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Sample records for 18kda translocator protein

  1. [PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDY OF NEW COMPOUNDS ACTING AS REGULATORS OF 18-KDA TRANSLOCATOR PROTEIN LIGANDS].

    PubMed

    Yarkov, S A; Mokrov, G V; Gudasheva, T A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of new original 1-arylpyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-3-carboxamide derivatives with mitochondrial translocator protein (MTP) 18 kDa has been studied by radioligand binding assay. Compounds GML-1 (Ki = 5.2 x 10⁻⁸ M) and GML-3 (Ki = 5.3 x 10⁻⁷ M) exhibit high binding affinity for MTP. GML-1 and GML-3 in a dose range of 0.1-1 mg/kg (i.p.) demonstrated anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus-maze test in CD-1 mice, which were blocked by the MTP selective antagonist PK11195. The data obtained on the molecular target, anxiolytic-like effects and low toxicity GML-1 and GML-3 suggest that these compounds are promising for further investigation as anxiolytics. PMID:27159950

  2. The effects of PK11195 on meningioma was associated with allopregnanolone biosynthesis, which was mediated by translocator protein 18 KDa.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhuo-Wei; Huang, Jing-Bin; Lin, Qing; Qin, Qiang; Liang, Yao-Jun; Zhou, Lu; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma is one of the common brain tumors in adults. It had been shown that the allopregnanolone biosynthesis was associated with tumorigenesis and PK11195, the translocator protein 18 KDa (TSPO) antagonist, had the effects of the allopregnanolone biosynthesis. However, little is known about the association between the effects of PK11195 on meningioma and the allopregnanolone biosynthesis. To evaluate this, the meningioma cell line IOMM-LEE was applied. Cell viability and proliferation were determined by CCK-8 assay. The IC50 of PK11195 on the IOMM-LEE was 1.505 ± 0.08 nM. The cell viability and proliferation of AC-5216 (TSPO selective ligand, 2 and 4 nM) was blocked by PK11195 (1.5 nM). Further, we evaluated the role of allopregnanolone biosynthesis in the effects of TSPO on meningioma. Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) was used in the measurement of the allopregnanolone level. It showed that the allopregnanolone level was increased by AC-5216 (2 and 4 nM) and the increase was reversed by PK11195 (1.5 nM). Collectedly, it firstly indicated that the effects of PK11195 on meningioma were relevant to the decrease of allopregnanolone biosynthesis, which was mediated by TSPO. PMID:26835706

  3. CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF THE TRANSLOCATOR PROTEIN (18 KDA), VOLTAGE-DEPENDENT ANION CHANNEL, AND DIAZEPAM BINDING INHIBITOR IN THE GONAD OF LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES) ACROSS THE REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE

    PubMed Central

    Doperalski, Nicholas J.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Barber, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membrane is rate-limiting for steroidogenesis in vertebrates. Previous studies in fish have characterized expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, however the function and regulation of other genes and proteins involved in piscine cholesterol transport have not been evaluated. In the current study, mRNA sequences of the 18 kDa translocator protein (tspo; formerly peripheral benzodiazepine receptor), voltage-dependent anion channel (vdac), and diazepam binding inhibitor (dbi; also acyl-CoA binding protein) were cloned from largemouth bass. Gonadal expression was examined across reproductive stages to determine if expression is correlated with changes in steroid levels and with indicators of reproductive maturation. In testis, transcript abundance of tspo and dbi increased with reproductive maturation (6- and 23-fold maximal increase, respectively) and expression of tspo and dbi was positively correlated with reproductive stage, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and circulating levels of testosterone. Testis vdac expression was positively correlated with reproductive stage and GSI. In females, gonadal tspo and vdac expression was negatively correlated with GSI and levels of plasma testosterone and 17β-estradiol. Ovarian dbi expression was not correlated with indicators of reproductive maturation. These studies represent the first investigation of the steroidogenic role of tspo, vdac, and dbi in fish. Findings suggest that cholesterol transport in largemouth bass testis, but not ovary, may be transcriptionally-regulated, however further investigation will be necessary to fully elucidate the role of these genes in largemouth bass steroidogenesis. PMID:21600210

  4. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Corey, Robin A; Allen, William J; Collinson, Ian

    2016-06-15

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process-commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  5. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Robin A.; Allen, William J.; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process–commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  6. What Drives the Translocation of Proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Peskin, Charles S.; Oster, George F.

    1992-05-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems.

  7. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  8. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  9. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. PMID:22374876

  10. What drives the translocation of proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Peskin, C S; Oster, G F

    1992-01-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems. Images PMID:1349170

  11. Multistep protein unfolding during nanopore translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-04-01

    Cells are divided into compartments and separated from the environment by lipid bilayer membranes. Essential molecules are transported back and forth across the membranes. We have investigated how folded proteins use narrow transmembrane pores to move between compartments. During this process, the proteins must unfold. To examine co-translocational unfolding of individual molecules, we tagged protein substrates with oligonucleotides to enable potential-driven unidirectional movement through a model protein nanopore, a process that differs fundamentally from extension during force spectroscopy measurements. Our findings support a four-step translocation mechanism for model thioredoxin substrates. First, the DNA tag is captured by the pore. Second, the oligonucleotide is pulled through the pore, causing local unfolding of the C terminus of the thioredoxin adjacent to the pore entrance. Third, the remainder of the protein unfolds spontaneously. Finally, the unfolded polypeptide diffuses through the pore into the recipient compartment. The unfolding pathway elucidated here differs from those revealed by denaturation experiments in solution, for which two-state mechanisms have been proposed.

  12. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  13. Toward a structural understanding of co-translational protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Rebecca M; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-08-01

    The translocation of most eukaryotic secreted and integral membrane proteins occurs co-translationally at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These nascent polypeptides are recognized on the ribosome by the signal recognition particle (SRP), targeted to the ER, and translocated across or inserted into the membrane by the Sec61 translocation channel. Structural analysis of these co-translational processes has been challenging due to the size, complexity, and flexibility of the targeting and translocation machinery. Recent technological advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have resulted in increasingly powerful tools to study large, heterogeneous, and low-abundance samples. These advances are being utilized to obtain near-atomic resolution reconstructions of functional translation, targeting, and translocation intermediates, paving the way to a mechanistic understanding of protein biogenesis. PMID:27155805

  14. Multistep current signal in protein translocation through graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bonome, Emma Letizia; Lepore, Rosalba; Raimondo, Domenico; Cecconi, Fabio; Tramontano, Anna; Chinappi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    In nanopore sensing experiments, the properties of molecules are probed by the variation of ionic currents flowing through the nanopore. In this context, the electronic properties and the single-layer thickness of graphene constitute a major advantage for molecule characterization. Here we analyze the translocation pathway of the thioredoxin protein across a graphene nanopore, and the related ionic currents, by integrating two nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods with a bioinformatic structural analysis. To obtain a qualitative picture of the translocation process and to identify salient features we performed unsupervised structural clustering on translocation conformations. This allowed us to identify some specific and robust translocation intermediates, characterized by significantly different ionic current flows. We found that the ion current strictly anticorrelates with the amount of pore occupancy by thioredoxin residues, providing a putative explanation of the multilevel current scenario observed in recently published translocation experiments. PMID:25866995

  15. Surface modification of graphene nanopores for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Y. P.; Tiwari, P. B.; Krishnakumar, P.; Vlassiouk, I.; Li, W.Z.; Wang, X.W.; Darici, Y.; Lindsay, S.M.; Wang, H. D.; Smirnov, S.; He, J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores have revealed their potential for DNA sequencing. Here we report a study of protein translocation through chemically modified graphene nanopores. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to cut nanopores with diameters between 5-20 nm in multilayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After oxygen plasma treatment, the dependence of the measured ionic current on salt concentration and pH was consistent with a small surface charge induced by the formation of carboxyl groups. While translocation of gold nanoparticles (10 nm) was readily detected through such treated pores of a larger diameter, translocation of protein ferritin was not observed either for oxygen plasma treated pores, or for pores modified with mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Ferritin translocation events were reliably observed after the pores were modified with the phospholipid-PEG (DPPE-PEG750) amphiphile. The ion current signature of translocation events was complex, suggesting that a series of interactions between the protein and pore occur during the process. PMID:24231385

  16. Surface modification of graphene nanopores for protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Y P; Tiwari, P B; Krishnakumar, P; Vlassiouk, I; Li, W Z; Wang, X W; Darici, Y; Lindsay, S M; Wang, H D; Smirnov, S; He, J

    2013-12-13

    Studies of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores have revealed their potential for DNA sequencing. Here we report a study of protein translocation through chemically modified graphene nanopores. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to cut nanopores with diameters between 5 and 20 nm in multilayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After oxygen plasma treatment, the dependence of the measured ionic current on salt concentration and pH was consistent with a small surface charge induced by the formation of carboxyl groups. While translocation of gold nanoparticles (10 nm) was readily detected through such treated pores of a larger diameter, translocation of the protein ferritin was not observed either for oxygen plasma treated pores, or for pores modified with mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Ferritin translocation events were reliably observed after the pores were modified with the phospholipid-PEG (DPPE-PEG750) amphiphile. The ion current signature of translocation events was complex, suggesting that a series of interactions between the protein and pores occurs during the process. PMID:24231385

  17. Light-regulated translocation of signaling proteins in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Frechter, Shahar; Minke, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    Illumination of Drosophila photoreceptor cells induces multi-facet responses, which include generation of the photoreceptor potential, screening pigment migration and translocation of signaling proteins which is the focus of recent extensive research. Translocation of three signaling molecules is covered in this review: (1) Light-dependent translocation of arrestin from the cytosol to the signaling membrane, the rhabdomere, determines the lifetime of activated rhodopsin. Arrestin translocates in PIP3 and NINAC myosin III dependent manner, and specific mutations which disrupt the interaction between arrestin and PIP3 or NINAC also impair the light-dependant translocation of arrestin and the termination of the response to light. (2) Activation of Drosophila visual G protein, DGq, causes a massive and reversible, translocation of the α subunit from the signaling membrane to the cytosol, accompanied by activity-dependent architectural changes. Analysis of the translocation and the recovery kinetics of DGqα in wild-type flies and specific visual mutants indicated that DGqα is necessary but not sufficient for the architectural changes. (3) The TRP-like (TRPL) but not TRP channels translocate in a light-dependent manner between the rhabdomere and the cell body. As a physiological consequence of this light-dependent modulation of the TRP/TRPL ratio, the photoreceptors of dark-adapted flies operate at a wider dynamic range, which allows the photoreceptors enriched with TRPL to function better in darkness and dim background illumination. Altogether, signal-dependent movement of signaling proteins plays a major role in the maintenance and function of photoreceptor cells. PMID:16458490

  18. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  19. Protein kinase C translocation in human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hoauyan; Friedman, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and translocation in response to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), serotonin (5-HT) and thrombin was assessed in human platelets. Stimulation with PMA and 5-HT for 10 minutes or thrombin for 1 minute elicited platelet PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. The catecholamines, norepinephrine or epinephrine at 10 {mu}M concentrations did not induce redistribution of platelet PKC. Serotonin and the specific 5-HT{sub 2} receptor agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-amino-propane (DOI) but not the 5-HT{sub 1A} or 5-HT{sub 1B} agonists, ({plus minus}) 8-hydroxy-dipropylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or 5-methoxy-3-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridin) 1H-indole succinate (RU 24969) induced dose-dependent PKC translocations. Serotonin-evoked PKC translocation was blocked by selective 5-HT{sub 2} receptor antagonists, ketanserin and spiroperidol. These results suggest that, in human platelets, PMA, thrombin and 5-HT can elicit PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. Serotonin-induced PKC translocation in platelets is mediated via 5-HT{sub 2} receptors.

  20. Protein translocation and thylakoid biogenesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Frain, Kelly M; Gangl, Doris; Jones, Alexander; Zedler, Julie A Z; Robinson, Colin

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria exhibit a complex form of membrane differentiation that sets them apart from most bacteria. Many processes take place in the plasma membrane, but photosynthetic light capture, electron transport and ATP synthesis take place in an abundant internal thylakoid membrane. This review considers how this system of subcellular compartmentalisation is maintained, and how proteins are directed towards the various subcompartments--specifically the plasma membrane, periplasm, thylakoid membrane and thylakoid lumen. The involvement of Sec-, Tat- and signal recognition particle- (SRP)-dependent protein targeting pathways is discussed, together with the possible involvement of a so-called 'spontaneous' pathway for the insertion of membrane proteins, previously characterised for chloroplast thylakoid membrane proteins. An intriguing aspect of cyanobacterial cell biology is that most contain only a single set of genes encoding Sec, Tat and SRP components, yet the proteomes of the plasma and thylakoid membranes are very different. The implications for protein sorting mechanisms are considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26341016

  1. Retro-translocation of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bragoszewski, Piotr; Wasilewski, Michal; Sakowska, Paulina; Gornicka, Agnieszka; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; Wiedemann, Nils; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The content of mitochondrial proteome is maintained through two highly dynamic processes, the influx of newly synthesized proteins from the cytosol and the protein degradation. Mitochondrial proteins are targeted to the intermembrane space by the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly pathway that couples their import and oxidative folding. The folding trap was proposed to be a driving mechanism for the mitochondrial accumulation of these proteins. Whether the reverse movement of unfolded proteins to the cytosol occurs across the intact outer membrane is unknown. We found that reduced, conformationally destabilized proteins are released from mitochondria in a size-limited manner. We identified the general import pore protein Tom40 as an escape gate. We propose that the mitochondrial proteome is not only regulated by the import and degradation of proteins but also by their retro-translocation to the external cytosolic location. Thus, protein release is a mechanism that contributes to the mitochondrial proteome surveillance. PMID:26056291

  2. Inhibitors of Protein Translocation Across the ER Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Römisch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) constitutes the first step of protein secretion. ER protein import is essential in all eukaryotic cells and is particularly critical in fast-growing tumour cells. Thus, the process can serve as target both for potential cancer drugs and for bacterial virulence factors. Inhibitors of protein transport across the ER membrane range from broad-spectrum to highly substrate-specific and can interfere with virtually any stage of this multistep process, and even with transport of endocytosed antigens into the cytosol for cross-presentation. PMID:26122014

  3. Covalently dimerized SecA is functional in protein translocation.

    PubMed

    de Keyzer, Jeanine; van der Sluis, Eli O; Spelbrink, Robin E J; Nijstad, Niels; de Kruijff, Ben; Nouwen, Nico; van der Does, Chris; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2005-10-21

    The ATPase SecA provides the driving force for the transport of secretory proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. SecA exists as a dimer in solution, but the exact oligomeric state of SecA during membrane binding and preprotein translocation is a topic of debate. To study the requirements of oligomeric changes in SecA during protein translocation, a non-dissociable SecA dimer was formed by oxidation of the carboxyl-terminal cysteines. The cross-linked SecA dimer interacts with the SecYEG complex with a similar stoichiometry as non-cross-linked SecA. Cross-linking reversibly disrupts the SecB binding site on SecA. However, in the absence of SecB, the activity of the disulfide-bonded SecA dimer is indistinguishable from wild-type SecA. Moreover, SecYEG binding stabilizes a cold sodium dodecylsulfate-resistant dimeric state of SecA. The results demonstrate that dissociation of the SecA dimer is not an essential feature of the protein translocation reaction. PMID:16115882

  4. Biophysical Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Translocator Proteins and the Translocator Proteins Attached to Bacterium-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaotong; Choudhari, Shyamal P; Kumar, Prashant; Toth, Ronald T; Kim, Jae Hyun; Van Roosmalen, Maarten L; Leenhouts, Kees; Middaugh, C Russell; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D

    2015-12-01

    Diarrhea caused by Shigella, Salmonella, and Yersinia is an important public health problem, but development of safe and effective vaccines against such diseases is challenging. A new antigen delivery platform called bacterium-like particles (BLPs) was explored as a means for delivering protective antigens from the type III secretion systems (T3SS) of these pathogens. BLPs are peptidoglycan skeletons derived from Lactococcus lactis that are safe for newborns and can carry multiple antigens. Hydrophobic T3SS translocator proteins were fused to a peptidoglycan anchor (PA) for BLP attachment. The proteins and protein-BLP complexes associated with BLPs were characterized and the resulting data used to create three-index empirical phase diagrams (EPDs). On the basis of these EPDs, IpaB (Shigella) and SipB (Salmonella) behave distinctly from YopB (Yersinia) under different environmental stresses. Adding the PA domain appears to enhance the stability of both the PA and translocator proteins, which was confirmed using differential scanning calorimetry, and although the particles dominated the spectroscopic signals in the protein-loaded BLPs, structural changes in the proteins were still detected. The protein-BLPs were most stable near neutral pH, but these proteins' hydrophobicity made them sensitive to environmental stresses. PMID:26422758

  5. Role of lipids in the translocation of proteins across membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Van Voorst, F; De Kruijff, B

    2000-01-01

    The architecture of cells, with various membrane-bound compartments and with the protein synthesizing machinery confined to one location, dictates that many proteins have to be transported through one or more membranes during their biogenesis. A lot of progress has been made on the identification of protein translocation machineries and their sorting signals in various organelles and organisms. Biochemical characterization has revealed the functions of several individual protein components. Interestingly, lipid components were also found to be essential for the correct functioning of these translocases. This led to the idea that there is a very intimate relationship between the lipid and protein components that enables them to fulfil their intriguing task of transporting large biopolymers through a lipid bilayer without leaking their contents. In this review we focus on the Sec translocases in the endoplasmic reticulum and the bacterial inner membrane. We also highlight the interactions of lipids and proteins during the process of translocation and integrate this into a model that enables us to understand the role of membrane lipid composition in translocase function. PMID:10769162

  6. Coliphage HK022 Nun protein inhibits RNA polymerase translocation.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Christal L; Kireeva, Maria L; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Kashlev, Mikhail; Gottesman, Max

    2014-06-10

    The Nun protein of coliphage HK022 arrests RNA polymerase (RNAP) in vivo and in vitro at pause sites distal to phage λ N-Utilization (nut) site RNA sequences. We tested the activity of Nun on ternary elongation complexes (TECs) assembled with templates lacking the λ nut sequence. We report that Nun stabilizes both translocation states of RNAP by restricting lateral movement of TEC along the DNA register. When Nun stabilized TEC in a pretranslocated register, immediately after NMP incorporation, it prevented binding of the next NTP and stimulated pyrophosphorolysis of the nascent transcript. In contrast, stabilization of TEC by Nun in a posttranslocated register allowed NTP binding and nucleotidyl transfer but inhibited pyrophosphorolysis and the next round of forward translocation. Nun binding to and action on the TEC requires a 9-bp RNA-DNA hybrid. We observed a Nun-dependent toe print upstream to the TEC. In addition, mutations in the RNAP β' subunit near the upstream end of the transcription bubble suppress Nun binding and arrest. These results suggest that Nun interacts with RNAP near the 5' edge of the RNA-DNA hybrid. By stabilizing translocation states through restriction of TEC lateral mobility, Nun represents a novel class of transcription arrest factors. PMID:24853501

  7. Protein Translocation through Tom40: Kinetics of Peptide Release

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Schlösinger, Andrea; Winterhalter, Mathias; Nussberger, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins are almost exclusively imported into mitochondria from the cytosol in an unfolded or partially folded conformation. Regardless of whether they are destined for the outer or inner membrane, the intermembrane space, or the matrix, proteins begin the importation process by crossing the mitochondrial outer membrane via a specialized protein import machinery whose main component is the Tom40 channel. High-resolution ion conductance measurements through the Tom40 channel in the presence of the mitochondrial presequence peptide pF1β revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. Here we show that the rates for association kon and dissociation koff strongly depend on the applied transmembrane voltage. Both kinetic constants increase with an increase in the applied voltage. The increase of koff with voltage provides strong evidence of peptide translocation. This allows us to distinguish quantitatively between substrate blocking and permeation. PMID:22225796

  8. Heterologous protein production using the twin arginine translocation pathway

    DOEpatents

    Pohlschroder, Mechtild; Kissinger, Jessica C; Rose, R. Wesley; Brueser, Thomas; Dilks, Kieran

    2008-11-04

    Provided are means for evaluating and identifying putative substrates of the twin arginine translocation (Tat) secretory pathway in Streptomyces and other bacterial species. Also provided, therefore, are simple ways to express, secrete and purify correctly folded heterologous proteins on a large scale using host microorganisms, such as, Streptomyces and the Tat pathway therein. Many of the thus-produced proteins are of significant therapeutic value in the pharmaceutical and biochemical industries, particularly when they can be secreted from the host in fully-folded active form. Accordingly, there are further provided the heterologous proteins produced by the Tat secretion pathway using the foregoing methods, and the computer algorithm used to identify the Tat signal sequence and putative substrates.

  9. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character. PMID:26996878

  10. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character.

  11. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character. PMID:26996878

  12. Minireview: Translocator Protein (TSPO) and Steroidogenesis: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Stocco, Douglas M.; Tu, Lan N.

    2015-01-01

    The 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a transmembrane protein in the outer mitochondrial membrane. TSPO has long been described as being indispensable for mitochondrial cholesterol import that is essential for steroid hormone production. In contrast to this initial proposition, recent experiments reexamining TSPO function have demonstrated that it is not involved in steroidogenesis. This fundamental change has forced a reexamination of the functional interpretations made for TSPO that broadly impacts both basic and clinical research across multiple fields. In this minireview, we recapitulate the key studies from 25 years of TSPO research and concurrently examine their limitations that perhaps led towards the incorrect association of TSPO and steroid hormone production. Although this shift in understanding raises new questions regarding the molecular function of TSPO, these recent developments are poised to have a significant positive impact for research progress in steroid endocrinology. PMID:25730708

  13. Identification of a plastid protein involved in vesicle fusion and/or membrane protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; d'Harlingue, A; Kuntz, M; Camara, B

    1995-01-01

    Structural evidence has accumulated suggesting that fusion and/or translocation factors are involved in plastid membrane biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an in vitro system in which the extent of fusion and/or translocation is monitored by the conversion of the xanthophyll epoxide (antheraxanthin) into the red ketocarotenoid (capsanthin). Only chromoplast membrane vesicles from red pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum) contain the required enzyme. Vesicles prepared from the mutant yellow cultivar are devoid of this enzyme and accumulate antheraxanthin. The fusion and/or translocation activity is characterized by complementation due to the synthesis of capsanthin and the parallel decrease of antheraxanthin when the two types of vesicles are incubated together in the presence of plastid stroma. We show that the extent of conversion is dependent upon an ATP-requiring protein that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Further purification and immunological analysis have revealed that the active factor, designated plastid fusion and/or translocation factor (Pftf), resides in a protein of 72 kDa. cDNA cloning revealed that mature Pftf has significant homology to yeast and animal (NSF) or bacterial (Ftsh) proteins involved in vesicle fusion or membrane protein translocation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777561

  14. The prediction of novel multiple lipid-binding regions in protein translocation motor proteins: a possible general feature.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2011-03-01

    Protein translocation is an important cellular process. SecA is an essential protein component in the Sec system, as it contains the molecular motor that facilitates protein translocation. In this study, a bioinformatics approach was applied in the search for possible lipid-binding helix regions in protein translocation motor proteins. Novel lipid-binding regions in Escherichia coli SecA were identified. Remarkably, multiple lipid-binding sites were also identified in other motor proteins such as BiP, which is involved in ER protein translocation. The prokaryotic signal recognition particle receptor FtsY, though not a motor protein, is in many ways related to SecA, and was therefore included in this study. The results demonstrate a possible general feature for motor proteins involved in protein translocation. PMID:20957445

  15. Mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO): From physiology to cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Morin, Didier; Musman, Julien; Pons, Sandrine; Berdeaux, Alain; Ghaleh, Bijan

    2016-04-01

    The mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol binding protein which is primarily located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it has been shown to interact with proteins implicated in mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) formation. TSPO is found in different species and is expressed at high levels in tissues that synthesize steroids but is also present in other peripheral tissues especially in the heart. TSPO has been involved in the import of cholesterol into mitochondria, a key step in steroidogenesis. This constitutes the main established function of the protein which was recently challenged by genetic studies. TSPO has also been associated directly or indirectly with a wide range of cellular functions such as apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, regulation of mitochondrial function or porphyrin transport. In the heart the role of TSPO remains undefined but a growing body of evidence suggests that TSPO plays a critical role in regulating physiological cardiac function and that TSPO ligands may represent interesting drugs to protect the heart under pathological conditions. This article briefly reviews current knowledge regarding TSPO and discusses its role in the cardiovascular system under physiological and pathologic conditions. More particularly, it provides evidence that TSPO can represent an alternative strategy to develop new pharmacological agents to protect the myocardium against ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26688086

  16. Structure and Activity of Tryptophan-rich TSPO Translocator Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Ginter, Christopher; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    TSPO translocator proteins bind steroids and porphyrins, and they are implicated in many human diseases, for which they serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. TSPOs have tryptophan-rich sequences that are fhighly conserved from bacteria to mammals. We report crystal structures for Bacillus cereus TSPO (BcTSPO) down to 1.7Å resolution, including a complex with the benzodiazepine-like inhibitor PK11195. We also describe BcTSPO-mediated protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) reactions, including catalytic degradation to a previously undescribed heme derivative. We used structure-inspired mutations to investigate reaction mechanisms, and we showed that TSPOs from Xenopus and man have similar PpIX-directed activities. Although TSPOs have been regarded as transporters, the catalytic activity in PpIX degradation suggests physiological importance for TSPOs in protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25635100

  17. Hsp70 chaperones accelerate protein translocation and the unfolding of stable protein aggregates by entropic pulling.

    PubMed

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Ben-Zvi, Anat; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2006-04-18

    Hsp70s are highly conserved ATPase molecular chaperones mediating the correct folding of de novo synthesized proteins, the translocation of proteins across membranes, the disassembly of some native protein oligomers, and the active unfolding and disassembly of stress-induced protein aggregates. Here, we bring thermodynamic arguments and biochemical evidences for a unifying mechanism named entropic pulling, based on entropy loss due to excluded-volume effects, by which Hsp70 molecules can convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into a force capable of accelerating the local unfolding of various protein substrates and, thus, perform disparate cellular functions. By means of entropic pulling, individual Hsp70 molecules can accelerate unfolding and pulling of translocating polypeptides into mitochondria in the absence of a molecular fulcrum, thus settling former contradictions between the power-stroke and the Brownian ratchet models for Hsp70-mediated protein translocation across membranes. Moreover, in a very different context devoid of membrane and components of the import pore, the same physical principles apply to the forceful unfolding, solubilization, and assisted native refolding of stable protein aggregates by individual Hsp70 molecules, thus providing a mechanism for Hsp70-mediated protein disaggregation. PMID:16606842

  18. Hsp70 chaperones accelerate protein translocation and the unfolding of stable protein aggregates by entropic pulling

    PubMed Central

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Ben-Zvi, Anat; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Hsp70s are highly conserved ATPase molecular chaperones mediating the correct folding of de novo synthesized proteins, the translocation of proteins across membranes, the disassembly of some native protein oligomers, and the active unfolding and disassembly of stress-induced protein aggregates. Here, we bring thermodynamic arguments and biochemical evidences for a unifying mechanism named entropic pulling, based on entropy loss due to excluded-volume effects, by which Hsp70 molecules can convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into a force capable of accelerating the local unfolding of various protein substrates and, thus, perform disparate cellular functions. By means of entropic pulling, individual Hsp70 molecules can accelerate unfolding and pulling of translocating polypeptides into mitochondria in the absence of a molecular fulcrum, thus settling former contradictions between the power-stroke and the Brownian ratchet models for Hsp70-mediated protein translocation across membranes. Moreover, in a very different context devoid of membrane and components of the import pore, the same physical principles apply to the forceful unfolding, solubilization, and assisted native refolding of stable protein aggregates by individual Hsp70 molecules, thus providing a mechanism for Hsp70-mediated protein disaggregation. PMID:16606842

  19. A G-protein subunit translocation embedded network motif underlies GPCR regulation of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K; Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K V; Gautam, N

    2014-07-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  20. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein and Arrhythmogenesis in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders, including ischemic heart disease. Although mitochondria are well recognized for their role in energy production and cell death, mechanisms by which they control excitation-contraction coupling, excitability, and arrhythmias are less clear. The translocator protein (TSPO) is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that is expressed in multiple organ systems. The abundant expression of TSPO in macrophages has been leveraged to image the immune response of the heart to inflammatory processes. More recently, the recognition of TSPO as a regulator of energy-dissipating mitochondrial pathways has extended its utility from a diagnostic marker of inflammation to a therapeutic target influencing diverse pathophysiological processes. Here, we provide an overview of the emerging role of TSPO in ischemic heart disease. We highlight the importance of TSPO in the regenerative process of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced ROS release through its effects on the inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) and the permeability transition pore (PTP). We discuss evidence implicating TSPO in arrhythmogenesis in the settings of acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:25918579

  1. Controlling protein translocation through nanopores with bio-inspired fluid walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusko, Erik C.; Johnson, Jay M.; Majd, Sheereen; Prangkio, Panchika; Rollings, Ryan C.; Li, Jiali; Yang, Jerry; Mayer, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Synthetic nanopores have been used to study individual biomolecules in high throughput, but their performance as sensors does not match that of biological ion channels. Challenges include control of nanopore diameters and surface chemistry, modification of the translocation times of single-molecule analytes through nanopores, and prevention of non-specific interactions with pore walls. Here, inspired by the olfactory sensilla of insect antennae, we show that coating nanopores with a fluid lipid bilayer tailors their surface chemistry and allows fine-tuning and dynamic variation of pore diameters in subnanometre increments. Incorporation of mobile ligands in the lipid bilayer conferred specificity and slowed the translocation of targeted proteins sufficiently to time-resolve translocation events of individual proteins. Lipid coatings also prevented pores from clogging, eliminated non-specific binding and enabled the translocation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers and fibrils. Through combined analysis of their translocation time, volume, charge, shape and ligand affinity, different proteins were identified.

  2. Cytoplasmic translocation of the retinoblastoma protein disrupts sarcomeric organization.

    PubMed

    Araki, Keigo; Kawauchi, Keiko; Hirata, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Mie; Taya, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle degeneration is a complication arising from a variety of chronic diseases including advanced cancer. Pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α plays a pivotal role in mediating cancer-related skeletal muscle degeneration. Here, we show a novel function for retinoblastoma protein (Rb), where Rb causes sarcomeric disorganization. In human skeletal muscle myotubes (HSMMs), up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and concomitant phosphorylation of Rb was induced by TNF-α treatment, resulting in the translocation of phosphorylated Rb to the cytoplasm. Moreover, induced expression of the nuclear exporting signal (NES)-fused form of Rb caused disruption of sarcomeric organization. We identified mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (mDia1), a potent actin nucleation factor, as a binding partner of cytoplasmic Rb and found that mDia1 helps maintain the structural integrity of the sarcomere. These results reveal a novel non-nuclear function for Rb and suggest a potential mechanism of TNF-α-induced disruption of sarcomeric organization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01228.001. PMID:24302570

  3. Protein translocation without specific quality control in a computational model of the Tat system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Chitra R.; Brown, Aidan I.; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins of various sizes across both bacterial and plant thylakoid membranes. The membrane-associated TatA protein is an essential component of the Tat translocon, and a broad distribution of different sized TatA-clusters is observed in bacterial membranes. We assume that the size dynamics of TatA clusters are affected by substrate binding, unbinding, and translocation to associated TatBC clusters, where clusters with bound translocation substrates favour growth and those without associated substrates favour shrinkage. With a stochastic model of substrate binding and cluster dynamics, we numerically determine the TatA cluster size distribution. We include a proportion of targeted but non-translocatable (NT) substrates, with the simplifying hypothesis that the substrate translocatability does not directly affect cluster dynamical rate constants or substrate binding or unbinding rates. This amounts to a translocation model without specific quality control. Nevertheless, NT substrates will remain associated with TatA clusters until unbound and so will affect cluster sizes and translocation rates. We find that the number of larger TatA clusters depends on the NT fraction f. The translocation rate can be optimized by tuning the rate of spontaneous substrate unbinding, {{\\Gamma }_{U}}. We present an analytically solvable three-state model of substrate translocation without cluster size dynamics that follows our computed translocation rates, and that is consistent with in vitro Tat-translocation data in the presence of NT substrates.

  4. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T. )

    1989-11-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl {beta}-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure ({sup 35}S)pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components.

  5. Stable Translocation Intermediates Jam Global Protein Export in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites and Link the PTEX Component EXP2 with Translocation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mesén-Ramírez, Paolo; Reinsch, Ferdinand; Blancke Soares, Alexandra; Bergmann, Bärbel; Ullrich, Ann-Katrin; Tenzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein export is central for the survival and virulence of intracellular P. falciparum blood stage parasites. To reach the host cell, exported proteins cross the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) and the parasite-enclosing parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), a process that requires unfolding, suggestive of protein translocation. Components of a proposed translocon at the PVM termed PTEX are essential in this phase of export but translocation activity has not been shown for the complex and questions have been raised about its proposed membrane pore component EXP2 for which no functional data is available in P. falciparum. It is also unclear how PTEX mediates trafficking of both, soluble as well as transmembrane proteins. Taking advantage of conditionally foldable domains, we here dissected the translocation events in the parasite periphery, showing that two successive translocation steps are needed for the export of transmembrane proteins, one at the PPM and one at the PVM. Our data provide evidence that, depending on the length of the C-terminus of the exported substrate, these steps occur by transient interaction of the PPM and PVM translocon, similar to the situation for protein transport across the mitochondrial membranes. Remarkably, we obtained constructs of exported proteins that remained arrested in the process of being translocated across the PVM. This clogged the translocation pore, prevented the export of all types of exported proteins and, as a result, inhibited parasite growth. The substrates stuck in translocation were found in a complex with the proposed PTEX membrane pore component EXP2, suggesting a role of this protein in translocation. These data for the first time provide evidence for EXP2 to be part of a translocating entity, suggesting that PTEX has translocation activity and provide a mechanistic framework for the transport of soluble as well as transmembrane proteins from the parasite boundary into the host cell. PMID:27168322

  6. Prediction of lipid-binding regions in cytoplasmic and extracellular loops of membrane proteins as exemplified by protein translocation membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rob C A

    2013-01-01

    The presence of possible lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic or extracellular loops of membrane proteins with an emphasis on protein translocation membrane proteins was investigated in this study using bioinformatics. Recent developments in approaches recognizing lipid-binding regions in proteins were found to be promising. In this study a total bioinformatics approach specialized in identifying lipid-binding helical regions in proteins was explored. Two features of the protein translocation membrane proteins, the position of the transmembrane regions and the identification of additional lipid-binding regions, were analyzed. A number of well-studied protein translocation membrane protein structures were checked in order to demonstrate the predictive value of the bioinformatics approach. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that lipid-binding regions in the cytoplasmic and extracellular loops in protein translocation membrane proteins can be predicted, and it is proposed that the interaction of these regions with phospholipids is important for proper functioning during protein translocation. PMID:22961045

  7. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor-Y Boosts Yersinia Effector Translocation by Activating Rac Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Manuel; Boyle, Erin C.; Lardong, Kerstin; Trülzsch, Konrad; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia spp. translocate the effectors YopT, YopE, and YopO/YpkA into target cells to inactivate Rho family GTP-binding proteins and block immune responses. Some Yersinia spp. also secrete the Rho protein activator cytotoxic necrotizing factor-Y (CNF-Y), but it has been unclear how the bacteria may benefit from Rho protein activation. We show here that CNF-Y increases Yop translocation in Yersinia enterocolitica-infected cells up to 5-fold. CNF-Y strongly activated RhoA and also delayed in time Rac1 and Cdc42, but when individually expressed, constitutively active mutants of Rac1, but not of RhoA, increased Yop translocation. Consistently, knock-out or knockdown of Rac1 but not of RhoA, -B, or -C inhibited Yersinia effector translocation in CNF-Y-treated and control cells. Activation or knockdown of Cdc42 also affected Yop translocation but much less efficiently than Rac. The increase in Yop translocation induced by CNF-Y was essentially independent of the presence of YopE, YopT, or YopO in the infecting Yersinia strain, indicating that none of the Yops reported to inhibit translocation could reverse the CNF-Y effect. In summary, the CNF-Y activity of Yersinia strongly enhances Yop translocation through activation of Rac. PMID:23803609

  8. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  9. Nuclear Translocation of Crk Adaptor Proteins by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Ylösmäki, Leena; Fagerlund, Riku; Kuisma, Inka; Julkunen, Ilkka; Saksela, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The non-structural protein-1 (NS1) of many influenza A strains, especially those of avian origin, contains an SH3 ligand motif, which binds tightly to the cellular adaptor proteins Crk (Chicken tumor virus number 10 (CT10) regulator of kinase) and Crk-like adapter protein (CrkL). This interaction has been shown to potentiate NS1-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), but additional effects on the host cell physiology may exist. Here we show that NS1 can induce an efficient translocation of Crk proteins from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which results in an altered pattern of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation. This was not observed using NS1 proteins deficient in SH3 binding or engineered to be exclusively cytoplasmic, indicating a physical role for NS1 as a carrier in the nuclear translocation of Crk. These data further emphasize the role of Crk proteins as host cell interaction partners of NS1, and highlight the potential for host cell manipulation gained by a viral protein simply via acquiring a short SH3 binding motif. PMID:27092521

  10. Translocator protein mediates the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of midazolam.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Li, Ming-Sheng; He, Jia-Li; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Guan-Hua; Lai, Sha; Ma, Jian-Chun; Zeng, Jia; Li, Yan; Wu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Yong; Shen, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) plays an important role in stress-related disorders, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), caused by neurosteroids (e.g. allopregnanolone). The present study sought to evaluate the significance of TSPO in anxiolytic and antidepressant effects induced by midazolam. The animals were administrated midazolam (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and subjected to behavioral tests, including Vogel-type conflict test, elevated plus-maze test, forced swimming test. Midazolam produced anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects Vogel-type conflict test (1 mg/kg, i.p.), elevated plus-maze test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and forced swimming test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.). These effects of Midazolam were totally blocked by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). To evaluate the role of allopregnanolone in the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam, the animals were decapitated at the end of the behavioral tests. The allopregnanolone levels of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The allopregnanolone level of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was increased by midazolam (0.5, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the increase was reversed by PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). Overall, the results indicated that the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam were mediated by TSPO, via stimulation of allopregnanolone biosynthesis. PMID:26455280

  11. Apratoxin Kills Cells by Direct Blockade of the Sec61 Protein Translocation Channel.

    PubMed

    Paatero, Anja O; Kellosalo, Juho; Dunyak, Bryan M; Almaliti, Jehad; Gestwicki, Jason E; Gerwick, William H; Taunton, Jack; Paavilainen, Ville O

    2016-05-19

    Apratoxin A is a cytotoxic natural product that prevents the biogenesis of secretory and membrane proteins. Biochemically, apratoxin A inhibits cotranslational translocation into the ER, but its cellular target and mechanism of action have remained controversial. Here, we demonstrate that apratoxin A prevents protein translocation by directly targeting Sec61α, the central subunit of the protein translocation channel. Mutagenesis and competitive photo-crosslinking studies indicate that apratoxin A binds to the Sec61 lateral gate in a manner that differs from cotransin, a substrate-selective Sec61 inhibitor. In contrast to cotransin, apratoxin A does not exhibit a substrate-selective inhibitory mechanism, but blocks ER translocation of all tested Sec61 clients with similar potency. Our results suggest that multiple structurally unrelated natural products have evolved to target overlapping but non-identical binding sites on Sec61, thereby producing distinct biological outcomes. PMID:27203376

  12. The invariant phenylalanine of precursor proteins discloses the importance of Omp85 for protein translocation into cyanelles

    PubMed Central

    Wunder, Tobias; Martin, Roman; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Schleiff, Enrico; Steiner, Jürgen M

    2007-01-01

    Background Today it is widely accepted that plastids are of cyanobacterial origin. During their evolutionary integration into the metabolic and regulatory networks of the host cell the engulfed cyanobacteria lost their independency. This process was paralleled by a massive gene transfer from symbiont to the host nucleus challenging the development of a retrograde protein translocation system to ensure plastid functionality. Such a system includes specific targeting signals of the proteins needed for the function of the plastid and membrane-bound machineries performing the transfer of these proteins across the envelope membranes. At present, most information on protein translocation is obtained by the analysis of land plants. However, the analysis of protein import into the primitive plastids of glaucocystophyte algae, revealed distinct features placing this system as a tool to understand the evolutionary development of translocation systems. Here, bacterial outer membrane proteins of the Omp85 family have recently been discussed as evolutionary seeds for the development of translocation systems. Results To further explore the initial mode of protein translocation, the observed phenylalanine dependence for protein translocation into glaucophyte plastids was pursued in detail. We document that indeed the phenylalanine has an impact on both, lipid binding and binding to proteoliposomes hosting an Omp85 homologue. Comparison to established import experiments, however, unveiled a major importance of the phenylalanine for recognition by Omp85. This finding is placed into the context of the evolutionary development of the plastid translocon. Conclusion The phenylalanine in the N-terminal domain signs as a prerequisite for protein translocation across the outer membrane assisted by a "primitive" translocon. This amino acid appears to be optimized for specifically targeting the Omp85 protein without enforcing aggregation on the membrane surface. The phenylalanine has

  13. Signal Peptide-Binding Drug as a Selective Inhibitor of Co-Translational Protein Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W.; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Giraut, Anne; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Hartmann, Enno

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, surface expression of most type I transmembrane proteins requires translation and simultaneous insertion of the precursor protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for subsequent routing to the cell surface. This co-translational translocation pathway is initiated when a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide (SP) on the nascent protein emerges from the ribosome, binds the cytosolic signal recognition particle (SRP), and targets the ribosome-nascent chain complex to the Sec61 translocon, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel in the ER-membrane. Despite their common function in Sec61 targeting and ER translocation, SPs have diverse but unique primary sequences. Thus, drugs that recognise SPs could be exploited to inhibit translocation of specific proteins into the ER. Here, through flow cytometric analysis the small-molecule macrocycle cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) is identified as a highly selective human CD4 (hCD4) down-modulator. We show that CADA inhibits CD4 biogenesis and that this is due to its ability to inhibit co-translational translocation of CD4 into the lumen of the ER, both in cells as in a cell-free in vitro translation/translocation system. The activity of CADA maps to the cleavable N-terminal SP of hCD4. Moreover, through surface plasmon resonance analysis we were able to show direct binding of CADA to the SP of hCD4 and identify this SP as the target of our drug. Furthermore, CADA locks the SP in the translocon during a post-targeting step, possibly in a folded state, and prevents the translocation of the associated protein into the ER lumen. Instead, the precursor protein is routed to the cytosol for degradation. These findings demonstrate that a synthetic, cell-permeable small-molecule can be developed as a SP-binding drug to selectively inhibit protein translocation and to reversibly regulate the expression of specific target proteins. PMID:25460167

  14. Protein O-Mannosyltransferases Associate with the Translocon to Modify Translocating Polypeptide Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Loibl, Martin; Wunderle, Lina; Hutzler, Johannes; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Aebi, Markus; Strahl, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    O-Mannosylation and N-glycosylation are essential protein modifications that are initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Protein translocation across the ER membrane and N-glycosylation are highly coordinated processes that take place at the translocon-oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex. In analogy, it was assumed that protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs) also act at the translocon, however, in recent years it turned out that prolonged ER residence allows O-mannosylation of un-/misfolded proteins or slow folding intermediates by Pmt1-Pmt2 complexes. Here, we reinvestigate protein O-mannosylation in the context of protein translocation. We demonstrate the association of Pmt1-Pmt2 with the OST, the trimeric Sec61, and the tetrameric Sec63 complex in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. The coordinated interplay between PMTs and OST in vivo is further shown by a comprehensive mass spectrometry-based analysis of N-glycosylation site occupancy in pmtΔ mutants. In addition, we established a microsomal translation/translocation/O-mannosylation system. Using the serine/threonine-rich cell wall protein Ccw5 as a model, we show that PMTs efficiently mannosylate proteins during their translocation into microsomes. This in vitro system will help to unravel mechanistic differences between co- and post-translocational O-mannosylation. PMID:24519942

  15. Preprotein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in milieus crowded by proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, José. Antonio; Guzmán, Orlando; Navarro, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Translocation of preproteins chains between the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum lumen takes place in a milieu crowded primarily by proteins. We compute translocation and retrotranslocation times for chains of different length in a milieu crowded by spherical agents at volume fractions equivalent to that found in cells. These numerical times obtained from a diffusion-equation model subject to a potential given by the free energy of one chain, indicate that crowding increases the translocation time by up to five times compared to those in dilute conditions for average-size chains and by up to a thousand times for long chains. Retrotranslocation times become smaller than translocation ones, in approximately 75%. Translocation rates obtained in this work are similar to those found in a theoretical model for Brownian-ratchet translocation and coincide with in vitro experimental results (1-8 aminoacid/s) only in the limit of very long chains; for shorter chains, translocation rates are much faster. Our prediction that for long chains translocation rates would be significantly slowed by crowding can be tested experimentally using vesicles. Discrepancy of time-scales with experiments for short chains indicates that other factors beside crowding must be included in our model.

  16. A protein kinase C isozyme is translocated to cytoskeletal elements on activation.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Henrich, C J; Cheever, L; Khaner, H; Simpson, P C

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC)1 isozymes comprise a family of related cytosolic kinases that translocate to the cell particulate fraction on stimulation. The activated enzyme is thought to be on the plasma membrane. However, phosphorylation of protein substrates occurs throughout the cell and is inconsistent with plasma membrane localization. Using an isozyme-specific monoclonal antibody we found that, on activation, this PKC isozyme translocates to myofibrils in cardiac myocytes and to microfilaments in fibroblasts. Translocation of this activated PKC isozyme to cytoskeletal elements may explain some of the effects of PKC on cell contractility and morphology. In addition, differences in the translocation site of individual isozymes--and, therefore, phosphorylation of different substrates localized at these sites--may explain the diverse biological effects of PKC. Images PMID:2078573

  17. Kinetics and energetics of the translocation of maltose binding protein folding mutants.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Danuta; Nouwen, Nico; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2008-03-14

    Protein translocation in Escherichia coli is mediated by the translocase that, in its minimal form, comprises a protein-conducting pore (SecYEG) and a motor protein (SecA). The SecYEG complex forms a narrow channel in the membrane that allows passage of secretory proteins (preproteins) in an unfolded state only. It has been suggested that the SecA requirement for translocation depends on the folding stability of the mature preprotein domain. Here we studied the effects of the signal sequence and SecB on the folding and translocation of folding stabilizing and destabilizing mutants of the mature maltose binding protein (MBP). Although the mutations affect the folding of the precursor form of MBP, these are drastically overruled by the combined unfolding stabilization of the signal sequence and SecB. Consequently, the translocation kinetics, the energetics and the SecA and SecB dependence of the folding mutants are indistinguishable from those of wild-type preMBP. These data indicate that unfolding of the mature domain of preMBP is likely not a rate-determining step in translocation when the protein is targeted to the translocase via SecB. PMID:18241889

  18. A Hands-On Approach to Teaching Protein Translation & Translocation into the ER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBonte, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in which students use Play-Doh to simulate the process of protein…

  19. SecA Alone Can Promote Protein Translocation and Ion Channel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ying-hsin; Zhang, Hao; Lin, Bor-ruei; Cui, Ningren; Na, Bing; Yang, Hsiuchin; Jiang, Chun; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C.

    2011-01-01

    SecA is an essential component of the Sec-dependent protein translocation pathway across cytoplasmic membranes in bacteria. Escherichia coli SecA binds to cytoplasmic membranes at SecYEG high affinity sites and at phospholipid low affinity sites. It has been widely viewed that SecYEG functions as the essential protein-conducting channel through which precursors cross the membranes in bacterial Sec-dependent pathways, and that SecA functions as a motor to hydrolyze ATP in translocating precursors through SecYEG channels. We have now found that SecA alone can promote precursor translocation into phospholiposomes. Moreover, SecA-liposomes elicit ionic currents in Xenopus oocytes. Patch-clamp recordings further show that SecA alone promotes signal peptide- or precursor-dependent single channel activity. These activities were observed with the functional SecA at about 1–2 μm. The results show that SecA alone is sufficient to promote protein translocation into liposomes and to elicit ionic channel activity at the phospholipids low affinity binding sites, thus indicating that SecA is able to form the protein-conducting channels. Even so, such SecA-liposomes are less efficient than those with a full complement of Sec proteins, and lose the signal-peptide proofreading function, resembling the effects of PrlA mutations. Addition of purified SecYEG restores the signal peptide specificity and increases protein translocation and ion channel activities. These data show that SecA can promote protein translocation and ion channel activities both when it is bound to lipids at low affinity sites and when it is bound to SecYEG with high affinity. The latter of the two interactions confers high efficiency and specificity. PMID:22033925

  20. Ion selectivity of the anthrax toxin channel and its effect on protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Damon; Finkelstein, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin consists of three ∼85-kD proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA). PA63 (the 63-kD, C-terminal portion of PA) forms heptameric channels ((PA63)7) in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes that enable the translocation of LF and EF across the membrane. These mushroom-shaped channels consist of a globular cap domain and a 14-stranded β-barrel stem domain, with six anionic residues lining the interior of the stem to form rings of negative charges. (PA63)7 channels are highly cation selective, and, here, we investigate the effects on both cation selectivity and protein translocation of mutating each of these anionic residues to a serine. We find that although some of these mutations reduce cation selectivity, selectivity alone does not directly predict the rate of protein translocation; local changes in electrostatic forces must be considered as well. PMID:26170174

  1. Protein co-translocational unfolding depends on the direction of pulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Bayley, Hagan

    2014-09-01

    Protein unfolding and translocation through pores occurs during trafficking between organelles, protein degradation and bacterial toxin delivery. In vivo, co-translocational unfolding can be affected by the end of the polypeptide that is threaded into the pore first. Recently, we have shown that co-translocational unfolding can be followed in a model system at the single-molecule level, thereby unravelling molecular steps and their kinetics. Here, we show that the unfolding kinetics of the model substrate thioredoxin, when pulled through an α-haemolysin pore, differ markedly depending on whether the process is initiated from the C terminus or the N terminus. Further, when thioredoxin is pulled from the N terminus, the unfolding pathway bifurcates: some molecules finish unfolding quickly, while others finish ~100 times slower. Our findings have important implications for the understanding of biological unfolding mechanisms and in the application of nanopore technology for the detection of proteins and their modifications.

  2. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11897.001 PMID:26714107

  3. Interaction of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), with focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Zurawski, D V; Chowrashi, P; Ayoob, J C; Huang, L; Mittal, B; Sanger, J M; Sanger, J W

    2000-12-01

    When enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) attach and infect host cells, they induce a cytoskeletal rearrangement and the formation of cytoplasmic columns of actin filaments called pedestals. The attached EPEC and pedestals move over the surface of the host cell in an actin-dependent reaction [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 34:279-287]. The discovery that EPEC inserts the protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), into the membrane of host cells, where it binds the EPEC outer membrane protein, intimin [Kenny et al., 1997: Cell 91:511-520], suggests Tir serves two functions: tethering the bacteria to the host cell and providing a direct connection to the host's cytoskeleton. The sequence of Tir predicts a protein of 56.8 kD with three domains separated by two predicted trans-membrane spanning regions. A GST-fusion protein of the N-terminal 233 amino acids of Tir (Tir1) binds to alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin from cell extracts. GST-Tir1 also coprecipitates purified forms of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin while GST alone does not bind these three focal adhesion proteins. Biotinylated probes of these three proteins also bound Tir1 cleaved from GST. Similar associations of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin were also detected with the C-terminus of Tir, i.e., Tir3, the last 217 amino acids. Antibody staining of EPEC-infected cultured cells reveals the presence of focal adhesion proteins beneath the attached bacteria. Our experiments support a model in which the cytoplasmic domains of Tir recruit a number of focal adhesion proteins that can bind actin filaments to form pedestals. Since pedestals also contain villin, tropomyosin and myosin II [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 34:279-287], the pedestals appear to be a novel structure sharing properties of both focal adhesions and microvilli. PMID:11093251

  4. Stochastic but highly coordinated protein unfolding and translocation by the ClpXP proteolytic machine.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Juan Carlos; Olivares, Adrian O; Shin, Yongdae; Stinson, Benjamin M; Calmat, Stephane; Schmitz, Karl R; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Baker, Tania A; Lang, Matthew J; Sauer, Robert T

    2014-07-31

    ClpXP and other AAA+ proteases recognize, mechanically unfold, and translocate target proteins into a chamber for proteolysis. It is not known whether these remarkable molecular machines operate by a stochastic or sequential mechanism or how power strokes relate to the ATP-hydrolysis cycle. Single-molecule optical trapping allows ClpXP unfolding to be directly visualized and reveals translocation steps of ∼1-4 nm in length, but how these activities relate to solution degradation and the physical properties of substrate proteins remains unclear. By studying single-molecule degradation using different multidomain substrates and ClpXP variants, we answer many of these questions and provide evidence for stochastic unfolding and translocation. We also present a mechanochemical model that accounts for single-molecule, biochemical, and structural results for our observation of enzymatic memory in translocation stepping, for the kinetics of translocation steps of different sizes, and for probabilistic but highly coordinated subunit activity within the ClpX ring. PMID:25083874

  5. Novel Translocation Responses of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Rhonda E.; Willingham, Mark C.; Daniel, Larry W.; Leslie, Christina C.; Rogers, LeAnn C.; Sergeant, Susan; O’Flaherty, Joseph T.

    2008-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)α responds to the rise in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) attending cell stimulation by moving to intracellular membranes, releasing arachidonic acid (AA) from these membranes, and thereby initiating the synthesis of various lipid mediators. Under some conditions, however, cPLA2α translocation occurs without any corresponding changes in [Ca2+]i. The signal for such responses has not been identified. Using confocal microscopy to track fluorescent proteins fused to cPLA2α or cPLA2α’s C2 domain, we find that AA mimics Ca2+ ionophores in stimulating cPLA2α translocations to the perinuclear ER and to a novel site, the lipid body. Unlike the ionophores, AA acted independently of [Ca2+]i rises and did not translocate the proteins to the Golgi. AA’s action did not involve its metabolism to eicosanoids or acylation into cellular lipids. Receptor agonists also stimulated translocations targeting lipid bodies. We propose that AA is a signal for Ca2+-independent cPLA2α translocation and that lipid bodies are common targets of cPLA2α and contributors to stimulus-induced lipid mediator synthesis. PMID:18406359

  6. Novel translocation responses of cytosolic phospholipase A2alpha fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Rhonda E; Willingham, Mark C; Daniel, Larry W; Leslie, Christina C; Rogers, LeAnn C; Sergeant, Susan; O'Flaherty, Joseph T

    2008-08-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)alpha responds to the rise in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) attending cell stimulation by moving to intracellular membranes, releasing arachidonic acid (AA) from these membranes, and thereby initiating the synthesis of various lipid mediators. Under some conditions, however, cPLA2alpha translocation occurs without any corresponding changes in [Ca2+]i. The signal for such responses has not been identified. Using confocal microscopy to track fluorescent proteins fused to cPLA2alpha or cPLA2alpha's C2 domain, we find that AA mimics Ca2+ ionophores in stimulating cPLA(2)alpha translocations to the perinuclear ER and to a novel site, the lipid body. Unlike the ionophores, AA acted independently of [Ca2+](i) rises and did not translocate the proteins to the Golgi. AA's action did not involve its metabolism to eicosanoids or acylation into cellular lipids. Receptor agonists also stimulated translocations targeting lipid bodies. We propose that AA is a signal for Ca2+-independent cPLA2alpha translocation and that lipid bodies are common targets of cPLA2alpha and contributors to stimulus-induced lipid mediator synthesis. PMID:18406359

  7. Decatransin, a new natural product inhibiting protein translocation at the Sec61/SecYEG translocon

    PubMed Central

    Junne, Tina; Wong, Joanne; Studer, Christian; Aust, Thomas; Bauer, Benedikt W.; Beibel, Martin; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Bruccoleri, Robert; Eichenberger, Jürg; Estoppey, David; Hartmann, Nicole; Knapp, Britta; Krastel, Philipp; Melin, Nicolas; Oakeley, Edward J.; Oberer, Lukas; Riedl, Ralph; Roma, Guglielmo; Schuierer, Sven; Petersen, Frank; Tallarico, John A.; Rapoport, Tom A.; Spiess, Martin; Hoepfner, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new cyclic decadepsipeptide was isolated from Chaetosphaeria tulasneorum with potent bioactivity on mammalian and yeast cells. Chemogenomic profiling in S. cerevisiae indicated that the Sec61 translocon complex, the machinery for protein translocation and membrane insertion at the endoplasmic reticulum, is the target. The profiles were similar to those of cyclic heptadepsipeptides of a distinct chemotype (including HUN-7293 and cotransin) that had previously been shown to inhibit cotranslational translocation at the mammalian Sec61 translocon. Unbiased, genome-wide mutagenesis followed by full-genome sequencing in both fungal and mammalian cells identified dominant mutations in Sec61p (yeast) or Sec61α1 (mammals) that conferred resistance. Most, but not all, of these mutations affected inhibition by both chemotypes, despite an absence of structural similarity. Biochemical analysis confirmed inhibition of protein translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum of both co- and post-translationally translocated substrates by both chemotypes, demonstrating a mechanism independent of a translating ribosome. Most interestingly, both chemotypes were found to also inhibit SecYEG, the bacterial Sec61 translocon homolog. We suggest ‘decatransin’ as the name for this new decadepsipeptide translocation inhibitor. PMID:25616894

  8. Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO): An Old Protein with New Functions?

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Liu, Nan; Kuhn, Leslie A; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2016-05-24

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) was previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in eukaryotes, where it is mainly localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Considerable evidence indicates that it plays regulatory roles in steroidogenesis and apoptosis and is involved in various human diseases, such as metastatic cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, inflammation, and anxiety disorders. Ligands of TSPO are widely used as diagnostic tools and treatment options, despite there being no clear understanding of the function of TSPO. An ortholog in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter was independently discovered as the tryptophan-rich sensory protein (TspO) and found to play a role in the response to changes in oxygen and light conditions that regulate photosynthesis and respiration. As part of this highly conserved protein family found in all three kingdoms, the rat TSPO is able to rescue the knockout phenotype in Rhodobacter, indicating functional as well as structural conservation. Recently, a major breakthrough in the field was achieved: the determination of atomic-resolution structures of TSPO from different species by several independent groups. This now allows us to reexamine the function of TSPO with a molecular perspective. In this review, we focus on recently determined structures of TSPO and their implications for potential functions of this ubiquitous multifaceted protein. We suggest that TSPO is an ancient bacterial receptor/stress sensor that has developed additional interactions, partners, and roles in its mitochondrial outer membrane environment in eukaryotes. PMID:27074410

  9. Protein structure. Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-01-30

    The 18-kilodalton translocator protein (TSPO), proposed to be a key player in cholesterol transport into mitochondria, is highly expressed in steroidogenic tissues, metastatic cancer, and inflammatory and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. TSPO ligands, including benzodiazepine drugs, are implicated in regulating apoptosis and are extensively used in diagnostic imaging. We report crystal structures (at 1.8, 2.4, and 2.5 angstrom resolution) of TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and a mutant that mimics the human Ala(147)→Thr(147) polymorphism associated with psychiatric disorders and reduced pregnenolone production. Crystals obtained in the lipidic cubic phase reveal the binding site of an endogenous porphyrin ligand and conformational effects of the mutation. The three crystal structures show the same tightly interacting dimer and provide insights into the controversial physiological role of TSPO and how the mutation affects cholesterol binding. PMID:25635101

  10. Trapping a translocating protein within the anthrax toxin channel: implications for the secondary structure of permeating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jennings-Antipov, Laura D.; Jakes, Karen S.; Finkelstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax toxin consists of three proteins: lethal factor (LF), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA). This last forms a heptameric channel, (PA63)7, in the host cell’s endosomal membrane, allowing the former two (which are enzymes) to be translocated into the cytosol. (PA63)7 incorporated into planar bilayer membranes forms a channel that translocates LF and EF, with the N terminus leading the way. The channel is mushroom-shaped with a cap containing the binding sites for EF and LF, and an ∼100 Å–long, 15 Å–wide stem. For proteins to pass through the stem they clearly must unfold, but is secondary structure preserved? To answer this question, we developed a method of trapping the polypeptide chain of a translocating protein within the channel and determined the minimum number of residues that could traverse it. We attached a biotin to the N terminus of LFN (the 263-residue N-terminal portion of LF) and a molecular stopper elsewhere. If the distance from the N terminus to the stopper was long enough to traverse the channel, streptavidin added to the trans side bound the N-terminal biotin, trapping the protein within the channel; if this distance was not long enough, streptavidin did not bind the N-terminal biotin and the protein was not trapped. The trapping rate was dependent on the driving force (voltage), the length of time it was applied, and the number of residues between the N terminus and the stopper. By varying the position of the stopper, we determined the minimum number of residues required to span the channel. We conclude that LFN adopts an extended-chain configuration as it translocates; i.e., the channel unfolds the secondary structure of the protein. We also show that the channel not only can translocate LFN in the normal direction but also can, at least partially, translocate LFN in the opposite direction. PMID:21402886

  11. The interplay between components of the mitochondrial protein translocation motor studied using purified components.

    PubMed

    Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Marom, Milit; Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Maoz, Sharon; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-11-23

    The final step of protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane is mediated by a translocation motor composed of 1) the matrix-localized, ATP-hydrolyzing, 70-kDa heat shock protein mHsp70; 2) its anchor to the import channel, Tim44; 3) the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1; and 4) a J-domain-containing complex of co-chaperones, Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16. Despite its essential role in the biogenesis of mitochondria, the mechanism by which the translocation motor functions is still largely unknown. The goal of this work was to carry out a structure-function analysis of the mitochondrial translocation motor utilizing purified components, with an emphasis on the formation of the Tim44-mHsp70 complex. To this end, we purified Tim44 and monitored its interaction with other components of the motor using cross-linking with bifunctional reagents. The effects of nucleotides, the J-domain-containing components, and the P5 peptide (CALLSAPRR, representing part of the mitochondrial targeting signal of aspartate aminotransferase) on the formation of the translocation motor were examined. Our results show that only the peptide and nucleotides, but not J-domain-containing proteins, affect the Tim44-mHsp70 interaction. Additionally, binding of Tim44 to mHsp70 prevents the formation of a complex between the latter and Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16. Thus, mutually exclusive interactions between various components of the motor with mHsp70 regulate its functional cycle. The results are discussed in light of known models for the function of the mitochondrial translocation motor. PMID:17881357

  12. Translocation of signalling proteins to the plasma membrane revealed by a new bioluminescent procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation by extracellular ligands of G protein-coupled (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), results in the generation of second messengers that in turn control specific cell functions. Further, modulation/amplification or inhibition of the initial signalling events, depend on the recruitment onto the plasma membrane of soluble protein effectors. High throughput methodologies to monitor quantitatively second messenger production, have been developed over the last years and are largely used to screen chemical libraries for drug development. On the contrary, no such high throughput methods are yet available for the other aspect of GPCRs regulation, i.e. protein translocation to the plasma membrane, despite the enormous interest of this phenomenon for the modulation of receptor downstream functions. Indeed, to date, the experimental procedures available are either inadequate or complex and expensive. Results Here we describe the development of a novel conceptual approach to the study of cytosolic proteins translocation to the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The basis of the technique consists in: i) generating chimeras between the protein of interests and the calcium (Ca2+)-sensitive, luminescent photo-protein, aequorin and ii) taking advantage of the large Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+] difference between bulk cytosolic and the sub-plasma membrane rim. Conclusion This approach, that keeps unaffected the translocation properties of the signalling protein, can in principle be applied to any protein that, upon activation, moves from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Thus, not only the modulation of GPCRs and RTKs can be investigated in this way, but that of all other proteins that can be recruited to the plasma membrane also independently of receptor activation. Moreover, its automated version, which can provide information about the kinetics and concentration-dependence of the process, is also applicable to high throughput screening of drugs

  13. Bioinformatic and mass spectrometry identification of Anaplasma phagocytophilum proteins translocated into host cell nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Sara H. G.; Garcia-Garcia, Jose C.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Obligate intracellular bacteria have an arsenal of proteins that alter host cells to establish and maintain a hospitable environment for replication. Anaplasma phagocytophilum secrets Ankyrin A (AnkA), via a type IV secretion system, which translocates to the nucleus of its host cell, human neutrophils. A. phagocytophilum-infected neutrophils have dramatically altered phenotypes in part explained by AnkA-induced transcriptional alterations. However, it is unlikely that AnkA is the sole effector to account for infection-induced transcriptional changes. We developed a simple method combining bioinformatics and iTRAQ protein profiling to identify potential bacterial-derived nuclear-translocated proteins that could impact transcriptional programming in host cells. This approach identified 50 A. phagocytophilum candidate genes or proteins. The encoding genes were cloned to create GFP fusion protein-expressing clones that were transfected into HEK-293T cells. We confirmed nuclear translocation of six proteins: APH_0062, RplE, Hup, APH_0382, APH_0385, and APH_0455. Of the six, APH_0455 was identified as a type IV secretion substrate and is now under investigation as a potential nucleomodulin. Additionally, application of this approach to other intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia trachomatis and other intracellular bacteria identified multiple candidate genes to be investigated. PMID:25705208

  14. The translocation time of DNA and protein molecules in solid-state nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledden, Bradley; Rollings, Ryan; Talaga, David; Li, Jiali

    2011-03-01

    The time that a biopolymer takes to translocate through a nanopore contains the properties of the polymer including its size, conformation, electrical charge and charge distribution. We measured the dependence of the translocation times on the size, charge and charge distribution, voltage, and conformation states of DNA and protein molecules. To quantitatively fit the time distributions measured, 1-D Langevin and 1-D Fokker-Planck equations were used for DNA and native state proteins. Kramers reaction rate theory was used to fit the time distribution of unfolded proteins. It was observed that native-state protein and DNA translocation approximately follows simple one-dimensional biased diffusion of charged particles. Due to the heterogeneous charge sequence of polypeptides, unfolded proteins obey a coupled electrophoretic and thermally activated process that is sequence specific. Deviations between models and experimental results as well as future challenges for single molecule DNA and protein characterization using solid-state nanopores will be discussed. Funding support provided by NHGRI/NIH R21HG003290, NHGRI /NIH R21HG00477, and NIH R01GM071684 to DST.

  15. Cooperation of TOM and TIM23 complexes during translocation of proteins into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Waegemann, Karin; Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; Neupert, Walter; Azem, Abdussalam; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-03-13

    Translocation of the majority of mitochondrial proteins from the cytosol into mitochondria requires the cooperation of TOM and TIM23 complexes in the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. The molecular mechanisms underlying this cooperation remain largely unknown. Here, we present biochemical and genetic evidence that at least two contacts from the side of the TIM23 complex play an important role in TOM-TIM23 cooperation in vivo. Tim50, likely through its very C-terminal segment, interacts with Tom22. This interaction is stimulated by translocating proteins and is independent of any other TOM-TIM23 contact known so far. Furthermore, the exposure of Tim23 on the mitochondrial surface depends not only on its interaction with Tim50 but also on the dynamics of the TOM complex. Destabilization of the individual contacts reduces the efficiency of import of proteins into mitochondria and destabilization of both contacts simultaneously is not tolerated by yeast cells. We conclude that an intricate and coordinated network of protein-protein interactions involving primarily Tim50 and also Tim23 is required for efficient translocation of proteins across both mitochondrial membranes. PMID:25083920

  16. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  17. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2.

    PubMed

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  18. Targeted Activation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinases C through Differential Translocation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Xin; Reither, Gregor; Kaestner, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the two ubiquitous families of protein kinases, protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), is thought to be independently coupled to stimulation of Gαs and Gαq, respectively. Live-cell confocal imaging of protein kinase C fluorescent protein fusion constructs revealed that simultaneous activation of Gαs and Gαq resulted in a differential translocation of the conventional PKCα to the plasma membrane while the novel PKCδ was recruited to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We demonstrate that the PKCδ translocation was driven by a novel Gαs-cyclic AMP-EPAC-RAP-PLCε pathway resulting in specific diacylglycerol production at the membrane of the ER. Membrane-specific phosphorylation sensors revealed that directed translocation resulted in phosphorylation activity confined to the target membrane. Specific stimulation of PKCδ caused phosphorylation of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor and dampening of global Ca2+ signaling revealed by graded flash photolysis of caged inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. Our data demonstrate a novel signaling pathway enabling differential decoding of incoming stimuli into PKC isoform-specific membrane targeting, significantly enhancing the versatility of cyclic AMP signaling, thus demonstrating the possible interconnection between the PKA and PKC pathways traditionally treated independently. We thus provide novel and elementary understanding and insights into intracellular signaling events. PMID:24732802

  19. A Cell-Free Translocation System Using Extracts of Cultured Insect Cells to Yield Functional Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ezure, Toru; Nanatani, Kei; Sato, Yoko; Suzuki, Satomi; Aizawa, Keishi; Souma, Satoshi; Ito, Masaaki; Hohsaka, Takahiro; von Heijine, Gunnar; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Abe, Keietsu; Ando, Eiji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis is a powerful method to explore the structure and function of membrane proteins and to analyze the targeting and translocation of proteins across the ER membrane. Developing a cell-free system based on cultured cells for the synthesis of membrane proteins could provide a highly reproducible alternative to the use of tissues from living animals. We isolated Sf21 microsomes from cultured insect cells by a simplified isolation procedure and evaluated the performance of the translocation system in combination with a cell-free translation system originating from the same source. The isolated microsomes contained the basic translocation machinery for polytopic membrane proteins including SRP-dependent targeting components, translocation channel (translocon)-dependent translocation, and the apparatus for signal peptide cleavage and N-linked glycosylation. A transporter protein synthesized with the cell-free system could be functionally reconstituted into a lipid bilayer. In addition, single and double labeling with non-natural amino acids could be achieved at both the lumen side and the cytosolic side in this system. Moreover, tail-anchored proteins, which are post-translationally integrated by the guided entry of tail-anchored proteins (GET) machinery, were inserted correctly into the microsomes. These results showed that the newly developed cell-free translocation system derived from cultured insect cells is a practical tool for the biogenesis of properly folded polytopic membrane proteins as well as tail-anchored proteins. PMID:25486605

  20. Structural Integrity of Proteins under Applied Bias during Solid-State Nanopore Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Khanzada, Raja Raheel; Mahmood, Mohammed A. I.; Ashfaq, Adnan; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2015-03-01

    The translocation behavior of proteins through solid-state nanopores can be used as a new way to detect and identify proteins. The ionic current through a nanopore that flows under applied bias gets perturbed when a biomolecule traverses the Nanopore. It is important for a protein detection scheme to know of any changes in the three-dimensional structure of the molecule during the process. Here we report the data on structural integrity of protein during translocation through nanopore under different applied biases. Nanoscale Molecular Dynamic was used to establish a framework to study the changes in protein structures as these travelled across the nanopore. The analysis revealed the contributions of structural changes of protein to its ionic current signature. As a model, thrombin protein crystalline structure was imported and positioned inside a 6 nm diameter pore in a 6 nm thick silicon nitride membrane. The protein was solvated in 1 M KCl at 295 K and the system was equilibrated for 20 ns to attain its minimum energy state. The simulation was performed at different electric fields from 0 to 1 kCal/(mol.Å.e). RMSD, radial distribution function, movement of the center of mass and velocity of the protein were calculated. The results showed linear increments in the velocity and perturbations in ionic current profile with increasing electric potential. Support Acknowledged from NSF through ECCS-1201878.

  1. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  2. The first dipeptide ligand of translocator protein: Design and anxiolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A; Deeva, O A; Mokrov, G V; Yarkov, S A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the structure of Alpidem, a pyrazolopyrimidine ligand of the translocator protein (TSPO), a dipeptide TSPO ligand, N-carbobenzoxy-L-tryptophanyl-L-isoleucine amide (GD-23), was designed and synthesized using our own original peptide design strategy. This compound exhibited anxiolytic activity in BALB/cAnN mice in the "open-field" test and in outbred CD1 mice in the "elevated plus maze" test. The stereoselectivity of the anxiolytic effect of GD-23 is demonstrated. The results of this study suggest that GD-23 is a ligand of the translocator protein, and its structure can become the basis for creating anxiolytics with a fundamentally new mechanism of action. PMID:26518550

  3. Slowing down single-molecule trafficking through a protein nanopore reveals intermediates for peptide translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereuta, Loredana; Roy, Mahua; Asandei, Alina; Lee, Jong Kook; Park, Yoonkyung; Andricioaei, Ioan; Luchian, Tudor

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic details of how peptides translocate one at a time through nanopores are crucial determinants for transport through membrane pores and important in developing nano-technologies. To date, the translocation process has been too fast relative to the resolution of the single molecule techniques that sought to detect its milestones. Using pH-tuned single-molecule electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate how peptide passage through the α-hemolysin protein can be sufficiently slowed down to observe intermediate single-peptide sub-states associated to distinct structural milestones along the pore, and how to control residence time, direction and the sequence of spatio-temporal state-to-state dynamics of a single peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptide translocation reveal the time- dependent ordering of intermediate structures of the translocating peptide inside the pore at atomic resolution. Calculations of the expected current ratios of the different pore-blocking microstates and their time sequencing are in accord with the recorded current traces.

  4. BCL2 protein expression in follicular lymphomas with t(14;18) chromosomal translocations.

    PubMed

    Masir, Noraidah; Campbell, Lisa J; Goff, Lindsey K; Jones, Margaret; Marafioti, Teresa; Cordell, Jacqueline; Clear, Andrew J; Lister, T Andrew; Mason, David Y; Lee, Abigail M

    2009-03-01

    The t(14;18)(q32;q21) chromosomal translocation induces BCL2 protein overexpression in most follicular lymphomas. However the expression of BCL2 is not always homogeneous and may demonstrate a variable degree of heterogeneity. This study analysed BCL2 protein expression pattern in 33 cases of t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphomas using antibodies against two different epitopes (i.e. the widely used antibody BCL2/124 and an alternative antibody E17). 16/33 (49%) cases demonstrated strong BCL2 expression. In 10/33 (30%) cases, BCL2 expression was heterogeneous and in some of these, its loss appeared to be correlated with cell proliferation, as indicated by Ki67 expression. Double immunofluorescence labelling confirmed an inverse BCL2/Ki67 relationship, where in 24/28 (86%) cases cellular expression of BCL2 and Ki67 was mutually exclusive. In addition, seven BCL2 'pseudo-negative' cases were identified in which immunostaining was negative with antibody BCL2/124, but positive with antibody E17. Genomic DNA sequencing of these 'pseudo-negative' cases demonstrated eleven mutations in four cases and nine of these were missense mutations. It can be concluded that in follicular lymphomas, despite carrying the t(14;18) translocations, BCL2 protein expression may be heterogeneous and loss of BCL2 could be related to cell proliferation. Secondly, mutations in translocated BCL2 genes appear to be common and may cause BCL2 pseudo-negative immunostaining. PMID:19120369

  5. Single-molecule protein unfolding and translocation by an ATP-fueled proteolytic machine

    PubMed Central

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Olivares, Adrian O.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    All cells employ ATP-powered proteases for protein-quality control and regulation. In the ClpXP protease, ClpX is a AAA+ machine that recognizes specific protein substrates, unfolds these molecules, and then translocates the denatured polypeptide through a central pore and into ClpP for degradation. Here, we use optical-trapping nanometry to probe the mechanics of enzymatic unfolding and translocation of single molecules of a multidomain substrate. Our experiments demonstrate the capacity of ClpXP and ClpX to perform mechanical work under load, reveal very fast and highly cooperative unfolding of individual substrate domains, suggest a translocation step size of 5–8 amino acids, and support a power-stroke model of denaturation in which successful enzyme-mediated unfolding of stable domains requires coincidence between mechanical pulling by the enzyme and a transient stochastic reduction in protein stability. We anticipate that single-molecule studies of the mechanical properties of other AAA+ proteolytic machines will reveal many shared features with ClpXP. PMID:21496645

  6. a Computational Approach to Explore Protein Translocation Through Type III Secretion Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi; Im, Wonpil

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria initiate infections by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) that is comprised of a basal body, a needle, and a tip. The needle channel is formed by the assembly of a single needle protein. To explore the export mechanisms of MxiH needle protein through the needle of Shigella flexneri, an essential step during needle assembly, we have performed steered molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent. Interestingly, the electronegative channel interior creates an energy barrier for MxiH to enter the channel, while the same may facilitate the ejection of the effectors into host cells. Structurally-known basal regions and ATPase underneath the basal region have also such electronegative interior, while effector proteins have considerable electronegative patches on their surfaces. Based on these observations, we propose a repulsive electrostatic mechanism for protein translocation through the TTSA. This mechanism is supported by the suggestion that an ATPase is required for protein translocation through these nanomachines, which may provide the energy to overcome the initial electrostatic energy barrier. A similar mechanism may be applicable to macromolecular channels in other secretion systems or viruses through which proteins or nucleic acids are transported.

  7. Genetic and biochemical characterization of ISP6, a small mitochondrial outer membrane protein associated with the protein translocation complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kassenbrock, C K; Cao, W; Douglas, M G

    1993-01-01

    To search genetically for additional components of the protein translocation apparatus of mitochondria, we have used low fidelity PCR mutagenesis to generate temperature-sensitive mutants in the outer membrane translocation pore component ISP42. A high copy number suppressor of temperature-sensitive isp42 has been isolated and sequenced. This novel gene, denoted ISP6, encodes a 61 amino acid integral membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which is oriented with its amino-terminus facing the cytosol. Disruption of the ISP6 gene is without apparent effect in wild type yeast cells, but is lethal in temperature-sensitive isp42 mutants. Immunoprecipitation of the gene product, ISP42p, from mitochondria solubilized under mild conditions reveals a multi-protein complex containing ISP6p and ISP42p. Images PMID:8344244

  8. SepD/SepL-Dependent Secretion Signals of the Type III Secretion System Translocator Proteins in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wanyin; Yu, Hong B.; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type III protein secretion system (T3SS) encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) is essential for the pathogenesis of attaching/effacing bacterial pathogens, including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and Citrobacter rodentium. These pathogens use the T3SS to sequentially secrete three categories of proteins: the T3SS needle and inner rod protein components; the EspA, EspB, and EspD translocators; and many LEE- and non-LEE-encoded effectors. SepD and SepL are essential for translocator secretion, and mutations in either lead to hypersecretion of effectors. However, how SepD and SepL control translocator secretion and secretion hierarchy between translocators and effectors is poorly understood. In this report, we show that the secreted T3SS components, the translocators, and both LEE- and non-LEE-encoded effectors all carry N-terminal type III secretion and translocation signals. These signals all behave like those of the effectors and are sufficient for mediating type III secretion and translocation by wild-type EPEC and hypersecretion by the sepD and sepL mutants. Our results extended previous observations and suggest that the secretion hierarchy of the different substrates is determined by a signal other than the N-terminal secretion signal. We identified a domain located immediately downstream of the N-terminal secretion signal in the translocator EspB that is required for SepD/SepL-dependent secretion. We further demonstrated that this EspB domain confers SepD/SepL- and CesAB-dependent secretion on the secretion signal of effector EspZ. Our results thus suggest that SepD and SepL control and regulate secretion hierarchy between translocators and effectors by recognizing translocator-specific export signals. IMPORTANCE Many bacterial pathogens use a syringe-like protein secretion apparatus, termed the type III protein secretion system (T3SS), to secrete and inject numerous proteins directly into

  9. The 18 kDa translocator protein, microglia and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Jun; Middleton, Ryan J; Hatty, Claire R; Kam, Winnie Wai-Ying; Chan, Ronald; Pham, Tien; Harrison-Brown, Meredith; Dodson, Eoin; Veale, Kelly; Banati, Richard B

    2014-11-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is expressed in the injured brain. It has become known as an imaging marker of "neuroinflammation" indicating active disease, and is best interpreted as a nondiagnostic biomarker and disease staging tool that refers to histopathology rather than disease etiology. The therapeutic potential of TSPO as a drug target is mostly based on the understanding that it is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein required for the translocation of cholesterol, which thus regulates the rate of steroid synthesis. This pivotal role together with the evolutionary conservation of TSPO has underpinned the belief that any loss or mutation of TSPO should be associated with significant physiological deficits or be outright incompatible with life. However, against prediction, full Tspo knockout mice are viable and across their lifespan do not show the phenotype expected if cholesterol transport and steroid synthesis were significantly impaired. Thus, the "translocation" function of TSPO remains to be better substantiated. Here, we discuss the literature before and after the introduction of the new nomenclature for TSPO and review some of the newer findings. In light of the controversy surrounding the function of TSPO, we emphasize the continued importance of identifying compounds with confirmed selectivity and suggest that TSPO expression is analyzed within specific disease contexts rather than merely equated with the reified concept of "neuroinflammation." PMID:25345894

  10. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Dubytska, Lidiya P; Rogge, Matthew L; Thune, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  11. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lidiya P.; Rogge, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  12. The Novel Dipeptide Translocator Protein Ligand, Referred to As GD-23, Exerts Anxiolytic and Nootropic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Povarnina, P. Yu.; Yarkov, S. A.; Gudasheva, T. A.; Yarkova, M. A.; Seredenin, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) promotes the translocation of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane and mediates steroid formation. In this study, we first report on a biological evaluation of the dipeptide GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L tryptophanyl-L isoleucine amide), a structural analogue of Alpidem, the principal TSPO ligand. We show that GD-23 in a dose range of 0.05 to 0.5 mg/kg (i.p.) exhibits anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze test and nootropic activity in the object recognition test in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodents. It was shown that GD-23 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, holding promise as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent. The anxiolytic and nootropic activities of GD-23 were abrogated by the TSPO specific ligand PK11195, which thus suggests a role for TSPO in mediating the pharmacological activity of GD-23. PMID:26483966

  13. The Novel Dipeptide Translocator Protein Ligand, Referred to As GD-23, Exerts Anxiolytic and Nootropic Activities.

    PubMed

    Povarnina, P Yu; Yarkov, S A; Gudasheva, T A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) promotes the translocation of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane and mediates steroid formation. In this study, we first report on a biological evaluation of the dipeptide GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L tryptophanyl-L isoleucine amide), a structural analogue of Alpidem, the principal TSPO ligand. We show that GD-23 in a dose range of 0.05 to 0.5 mg/kg (i.p.) exhibits anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze test and nootropic activity in the object recognition test in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodents. It was shown that GD-23 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, holding promise as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent. The anxiolytic and nootropic activities of GD-23 were abrogated by the TSPO specific ligand PK11195, which thus suggests a role for TSPO in mediating the pharmacological activity of GD-23. PMID:26483966

  14. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate promotes nuclear translocation of hepatic steroid response element binding protein-2.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Tan, Yan Qin; Lin, Shu-Mei; Leung, Lai K

    2016-06-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-2 is a pivotal transcriptional factor in cholesterol metabolism. Factors interfering with the proper functioning of SREBP-2 potentially alter plasma lipid profiles. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), which is a common protein kinase C (PKC) activator, was shown to promote the post-translational processing and nuclear translocation of SREBP-2 in hepatic cells in the current study. Following SREBP-2 translocation, the transcripts of its target genes HMGCR and LDLR were upregulated as demonstrated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) also demonstrated an induced DNA-binding activity on the sterol response element (SRE) domain under PMA treatment. The increase of activated Srebp-2 without the concurrent induced mRNA expression was also observed in an animal model. As the expression of SREBP-2 was not increased by PMA, the activation of PKC was the focus of investigation. Specific PKC isozyme inhibition and overexpression supported that PKCβ was responsible for the promoting effect. Further studies showed that the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), but not 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), were the possible downstream signaling proteins of PKCβ. In conclusion, this study illustrated that PKCβ increased SREBP-2 nuclear translocation in a pathway mediated by MEK/ERK and JNK, rather than the one dictated by AMPK. These results revealed a novel signaling target of PKCβ in the liver cells. PMID:27032751

  15. Computer simulations of the translocation and unfolding of a protein pulled mechanically through a pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2005-09-01

    Protein degradation by ATP-dependent proteases and protein import into the mitochondrial matrix involve the unfolding of proteins upon their passing through narrow constrictions. It has been hypothesized that the cellular machinery accomplishes protein unfolding by pulling mechanically at one end of the polypeptide chain. Here, we use Langevin dynamics simulations of a minimalist off-lattice model to examine this hypothesis and to study the unfolding of a protein domain pulled mechanically through a long narrow pore. We compute the potential of mean force (PMF) experienced by the domain as a function of its displacement along the pore and identify the unfolding intermediates corresponding to the local minima of the PMF. The observed unfolding mechanism is different from that found when the two termini are pulled apart, as in single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments. It depends on the pore diameter, the magnitude of the pulling force, and on whether the force is applied at the N- or the C-terminus of the chain. Consequently, the translocation time exhibits a pulling force dependence that is more complex than a simple exponential function expected on the basis of simple phenomenological models of translocation.

  16. Functional characterization of the trans-membrane domain interactions of the Sec61 protein translocation complex beta-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueqiang; Jäntti, Jussi

    2009-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic cells co- and post-translational protein translocation is mediated by the trimeric Sec61 complex. Currently, the role of the Sec61 complex β-subunit in protein translocation is poorly understood. We have shown previously that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the trans-membrane domain alone is sufficient for the function of the β-subunit Sbh1p in co-translational protein translocation. In addition, Sbh1p co-purifies not only with the protein translocation channel subunits Sec61p and Sss1p, but also with the reticulon family protein Rtn1p. Results We used random mutagenesis to generate novel Sbh1p mutants in order to functionally map the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. These mutants were analyzed for their interactions with Sec61p and how they support co-translational protein translocation. The distribution of mutations identifies one side of the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain α-helix that is involved in interactions with Sec61p and that is important for Sbh1p function in protein translocation. At the same time, these mutations do not affect Sbh1p interaction with Rtn1p. Furthermore we show that Sbh1p is found in protein complexes containing not only Rtn1p, but also the two other reticulon-like proteins Rtn2p and Yop1p. Conclusion Our results identify functionally important amino acids in the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. In addition, our results provide additional support for the involvement of Sec61β in processes unlinked to protein translocation. PMID:19857245

  17. Twin-arginine-dependent translocation of SufI in the absence of cytosolic helper proteins.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Eva; Moser, Michael; Schiltz, Emile; Ueda, Takuya; Betton, Jean-Michel; Müller, Matthias

    2009-06-16

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) machinery present in bacterial and thylakoidal membranes is able to transport fully folded proteins. Folding of some Tat precursor proteins requires dedicated chaperones that also sequester the signal sequence during the maturation process. Whether or not signal sequence-binding chaperones are a general prerequisite for all Tat substrate proteins is not known. Here, we have studied the propensity of Tat signal sequences of Escherichia coli to interact with general chaperones and peptidyl-prolyl-cis,trans-isomerases. Site-specific photocross-linking revealed a clear specificity for FK506-binding proteins. Nevertheless transport of the Tat substrate SufI into inverted inner membrane vesicles of E. coli was found to occur in the bona fide absence of any cytosolic chaperone. Our results suggest that in E. coli, cytosolic chaperones are not essential for the twin-arginine-dependent export of cofactor-less substrates. PMID:19432418

  18. Structural model for the protein-translocating element of the twin-arginine transport system

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fernanda; Rouse, Sarah L.; Tait, Claudia E.; Harmer, Jeffrey; De Riso, Antonio; Timmel, Christiane R.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Berks, Ben C.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocase (Tat) carries out the remarkable process of translocating fully folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of prokaryotes and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Tat is required for bacterial pathogenesis and for photosynthesis in plants. TatA, the protein-translocating element of the Tat system, is a small transmembrane protein that assembles into ring-like oligomers of variable size. We have determined a structural model of the Escherichia coli TatA complex in detergent solution by NMR. TatA assembly is mediated entirely by the transmembrane helix. The amphipathic helix extends outwards from the ring of transmembrane helices, permitting assembly of complexes with variable subunit numbers. Transmembrane residue Gln8 points inward, resulting in a short hydrophobic pore in the center of the complex. Simulations of the TatA complex in lipid bilayers indicate that the short transmembrane domain distorts the membrane. This finding suggests that TatA facilitates protein transport by sensitizing the membrane to transient rupture. PMID:23471988

  19. The role of protein kinase C alpha translocation in radiation-induced bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zihui; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun; Hei, Tom K.; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well known human carcinogen. Evidence accumulated over the past decade suggested that extranuclear/extracellular targets and events may also play a critical role in modulating biological responses to ionizing radiation. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of radiation-induced bystander effect is still unclear. In the current study, AL cells were irradiated with alpha particles and responses of bystander cells were investigated. We found out that in bystander AL cells, protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) translocated from cytosol to membrane fraction. Pre-treatment of cells with PKC translocation inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed the induced extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activity and the increased cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression as well as the mutagenic effect in bystander cells. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was elevated in directly irradiated but not bystander cells; while TNFα receptor 1 (TNFR1) increased in the membrane fraction of bystander cells. Further analysis revealed that PKC activation caused accelerated internalization and recycling of TNFR1. Our data suggested that PKCα translocation may occur as an early event in radiation-induced bystander responses and mediate TNFα-induced signaling pathways that lead to the activation of ERK and up-regulation of COX-2. PMID:27165942

  20. Glycosylation is essential for translocation of carp retinol-binding protein across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Devirgiliis, Chiara; Gaetani, Sancia; Apreda, Marianna; Bellovino, Diana . E-mail: bellovino@inran.it

    2005-07-01

    Retinoid transport is well characterized in many vertebrates, while it is still largely unexplored in fish. To study the transport and utilization of vitamin A in these organisms, we have isolated from a carp liver cDNA library retinol-binding protein, its plasma carrier. The primary structure of carp retinol-binding protein is very conserved, but presents unique features compared to those of the correspondent proteins isolated and characterized so far in other species: it has an uncleavable signal peptide and two N-glycosylation sites in the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the protein that are glycosylated in vivo. In this paper, we have investigated the function of the carbohydrate chains, by constructing three mutants deprived of the first, the second or both carbohydrates. The results of transient transfection of wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein in Cos cells followed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis have shown that the absence of both carbohydrate moieties blocks secretion, while the presence of one carbohydrate group leads to an inefficient secretion. Experiments of carp RBP mRNA in vitro translation in a reticulocyte cell-free system in the presence of microsomes have demonstrated that N-glycosylation is necessary for efficient translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Moreover, when Cos cells were transiently transfected with wild type and mutant retinol-binding protein (aa 1-67)-green fluorescent protein fusion constructs and semi-permeabilized with streptolysin O, immunofluorescence analysis with anti-green fluorescent protein antibody revealed that the double mutant is exposed to the cytosol, thus confirming the importance of glycan moieties in the translocation process.

  1. A homologous cell-free system for studying protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Brennwald, P; Wise, J A

    1994-02-01

    We report the development of a homologous in vitro assay system for analysing translocation of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our protocol for preparing an S. pombe extract capable of translating natural messenger RNAs was modified from a procedure previously used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which cells are lysed in a bead-beater. However, we were unable to prepare fission yeast microsomes active in protein translocation using existing budding yeast protocols. Instead, our most efficient preparations were isolated by fractionating spheroplasts, followed by extensive washing and size exclusion chromatography of the crude membranes. Translocation of two ER-targeted proteins, pre-acid phosphatase from S. pombe and prepro-alpha-factor from S. cerevisiae, was monitored using two distinct assays. First, evidence that a fraction of both proteins was sequestered within membrane-enclosed vesicles was provided by resistance to exogenously added protease. Second, the protected fraction of each protein was converted to a higher molecular weight, glycosylated form; attachment of carbohydrate to the translocated proteins was confirmed by their ability to bind Concanavalin A-Sepharose. Finally, we examined whether proteins could be translocated across fission yeast microsomal membranes after their synthesis was complete. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae prepro-alpha-factor can be post-translationally imported into the fission yeast ER, while S. pombe pre-acid phosphatase crosses the membrane only by a co-translational mechanism. PMID:8203158

  2. A Fluorescent Live Imaging Screening Assay Based on Translocation Criteria Identifies Novel Cytoplasmic Proteins Implicated in G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecat, Sandra; Matthes, Hans W D; Pepperkok, Rainer; Simpson, Jeremy C; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    Several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascades are known to translocate to the plasma membrane upon receptor activation, such as beta-arrestin2. Based on this example and in order to identify new cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the ON-and-OFF cycle of G protein-coupled receptor, a live-imaging screen of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins was performed using translocation criteria. The screening of 193 fluorescently tagged human proteins identified eight proteins that responded to activation of the tachykinin NK2 receptor by a change in their intracellular localization. Previously we have presented the functional characterization of one of these proteins, REDD1, that translocates to the plasma membrane. Here we report the results of the entire screening. The process of cell activation was recorded on videos at different time points and all the videos can be visualized on a dedicated website. The proteins BAIAP3 and BIN1, partially translocated to the plasma membrane upon activation of NK2 receptors. Proteins ARHGAP12 and PKM2 translocated toward membrane blebs. Three proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton were of particular interest : PLEKHH2 rearranged from individual dots located near the cell-substrate adhesion surface into lines of dots. The speriolin-like protein, SPATC1L, redistributed to cell-cell junctions. The Chloride intracellular Channel protein, CLIC2, translocated from actin-enriched plasma membrane bundles to cell-cell junctions upon activation of NK2 receptors. CLIC2, and one of its close paralogs, CLIC4, were further shown to respond with the same translocation pattern to muscarinic M3 and lysophosphatidic LPA receptors. This screen allowed us to identify potential actors in signaling pathways downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and could be scaled-up for high-content screening. PMID:25759509

  3. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters

    PubMed Central

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise. PMID:27098003

  4. Wnt Signaling Translocates Lys48-Linked Polyubiquitinated Proteins to the Lysosomal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjoon; Vick, Philipp; Hedtke, Joshua; Ploper, Diego; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-05-26

    Cellular proteins are degraded in either proteasomes or lysosomes depending on the types of ubiquitin chains that covalently modify them. It is not known whether the choice between these two pathways is physiologically regulated. The Lys48-polyubiquitin chain is the major signal directing proteins for degradation in proteasomes. Here, we report the unexpected finding that canonical Wnt signaling translocates some K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins to the endolysosomal pathway. Proteasomal target proteins, such as b-catenin, Smad1, and Smad4, were targeted into endolysosomes in a process dependent on GSK3 activity. Relocalization was also dependent on Axin1 and the multivesicular body (MVB) proteins HRS/Vps27 and Vps4. The Wnt-induced accumulation of K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins in endolysosomal organelles was accompanied by a transient decrease in cellular levels of free mono-ubiquitin, which may contribute to Wnt-regulated stabilization of proteins (Wnt/ STOP). We conclude that Wnt redirects Lys48-polyubiquitinated proteins that are normally degraded in proteasomes to endolysosomes. PMID:26004177

  5. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of protein translocation through nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Helms, Volkhard; Geyer, Tihamér

    2012-10-01

    A crucial process in biological cells is the translocation of newly synthesized proteins across cell membranes via integral membrane protein pores termed translocons. Recent improved techniques now allow producing artificial membranes with pores of similar dimensions of a few nm as the translocon system. For the translocon system, the protein has to be unfolded, whereas the artificial pores are wide enough so that small proteins can pass through even when folded. To study how proteins permeate through such membrane pores, we used coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations where the proteins were modeled as single beads or bead-spring polymers for both folded and unfolded states. The pores were modeled as cylindrical holes through the membrane with various radii and lengths. Diffusion was driven by a concentration gradient created across the porous membrane. Our results for both folded and unfolded configurations show the expected reciprocal relation between the flow rate and the pore length in agreement with an analytical solution derived by Brunn et al. [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 37, 311 (1984)], 10.1093/qjmam/37.2.311. Furthermore, we find that the geometric constriction by the narrow pore leads to an accumulation of proteins at the pore entrance, which in turn compensates for the reduced diffusivity of the proteins inside the pore.

  6. Functional cooperation and separation of translocators in protein import into mitochondria, the double-membrane bounded organelles.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Hayashi; Esaki, Masatoshi

    2003-08-15

    Nearly all mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytosol and subsequently imported into mitochondria with the aid of translocators: the TOM complex in the outer membrane, and the TIM23 and TIM22 complexes in the inner membrane. The TOM complex and the TIM complexes cooperate to achieve efficient transport of proteins to the matrix or into the inner membrane and several components, including Tom22, Tim23, Tim50 and small Tim proteins, mediate functional coupling of the two translocator systems. The TOM complex can be disconnected from the TIM systems and their energy sources (ATP and DeltaPsi), however, using alternative mechanisms to achieve vectorial protein translocation across the outer membrane PMID:12857785

  7. Adaptation of Clostridium difficile toxin A for use as a protein translocation system

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, Stephanie M.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Catalytic domain of TcdA was replaced by a luciferase reporter. {yields} Each functional domain retains activity in the context of the fusion protein. {yields} We provide evidence that reporter proteins are delivered into vero cells. {yields} System releases cargo into the cytosol, providing a powerful new biotechnology tool. -- Abstract: A cellular delivery system is a useful biotechnology tool, with many possible applications. Two derivatives of Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) have been constructed (GFP-TcdA and Luc-TcdA), by fusing reporter genes to functional domains of TcdA, and evaluated for their ability to translocate their cargo into mammalian cells. The cysteine protease and receptor binding domains of TcdA have been examined and found to be functional when expressed in the chimeric construct. Whereas GFP failed to internalize in the context of the TcdA fusion, significant cellular luciferase activity was detected in vero cell lysates after treatment with Luc-TcdA. Treatment with bafilomycin A1, which inhibits endosomal acidification, traps the luciferase activity within endosomes. To further understand these results, clarified lysates were subjected to molecular weight sieving, demonstrating that active luciferase was released from Luc-TcdA after translocation and internal processing.

  8. A physical model for the translocation and helicase activities of Escherichia coli transcription termination protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Geiselmann, J; Wang, Y; Seifried, S E; von Hippel, P H

    1993-01-01

    Transcription termination protein Rho of Escherichia coli interacts with newly synthesized RNA chains and brings about their release from elongation complexes paused at specific Rho-dependent termination sites. Rho is thought to accomplish this by binding to a specific Rho "loading site" on the nascent RNA and then translocating preferentially along the transcript in a 5'-->3' direction. On reaching the elongation complex, Rho releases the nascent RNA by a 5'-->3' RNA.DNA helicase activity. These translocation and helicase activities are driven by the RNA-dependent ATPase activity of Rho. In this paper we propose a mechanism for these processes that is based on the structure and properties of the Rho protein. Rho is a hexamer of identical subunits that are arranged as a trimer of asymmetric dimers with D3 symmetry. The binding of ATP and RNA to Rho also reflects this pattern; the Rho hexamer carries three strong and three weak binding sites for each of these entities. The asymmetric dimers of Rho correspond to functional dimers that can undergo conformational transitions driven by ATP hydrolysis. We propose that the quaternary structure of Rho coordinates the ATP-driven RNA binding and release processes to produce a biased random walk of the Rho hexamer along the RNA, followed by RNA.DNA helicase activity and transcript release. The proposed model may have implications for other hexameric DNA.DNA, RNA.DNA, and RNA.RNA helicases that function in replication and transcription. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7689228

  9. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca2+- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations (“spiking”) at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K+ depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca2+]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca2+]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function. PMID:27226533

  10. Autocrine Signaling Underlies Fast Repetitive Plasma Membrane Translocation of Conventional and Novel Protein Kinase C Isoforms in β Cells.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Anne; Yu, Qian; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-07-15

    PKC signaling has been implicated in the regulation of many cell functions, including metabolism, cell death, proliferation, and secretion. Activation of conventional and novel PKC isoforms is associated with their Ca(2+)- and/or diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent translocation to the plasma membrane. In β cells, exocytosis of insulin granules evokes brief (<10 s) local DAG elevations ("spiking") at the plasma membrane because of autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinoceptors by ATP co-released with insulin. Using total internal reflection microscopy, fluorescent protein-tagged PKCs, and signaling biosensors, we investigated whether DAG spiking causes membrane recruitment of PKCs and whether different classes of PKCs show characteristic responses. Glucose stimulation of MIN6 cells triggered DAG spiking with concomitant repetitive translocation of the novel isoforms PKCδ, PKCϵ, and PKCη. The conventional PKCα, PKCβI, and PKCβII isoforms showed a more complex pattern with both rapid and slow translocation. K(+) depolarization-induced PKCϵ translocation entirely mirrored DAG spiking, whereas PKCβI translocation showed a sustained component, reflecting the subplasma membrane Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]pm), with additional effect during DAG spikes. Interference with DAG spiking by purinoceptor inhibition prevented intermittent translocation of PKCs and reduced insulin secretion but did not affect [Ca(2+)]pm elevation or sustained PKCβI translocation. The muscarinic agonist carbachol induced pronounced transient PKCβI translocation and sustained recruitment of PKCϵ. When rise of [Ca(2+)]pm was prevented, the carbachol-induced DAG and PKCϵ responses were somewhat reduced, but PKCβI translocation was completely abolished. We conclude that exocytosis-induced DAG spikes efficiently recruit both conventional and novel PKCs to the β cell plasma membrane. PKC signaling is thus implicated in autocrine regulation of β cell function. PMID:27226533

  11. The role of lipids in membrane insertion and translocation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, Annemieke; de Kruijff, Ben

    2004-11-11

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of membranes and maintain the membrane permeability barrier of cells and organelles. They provide not only the bilayer matrix in which the functional membrane proteins reside, but they also can play direct roles in many essential cellular processes. In this review, we give an overview of the lipid involvement in protein translocation across and insertion into the Escherichia coli inner membrane. We describe the key and general roles that lipids play in these processes in conjunction with the protein components involved. We focus on the Sec-mediated insertion of leader peptidase. We describe as well the more direct roles that lipids play in insertion of the small coat proteins Pf3 and M13. Finally, we focus on the role of lipids in membrane assembly of oligomeric membrane proteins, using the potassium channel KcsA as model protein. In all cases, the anionic lipids and lipids with small headgroups play important roles in either determining the efficiency of the insertion and assembly process or contributing to the directionality of the insertion process. PMID:15546660

  12. Multifunctional Roles for the Protein Translocation Machinery in RNA Anchoring to the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Hsu, Jack C.-C.; Reid, David W.; Chen, Qiang; Thompson, Will J.; Moseley, Arthur M.; Nicchitta, Christopher V.

    2014-01-01

    Signal sequence-encoding mRNAs undergo translation-dependent localization to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and at the ER are anchored via translation on Sec61-bound ribosomes. Recent investigations into the composition and membrane association characteristics of ER-associated mRNAs have, however, revealed both ribosome-dependent (indirect) and ribosome-independent (direct) modes of mRNA association with the ER. These findings raise important questions regarding our understanding of how mRNAs are selected, localized, and anchored to the ER. Using semi-intact tissue culture cells, we performed a polysome solubilization screen and identified conditions that distinguish polysomes engaged in the translation of distinct cohorts of mRNAs. To gain insight into the molecular basis of direct mRNA anchoring to the ER, we performed RNA-protein UV photocross-linking studies in rough microsomes and demonstrate that numerous ER integral membrane proteins display RNA binding activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of HeLa cytosolic and ER-bound polysome fractions identified translocon components as selective polysome-interacting proteins. Notably, the Sec61 complex was highly enriched in polysomes engaged in the translation of endomembrane organelle proteins, whereas translocon accessory proteins, such as ribophorin I, were present in all subpopulations of ER-associated polysomes. Analyses of the protein composition of oligo(dT)-selected UV photocross-linked ER protein-RNA adducts identified Sec61α,β and ribophorin I as ER-poly(A) mRNA-binding proteins, suggesting unexpected roles for the protein translocation and modification machinery in mRNA anchoring to the ER. In summary, we propose that multiple mechanisms of mRNA and ribosome association with ER operate to enable an mRNA transcriptome-wide function for the ER in protein synthesis. PMID:25063809

  13. Translocation of an 89-kDa periplasmic protein is associated with Holospora infection

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Koichi; Dohra, Hideo; Lang, B. Franz; Burger, Gertraud; Hori, Manabu; Fujishima, Masahiro . E-mail: fujishim@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-02

    The symbiotic bacterium Holospora obtusa infects the macronucleus of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. After ingestion by its host, an infectious form of Holospora with an electron-translucent tip passes through the host digestive vacuole and penetrates the macronuclear envelope with this tip. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this process, we raised a monoclonal antibody against the tip-specific 89-kDa protein, sequenced this partially, and identified the corresponding complete gene. The deduced protein sequence carries two actin-binding motifs. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy shows that during escape from the host digestive vacuole, the 89-kDa proteins translocates from the inside to the outside of the tip. When the bacterium invades the macronucleus, the 89-kDa protein is left behind at the entry point of the nuclear envelope. Transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of fine fibrous structures that co-localize with the antibody-labeled regions of the bacterium. Our findings suggest that the 89-kDa protein plays a role in Holospora's escape from the host digestive vacuole, the migration through the host cytoplasm, and the invasion into the macronucleus.

  14. Site-specific fluorescent labeling to visualize membrane translocation of a myristoyl switch protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Lim, Sung In; Kiessling, Volker; Kwon, Inchan; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence approaches have been widely used for elucidating the dynamics of protein-membrane interactions in cells and model systems. However, non-specific multi-site fluorescent labeling often results in a loss of native structure and function, and single cysteine labeling is not feasible when native cysteines are required to support a protein's folding or catalytic activity. Here, we develop a method using genetic incorporation of non-natural amino acids and bio-orthogonal chemistry to site-specifically label with a single fluorescent small molecule or protein the myristoyl-switch protein recoverin, which is involved in rhodopsin-mediated signaling in mammalian visual sensory neurons. We demonstrate reversible Ca(2+)-responsive translocation of labeled recoverin to membranes and show that recoverin favors membranes with negative curvature and high lipid fluidity in complex heterogeneous membranes, which confers spatio-temporal control over down-stream signaling events. The site-specific orthogonal labeling technique is promising for structural, dynamical, and functional studies of many lipid-anchored membrane protein switches. PMID:27605302

  15. Serotonin transporter (SERT) and translocator protein (TSPO) expression in the obese ob/ob mouse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An ever growing body of evidences is emerging concerning metabolism hormones, neurotransmitters or stress-related biomarkers as effective modulators of eating behavior and body weight in mammals. The present study sought at examining the density and affinity of two proteins related to neurotransmission and cell metabolism, the serotonin transporter SERT and the cholesterol import-benzodiazepine site TSPO (translocator protein), in a rodent leptin-lacking mutant, the obese ob/ob mouse. Binding studies were thus carried out in brain or peripheral tissues, blood platelets (SERT) and kidneys (TSPO), of ob/ob and WT mice supplied with a standard diet, using the selective radiochemical ligands [3H]-paroxetine and [3H]-PK11195. Results We observed comparable SERT number or affinity in brain and platelets of ob/ob and WT mice, whilst a significantly higher [3H]-PK11195 density was reported in the brain of ob/ob animals. TSPO binding parameters were similar in the kidneys of all tested mice. By [3H]-PK11195 autoradiography of coronal hypothalamic-hippocampal sections, an increased TSPO signal was detected in the dentate gyrus (hippocampus) and choroids plexus of ob/ob mice, without appreciable changes in the cortex or hypothalamic-thalamic regions. Conclusions These findings show that TSPO expression is up-regulated in cerebral regions of ob/ob leptin-deficient mice, suggesting a role of the translocator protein in leptin-dependent CNS trophism and metabolism. Unchanged SERT in mutant mice is discussed herein in the context of previous literature as the forerunner to a deeper biochemical investigation. PMID:21299850

  16. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  17. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System.

    PubMed

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M; Enninga, Jost; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found theEscherichia coliO157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of theShigella flexnerieffector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles. PMID:26921426

  18. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System

    PubMed Central

    Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M.; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of the Shigella flexneri effector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles. PMID:26921426

  19. Dynamics of ten-eleven translocation hydroxylase family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianghui; Dai, Jinxiang; Ma, Yue; Mi, Yajing; Cui, Daxiang; Ju, Gong; Macklin, Wendy B; Jin, Weilin

    2014-06-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of methylcytosine dioxygenases catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and promote DNA demethylation. Despite the abundance of 5hmC and TET proteins in the brain, little is known about their role in oligodendrocytes (OLs). Here, we analyzed TET expression during OL development in vivo and in vitro, and found that three TET family members possess unique subcellular and temporal expression patterns. Furthermore, the level of 5hmC exhibits dynamic changes during OL maturation, which implies that 5hmC modification may play a role in the expression of critical genes necessary for OL maturation. siRNA-mediated silencing of the TET family proteins in OLs demonstrated that each of the TET proteins is required for OL differentiation. However, based on their unique domain structures, we speculate that the three TET members may function by different mechanisms. In summary, we have established the temporal expression of TET proteins and the dynamic level of 5hmC during OL development and demonstrate that all three TET members are necessary for OL differentiation. PMID:24615693

  20. Site-specific fluorescent labeling to visualize membrane translocation of a myristoyl switch protein

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Lim, Sung In; Kiessling, Volker; Kwon, Inchan; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence approaches have been widely used for elucidating the dynamics of protein-membrane interactions in cells and model systems. However, non-specific multi-site fluorescent labeling often results in a loss of native structure and function, and single cysteine labeling is not feasible when native cysteines are required to support a protein’s folding or catalytic activity. Here, we develop a method using genetic incorporation of non-natural amino acids and bio-orthogonal chemistry to site-specifically label with a single fluorescent small molecule or protein the myristoyl-switch protein recoverin, which is involved in rhodopsin-mediated signaling in mammalian visual sensory neurons. We demonstrate reversible Ca2+-responsive translocation of labeled recoverin to membranes and show that recoverin favors membranes with negative curvature and high lipid fluidity in complex heterogeneous membranes, which confers spatio-temporal control over down-stream signaling events. The site-specific orthogonal labeling technique is promising for structural, dynamical, and functional studies of many lipid-anchored membrane protein switches. PMID:27605302

  1. Ether analogues of DPA-714 with subnanomolar affinity for the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Beinat, Corinne; Wilkinson, Shane M; Shen, Bin; Bartoli, Cecilia; Selleri, Silvia; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Martini, Claudia; Chin, Frederick T; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-03-26

    Sixteen new phenyl alkyl ether derivatives (12, 14-28) of the 5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-ylacetamide (DPA) class were synthesized and evaluated in a competition binding assay against [(3)H]PK11195 using 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) derived from rat kidney mitochondrial fractions. All analogues showed superior binding affinities for TSPO compared to DPA-713 (5) and DPA-714 (6). Picomolar affinities were observed for this class of TSPO ligands in this assay for the first time, with phenethyl ether 28 showing the greatest affinity (Ki = 0.13 nM). Additionally, all analogues increased pregnenolone biosynthesis (134-331% above baseline) in a rat C6 glioma cell steroidogenesis assay. PMID:25725375

  2. Translocation and activation of protein kinase C by the plasma cell tumor-promoting alkane pristane.

    PubMed

    Janz, S; Gawrisch, K; Lester, D S

    1995-02-01

    Pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane) is a C19-isoalkane that promotes the development of plasmacytomas in genetically susceptible BALB/c mice. Similarities between the effects of pristane and protein kinase C (PKC)-activating phorbol esters suggested that the tumor promoting activity of pristane might involve the activation of PKC. Here we show that up to 5 mol% of pristane can be homogeneously incorporated into phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine bilayers. Membrane-incorporated pristane partially activated PKC and increased phorbol ester binding to the bilayer by more than 50%. Pristane (50 microM) delivered as an inclusion complex with beta-cyclodextrin to promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells induced a partial long-term translocation of PKC to the cell membrane. This was accompanied by differentiation of HL-60 cells into macrophage-like cells. It is concluded that activation of PKC may comprise an important aspect of the tumor promoting potential of pristane. PMID:7834620

  3. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 Translocates from the Cytosol to Mitochondria during UV-Induced Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wu, Shengnan; Feng, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic structures that frequently divide and fuse with one another to form interconnecting network. This network disintegrates into punctiform organelles during apoptosis. However, the mechanisms involved in these processes are still not well characterized. In this study, we investigate the role of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a large GTPase that mediates outer mitochondrial membrane fission, in mitochondrial dynamics in response to UV irradiation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-α-1) and HeLa cells. Using time-lapse fluorescent imaging, we find that Drp1 primarily distributes in cytosol under physiological conditions. After UV treatment, Drp1 translocates from cytosol to mitochondria, indicating the enhancement of Drp1 mitochondrial accumulation. Our results suggest that Drp1 is involved in the regulation of transition from an interconnecting network to a punctiform mitochondrial phenotype during UV-induced apoptosis.

  4. The Pathogenic Mechanism of the Mycobacterium ulcerans Virulence Factor, Mycolactone, Depends on Blockade of Protein Translocation into the ER

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Belinda S.; Hill, Kirsti; McKenna, Michael; Ogbechi, Joy; High, Stephen; Willis, Anne E.; Simmonds, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans is characterised by tissue necrosis and immunosuppression due to mycolactone, the necessary and sufficient virulence factor for Buruli ulcer disease pathology. Many of its effects are known to involve down-regulation of specific proteins implicated in important cellular processes, such as immune responses and cell adhesion. We have previously shown mycolactone completely blocks the production of LPS-dependent proinflammatory mediators post-transcriptionally. Using polysome profiling we now demonstrate conclusively that mycolactone does not prevent translation of TNF, IL-6 and Cox-2 mRNAs in macrophages. Instead, it inhibits the production of these, along with nearly all other (induced and constitutive) proteins that transit through the ER. This is due to a blockade of protein translocation and subsequent degradation of aberrantly located protein. Several lines of evidence support this transformative explanation of mycolactone function. First, cellular TNF and Cox-2 can be once more detected if the action of the 26S proteasome is inhibited concurrently. Second, restored protein is found in the cytosol, indicating an inability to translocate. Third, in vitro translation assays show mycolactone prevents the translocation of TNF and other proteins into the ER. This is specific as the insertion of tail-anchored proteins into the ER is unaffected showing that the ER remains structurally intact. Fourth, metabolic labelling reveals a near-complete loss of glycosylated and secreted proteins from treated cells, whereas cytosolic proteins are unaffected. Notably, the profound lack of glycosylated and secreted protein production is apparent in a range of different disease-relevant cell types. These studies provide a new mechanism underlying mycolactone's observed pathological activities both in vitro and in vivo. Mycolactone-dependent inhibition of protein translocation into the ER not only explains the deficit of innate cytokines, but

  5. Bacterial Ortholog of Mammalian Translocator Protein (TSPO) with Virulence Regulating Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chapalain, Annelise; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Murillo, Laurence; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10−5 M) adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies. PMID:19564920

  6. Bacterial ortholog of mammalian translocator protein (TSPO) with virulence regulating activity.

    PubMed

    Chapalain, Annelise; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Murillo, Laurence; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2009-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. TSPO is implicated in major physiological functions and functionally associated with other proteins such as the voltage-dependent anionic channel, also designated as mitochondrial porin. Surprisingly, a TSPO-related protein was identified in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides but it was initially considered as a relict of evolution. In the present study we cloned a tspO gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37, a non-photosynthetic eubacterium and we used bioinformatics tools to identify TSPO in the genome of 97 other bacteria. P. fluorescens TSPO was recognized by antibodies against mouse protein and by PK 11195, an artificial ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. As in eukaryotes, bacterial TSPO appears functionally organized as a dimer and the apparent Kd for PK 11195 is in the same range than for its eukaryotic counterpart. When P. fluorescens MF37 was treated with PK 11195 (10(-5) M) adhesion to living or artificial surfaces and biofilm formation activity were increased. Conversely, the apoptotic potential of bacteria on eukaryotic cells was significantly reduced. This effect of PK11195 was abolished in a mutant of P. fluorescens MF37 deficient for its major outer membrane porin, OprF. The present results demonstrate the existence of a bacterial TSPO that shares common structural and functional characteristics with its mammalian counterpart. This protein, apparently involved in adhesion and virulence, reveals the existence of a possible new inter kingdom signalling system and suggests that the human microbiome should be involuntarily exposed to the evolutionary pressure of benzodiazepines and related molecules. This discovery also represents a promising opportunity for the development of alternative antibacterial strategies. PMID:19564920

  7. Nuclear translocation of IQGAP1 protein upon exposure to puromycin aminonucleoside in cultured human podocytes: ERK pathway involvement.

    PubMed

    Rigothier, Claire; Saleem, Moin Ahson; Bourget, Chantal; Mathieson, Peter William; Combe, Christian; Welsh, Gavin Iain

    2016-10-01

    IQGAP1, a protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to slit diaphragm proteins, is involved in podocyte motility and permeability. Its regulation in glomerular disease is not known. We have exposed human podocytes to puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), an inducer of nephrotic syndrome in rats, and studied the effects on IQGAP1 biology and function. In human podocytes exposed to PAN, a nuclear translocation of IQGAP1 was observed by immunocytolocalization and confirmed by Western blot after selective nuclear/cytoplasmic extraction. In contrast to IQGAP1, IQGAP2 expression remained cytoplasmic. IQGAP1 nuclear translocation was associated with a significant decrease in its interaction with nephrin and podocalyxin. Activation of the ERK pathway was observed in PAN treated podocytes with a preponderant nuclear localization of the phosphorylated form of ERK (P-ERK). The interaction between IQGAP1 and P-ERK increased upon podocyte exposure to PAN. Inhibitors of ERK pathway activation blocked IQGAP1 nuclear translocation (p<0.02). Chromatin interaction protein assays demonstrated an interaction of IQGAP1 with chromatin and with Histone H3, which increased in response to PAN. In summary, PAN induces the ERK dependent translocation of IQGAP1 into the nuclei in human podocytes which leads to the interaction of IQGAP1 with chromatin and Histone H3, and decreased interactions between IQGAP1 and slit-diaphragm proteins. Therefore, IQGAP1 may have a role in podocyte gene regulation in glomerular disease. PMID:27377965

  8. Nuclear translocation of the cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, upon induction of skeletal muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cambier, Linda; Pomies, Pascal

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} The cytoskeleton-associated protein, smALP, is expressed in differentiated skeletal muscle. {yields} smALP is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts upon induction of myogenesis. {yields} The differentiation-dependent nuclear translocation of smALP occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. {yields} The LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear accumulation of the protein. {yields} smALP might act in the nucleus to control some critical aspect of the muscle differentiation process. -- Abstract: The skALP isoform has been shown to play a critical role in actin organization and anchorage within the Z-discs of skeletal muscles, but no data is available on the function of the smALP isoform in skeletal muscle cells. Here, we show that upon induction of differentiation a nuclear translocation of smALP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of C2C12 myoblasts, concomitant to an up-regulation of the protein expression, occurs in parallel with the nuclear accumulation of myogenin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the LIM domain of smALP is essential for the nuclear translocation of the protein.

  9. Structure-to-function relationships of bacterial translocator protein (TSPO): a focus on Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Leneveu-Jenvrin, Charlène; Connil, Nathalie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), which was previously designated as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a 3.5 billion year-old evolutionarily conserved protein expressed by most Eukarya, Archae and Bacteria, but its organization and functions differ remarkably. By taking advantage of the genomic data available on TSPO, we focused on bacterial TSPO and attempted to define functions of TSPO in Pseudomonas via in silico approaches. A tspo ortholog has been identified in several fluorescent Pseudomonas. This protein presents putative binding motifs for cholesterol and PK 11195, which is a specific drug ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. While it is a common surface distribution, the sense of insertion and membrane localization differ between α- and γ-proteobacteria. Experimental published data and STRING analysis of common TSPO partners in fluorescent Pseudomonas indicate a potential role of TSPO in the oxidative stress response, iron homeostasis and virulence expression. In these bacteria, TSPO could also take part in signal transduction and in the preservation of membrane integrity. PMID:25477872

  10. A functional link between the co-translational protein translocation pathway and the UPR

    PubMed Central

    Plumb, Rachel; Zhang, Zai-Rong; Appathurai, Suhila; Mariappan, Malaiyalam

    2015-01-01

    Upon endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the transmembrane endoribonuclease Ire1α performs mRNA cleavage reactions to increase the ER folding capacity. It is unclear how the low abundant Ire1α efficiently finds and cleaves the majority of mRNAs at the ER membrane. Here, we reveal that Ire1α forms a complex with the Sec61 translocon to cleave its mRNA substrates. We show that Ire1α's key substrate, XBP1u mRNA, is recruited to the Ire1α-Sec61 translocon complex through its nascent chain, which contains a pseudo-transmembrane domain to utilize the signal recognition particle (SRP)-mediated pathway. Depletion of SRP, the SRP receptor or the Sec61 translocon in cells leads to reduced Ire1α-mediated splicing of XBP1u mRNA. Furthermore, mutations in Ire1α that disrupt the Ire1α-Sec61 complex causes reduced Ire1α-mediated cleavage of ER-targeted mRNAs. Thus, our data suggest that the Unfolded Protein Response is coupled with the co-translational protein translocation pathway to maintain protein homeostasis in the ER during stress conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07426.001 PMID:25993558

  11. Structure-to-function relationships of bacterial translocator protein (TSPO): a focus on Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Leneveu-Jenvrin, Charlène; Connil, Nathalie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), which was previously designated as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a 3.5 billion year-old evolutionarily conserved protein expressed by most Eukarya, Archae and Bacteria, but its organization and functions differ remarkably. By taking advantage of the genomic data available on TSPO, we focused on bacterial TSPO and attempted to define functions of TSPO in Pseudomonas via in silico approaches. A tspo ortholog has been identified in several fluorescent Pseudomonas. This protein presents putative binding motifs for cholesterol and PK 11195, which is a specific drug ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. While it is a common surface distribution, the sense of insertion and membrane localization differ between α- and γ-proteobacteria. Experimental published data and STRING analysis of common TSPO partners in fluorescent Pseudomonas indicate a potential role of TSPO in the oxidative stress response, iron homeostasis and virulence expression. In these bacteria, TSPO could also take part in signal transduction and in the preservation of membrane integrity. PMID:25477872

  12. Signal-on Protein Detection via Dye Translocation between Aptamer and Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Chi, Chun-Wei; Friedrich, Sarah M; Peck, Konan; Wang, Tza-Huei; Leong, Kam W; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2016-05-18

    A unique interaction between the cyanine dye and negatively charged quantum dot is used to construct a signal-on biaptameric quantum dot (QD) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) beacon for protein detection and distinct aptamer characterization. The beacon comprises a pair of aptamers, one intercalated with the cyanine dye (YOYO-3) and the other conjugated to a negatively charged, carboxyl-QD. When the target protein is present, structural folding and sandwich association of the two aptamers take place. As a consequence, YOYO-3 is displaced from the folded aptamer and transferred to the unblocked QD surface to yield a target concentration-dependent FRET signal. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection of thrombin ranging from nanomolar to submicromolar concentrations and confirm the dye translocation using cylindrical illumination confocal spectroscopy (CICS). The proposed beacon provides a simple, rapid, signal-on FRET detection for protein as well as a potential platform for distinct aptamer screening. PMID:27101438

  13. Nuclear translocation and regulation of intranuclear distribution of cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein are distinct processes mediated by two Epstein Barr virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Richard; El-Guindy, Ayman; Heston, Lee; Lin, Su-Fang; Yu, Kuan-Ping; Nagy, Mate; Borah, Sumit; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Steitz, Joan; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC) to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs). During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E), was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors. PMID:24705134

  14. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  15. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tina I; Stanker, Larry H; Lee, Kwangkook; Jin, Rongsheng; Cheng, Luisa W

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins. Botulinum neurotoxins associate with neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs) forming large complexes that are protected from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. However, it is still unclear how BoNT complexes as large as 900 kDa traverse the epithelial barrier and what role NAPs play in toxin translocation. In this study, we examined the transit of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) holotoxin, complex and recombinantly purified NAP complex through cultured and polarized Caco-2 cells and, for the first time, in the small mouse intestine. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and NAPs in the toxin complex were detectable inside intestinal cells beginning at 2 h post intoxication. Appearance of the BoNT/A holotoxin signal was slower, with detection starting at 4–6 h. This indicated that the holotoxin alone was sufficient for entry but the presence of NAPs enhanced the rate of entry. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A detection peaked at approximately 6 and 8 h for complex and holotoxin, respectively, and thereafter began to disperse with some toxin remaining in the epithelia after 24 h. Purified HA complexes alone were also internalized and followed a similar time course to that of BoNT/A complex internalization. However, recombinant HA complexes did not enhance BoNT/A holotoxin entry in the absence of a physical link with BoNT/A. We propose a model for BoNT/A toxin complex translocation whereby toxin complex entry is facilitated by NAPs in a receptor-mediated mechanism. Understanding the intestinal uptake of BoNT complexes will aid the development of new measures to prevent or treat oral intoxications. PMID:25640773

  16. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tina I; Stanker, Larry H; Lee, Kwangkook; Jin, Rongsheng; Cheng, Luisa W

    2015-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins. Botulinum neurotoxins associate with neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs) forming large complexes that are protected from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. However, it is still unclear how BoNT complexes as large as 900 kDa traverse the epithelial barrier and what role NAPs play in toxin translocation. In this study, we examined the transit of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) holotoxin, complex and recombinantly purified NAP complex through cultured and polarized Caco-2 cells and, for the first time, in the small mouse intestine. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and NAPs in the toxin complex were detectable inside intestinal cells beginning at 2 h post intoxication. Appearance of the BoNT/A holotoxin signal was slower, with detection starting at 4-6 h. This indicated that the holotoxin alone was sufficient for entry but the presence of NAPs enhanced the rate of entry. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A detection peaked at approximately 6 and 8 h for complex and holotoxin, respectively, and thereafter began to disperse with some toxin remaining in the epithelia after 24 h. Purified HA complexes alone were also internalized and followed a similar time course to that of BoNT/A complex internalization. However, recombinant HA complexes did not enhance BoNT/A holotoxin entry in the absence of a physical link with BoNT/A. We propose a model for BoNT/A toxin complex translocation whereby toxin complex entry is facilitated by NAPs in a receptor-mediated mechanism. Understanding the intestinal uptake of BoNT complexes will aid the development of new measures to prevent or treat oral intoxications. PMID:25640773

  17. Targeting and insertion of the cholesterol-binding translocator protein into the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Rone, Malena B; Liu, Jun; Blonder, Josip; Ye, Xiaoying; Veenstra, Timothy D; Young, Jason C; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2009-07-28

    Translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO), previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) protein necessary for cholesterol import and steroid production. We reconstituted the mitochondrial targeting and insertion of TSPO into the OMM to analyze the signals and mechanisms required for this process. Initial studies indicated the formation of a mitochondrial 66 kDa complex through Blue Native-PAGE analysis. The formation of this complex was found to be dependent on the presence of ATP and the cytosolic chaperone Hsp90. Through mutational analysis we identified two areas necessary for TSPO targeting, import, and function: amino acids 103-108 (Schellman motif), which provide the necessary structural orientation for import, and the cholesterol-binding C-terminus required for insertion. Although the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex proteins Tom22 and Tom40 were present in the OMM, the TOM complex did not interact with TSPO. In search of proteins involved in TSPO import, we analyzed complexes known to interact with TSPO by mass spectrometry. Formation of the 66 kDa complex was found to be dependent on an identified protein, Metaxin 1, for formation and TSPO import. The level of import of TSPO into steroidogenic cell mitochondria was increased following treatment of the cells with cAMP. These findings suggest that the initial targeting of TSPO to mitochondria is dependent upon the presence of cytosolic chaperones interacting with the import receptor Tom70. The C-terminus plays an important role in targeting TSPO to mitochondria, whereas its import into the OMM is dependent upon the presence of the Schellman motif. Final integration of TSPO into the OMM occurs via its interaction with Metaxin 1. Import of TSPO into steroidogenic cell mitochondria is regulated by cAMP. PMID:19552401

  18. Heat shock protein 70 is translocated to lipid droplets in rat adipocytes upon heat stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongfeng; He, Jinhan; Pu, Shenshen; Tang, Chaoshu; Xu, Guoheng

    2007-01-01

    In mammalian cells, lipid storage droplets contain a triacylglycerol and cholesterol ester core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer into which a number of proteins are imbedded. These proteins are thought to be involved in modulating the formation and metabolic functions of the lipid droplet. In this study, we show that heat stress upregulates several heat shock proteins (Hsps), including Hsp27, Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Grp78, in primary and differentiated adipocytes. Immunostaining and immunoblotting data indicate that among the Hsps examined, only Hsp70 is induced to redirect to the lipid droplet surface in heat-stressed adipocytes. The thermal induction of Hsp70 translocation to lipid droplet does not typically happen in a temperature- or time-dependent manner and occurs abruptly at 30-40 min and rapidly achieves a steady state within 60 min after 40 degrees C stress of adipocytes. Though Hsp70 is co-localized with perilipin on the lipid droplets in stressed adipocytes, immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Hsp70 does not directly interact with perilipin. Alkaline treatments indicate that Hsp70 associates with the droplet surface through non-hydrophobic interactions. We speculate that Hsp70 might noncovalently associate with monolayer microdomains of the lipid droplet in a manner similar to its interaction with lipid bilayer moieties composed of specific fatty acids. As an acute and specific cellular response to the heat stimulation, accumulation of Hsp70 on adipocytes lipid droplets might be involved in stabilizing the droplet monolayer, transferring nascent proteins to the lipid droplets, or chaperoning denatured proteins on the droplet for subsequent refolding. PMID:17175194

  19. [Investigation of Protein Translocation Sec-System with Heterologous Gene Expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Bacterium Cells].

    PubMed

    Mordkovich, N N; Okorokova, N A; Veiko, V P

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the primary structures of the protein translocation Sec-system proteins in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli bacteria was carried out. The process of translocation of recombinant pro-enteroxins (SEB and SEH) from Staphylococcus aureus and pro-streptavidin (SAV) from Streptomyces avidinii in the S. oneidensis MR-1 and E. coli cell periplasm was studied. It was demonstrated that these marker proteins are transferred into the periplasmic space of the S. oneidensis MR-1 transformant strain cells. The identity of N-terminal amino acid sequences of mature recombinant SEB, SEH, and SAV proteins (generated during post-translation proteolysis of leader peptide by the Sec-system both in E. coli and S. oneidensis MR-1) was established. PMID:26204774

  20. Cholesterol and steroid synthesizing smooth endoplasmic reticulum of adrenocortical cells contains high levels of translocation apparatus proteins.

    PubMed

    Black, V H; Sanjay, A; van Leyen, K; Möeller, I; Lauring, B; Kreibich, G

    2002-11-01

    Steroid-secreting cells possess abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum whose membranes contain many enzymes involved in sterol and steroid synthesis. In this study we demonstrate that adrenal smooth microsomal subfractions enriched in these membranes also possess high levels of proteins belonging to the translocation apparatus, proteins previously assumed to be confined to morphologically identifiable rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). We further demonstrate that these smooth microsomal subfractions are capable of effecting the functions of these protein complexes: co-translational translocation, signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation of newly synthesized polypeptides. We hypothesize that these elements participate in regulating the levels of ER-targeted membrane proteins involved in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in a sterol-dependent and hormonally-regulated manner. PMID:12530645

  1. Dynamin-related protein Drp1 is required for Bax translocation to mitochondria in response to irradiation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Peiguo; Liu, Becky; Zhao, Jing; Pang, Qingsong; Agrawal, Samir G; Jia, Li; Liu, Feng-Ting

    2015-09-01

    Translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax from the cytosol to the mitochondria is a crucial step in DNA damage-mediated apoptosis, and is also found to be involved in mitochondrial fragmentation. Irradiation-induced cytochrome c release and apoptosis was associated with Bax activation, but not mitochondrial fragmentation. Both Bax and Drp1 translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondria in response to irradiation. However, Drp1 mitochondrial translocation and oligomerization did not require Bax, and failed to induce apoptosis in Bax deficient diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells. Using fluorescent microscopy and the intensity correlation analysis, we demonstrated that Bax and Drp1 were colocalized and the levels of colocalization were increased by UV irradiation. Using co-immuno-precipitation, we confirmed that Bax and Drp1 were binding partners. Irradiation induced a time-associated increase in the interaction between active Bax and Drp1. Knocking down Drp1 using siRNA blocked UV irradiation-mediated Bax mitochondrial translocation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate for the first time, that Drp1 is required for Bax mitochondrial translocation, but Drp1-induced mitochondrial fragmentation alone is not sufficient to induce apoptosis in DLBCL cells. PMID:26093086

  2. Detergent Isolation Stabilizes and Activates the Shigella Type III Secretion System Translocator Protein IpaC.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Abram R; Duarte, Shari M; Kumar, Prashant; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2016-07-01

    Shigella rely on a type III secretion system as the primary virulence factor for invasion and colonization of human hosts. Although there are an estimated 90 million Shigella infections, annually responsible for more than 100,000 deaths worldwide, challenges isolating and stabilizing many type III secretion system proteins have prevented a full understanding of the Shigella invasion mechanism and additionally slowed progress toward a much needed Shigella vaccine. Here, we show that the non-denaturing zwitterionic detergent N, N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) and non-ionic detergent n-octyl-oligo-oxyethylene efficiently isolated the hydrophobic Shigella translocator protein IpaC from the co-purified IpaC/IpgC chaperone-bound complex. Both detergents resulted in monomeric IpaC that exhibits strong membrane binding and lysis characteristics while the chaperone-bound complex does not, suggesting that the stabilizing detergents provide a means of following IpaC "activation" in vitro. Additionally, biophysical characterization found that LDAO provides significant thermal and temporal stability to IpaC, protecting it for several days at room temperature and brief exposure to temperatures reaching 90°C. In summary, this work identified and characterized conditions that provide stable, membrane active IpaC, providing insight into key interactions with membranes and laying a strong foundation for future vaccine formulation studies taking advantage of the native immunogenicity of IpaC and the stability provided by LDAO. PMID:27297397

  3. PK11195 effect on steroidogenesis is not mediated through the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Zhao, Amy H; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2015-03-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein of unknown function with high physiological expression in steroidogenic cells. Using TSPO gene-deleted mice, we recently demonstrated that TSPO function is not essential for steroidogenesis. The first link between TSPO and steroidogenesis was established in studies showing modest increases in progesterone production by adrenocortical and Leydig tumor cell lines after treatment with PK11195. To reconcile discrepancies between physiological and pharmacological interpretations of TSPO function, we generated TSPO-knockout MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells (MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ) and examined their steroidogenic potential after exposure to either dibutyryl-cAMP or PK11195. Progesterone production in MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ after dibutyryl-cAMP was not different from control MA-10:Tspo+/+ cells, confirming that TSPO function is not essential for steroidogenesis. Interestingly, when treated with increasing concentrations of PK11195, both control MA-10:Tspo+/+ cells and MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ cells responded in a similar dose-dependent manner showing increases in progesterone production. These results show that the pharmacological effect of PK11195 on steroidogenesis is not mediated through TSPO. PMID:25535830

  4. Translocator protein (18 kDa) TSPO: an emerging therapeutic target in neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Lecanu, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces physical, cognitive, and psychosocial deficits that affect millions of patients. TBI activates numerous cellular mechanisms and molecular cascades that produce detrimental outcomes, including neuronal death and loss of function. The mitochondrion is one of the major targets of TBI, as seen by increased mitochondrial activity in activated and proliferating microglia (due to high energy requirements and/or calcium overload) as well as increased reactive oxygen species, changes in mitochondrial permeability transition, release of cytochrome c, caspase activation, reduced ATP levels, and cell death in neurons. Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18-kDa outer mitochondrial membrane protein that interacts with the mitochondria permeability transition pore and binds with high affinity to cholesterol and various classes of drug ligands, including some benzodiazepines such as 4′-chlorodiazepam (Ro5-4864). Although TSPO levels in the brain are low, they are increased after brain injury and inflammation. This finding has led to the proposed use of TSPO expression as a marker of brain injury and repair. TSPO drug ligands have been shown to participate in the control of mitochondrial respiration and function, mitochondrial steroid and neurosteroid formation, as well as apoptosis. This review and commentary will outline our current knowledge of the benefits of targeting TSPO for TBI treatment and the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of TSPO drug ligands in neurotrauma. PMID:19409385

  5. Protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions in pharmacology: the case of the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Hatty, Claire R; Banati, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    The targets of many small molecule drugs are membrane proteins, and traditionally the focus of pharmacology is on the interaction between such receptors and their small molecule drug ligands. However, the lipid membranes of cells and organelles are increasingly appreciated as diverse and dynamic structures that also specifically interact with small molecule drugs and peptides, causing profound changes in the properties of these membranes, and modulating the function of the membrane and the proteins within it. Drug-membrane interactions are likely to have a role in both the therapeutic and toxic activity of a variety of compounds, and their role in the overall pharmacological effect of a drug needs to be understood more clearly. This is the case for the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) and its ligands, where functions that were established based on pharmacological studies are being called into question. Re-examining the putative functions of the TSPO and the effects of its ligands reveals a need to consider in more detail the interplay between protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions, and the modulatory relationship between TSPO and the lipid membrane. PMID:26238176

  6. Increased Translocator Protein Distribution Volume, A Marker of Neuroinflammation, in the Brain During Major Depressive Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Setiawan, Elaine; Wilson, Alan A.; Mizrahi, Romina; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Miler, Laura; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Suridjan, Ivonne; Kennedy, James L.; Rekkas, P. Vivien; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The neuroinflammatory hypothesis of major depressive disorder (MDD) is supported by several main findings: First, in humans and animals, activation of the immune system causes sickness behaviors that present during a major depressive episode (MDE) such as low mood, anhedonia, anorexia and weight loss. Second, peripheral markers of inflammation are frequently reported in MDD. Third, neuroinflammatory illnesses are associated with high rates of MDE. However, a fundamental limitation of the neuroinflammatory hypothesis is a paucity of evidence for brain inflammation during MDE. To investigate whether microglial activation, an important aspect of neuroinflammation, is present during MDE, [18F]FEPPA positron emission tomography (PET) was applied to measure translocator protein total distribution volume (TSPO VT), an index of TSPO density. Translocator protein density is elevated in activated microglia. Objective To determine whether TSPO VT, is elevated in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insula in MDE secondary to MDD. Design Case-control study. Setting Tertiary care psychiatric hospital. Participants 20 subjects with MDE secondary to MDD and 20 healthy controls, underwent an [18F]FEPPA PET scan. MDE subjects were medication-free for at least 6 weeks. All participants were otherwise healthy, and non-smoking. Main Outcome Measure TSPO VT was measured in the prefrontal cortex, ACC, and insula. Results In MDE, TSPO VT was significantly elevated in all brain regions examined (multivariate analysis of variance, F15,23=4.46, P=0.001).TSPO VT was increased, on average, by 30% in the prefrontal cortex, ACC and insula. In MDE, greater TSPO VT in the ACC correlated with greater depression severity (ACC: r=0.628, P=0.005). Conclusions and Relevance This finding provides the most compelling evidence to date for brain inflammation, and more specifically microglial activation, in MDE. This is important for improving treatment since it implies

  7. Targeting mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux and lipid phenotype.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janice M W; Allen, Anne-Marie; Graham, Annette

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as a potential therapeutic target, capable of increasing macrophage cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. Expression and activity of TSPO in human (THP-1) macrophages were manipulated genetically and by the use of selective TSPO ligands. Cellular responses were analysed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), immunoblotting and radiolabelling, including [3H]cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and human serum. Induction of macrophage cholesterol deposition by acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL) increased expression of TSPO mRNA and protein, reflecting findings in human carotid atherosclerosis. Transient overexpression of TSPO enhanced efflux (E%) of [3H]cholesterol to apoA-I, HDL and human serum compared with empty vector (EV) controls, whereas gene knockdown of TSPO achieved the converse. Ligation of TSPO (using PK11195, FGIN-1-27 and flunitrazepam) triggered increases in [3H]cholesterol efflux, an effect that was amplified in TSPO-overexpressing macrophages. Overexpression of TSPO induced the expression of genes [PPARA (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α), NR1H3 (nuclear receptor 1H3/liver X receptor α), ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette A1), ABCG4 (ATP-binding cassette G4) and APOE (apolipoprotein E)] and proteins (ABCA1 and PPARα) involved in cholesterol efflux, reduced macrophage neutral lipid mass and lipogenesis and limited cholesterol esterification following exposure to AcLDL. Thus, targeting TSPO reduces macrophage lipid content and prevents macrophage foam cell formation, via enhanced cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. PMID:24814875

  8. Translocator Protein (TSPO) Affects Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation in Steroidogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Zhao, Amy H; Hussein, Mahmoud; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-03-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a highly conserved outer mitochondrial membrane protein present in specific subpopulations of cells within different tissues. In recent studies, the presumptive model depicting mammalian TSPO as a critical cholesterol transporter for steroidogenesis has been refuted by studies examining effects of Tspo gene deletion in vivo and in vitro, biochemical testing of TSPO cholesterol transport function, and specificity of TSPO-mediated pharmacological responses. Nevertheless, high TSPO expression in steroid-producing cells seemed to indicate an alternate function for this protein in steroidogenic mitochondria. To seek an explanation, we used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated TSPO knockout steroidogenic MA-10 Leydig cell (MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ) clones to examine changes to core mitochondrial functions resulting from TSPO deficiency. We observed that 1) MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ cells had a shift in substrate utilization for energy production from glucose to fatty acids with significantly higher mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increased reactive oxygen species production; and 2) oxygen consumption rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, and proton leak were not different between MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ and MA-10:Tspo+/+ control cells. Consistent with this finding, TSPO-deficient adrenal glands from global TSPO knockout (Tspo(-/-)) mice also showed up-regulation of genes involved in FAO compared with the TSPO floxed (Tspo(fl/fl)) controls. These results demonstrate the first experimental evidence that TSPO can affect mitochondrial energy homeostasis through modulation of FAO, a function that appears to be consistent with high levels of TSPO expression observed in cell types active in lipid storage/metabolism. PMID:26741196

  9. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these “molecular syringes” for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells. PMID:26017572

  10. Mitochondrial Translocator Protein (TSPO) Function Is Not Essential for Heme Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Amy H; Tu, Lan N; Mukai, Chinatsu; Sirivelu, Madhu P; Pillai, Viju V; Morohaku, Kanako; Cohen, Roy; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-01-22

    Function of the mammalian translocator protein (TSPO; previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor) remains unclear because its presumed role in steroidogenesis and mitochondrial permeability transition established using pharmacological methods has been refuted in recent genetic studies. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is considered a conserved endogenous ligand for TSPO. In bacteria, TSPO was identified to regulate tetrapyrrole metabolism and chemical catalysis of PPIX in the presence of light, and in vertebrates, TSPO function has been linked to porphyrin transport and heme biosynthesis. Positive correlation between high TSPO expression in cancer cells and susceptibility to photodynamic therapy based on their increased ability to convert the precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to PPIX appeared to reinforce this mechanism. In this study, we used TSPO knock-out (Tspo(-/-)) mice, primary cells, and different tumor cell lines to examine the role of TSPO in erythropoiesis, heme levels, PPIX biosynthesis, phototoxic cell death, and mitochondrial bioenergetic homeostasis. In contrast to expectations, our results demonstrate that TSPO deficiency does not adversely affect erythropoiesis, heme biosynthesis, bioconversion of ALA to PPIX, and porphyrin-mediated phototoxic cell death. TSPO expression levels in cancer cells do not correlate with their ability to convert ALA to PPIX. In fibroblasts, we observed that TSPO deficiency decreased the oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) indicative of a cellular metabolic shift, without a negative impact on porphyrin biosynthetic capability. Based on these findings, we conclude that mammalian TSPO does not have a critical physiological function related to PPIX and heme biosynthesis. PMID:26627829

  11. Translocator Protein 18kDA (TSPO): Molecular Sensor of Brain Injury & Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Kai; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2008-01-01

    For over 15 years, the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), recently named translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) has been studied as a biomarker of reactive gliosis and inflammation associated with a variety of neuropathological conditions. Early studies documented that in the brain parenchyma, TSPO is exclusively localized in glial cells. Under normal physiological conditions, TSPO levels are low in the brain neuropil but they markedly increase at sites of brain injury and inflammation making it uniquely suited for assessing active gliosis. This research has generated significant efforts from multiple research groups throughout the world to apply TSPO as a marker of “active” brain pathology using in vivo imaging modalities such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in experimental animals and humans. Further, in the last few years, there has been an increased interest in understanding the molecular and cellular function(s) of TSPO in glial cells. The latest evidence suggests that TSPO may not only serve as a biomarker of active brain disease but also the use of TSPO-specific ligands may have therapeutic implications in brain injury and repair. This review presents an overview of the history and function of TSPO focusing on studies related to its use as a sensor of active brain disease in experimental animals and in human studies. PMID:18374421

  12. (11)C-PBR28 binding to translocator protein increases with progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kreisl, William C; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Liow, Jeih-San; Wei, Monica; Snow, Joseph; Page, Emily; Jenko, Kimberly J; Morse, Cheryl L; Zoghbi, Sami S; Pike, Victor W; Turner, R Scott; Innis, Robert B

    2016-08-01

    This longitudinal study sought to determine whether the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of neuroinflammation, increases over time in Alzheimer's disease. Positron emission tomography imaging with the TSPO radioligand (11)C-PBR28 was performed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 2.7 years in 14 amyloid-positive patients and 8 amyloid-negative controls. Patients had a greater increase in TSPO binding than controls in inferior parietal lobule, precuneus, occipital cortex, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and combined middle and inferior temporal cortex. TSPO binding in temporoparietal regions increased from 3.9% to 6.3% per annum in patients, but ranged from -0.5% to 1% per annum in controls. The change in TSPO binding correlated with cognitive worsening on clinical dementia rating scale-sum of boxes and reduced cortical volume. The annual rate of increased TSPO binding in temporoparietal regions was about 5-fold higher in patients with clinical progression (n = 9) compared with those who did not progress (n = 5). TSPO may serve as a biomarker of Alzheimer's progression and response to anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:27318133

  13. Nucleocytoplasmic protein translocation during mitosis in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Budniak, Aldona

    2015-02-01

    Mitosis is a fundamental and essential life process. It underlies the duplication and survival of all cells and, as a result, all eukaryotic organisms. Since uncontrolled mitosis is a dreaded component of many cancers, a full understanding of the process is critical. Evolution has led to the existence of three types of mitosis: closed, open, and semi-open. The significance of these different mitotic species, how they can lead to a full understanding of the critical events that underlie the asexual duplication of all cells, and how they may generate new insights into controlling unregulated cell division remains to be determined. The eukaryotic microbe Dictyostelium discoideum has proved to be a valuable biomedical model organism. While it appears to utilize closed mitosis, a review of the literature suggests that it possesses a form of mitosis that lies in the middle between truly open and fully closed mitosis-it utilizes a form of semi-open mitosis. Here, the nucleocytoplasmic translocation patterns of the proteins that have been studied during mitosis in the social amoebozoan D. discoideum are detailed followed by a discussion of how some of them provide support for the hypothesis of semi-open mitosis. PMID:24618050

  14. Radiosynthesis and Preliminary Biological Evaluation of [18F]VC701, a Radioligand for Translocator Protein.

    PubMed

    Di Grigoli, Giuseppe; Monterisi, Cristina; Belloli, Sara; Masiello, Valeria; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Valenti, Salvatore; Paolino, Marco; Anzini, Maurizio; Matarrese, Mario; Cappelli, Andrea; Moresco, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor in vivo translocator protein (TSPO) expression by using specific radioligands. Recently, several [11C]PK11195 analogues have been synthesized to improve binding stability and brain availability. [18F]VC701 was synthesized and validated in CD healthy rats by biodistribution and inhibition analysis. Imaging studies were also conducted on animals injected unilaterally in the striatum with quinolinic acid (QA) to evaluate the TSPO ligand uptake in a neuroinflammation/neurodegenerative model. [18F]VC701 was synthesized with a good chemical and radiochemical purity and specific activity higher than 37 GBq/μmol. Kinetic studies performed on healthy animals showed the highest tracer biodistribution in TSPO-rich organs, and preadministration of cold PK11195 caused an overall radioactivity reduction. Metabolism studies showed the absence of radiometabolites in the rat brain of QA lesioned rats, and biodistribution analysis revealed a progressive increase in radioactivity ratios (lesioned to nonlesioned striatum) during time, reaching an approximate value of 5 4 hours after tracer injection. These results encourage further evaluation of this TSPO radioligand in other models of central and peripheral diseases. PMID:26044669

  15. Translocator Protein-Mediated Stabilization of Mitochondrial Architecture during Inflammation Stress in Colonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Issop, Leeyah; Ostuni, Mariano A.; Lee, Sunghoon; Laforge, Mireille; Péranzi, Gabriel; Rustin, Pierre; Benoist, Jean-François; Estaquier, Jérome; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Lacapère, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract increasing the risk of cancer has been described to be linked to the high expression of the mitochondrial translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO). Accordingly, TSPO drug ligands have been shown to regulate cytokine production and to improve tissue reconstruction. We used HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells to evaluate the role of TSPO and its drug ligands in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced inflammation. TNF-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression, coupled to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was followed by TSPO overexpression. TNF also destabilized mitochondrial ultrastructure, inducing cell death by apoptosis. Treatment with the TSPO drug ligand PK 11195 maintained the mitochondrial ultrastructure, reducing IL-8 and ROS production and cell death. TSPO silencing and overexpression studies demonstrated that the presence of TSPO is essential to control IL-8 and ROS production, so as to maintain mitochondrial ultrastructure and to prevent cell death. Taken together, our data indicate that inflammation results in the disruption of mitochondrial complexes containing TSPO, leading to cell death and epithelia disruption. Significance: This work implicates TSPO in the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity and in the control of mitochondrial ROS production, ultimately favoring tissue regeneration. PMID:27054921

  16. [Effects of sprinkler irrigation on the plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation and kernel protein content of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Yao, Su-mei; Kang, Yue-hu; Ru, Zhen-gang; Liu, Ming-jiu; Yang, Wen-ping; Li, Gan

    2013-08-01

    Taking wheat cultivar Bainong AK58 as test material, a field experiment was conducted to study the plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation and kernel protein content of winter wheat under sprinkler irrigation and surface irrigation, aimed to understand the differences in the nitrogen metabolism characteristics of winter wheat under different irrigation regimes. At booting stage, no significant difference was observed in the total amount of plant nitrogen accumulation between sprinkler irrigation and surface irrigation; while from booting stage to maturing stage, the total amount of plant nitrogen accumulation under sprinkler irrigation was significantly higher. Under sprinkler irrigation, the translocation amount and contribution rate of the nitrogen stored in leaf, glume, stem and sheath at pre-anthesis to the kernel increased, while the contribution rate of the assimilated nitrogen after anthesis to the kernel nitrogen declined. Both the relative protein content and the total protein yield in the kernel increased significantly under sprinkler irrigation. In conclusion, sprinkler irrigation could significantly regulate the nitrogen translocation and kernel protein accumulation of winter wheat. PMID:24380339

  17. Structural requirements to obtain highly potent and selective 18 kDa Translocator Protein (TSPO) Ligands.

    PubMed

    Taliani, Sabrina; Pugliesi, Isabella; Da Settimo, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The (18 kDa) Translocator Protein (TSPO), was initially identified in 1977 as peripheral binding site for the benzodiazepine diazepam and named "Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)". It is an evolutionarily well-conserved protein particularly located at the outer/inner mitochondrial membrane contact sites, in closely association with the 32 kDa voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and the 30 kDa adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), thus forming the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). TSPO is ubiquitary expressed in peripheral tissues (steroid producing tissues, liver, heart, kidney, lung, immune system) and in lower levels in the central nervous system, where it is mainly located in glial cells, and in neurons. TSPO is involved in a variety of biological processes such as cholesterol transport, steroidogenesis, calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism, mitochondrial oxidation, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis induction, and regulation of immune functions. In the last decade, many studies have reported that TSPO basal expression is altered in a number of human pathologies, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders (Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases), as well as in various forms of brain injury and inflammation and anxiety. Consequently, TSPO has not only been suggested as a promising drug target for a number of therapeutic applications (anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, immunomodulating, etc.), but also as valid diagnostic marker for related-disease state and progression, prompting the development of specific labelled ligands as powerful tools for imaging techniques. A number of structurally different classes of ligands have been reported, showing high affinity and selectivity towards TSPO. Indeed, most of these ligands have been designed starting from selective CBR ligands which were structurally modified in order to shift their affinity towards TSPO. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies were performed allowing to

  18. The Effect of Cigarette Smoke on the Translocator Protein (TSPO) in Cultured Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Rafael; Cohen, Shiri; Gavish, Moshe

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is prevalent in cigarette smokers. The mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (TSPO), is thought to protect cells from free radical damage. We examined the effect of cigarette smoke (CS) (containing free radicals) alone and in the presence of saliva (containing redox active free iron), on survival of H1299 lung cancer cells and on their mitochondrial characteristics, and whether TSPO binding was influenced by CS and by saliva. We exposed H1299 cells to CS in the presence/absence of saliva and also characterized TSPO binding in the cells using [3H]PK 11195 as a radioligand. CS induced a significant drop in mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm), while addition of saliva did not lead to further loss of ΔΨm (42.5% vs. 39.85%). Scatchard analysis of the saturation curve of [3H]PK 11195 binding (0.2-6 nM final concentration) yielded a straight-line plot (R =  0.9). Average Bmax value was 3274 ± 787 fmol/mg of protein, and average Kd value was 9.2 ± 1.3 nM. Benzodiazepine diazepam partially prevented decrease in cell survival following exposure to CS and redox active iron containing media (saliva) while benzodiazepine clonazepam did not, indicating that this effect is TSPO-specific. Exposure of cells to CS resulted in alternation of biomolecules expressed by CLs peroxidation, reduction of TSPO binding, and depletion of the mitochondrial potential. This irreversible damage was enhanced in the presence of saliva. All these modulations may result in cellular death increase following CS exposure, enhanced in the presence of saliva. PMID:25968977

  19. Understanding the molecular mechanism of protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane: still a long way to go.

    PubMed

    Marom, Milit; Azem, Abdussalam; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2011-03-01

    In order to reach the final place of their function, approximately half of the proteins in any eukaryotic cell have to be transported across or into one of the membranes in the cell. In this article, we present an overview of our current knowledge concerning the structural properties of the TIM23 complex and their relationship with the molecular mechanism of protein transport across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Protein translocation across or insertion into membranes. PMID:20646995

  20. Actions of translocator protein ligands on neutrophil adhesion and motility induced by G-protein coupled receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Camila Bento; Tamura, Eduardo K; Montero-Melendez, Trindad; Palermo-Neto, João; Perretti, Mauro; Markus, Regina P; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2012-01-13

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), mediates the transportation of cholesterol and anions from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane in different cells types. Although recent evidences indicate a potential role for TSPO in the development of inflammatory processes, the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. The present study investigated the ability of the specific TSPO ligands, the isoquinoline carboxamide PK11195 and benzodiazepine Ro5-4864, on neutrophil recruitment promoted by the N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptide (fMLP), an agonist of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). Pre-treatment with Ro5-4864 abrograted fMLP-induced leukocyte-endothelial interactions in mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo. Moreover, in vitro Ro5-4864 treatment prevented fMLP-induced: (i) L-selectin shedding and overexpression of PECAM-1 on the neutrophil cell surface; (ii) neutrophil chemotaxis and (iii) enhancement of intracellular calcium cations (iCa(+2)). Intriguingly, the two latter effects were augmented by cell treatment with PK11195. An allosteric agonist/antagonist relation may be suggested, as the effects of Ro5-4864 on fMLP-stimulated neutrophils were reverted by simultaneous treatment with PK11195. Taken together, these data highlight TSPO as a modulator of pathways of neutrophil adhesion and locomotion induced by GPCR, connecting TSPO actions and the onset of an innate inflammatory response. PMID:22209795

  1. Therapeutic actions of translocator protein (18 kDa) ligands in experimental models of psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Arbo, B D; Benetti, F; Garcia-Segura, L M; Ribeiro, M F

    2015-11-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is an 18kDa protein located at contact sites between the outer and the inner mitochondrial membrane. Numerous studies have associated TSPO with the translocation of cholesterol across the aqueous mitochondrial intermembrane space and the regulation of steroidogenesis, as well as with the control of some other mitochondrial functions, such as mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, apoptosis and cell proliferation. In the brain, changes in TSPO expression occur in several neuropathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Furthermore, TSPO ligands have been shown to promote neuroprotection in animal models of brain pathology. At least in some cases, the mechanisms of neuroprotection are associated with modifications in brain steroidogenesis. In addition, regulation of neuroinflammation seems to be a common mechanism in the neuroprotective actions of TSPO ligands in different animal models of brain pathology. PMID:26200949

  2. Response to Comment on "Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism".

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-10-30

    Wang comments that the diffraction data for the structure of the A139T mutant of translocator protein TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides should be used to 1.65 instead of 1.8 angstroms and that the density interpreted as porphyrin and monoolein is better fitted as polyethylene glycol. Although different practices of data processing exist, in this case they do not substantially influence the final map. Additional data are presented supporting the fit of a porphyrin and monooleins. PMID:26516277

  3. Non-native, N-terminal Hsp70 Molecular Motor Recognition Elements in Transit Peptides Support Plastid Protein Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Bruce, Barry D.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we identified the N-terminal domain of transit peptides (TPs) as a major determinant for the translocation step in plastid protein import. Analysis of Arabidopsis TP dataset revealed that this domain has two overlapping characteristics, highly uncharged and Hsp70-interacting. To investigate these two properties, we replaced the N-terminal domains of the TP of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and its reverse peptide with a series of unrelated peptides whose affinities to the chloroplast stromal Hsp70 have been determined. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that eight out of nine peptides in this series are not similar to the TP N terminus. Using in vivo and in vitro protein import assays, the majority of the precursors containing Hsp70-binding elements were targeted to plastids, whereas none of the chimeric precursors lacking an N-terminal Hsp70-binding element were targeted to the plastids. Moreover, a pulse-chase assay showed that two chimeric precursors with the most uncharged peptides failed to translocate into the stroma. The ability of multiple unrelated Hsp70-binding elements to support protein import verified that the majority of TPs utilize an N-terminal Hsp70-binding domain during translocation and expand the mechanistic view of the import process. This work also indicates that synthetic biology may be utilized to create de novo TPs that exceed the targeting activity of naturally occurring sequences. PMID:25645915

  4. Translocation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein to plasma membrane leads to necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Li, Wenjuan; Ren, Junming; Huang, Deli; He, Wan-ting; Song, Yunlong; Yang, Chao; Li, Wanyun; Zheng, Xinru; Chen, Pengda; Han, Jiahuai

    2014-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) was identified to function downstream of receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-induced necrosis (also called necroptosis). However, how MLKL functions to mediate necroptosis is unknown. By reconstitution of MLKL function in MLKL-knockout cells, we showed that the N-terminus of MLKL is required for its function in necroptosis. The oligomerization of MLKL in TNF-treated cells is essential for necroptosis, as artificially forcing MLKL together by using the hormone-binding domain (HBD*) triggers necroptosis. Notably, forcing together the N-terminal domain (ND) but not the C-terminal kinase domain of MLKL causes necroptosis. Further deletion analysis showed that the four-α-helix bundle of MLKL (1-130 amino acids) is sufficient to trigger necroptosis. Both the HBD*-mediated and TNF-induced complexes of MLKL(ND) or MLKL are tetramers, and translocation of these complexes to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane precedes cell death. The homo-oligomerization is required for MLKL translocation and the signal sequence for plasma membrane location is located in the junction of the first and second α-helices of MLKL. The plasma membrane translocation of MLKL or MLKL(ND) leads to sodium influx, and depletion of sodium from the cell culture medium inhibits necroptosis. All of the above phenomena were not seen in apoptosis. Thus, the MLKL oligomerization leads to translocation of MLKL to lipid rafts of plasma membrane, and the plasma membrane MLKL complex acts either by itself or via other proteins to increase the sodium influx, which increases osmotic pressure, eventually leading to membrane rupture. PMID:24366341

  5. Translocator protein (18 kDa) as a pharmacological target in adipocytes to regulate glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-09-01

    As a major regulator in obesity and its associated metabolic complications, the proper functioning of adipocytes is crucial for health maintenance, thus serving as an important target for the development of anti-obese and anti-diabetic therapies. There is increasing evidence that mitochondrial malfunction is a pivotal event in disturbing adipocyte cell homeostasis. Among major mitochondrial structure components, the high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) has shown importance across a broad spectrum of mitochondrial functions. Recent studies demonstrated the presence of TSPO in white adipocyte mitochondria of mice, and administration of TSPO drug ligands to obese mice reduced weight gain and lowered glucose level. Therefore, it is of great interest to assess whether TSPO in adipocytes could serve as a drug target to regulate adipocyte activities with potential influence on weight control and glucose metabolism. Two structurally distinct TSPO drug ligands, PK 11195 and FGIN-1-27, improved the intracellular dynamics of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, such as the production and release of adipokines, glucose uptake, and adipogenesis. TSPO knockdown in either differentiated adipocytes or preadipocytes impaired these functions. Findings from 3T3-L1 cells were related to human primary cells, where TSPO expression was tightly associated with the metabolic state of primary adipocytes and the differentiation of primary preadipocytes. These results suggest that TSPO expression is essential to safeguard healthy adipocyte functions, and that TSPO activation in adipocytes improves their metabolic status in regulating glucose homeostasis. Adipocyte TSPO may serve as a pharmacologic target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:26123521

  6. Calcium-Driven Folding of RTX Domain β-Rolls Ratchets Translocation of RTX Proteins through Type I Secretion Ducts.

    PubMed

    Bumba, Ladislav; Masin, Jiri; Macek, Pavel; Wald, Tomas; Motlova, Lucia; Bibova, Ilona; Klimova, Nela; Bednarova, Lucie; Veverka, Vaclav; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I; Barinka, Cyril; Sebo, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-binding RTX proteins are equipped with C-terminal secretion signals and translocate from the Ca(2+)-depleted cytosol of Gram-negative bacteria directly into the Ca(2+)-rich external milieu, passing through the "channel-tunnel" ducts of type I secretion systems (T1SSs). Using Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin, we solved the structure of an essential C-terminal assembly that caps the RTX domains of RTX family leukotoxins. This is shown to scaffold directional Ca(2+)-dependent folding of the carboxy-proximal RTX repeat blocks into β-rolls. The resulting intramolecular Brownian ratchets then prevent backsliding of translocating RTX proteins in the T1SS conduits and thereby accelerate excretion of very large RTX leukotoxins from bacterial cells by a vectorial "push-ratchet" mechanism. Successive Ca(2+)-dependent and cosecretional acquisition of a functional RTX toxin structure in the course of T1SS-mediated translocation, through RTX domain folding from the C-terminal cap toward the N terminus, sets a paradigm that opens for design of virulence inhibitors of major pathogens. PMID:27058787

  7. Reciprocal translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 26, describes reciprocal translocations of chromosomes: their occurrence, breakpoints, and multiple rearrangements. In addition, phenotypes of balanced and unbalanced translocation carriers and fetal death are discussed. Examples of translocation families are given. Meiosis and genetic risk in translocation carriers is presented. Finally, sperm chromosomes in meiotic segregation analysis is mentioned. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Diversin translocates to the nucleus to interact with the transcription factor AF9

    SciTech Connect

    Haribaskar, Ramachandran; Puetz, Michael; Schupp, Birte; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Bietenbeck, Andreas; Walz, Gerd; Schaefer, Tobias

    2009-09-11

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, a {beta}-catenin-independent branch of the Wnt signaling pathway, orients cells and their appendages with respect to the body axes. Diversin, the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila PCP protein Diego, acts as a molecular switch that blocks {beta}-catenin-dependent and promotes {beta}-catenin-independent Wnt signaling. We report now that Diversin, containing several nuclear localization signals, translocates to the nucleus, where it interacts with the transcription factor AF9. Both Diversin and AF9 block canonical Wnt signaling; however, this occurs independently of each other, and does not require nuclear Diversin. In contrast, AF9 strongly augments the Diversin-driven activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent gene expression in the nucleus, and this augmentation largely depends on the presence of nuclear Diversin. Thus, our findings reveal that components of the PCP cascade translocate to the nucleus to participate in transcriptional regulation and PCP signaling.

  9. A Munc13-like protein in Arabidopsis mediates H+-ATPase translocation that is essential for stomatal responses

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Higaki, Takumi; Yaeno, Takashi; Nagami, Ayako; Irie, Mari; Fujimi, Miho; Miyamoto, Megumi; Akita, Kae; Negi, Juntaro; Shirasu, Ken; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Iba, Koh

    2013-01-01

    Plants control CO2 uptake and water loss by modulating the aperture of stomata located in the epidermis. Stomatal opening is initiated by the activation of H+-ATPases in the guard-cell plasma membrane. In contrast to regulation of H+-ATPase activity, little is known about the translocation of the guard cell H+-ATPase to the plasma membrane. Here we describe the isolation of an Arabidopsis gene, PATROL1, that controls the translocation of a major H+-ATPase, AHA1, to the plasma membrane. PATROL1 encodes a protein with a MUN domain, known to mediate synaptic priming in neuronal exocytosis in animals. Environmental stimuli change the localization of plasma membrane-associated PATROL1 to an intracellular compartment. Plasma membrane localization of AHA1 and stomatal opening require the association of PATROL1 with AHA1. Increased stomatal opening responses in plants overexpressing PATROL1 enhance the CO2 assimilation rate, promoting plant growth. PMID:23896897

  10. Long-Distance Translocation of Protein during Morphogenesis of the Fruiting Body in the Filamentous Fungus, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Woolston, Benjamin M.; Schlagnhaufer, Carl; Wilkinson, Jack; Larsen, Jeffrey; Shi, Zhixin; Mayer, Kimberly M.; Walters, Donald S.; Curtis, Wayne R.; Romaine, C. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of the mushroom fungus, Agaricus bisporus, utilizes a substrate consisting of a lower layer of compost and upper layer of peat. Typically, the two layers are seeded with individual mycelial inoculants representing a single genotype of A. bisporus. Studies aimed at examining the potential of this fungal species as a heterologous protein expression system have revealed unexpected contributions of the mycelial inoculants in the morphogenesis of the fruiting body. These contributions were elucidated using a dual-inoculant method whereby the two layers were differientially inoculated with transgenic β-glucuronidase (GUS) and wild-type (WT) lines. Surprisingly, use of a transgenic GUS line in the lower substrate and a WT line in the upper substrate yielded fruiting bodies expressing GUS activity while lacking the GUS transgene. Results of PCR and RT-PCR analyses for the GUS transgene and RNA transcript, respectively, suggested translocation of the GUS protein from the transgenic mycelium colonizing the lower layer into the fruiting body that developed exclusively from WT mycelium colonizing the upper layer. Effective translocation of the GUS protein depended on the use of a transgenic line in the lower layer in which the GUS gene was controlled by a vegetative mycelium-active promoter (laccase 2 and β-actin), rather than a fruiting body-active promoter (hydrophobin A). GUS-expressing fruiting bodies lacking the GUS gene had a bonafide WT genotype, confirmed by the absence of stably inherited GUS and hygromycin phosphotransferase selectable marker activities in their derived basidiospores and mycelial tissue cultures. Differientially inoculating the two substrate layers with individual lines carrying the GUS gene controlled by different tissue-preferred promoters resulted in up to a ∼3.5-fold increase in GUS activity over that obtained with a single inoculant. Our findings support the existence of a previously undescribed phenomenon of long

  11. Plasma membrane translocation of a protein needle based on a triple-stranded β-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Sanghamitra, Nusrat J M; Inaba, Hiroshi; Arisaka, Fumio; Ohtan Wang, Dan; Kanamaru, Shuji; Kitagawa, Susumu; Ueno, Takafumi

    2014-10-01

    Plasma membrane translocation is challenging due to the barrier of the cell membrane. Contrary to the synthetic cell-penetrating materials, tailed bacteriophages use cell-puncturing protein needles to puncture the cell membranes as an initial step of the DNA injection process. Cell-puncturing protein needles are thought to remain functional in the native phages. In this paper, we found that a bacteriophage T4 derived protein needle of 16 nm length spontaneously translocates through the living cell membrane. The β-helical protein needle (β-PN) internalizes into human red blood cells that lack endocytic machinery. By comparing the cellular uptake of β-PNs with modified surface charge, it is shown that the uptake efficiency is maximum when it has a negative charge corresponding to a zeta potential value of -16 mV. In HeLa cells, uptake of β-PN incorporates endocytosis independent mechanisms with partial macropinocytosis dependence. The endocytosis dependence of the uptake increases when the surface charges of β-PNs are modified to positive or negative. Thus, these results suggest that natural DNA injecting machinery can serve as an inspiration to design new class of cell-penetrating materials with a tailored mechanism. PMID:25082560

  12. DNA translocation activity of the multifunctional replication protein ORF904 from the archaeal plasmid pRN1

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Martin; Drechsler, Markus; Stark, Holger; Lipps, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The replication protein ORF904 from the plasmid pRN1 is a multifunctional enzyme with ATPase-, primase- and DNA polymerase activity. Sequence analysis suggests the presence of at least two conserved domains: an N-terminal prim/pol domain with primase and DNA polymerase activities and a C-terminal superfamily 3 helicase domain with a strong double-stranded DNA dependant ATPase activity. The exact molecular function of the helicase domain in the process of plasmid replication remains unclear. Potentially this motor protein is involved in duplex remodelling and/or origin opening at the plasmid replication origin. In support of this we found that the monomeric replication protein ORF904 forms a hexameric ring in the presence of DNA. It is able to translocate along single-stranded DNA in 3′–5′ direction as well as on double-stranded DNA. Critical residues important for ATPase activity and DNA translocation activity were identified and are in agreement with a homology model of the helicase domain. In addition we propose that a winged helix DNA-binding domain at the C-terminus of the helicase domain could assist the binding of the replication protein specifically to the replication origin. PMID:19762479

  13. A multisubunit complex of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane protein translocases stabilized in vivo by translocation intermediates.

    PubMed

    Schülke, N; Sepuri, N B; Gordon, D M; Saxena, S; Dancis, A; Pain, D

    1999-08-01

    Translocation of nuclear encoded preproteins into the mitochondrial matrix requires the coordinated action of two translocases: one (Tom) located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and the other (Tim) located in the inner membrane. These translocases reversibly cooperate during protein import. We have previously constructed a chimeric precursor (pPGPrA) consisting of an authentic mitochondrial precursor at the N terminus (Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, pPut) linked, through glutathione S-transferase, to protein A. When pPGPrA is expressed in yeast, it becomes irreversibly arrested during translocation across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. Consequently, the two membranes of mitochondria become progressively "zippered" together, forming long stretches in which they are in close contact (Schülke, N., Sepuri, N. B. V., and Pain, D. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 94, 7314-7319). We now demonstrate that trapped PGPrA intermediates hold the import channels stably together and inhibit mitochondrial protein import and cell growth. Using IgG-Sepharose affinity chromatography of solubilized zippered membranes, we have isolated a multisubunit complex that contains all Tom and Tim components known to be essential for import of matrix-targeted proteins, namely Tom40, Tom22, Tim17, Tim23, Tim44, and matrix-localized Hsp70. Further characterization of this complex may shed light on structural features of the complete mitochondrial import machinery. PMID:10428870

  14. Protein kinase C modulates aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator protein-mediated transactivation potential in a dimer context.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Chen, X; Perdew, G H

    1999-04-30

    Protein kinase C (PKC)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated modulation of the transactivation potential of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (hARNT), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS transcription factor, and the bHLH-ZIP transcription factors USF-1 (for upstream regulatory factor 1) and c-Myc were examined. An 81 nM dose of the PKC activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), shown here to specifically activate PKC in COS-1 cells, or a 1 nM dose of the PKA activator 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) results in 2. 6- and 1.9-fold enhancements, respectively, in hARNT-mediated transactivation of the class B, E-box-driven reporter pMyc3E1bLuc relative to identically transfected, carrier solvent-treated COS-1 cells. In contrast, 81 nM PMA and 1 nM 8-Br-cAMP did not enhance transactivation of pMyc3E1bLuc-driven by USF-1 and c-Myc expression relative to identically transfected, carrier-treated COS-1 cells. Co-transfection of pcDNA3/ARNT-474-Flag, expressing a hARNT carboxyl-terminal transactivation domain deletion, and pMyc3E1bLuc does not result in induction of reporter activity, suggesting PMA's effects do not involve formation of unknown hARNT-protein heterodimers. Additionally, PMA had no effect on hARNT expression relative to Me2SO-treated cells. Metabolic 32P labeling of hARNT in cells treated with carrier solvent or 81 nM PMA demonstrates that PMA does not increase the overall phosphorylation level of hARNT. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that the transactivation potential of ARNT in a dimer context can be specifically modulated by PKC or PKA stimulation and that the bHLH-PAS and bHLH-ZIP transcription factors are differentially regulated by these pathways in COS-1 cells. PMID:10212212

  15. The kinetics of translocation and cellular quantity of protein kinase C in human leukocytes are modified during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Gaubert, F.; Lewis, M. L.; Darsel, Y.; Ohlmann, P.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D.

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases that play an important role in mediating intracellular signal transduction in eukaryotes. U937 cells were exposed to microgravity during a space shuttle flight and stimulated with a radiolabeled phorbol ester ([3H]PDBu) to both specifically label and activate translocation of PKC from the cytosol to the particulate fraction of the cell. Although significant translocation of PKC occurred at all g levels, the kinetics of translocation in flight were significantly different from those on the ground. In addition, the total quantity of [3H]PDBu binding PKC was increased in flight compared to cells at 1 g on the ground, whereas the quantity in hypergravity (1.4 g) was decreased with respect to 1 g. Similarly, in purified human peripheral blood T cells the quantity of PKCdelta varied in inverse proportion to the g level for some experimental treatments. In addition to these novel findings, the results confirm earlier studies which showed that PKC is sensitive to changes in gravitational acceleration. The mechanisms of cellular gravisensitivity are poorly understood but the demonstrated sensitivity of PKC to this stimulus provides us with a useful means of measuring the effect of altered gravity levels on early cell activation events.

  16. Inhibition of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases induces abortive translocation and degradation of the cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Stocki, Pawel; Sawicki, Maxime; Mays, Charles E; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C; Westaway, David; Williams, David B

    2016-03-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Because the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is required for propagation of the infectious scrapie form of the protein, one therapeutic strategy is to reduce PrP(C) expression. Recently FK506, an inhibitor of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases, was shown to increase survival in animal models of prion disease, with proposed mechanisms including calcineurin inhibition, induction of autophagy, and reduced PrP(C) expression. We show that FK506 treatment results in a profound reduction in PrP(C) expression due to a defect in the translocation of PrP(C) into the endoplasmic reticulum with subsequent degradation by the proteasome. These phenotypes could be bypassed by replacing the PrP(C) signal sequence with that of prolactin or osteopontin. In mouse cells, depletion of ER luminal FKBP10 was almost as potent as FK506 in attenuating expression of PrP(C). However, this occurred at a later stage, after translocation of PrP(C) into the ER. Both FK506 treatment and FKBP10 depletion were effective in reducing PrP(Sc) propagation in cell models. These findings show the involvement of FKBP proteins at different stages of PrP(C) biogenesis and identify FKBP10 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26764098

  17. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15598.001 PMID:27183269

  18. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Baldwin, Steve A; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:27183269

  19. Inhibition of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases induces abortive translocation and degradation of the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Stocki, Pawel; Sawicki, Maxime; Mays, Charles E.; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C.; Westaway, David; Williams, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Because the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is required for propagation of the infectious scrapie form of the protein, one therapeutic strategy is to reduce PrPC expression. Recently FK506, an inhibitor of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases, was shown to increase survival in animal models of prion disease, with proposed mechanisms including calcineurin inhibition, induction of autophagy, and reduced PrPC expression. We show that FK506 treatment results in a profound reduction in PrPC expression due to a defect in the translocation of PrPC into the endoplasmic reticulum with subsequent degradation by the proteasome. These phenotypes could be bypassed by replacing the PrPC signal sequence with that of prolactin or osteopontin. In mouse cells, depletion of ER luminal FKBP10 was almost as potent as FK506 in attenuating expression of PrPC. However, this occurred at a later stage, after translocation of PrPC into the ER. Both FK506 treatment and FKBP10 depletion were effective in reducing PrPSc propagation in cell models. These findings show the involvement of FKBP proteins at different stages of PrPC biogenesis and identify FKBP10 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26764098

  20. Kinetically Competent Intermediate(s) in the Translocation Step of Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dongli; Kirillov, Stanislav V.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Translocation requires large-scale movements of ribosome-bound tRNAs. Using tRNAs that are proflavin-labeled and single turnover rapid kinetics assays, we identify one or possibly two kinetically competent intermediates in translocation. EF-G.GTP binding to the pretranslocation (PRE) complex and GTP hydrolysis is rapidly followed by formation of the securely identified intermediate complex (INT), which is more slowly converted to the posttranslocation (POST) complex. Peptidyl tRNA within the INT complex occupies a hybrid site, having puromycin reactivity intermediate between those of the PRE and POST complexes. Thiostrepton and viomycin inhibit INT formation, whereas spectinomycin selectively inhibits INT disappearance. The effects of other translocation modulators suggest that EF-G-dependent GTP hydrolysis is more important for INT complex formation than for INT complex conversion to POST complex, and that subtle changes in tRNA structure influence coupling of tRNA movement to EF-G.GTP-induced conformational changes. PMID:17317625

  1. Arabidopsis ABCG14 protein controls the acropetal translocation of root-synthesized cytokinins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kewei; Novak, Ondrej; Wei, Zhaoyang; Gou, Mingyue; Zhang, Xuebin; Yu, Yong; Yang, Huijun; Cai, Yuanheng; Strnad, Miroslav; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Cytokinins are a major group of phytohormones regulating plant growth, development and stress responses. However, in contrast to the well-defined polar transport of auxins, the molecular basis of cytokinin transport is poorly understood. Here we show that an ATP-binding cassette transporter in Arabidopsis, AtABCG14, is essential for the acropetal (root to shoot) translocation of the root-synthesized cytokinins. AtABCG14 is expressed primarily in the pericycle and stelar cells of roots. Knocking out AtABCG14 strongly impairs the translocation of trans-zeatin (tZ)-type cytokinins from roots to shoots, thereby affecting the plant’s growth and development. AtABCG14 localizes to the plasma membrane of transformed cells. In planta feeding of C14 or C13-labelled tZ suggests that it acts as an efflux pump and its presence in the cells directly correlates with the transport of the fed cytokinin. Therefore, AtABCG14 is a transporter likely involved in the long-distance translocation of cytokinins in planta.

  2. AIRE-induced apoptosis is associated with nuclear translocation of stress sensor protein GAPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Kisand, Kai; Maslovskaja, Julia; Laan, Martti; Peterson, Paert

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induces apoptosis in epithelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARD domain of AIRE is sufficient for apoptosis induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE induced apoptosis involves GAPDH translocation to the nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deprenyl inhibits AIRE induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator) has a central role in the transcriptional regulation of self-antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, which is necessary for negative selection of autoreactive T cells. Recent data have shown that AIRE can also induce apoptosis, which may be linked to cross-presentation of these self-antigens. Here we studied AIRE-induced apoptosis using AIRE over-expression in a thymic epithelial cell line as well as doxycycline-inducible HEK293 cells. We show that the HSR/CARD domain in AIRE together with a nuclear localization signal is sufficient to induce apoptosis. In the nuclei of AIRE-positive cells, we also found an increased accumulation of a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAPDH) reflecting cellular stress and apoptosis. Additionally, AIRE-induced apoptosis was inhibited with an anti-apoptotic agent deprenyl that blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and nuclear translocation. We propose that the AIRE-induced apoptosis pathway is associated with GAPDH nuclear translocation and induction of NO-induced cellular stress in AIRE-expressing cells.

  3. Exploration of twin‐arginine translocation for expression and purification of correctly folded proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Adam C.; Kim, Jae‐Young; Perez‐Rodriguez, Ritsdeliz; Tullman‐Ercek, Danielle; Fish, Wallace R.; Henderson, Lee A.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Historically, the general secretory (Sec) pathway of Gram‐negative bacteria has served as the primary route by which heterologous proteins are delivered to the periplasm in numerous expression and engineering applications. Here we have systematically examined the twin‐arginine translocation (Tat) pathway as an alternative, and possibly advantageous, secretion pathway for heterologous proteins. Overall, we found that: (i) export efficiency and periplasmic yield of a model substrate were affected by the composition of the Tat signal peptide, (ii) Tat substrates were correctly processed at their N‐termini upon reaching the periplasm and (iii) proteins fused to maltose‐binding protein (MBP) were reliably exported by the Tat system, but only when correctly folded; aberrantly folded MBP fusions were excluded by the Tat pathway's folding quality control feature. We also observed that Tat export yield was comparable to Sec for relatively small, well‐folded proteins, higher relative to Sec for proteins that required cytoplasmic folding, and lower relative to Sec for larger, soluble fusion proteins. Interestingly, the specific activity of material purified from the periplasm was higher for certain Tat substrates relative to their Sec counterparts, suggesting that Tat expression can give rise to relatively pure and highly active proteins in one step. PMID:21261860

  4. Effects of sevoflurane on tight junction protein expression and PKC-α translocation after pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jun; Long, Bo; Liu, Xiaomei; Li, Yan; Han, Ning; Zhao, Ping; Chen, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of mortality in lung transplantation. We aimed to investigate the effects of sevoflurane pretreatment on lung permeability, tight junction protein occludin and zona occludens 1 (ZO-1) expression, and translocation of protein kinase C (PKC)-α after ischemia-reperfusion. A lung ischemia-reperfusion injury model was established in 96 male Wistar rats following the modified Eppinger method. The rats were divided into four groups with 24 rats in each group: a control (group C), an ischemia-reperfusion group (IR group), a sevoflurane control group (sev-C group), and a sevoflurane ischemia-reperfusion group (sev-IR group). There were three time points in each group: ischemic occlusion for 45 min, reperfusion for 60 min and reperfusion for 120 min; and there were six rats per time point. For the 120-min reperfusion group, six extra rats underwent bronchoalveolar lavage. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded at each time point. The wet/dry weight ratio and lung permeability index (LPI) were measured. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure pulmonary occludin and ZO-1, and Western blot was used to measure cytosolic and membranous PKC-α in the lung. Lung permeability was significantly increased after ischemia-reperfusion. Sevoflurane pretreatment promoted pulmonary expression of occludin and ZO-1 after reperfusion and inhibited the translocation of PKC-α. In conclusion, sevoflurane pretreatment alleviated lung permeability by upregulating occludin and ZO-1 after ischemia-reperfusion. Sevoflurane pretreatment inhibited the translocation and activation of PKC-α, which also contributed to the lung-protective effect of sevoflurane. PMID:26045255

  5. Translocation of the ABC transporter ABCD4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes requires the escort protein LMBD1.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takumi; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ABCD4 does not localize to peroxisomes but rather, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because it lacks the NH2-terminal hydrophilic region required for peroxisomal targeting. It was recently reported that mutations in ABCD4 result in a failure to release vitamin B12 from lysosomes. A similar phenotype is caused by mutations in LMBRD1, which encodes the lysosomal membrane protein LMBD1. These findings suggested to us that ABCD4 translocated from the ER to lysosomes in association with LMBD1. In this report, it is demonstrated that ABCD4 interacts with LMBD1 and then localizes to lysosomes, and this translocation depends on the lysosomal targeting ability of LMBD1. Furthermore, endogenous ABCD4 was localized to both lysosomes and the ER, and its lysosomal localization was disturbed by knockout of LMBRD1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the subcellular localization of the ABC transporter is determined by its association with an adaptor protein. PMID:27456980

  6. Accumulation of the Drosophila Torso-like protein at the blastoderm plasma membrane suggests that it translocates from the eggshell.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Alessandro; Furriols, Marc; Casanova, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    The eggshell serves as a depository for proteins that play an important role in early embryonic development. In particular, the Drosophila eggshell is responsible for transferring asymmetries from the egg chamber to specify the regions at both ends of the embryo through the uneven activation of the Torso (Tor) receptor in its membrane. This process relies on the restricted expression of the gene torso-like (tsl) in subpopulations of follicle cells during oogenesis and its protein accumulation at both poles of the eggshell, but it is not known how this signal is transmitted to the embryo. Here, we show that Tsl accumulates at the embryonic plasma membrane, even in the absence of the Tor receptor. However, during oogenesis, we detected Tsl accumulation only at the eggshell. These results suggest that there is a two-step mechanism to transfer the asymmetric positional cues from the egg chamber into the early embryo: initial anchoring of Tsl at the eggshell as it is secreted, followed by its later translocation to the egg plasma membrane, where it enables Tor receptor activation. Translocation of anchored determinants from the eggshell might then regulate the spatial and temporal control of early embryonic developmental processes. PMID:25758463

  7. Translocation of the ABC transporter ABCD4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to lysosomes requires the escort protein LMBD1

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Okamoto, Takumi; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ABCD4 does not localize to peroxisomes but rather, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because it lacks the NH2-terminal hydrophilic region required for peroxisomal targeting. It was recently reported that mutations in ABCD4 result in a failure to release vitamin B12 from lysosomes. A similar phenotype is caused by mutations in LMBRD1, which encodes the lysosomal membrane protein LMBD1. These findings suggested to us that ABCD4 translocated from the ER to lysosomes in association with LMBD1. In this report, it is demonstrated that ABCD4 interacts with LMBD1 and then localizes to lysosomes, and this translocation depends on the lysosomal targeting ability of LMBD1. Furthermore, endogenous ABCD4 was localized to both lysosomes and the ER, and its lysosomal localization was disturbed by knockout of LMBRD1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the subcellular localization of the ABC transporter is determined by its association with an adaptor protein. PMID:27456980

  8. The Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) and Its Role in Mitochondrial Biology and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Rupprecht, Rainer; Wetzel, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane of many cell types and its expression is found to be up-regulated under various pathological conditions such as cancer, inflammation, mechanical lesions, and neurological diseases, e.g. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Its primary function is to mediate the transport of cholesterol into the inner compartments of mitochondria. Moreover, TSPO is interacting and building up functional complexes with other mitochondrial proteins such as the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT), hexokinase I and II and Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β). This mini review will focus on the role of TSPO as a central regulator of mitochondrial function with regard to pathologic states and as a target for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25807946

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Tubule Protein Reticulon 4 Associates with the Legionella pneumophila Vacuole and with Translocated Substrate Ceg9

    PubMed Central

    Haenssler, Eva; Ramabhadran, Vinay; Murphy, Connor S.; Heidtman, Matthew I.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila occurs in a replication vacuole constructed by host proteins that regulate vesicular traffic from the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This process is promoted by a combination of approximately 300 Icm/Dot translocated substrates (IDTS). One of these proteins, Ceg9, was previously identified in a screen for L. pneumophila IDTS that manipulate secretory traffic when overexpressed in yeast. Using ectopic expression of Ceg9 in mammalian cells, we demonstrate that Ceg9 interacts with isoforms of host reticulon 4 (Rtn4), a protein that regulates ER tubule formation. Binding occurs under conditions that prevent association with other known reticulon binding proteins, arguing that Ceg9 binding is stable. A tripartite complex was demonstrated among Rtn4, Ceg9, and atlastin 1, a previously characterized reticulon interacting partner. The binding of Ceg9 to Rtn4 was not due to bridging by atlastin 1 but resulted from the two interacting partners binding independently to reticulon. When Ceg9 is ectopically expressed in mammalian cells, it shows a localization pattern that is indistinguishable from that of Rtn4, perhaps due to interactions between and similar structural features of the two proteins. Consistent with Rtn4 playing a role in the formation of the Legionella-containing vacuole, it was recruited to almost 50% of the vacuoles within 20 min postinfection. Our studies suggest that L. pneumophila proteins interact with ER tubules at an early stage of replication vacuole formation. PMID:26099580

  10. Angiogenin-induced protein kinase B/Akt activation is necessary for angiogenesis but is independent of nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hye-Mi; Kang, Dong-Ku; Kim, Hak Yong; Kang, Sang Sun; Chang, Soo-Ik . E-mail: sichang@cbnu.ac.kr

    2007-01-12

    Angiogenin, a potent angiogenic factor, binds to endothelial cells and is endocytosed and rapidly translocated to and concentrated in the nucleolus where it binds to DNA. In this study, we report that angiogenin induces transient phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells. LY294002 inhibits the angiogenin-induced protein kinase B/Akt activation and also angiogenin-induced cell migration in vitro as well as angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane in vivo without affecting nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells. These results suggest that cross-talk between angiogenin and protein kinase B/Akt signaling pathways is essential for angiogenin-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and that angiogenin-induced PKB/Akt activation is independent of nuclear translocation of angiogenin in HUVE cells.

  11. The code for directing proteins for translocation across ER membrane: SRP cotranslationally recognizes specific features of a signal sequence.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, IngMarie; Lara, Patricia; Hessa, Tara; Johnson, Arthur E; von Heijne, Gunnar; Karamyshev, Andrey L

    2015-03-27

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) cotranslationally recognizes signal sequences of secretory proteins and targets ribosome-nascent chain complexes to the SRP receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, initiating translocation of the nascent chain through the Sec61 translocon. Although signal sequences do not have homology, they have similar structural regions: a positively charged N-terminus, a hydrophobic core and a more polar C-terminal region that contains the cleavage site for the signal peptidase. Here, we have used site-specific photocrosslinking to study SRP-signal sequence interactions. A photoreactive probe was incorporated into the middle of wild-type or mutated signal sequences of the secretory protein preprolactin by in vitro translation of mRNAs containing an amber-stop codon in the signal peptide in the presence of the N(ε)-(5-azido-2 nitrobenzoyl)-Lys-tRNA(amb) amber suppressor. A homogeneous population of SRP-ribosome-nascent chain complexes was obtained by the use of truncated mRNAs in translations performed in the presence of purified canine SRP. Quantitative analysis of the photoadducts revealed that charged residues at the N-terminus of the signal sequence or in the early part of the mature protein have only a mild effect on the SRP-signal sequence association. However, deletions of amino acid residues in the hydrophobic portion of the signal sequence severely affect SRP binding. The photocrosslinking data correlate with targeting efficiency and translocation across the membrane. Thus, the hydrophobic core of the signal sequence is primarily responsible for its recognition and binding by SRP, while positive charges fine-tune the SRP-signal sequence affinity and targeting to the translocon. PMID:24979680

  12. A Dot/Icm-translocated ankyrin protein of Legionella pneumophila is required for intracellular proliferation within human macrophages and protozoa.

    PubMed

    Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Price, Christopher T; Habyarimana, Fabien; Kalia, Awdhesh; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2008-11-01

    The Dot/Icm type IV secretion system of Legionella pneumophila translocates numerous bacterial effectors into the host cell and is essential for bacterial proliferation within macrophages and protozoa. We have recently shown that L. pneumophila strain AA100/130b harbours 11 genes encoding eukaryotic-like ankyrin (Ank) proteins, a family of proteins involved in various essential eukaryotic cellular processes. In contrast to most Dot/Icm-exported substrates, which have little or no detectable role in intracellular proliferation, a mutation in ankB results in a severe growth defect in intracellular replication within human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs), U937 macrophages and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Single cell analyses of coinfections of hMDMs have shown that the intracellular growth defect of the ankB mutant is totally rescued in cis within communal phagosomes harbouring the wild type strain. Interestingly, distinct from dot/icm structural mutants, the ankB mutant is also rescued in trans within cells harbouring the wild type strain in a different phagosome, indicating that AnkB is a trans-acting secreted effector. Using adenylate cyclase fusions to AnkB, we show that AnkB is translocated into the host cell via the Dot/Icm secretion system in an IcmSW-dependent manner and that the last three C-terminal amino acid residues are essential for translocation. Distinct from the dot/icm structural mutants, the ankB mutant-containing phagosomes exclude late endosomal and lysosomal markers and their phagosomes are remodelled by the rough endoplasmic reticulum. We show that at the postexponential phase of growth, the LetA/S and PmrA/B Two Component Systems confer a positive regulation on expression of the ankB gene, whereas RpoS, LetE and RelA suppress its expression. Our data show that the eukaryotic-like AnkB protein is a Dot/Icm-exported effector that plays a major role in intracellular replication of L. pneumophila within macrophages and protozoa, and its expression

  13. A Dot/Icm-translocated ankyrin protein of Legionella pneumophila is required for intracellular proliferation within human macrophages and protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Al-khodor, Souhaila; Price, Christopher T.; Habyarimana, Fabien; Kalia, Awdhesh; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Dot/Icm type IV secretion system of L. pneumophila translocates numerous bacterial effectors into the host cell and is essential for bacterial proliferation within macrophages and protozoa. We have recently shown that L. pneumophila strain AA100/130b harbors 11 genes encoding eukaryotic-like ankyrin (Ank) proteins, a family of proteins involved in various essential eukaryotic cellular processes. In contrast to most Dot/Icm-exported substrates, which have little or no detectable role in intracellular proliferation, a mutation in ankB results in a severe growth defect in intracellular replication within human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs), U937 macrophages, and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Single cell analyses of co-infections of hMDMs have shown that the intracellular growth defect of the ankB mutant is totally rescued in-cis within communal phagosomes harboring the wild type strain. Interestingly, distinct from dot/icm structural mutants, the ankB mutant is also rescued in-trans within cells harboring the wild type strain in a different phagosome, indicating that AnkB is a transacting secreted effector. Using adenylate cyclase fusions to AnkB, we show that AnkB is translocated into the host cell via the Dot/Icm secretion system in an IcmSW-dependent manner, and that the last 3 C-terminal amino acid residues are essential for translocation. Distinct from the dot/icm structural mutants, the ankB mutant-containing phagosomes exclude late endosomal and lysosomal markers and their phagosomes are remodeled by the RER. We show that at the post exponential phase of growth, the LetA/S and PmrA/B two component systems confer a positive regulation on expression of the ankB gene, whereas RpoS, LetE, and RelA suppress its expression. Our data show that the eukaryotic-like AnkB protein is a Dot/Icm-exported effector that plays a major role in intracellular replication of L. pneumophila within macrophages and protozoa, and its expression is temporally controlled by

  14. SpiC Is Required for Translocation of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 Effectors and Secretion of Translocon Proteins SseB and SseC

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jeremy A.; Rappl, Catherine; Kuhle, Volker; Hensel, Michael; Miller, Samuel I.

    2002-01-01

    The Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) type III secretion system (TTSS) promotes Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence for mice and increased survival and replication within eukaryotic cells. After phagocytosis, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium assembles the SPI2 TTSS to translocate over a dozen effector proteins across the phagosome membrane. SpiC has been previously shown to be a translocated effector with a large contribution to virulence (K. Uchiya, M. A. Barbieri, K. Funato, A. H. Shah, P. D. Stahl, and E. A. Groisman, EMBO J. 18:3924-3933, 1999). This report demonstrates by competitive index that the virulence phenotype of a spiC mutant is equivalent to that of a secretion component mutant. In addition, translocation of SPI2 effector proteins was shown to require SpiC. Thus, the severe virulence phenotype resulting from deletion of spiC is likely due to the inability to translocate all SPI2 effectors. SpiC was also required to secrete translocon proteins SseB and SseC but not translocated effector SseJ, indicating that lack of assembly of the translocon explains the spiC mutant phenotype. PMID:12193612

  15. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  16. The glove-like structure of the conserved membrane protein TatC provides insight into signal sequence recognition in twin-arginine translocation.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Abrol, Ravinder; Suloway, Christian J M; Clemons, William M

    2013-05-01

    In bacteria, two signal-sequence-dependent secretion pathways translocate proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Although the mechanism of the ubiquitous general secretory pathway is becoming well understood, that of the twin-arginine translocation pathway, responsible for translocation of folded proteins across the bilayer, is more mysterious. TatC, the largest and most conserved of three integral membrane components, provides the initial binding site of the signal sequence prior to pore assembly. Here, we present two crystal structures of TatC from the thermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus at 4.0 Å and 6.8 Å resolution. The membrane architecture of TatC includes a glove-shaped structure with a lipid-exposed pocket predicted by molecular dynamics to distort the membrane. Correlating the biochemical literature to these results suggests that the signal sequence binds in this pocket, leading to structural changes that facilitate higher order assemblies. PMID:23583035

  17. The glove-like structure of the conserved membrane protein TatC provides insight into signal sequence recognition in twin-arginine translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Abrol, Ravinder; Suloway, Christian J.M.; Clemons, William M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In bacteria, two signal sequence dependent secretion pathways translocate proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. While the mechanism of the ubiquitous general secretory pathway (SEC) is becoming well understood, that of the twin-arginine translocation pathway (TAT), responsible for translocation of folded proteins across the bilayer, is more mysterious. TatC, the largest and most conserved of three integral membrane components, provides the initial binding site of the signal sequence prior to pore assembly. Here, we present two crystal structures of TatC from the thermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus at 4.0Å and 6.8Å resolution. The novel membrane architecture of TatC includes a glove-shaped structure with a lipid-exposed pocket predicted by molecular dynamics to distort the membrane. Correlating the biochemical literature to these results suggests that the signal sequence binds in this pocket leading to structural changes that facilitate higher order assemblies. PMID:23583035

  18. Membrane translocation of mitochondrially coded Cox2p: distinct requirements for export of N and C termini and dependence on the conserved protein Oxa1p.

    PubMed Central

    He, S; Fox, T D

    1997-01-01

    To study in vivo the export of mitochondrially synthesized protein from the matrix to the intermembrane space, we have fused a synthetic mitochondrial gene, ARG8m, to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COX2 gene in mitochondrial DNA. The Arg8mp moiety was translocated through the inner membrane when fused to the Cox2p C terminus by a mechanism dependent on topogenic information at least partially contained within the exported Cox2p C-terminal tail. The pre-Cox2p leader peptide did not signal translocation. Export of the Cox2p C-terminal tail, but not the N-terminal tail, was dependent on the inner membrane potential. The mitochondrial export system does not closely resemble the bacterial Sec translocase. However, normal translocation of both exported domains of Cox2p was defective in cells lacking the widely conserved inner membrane protein Oxa1p. Images PMID:9285818

  19. Protein domain of unknown function 3233 is a translocation domain of autotransporter secretory mechanism in gamma proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3(rd) of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system. PMID:22073138

  20. Apoptosis Therapy in Cancer: The First Single-molecule Co-activating p53 and the Translocator Protein in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Simona; Taliani, Sabrina; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Giacomelli, Chiara; Costa, Barbara; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Leonardo; La Pietra, Valeria; Barresi, Elisabetta; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Limatola, Antonio; Lamberti, Anna; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Da Settimo, Federico; Martini, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    In the complex scenario of cancer, treatment with compounds targeting multiple cell pathways has been emerging. In Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), p53 and Translocator Protein (TSPO), both acting as apoptosis inducers, represent two attractive intracellular targets. On this basis, novel indolylglyoxylyldipeptides, rationally designed to activate TSPO and p53, were synthesized and biologically characterized. The new compounds were able to bind TSPO and to reactivate p53 functionality, through the dissociation from its physiological inhibitor, murine double minute 2 (MDM2). In GBM cells, the new molecules caused Δψm dissipation and inhibition of cell viability. These effects resulted significantly higher with respect to those elicited by the single target reference standards applied alone, and coherent with the synergism resulting from the simultaneous activation of TSPO and p53. Taken together, these results suggest that TSPO/MDM2 dual-target ligands could represent a new attractive multi-modal opportunity for anti-cancer strategy in GBM. PMID:24756113

  1. The Nun protein of bacteriophage HK022 inhibits translocation of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase without abolishing its catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Siu Chun; Gottesman, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Bacteriophage HK022 Nun protein blocks transcription elongation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in vitro without dissociating the transcription complex. Nun is active on complexes located at any template site tested. Ultimately, only the 3′-OH terminal nucleotide of the nascent transcript in an arrested complex can turn over; it is removed by pyrophosphate and restored with NTPs. This suggests that Nun inhibits the translocation of RNA polymerase without abolishing its catalytic activities. Unlike spontaneously arrested complexes, Nun-arrested complexes cannot be reactivated by transcription factor GreB. The various complexes show distinct patterns of nucleotide incorporation and pyrophosphorolysis before or after treatment with Nun, suggesting that the configuration of RNAP, transcript, and template DNA is different in each complex. PMID:9334329

  2. Geometry of a complex formed by double strand break repair proteins at a single DNA end: recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces inward translocation of Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S; Dynan, W S

    1999-12-15

    Ku protein and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) are essential components of the double-strand break repair machinery in higher eukaryotic cells. Ku protein binds to broken DNA ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form an enzymatically active complex. To characterize the arrangement of proteins in this complex, we developed a set of photocross-linking probes, each with a single free end. We have previously used this approach to characterize the contacts in an initial Ku-DNA complex, and we have now applied the same technology to define the events that occur when Ku recruits DNA-PKcs. The new probes allow the binding of one molecule of Ku protein and one molecule of DNA-PKcs in a defined position and orientation. Photocross-linking reveals that DNA-PKcs makes direct contact with the DNA termini, occupying an approximately 10 bp region proximal to the free end. Characterization of the Ku protein cross-linking pattern in the presence and absence of DNA-PKcs suggests that Ku binds to form an initial complex at the DNA ends, and that recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces an inward translocation of this Ku molecule by about one helical turn. The presence of ATP had no effect on protein-DNA contacts, suggesting that neither DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation nor a putative Ku helicase activity plays a role in modulating protein conformation under the conditions tested. PMID:10572166

  3. Modification and translocation of Rac/Rop guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding proteins of Scoparia dulcis in response to stimulation with methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Toshiaki; Yamamura, Yoshimi; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2011-01-01

    Translocation of two Rac/Rop guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding proteins from Scoparia dulcis, Sdrac-1 and Sdrac-2, was examined employing transformed belladonna which overproduces these proteins as glutathione-S-transferase-tagged forms. The transferase activities of the fused proteins in microsomal fraction of belladonna markedly increased by the incubation with methyl jasmonate either in Sdrac-1 or Sdrac-2 transformant, while low and constant activities were observed in the untreated control. Recombinant Sdrac-2 protein was found to bind to prenyl chain in the presence of cell extracts prepared from methyl jasmonate-treated S. dulcis, however, Sdrac-1 was palmitoylated by the addition of the cell extracts. These results suggest that both Sdrac-1 and Sdrac-2 translocate to plant membranes by the stimulation with methyl jasmonate, however, targeting of these proteins is triggered by the independent modification mechanisms, palmitoylation for Sdrac-1 and prenylation for Sdrac-2. PMID:21628882

  4. Dual mode of energy coupling by the oxyanion-translocating ArsB protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, S; Rosen, B P

    1995-01-01

    The arsA and arsB genes of the ars operon of R-factor R773 confer arsenite resistance in Escherichia coli by coding for an anion-translocating ATPase. Arsenite resistance and the in vivo energetics of arsenite transport were compared in cells expressing the arsA and arsB genes and those expressing just the arsB gene. Cells expressing the arsB gene exhibited intermediate arsenite resistance compared with cells expressing both the arsA and arsB genes. Both types of cells exhibited energy-dependent arsenite exclusion. Exclusion of 73AsO2- from cells expressing only the arsB gene was coupled to electrochemical energy, while in cells expressing both genes, transport was coupled to chemical energy, most likely ATP. These results suggest that the Ars anion transport system can be either an obligatory ATP-coupled primary pump or a secondary carrier coupled to the proton motive force, depending on the subunit composition of the transport complex. PMID:7814328

  5. CD4 and BST-2/tetherin proteins retro-translocate from endoplasmic reticulum to cytosol as partially folded and multimeric molecules.

    PubMed

    Petris, Gianluca; Casini, Antonio; Sasset, Linda; Cesaratto, Francesca; Bestagno, Marco; Cereseto, Anna; Burrone, Oscar R

    2014-01-01

    CD4 and BST-2/Tetherin are cellular membrane proteins targeted to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vpu. In both cases proteasomal degradation following recruitment into the ERAD pathway has been described. CD4 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, with four extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains containing three intrachain disulfide bridges. BST-2/Tetherin is an atypical type II transmembrane glycoprotein with an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal glycophosphatidylinositol anchor, which dimerizes through three interchain bridges. We investigated spontaneous and Vpu-induced retro-translocation of CD4 and BST-2/Tetherin using our novel biotinylation technique in living cells to determine ER-to-cytosol retro-translocation of proteins. We found that CD4 retro-translocates with oxidized intrachain disulfide bridges, and only upon proteasomal inhibition does it accumulate in the cytosol as already reduced and deglycosylated molecules. Similarly, BST-2/Tetherin is first exposed to the cytosol as a dimeric oxidized complex and then becomes deglycosylated and reduced to monomers. These results raise questions on the required features of the putative retro-translocon, suggesting alternative retro-translocation mechanisms for membrane proteins in which complete cysteine reduction and unfolding are not always strictly required before ER to cytosol dislocation. PMID:24257748

  6. Long lasting MDM2/Translocator protein modulator: a new strategy for irreversible apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zappelli, Elisa; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Da Settimo, Federico; Taliani, Sabrina; Trincavelli, Maria L.; Martini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The development of multi-target drugs and irreversible modulators of deregulated signalling proteins is the major challenge for improving glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment. Reversible single-target drugs are not sufficient to sustain a therapeutic effect over time and may favour the activation of alternative signalling pathways and the onset of resistance phenomena. Thus, a multi-target compound that has a long-lasting mechanism of action might have a greater and longer life span of anti-proliferative activity. Recently, a dual-target indol-3ylglyoxyldipeptide derivative, designed to bind to the Translocator Protein (TSPO) and reactivate p53 function via dissociation from its physiological inhibitor, murine double minute 2 (MDM2), has been developed as a potent GBM pro-apoptotic agent. In this study, this derivative was chemically modified to irreversibly bind MDM2 and TSPO. The new compound elicited a TSPO-mediated mitochondrial membrane dissipation and restored p53 activity, triggering a long-lasting apoptosis of GBM cells. These effects were sustained over time, involved a stable activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases and were specifically observed in cancer cells, in which these protein kinases are deregulated. Dual-targeting and irreversible binding properties combined in the same molecule may represent a useful strategy to overcome the time-limited effects elicited by classical chemotherapies. PMID:26761214

  7. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Kravats, Andrea N.; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  8. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Kravats, Andrea N; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  9. Investigation of translocation, DNA unwinding, and protein displacement by NS3h, the helicase domain from the Hepatitis C virus helicase†

    PubMed Central

    Matlock, Dennis L.; Yeruva, Laxmi; Byrd, Alicia K.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Langston, Clint; Brown, Carrie; Cameron, Craig E.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases are motor proteins that are involved in DNA and RNA metabolism, replication, recombination, transcription and repair. The motors are powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Hepatitis C virus encodes a helicase called non-structural protein (NS3). NS3 possesses protease and helicase activities on its N-terminal and C-terminal domains respectively. The helicase domain of NS3 protein is referred as NS3h. In vitro, NS3h catalyzes RNA and DNA unwinding in a 3’ to -5’ direction. The directionality for unwinding is thought to arise in part from the enzyme's ability to translocate along DNA, but translocation has not been shown explicitly. We examined the DNA translocase activity of NS3h by using single-stranded oligonucleotide substrates containing a fluorescent probe on the 5’ end. NS3h can bind to the ssDNA and in the presence of ATP, move towards the 5’-end. When the enzyme encounters the fluorescent probe, a fluorescence change is observed that allows translocation to be characterized. Under conditions that favor binding of one NS3h per DNA substrate (100 nM NS3h, 200 nM oligonucleotide) we find that NS3h translocates on ssDNA at a rate of 46 ± 5 nt s−1 and that it can move for 230 ± 60 nt before dissociating from the DNA. The translocase activity of some helicases is responsible for displacing proteins that are bound to DNA. We studied protein displacement by using a ssDNA oligonucleotide covalently linked to biotin on the 5’-end. Upon addition of streptavidin, a ‘protein-block’ was placed in the pathway of the helicase. Interestingly, NS3h was unable to displace streptavidin from the end of the oligonucleotide, despite its ability to translocate along the DNA. The DNA unwinding activity of NS3h was examined using a 22 bp duplex DNA substrate under conditions that were identical to those used to study translocation. NS3h exhibited little or no DNA unwinding under single cycle conditions, supporting the conclusion that NS3h is a relatively

  10. Translocation of a store of maternal cytoplasmic c-myc protein into nuclei during early development.

    PubMed Central

    Gusse, M; Ghysdael, J; Evan, G; Soussi, T; Méchali, M

    1989-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is expressed as a maternal protein during oogenesis in Xenopus laevis, namely, in nondividing cells. A delayed translation of c-myc mRNA accumulated in early oocytes results in the accumulation of the protein during late oogenesis. The oocyte c-myc protein is unusually stable and is located in the cytoplasm, contrasting with its features in somatic cells. A mature oocyte contains a maternal c-myc protein stockpile of 4 x 10(5) to 6 x 10(5) times the level in a somatic growing cell. This level of c-myc protein is preserved only during the cleavage stage of the embryo. Fertilization triggers its rapid migration into the nuclei of the cleaving embryo and a change in the phosphorylation state of the protein. The c-myc protein content per nucleus decreases exponentially during the cleavage stage until a stoichiometric titration by the embryonic nuclei is reached during a 0.5-h period at the midblastula stage. Most of the maternal c-myc store is degraded by the gastrula stage. These observations implicate the participation of c-myc in the events linked to early embryonic development and the midblastula transition. Images PMID:2685563

  11. Mitochondrial protein import: Mia40 facilitates Tim22 translocation into the inner membrane of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lidia; Trojanowska, Agata; Sztolsztener, Malgorzata E.; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly (MIA) pathway is generally considered to be dedicated to the redox-dependent import and biogenesis of proteins localized to the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The oxidoreductase Mia40 is a central component of the pathway responsible for the transfer of disulfide bonds to intermembrane space precursor proteins, causing their oxidative folding. Here we present the first evidence that the function of Mia40 is not restricted to the transport and oxidative folding of intermembrane space proteins. We identify Tim22, a multispanning membrane protein and core component of the TIM22 translocase of inner membrane, as a protein with cysteine residues undergoing oxidation during Tim22 biogenesis. We show that Mia40 is involved in the biogenesis and complex assembly of Tim22. Tim22 forms a disulfide-bonded intermediate with Mia40 upon import into mitochondria. Of interest, Mia40 binds the Tim22 precursor also via noncovalent interactions. We propose that Mia40 not only is responsible for disulfide bond formation, but also assists the Tim22 protein in its integration into the inner membrane of mitochondria. PMID:23283984

  12. Module swaps between related translocator proteins pIV(f1), pIV(IKe) and PulD: identification of a specificity domain.

    PubMed

    Daefler, S; Russel, M; Model, P

    1997-03-14

    In Gram-negative bacteria, type II and type III secretion and filamentous phage assembly systems use related outer membrane proteins for substrate-specific transport across the outer membrane. We show here that the specificity domain of the phage f1 outer membrane protein pIV is contained within the 149 N-terminal amino acid residues. When the pIV(f1) specificity domain is fused to the translocator domain of the related pIV of phage IKe, the chimeric construct supports f1 but not IKe assembly. Functional coupling between the two domains in this chimeric construct is poor and is improved by a single amino acid change in the translocator domain of the pIV(IKe). In native pIV(IKe), two amino acid changes within its specificity domain are both necessary and sufficient to change the specificity from IKe to f1 assembly. Analysis of 39 chimeric constructs between pIV(f1) and the outer membrane protein PulD of the pullulanase secretion system failed to identify a comparable exchangeable specificity domain. These results indicate that the two domains may not function autonomously, and suggest that tertiary and quarternary changes of the entire translocator component rather than of an autonomous functional domain are required for specific translocation across the outer membrane. PMID:9086275

  13. La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus V protein antagonizes type I interferon response by binding STAT2 protein and preventing STATs nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, Giuseppe; Laurent-Rolle, Maudry; Manicassamy, Balaji; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Morrison, Juliet; Lozano-Dubernard, Bernardo; Castro-Peralta, Felipa; Iovane, Giuseppe; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    La Piedad Michoacán Mexico Virus (LPMV) is a member of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. LPMV is the etiologic agent of "blue eye disease", causing a significant disease burden in swine in Mexico with long-term implications for the agricultural industry. This virus mainly affects piglets and is characterized by meningoencephalitis and respiratory distress. It also affects adult pigs, causing reduced fertility and abortions in females, and orchitis and epididymitis in males. Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family evade the innate immune response by targeting components of the interferon (IFN) signaling pathway. The V protein, expressed by most paramyxoviruses, is a well-characterized IFN signaling antagonist. Until now, there were no reports on the role of the LPMV-V protein in inhibiting the IFN response. In this study we demonstrate that LPMV-V protein antagonizes type I but not type II IFN signaling by binding STAT2, a component of the type I IFN cascade. Our results indicate that the last 18 amino acids of LPMV-V protein are required for binding to STAT2 in human and swine cells. While LPMV-V protein does not affect the protein levels of STAT1 or STAT2, it does prevent the IFN-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 thereby inhibiting cellular responses to IFN α/β. PMID:26546155

  14. Binding studies using Pichia pastoris expressed human aryl hydrocarbon receptor and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yujuan; Xie, Jinghang; Huang, Xin; Dong, Jin; Park, Miki S; Chan, William K

    2016-06-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor which activates gene transcription by binding to its corresponding enhancer as the heterodimer, which is consisted of AHR and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT). Human AHR can be rather difficult to study, when compared among the AHR of other species, since it is relatively unstable and less sensitive to some ligands in vitro. Overexpression of human AHR has been limited to the baculovirus expression, which is costly and tedious due to the need of repetitive baculovirus production. Here we explored whether we could generate abundant amounts of human AHR and ARNT in a better overexpression system for functional study. We observed that human AHR and ARNT can be expressed in Pichia pastoris with yields that are comparable to the baculovirus system only if their cDNAs are optimized for Pichia expression. Fusion with a c-myc tag at their C-termini seems to increase the expression yield. These Pichia expressed proteins can effectively heterodimerize and form the ternary AHR/ARNT/enhancer complex in the presence of β-naphthoflavone or kynurenine. Limited proteolysis using thermolysin can be used to study the heterodimerization of these human AHR and ARNT proteins. PMID:26923060

  15. Whey Protein Hydrolysate Increases Translocation of GLUT-4 to the Plasma Membrane Independent of Insulin in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Priscila Neder; Lollo, Pablo Christiano Barboza; Moura, Carolina Soares; Batista, Thiago Martins; Camargo, Rafael Ludemann; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) have the recognized capacity to increase glycogen stores. The objective of this study was to verify if consuming WP and WPH could also increase the concentration of the glucose transporters GLUT-1 and GLUT-4 in the plasma membrane (PM) of the muscle cells of sedentary and exercised animals. Forty-eight Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 8 per group), were treated and fed with experimental diets for 9 days as follows: a) control casein (CAS); b) WP; c) WPH; d) CAS exercised; e) WP exercised; and f) WPH exercised. After the experimental period, the animals were sacrificed, muscle GLUT-1 and GLUT-4, p85, Akt and phosphorylated Akt were analyzed by western blotting, and the glycogen, blood amino acids, insulin levels and biochemical health indicators were analyzed using standard methods. Consumption of WPH significantly increased the concentrations of GLUT-4 in the PM and glycogen, whereas the GLUT-1 and insulin levels and the health indicators showed no alterations. The physical exercise associated with consumption of WPH had favorable effects on glucose transport into muscle. These results should encourage new studies dealing with the potential of both WP and WPH for the treatment or prevention of type II diabetes, a disease in which there is reduced translocation of GLUT-4 to the plasma membrane. PMID:24023607

  16. Selective translocation of protein kinase C-delta in PC12 cells during nerve growth factor-induced neuritogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, K R; Teng, K K; Fabbro, D; Greene, L A; Weinstein, I B

    1995-01-01

    The specific intracellular signals initiated by nerve growth factor (NGF) that lead to neurite formation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells are as of yet unclear. Protein kinase C-delta (PKC delta) is translocated from the soluble to the particulate subcellular fraction during NGF-induced-neuritogenesis; however, this does not occur after treatment with the epidermal growth factor, which is mitogenic but does not induce neurite formation. PC12 cells also contain both Ca(2+)-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent PKC enzymatic activities, and express mRNA and immunoreactive proteins corresponding to the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, delta, epsilon, and zeta. There are transient decreases in the levels of immunoreactive PKCs alpha, beta, and epsilon after 1-3 days of NGF treatment, and after 7 days there is a 2.5-fold increase in the level of PKC alpha, and a 1.8-fold increase in total cellular PKC activity. NGF-induced PC12 cell neuritogenesis is enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in a TPA dose- and time-dependent manner, and this differentiation coincides with abrogation of the down-regulation of PKC delta and other PKC isoforms, when the cells are treated with TPA. Thus a selective activation of PKC delta may play a role in neuritogenic signals in PC12 cells. Images PMID:7626808

  17. The exocyst affects protein synthesis by acting on the translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Joshua H; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Mostov, Keith E

    2003-06-01

    We previously showed that the exocyst complex specifically affected the synthesis and delivery of secretory and basolateral plasma membrane proteins. Significantly, the entire spectrum of secreted proteins was increased when the hSec10 (human Sec10) component of the exocyst complex was overexpressed, suggestive of post-transcriptional regulation (Lipschutz, J. H., Guo, W., O'Brien, L. E., Nguyen, Y. H., Novick, P., and Mostov, K. E. (2000) Mol. Biol. Cell 11, 4259-4275). Here, using an exogenously transfected basolateral protein, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), and a secretory protein, gp80, we show that pIgR and gp80 protein synthesis and delivery are increased in cells overexpressing Sec10 despite the fact that mRNA levels are unchanged, which is highly indicative of post-transcriptional regulation. To test specificity, we also examined the synthesis and delivery of an exogenous apical protein, CNT1 (concentrative nucleoside transporter 1), and found no increase in CNT1 protein synthesis, delivery, or mRNA levels in cells overexpressing Sec10. Sec10-GFP-overexpressing cell lines were created, and staining was seen in the endoplasmic reticulum. It was demonstrated previously in yeast that high levels of expression of SEB1, the Sec61beta homologue, suppressed sec15-1, an exocyst mutant (Toikkanen, J., Gatti, E., Takei, K., Saloheimo, M., Olkkonen, V. M., Soderlund, H., De Camilli, P., and Keranen, S. (1996) Yeast 12, 425-438). Sec61beta is a member of the Sec61 heterotrimer, which is the main component of the endoplasmic reticulum translocon. By co-immunoprecipitation we show that Sec10, which forms an exocyst subcomplex with Sec15, specifically associates with the Sec61beta component of the translocon and that Sec10 overexpression increases the association of other exocyst complex members with Sec61beta. Proteosome inhibition does not appear to be the mechanism by which increased protein synthesis occurs in the face of equivalent amounts of m

  18. Control of Protein Activity and Cell Fate Specification via Light-Mediated Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Seth P.; Bear, James E.; Goldstein, Bob; Hahn, Klaus; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Light-activatable proteins allow precise spatial and temporal control of biological processes in living cells and animals. Several approaches have been developed for controlling protein localization with light, including the conditional inhibition of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) with the Light Oxygen Voltage (AsLOV2) domain of phototropin 1 from Avena sativa. In the dark, the switch adopts a closed conformation that sterically blocks the NLS motif. Upon activation with blue light the C-terminus of the protein unfolds, freeing the NLS to direct the protein to the nucleus. A previous study showed that this approach can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins in mammalian tissue culture cells. Here, we extend this result by characterizing the binding properties of a LOV/NLS switch and demonstrating that it can be used to control gene transcription in yeast. Additionally, we show that the switch, referred to as LANS (light-activated nuclear shuttle), functions in the C. elegans embryo and allows for control of nuclear localization in individual cells. By inserting LANS into the C. elegans lin-1 locus using Cas9-triggered homologous recombination, we demonstrated control of cell fate via light-dependent manipulation of a native transcription factor. We conclude that LANS can be a valuable experimental method for spatial and temporal control of nuclear localization in vivo. PMID:26083500

  19. NqrM (DUF539) Protein Is Required for Maturation of Bacterial Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Vitaly A.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Baykov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the bacterial respiratory chain, coupled with Na+ translocation across the membrane. Na+-NQR maturation involves covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues, catalyzed by flavin transferase encoded by the nqr-associated apbE gene. Analysis of complete bacterial genomes has revealed another putative gene (duf539, here renamed nqrM) that usually follows the apbE gene and is present only in Na+-NQR-containing bacteria. Expression of the Vibrio harveyi nqr operon alone or with the associated apbE gene in Escherichia coli, which lacks its own Na+-NQR, resulted in an enzyme incapable of Na+-dependent NADH or reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (dNADH) oxidation. However, fully functional Na+-NQR was restored when these genes were coexpressed with the V. harveyi nqrM gene. Furthermore, nqrM lesions in Klebsiella pneumoniae and V. harveyi prevented production of functional Na+-NQR, which could be recovered by an nqrM-containing plasmid. The Na+-NQR complex isolated from the nqrM-deficient strain of V. harveyi lacks several subunits, indicating that nqrM is necessary for Na+-NQR assembly. The protein product of the nqrM gene, NqrM, contains a single putative transmembrane α-helix and four conserved Cys residues. Mutating one of these residues (Cys33 in V. harveyi NqrM) to Ser completely prevented Na+-NQR maturation, whereas mutating any other Cys residue only decreased the yield of the mature protein. These findings identify NqrM as the second specific maturation factor of Na+-NQR in proteobacteria, which is presumably involved in the delivery of Fe to form the (Cys)4[Fe] center between subunits NqrD and NqrE. IMPORTANCE Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (Na+-NQR) is a unique primary Na+ pump believed to enhance the vitality of many bacteria, including important pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio

  20. Pim-1 preserves mitochondrial morphology by inhibiting dynamin-related protein 1 translocation

    PubMed Central

    Din, Shabana; Mason, Matthew; Völkers, Mirko; Johnson, Bevan; Cottage, Christopher T.; Wang, Zeping; Joyo, Anya Y.; Quijada, Pearl; Erhardt, Peter; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphological dynamics affect the outcome of ischemic heart damage and pathogenesis. Recently, mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has been identified as a mediator of mitochondrial morphological changes and cell death during cardiac ischemic injury. In this study, we report a unique relationship between Pim-1 activity and Drp1 regulation of mitochondrial morphology in cardiomyocytes challenged by ischemic stress. Transgenic hearts overexpressing cardiac Pim-1 display reduction of total Drp1 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of Drp1-S637, and inhibition of Drp1 localization to the mitochondria. Consistent with these findings, adenoviral-induced Pim-1 neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) retain a reticular mitochondrial phenotype after simulated ischemia (sI) and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial sequestration. Interestingly, adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs show increased expression of Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only protein p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), which has been previously shown to induce Drp1 accumulation at mitochondria and increase sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Overexpression of the p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis–dominant negative adenovirus attenuates localization of Drp1 to mitochondria in adenovirus Pim-dominant negative NRCMs promotes reticular mitochondrial morphology and inhibits cell death during sI. Therefore, Pim-1 activity prevents Drp1 compartmentalization to the mitochondria and preserves reticular mitochondrial morphology in response to sI. PMID:23530233

  1. Protein-translocating outer membrane porins of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ming Ren; Peabody, Christopher R; Partovi, Salar M; Zhai, Yufeng; Tseng, Yi Hsiung; Saier, Milton H

    2002-05-01

    Five families of outer membrane porins that function in protein secretion in Gram-negative bacteria are currently recognized. In this report, these five porin families are analyzed from structural and phylogenetic standpoints. They are the fimbrial usher protein (FUP), outer membrane factor (OMF), autotransporter (AT), two-partner secretion (TPS) and outer membrane secretin (Secretin) families. All members of these families in the current databases were identified, and all full-length homologues were multiply aligned for structural and phylogenetic analyses. The organismal distribution of homologues in each family proved to be unique with some families being restricted to proteobacteria and others being widespread in other bacterial kingdoms as well as eukaryotes. The compositions of and size differences between subfamilies provide evidence for specific orthologous relationships, which agree with available functional information and intra-subfamily phylogeny. The results reveal that horizontal transfer of genes encoding these proteins between phylogenetically distant organisms has been exceptionally rare although transfer within select bacterial kingdoms may have occurred. The resultant in silico analyses are correlated with available experimental evidence to formulate models relevant to the structures and evolutionary origins of these proteins. PMID:11988218

  2. Protein and Quality Characterization of Triticale Translocation Lines in Bread Making

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction of high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) from the Glu-Did locus of wheat into triticale restores the genetic constitution of storage protein loci to that of wheat and subsequently improves the bread making quality of triticale. One means to achieve such restoration of the gen...

  3. Translocation of botulinum neurotoxin serotype a and associated proteins across the intestinal epithelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most poisonous natural toxins and considered to be a major venue of bioterrorist threat. BoNTs associate with neurotoxin associated proteins (NAPs), forming large complexes. NAPs have been shown to shield the BoNT holotoxin from the harsh environment of ...

  4. Human translocation liposarcoma-CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (TLS-CHOP) oncoprotein prevents adipocyte differentiation by directly interfering with C/EBPbeta function.

    PubMed

    Adelmant, G; Gilbert, J D; Freytag, S O

    1998-06-19

    Human translocation liposarcoma (TLS)-CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is a fusion oncoprotein found specifically in a malignant tumor of adipose tissue and results from a t(12;16) translocation that fuses the amino-terminal part of TLS to the entire coding region of CHOP. Being that CHOP is a member of the C/EBP transcription factor family, proteins that comprise part of the adipocyte differentiation machinery, we examined whether TLS-CHOP blocked adipocyte differentiation by directly interfering with C/EBP function. Using a single-step retroviral infection protocol, either wild-type or mutant TLS-CHOP were co-expressed along with C/EBPbeta in naïve NIH3T3 cells, and their ability to inhibit C/EBPbeta-driven adipogenesis was determined. TLS-CHOP was extremely effective at blocking adipocyte differentiation when expressed at a level comparable to that observed in human myxoid liposarcoma. This effect of TLS-CHOP required a functional leucine zipper domain and correlated with its ability to heterodimerize with C/EBPbeta and inhibit C/EBPbeta DNA binding and transactivation activity in situ. In contrast, the TLS-CHOP basic region was dispensable, making it unlikely that the inhibitory effect of TLS-CHOP is attributable to unscheduled gene expression resulting from TLS-CHOP's putative transactivation activity. Another adipogenic transcription factor, PPARgamma2, was able to rescue TLS-CHOP-inhibited cells, indicating that TLS-CHOP interferes primarily with C/EBPbeta-driven adipogenesis and not with other requisite events of the adipocyte differentiation program. Together, the results demonstrate that TLS-CHOP blocks adipocyte differentiation by directly preventing C/EBPbeta from binding to and transactivating its target genes. Moreover, they provide strong support for the thesis that a blockade to normal differentiation is an important aspect of the cancer process. PMID:9624148

  5. High-yield export of a native heterologous protein to the periplasm by the tat translocation pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matos, Cristina F R O; Branston, Steven D; Albiniak, Anna; Dhanoya, Arjun; Freedman, Robert B; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Robinson, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Numerous high-value recombinant proteins that are produced in bacteria are exported to the periplasm as this approach offers relatively easy downstream processing and purification. Most recombinant proteins are exported by the Sec pathway, which transports them across the plasma membrane in an unfolded state. The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system operates in parallel with the Sec pathway but transports substrate proteins in a folded state; it therefore has potential to export proteins that are difficult to produce using the Sec pathway. In this study, we have produced a heterologous protein (green fluorescent protein; GFP) in Escherichia coli and have used batch and fed-batch fermentation systems to test the ability of the newly engineered Tat system to export this protein into the periplasm under industrial-type production conditions. GFP cannot be exported by the Sec pathway in an active form. We first tested the ability of five different Tat signal peptides to export GFP, and showed that the TorA signal peptide directed most efficient export. Under batch fermentation conditions, it was found that TorA-GFP was exported efficiently in wild type cells, but a twofold increase in periplasmic GFP was obtained when the TatABC components were co-expressed. In both cases, periplasmic GFP peaked at about the 12 h point during fermentation but decreased thereafter, suggesting that proteolysis was occurring. Typical yields were 60 mg periplasmic GFP per liter culture. The cells over-expressed the tat operon throughout the fermentation process and the Tat system was shown to be highly active over a 48 h induction period. Fed-batch fermentation generated much greater yields: using glycerol feed rates of 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mL h(-1), the cultures reached OD(600) values of 180 and periplasmic GFP levels of 0.4, 0.85, and 1.1 g L(-1) culture, respectively. Most or all of the periplasmic GFP was shown to be active. These export values are in line with those obtained in

  6. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 translocates protein kinase C beta to nucleus and enhances plasma membrane association of protein kinase C alpha in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Gagnon, A; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1994-02-01

    1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2-D3) increases membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) activity and immunoreactivity in renal epithelial (Madin Darby bovine kidney, MDBK) cells (Simboli-Campbell, M., Franks, D. J., and Welsh, J. E. (1992) Cell Signalling 4, 99-109). We have now characterized the effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 on the subcellular localization of three individual isozymes by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Although the total amount of PKC alpha, PKC beta, and PKC zeta are unaffected by 1,25-(OH)2-D3, this steroid hormone induces subcellular redistribution of both PKC alpha and PKC beta. Treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3 (100 nM, 24 h) enhances plasma membrane association of PKC alpha and induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. The effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 appear to be limited to the calcium-dependent PKC isozymes, since 1,25-(OH)2-D3 has no effect on the calcium independent isozyme, PKC zeta. In contrast to rapid transient PKC translocation seen in response to agents which interact with membrane receptors to induce phospholipid hydrolysis, modulation of PKC alpha and PKC beta is observed after 24 h treatment with 1,25-(OH)2-D3. In MDBK cells, the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (100 nM, 24 h) down-regulates PKC alpha and, to a lesser extent, PKC zeta, without altering their subcellular distribution. TPA also induces translocation of PKC beta to the nuclear membrane. MDBK cells treated with 1,25-(OH)2-D3, but not TPA, exhibit enhanced phosphorylation of endogenous nuclear proteins. In addition to the distinct effects of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and TPA on PKC isozyme patterns, 1,25-(OH)2-D3 up-regulates both the vitamin D receptor and calbindin D-28K, whereas TPA down-regulates the expression of both proteins. These data support the involvement of PKC in the mechanism of action of 1,25-(OH)2-D3 and specifically implicate PKC beta in 1,25-(OH)2-D3-mediated nuclear events. PMID:8106362

  7. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, substrate transporter translocation, and metabolism in the contracting hyperthyroid rat heart.

    PubMed

    Heather, Lisa C; Cole, Mark A; Atherton, Helen J; Coumans, Will A; Evans, Rhys D; Tyler, Damian J; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Clarke, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones can modify cardiac metabolism via multiple molecular mechanisms, yet their integrated effect on overall substrate metabolism is poorly understood. Here we determined the effect of hyperthyroidism on substrate metabolism in the isolated, perfused, contracting rat heart. Male Wistar rats were injected for 7 d with T(3) (0.2 mg/kg x d ip). Plasma free fatty acids increased by 97%, heart weights increased by 33%, and cardiac rate pressure product, an indicator of contractile function, increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rats. Insulin-stimulated glycolytic rates and lactate efflux rates were increased by 33% in hyperthyroid rat hearts, mediated by an increased insulin-stimulated translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the sarcolemma. This was accompanied by a 70% increase in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and a 100% increase in phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase, confirming downstream signaling from AMPK. Fatty acid oxidation rates increased in direct proportion to the increased heart weight and rate pressure product in the hyperthyroid heart, mediated by synchronized changes in mitochondrial enzymes and respiration. Protein levels of the fatty acid transporter, fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), were reduced by 24% but were accompanied by a 19% increase in the sarcolemmal content of fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1). Thus, the relationship between fatty acid metabolism, cardiac mass, and contractile function was maintained in the hyperthyroid heart, associated with a sarcolemmal reorganization of fatty acid transporters. The combined effects of T(3)-induced AMPK activation and insulin stimulation were associated with increased sarcolemmal GLUT4 localization and glycolytic flux in the hyperthyroid heart. PMID:19940039

  8. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology. PMID:27608010

  9. Phospholipid translocation and miltefosine potency require both L. donovani miltefosine transporter and the new protein LdRos3 in Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Victoria, F Javier; Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2006-08-18

    The antitumor drug miltefosine has been recently approved as the first oral drug active against visceral leishmaniasis. We have previously identified the L. donovani miltefosine transporter (LdMT) as a P-type ATPase involved in phospholipid translocation at the plasma membrane of Leishmania parasites. Here we show that this protein is essential but not sufficient for the phospholipid translocation activity and, thus, for the potency of the drug. Based on recent findings in yeast, we have identified the putative beta subunit of LdMT, named LdRos3, as another protein factor required for the translocation activity. LdRos3 belongs to the CDC50/Lem3 family, proposed as likely beta subunits for P4-ATPases. The phenotype of LdRos3-defective parasites was identical to that of the LdMT-/-, including a defect in the uptake of 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-amino)-phosphatidylserine, generally considered as not affected in Lem3p-deficient yeast. Both LdMT and LdRos3 normally localized to the plasma membrane but were retained inside the endoplasmic reticulum in the absence of the other protein or when inactivating point mutations were introduced in LdMT. Modulating the expression levels of either protein independently, we show that any one of them could behave as the protein limiting the level of flippase activity. Thus, LdMT and LdRos3 seem to form part of the same translocation machinery that determines flippase activity and miltefosine sensitivity in Leishmania, further supporting the consideration of CDC50/Lem3 proteins as beta subunits required for the normal functioning of P4-ATPases. PMID:16785229

  10. Copper-Induced Translocation of the Wilson Disease Protein ATP7B Independent of Murr1/COMMD1 and Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Karl Heinz; Lozoya, Javier Carbajo; Tuma, Sabine; Gotthardt, Daniel; Reichert, Jürgen; Ehehalt, Robert; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Wilson disease is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism. Impaired biliary excretion results in a gradual accumulation of copper, which leads to severe disease. The specific gene defect lies in the Wilson disease protein, ATP7B, a copper-transporting ATPase that is highly active in hepatocytes. The two major functions of ATP7B in the liver are the copper loading of ceruloplasmin in the Golgi apparatus, and the excretion of excess copper into the bile. In response to elevated copper levels, ATP7B shows a unique intracellular trafficking pattern that is required for copper excretion from the Golgi apparatus into dispersed vesicles. We analyzed the translocation of ATP7B by both confocal microscopy and RNA interference, testing current models that suggest the involvement of Murr1/COMMD1 and Rab7 in this pathway. We found that although the ATP7B translocation is conserved among nonhepatic cell lines, there is no co-localization with Murr1/COMMD1 or the Rab marker proteins of the endolysosomal system. Consistent with this finding, the translocation of ATP7B was not impaired by the depletion of either Murr1/COMMD1 or Rab7, or by a dominant-negative Rab7 mutant. In conclusion, our data suggest that the translocation of ATP7B takes place independently of Rab7-regulated endosomal traffic events. Murr1/COMMD1 plays a role in a later step of the copper excretion pathway but is not involved in the translocation of the Wilson disease protein. PMID:18974300

  11. Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Is Regulated in White and Brown Adipose Tissue by Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Misty M.; Manning, H. Charles; Ellacott, Kate L. J.

    2013-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is an outer-mitochondrial membrane transporter which has many functions including participation in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), production of cellular energy, and is the rate-limiting step in the uptake of cholesterol. TSPO expression is dysregulated during disease pathologies involving changes in tissue energy demands such as cancer, and is up-regulated in activated macrophages during the inflammatory response. Obesity is associated with decreased energy expenditure, mitochondrial dysfunction, and chronic low-grade inflammation which collectively contribute to the development of the Metabolic Syndrome. Therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of TSPO in adipose tissue may be a feature of disease pathology in obesity. Radioligand binding studies revealed a significant reduction in TSPO ligand binding sites in mitochondrial extracts from both white (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in mouse models of obesity (diet-induced and genetic) compared to control animals. We also confirmed a reduction in TSPO gene expression in whole tissue extracts from WAT and BAT. Immunohistochemistry in WAT confirmed TSPO expression in adipocytes but also revealed high-levels of TSPO expression in WAT macrophages in obese animals. No changes in TSPO expression were observed in WAT or BAT after a 17 hour fast or 4 hour cold exposure. Treatment of mice with the TSPO ligand PK11195 resulted in regulation of metabolic genes in WAT. Together, these results suggest a potential role for TSPO in mediating adipose tissue homeostasis. PMID:24260329

  12. Lead Optimization of 2-Phenylindolylglyoxylyldipeptide Murine Double Minute (MDM)2/Translocator Protein (TSPO) Dual Inhibitors for the Treatment of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Simona; La Pietra, Valeria; Barresi, Elisabetta; Di Maro, Salvatore; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Robello, Marco; La Motta, Concettina; Cosconati, Sandro; Taliani, Sabrina; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia; Da Settimo, Federico

    2016-05-26

    In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), translocator protein (TSPO) and murine double minute (MDM)2/p53 complex represent two druggable targets. We recently reported the first dual binder 3 possessing a higher anticancer effect in GBM cells than the standards PK11195 1 or Nutlin-3 2 singularly applied. Herein, through a structure-activity relationship study, we developed derivatives 4-10 with improved potencies toward both TSPO and MDM2. As a result, compound 9: (i) reactivated the p53 functionality; (ii) inhibited the viability of two human GBM cells; (iii) impaired the proliferation of glioma cancer stem cells (CSCs), more resistant to chemotherapeutics and responsible of GBM recurrence; (iv) sensitized GBM cells and CSCs to the activity of temozolomide; (v) directed its effects preferentially toward tumor cells with respect to healthy ones. Thus, 9 may represent a promising cytotoxic agent, which is worthy of being further developed for a therapeutic approach against GBM, where the downstream p53 signaling is intact and TSPO is overexpressed. PMID:27050782

  13. Calcium translocation mechanism in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, deduced from location studies of protein-bound spin labels.

    PubMed Central

    Champeil, P; Rigaud, J L; Gary-Bobo, C M

    1980-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were exposed to various thiol-directed spin labels, and the position of the label on the inner or outer vesicle surface was investigated as a function of the ATPase (adenosinetriphosphatase; ATP phosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.3) chemical state. Previous measurements of label accessibility to externally added ascorbate had been considered to suggest an external-internal transition of protein-bound labels, coupled with ion translocation [Tonomura, Y. & Morales, M.F. (1974) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 3687-3691]. We show that these ascorbate studies do not lead to convincing conclusions. We demonstrate, on the contrary, that transition ions (nickel and ferricyanide) can be used as selective line-broadening agents for the signals arising from external labels. No significant difference in nickel- or ferricyanide-label interaction can be attributed to a different orientation of the label in any of the enzyme chemical states tested. Our results therefore contradict the current interpretation of ascorbate quenching experiments in terms of calcium ATPase rotatory motion; rather they are consistent with ion transport models involving only limited conformational rearrangements of the pump. PMID:6446710

  14. Deepening the Topology of the Translocator Protein Binding Site by Novel N,N-Dialkyl-2-arylindol-3-ylglyoxylamides.

    PubMed

    Barresi, Elisabetta; Bruno, Agostino; Taliani, Sabrina; Cosconati, Sandro; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Salerno, Silvia; Simorini, Francesca; Daniele, Simona; Giacomelli, Chiara; Marini, Anna Maria; La Motta, Concettina; Marinelli, Luciana; Cosimelli, Barbara; Novellino, Ettore; Greco, Giovanni; Da Settimo, Federico; Martini, Claudia

    2015-08-13

    As a continuation of our studies on 2-phenylindol-3-ylglyoxylamides as potent and selective translocator protein (TSPO) ligands, two subsets of novel derivatives, featuring hydrophilic group (OH, NH2, COOH) at the para-position of the pendent 2-phenyl ring (8-16) or different 2-aryl moieties, namely, 3-thienyl, p-biphenyl, 2-naphthyl (23-35), were synthesized and biologically evaluated, some of them showing Ki values in the subnanomolar range and the 2-naphthyl group performance being the best. The resulting SARs confirmed the key role played by interactions taking place between ligands and the lipophilic L1 pocket of the TSPO binding site. Docking simulations were performed on the most potent compound of the present series (29) exploiting the recently available 3D structures of TSPO bound to its standard ligand (PK11195). Our theoretical model was fully consistent with SARs of the newly investigated as well of the previously reported 2-phenylindol-3-ylglyoxylamide derivatives. PMID:26177193

  15. Regional brain distribution of translocator protein using [(11)C]DPA-713 PET in individuals infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Jennifer M; Wang, Yuchuan; Ma, Shuangchao; Yue, Chen; Kim, Pearl K; Adams, Ashley V; Roosa, Heidi V; Gage, Kenneth L; Stathis, Marigo; Rais, Rana; Rojas, Camilo; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Watkins, Crystal C; Sacktor, Ned; Guilarte, Tomas R; Zhou, Yun; Sawa, Akira; Slusher, Barbara S; Caffo, Brian; Kassiou, Michael; Endres, Christopher J; Pomper, Martin G

    2014-06-01

    Imaging the brain distribution of translocator protein (TSPO), a putative biomarker for glial cell activation and neuroinflammation, may inform management of individuals infected with HIV by uncovering regional abnormalities related to neurocognitive deficits and enable non-invasive therapeutic monitoring. Using the second-generation TSPO-targeted radiotracer, [(11)C]DPA-713, we conducted a positron emission tomography (PET) study to compare the brains of 12 healthy human subjects to those of 23 individuals with HIV who were effectively treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Compared to PET data from age-matched healthy control subjects, [(11)C]DPA-713 PET of individuals infected with HIV demonstrated significantly higher volume-of-distribution (VT) ratios in white matter, cingulate cortex, and supramarginal gyrus, relative to overall gray matter VT, suggesting localized glial cell activation in susceptible regions. Regional TSPO abnormalities were evident within a sub-cohort of neuro-asymptomatic HIV subjects, and an increase in the VT ratio within frontal cortex was specifically linked to individuals affected with HIV-associated dementia. These findings were enabled by employing a gray matter normalization approach for PET data quantification, which improved test-retest reproducibility, intra-class correlation within the healthy control cohort, and sensitivity of uncovering abnormal regional findings. PMID:24567030

  16. Visualization and translocation of ternary Calcineurin-A/Calcineurin-B/Calmodulin-2 protein complexes by dual-color trimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Waadt, Rainer; Kudla, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence complementation (FC) techniques are expedient for analyzing bimolecular protein-protein interactions. Here we aimed to develop a method for visualization of ternary protein complexes using dual-color trimolecular fluorescence complementation (TriFC). Dual-color TriFC combines protein fragments of mCherry and mVenus, in which a scaffold protein is bilaterally fused to C-terminal fragments of both fluorescent proteins and combined with potential interacting proteins fused to an N-terminal fluorescent protein fragment. For efficient visual verification of ternary complex formation, TriFC was combined with a cytoplasm to plasma membrane translocation assay. Modular vector sets were designed which are fully compatible with previously reported bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) vectors. As a proof-of-principle, the ternary complex formation of the PP2B protein phosphatase Calcineurin-A/Calcineurin-B with Calmodulin-2 was investigated in transiently transformed Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells. The results indicate a Calcineurin-B-induced interaction of Calmodulin-2 with Calcineurin-A. TriFC and the translocation of TriFC complexes provide a novel tool to investigate ternary complex formations with the simplicity of a BiFC approach. The robustness of FC applications and the opportunity to quantify fluorescence complementation render this assay suitable for a broad range of interaction analyses. PMID:25919910

  17. Cytomegalovirus Assembly Protein Precursor and Proteinase Precursor Contain Two Nuclear Localization Signals That Mediate Their Own Nuclear Translocation and That of the Major Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; Gibson, Wade

    1998-01-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) assembly protein precursor (pAP) interacts with the major capsid protein (MCP), and this interaction is required for nuclear translocation of the MCP, which otherwise remains in the cytoplasm of transfected cells (L. J. Wood et al., J. Virol. 71:179–190, 1997). We have interpreted this finding to indicate that the CMV MCP lacks its own nuclear localization signal (NLS) and utilizes the pAP as an NLS-bearing escort into the nucleus. The CMV pAP amino acid sequence has two clusters of basic residues (e.g., KRRRER [NLS1] and KARKRLK [NLS2], for simian CMV) that resemble the simian virus 40 large-T-antigen NLS (D. Kalderon et al., Cell 39:499–509, 1984) and one of these (NLS1) has a counterpart in the pAP homologs of other herpesviruses. The work described here establishes that NLS1 and NLS2 are mutually independent NLS that can act (i) in cis to translocate pAP and the related proteinase precursor (pNP1) into the nucleus and (ii) in trans to transport MCP into the nucleus. By using combinations of NLS mutants and carboxy-terminal deletion constructs, we demonstrated a self-interaction of pAP and cytoplasmic interactions of pAP with pNP1 and of pNP1 with itself. The relevance of these findings to early steps in capsid assembly, the mechanism of MCP nuclear transport, and the possible cytoplasmic formation of protocapsomeric substructures is discussed. PMID:9733808

  18. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein global knock-out mice are viable with no effects on steroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R; Pelton, Susanne H; Butler, W Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-10-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo(-/-)) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo(-/-) mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo(-/-) mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  19. The Pam18/Tim14-Pam16/Tim16 complex of the mitochondrial translocation motor: the formation of a stable complex from marginally stable proteins.

    PubMed

    Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Marom, Milit; Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-02-01

    The vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are imported from the cytosol. For matrix-localized proteins, the final step of translocation across the inner membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial translocation motor, of which mhsp70 is a key component. The ATP-dependent function of mhsp70 is regulated by a complex, composed of a J-protein (called Pam18 or Tim14) and a J-like protein (called Pam16 or Tim16), and the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1. In this study, we investigated the structural properties of a recombinant purified Pam18/Tim14-Pam16/Tim16 complex using cross-linking with the bifunctional reagent DSS and CD-spectroscopy. The results of the study show that both Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 are thermally unstable proteins that unfold at very low temperatures (T(m) values of 16.5 degrees C and 29 degrees C, respectively). Upon mixing the proteins in vitro, or when both proteins are co-overexpressed in bacteria, Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 form a heterodimer that is thermally more stable than the individual proteins (T(m) = 41 degrees C). Analysis of the properties of the complex in GdnHCl shows that dissociation of the heterodimer is the limiting step in achieving full denaturation. PMID:17242434

  20. The Pam18/Tim14–Pam16/Tim16 complex of the mitochondrial translocation motor: The formation of a stable complex from marginally stable proteins

    PubMed Central

    Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Marom, Milit; Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are imported from the cytosol. For matrix-localized proteins, the final step of translocation across the inner membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial translocation motor, of which mhsp70 is a key component. The ATP-dependent function of mhsp70 is regulated by a complex, composed of a J-protein (called Pam18 or Tim14) and a J-like protein (called Pam16 or Tim16), and the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1. In this study, we investigated the structural properties of a recombinant purified Pam18/Tim14–Pam16/Tim16 complex using cross-linking with the bifunctional reagent DSS and CD-spectroscopy. The results of the study show that both Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 are thermally unstable proteins that unfold at very low temperatures (Tm values of 16.5°C and 29°C, respectively). Upon mixing the proteins in vitro, or when both proteins are co-overexpressed in bacteria, Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 form a heterodimer that is thermally more stable than the individual proteins (Tm = 41°C). Analysis of the properties of the complex in GdnHCl shows that dissociation of the heterodimer is the limiting step in achieving full denaturation. PMID:17242434

  1. Protein Kinase D and Gβγ Subunits Mediate Agonist-evoked Translocation of Protease-activated Receptor-2 from the Golgi Apparatus to the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane D; Zhao, Peishen; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lieu, TinaMarie; Gerges, Marina; Yeatman, Holly R; Canals, Meritxell; Vanner, Stephen J; Poole, Daniel P; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2016-05-20

    Agonist-evoked endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors has been extensively studied. The mechanisms by which agonists stimulate mobilization and plasma membrane translocation of G protein-coupled receptors from intracellular stores are unexplored. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) traffics to lysosomes, and sustained protease signaling requires mobilization and plasma membrane trafficking of PAR2 from Golgi stores. We evaluated the contribution of protein kinase D (PKD) and Gβγ to this process. In HEK293 and KNRK cells, the PAR2 agonists trypsin and 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 activated PKD in the Golgi apparatus, where PKD regulates protein trafficking. PAR2 activation induced translocation of Gβγ, a PKD activator, to the Golgi apparatus, determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer between Gγ-Venus and giantin-Rluc8. Inhibitors of PKD (CRT0066101) and Gβγ (gallein) prevented PAR2-stimulated activation of PKD. CRT0066101, PKD1 siRNA, and gallein all inhibited recovery of PAR2-evoked Ca(2+) signaling. PAR2 with a photoconvertible Kaede tag was expressed in KNRK cells to examine receptor translocation from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Irradiation of the Golgi region (405 nm) induced green-red photo-conversion of PAR2-Kaede. Trypsin depleted PAR2-Kaede from the Golgi apparatus and repleted PAR2-Kaede at the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 inhibited PAR2-Kaede translocation to the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 also inhibited sustained protease signaling to colonocytes and nociceptive neurons that naturally express PAR2 and mediate protease-evoked inflammation and nociception. Our results reveal a major role for PKD and Gβγ in agonist-evoked mobilization of intracellular PAR2 stores that is required for sustained signaling by extracellular proteases. PMID:27030010

  2. Dynamics of initiation, termination and reinitiation of DNA translocation by the motor protein EcoR124I

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Ralf; Bloom, Joost G P; van Noort, John; Dutta, Christina F; Dekker, Nynke H; Firman, Keith; Szczelkun, Mark D; Dekker, Cees

    2005-01-01

    Type I restriction enzymes use two motors to translocate DNA before carrying out DNA cleavage. The motor function is accomplished by amino-acid motifs typical for superfamily 2 helicases, although DNA unwinding is not observed. Using a combination of extensive single-molecule magnetic tweezers and stopped-flow bulk measurements, we fully characterized the (re)initiation of DNA translocation by EcoR124I. We found that the methyltransferase core unit of the enzyme loads the motor subunits onto adjacent DNA by allowing them to bind and initiate translocation. Termination of translocation occurs owing to dissociation of the motors from the core unit. Reinitiation of translocation requires binding of new motors from solution. The identification and quantification of further initiation steps—ATP binding and extrusion of an initial DNA loop—allowed us to deduce a complete kinetic reinitiation scheme. The dissociation/reassociation of motors during translocation allows dynamic control of the restriction process by the availability of motors. Direct evidence that this control mechanism is relevant in vivo is provided. PMID:16292342

  3. Edwardsiella tarda EscE (Orf13 Protein) Is a Type III Secretion System-Secreted Protein That Is Required for the Injection of Effectors, Secretion of Translocators, and Pathogenesis in Fish.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Fang; Wang, Wei Na; Wang, Gai Ling; Zhang, He; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda is crucial for its intracellular survival and pathogenesis in fish. The orf13 gene (escE) of E. tarda is located 84 nucleotides (nt) upstream of esrC in the T3SS gene cluster. We found that EscE is secreted and translocated in a T3SS-dependent manner and that amino acids 2 to 15 in the N terminus were required for a completely functional T3SS in E. tarda. Deletion of escE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocators, as well as the secretion and translocation of T3SS effectors, but did not influence their intracellular protein levels in E. tarda. Complementation of the escE mutant with a secretion-incompetent EscE derivative restored the secretion of translocators and effectors. Interestingly, the effectors that were secreted and translocated were positively correlated with the EscE protein level in E. tarda. The escE mutant was attenuated in the blue gourami fish infection model, as its 50% lethal dose (LD50) increased to 4 times that of the wild type. The survival rate of the escE mutant-strain-infected fish was 69%, which was much higher than that of the fish infected with the wild-type bacteria (6%). Overall, EscE represents a secreted T3SS regulator that controls effector injection and translocator secretion, thus contributing to E. tarda pathogenesis in fish. The homology of EscE within the T3SSs of other bacterial species suggests that the mechanism of secretion and translocation control used by E. tarda may be commonly used by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26459509

  4. Edwardsiella tarda EscE (Orf13 Protein) Is a Type III Secretion System-Secreted Protein That Is Required for the Injection of Effectors, Secretion of Translocators, and Pathogenesis in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin Fang; Wang, Wei Na; Wang, Gai Ling; Zhang, He; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Zhi Peng

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda is crucial for its intracellular survival and pathogenesis in fish. The orf13 gene (escE) of E. tarda is located 84 nucleotides (nt) upstream of esrC in the T3SS gene cluster. We found that EscE is secreted and translocated in a T3SS-dependent manner and that amino acids 2 to 15 in the N terminus were required for a completely functional T3SS in E. tarda. Deletion of escE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocators, as well as the secretion and translocation of T3SS effectors, but did not influence their intracellular protein levels in E. tarda. Complementation of the escE mutant with a secretion-incompetent EscE derivative restored the secretion of translocators and effectors. Interestingly, the effectors that were secreted and translocated were positively correlated with the EscE protein level in E. tarda. The escE mutant was attenuated in the blue gourami fish infection model, as its 50% lethal dose (LD50) increased to 4 times that of the wild type. The survival rate of the escE mutant-strain-infected fish was 69%, which was much higher than that of the fish infected with the wild-type bacteria (6%). Overall, EscE represents a secreted T3SS regulator that controls effector injection and translocator secretion, thus contributing to E. tarda pathogenesis in fish. The homology of EscE within the T3SSs of other bacterial species suggests that the mechanism of secretion and translocation control used by E. tarda may be commonly used by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26459509

  5. A Tat ménage à trois--The role of Bacillus subtilis TatAc in twin-arginine protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Goosens, Vivianne J; De-San-Eustaquio-Campillo, Alba; Carballido-López, Rut; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2015-10-01

    The twin-arginine translocation system (Tat) is a protein transport system that moves fully folded and cofactor-containing proteins across membranes of bacteria, archaea and thylakoids. The minimal Tat pathway is composed of two subunits, TatA and TatC. In some organisms TatA has been duplicated and evolved to form a third specialized subunit, TatB. The Bacillus subtilis genome encodes two TatC subunits (TatCd and TatCy) and three TatA subunits (TatAd, TatAy and TatAc). These subunits combine to form two parallel minimal pathways, TatAy-TatCy and TatAd-TatCd. The purpose and role of the third TatA component, TatAc, has remained ambiguous. In this study we examined the translocation of two natively expressed TatAy-TatCy-dependent substrates, EfeB and QcrA, in various Tat-deficient genetic backgrounds. More specifically, we examined the ability of different mutated TatAy subunits to complement for the absence of wild-type TatAy. We further detailed a graded growth phenotype associated with the functional translocation of EfeB. We found that in various instances where specific amino acid substitutions were made in TatAy, a definite TatAc-associated growth phenotype occurred in genetic backgrounds lacking TatAc. Altogether, our findings show that TatAy and TatAc interact and that this TatAy-TatAc interaction, although not essential, supports the translocation of the Tat substrate EfeB when TatAy function is compromised. This implies that the third TatA-like protein in B. subtilis could represent an intermediate evolutionary step in TatA-TatB specialization. PMID:26239117

  6. Cigarette smoke-induced reduction in binding of the salivary translocator protein is not mediated by free radicals.

    PubMed

    Nagler, R; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M

    2016-02-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy of the head and neck and its main inducer is exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) in the presence of saliva. It is commonly accepted that CS contributes to the pathogenesis of oral cancer via reactive free radicals and volatile aldehydes. The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is an intracellular receptor involved in proliferation and apoptosis, and has been linked to various types of cancer. The presence of TSPO in human saliva has been linked to oral cancer, and its binding affinity to its ligand is reduced following exposure to CS. In the present study we wished to further investigate the mechanism behind the CS-induced reduction of TSPO binding by exploring the possible mediatory role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and volatile aldehydes in this process. We first analyzed TSPO binding in control saliva and in saliva exposed to CS in the presence and absence of various antioxidants. These experiments found that TSPO binding ability was not reversed by any of the antioxidants added, suggesting that CS exerts its effect on TSPO via mechanisms that do not involve volatile aldehydes and free radicals tested. Next, we analyzed TSPO binding in saliva following addition of exogenous ROS in the form of H2O2. These experiments found that TSPO binding was enhanced due to the treatment, once again showing that the CS-induced TSPO binding reduction is not mediated by this common form of ROS. However, the previously reported CS-induced reduction in salivary TSPO binding together with the role of TSPO in cells and its link to cancer strongly suggest that TSPO has a critical role in the pathogenesis of CS-induced oral cancer. The importance of further elucidating the mechanisms behind it should be emphasized. PMID:26582415

  7. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Loss of Retinoschisin (RS1) Cell Surface Protein in Maturing Mouse Rod Photoreceptors Elevates the Luminance Threshold for Light-Driven Translocation of Transducin But Not Arrestin

    PubMed Central

    Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bush, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of retinoschisin (RS1) in Rs1 knock-out (Rs1–KO) retina produces a post-photoreceptor phenotype similar to X-linked retinoschisis in young males. However, Rs1 is expressed strongly in photoreceptors, and Rs1–KO mice have early reduction in the electroretinogram a-wave. We examined light-activated transducin and arrestin translocation in young Rs1–KO mice as a marker for functional abnormalities in maturing rod photoreceptors. We found a progressive reduction in luminance threshold for transducin translocation in wild-type (WT) retinas between postnatal days P18 and P60. At P21, the threshold in Rs1–KO retinas was 10-fold higher than WT, but it decreased to <2.5-fold higher by P60. Light-activated arrestin translocation and re-translocation of transducin in the dark were not affected. Rs1–KO rod outer segment (ROS) length was significantly shorter than WT at P21 but was comparable with WT at P60. These findings suggested a delay in the structural and functional maturation of Rs1–KO ROS. Consistent with this, transcription factors CRX and NRL, which are fundamental to maturation of rod protein expression, were reduced in ROS of Rs1–KO mice at P21 but not at P60. Expression of transducin was 15–30% lower in P21 Rs1–KO ROS and transducin GTPase hydrolysis was nearly twofold faster, reflecting a 1.7- to 2.5-fold increase in RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signaling) level. Transduction protein expression and activity levels were similar to WT at P60. Transducin translocation threshold elevation indicates photoreceptor functional abnormalities in young Rs1–KO mice. Rapid reduction in threshold coupled with age-related changes in transduction protein levels and transcription factor expression are consistent with delayed maturation of Rs1–KO photoreceptors. PMID:22993419

  9. RNA interference targeting rye secalins alters flour protein composition in a wheat variety carrying a 1Bl.1RS translocation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat varieties carrying chromosome translocations from rye are part of the international wheat breeding pool, despite being associated with defects in dough processing quality. Among the proposed causes for the quality defects of flours from such wheats is the presence of the secalins, encoded by ...

  10. Translocation of protein kinase C to membranes induced by TNF does not cause the inhibition of EGF binding to human wish cells.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Karasaki, Y; Hirano, H; Gotoh, S; Higashi, K

    1990-04-30

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) caused an inhibition of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor [( 125I]EGF) binding to its receptors of human amniotic (WISH) cells at 5 min after addition of TNF, which reached a maximal level (60-70% reduction) after 15-30 min and declined thereafter. TNF also induced a translocation of protein kinase C activity from the cytosol to the membrane, which peaked at 45-60 min after addition of TNF and almost returned to basal level at 120 min. Furthermore, prolonged incubation of WISH cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13 acetate (TPA) diminished the TPA effect on the inhibition of EGF binding to the cells due to the desensitization of protein kinase C; however, TNF still reduced the EGF binding to the cells pretreated with TPA for a long time. These results indicate that although TNF causes the translocation of protein kinase C to the membrane, activation of protein kinase C is not required for TNF to induce a decrease in EGF binding to the cells. PMID:2334431