effects on sediment availability. Artificial features accounted for 273 acres (89%) of the 307 acres of active erosional landforms mapped in 1984. Increased availability of sediment in the Permanente Creek basin appears to be indicated by elevated intercepts of sediment-transport curves. A comparison of sediment-transport curves for the West Fork Permanente Creek with similar curves for the Permanente Creek basin under natural conditions suggests that the sediment yield from Permanente Creek is about 3.5 times higher than it would be under natural basin conditions. The increased yield apparently is due to an increase in sediment availability rather than an increase in runoff. (USGS)

  12. Screening of perfluorinated compounds in water, sediment and biota of the Llobregat River basin (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Julian; Perez, Francisca; Pico, Yolanda; Farre, Marinella; Barcelo, Damia; Andreu, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    PFCs present significant thermal and chemical stability being persistent in the environment, where they can bio-accumulate and adversely affect humans and wildlife (Llorca et al., 2012). Human exposure to PFCs is of concern since PFCs tend to be associated with fatty acid binding proteins in the liver or albumin proteins in blood, and have been detected in human serum, urine, saliva, seminal plasma and breast milk (Sundstrom et al., 2011). This study is aimed at the screening of 21 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in environmental samples by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The main objective is to identify target compounds at low levels in water, sediments and biota of the Llobregat River (2010), second longest river in Catalonia and one of Barcelona's major drinking water resources. PFCs were extracted from water samples by Solid Phase Extraction (SPE); from sediment by ultrasonication with acidified methanol followed by an off-line SPE procedure (Picó et al., 2012), and from biota (fish) with alkaline digestion, clean-up by TurboFlow™ on line technology coupled to LC-MS/MS (Llorca et al., 2012). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the method were calculated by analysis of spiked river water, sediment, and biota with minimum concentrations of each individual compound at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and 10, respectively. The LODs and LOQs of the method in river water ranged between 0.004 and 0.8 ng L-1 and between 0.01 and 2 ng L-1, respectively. In sediment LODs were 0.013-2.667 ng g-1 dry weight (dw) and LOQs were 0.04-8 ng g-1 dw, meanwhile in biota these were 0.006-0.7 pg μL-1 and 0.02-2.26 pg μL-1, respectively. Recoveries ranged between 65% and 102% for all target compounds. The method was applied to study the spatial distribution of these compounds in the Llobregat River basin. For this, a total of 40 samples were analysed (14 water, 14 sediments, 12 fishes). Of the 21 target

  13. Porosity and Mineralogy Control on the Thermal Properties of Sediments in Off-Shimokita Deep-Water Coal Bed Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Tadai, O.; Morita, S.; Lin, W.; Yamada, Y.; Sanada, Y.; Moe, K.; Kubo, Y.; Inagaki, F.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transport properties such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity are significant parameters that influence on geothermal process in sedimentary basins at depth. We measured the thermal properties of sediment core samples at off-Shimokita basin obtained from the IODP Expedition 337 and Expedition CK06-06 in D/V Chikyu shakedown cruise. Overall, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity increased with depth and heat capacity decreased with depth, although the data was highly scattered at the depth of approximately 2000 meters below sea floor, where coal-layers were formed. The increase of thermal conductivity is mainly explained by the porosity reduction of sediment by the consolidation during sedimentation. The highly variation of the thermal conductivity at the same core section is probably caused by the various lithological rocks formed at the same section. Coal shows the lowest thermal conductivity of 0.4 Wm-1K-1, and the calcite cemented sandstone/siltstone shows highest conductivity around 3 Wm-1K-1. The thermal diffusivity and heat capacity are influenced by the porosity and lithological contrast as well. The relationship between thermal conductivity and porosity in this site is well explained by the mixed-law model of Maxwell or geometric mean. One dimensional temperature-depth profile at Site C0020 in Expedition 337 estimated from measured physical properties and radiative heat production data shows regression of thermal gradient with depth. Surface heat flow value was evaluated as 29~30 mWm-2, and the value is consistent with the heat flow data near this site. Our results suggest that increase of thermal conductivity with depth significantly controls on temperature profile at depth of basin. If we assume constant thermal conductivity or constant geothermal gradient, we might overestimate temperature at depth, which might cause big error to predict the heat transport or hydrocarbon formation in deepwater sedimentary basins.

  14. A review of the geologic framework of the Long Island Sound Basin, with some observations relating to postglacial sedimentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Ralph S.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Most of the papers in this thematic section present regional perspectives that build on more than 100 years of geologic investigation in Long Island Sound. When viewed collectively, a common theme emerges in these works. The major geologic components of the Long Island Sound basin (bedrock, buried coastal-plain strata, recessional moraines, glacial-lake deposits, and the remains of a large marine delta) interact with the water body to affect the way the modern sedimentary system functions. Previous work, along with our present knowledge of the geologic framework of the Long Island Sound basin,