Science.gov

Sample records for 1961-91 forest service

  1. 78 FR 23903 - Forest Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Forest Service Dixie Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting... recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with Title II of the Act. The meeting is open to the public. The purpose of the meeting is to review proposals for forest projects...

  2. Forest Service produces risk maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    As part of an effort to improve the management and health of forests in the United States, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) presented Congress with new maps to help assess the risks that woodlands face from catastrophic fires, pests, and disease, at a February 24 hearing of a subcommittee of the House of Representatives' Committee on Agriculture.However, Subcommittee Chair Robert Goodlatte (R-Va.) questioned the Forest Service's commitment to the mapping initiative, which the committee earlier had requested that the agency undertake. "Even if the initiative is completed on paper, there remains the question whether the Forest Service will actually implement it on the ground," he said.

  3. 78 FR 13621 - Forest Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    .... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, San Bernardino National Forest (SBNF); and A Mining and Land... existing permitted Sentinel and Butterfield limestone quarries are located on mining claims within the SBNF... mining at both quarries to be extended until 2055. Depending on market demand, the combined Sentinel...

  4. Modeling the forest transition: forest scarcity and ecosystem service hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Satake, Akiko; Rudel, Thomas K

    2007-10-01

    An historical generalization about forest cover change in which rapid deforestation gives way over time to forest restoration is called "the forest transition." Prior research on the forest transition leaves three important questions unanswered: (1) How does forest loss influence an individual landowner's incentives to reforest? (2) How does the forest recovery rate affect the likelihood of forest transition? (3) What happens after the forest transition occurs? The purpose of this paper is to develop a minimum model of the forest transition to answer these questions. We assume that deforestation caused by landowners' decisions and forest regeneration initiated by agricultural abandonment have aggregated effects that characterize entire landscapes. These effects include feedback mechanisms called the "forest scarcity" and "ecosystem service" hypotheses. In the forest scarcity hypothesis, forest losses make forest products scarcer, which increases the economic value of forests. In the ecosystem service hypothesis, the environmental degradation that accompanies the loss of forests causes the value of ecosystem services provided by forests to decline. We examined the impact of each mechanism on the likelihood of forest transition through an investigation of the equilibrium and stability of landscape dynamics. We found that the forest transition occurs only when landowners employ a low rate of future discounting. After the forest transition, regenerated forests are protected in a sustainable way if forests regenerate slowly. When forests regenerate rapidly, the forest scarcity hypothesis expects instability in which cycles of large-scale deforestation followed by forest regeneration repeatedly characterize the landscape. In contrast, the ecosystem service hypothesis predicts a catastrophic shift from a forested to an abandoned landscape when the amount of deforestation exceeds the critical level, which can lead to a resource degrading poverty trap. These findings imply

  5. Montana's forest resources. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, R.C.; O'Brien, R.A.

    1993-09-01

    The report includes highlights of the forest resource in Montana as of 1989. Also the study describes the extent, condition, and location of the State's forests with particular emphasis on timberland. Includes statistical tables, area by land classes, ownership, and forest type, growing stock and sawtimber volumes, growth, mortality, and removals for timberland.

  6. 75 FR 52716 - Transfer of Land to Forest Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... Forest Service Transfer of Land to Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of land.... Department of Agriculture, and on March 16, 2010, the Deputy Chief of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of... Federally owned lands in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico from the Farm Service Agency to the Forest...

  7. 36 CFR 200.3 - Forest Service functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Forest Service functions. 200.3 Section 200.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND PROCEDURES Functions and Procedures § 200.3 Forest Service functions....

  8. 36 CFR 200.3 - Forest Service functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Forest Service functions. 200.3 Section 200.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND PROCEDURES Functions and Procedures § 200.3 Forest Service functions....

  9. 36 CFR 200.3 - Forest Service functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Forest Service functions. 200.3 Section 200.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION, FUNCTIONS, AND PROCEDURES Functions and Procedures § 200.3 Forest Service functions....

  10. Earth Observation Services (Forest Imaging)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Two university professors used EOCAP funding to demonstrate that satellite data can generate forest classifications with equal or better accuracy than traditional aerial photography techniques. This comparison had not been previously available. CALFIRST, the resulting processing package, will be marketed to forest companies and government agencies. The EOCAP program provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in, and to broaden the use of, NASA- developed technology for analyzing information about Earth and ocean resources.

  11. 78 FR 34031 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Response activities on National Forest System lands. Agency regulations at 36 CFR 220.6(d)(2) (73 FR 43093...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of interim directive; request for public comment. SUMMARY:...

  12. 77 FR 11569 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest... believes itself to be culturally affiliated ] with the cultural items may contact the USDA Forest...

  13. 77 FR 5838 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest... believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the USDA Forest...

  14. Mobile satellite communications in the Forest Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, John R.

    1988-01-01

    There are usually some places within a forest that do not have adequate communication coverage due to line-of-sight or other reasons. These areas are generally known by the foresters and radio technicians and allowances are made for that when working or traveling in those areas. However, when wildfire or other emergencies occur, communications are vital because wildfires can require hundreds of firefighters and cover thousands of acres. During these emergency operations, the existing communications are not adequate and complete radio systems are moved into the area for the conduct of fire communications. Incident command posts (ICPs) and fire camps are set up in remote locations and there is constant need for communications in the fire area and to agency headquarters and dispatch offices. Mobile satellite communications would be an ideal supplement to the Forest Service's current communications system in aiding forest fire control activities.

  15. 36 CFR 200.3 - Forest Service functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Agriculture, the broad responsibilities of the Forest Service are: (1) Leadership in forestry. The Forest Service provides overall leadership in forest and forest-range conservation, development, and use. This... Management Act of October 22, 1976 (16 U.S.C. 472a, 476, 500, 513-516, 521b; 576b, 1600-1602, 1604,...

  16. 36 CFR 200.3 - Forest Service functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Agriculture, the broad responsibilities of the Forest Service are: (1) Leadership in forestry. The Forest Service provides overall leadership in forest and forest-range conservation, development, and use. This... Management Act of October 22, 1976 (16 U.S.C. 472a, 476, 500, 513-516, 521b; 576b, 1600-1602, 1604,...

  17. 76 FR 47353 - Final Directives for Forest Service Wind Energy Special Use Authorizations, Forest Service Manual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ...The Forest Service is amending its internal directives for special use authorizations and wildlife monitoring. The amendments provide direction and guidance specific to wind energy projects on National Forest System (NFS) lands. These amendments supplement, rather than supplant or duplicate, existing special use and wildlife directives to address issues specifically associated with siting,......

  18. 78 FR 44523 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ..., (78 FR 34031). This correction adds the Web site that was inadvertently omitted from the interim... Federal Register of June 6, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-13459, on page 34031, column 3, after the first... Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service,...

  19. Old-growth definition for wet pine forests, woodlands, and savannas. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, W.R.

    1996-09-01

    All Forest Service Stations and Regions began developing old-growth definitions for specific forest types. Definitions will first be developed for broad forest types and based mainly on published information and so must be viewed accordingly. Refinements will be made by the Forest Service as new information becomes available. This document represents 1 of 35 forest types for which old-growth definition will be drafted.

  20. Southern Idaho`s forest land outside national forests, 1991. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Chojnacky, D.C.

    1995-05-01

    The report presents 59 summary tables of forest statistics for land in southern Idaho outside National Forests. The tables show forest land area, tree numbers, wood volume and growth, and tree mortality organized by ownership, stand, and tree classification variables. These stimates are derived from summarization of 292 field plots and over 100,000 photo points using a two-phase sample design. Of the 292 field plots, 91 were remeasurements of plots established in 1981. The sampling was done in 1991 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) unit located in Ogden, UT. Besides presenting detailed tables, the report briefly explains key FIA terminology, overviews the table formats, highlights some results, and discusses inventory design and data reliability.

  1. Forest restoration and forest communities: have local communities benefited from forest service contracting of ecosystem management?

    PubMed

    Moseley, Cassandra; Reyes, Yolanda E

    2008-08-01

    Conservation-based development programs have sought to create economic opportunities for people negatively impacted by biological diversity protection. The USDA Forest Service, for example, developed policies and programs to create contracting opportunities for local communities to restore public lands to replace jobs lost from reduced timber harvest. This article examines 12 years of Forest Service land management contracting in western Oregon, Washington, and northern California to evaluate if contractors located in communities near national forests have been awarded more land management contracts and contract value over time. We find that land management contracting spending has declined dramatically and, once we control for intervening factors, we find that local contractors have received a smaller proportion of land management contracts over time. PMID:18521660

  2. Forest Restoration and Forest Communities: Have Local Communities Benefited from Forest Service Contracting of Ecosystem Management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Cassandra; Reyes, Yolanda E.

    2008-08-01

    Conservation-based development programs have sought to create economic opportunities for people negatively impacted by biological diversity protection. The USDA Forest Service, for example, developed policies and programs to create contracting opportunities for local communities to restore public lands to replace jobs lost from reduced timber harvest. This article examines 12 years of Forest Service land management contracting in western Oregon, Washington, and northern California to evaluate if contractors located in communities near national forests have been awarded more land management contracts and contract value over time. We find that land management contracting spending has declined dramatically and, once we control for intervening factors, we find that local contractors have received a smaller proportion of land management contracts over time.

  3. Paying for Forest Ecosystem Services: Voluntary Versus Mandatory Payments.

    PubMed

    Roesch-McNally, Gabrielle E; Rabotyagov, Sergey S

    2016-03-01

    The emergence of new markets for forest ecosystem services can be a compelling opportunity for market diversification for private forest landowners, while increasing the provision of public goods from private lands. However, there is limited information available on the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for specific forest ecosystem services, particularly across different ecosystem market mechanisms. We utilize survey data from Oregon and Washington households to compare marginal WTP for forest ecosystem services and the total WTP for cost-effective bundles of forest ecosystem services obtained from a typical Pacific Northwest forest across two value elicitation formats representing two different ecosystem market mechanisms: an incentive-compatible choice experiment involving mandatory tax payments and a hypothetical private provision scenario modeled as eliciting contributions to the preferred forest management alternative via a provision point mechanism with a refund. A representative household's total WTP for the average forest management program was estimated at $217.59 per household/year under a mandatory tax mechanism and $160.44 per household/per year under a voluntary, crowdfunding-style, contribution mechanism; however, these estimates are not statistically different. Marginal WTP estimates were assessed for particular forest ecosystem service attributes including water quality, carbon storage, mature forest habitat, and public recreational access. This study finds that survey respondents place significant economic value on forest ecosystem services in both elicitation formats and that the distributions of the marginal WTP are not statistically significantly different. PMID:26661136

  4. Paying for Forest Ecosystem Services: Voluntary Versus Mandatory Payments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesch-McNally, Gabrielle E.; Rabotyagov, Sergey S.

    2016-03-01

    The emergence of new markets for forest ecosystem services can be a compelling opportunity for market diversification for private forest landowners, while increasing the provision of public goods from private lands. However, there is limited information available on the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for specific forest ecosystem services, particularly across different ecosystem market mechanisms. We utilize survey data from Oregon and Washington households to compare marginal WTP for forest ecosystem services and the total WTP for cost-effective bundles of forest ecosystem services obtained from a typical Pacific Northwest forest across two value elicitation formats representing two different ecosystem market mechanisms: an incentive-compatible choice experiment involving mandatory tax payments and a hypothetical private provision scenario modeled as eliciting contributions to the preferred forest management alternative via a provision point mechanism with a refund. A representative household's total WTP for the average forest management program was estimated at 217.59 per household/year under a mandatory tax mechanism and 160.44 per household/per year under a voluntary, crowdfunding-style, contribution mechanism; however, these estimates are not statistically different. Marginal WTP estimates were assessed for particular forest ecosystem service attributes including water quality, carbon storage, mature forest habitat, and public recreational access. This study finds that survey respondents place significant economic value on forest ecosystem services in both elicitation formats and that the distributions of the marginal WTP are not statistically significantly different.

  5. [Evaluation of economic forest ecosystem services in China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Lu, Shao-Wei

    2009-02-01

    This paper quantitatively evaluated the economic forest ecosystem services in the provinces of China in 2003, based on the long-term and continuous observations of economic forest ecosystems in this country, the sixth China national forest resources inventory data, and the price parameter data from the authorities in the world, and by applying the law of market value, the method of substitution of the expenses, and the law of the shadow project. The results showed that in 2003, the total value of economic forest ecosystem services in China was 11763.39 x 10(8) yuan, and the total value of the products from economic forests occupied 19.3% of the total ecosystem services value, which indicated that the economic forests not only provided society direct products, but also exhibited enormous eco-economic value. The service value of the functions of economic forests was in the order of water storage > C fixation and O2 release > biodiversity conservation > erosion control > air quality purification > nutrient cycle. The spatial pattern of economic forest ecosystem services in the provinces of China had the same trend with the spatial distribution of water and heat resources and biodiversity. To understand the differences of economic forest ecosystem services in the provinces of China was of significance in alternating the irrational arrangement of our present forestry production, diminishing the abuses of forest management, and establishing high grade, high efficient, and modernized economic forests. PMID:19459385

  6. Beyond deforestation: restoring forests and ecosystem services on degraded lands.

    PubMed

    Chazdon, Robin L

    2008-06-13

    Despite continued forest conversion and degradation, forest cover is increasing in countries across the globe. New forests are regenerating on former agricultural land, and forest plantations are being established for commercial and restoration purposes. Plantations and restored forests can improve ecosystem services and enhance biodiversity conservation, but will not match the composition and structure of the original forest cover. Approaches to restoring forest ecosystems depend strongly on levels of forest and soil degradation, residual vegetation, and desired restoration outcomes. Opportunities abound to combine ambitious forest restoration and regeneration goals with sustainable rural livelihoods and community participation. New forests will require adaptive management as dynamic, resilient systems that can withstand stresses of climate change, habitat fragmentation, and other anthropogenic effects. PMID:18556551

  7. Forest Ecosystem Services and Eco-Compensation Mechanisms in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongbing; Zheng, Peng; Liu, Tianxing; Liu, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Forests are a major terrestrial ecosystem providing multiple ecosystem services. However, the importance of forests is frequently underestimated from an economic perspective because of the externalities and public good properties of these services. Forest eco-compensation is a transfer mechanism that serves to internalize the externalities of forest ecosystem services by compensating individuals or companies for the losses or costs resulting from the provision of these services. China's current forest eco-compensation system is centered mainly on noncommercial forest. The primary measures associated with ecosystem services are (1) a charge on destructive activities, such as indiscriminate logging, and (2) compensation for individual or local activities and investments in forest conservation. The Compensation Fund System for Forest Ecological Benefits was first listed in the Forest Law of the People's Republic of China in 1998. In 2004, the Central Government Financial Compensation Fund, an important source for the Compensation Fund for Forest Ecological Benefits, was formally established. To improve the forest eco-compensation system, it is crucial to design and establish compensation criteria for noncommercial forests. These criteria should take both theoretical and practical concerns into account, and they should be based on the quantitative valuation of ecosystem services. Although some initial headway has been made on this task, the implementation of an effective forest eco-compensation system in China still has deficiencies and still faces problems. Implementing classification-based and dynamic management for key noncommercial forests and establishing an eco-compensation mechanism with multiple funding sources in the market economy are the key measures needed to conquer these problems and improve the forest eco-compensation system and China's forestry development in sequence.

  8. Forest ecosystem services and eco-compensation mechanisms in China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hongbing; Zheng, Peng; Liu, Tianxing; Liu, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Forests are a major terrestrial ecosystem providing multiple ecosystem services. However, the importance of forests is frequently underestimated from an economic perspective because of the externalities and public good properties of these services. Forest eco-compensation is a transfer mechanism that serves to internalize the externalities of forest ecosystem services by compensating individuals or companies for the losses or costs resulting from the provision of these services. China's current forest eco-compensation system is centered mainly on noncommercial forest. The primary measures associated with ecosystem services are (1) a charge on destructive activities, such as indiscriminate logging, and (2) compensation for individual or local activities and investments in forest conservation. The Compensation Fund System for Forest Ecological Benefits was first listed in the Forest Law of the People's Republic of China in 1998. In 2004, the Central Government Financial Compensation Fund, an important source for the Compensation Fund for Forest Ecological Benefits, was formally established. To improve the forest eco-compensation system, it is crucial to design and establish compensation criteria for noncommercial forests. These criteria should take both theoretical and practical concerns into account, and they should be based on the quantitative valuation of ecosystem services. Although some initial headway has been made on this task, the implementation of an effective forest eco-compensation system in China still has deficiencies and still faces problems. Implementing classification-based and dynamic management for key noncommercial forests and establishing an eco-compensation mechanism with multiple funding sources in the market economy are the key measures needed to conquer these problems and improve the forest eco-compensation system and China's forestry development in sequence. PMID:21882001

  9. Forest resources of pennsylvania. Forest Service resource bulletin (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, R.H.

    1995-06-28

    This report presents an analysis of the results of the 1989 forest inventory of Pennsylvania as well as trends that have occurred since the previous survey. Major topics include changes in forest land by ownership, forest type, and timberland component: stand structure is characterized by stand size, understory wood vegetation, dead trees, and changes in relative stocking; and harvesting by distribution of cut, species composition, and growth to removal ratios.

  10. Recycling research progress at the forest products laboratory. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This document summarizes accomplishments of USDA Forest Service researchers in the area of recycling. Specifically, it describes work in economic assessment paper recycling, recycled housing and industrial applications of recycle materials, other recycled applications, and technology transfer. The literature list includes the references cited in the text and additional publications regarding Forest Service recycling research.

  11. Amazon Forest maintenance as a source of environmental services.

    PubMed

    Fearnside, Philip M

    2008-03-01

    Amazonian forest produces environmental services such as maintenance of biodiversity, water cycling and carbon stocks. These services have a much greater value to human society than do the timber, beef and other products that are obtained by destroying the forest. Yet institutional mechanisms are still lacking to transform the value of the standing forest into the foundation of an economy based on maintaining rather than destroying this ecosystem. Forest management for commodities such as timber and non-timber forest products faces severe limitations and inherent contradictions unless income is supplemented based on environmental services. Amazon forest is threatened by deforestation, logging, forest fires and climate change. Measures to avoid deforestation include repression through command and control, creation of protected areas, and reformulation of infrastructure decisions and development policies. An economy primarily based on the value of environmental services is essential for long-term maintenance of the forest. Much progress has been made in the decades since I first proposed such a transition, but many issues also remain unresolved. These include theoretical issues regarding accounting procedures, improved quantification of the services and of the benefits of different policy options, and effective uses of the funds generated in ways that maintain both the forest and the human population. PMID:18345379

  12. Maintaining ecosystem function and services in logged tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David P; Tobias, Joseph A; Sheil, Douglas; Meijaard, Erik; Laurance, William F

    2014-09-01

    Vast expanses of tropical forests worldwide are being impacted by selective logging. We evaluate the environmental impacts of such logging and conclude that natural timber-production forests typically retain most of their biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions, as well as their carbon, climatic, and soil-hydrological ecosystem services. Unfortunately, the value of production forests is often overlooked, leaving them vulnerable to further degradation including post-logging clearing, fires, and hunting. Because logged tropical forests are extensive, functionally diverse, and provide many ecosystem services, efforts to expand their role in conservation strategies are urgently needed. Key priorities include improving harvest practices to reduce negative impacts on ecosystem functions and services, and preventing the rapid conversion and loss of logged forests. PMID:25092495

  13. FOREST SOIL CARBON SEQUESTRATION: ACCOUNTING FOR THIS VITAL ECOSYSTEM SERVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forests play a crucial role in supplying many goods and services that society depends upon on a daily basis including water supply, production of oxygen, soil protection, building materials, wildlife habitat and recreation. Forests also provide a significant amount of carbon seq...

  14. Forest Services: World of Work Project: Fifth Grade: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board for Vocational Education, Salt Lake City.

    The document is one of the teaching units developed by the Utah World of Work Project, designed to integrate career awareness into the regular curriculum at the elementary level. The fifth grade guide is tied to the science area and focuses on conservation as practiced by Forest Service workers; the growth cycle of forests and the management of…

  15. 37. Photo copy of map, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photo copy of map, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, 'Blister Rust Survey Map), 1930. PARSONS NURSERY SITE PLAN - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  16. Dead wood: The forest service needs more than pruning

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, G.

    1996-10-01

    The author examines the conflicts involving the United States Forest Service decisions regarding the Environmental Protection Statutes and the Congressional mandates to sell timber. Historical and political aspects of these issues are presented.

  17. 6. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #246860), photographer unknown, ca. 1935. EQUIPMENT DETAIL, SEED WING REMOVER. - Parsons Nursery, Seed Extractor Building, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  18. U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes the U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program, which strongly encouraged employees to shut off their computers when leaving the office. The U.S. Forest Service first piloted the program on a voluntary basis in one region then implemented it across the agency's 43,000 computers as a joint effort by the Chief Information Office and Sustainable Operations department.

  19. 3. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #292222), photographer unknown, ca. 1935. VIEW EAST, CCC CAMP PARSONS, FOREST SERVICE TRUCK STORAGE ON LEFT, WATER TANK (DEMOLISHED), MESS HALL (DEMOLISHED). (see also historic photograph WV-237-20, WV-237-35) - Parsons Nursery, Civilian Conservation Corps Garage, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  20. [Forest ecosystem service and its evaluation in China].

    PubMed

    Fang, Jin; Lu, Shaowei; Yu, Xinxiao; Rao, Liangyi; Niu, Jianzhi; Xie, Yuanyuan; Zhag, Zhenming

    2005-08-01

    Facing the relative lag of forest ecosystem service and estimation in China, this paper proposed to quickly carry out the research on the evaluation of forest ecosystem service. On the basis of the classification of forest ecosystem types in China, the service of artificial and semi-artificial forest ecosystems was investigated, which was divided into eight types, i.e., timber and other products, recreation and eco-tourism, water storage, C fixation and O2 release, nutrient cycling, air quality purifying, erosion control, and habitat provision. According to the assessment index system for global ecosystem service proposed by Costanza et al., a series of assessment index system suitable for Chinese forest ecosystem service was set up, by which, the total value of forest ecosystem service in China was estimated to be 30 601.20 x 10(8) yuan x yr(-1), including direct and indirect economic value about 1 920.23 x 10(8) and 28 680.97 x 10(8) yuan x yr(-1), respectively. The indirect value was as 14.94 times as the direct one. The research aimed to bring natural resources and environment factors into the account system of national economy quickly, and to realize the green GDP at last, which would be helpful to realize sustainable development and environment protection. PMID:16262073

  1. A Job with the Forest Service. A Guide to Nonprofessional Employment. Miscellaneous Publication No. 843. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The following questions are answered in this guide to nonprofessional employment with the U.S. Forest Service: What does the Forest Service do? What kind of work can a nonprofessional find in the Forest Service? How important are the nonprofessional workers to the Forest Service? What kind of experience does one need to qualify for a…

  2. Climate change and forests: Context for the Canadian Forest Service's science program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of context papers intended as guides to the current and future directions of the Canadian Forest Service science program. It defines climate change in the context of forests and describes why the Service, in co-operation with its wide range of partners, addresses climate change issues through research, monitoring, and assessment activities in its science and technology research networks.

  3. Estimating the value of watershed services following forest restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Julie M.; Swaffar, Wes; Nielsen, Erik A.; Springer, Abraham E.; Lopez, Sharon Masek

    2013-04-01

    Declining forest health, climate change, and development threaten the sustainability of water supplies in the western United States. While forest restoration may buffer threats to watershed services, funding shortfalls for landscape-scale restoration efforts limit management action. The hydrologic response and reduction in risk to watersheds following forest restoration treatments could create significant nonmarket benefits for downstream water users. Historic experimental watershed studies indicate a significant and positive response from forest thinning by a reallocation of water from evapotranspiration to surface-water yield. In this study, we estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) for improved watershed services for one group of downstream users, irrigators, following forest restoration activities. We find a positive and statistically significant WTP within our sample of 183.50 per household, at an aggregated benefit of more than 400,000 annually for 2181 irrigators. Our benefit estimate provides evidence that downstream irrigators may be willing to invest in landscape-scale forest restoration to maintain watershed services.

  4. Ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types: understanding the interactions and suggesting pathways for sustaining multiple ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Turton, Stephen M; Macgregor, Colin J; Pert, Petina L

    2016-10-01

    As ecosystem services supply from tropical forests is declining due to deforestation and forest degradation, much effort is essential to sustain ecosystem services supply from tropical forested landscapes, because tropical forests provide the largest flow of multiple ecosystem services among the terrestrial ecosystems. In order to sustain multiple ecosystem services, understanding ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types and identifying certain ecosystem services that could be managed to leverage positive effects across the wider bundle of ecosystem services are required. We sampled three forest types, tropical rainforests, sclerophyll forests, and rehabilitated plantation forests, over an area of 32,000m(2) from Wet Tropics bioregion, Australia, aiming to compare supply and evaluate interactions and patterns of eight ecosystem services (global climate regulation, air quality regulation, erosion regulation, nutrient regulation, cyclone protection, habitat provision, energy provision, and timber provision). On average, multiple ecosystem services were highest in the rainforests, lowest in sclerophyll forests, and intermediate in rehabilitated plantation forests. However, a wide variation was apparent among the plots across the three forest types. Global climate regulation service had a synergistic impact on the supply of multiple ecosystem services, while nutrient regulation service was found to have a trade-off impact. Considering multiple ecosystem services, most of the rehabilitated plantation forest plots shared the same ordination space with rainforest plots in the ordination analysis, indicating that rehabilitated plantation forests may supply certain ecosystem services nearly equivalent to rainforests. Two synergy groups and one trade-off group were identified. Apart from conserving rainforests and sclerophyll forests, our findings suggest two additional integrated pathways to sustain the supply of multiple ecosystem services from a

  5. Conservation science and forest service policy for roadless areas.

    PubMed

    Turner, James Morton

    2006-06-01

    Questions persist regarding whether the science of conservation biology can successfully affect environmental decision making. One of the most prominent fields of intersection between conservation science and environmental policy is public-lands debates in the United States. I reviewed the role of conservation science in the roadless-area policies of the U.S. Forest Service. Since 1971, the Forest Service has systematically evaluated roadless areas on national forests three times, most recently during the Clinton administration's Roadless Area Conservation Review (1998-2000) (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service 2000b). Drawing on the agency's environmental impact statements and supporting documents and the internal records of conservation organizations, I examined the changing goals, methodology, and outcome of roadless-area advocacy and policy Since the 1970s, conservation science has successfully informed public and administrative concern for roadless-area protection. Conservation science has transformed public discourse regarding roadless areas and has changed the scope and rationale of national conservation organizations' goals for roadless-area policy from protecting some to protecting all remaining national forest roadless areas. The Forest Service has increasingly drawn on the lessons of conservation biology to justify its methodology and its administrative recommendations to protect roadless areas. The 2000 Roadless Area Conservation Review resulted in a recommendation to protect all remaining national forest roadless areas, up from 22% of roadless areas in the first roadless review. Despite the scientific merits of recent roadless-area advocacy and policy, however such initiatives have faced political difficulties. The emphasis on large-scale, top-down, national approaches to conservation policy has rendered such policies politically problematic. PMID:16909564

  6. Scan angle calculation and image compositing for the Mexico Forest Mapping Project. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.

    1994-02-01

    Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used in a cooperative project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station, and the United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), to map Mexico's forest cover types. To provide satisfactory AVHRR data sets for the project, the sensor scan angle needed to be calculated for data points in the composite image data, and the clouds had to be removed and composite image data created from individual data sets. Techniques used to accomplish those two tasks are described here. Concepts illustrated here should be applicable to other similar projects.

  7. Nonmarket economic impacts of forest insect pests: A literature review. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberger, R.S.; Smith, E.L.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of research on the nonmarket economic impacts of forest insect pests. The majority of the research reports are journal articles or fulfillment of three USDA Forest Service research contracts. This report also reviews the foundations for methodologies used and classifies the forest insect pests studied, the regions in which research has been conducted, the designated land-use areas, the stakeholders, the values, the measurement methods used, and the measures of value indicators. Information on each research project is described with relevant information condensed in tabular form.

  8. 7. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #246865, 'Drying racks'), D. A. Oliver, 1934. FURNISHING DETAIL, DRYING RACKS. - Parsons Nursery, Cone Drying Shed, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  9. 14. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #333469, 'Tree nurseries-seed bed preparation'), D. A. Oliver, November 1936. VIEW NORTHEAST, ORIGINAL WASH HOUSE, GARAGE (DEMOLISHED), WORKSHOP/WAREHOUSE, AND NURSERY OFFICE. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  10. 4. Photocopy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV), photographer unknown, 1937. VIEW NORTHWEST. (see also historic photographs WV-237-11, WV-237-12, WV-237-13, WV-237-14) - Parsons Nursery, Nursery Office, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  11. 4. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #302582, 'Insect/disease control'), D. A. Oliver, May 1935. VIEW NORTHEAST. - Parsons Nursery, Packing Building, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  12. 29. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #292218, 'Planting with 10 ft. transplant board'), D. A. Oliver, 1934. VIEW EAST, FIRMING EARTH BEFORE REMOVING TRANSPLANT BOARD FROM NEWLY TRANSPLANTED SEEDLINGS. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  13. 39. Photo copy of site plan, (original in Forest Service ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Photo copy of site plan, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, 'Parsons Nursery Special Use Permit, West Virginia Department of Natural Resources'), 1969. PARSONS NURSERY SITE PLAN. CORROLATES TO PARSONS NURSERY AT TIME OF FLOOD, NOVEMBER, 1985. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  14. 3. Photo copy of blue print, (original in Forest Service ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photo copy of blue print, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV), George W. Root, draftsman, 1928. DETAILS FOR PUMP HOUSE. (see also historic photograph WV-237-13) (see also WV-237-B-3, FOR CONSTRUCTION DETAILS) - Parsons Nursery, Pump House, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  15. 4. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #298180, 'seed extracting equipment'), D. A. Oliver, 1934. LOWER FLOOR, LOOKING WEST, SEED EXTRACTOR. - Parsons Nursery, Seed Extractor Building, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  16. 23. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #248336, 'Tree nurseries-seed bed seeding machine'), D. A. Oliver, 1930. VIEW WEST, SEEDING MACHINE. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  17. 22. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #244025, 'seed planter'), D. A. Oliver, 1930. VIEW EAST, FRONT OF WORKSHOP/WAREHOUSE, SEED BED PLANTER. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  18. 5. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #298181), D. A. Oliver, 1934. LOWER FLOOR, LOOKING WEST, SEED EXTRACTOR. - Parsons Nursery, Seed Extractor Building, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  19. 36 CFR 222.32 - Use of non-Forest Service personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of non-Forest Service personnel. 222.32 Section 222.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.32 Use of...

  20. 36 CFR 222.32 - Use of non-Forest Service personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of non-Forest Service personnel. 222.32 Section 222.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.32 Use of...

  1. 36 CFR 222.72 - Use of non-Forest Service personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of non-Forest Service personnel. 222.72 Section 222.72 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.72 Use of...

  2. 36 CFR 222.32 - Use of non-Forest Service personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of non-Forest Service personnel. 222.32 Section 222.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.32 Use of...

  3. 36 CFR 222.72 - Use of non-Forest Service personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of non-Forest Service personnel. 222.72 Section 222.72 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.72 Use of...

  4. Field guide for forested plant associations of the Wenatchee National Forest. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lillybridge, T.R.; Kovalchik, B.L.; Williams, C.K.; Smith, B.G.

    1995-10-01

    A classification of forest vegetation is presented for the Wenatchee National Forest (NF). It is based on potential vegetation, with the plant association as the basic unit. The sample includes about 570 intensive plots and 840 reconnaissance plots distributed across the Wenatchee National Forest and the southwest portion of the Okanogan National Forest from 1975 through 1994. The hierarchical classification includes 10 forest series and 104 types (plant association or community type). Deagnostic keys and descriptions are presented for each tree series and type. Detailed descriptions are given for each type having at least five sample standard in the Wenatchee NF. Those descriptions include information about plant species occurrences, type distribution, environment and soils, potential timber productivity, management considerations, and relationships to other classifications. Brief descriptions are presented for miscellaneous types (those having fewer than five plots in the Wenatchee NF).

  5. 7 CFR 1.624 - How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.624 How will the Forest Service... Forest Service may file with the Hearing Clerk an answer to any hearing request under § 1.621....

  6. 7 CFR 1.624 - How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.624 How will the Forest Service... Forest Service may file with the Hearing Clerk an answer to any hearing request under § 1.621....

  7. 7 CFR 1.624 - How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.624 How will the Forest Service... Forest Service may file with the Hearing Clerk an answer to any hearing request under § 1.621....

  8. 7 CFR 1.624 - How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.624 How will the Forest Service... Forest Service may file with the Hearing Clerk an answer to any hearing request under § 1.621....

  9. 7 CFR 1.624 - How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How will the Forest Service respond to any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.624 How will the Forest Service... Forest Service may file with the Hearing Clerk an answer to any hearing request under § 1.621....

  10. Advances of air pollution science: from forest decline to multiple-stress effects on forest ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, E; Schaub, M; Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Augustaitis, A; Bastrup-Birk, A M; Bytnerowicz, A; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Müller-Starck, G; Serengil, Y

    2010-06-01

    Over the past 20 years, the focus of forest science on air pollution has moved from forest decline to a holistic framework of forest health, and from the effects on forest production to the ecosystem services provided by forest ecosystems. Hence, future research should focus on the interacting factorial impacts and resulting antagonistic and synergistic responses of forest trees and ecosystems. The synergistic effects of air pollution and climatic changes, in particular elevated ozone, altered nitrogen, carbon and water availability, must be key issues for research. Present evidence suggests air pollution will become increasingly harmful to forests under climate change, which requires integration amongst various stressors (abiotic and biotic factors, including competition, parasites and fire), effects on forest services (production, biodiversity protection, soil protection, sustained water balance, socio-economical relevance) and assessment approaches (research, monitoring, modeling) to be fostered. PMID:20036449

  11. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  12. 24. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photo copy of photograph, (original in Forest Service Office, Elkins, WV, photo #397508, 'Women weeding in the one-year old red spruce seedlings at the Parsons Nursery at Parsons, W. Va. Women are used for weeding here because of the dexterity of their hands. They are paid 40 cents an hour'), B. W. Muir, 1940. VIEW NORTHEAST, PACKING BUILDING IN BACKGROUND, WOMEN WEEDING. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  13. Comparison of NASA OMI and MLS Ozone Products with US Forest Service Ground-based Ozone Monitoring Data for US Forest Service Air Quality / Forest Management Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S.; Brooks, A.; Moussa, Y.; Spencer, T.; Thompson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone, formed when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) react with sunlight, is a significant threat to the health of US National Forests. Approximately one third of ozone is absorbed by plants during the uptake of carbon dioxide. This increases the vegetation's susceptibility to drought, beetle infestation, and wildfire. Currently the US Forest Service has ground monitoring stations sparsely located across the country. This project looks specifically at the area surrounding several Class I Wilderness Areas in the Appalachian region. These areas are the highest priority for protection from air pollutants. The Forest Service must interpolate ozone concentrations for areas between these monitoring stations. Class I Wilderness Areas are designated by the Forest Service and are defined as a total 5000 acres or greater when the Clean Air Act was passed in 1977. This Act mandated that the EPA create national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for six major air pollutants including ground-level ozone. This project assessed the feasibility of incorporating NASA ozone data into Forest Service ozone monitoring in an effort to enhance the accuracy and precision of ozone exposure measurements in Class I Wilderness Areas and other federally managed lands in order to aid in complying with the Clean Air Act of 1977. This was accomplished by establishing a method of comparison between a preliminary data product produced at the Goddard Space Flight Center that uses OMI/MLS data to derive global tropospheric ozone measurements and Forest Service ozone monitoring station measurements. Once a methodology for comparison was established, statistical comparisons of these data were performed to assess the quantitative differences.

  14. Urban Forest Ecosystem Service Optimization, Tradeoffs, and Disparities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnaruk, E.; Kroll, C. N.; Endreny, T. A.; Hirabayashi, S.; Yang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Urban land area and the proportion of humanity living in cities is growing, leading to increased urban air pollution, temperature, and stormwater runoff. These changes can exacerbate respiratory and heat-related illnesses and affect ecosystem functioning. Urban trees can help mitigate these threats by removing air pollutants, mitigating urban heat island effects, and infiltrating and filtering stormwater. The urban environment is highly heterogeneous, and there is no tool to determine optimal locations to plant or protect trees. Using spatially explicit land cover, weather, and demographic data within biophysical ecosystem service models, this research expands upon the iTree urban forest tools to produce a new decision support tool (iTree-DST) that will explore the development and impacts of optimal tree planting. It will also heighten awareness of environmental justice by incorporating the Atkinson Index to quantify disparities in health risks and ecosystem services across vulnerable and susceptible populations. The study area is Baltimore City, a location whose urban forest and environmental justice concerns have been studied extensively. The iTree-DST is run at the US Census block group level and utilizes a local gradient approach to calculate the change in ecosystem services with changing tree cover across the study area. Empirical fits provide ecosystem service gradients for possible tree cover scenarios, greatly increasing the speed and efficiency of the optimization procedure. Initial results include an evaluation of the performance of the gradient method, optimal planting schemes for individual ecosystem services, and an analysis of tradeoffs and synergies between competing objectives.

  15. 7 CFR 1.625 - What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.625 What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests? (a) Case referral. Within 5 days after receipt of the Forest...

  16. 7 CFR 1.625 - What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.625 What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests? (a) Case referral. Within 5 days after receipt of the Forest...

  17. 7 CFR 1.625 - What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.625 What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests? (a) Case referral. Within 5 days after receipt of the Forest...

  18. 7 CFR 1.625 - What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.625 What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests? (a) Case referral. Within 5 days after receipt of the Forest...

  19. 7 CFR 1.625 - What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with any hearing... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Initiation of Hearing Process § 1.625 What will the Forest Service do with any hearing requests? (a) Case referral. Within 5 days after receipt of the Forest...

  20. Dynamics of Ecosystem Services during Forest Transitions in Reventazón, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Améline; Locatelli, Bruno; Levrel, Harold; Brenes Pérez, Christian; Imbach, Pablo; Estrada Carmona, Natalia; Manlay, Raphaël; Oszwald, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The forest transition framework describes the temporal changes of forest areas with economic development. A first phase of forest contraction is followed by a second phase of expansion once a turning point is reached. This framework does not differentiate forest types or ecosystem services, and describes forests regardless of their contribution to human well-being. For several decades, deforestation in many tropical regions has degraded ecosystem services, such as watershed regulation, while increasing provisioning services from agriculture, for example, food. Forest transitions and expansion have been observed in some countries, but their consequences for ecosystem services are often unclear. We analyzed the implications of forest cover change on ecosystem services in Costa Rica, where a forest transition has been suggested. A review of literature and secondary data on forest and ecosystem services in Costa Rica indicated that forest transition might have led to an ecosystem services transition. We modeled and mapped the changes of selected ecosystem services in the upper part of the Reventazón watershed and analyzed how supply changed over time in order to identify possible transitions in ecosystem services. The modeled changes of ecosystem services is similar to the second phase of a forest transition but no turning point was identified, probably because of the limited temporal scope of the analysis. Trends of provisioning and regulating services and their tradeoffs were opposite in different spatial subunits of our study area, which highlights the importance of scale in the analysis of ecosystem services and forest transitions. The ecosystem services transition framework proposed in this study is useful for analyzing the temporal changes of ecosystem services and linking socio-economic drivers to ecosystem services demand at different scales. PMID:27390869

  1. Dynamics of Ecosystem Services during Forest Transitions in Reventazón, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Améline; Locatelli, Bruno; Levrel, Harold; Brenes Pérez, Christian; Imbach, Pablo; Estrada Carmona, Natalia; Manlay, Raphaël; Oszwald, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The forest transition framework describes the temporal changes of forest areas with economic development. A first phase of forest contraction is followed by a second phase of expansion once a turning point is reached. This framework does not differentiate forest types or ecosystem services, and describes forests regardless of their contribution to human well-being. For several decades, deforestation in many tropical regions has degraded ecosystem services, such as watershed regulation, while increasing provisioning services from agriculture, for example, food. Forest transitions and expansion have been observed in some countries, but their consequences for ecosystem services are often unclear. We analyzed the implications of forest cover change on ecosystem services in Costa Rica, where a forest transition has been suggested. A review of literature and secondary data on forest and ecosystem services in Costa Rica indicated that forest transition might have led to an ecosystem services transition. We modeled and mapped the changes of selected ecosystem services in the upper part of the Reventazón watershed and analyzed how supply changed over time in order to identify possible transitions in ecosystem services. The modeled changes of ecosystem services is similar to the second phase of a forest transition but no turning point was identified, probably because of the limited temporal scope of the analysis. Trends of provisioning and regulating services and their tradeoffs were opposite in different spatial subunits of our study area, which highlights the importance of scale in the analysis of ecosystem services and forest transitions. The ecosystem services transition framework proposed in this study is useful for analyzing the temporal changes of ecosystem services and linking socio-economic drivers to ecosystem services demand at different scales. PMID:27390869

  2. Small target identification. Forest Service project record. [Raptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The identification, observation, and counting of raptor (hawks, owls, ospreys, eagles, etc.) nests, fledglings, and eggs are accomplished by Forest Service wildlife biologists as part of the eagle recovery effort, the protection of endangered species, and wildlife management in general. One alternative to real-time direct observation would be some sort of a stabilized television platform, equipped with a television camera which has a remotely zoomable lens, and a real-time monitor. The objective of the tests described in the report is to determine if a stabilized, real-time optical system (hereinafter called simply sight) is available to do the raptor observation job.

  3. 75 FR 67998 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Chattahoochee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service... objects in the possession of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  4. ECOSYSTEM SERVICES OF SECONDARY FORESTS IN THE MATA ATLÂNTICA OF BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land use history can be an important driver of many ecosystem services. Carbon storage and species richness of primary forests likely will exceed that of secondary forests. Productivity of secondary forests may be limited by nitrogen and/or phosphorus because of nutrient re...

  5. 75 FR 68000 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Hiawatha National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service... inventory of human remains in the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Hiawatha... assessment of the human remains was made by U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  6. Forest Service Career Guide. Professional Opportunities in Natural Resource Management, Planning, and Research. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The guide provides information on professional opportunities in natural resource management, planning, and research. Reasons for careers in forest service are presented and a brief description of the forest service is provided. Career opportunities in the following areas are described: forestry, engineering, geology, hydrology, landscape…

  7. 7 CFR 1.672 - What will the Forest Service do with a proposed alternative?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... comments to FERC's NEPA document under 18 CFR 5.25(c): (a) Analyze the alternative under § 1.673; and (b... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with a proposed... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Alternatives Process § 1.672 What will the Forest Service do with...

  8. 7 CFR 1.672 - What will the Forest Service do with a proposed alternative?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... comments to FERC's NEPA document under 18 CFR 5.25(c): (a) Analyze the alternative under § 1.673; and (b... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with a proposed... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Alternatives Process § 1.672 What will the Forest Service do with...

  9. 7 CFR 1.672 - What will the Forest Service do with a proposed alternative?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... comments to FERC's NEPA document under 18 CFR 5.25(c): (a) Analyze the alternative under § 1.673; and (b... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with a proposed... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Alternatives Process § 1.672 What will the Forest Service do with...

  10. 7 CFR 1.672 - What will the Forest Service do with a proposed alternative?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... comments to FERC's NEPA document under 18 CFR 5.25(c): (a) Analyze the alternative under § 1.673; and (b... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with a proposed... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Alternatives Process § 1.672 What will the Forest Service do with...

  11. 7 CFR 1.672 - What will the Forest Service do with a proposed alternative?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... comments to FERC's NEPA document under 18 CFR 5.25(c): (a) Analyze the alternative under § 1.673; and (b... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What will the Forest Service do with a proposed... Conditions in FERC Hydropower Licenses Alternatives Process § 1.672 What will the Forest Service do with...

  12. Forest Service Films Available On Loan For Educational Purposes to Schools, Civic Groups, Churches, Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Over 100 films prepared by the Forest Service are listed in this catalog. Sixty-five general interest films and seven "Smokey the Bear" fire prevention films are available on loan, free of charge, to the public. Twenty-nine Forest Service training films are also listed which are not available for public use except under special circumstances. All…

  13. Climate Change and Ecosystem Services Output Efficiency in Southern Loblolly Pine Forests.

    PubMed

    Susaeta, Andres; Adams, Damian C; Carter, Douglas R; Dwivedi, Puneet

    2016-09-01

    Forests provide myriad ecosystem services that are vital to humanity. With climate change, we expect to see significant changes to forests that will alter the supply of these critical services and affect human well-being. To better understand the impacts of climate change on forest-based ecosystem services, we applied a data envelopment analysis method to assess plot-level efficiency in the provision of ecosystem services in Florida natural loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forests. Using field data for n = 16 loblolly pine forest plots, including inputs such as site index, tree density, age, precipitation, and temperatures for each forest plot, we assessed the relative plot-level production of three ecosystem services: timber, carbon sequestered, and species richness. The results suggested that loblolly pine forests in Florida were largely inefficient in the provision of these ecosystem services under current climatic conditions. Climate change had a small negative impact on the loblolly pine forests efficiency in the provision of ecosystem services. In this context, we discussed the reduction of tree density that may not improve ecosystem services production. PMID:27263100

  14. Climate Change and Ecosystem Services Output Efficiency in Southern Loblolly Pine Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susaeta, Andres; Adams, Damian C.; Carter, Douglas R.; Dwivedi, Puneet

    2016-09-01

    Forests provide myriad ecosystem services that are vital to humanity. With climate change, we expect to see significant changes to forests that will alter the supply of these critical services and affect human well-being. To better understand the impacts of climate change on forest-based ecosystem services, we applied a data envelopment analysis method to assess plot-level efficiency in the provision of ecosystem services in Florida natural loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) forests. Using field data for n = 16 loblolly pine forest plots, including inputs such as site index, tree density, age, precipitation, and temperatures for each forest plot, we assessed the relative plot-level production of three ecosystem services: timber, carbon sequestered, and species richness. The results suggested that loblolly pine forests in Florida were largely inefficient in the provision of these ecosystem services under current climatic conditions. Climate change had a small negative impact on the loblolly pine forests efficiency in the provision of ecosystem services. In this context, we discussed the reduction of tree density that may not improve ecosystem services production.

  15. 36 CFR 213.2 - Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands. 213.2 Section 213.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ADMINISTRATION OF LANDS UNDER TITLE III OF THE...

  16. 36 CFR 213.2 - Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands. 213.2 Section 213.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ADMINISTRATION OF LANDS UNDER TITLE III OF THE...

  17. 36 CFR 213.2 - Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands. 213.2 Section 213.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ADMINISTRATION OF LANDS UNDER TITLE III OF THE...

  18. 36 CFR 228.63 - Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract. 228.63 Section 228.63 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials Types and Methods...

  19. 36 CFR 228.63 - Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract. 228.63 Section 228.63 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials Types and Methods...

  20. 36 CFR 228.63 - Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract. 228.63 Section 228.63 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials Types and Methods...

  1. 36 CFR 213.2 - Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands. 213.2 Section 213.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ADMINISTRATION OF LANDS UNDER TITLE III OF THE...

  2. 36 CFR 228.63 - Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract. 228.63 Section 228.63 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials Types and Methods...

  3. 36 CFR 213.2 - Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authority for Chief, Forest Service, to group, define, and name national grasslands. 213.2 Section 213.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ADMINISTRATION OF LANDS UNDER TITLE III OF THE...

  4. 36 CFR 228.63 - Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Removal under terms of a timber sale or other Forest Service contract. 228.63 Section 228.63 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials Types and Methods...

  5. US Forest Service and National Park Service Wilderness Aircraft Overflight Study: Sociological background and study plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robin T.; Hartmann, Lawrence

    1990-04-01

    The background and sociological aspects of the combined U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service Wilderness Aircraft Overflight Study (WACOS) are presented. The WACOS broaches a new area of research by combining aspects of outdoor recreation sociology and aircraft noise response studies. The tasks faced create new challenges and require innovative solutions. Background information on the WACOS is presented with special emphasis on sociological considerations. At the time of this writing, no data have yet been collected, so this paper will present background information, related issues, and plans for data collection. Some recent studies indicate that managers of Forest Service wildernesses and National Park Service areas consider aircraft overflights to be a problem to their users in some areas. Additional relevant background research from outdoor recreation sociology is discussed, followed by presentation of the authors' opinions of the most salient sociological issues faced by this study. The goals and desired end products are identified next, followed by a review of the methods anticipated to be used to obtain these results. Finally, a discussion and conclusion section is provided.

  6. US Forest Service and National Park Service Wilderness Aircraft Overflight Study: Sociological background and study plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Robin T.; Hartmann, Lawrence

    1990-01-01

    The background and sociological aspects of the combined U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service Wilderness Aircraft Overflight Study (WACOS) are presented. The WACOS broaches a new area of research by combining aspects of outdoor recreation sociology and aircraft noise response studies. The tasks faced create new challenges and require innovative solutions. Background information on the WACOS is presented with special emphasis on sociological considerations. At the time of this writing, no data have yet been collected, so this paper will present background information, related issues, and plans for data collection. Some recent studies indicate that managers of Forest Service wildernesses and National Park Service areas consider aircraft overflights to be a problem to their users in some areas. Additional relevant background research from outdoor recreation sociology is discussed, followed by presentation of the authors' opinions of the most salient sociological issues faced by this study. The goals and desired end products are identified next, followed by a review of the methods anticipated to be used to obtain these results. Finally, a discussion and conclusion section is provided.

  7. [Forest ecosystem services and their ecological valuation--a case study of tropical forest in Jianfengling of Hainan Island].

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Ouyang, Z; Zhao, J; Wang, X

    2000-08-01

    This paper attempts to present forest ecosystem services and their indirect economic value of Jianfengling tropical forest in Hainan Island. The results show that average annual integrated ecosystem service value of Jianfengling tropical forest, which covers 44667.00 hm2, adds up to 664.38 million yuan(Chinese RMB), of which, about 71.64 million yuan is of the output of standing trees and other forest products, about 394.29 million yuan of water-holding, about 2.47 million yuan of soil conservation against erosion, about 13.16 million yuan of carbon fixation for reducing green house effect, about 4.29 million yuan of nutrient retention for N, P, K, Ca and Mg, about 178.53 million yuan of air purification. PMID:11767660

  8. Assessing the ecosystem service potential of Tucson AZ's urban forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavao-Zuckerman, M.

    2011-12-01

    canopy photos) to asses growth of the trees in the urban environment. These growth rates, and associated ecosystem services (C-sequestration, energy savings, pollution mitigation, etc.) are evaluated using US Forest Service models (Tree Carbon Calculator and i-tree software) to determine how the performance of trees in the Tucson urban environment perform vs. model predictions. We hypothesize that the models overestimate tree performance as Tucson differs in water availability relative to the cities the model was parameterized in (e.g. Glendale), both in terms of soil water holding capacities and also city "water culture." This preliminary study will provide a data collection framework for a citizen science urban forestry project which will provide data to improve environmental decision making related to the interaction of plants, water, and energy balance in this arid city.

  9. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC,...

  10. 7 CFR 1.673 - How will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How will the Forest Service analyze a proposed... will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition? (a) In deciding whether to adopt a proposed alternative, the Forest Service must consider evidence and...

  11. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC,...

  12. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC,...

  13. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC,...

  14. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC,...

  15. 75 FR 45656 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Siuslaw National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Siuslaw National Forest, Waldport, OR. The human remains...

  16. 78 FR 11677 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Apache-Sitgreaves...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service... Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests and the Field Museum of Natural...

  17. Aquatic biodiversity in forests: A weak link in ecosystem services resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penaluna, Brooke E.; Olson, Deanna H.; Flitcroft, Rebecca L; Weber, Matthew A.; Bellmore, James R.; Wondzell, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason; Johnson, Sherri L.; Reeves, Gordon H.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of aquatic ecosystems is being quickly reduced on many continents, warranting a closer examination of the consequences for ecological integrity and ecosystem services. Here we describe intermediate and final ecosystem services derived from aquatic biodiversity in forests. We include a summary of the factors framing the assembly of aquatic biodiversity in forests in natural systems and how they change with a variety of natural disturbances and human-derived stressors. We consider forested aquatic ecosystems as a multi-state portfolio, with diverse assemblages and life-history strategies occurring at local scales as a consequence of a mosaic of habitat conditions and past disturbances and stressors. Maintaining this multi-state portfolio of assemblages requires a broad perspective of ecosystem structure, various functions, services, and management implications relative to contemporary stressors. Because aquatic biodiversity provides multiple ecosystem services to forests, activities that compromise aquatic ecosystems and biodiversity could be an issue for maintaining forest ecosystem integrity. We illustrate these concepts with examples of aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem services in forests of northwestern North America, also known as Northeast Pacific Rim. Encouraging management planning at broad as well as local spatial scales to recognize multi-state ecosystem management goals has promise for maintaining valuable ecosystem services. Ultimately, integration of information from socio-ecological ecosystems will be needed to maintain ecosystem services derived directly and indirectly from forest aquatic biota.

  18. Glossary of terms used in timber harvesting and forest engineering. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, B.J.; Ashmore, C.; Rawlins, C.L.; Sirois, D.L.

    1989-09-01

    With the increasing cost and complexity of forest operations, there is an ever-growing need for standardization of forest-engineering terminology. This publication provides a glossary of definitions for a broad group of terms used in forestry and in forest engineering, with an emphasis on harvesting.

  19. Carbon sequestration and water flow regulation services in mature Mediterranean Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguería, S.; Ovando, P.

    2015-12-01

    We develop a forestland use and management model that integrates spatially-explicit biophysical and economic data, to estimate the expected pattern of climate regulation services through carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in tree and shrubs biomass, and water flow regulation. We apply this model to examine the potential trade-offs and synergies in the supply of CO2 sequestration and water flow services in mature Mediterranean forest, considering two alternative forest management settings. A forest restoration scenario through investments in facilitating forest regeneration, and a forestry activity abandonment scenario as result of unprofitable forest regeneration investment. The analysis is performed for different discount rates and price settings for carbon and water. The model is applied at the farm level in a group of 567 private silvopastoral farms across Andalusia (Spain), considering the main forest species in this region: Quercus ilex, Q. suber, Pinus pinea, P. halepensis, P. pinaster and Eucalyptus sp., as well as for tree-less shrubland and pastures. The results of this research are provided by forest land unit, vegetation, farm and for the group of municipalities where the farms are located. Our results draw attention to the spatial variability of CO2 and water flow regulation services, and point towards a trade-off between those services. The pattern of economic benefits associated to water and carbon services fluctuates according to the assumptions regarding price levels and discounting rates, as well as in connection to the expected forest management and tree growth models, and to spatially-explicit forest attributes such as existing tree and shrubs inventories, the quality of the sites for growing different tree species, soil structure or the climatic characteristics. The assumptions made regarding the inter-temporal preferences and relative prices have a large effect on the estimated economic value of carbon and water services. These results

  20. Higher levels of multiple ecosystem services are found in forests with more tree species.

    PubMed

    Gamfeldt, Lars; Snäll, Tord; Bagchi, Robert; Jonsson, Micael; Gustafsson, Lena; Kjellander, Petter; Ruiz-Jaen, María C; Fröberg, Mats; Stendahl, Johan; Philipson, Christopher D; Mikusiński, Grzegorz; Andersson, Erik; Westerlund, Bertil; Andrén, Henrik; Moberg, Fredrik; Moen, Jon; Bengtsson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Forests are of major importance to human society, contributing several crucial ecosystem services. Biodiversity is suggested to positively influence multiple services but evidence from natural systems at scales relevant to management is scarce. Here, across a scale of 400,000 km(2), we report that tree species richness in production forests shows positive to positively hump-shaped relationships with multiple ecosystem services. These include production of tree biomass, soil carbon storage, berry production and game production potential. For example, biomass production was approximately 50% greater with five than with one tree species. In addition, we show positive relationships between tree species richness and proxies for other biodiversity components. Importantly, no single tree species was able to promote all services, and some services were negatively correlated to each other. Management of production forests will therefore benefit from considering multiple tree species to sustain the full range of benefits that the society obtains from forests. PMID:23299890

  1. Higher levels of multiple ecosystem services are found in forests with more tree species

    PubMed Central

    Gamfeldt, Lars; Snäll, Tord; Bagchi, Robert; Jonsson, Micael; Gustafsson, Lena; Kjellander, Petter; Ruiz-Jaen, María C.; Fröberg, Mats; Stendahl, Johan; Philipson, Christopher D.; Mikusiński, Grzegorz; Andersson, Erik; Westerlund, Bertil; Andrén, Henrik; Moberg, Fredrik; Moen, Jon; Bengtsson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Forests are of major importance to human society, contributing several crucial ecosystem services. Biodiversity is suggested to positively influence multiple services but evidence from natural systems at scales relevant to management is scarce. Here, across a scale of 400,000 km2, we report that tree species richness in production forests shows positive to positively hump-shaped relationships with multiple ecosystem services. These include production of tree biomass, soil carbon storage, berry production and game production potential. For example, biomass production was approximately 50% greater with five than with one tree species. In addition, we show positive relationships between tree species richness and proxies for other biodiversity components. Importantly, no single tree species was able to promote all services, and some services were negatively correlated to each other. Management of production forests will therefore benefit from considering multiple tree species to sustain the full range of benefits that the society obtains from forests. PMID:23299890

  2. The US Forest Service Framework for Climate Adaptation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaves, D.

    2013-12-01

    Public lands are changing in response to climate change and related stressors such that resilience-based management plans that integrate climate-smart adaptation are needed. The goal of these plans is to facilitate land managers' consideration of a range of potential futures while simplifying the complex array of choices and assumptions in a rigorous, defensible manner. The foundation for climate response has been built into recent Forest Service policies, guidance, and strategies like the climate change Roadmap and Scorecard; 2012 Planning Rule; Cohesive Wildland Fire Management strategy; and Inventory, Monitoring & Assessment strategy. This has driven the need for information that is relevant, timely, and accessible to support vulnerability assessments and risk management to aid in designing and choosing alternatives and ranking actions. Managers must also consider carbon and greenhouse gas implications as well as understand the nature and level of uncertainties. The major adjustments that need to be made involve: improving risk-based decision making and working with predictive models and information; evaluating underlying assumptions against new realities and possibilities being revealed by climate science; integrating carbon cycle science and a new ethic of carbon stewardship into management practices; and preparing systems for inevitable changes to ameliorate negative effects, capture opportunities, or accept different and perhaps novel ecosystem configurations. We need to avoid waiting for complete science that never arrives and take actions that blend science and experience to boost learning, reduce costs and irreversible losses, and buy lead time.

  3. Forest statistics for Michigan`s northern lower peninsula unit, 1993. Forest Service research bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Leatherberry, E.C.

    1994-10-30

    Michigan`s Northern Lower Peninsula Unit (fig. 1) is comprised of 33 counties. This region of the State is rich with resources that support a network of social, economic, and ecological processes that are forest dependent. The forest resource of the Unit presently supports an industry that operates on a sustaining basis. In 1990 nearly half of Michigan`s saw-log production--297 million board feet--was harvest in the Unit. The forests of the Northern Lower Peninsula are vital to the region. The forest contains a variety of both deciduous and coniferous forest species, which results in regionally unique ecosystems that contribute to biodiversity.

  4. Woody biomass resource of Arkansas, 1988. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    Data from the most recent Arkansas forest survey were used to derive estimates of wood and bark biomass by counties. Wood and bark biomass estimates for all trees on timberland are summarized in the report. The resource is described by dimension (size), forest type, ownership, species, stand attributes, and tree merchantability class. Also, estimates pertaining to timberland acreage were included.

  5. A decision framework for identifying models to estimate forest ecosystem services gains from restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christin, Zachary; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Verdone, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Restoring degraded forests and agricultural lands has become a global conservation priority. A growing number of tools can quantify ecosystem service tradeoffs associated with forest restoration. This evolving “tools landscape” presents a dilemma: more tools are available, but selecting appropriate tools has become more challenging. We present a Restoration Ecosystem Service Tool Selector (RESTS) framework that describes key characteristics of 13 ecosystem service assessment tools. Analysts enter information about their decision context, services to be analyzed, and desired outputs. Tools are filtered and presented based on five evaluative criteria: scalability, cost, time requirements, handling of uncertainty, and applicability to benefit-cost analysis. RESTS uses a spreadsheet interface but a web-based interface is planned. Given the rapid evolution of ecosystem services science, RESTS provides an adaptable framework to guide forest restoration decision makers toward tools that can help quantify ecosystem services in support of restoration.

  6. Preliminary checklist of fungi of the Fernow Experimental Forest. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S.L.; Kumar, A.; Bhatt, R.; Dubey, T.; Landolt, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The report provides a checklist of fungi found on the Fernow Experimental Forest in West Virginia during 4 years of research and collecting by the authors. More than 500 fungi in seven major taxonomic groups (Acrasiomycetes, Myxomycetes, Chytridiomycetes, Oomycetes, Ascomycetes, Deuteromycetes, and Basidiomycetes) are listed alphabetically by genus and species. Also provided is a general description of the forest vegetation of the Fernow Experimental Forest.

  7. Michigan`s forests 1993: An analysis. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.L.; Spencer, J.S.; Bertsch, R.

    1997-02-04

    Michigan`s forests are abundant, diverse, healthy, productive, and expanding. These forests make important contributions to the quality of life by providing a wide array of benefits, including wildlife habitat, biological diversity, outdoor recreation, improved air and water quality, and economic resources such as the estimated $12 billion of value added and 200,000 jobs annually supported by forest-based industries/tourism/recreation.

  8. Forest statistics for New York: 1980 and 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin. (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Alerich, C.L.; Drake, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    A statistical report on the fourth forest inventory of New York conducted in 1991-94 by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Unit, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. Statistical for forest area, numbers of trees, wildlife habitat, tree biomass, timber volume, timber products output, growth and change are displayed at the state and, when appropriate, at the unit and county levels. The current inventory indicates that there approximately 21.8 billion cubic feet of growing-stock volume on 15.4 million acres of timberland in New York.

  9. Forest statistics for southeast texas counties, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.F.; Miller, P.E.; Hartsell, A.J.

    1992-11-01

    The report includes tables derived from data obtained during a 1992 forest inventory of southeast Texas counties. The Southern Forest Experiment Station, Forest Inventory and Analysis unit (SO-FIA) uses a two-phase sample of temporary aerialphoto points and a systematic grid of permanent ground plots. The area of forested land was determined by photointerpretation of temporary points and field checks of permanent plots. Tree data were used to estimate volumes, basal area, number of trees, and other plot-level variables. Ownership information was obtained for each measurement plot using tax records and other sources.

  10. 75 FR 52014 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ..., Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is... control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN... with the Cherokee Tribes. The Cherokee are represented by the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern...

  11. 77 FR 51562 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest.... SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Coconino National Forest,...

  12. 77 FR 52055 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest.... SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Coconino National Forest,...

  13. 75 FR 44808 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest... repatriate cultural items in the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Coconino... Canyon with the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest...

  14. Implementing watershed investment programs to restore fire-adapted forests for watershed services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Payments for ecosystems services and watershed investment programs have created new solutions for restoring upland fire-adapted forests to support downstream surface-water and groundwater uses. Water from upland forests supports not only a significant percentage of the public water supplies in the U.S., but also extensive riparian, aquatic, and groundwater dependent ecosystems. Many rare, endemic, threatened, and endangered species are supported by the surface-water and groundwater generated from the forested uplands. In the Ponderosa pine forests of the Southwestern U.S., post Euro-American settlement forest management practices, coupled with climate change, has significantly impacted watershed functionality by increasing vegetation cover and associated evapotranspiration and decreasing runoff and groundwater recharge. A large Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program project known as the Four Forests Restoration Initiative is developing landscape scale processes to make the forests connected to these watersheds more resilient. However, there are challenges in financing the initial forest treatments and subsequent maintenance treatments while garnering supportive public opinion to forest thinning projects. A solution called the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project is utilizing City tax dollars collected through a public bond to finance forest treatments. Exit polling from the bond election documented the reasons for the 73 % affirmative vote on the bond measure. These forest treatments have included in their actions restoration of associated ephemeral stream channels and spring ecosystems, but resources still need to be identified for these actions. A statewide strategy for developing additional forest restoration resources outside of the federal financing is being explored by state and local business and governmental leaders. Coordination, synthesis, and modeling supported by a NSF Water Sustainability and Climate project has been instrumental in

  15. Silvicultural guidelines for forest stands threatened by the Gypsy moth. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, K.W.

    1993-02-02

    The ecological and silvicultural information on the interaction of gypsy moth and its host forest types is incorporated into silvicultural guidelines for minimizing the impacts of gypsy moth on forest stands threatened by the insect. Decision charts are used to match stand and insect conditions to the proper prescription that includes instructions for implementing it.

  16. Forest statistics for northeast texas counties, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.F.; Miller, P.E.; Hartsell, A.J.

    1992-11-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a 1992 forest inventory of northeast Texas counties. Core tables are compatible among Forest Inventory and Analysis units in the Eastern United States. Supplemental tables provide information beyond that provided by the core tables. Comparisons are made between results of the 1992 inventory and previous inventories conducted in 1986 and 1975.

  17. [Evaluation of ecological services of Populus simonii forest on Heerqin sandy land].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Fengrui; Zhang, Tonghui; Zhao, Liya; Yasuhito, Shirato

    2003-10-01

    The main ecological services of the sand-fixed forest are windbreak, soil erosion control, and atmospheric dust retention. In this paper, the ecological services of Populus simonii forest were assessed by simultaneous measurements of wind speeds, daily amount of soil surface wind erosion, and amount of atmospheric dust deposition at different observation sites located within and outside the forestland. The results showed that compared with the control site (mobile sand dune), the daily mean wind velocity at 2 m height was reduced by 18.3, 31.6, 66.1, 66.0, 62.3 and 45.2% for the observation sites over the distances of 6 and 3 H (H meant average tree height) from forest edge of the windward side, forest center, and observation sites over the distances of 0, 6 and 8 H from forest edge of the leeward side, respectively. The greatest reduction in daily mean wind velocity was occurred in both forest center and forest edge of the leeward side. There was a significant positive relationship between leaf area index of the forest and monthly declining index of mean wind speed. The monthly declining index of mean wind speed increased with increasing the forest leaf area index by a cubic function. The daily wind erosion rates of soil surface in observation sites at 6 and 3 H from forest edge of the windward side, forest center, and at 0, 6 and 8 H from forest edge of the leeward side were reduced by as much as 85.2%-99.9%, in comparison with the control site. The greatest reduction in daily wind erosion rate of soil surface occurred in forest edge of the leeward side, followed in decreasing order by forest center, 6 and 8 H from forest edge of the leeward side, 3 and 6 H from forest edge of the windward side. During the observation period, the daily mean dust deposition within the forestland was 13.2 kg.hm-2, compared with 9.9 kg.hm-2 outside the forestland, with a 33% increase. All these results suggested that the poplar forest played an important role in reducing damaging

  18. Sustainable carbon uptake - important ecosystem service within sustainable forest management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorana Ostrogović Sever, Maša; Anić, Mislav; Paladinić, Elvis; Alberti, Giorgio; Marjanović, Hrvoje

    2016-04-01

    Even-aged forest management with natural regeneration under continuous cover (i.e. close to nature management) is considered to be sustainable regarding the yield, biodiversity and stability of forest ecosystems. Recently, in the context of climate change, there is a raising question of sustainable forest management regarding carbon uptake. Aim of this research was to explore whether current close to nature forest management approach in Croatia can be considered sustainable in terms of carbon uptake throughout the life-time of Pedunculate oak forest. In state-owned managed forest a chronosequence experiment was set up and carbon stocks in main ecosystem pools (live biomass, dead wood, litter and mineral soil layer), main carbon fluxes (net primary production, soil respiration (SR), decomposition) and net ecosystem productivity were estimated in eight stands of different age (5, 13, 38, 53, 68, 108, 138 and 168 years) based on field measurements and published data. Air and soil temperature and soil moisture were recorded on 7 automatic mini-meteorological stations and weekly SR measurements were used to parameterize SR model. Carbon balance was estimated at weekly scale for the growing season 2011 (there was no harvesting), as well as throughout the normal rotation period of 140 years (harvesting was included). Carbon stocks in different ecosystem pools change during a stand development. Carbon stocks in forest floor increase with stand age, while carbon stocks in dead wood are highest in young and older stands, and lowest in middle-aged, mature stands. Carbon stocks in mineral soil layer were found to be stable across chronosequence with no statistically significant age-dependent trend. Pedunculate Oak stand, assuming successful regeneration, becomes carbon sink very early in a development phase, between the age of 5 and 13 years, and remains carbon sink even after the age of 160 years. Greatest carbon sink was reached in the stand aged 53 years. Obtained results

  19. The Price of Snow: Valuing Albedo as an Ecosystem Service in Northeastern Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D. A.; Howarth, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Surface albedo is a property of forests that provides an important climate regulating ecosystem service, particularly in environments where snow is frequent. In some cases, the influence of albedo can equal and surpass the climatic benefits of carbon sequestration from forest growth. However, no current climate mitigation platforms consider albedo in their framework. Therefore, it is essential to integrate these two climatic services in an economic context for the effective design and implementation of forestry climate projects. Here we place an economic value on albedo-related shortwave radiation through the use of shadow prices derived from an integrated assessment model (DICE). We then examine the potential impact of this value on optimal forest rotation in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire using an ecological and economic forest model. Our results suggest that including albedo can shorten optimal rotation periods significantly compared to scenarios where only timber and carbon are considered. For instance, in spruce-fir stands, very short rotation periods of just 25 years become economically optimal. Annual snowfall and productivity were important variables in assessing the net benefits of albedo in forested environments. Therefore, in high latitude forests with low carbon storage and high snowfall, we expect optimal rotation periods to approach zero, indicating that these forests should be maintained instead as open fields for optimal climatic benefits, which may have serious implications for biodiversity and biogeochemical cycling in these areas.

  20. Wildfires, Ecosystem Services, and Biodiversity in Tropical Dry Forest in India.

    PubMed

    Schmerbeck, Joachim; Fiener, Peter

    2015-08-01

    This review is intended to contribute to the understanding of the interlinkage between wildfire in India's tropical dry forest (TDF) and selected ecosystem services (ES), namely forest provisioning and water regulating services, as well as biodiversity. TDF covers approximately 146,000 km(2) (4.4%) of India, whereas according to the MODIS fire product about 2200 km(2) (1.4%) burns per year. As studies on wildfire effects upon ESs and biodiversity in Indian TDFs are rare we partly transferred findings from other (dry) forest areas to the environmental situation in India. In India (intentionally lit) wildfires have a very important connection to local livelihoods and the availability of non-wood forest products. Very important adverse long-term effects are the deterioration of forest ecosystems and soil degradation. The potential for TDF to regulate hydrological cycles is expected to be greater in the absence of fire than with it. A general judgment on the effect of fire on biodiversity is difficult as it depends on the community and species involved but a loss of biodiversity under regular burnings is apparent. Consequently, forest managers need sound knowledge regarding the interplay of wildfires and ecosystem behavior in general and more specific knowledge regarding the effects on taxa being considered for conservation efforts. Generally, much more research is needed to understand the trade-offs between the short-term benefits gained from forest provisioning services and long-term adverse effects. PMID:25900601

  1. Wildfires, Ecosystem Services, and Biodiversity in Tropical Dry Forest in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerbeck, Joachim; Fiener, Peter

    2015-08-01

    This review is intended to contribute to the understanding of the interlinkage between wildfire in India's tropical dry forest (TDF) and selected ecosystem services (ES), namely forest provisioning and water regulating services, as well as biodiversity. TDF covers approximately 146,000 km2 (4.4 %) of India, whereas according to the MODIS fire product about 2200 km2 (1.4 %) burns per year. As studies on wildfire effects upon ESs and biodiversity in Indian TDFs are rare we partly transferred findings from other (dry) forest areas to the environmental situation in India. In India (intentionally lit) wildfires have a very important connection to local livelihoods and the availability of non-wood forest products. Very important adverse long-term effects are the deterioration of forest ecosystems and soil degradation. The potential for TDF to regulate hydrological cycles is expected to be greater in the absence of fire than with it. A general judgment on the effect of fire on biodiversity is difficult as it depends on the community and species involved but a loss of biodiversity under regular burnings is apparent. Consequently, forest managers need sound knowledge regarding the interplay of wildfires and ecosystem behavior in general and more specific knowledge regarding the effects on taxa being considered for conservation efforts. Generally, much more research is needed to understand the trade-offs between the short-term benefits gained from forest provisioning services and long-term adverse effects.

  2. Variability in stream nitrogen at US Forest Service Experimental Forests and relevance to proposed stream nutrient criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Argerich, A.; Edwards, P.; Greathouse, E.; Ice, G. G.; Knoepp, J.; Amatya, D. M.; Wohlgemuth, P. M.; Wright, D.

    2011-12-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are attempting to develop criteria that will help monitor and sustain delivery of clean water and protect aquatic ecosystems. However, the factors that control stream nitrogen export are not well enough understood to meet this challenge. A number of approaches to generate and assess numeric nutrient criteria are underway; some combination of high-frequency monitoring of well-characterized sites and spatially extensive synoptic sampling will likely be needed to capture the dominant sources of variability. The US Forest Service Experimental Forest and Range Network measures stream chemistry weekly to monthly at sites in untreated forest catchments across the USA. Originally designed to evaluate the effects of forest practices and other disturbances across a broad range of catchment size, vegetation, soil and climate conditions, these stream chemistry records are also pertinent to discussions of nutrient criteria. We examined a decade of stream nitrate and total nitrogen concentrations from 19 reference catchments at 8 Experimental Forest sites relative to stream N criteria under consideration by the US EPA and state regulatory agencies. Stream N concentrations exceeded draft criteria to varying extents at all sites. At two forests in the central and western US that are exposed to high atmospheric N deposition, stream nitrate-N consistently surpassed draft criteria. For a third of the remaining catchments, stream nitrate exceeded proposed criteria in >20% of the samples. During summer, total N typically reached peak concentrations when for most sites nitrate concentrations were at their lowest levels. At individual Experimental Forests, stream nitrate varied as much as 2- to 10-fold among catchments in a given season. Differences in physical characteristics and natural disturbance history often outweigh seasonal and regional sources of variability among these reference catchments. Such local variability

  3. Avian research on U.S. Forest Service Experimental Forests and Ranges: Emergent themes, opportunities, and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoleson, S.H.; King, D.I.; Tomosy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1908, U.S. Forest Service Experimental Forests and Ranges have been dedicated to long-term interdisciplinary research on a variety of ecological and management questions. They encompass a wide diversity of life zones and ecoregions, and provide access to research infrastructure, opportunities for controlled manipulations, and integration with other types of long-term data. These features have facilitated important advances in a number of areas of avian research, including furthering our understanding of population dynamics, the effects of forest management on birds, avian responses to disturbances such as fire and hurricanes, and other aspects of avian ecology and conservation. However, despite these contributions, this invaluable resource has been underutilized by ornithologists. Most of the Experimental Forests and Ranges have had no ornithological work done on them. We encourage the ornithological community, especially graduate students and new faculty, to take advantage of this largely untapped potential for long-term work, linkage with long-term data sets, multiple disciplines, and active forest management. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Westwide forest inventory data base: User`s manual. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Woudenberg, S.W.; Farrenkopf, T.O.

    1995-06-01

    Describes the standard Westwide data base (WWDB) structure. This computer file structure was developed to provide consistent data on the forest resources of the Western United States. These data files are available to the public.

  5. Lake states regional forest resources assessments: Technical papers. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, H.H.; Vasievich, J.M.

    1997-07-23

    Contains 21 technical working papers prepared for the Lake States regional forest resources assessment, Lake States Forestry Alliance 1995. They represent significant contributions from many individuals and organizations and form the technical background for the Assessment.

  6. Flora of the Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, S.J.; Shepperd, W.D.; Reichert, D.W.; Cone, M.A.

    1993-08-01

    The report lists 441 vascular plant taxa in 228 genera and 63 families encountered on the 9,300-ha Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado. Synonyms appearing in previous publications and other works pertaining to the Fraser Experimental Forest, as well as appropriate Colorado floras and less-technical field guides, are included. Plant communities and habitats are discussed, and a list of 54 lichens is also presented. A glossary of related terms is included.

  7. 77 FR 68819 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Ozark...: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis...

  8. 78 FR 59953 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Coconino National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service... Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest...

  9. 77 FR 68821 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Ozark...: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis...

  10. 77 FR 68822 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Ozark...: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis...

  11. Project risk and appeals in U.S. Forest Service planning

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Marc J.; Predmore, S. Andrew; Morse, Wayde C.; Seesholtz, David N.

    2013-09-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires U.S. Forest Service planning processes to be conducted by interdisciplinary teams of resource specialists to analyze and disclose the likely environmental impacts of proposed natural resource management actions on Forest Service lands. Multiple challenges associated with these processes have been a source of frustration for the agency. One of these challenges involves administrative appeals through which public entities can challenge a Forest Service decision following a NEPA process. These appeals instigate an internal review process and can result in an affirmation of the Forest Service decision, a reversal of that decision, or additional work that re-initiates all or part of the NEPA process. We examine the best predictors of appeals and their outcomes on a representative sample of 489 Forest Service NEPA processes that were decided between 2007 and 2009. While certain factors associated with pre-existing social contexts (such as a history of controversy) or pre-determined elements of a proposed action (such as the extraction of forest products) predispose certain processes to a higher risk of appeals, other practices and process-related strategies within the control of the agency also appear to bear meaningful influence on the occurrence of appeals and their outcomes. Appeals and their outcomes were most strongly related to programmatic, structural (turnover of personnel in particular), and relationship risks (both internal and external) within the processes, suggesting the need for greater focus within the agency on cultivating positive internal and external relationships to manage the risk of appeals. -- Highlights: ► We examined appeals and their outcomes on 489 U.S. Forest Service NEPA processes. ► Project type, context, team turnover, and personal relationships predicted appeals. ► External relationship management and staff turnover best predicted appeal outcomes. ► Positive internal and

  12. Potential of VIIRS Time Series Data for Aiding the USDA Forest Service Early Warning System for Forest Health Threats: A Gypsy Moth Defoliation Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ryan, Robert E.; McKellip, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    The Healthy Forest Restoration Act of 2003 mandated that a national forest threat Early Warning System (EWS) be developed. The USFS (USDA Forest Service) is currently building this EWS. NASA is helping the USFS to integrate remotely sensed data into the EWS, including MODIS data for monitoring forest disturbance at broad regional scales. This RPC experiment assesses the potential of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data for contribution to the EWS. In doing so, the RPC project employed multitemporal simulated VIIRS and MODIS data for detecting and monitoring forest defoliation from the non-native Eurasian gypsy moth (Lymantria despar). Gypsy moth is an invasive species threatening eastern U.S. hardwood forests. It is one of eight major forest insect threats listed in the Healthy Forest Restoration Act of 2003. This RPC experiment is relevant to several nationally important mapping applications, including carbon management, ecological forecasting, coastal management, and disaster management

  13. Stand hazard rating for central idaho forests. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R.; Williams, R.E.; Weatherby, J.C.; Reinhardt, E.D.; Hoffman, J.T.

    1996-03-01

    Growing concern over sustainability of central Idaho forests has created a need to assess the health of forest stands on a relative basis. A stand hazard rating was developed as a composite of 11 individual ratings to compare the health hazards of different stands. The composite rating includes Douglas-fire bettle, mountain pine beetle, western pine beetle, spruce beetle, Douglas-fire tussock moth, western spruce budworm, dwarf mistletoes, annosus root disease, Swhweinitzii root and butt rot, and wildfire. The interacting effects of these agents were also considered.

  14. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  15. National forest trail users: Planning for recreation opportunities. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Daigle, J.J.; Watson, A.E.; Haas, G.E.

    1994-03-01

    National forest trail users in four geographical regions of the United States are described based on participation in clusters of recreation activities. Visitors are classified into day hiking, undeveloped recreation, and two developed camping and hiking activity clusters for the Appalachian, Pacific, Rocky Mountain, and Southwestern regions. Distance and time traveled to national forest sites from home varied for activity clusters. Length of time at the site varied across activity clusters. Recreation activities combined with home range allows for assessing relative availability of, and demand for, different types of place-related opportunities and experiences users seek within a particular region.

  16. 77 FR 57113 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Arapaho and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ..., Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forest and Pawnee National Grasslands, Fort Collins, CO AGENCY: National... Service, Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forest and the Pawnee National Grassland (ARP) has completed an... National Forest and Pawnee National Grasslands, 2150 Centre Avenue, Building E, Fort Collins, CO...

  17. Forest statistics for east Texas counties, 1992. Forest Service Resource Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.E.; Hartsell, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    The report contains statistical tables and figures derived from data obtained during a recent inventory of east Texas. The multiresource inventory included 43 counties and two survey regions. Classification of forest-nonforest points was accomplished, each representing approximately 230 acres. The sampling methods are designed to achieve suitable sampling errors for estimates of area and volume at the State level.

  18. Timber resource of the superior national forest. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, N.P.; Ramquist, J.

    1993-01-01

    Contents: forest area; timber volume; timber growth and removals; appendix; (accuracy of the survey, survey procedures, comparing minnesota's fifth inventory with the fourth inventory, log grade, metric equivalents of units used in the report, tree species groups in minnesota, definition of terms, and tables).

  19. Remote Sensing: A valuable tool in the Forest Service decision making process. [in Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, F. L.

    1975-01-01

    Forest Service studies for integrating remotely sensed data into existing information systems highlight a need to: (1) re-examine present methods of collecting and organizing data, (2) develop an integrated information system for rapidly processing and interpreting data, (3) apply existing technological tools in new ways, and (4) provide accurate and timely information for making right management decisions. The Forest Service developed an integrated information system using remote sensors, microdensitometers, computer hardware and software, and interactive accessories. Their efforts substantially reduce the time it takes for collecting and processing data.

  20. Upland forests of the American/Pacific islands: Research opportunities in Micronesia and American Samoa. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    DeBell, D.S.; Whitesell, C.D.

    1993-07-01

    The Upland forests of Micronesia and American Samoa can provide many social, ecological, and esthetic benefits for island inhabitants. Substantial upland areas (the majority of acreage on some islands) are now occupied by secondary and grassland/savanna vegetation: such areas represent opportunities for restoration, with both native forest cover and plantations of introduced species. The review briefly describes characteristics of the islands and the nature of existing and potential upland forests, including the most common upland tree species. Principal information needs and research opportunities are discussed for 10 subjects: watershed rehabilitation, forest restoration in secondary vegetation areas, basic ecology, soils and nutrient relationships, damaging agents, forest inventory and productivity assessment, silvicultural systems, valuation of forest products and services, threatened and endangered species, and description and protection of native forest habitats.

  1. Collaboration between the US Forest Service and the USDA Agricultural Research Service on the complementary conservation of crop wild relatives in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two USDA agencies, the Forest Service (USFS) and the Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) are cooperating on the complementary conservation of crop wild relatives (CWR) native to the United States. The USFS manages 193 million acres of National Forest System lands in 43 states and provides suppo...

  2. Chicago's evolving urban forest: Initial report of the Chicago Urban Forest Climate Project, 1993. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, E.G.; Nowak, D.J.; Sacamano, P.L.; Prichard, S.E.; Makra, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    The report traces the history of Chicago's landscape as it has evolved from a mixture of prairie, wetlands, and oak-hickory forests into a major metropolis. An analysis of 1987 aerial photographs indicates that Chicago-area tree cover has increased from a presettlement level of about 13 percent to nearly 20 percent today. Street trees predominate in Chicago's residential areas, where buildings and paving restrict tree cover in many off-street locations. Larger percentages of tree cover were found for off-street trees in suburban Cook and DuPage Counties. Chicago's urban climate is associated with increases in rainfall and flooding, summertime temperatures and air conditioning use, and unhealthy levels of ozone. The potential of urban vegetation to improve environmental quality is reviewed and the Chicago urban Forest Climate Project research plan is described.

  3. Consume users guide. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ottmar, R.D.; Burns, M.F.; Hall, J.N.; Hanson, A.D.

    1993-01-01

    CONSUME is a user-friendly computer program designed for resource managers with some working knowledge of IBM-PC applications. The software predicts the amount of fuel consumption on logged units based on weather data, the amount and fuel moisture of fuels, and a number of other factors. Using these predictions, the resource manager can accurately determine when and where to conduct a prescribed burn to achieve desired objectives, while reducing impacts on other resources. CONSUME can be used for most broadcast and underburns on forested lands in the western states if the woody fuels are relatively homogeneous and composed of Douglas-fir, hemlock, alder, lodgepole pine, or mixed conifer species.

  4. Forest statistics for north Mississippi counties, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Faulkner, J.L.; Miller, P.E.; Hartsell, A.J.; London, J.D.

    1993-06-01

    The report includes tabulated results which were derived from data obtained during a 1994 forest inventory of north Mississippi counties. Field work was conducted from December 1992 to May 1993. The major change affecting the 1994 inventory is the modified tree classification system that has been in effect since the 1988 inventory of Arkansas. Changes in the forest resources of north Mississippi are evident. Timberland area increased 10 percent, and the area in pine plantations showed a large increase. Sapling-seedling stands now constitute the greatest portion of the timberland base. Removals of all live trees increased significantly during this period. This reveals a change over the previous period from an increasing inventory to a decreasing inventory.

  5. EO Underpinning the Quality of Ecosystem Services with Geospatial Data- The Case of Sustainable Forest Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosthwaite Eyre, Charles

    2010-12-01

    Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) is an exciting and expanding opportunity for sustainably managed forests. PES are derived from a range of ecosystem benefits from forests including climate change mitigation through afforestation and avoided deforestation, green power generation, wetland and watershed rehabilitation, water quality improvement, marine flood defence and the reduction in desertification and soil erosion. Forests are also the ancestral home to many vulnerable communities which need protection. Sustainable forest management plays a key role in many of these services which generates a potentially critical source of finance. However, for forests to realise revenues from these PES, they must meet demanding standards of project validation and service verification. They also need geospatial data to manage and monitor operational risk. In many cases the data is difficult to collect on the ground - in some cases impossible. This will create a new demand for data that must be impartial, timely, area wide, accurate and cost effective. This presentation will highlight the unique capacity of EO to provide these geospatial inputs required in the generation of PES from forestry and demonstrate products with practical examples.

  6. Measuring ecosystem capacity to provide regulating services: forest removal and recovery at Hubbard Brook (USA).

    PubMed

    Beier, Colin M; Caputo, Jesse; Groffman, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    In this study, by coupling long-term ecological data with empirical proxies of societal demand for benefits, we measured the capacity of forest watersheds to provide ecosystem services over variable time periods, to different beneficiaries, and in response to discrete perturbations and drivers of change. We revisited one of the earliest ecosystem experiments in North America: the 1963 de-vegetation of a forested catchment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. Potential benefits of the regulation of water flow, water quality, greenhouse gases, and forest growth were compared between experimental (WS 2) and reference (WS 6) watersheds over a 30-year period. Both watersheds exhibited similarly high capacity for flow regulation, in part because functional loads remained low (i.e., few major storm events) during the de-vegetation period. Drought mitigation capacity, or the maintenance of flows sufficient to satisfy municipal water consumption, was higher in WS 2 due to reduced evapotranspiration associated with loss of plant cover. We also assessed watershed capacity to regulate flows to satisfy different beneficiaries, including hypothetical flood averse and drought averse types. Capacity to regulate water quality was severely degraded during de-vegetation, as nitrate concentrations exceeded drinking water standards on 40% of measurement days. Once forest regeneration began, WS 2 rapidly recovered the capacity to provide safe drinking water, and subsequently mitigated the eutrophication potential of rainwater at a marginally higher level than WS 6. We estimated this additional pollution removal benefit would have to accrue for approximately 65-70 years to offset the net eutrophication cost incurred during forest removal. Overall, our results affirmed the critical role of forest vegetation in water regulation, but also indicated trade-offs associated with forest removal and recovery that partially depend on larger-scale exogenous changes in climate

  7. 75 FR 70026 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service... funerary objects in the possession and control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest...

  8. PREFER: a European service providing forest fire management support products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftychidis, George; Laneve, Giovanni; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Sebastian Lopez, Ana; Lourenco, Louciano; Clandillon, Stephen; Tampellini, Lucia; Hirn, Barbara; Diagourtas, Dimitris; Leventakis, George

    2015-06-01

    PREFER is a Copernicus project of the EC-FP7 program which aims developing spatial information products that may support fire prevention and burned areas restoration decisions and establish a relevant web-based regional service for making these products available to fire management stakeholders. The service focuses to the Mediterranean region, where fire risk is high and damages from wildfires are quite important, and develop its products for pilot areas located in Spain, Portugal, Italy, France and Greece. PREFER aims to allow fire managers to have access to online resources, which shall facilitate fire prevention measures, fire hazard and risk assessment, estimation of fire impact and damages caused by wildfire as well as support monitoring of post-fire regeneration and vegetation recovery. It makes use of a variety of products delivered by space borne sensors and develop seasonal and daily products using multi-payload, multi-scale and multi-temporal analysis of EO data. The PREFER Service portfolio consists of two main suite of products. The first refers to mapping products for supporting decisions concerning the Preparedness/Prevention Phase (ISP Service). The service delivers Fuel, Hazard and Fire risk maps for this purpose. Furthermore the PREFER portfolio includes Post-fire vegetation recovery, burn scar maps, damage severity and 3D fire damage assessment products in order to support relative assessments required in context of the Recovery/Reconstruction Phase (ISR Service) of fire management.

  9. Costa Rican environmental service payments: The use of a financial instrument in participatory forest management.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Miriam; Dieperink, Carel; Glasbergen, Pieter

    2006-10-01

    The core element of the Costa Rican forestry policy is a financial instrument called the environmental service payment. This instrument rewards forest owners for the environmental services (the mitigation of greenhouse gases, the protection of watersheds and scenic beauty, and the development of biodiversity) their forests provide. In this article, the experiences with this new instrument are analyzed by focusing on the way interests are represented and access is granted, the openness of information exchange, whether social learning occurred, and whether decision-making authority is shared. The analysis is based on a survey conducted in the Huetar Norte Region and on in-depth interviews with the major stakeholders. The Costa Rican case indicates that financial instruments can be used to share responsibilities and that stakeholders can successfully cooperate on forest issues. It also shows that such a participatory approach is only promising if certain cultural, economic, organizational, and political conditions are met. PMID:16933086

  10. Improving planting stock quality: The humboldt experience. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkinson, J.L.; Nelson, J.A.; Huddleston, M.E.

    1993-05-01

    A seedling testing program was developed to improve the survival and growth potential of planting stock produced in the USDA Forest Service Humboldt Nursery, situated on the Pacific Coast in northern California. Coastal and inland seed sources of Douglas-fir and eight other conifers in the Pacific Slope forests of western Oregon and northern California were assessed in both nursery and field studies. Seedling top and root growth capacities were evaluated just after lifting and after cold storage, and stored seedlings were tested for suvival and growth on cleared planting sites in the seed zones of origin. Safe lifting and cold storage schedules were defined, and seedling cultural regimes were formulated to produce successful 1-0, 1-1, and 2-0 stock types. Testing deomonstrated the critical elements of reforestation and proved that rapid establishment is attainable on diverse sites. Accomplishments of the Humboldt program recommended similar programs for other forest nurseries and their service regions.

  11. US forest service technical cooperation visit Badia Rangeland and irrigation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A US Forest Service (USFS) team comprised of a rangeland management advisor, a dryland water resource, and irrigation specialist, and a Middle East program specialist visited Jordan to provide technical assistance to the Ministry of Agriculture-Water Harvesting Directorate (MoA) and the Hashemite Fu...

  12. Opportunities in Manpower Training Programs for the Forest Service and Its Cooperators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Manpower programs in which the U.S. Forest Service can participate are identified in this booklet, and methods and procedures for initiating programs in the interest of meeting the needs of rural areas are explained. Major divisions of the document are Overall Planning, Program Sponsorship, The Program-Operation Mainstream, Manpower Development…

  13. Managing pinon-juniper ecosystems for sustainability and social needs. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Aldon, E.F.; Shaw, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of the symposium was to assist the USDA Forest Service, other federal land management agencies, and the New Mexico State Land Office in the future development and management of the pinon-juniper ecosystem in the Southwest. Authors assessed the current state of knowledge about the pinon-juniper resources and helped develop future research and management goals.

  14. Woody biomass resource of Louisiana, 1991. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1993-09-01

    Data from the 1991 Louisiana forest survey were used to derive fresh and dry biomass estimates for all trees, on timberland, greater than 1.0 inch in diameter at breast height (d.b.h.). There are 470.0 million fresh tons in softwood species and 757.5 million fresh tons in hardwood species. The woody biomass resource averages 45.9 and 61.9 tons per acre for softwoods and hardwoods where they occur, respectively. Most of this biomass is in the stem portion of the trees--85 percent for softwoods and 75 percent for hardwoods. Nonindustrial private landowners hold 58 and 69 percent of the total softwood and hardwood biomass resource, respectively.

  15. Annotated bibliography of thinning literature. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, B.J.

    1992-12-01

    The bibliography is a general review of thinning, with an emphasis on harvesting in the Southern United States. The bibliography was developed to aid the decision-making process of foresters and as a basis for continued research on thinning of pine stands. Much information is available for the formulation of policies and strategies, as well as for the premises of innovative concepts and ideas. Some silvicultural aspects are included, but these are not intensively reviewed. References were compiled from many sources. Abstracts and associated information are included for each publication. The citations are displayed in computer fields. Publications are listed alphabetically by primary author, and an index by year, keywords, and author has been included.

  16. Estate planning for forest landowners. What will become of your timberland. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, H.L.; Siegel, W.C.

    1993-09-01

    The book's purpose is to provide guidelines and assistance to nonindustrial private woodland owners in applying estate planning techniques to their forest properties. It presents a working knowledge of the Federal estate and gift tax law as it relates to timberland ownership. The unique character of timber assets is addressed in terms of tree farm estate planning goals. The book has four major parts plus a glossary, selected tax forms, and a list of additional readings. The foundation for estate planning is developed in part I. The general estate planning tools are explained in part II and integrated with forestry examples. Part III is concerned with forestry-specific estate planning tools.

  17. Suggested stocking levels for forest stands in northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, P.H.; Geist, J.M.; Clemens, D.L.; Clausnitzer, R.R.; Powell, D.C.

    1994-04-01

    Catastrophes and manipulation of stocking levels are primary determinants of stand development and the appearance of future forest landscapes. Managers need stocking level guides particularly for sites incapable of supporting stocking levels presented in normal yield tables. To take advantage of information currently available the authors used some assumptions to relate growth basal area (GBA) to stand density index (SDI) and then create stocking level curves for use in northeastern Oregon and southeastern Washington. Use of these curves cannot be expected to eliminate all insect and disease problems, but the impact of mountain pine beetle should be moderated.

  18. Possibilities of a Personal Laser Scanning System for Forest Mapping and Ecosystem Services

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xinlian; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Wang, Yunsheng

    2014-01-01

    A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS) system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH) was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking. PMID:24434879

  19. Threats and knowledge gaps for ecosystem services provided by kelp forests: a northeast Atlantic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Smale, Dan A; Burrows, Michael T; Moore, Pippa; O'Connor, Nessa; Hawkins, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Kelp forests along temperate and polar coastlines represent some of most diverse and productive habitats on the Earth. Here, we synthesize information from >60 years of research on the structure and functioning of kelp forest habitats in European waters, with particular emphasis on the coasts of UK and Ireland, which represents an important biogeographic transition zone that is subjected to multiple threats and stressors. We collated existing data on kelp distribution and abundance and reanalyzed these data to describe the structure of kelp forests along a spatial gradient spanning more than 10° of latitude. We then examined ecological goods and services provided by kelp forests, including elevated secondary production, nutrient cycling, energy capture and flow, coastal defense, direct applications, and biodiversity repositories, before discussing current and future threats posed to kelp forests and identifying key knowledge gaps. Recent evidence unequivocally demonstrates that the structure of kelp forests in the NE Atlantic is changing in response to climate- and non-climate-related stressors, which will have major implications for the structure and functioning of coastal ecosystems. However, kelp-dominated habitats along much of the NE Atlantic coastline have been chronically understudied over recent decades in comparison with other regions such as Australasia and North America. The paucity of field-based research currently impedes our ability to conserve and manage these important ecosystems. Targeted observational and experimental research conducted over large spatial and temporal scales is urgently needed to address these knowledge gaps. PMID:24198956

  20. Possibilities of a personal laser scanning system for forest mapping and ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinlian; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Wang, Yunsheng

    2013-01-01

    A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS) system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH) was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking. PMID:24434879

  1. Influence of forest management systems on natural resource use and provision of ecosystem services in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Strauch, Ayron M; Rurai, Masegeri T; Almedom, Astier M

    2016-09-15

    Social, religious and economic facets of rural livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa are heavily dependent on natural resources, but improper resource management, drought, and social instability frequently lead to their unsustainable exploitation. In rural Tanzania, natural resources are often governed locally by informal systems of traditional resource management (TRM), defined as cultural practices developed within the context of social and religious institutions over hundreds of years. However, following independence from colonial rule, centralized governments began to exercise jurisdictional control over natural resources. Following decades of mismanagement that resulted in lost ecosystem services, communities demanded change. To improve resource protection and participation in management among stakeholders, the Tanzanian government began to decentralize management programs in the early 2000s. We investigated these two differing management approaches (traditional and decentralized government) in Sonjo communities, to examine local perceptions of resource governance, management influences on forest use, and their consequences for forest and water resources. While 97% of households understood the regulations governing traditionally-managed forests, this was true for only 39% of households for government-managed forests, leading to differences in forest use. Traditional management practices resulted in improved forest condition and surface water quality. This research provides an essential case study demonstrating the importance of TRM in shaping decision frameworks for natural resource planning and management. PMID:27203700

  2. Cost-effectiveness of dryland forest restoration evaluated by spatial analysis of ecosystem services

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Jennifer C.; Newton, Adrian C.; Aquino, Claudia Alvarez; Cantarello, Elena; Echeverría, Cristian; Kitzberger, Thomas; Schiappacasse, Ignacio; Garavito, Natalia Tejedor

    2010-01-01

    Although ecological restoration is widely used to combat environmental degradation, very few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of this approach. We examine the potential impact of forest restoration on the value of multiple ecosystem services across four dryland areas in Latin America, by estimating the net value of ecosystem service benefits under different reforestation scenarios. The values of selected ecosystem services were mapped under each scenario, supported by the use of a spatially explicit model of forest dynamics. We explored the economic potential of a change in land use from livestock grazing to restored native forest using different discount rates and performed a cost–benefit analysis of three restoration scenarios. Results show that passive restoration is cost-effective for all study areas on the basis of the services analyzed, whereas the benefits from active restoration are generally outweighed by the relatively high costs involved. These findings were found to be relatively insensitive to discount rate but were sensitive to the market value of carbon. Substantial variation in values was recorded between study areas, demonstrating that ecosystem service values are strongly context specific. However, spatial analysis enabled localized areas of net benefits to be identified, indicating the value of this approach for identifying the relative costs and benefits of restoration interventions across a landscape. PMID:21106761

  3. Cost-effectiveness of dryland forest restoration evaluated by spatial analysis of ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Birch, Jennifer C; Newton, Adrian C; Aquino, Claudia Alvarez; Cantarello, Elena; Echeverría, Cristian; Kitzberger, Thomas; Schiappacasse, Ignacio; Garavito, Natalia Tejedor

    2010-12-14

    Although ecological restoration is widely used to combat environmental degradation, very few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of this approach. We examine the potential impact of forest restoration on the value of multiple ecosystem services across four dryland areas in Latin America, by estimating the net value of ecosystem service benefits under different reforestation scenarios. The values of selected ecosystem services were mapped under each scenario, supported by the use of a spatially explicit model of forest dynamics. We explored the economic potential of a change in land use from livestock grazing to restored native forest using different discount rates and performed a cost-benefit analysis of three restoration scenarios. Results show that passive restoration is cost-effective for all study areas on the basis of the services analyzed, whereas the benefits from active restoration are generally outweighed by the relatively high costs involved. These findings were found to be relatively insensitive to discount rate but were sensitive to the market value of carbon. Substantial variation in values was recorded between study areas, demonstrating that ecosystem service values are strongly context specific. However, spatial analysis enabled localized areas of net benefits to be identified, indicating the value of this approach for identifying the relative costs and benefits of restoration interventions across a landscape. PMID:21106761

  4. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the...

  5. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the...

  6. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the...

  7. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Link to an... facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of...

  8. 47 CFR 17.58 - Facilities to be located on land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. 17.58 Section 17.58 Telecommunication... land under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Any... the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management shall include a statement that the...

  9. Hydrological services and biodiversity conservation under forestation scenarios: comparing options to improve watershed management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho-Santos, Claudia; Nunes, João Pedro; Sousa-Silva, Rita; Gonçalves, João; Pradinho Honrado, João

    2015-04-01

    Humans rely on ecosystems for the provision of hydrological services, namely water supply and water damage mitigation, and promoting forests is a widely used management strategy for the provision of hydrological services. Therefore, it is important to model how forests will contribute for this provision, taking into account the environmental characteristics of each region, as well as the spatio-temporal patterns of societal demand. In addition, ensuring forest protection and the delivery of forest ecosystem services is one of the aims included in the European Union biodiversity strategy to 2020. On the other hand, forest management for hydrological services must consider possible trade-offs with other services provision, as well as with biodiversity conservation. Accurate modeling and mapping of both hydrological services and biodiversity conservation value is thus important to support spatial planning and land management options involving forests. The objectives of this study were: to analyze the provision and spatial dynamics of hydrological services under two forest cover change scenarios (oak and eucalyptus/pine) compared to the current shrubland-dominated landscape; and to evaluate their spatial trade-offs with biodiversity conservation value. The Vez watershed (250km2), in northwest Portugal, was used as case-study area. SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) was applied to simulate the provision of hydrological services (water supply quantity, timing and quality; soil erosion and flood regulation), and was calibrated against daily discharge, sediments, nitrates and evapotranspiration. Good agreement was obtained between model predictions and field measurements. The maps for each service under the different scenarios were produced at the Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) level. Biodiversity conservation value was based on nature protection regimes and on expert valuation applied to a land cover map. Statistical correlations between hydrological services provision

  10. Forest statistics for the northern coastal plain of South Carolina, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.T.; Sheffield, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1986, the area of timberland in the Northern Coastal Plain of South Carolina increased by 3 percent to 4.7 million acres. Nonindustrial private forest landowners control 67 percent of the region's timberland. Area classified as a pine type remained stable at 1.9 million acres. More than 116,000 acres were harvested annually, while 177,000 acres were regenerated by artificial and natural means. The volume of softwood growing stock decreased 26 percent to 2.5 billion cubic feet. The volume of hardwood growing stock declined 13 percent to 3.1 billion cubic feet. Extremely high mortality drove net growth downward. Net annual growth of softwoods declined 84 percent to 28 million cubic feet. Hardwood growth dropped 77 percent to 23 million cubic feet. Annual removals of softwood growing stock increased 9 percent to 175 million cubic feet; hardwood removals jumped 18 percent to 87 million cubic feet. Annual mortality of softwood growing stock was up eight times the level recorded in 1986, whereas hardwood mortality was up four times the previous level.

  11. Ecosystem services of boreal forests - Carbon budget mapping at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Akujärvi, Anu; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Liski, Jari

    2016-10-01

    The carbon (C) cycle of forests produces ecosystem services (ES) such as climate regulation and timber production. Mapping these ES using simple land cover -based proxies might add remarkable inaccuracy to the estimates. A framework to map the current status of the C budget of boreal forested landscapes was developed. The C stocks of biomass and soil and the annual change in these stocks were quantified in a 20 × 20 m resolution at the regional level on mineral soils in southern Finland. The fine-scale variation of the estimates was analyzed geo-statistically. The reliability of the estimates was evaluated by comparing them to measurements from the national multi-source forest inventory. The C stocks of forests increased slightly from the south coast to inland whereas the changes in these stocks were more uniform. The spatial patches of C stocks were larger than those of C stock changes. The patch size of the C stocks reflected the spatial variation in the environmental conditions, and that of the C stock changes the typical area of forest management compartments. The simulated estimates agreed well with the measurements indicating a good mapping framework performance. The mapping framework is the basis for evaluating the effects of forest management alternatives on C budget at high resolution across large spatial scales. It will be coupled with the assessment of other ES and biodiversity to study their relationships. The framework integrated a wide suite of simulation models and extensive inventory data. It provided reliable estimates of the human influence on C cycle in forested landscapes. PMID:27420172

  12. Quantifying Forest Ecosystem Services Tradeoff—Coupled Ecological and Economic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.; Ling, P. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of the effect of carbon-related forestland management activities on ecosystem services is difficult, because knowledge about the dynamics of coupled social-ecological systems is lacking. Different forestland management activities, such as various amount, timing, and methods of harvesting, and natural disturbances events, such as wind and fires, create shocks and uncertainties to the forest carbon dynamics. A spatially explicit model, Landis-ii, was used to model the forest succession for different harvest management scenarios at the Grandfather District, North Carolina. In addition to harvest, the model takes into account of the impact of natural disturbances, such as fire and insects, and species competition. The result shows the storage of carbon in standing biomass and in wood product for each species for each scenario. In this study, optimization is used to analyze the maximum profit and the number of tree species that each forest landowner can gain at different prices of carbon, roundwood, and interest rates for different harvest management scenarios. Time series of roundwood production of different types were estimated using remote sensing data. Econometric analysis is done to understand the possible interaction and relations between the production of different types of roundwood and roundwood prices, which can indicate the possible planting scheme that a forest owner may make. This study quantifies the tradeoffs between carbon sequestration, roundwood production, and forest species diversity not only from an economic perspective, but also takes into account of the forest succession mechanism in a species-diverse region. The resulting economic impact on the forest landowners is likely to influence their future planting decision, which in turn, will influence the species composition and future revenue of the landowners.

  13. Modelling the role of forests on water provision services: a hydro-economic valuation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguería, S.; Campos, P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydro-economic models that allow integrating the ecological, hydrological, infrastructure, economic and social aspects into a coherent, scientifically- informed framework constitute preferred tools for supporting decision making in the context of integrated water resources management. We present a case study of water regulation and provision services of forests in the Andalusia region of Spain. Our model computes the physical water flows and conducts an economic environmental income and asset valuation of forest surface and underground water yield. Based on available hydrologic and economic data, we develop a comprehensive water account for all the forest lands at the regional scale. This forest water environmental valuation is integrated within a much larger project aiming at providing a robust and easily replicable accounting tool to evaluate yearly the total income and capital of forests, encompassing all measurable sources of private and public incomes (timber and cork production, auto-consumption, recreational activities, biodiversity conservation, carbon sequestration, water production, etc.). We also force our simulation with future socio-economic scenarios to quantify the physical and economic efects of expected trends or simulated public and private policies on future water resources. Only a comprehensive integrated tool may serve as a basis for the development of integrated policies, such as those internationally agreed and recommended for the management of water resources.

  14. Soil and water related forest ecosystem services and resilience of social ecological system in the Central Highlands of Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekalign, Meron; Muys, Bart; Nyssen, Jan; Poesen, Jean

    2014-05-01

    In the central highlands of Ethiopia, deforestation and forest degradation are occurring and accelerating during the last century. The high population pressure is the most repeatedly mentioned reason. However, in the past 30 years researchers agreed that the absence of institutions, which could define the access rights to particular forest resources, is another underlying cause of forest depletion and loss. Changing forest areas into different land use types is affecting the biodiversity, which is manifested through not proper functioning of ecosystem services. Menagesha Suba forest, the focus of this study has been explored from various perspectives. However the social dimension and its interaction with the ecology have been addressed rarely. This research uses a combined theoretical framework of Ecosystem Services and that of Resilience thinking for understanding the complex social-ecological interactions in the forest and its influence on ecosystem services. For understanding the history and extent of land use land cover changes, in-depth literature review and a GIS and remote sensing analysis will be made. The effect of forest conversion into plantation and agricultural lands on soil and above ground carbon sequestration, fuel wood and timber products delivery will be analyzed with the accounting of the services on five land use types. The four ecosystem services to be considered are Supporting, Provisioning, Regulating, and Cultural services as set by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. A resilience based participatory framework approach will be used to analyze how the social and ecological systems responded towards the drivers of change that occurred in the past. The framework also will be applied to predict future uncertainties. Finally this study will focus on the possible interventions that could contribute to the sustainable management and conservation of the forest. An ecosystem services trade-off analysis and an environmental valuation of the water

  15. Correlation and prediction of snow water equivalent from snow sensors. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, B.J.; Azuma, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1982, under an agreement between the California Department of Water Resources and the USDA Forest Service, snow sensors have been installed and operated in Forest Service-administered wilderness areas in the Sierra Nevada of California. Because analysis of snow water equivalent(SWE) data from these wilderness sensors would not be possible until just before they are due to be removed, surrogate pairs of high- and low-elevation snow sensors were selected to determine whether correlation and prediction might be achieved. Surrogate pairs of sensors with between 5 and 15 years of concurrent data were selected, and correlation and regression were used to examine the statistical feasibility of SWE prediction after removal of the wilderness sensors. Of the 10 pairs analyzed, two pairs achieved a correlation coefficient of 0.95 or greater.

  16. Wilderness threats matrix: A framework for assessing impacts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.N.

    1994-04-01

    The report includes the framework represented as a matrix of potential threats and attributes of wilderness character. Cells in the matrix represent the impacts of threats on each attribute. Potential application of the matrix are described. An application of the matrix to the wildernesses in the Forest Service's Northern Region (northern Idaho and Montana) suggests that fire management is the most significant threat to those wildernesses and that aquatic systems are the most threatened wilderness attribute.

  17. Toward a woody plant list for Antigua and Barbuda: Past and present. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, J.; Rivera, C.; Figureroa, J.

    1994-06-01

    Beginning in the 17th century, the forest lands of Antigua and Barbuda were cleared for agriculture, burned, cut over, and grazed severely. A survey by personnel of the USDA Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry and previous surveys were used to assemble lists of native and exotic woody plants. A large majority of the original woody flora still grows on both islands.

  18. 75 FR 44280 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Service, Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ, and American Museum of Natural History, New York City... National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ, and in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York... American Museum of Natural History and have been in the possession......

  19. The public water supply protection value of forests: A watershed-scale ecosystem services based upon total organic carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a cost-based methodology to assess the value of forested watersheds to improve water quality in public water supplies. The developed methodology is applicable to other source watersheds to determine ecosystem services for water quality. We assess the value of forest land for source wate...

  20. Vulnerability to climate-induced changes in ecosystem services of boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Maria; Rankinen, Katri; Aalto, Tuula; Akujärvi, Anu; Nadir Arslan, Ali; Liski, Jari; Markkanen, Tiina; Mäkelä, Annikki; Peltoniemi, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests provide an array of ecosystem services. They regulate climate, and carbon, water and nutrient fluxes, and provide renewable raw material, food, and recreational possibilities. Rapid climate warming is projected for the boreal zone, and has already been observed in Finland, which sets these services at risk. MONIMET (LIFE12 ENV/FI/000409, 2.9.2013 - 1.9.2017) is a project funded by EU Life programme about Climate Change Indicators and Vulnerability of Boreal Zone Applying Innovative Observation and Modeling Techniques. The coordinating beneficiary of the project is the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Associated beneficiaries are the Natural Resources Institute Finland, the Finnish Environment Institute and the University of Helsinki. In the MONIMET project, we use state-of-the-art models and new monitoring methods to investigate the impacts of a warming climate on the provision of ecosystem services of boreal forests. This poster presents results on carbon storage in soil and assessment of drought indices, as a preparation for assessing the vulnerability of society to climate-induced changes in ecosystem services. The risk of decreasing provision of ecosystem services depends on the sensitivity of the ecosystem as well as its exposure to climate stress. The vulnerability of society, in turn, depends on the risk of decreasing provision of a certain service in combination with society's demand for that service. In the next phase, we will look for solutions to challenges relating to the quantification of the demand for ecosystem services and differences in spatial extent and resolution of the information on future supply and demand.

  1. The spatial extent of change in tropical forest ecosystem services in the Amazon delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo Barbosa, C. C.; Atkinson, P.; Dearing, J.

    2014-12-01

    Deltas hold major economic potential due their strategic location, close to seas and inland waterways, thereby supporting intense economic activity. The increasing pace of human development activities in coastal deltas over the past five decades has also strained environmental resources and produced extensive economic and sociocultural impacts. The Amazon delta is located in the Amazon Basin, North Brazil, the largest river basin on Earth and also one of the least understood. A considerable segment of the population living in the Amazon delta is directly dependent on the local extraction of natural resources for their livelihood. Areas sparsely inhabited may be exploited with few negative consequences for the environment. However, increasing pressure on ecosystem services is amplified by large fluxes of immigrants from other parts of the country, especially from the semi-arid zone in Northeast Brazil to the lowland forests of the Amazon delta. Here we present partial results from a bigger research project. Therefore, the focus will be on presenting an overview of the current state, and the extent of changes on forest related ecosystem services in the Amazon delta over the last three decades. We aggregated a multitude of datasets, from a variety of sources, for example, from satellite imagery such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the Global Inventory Modelling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and climate datasets at meteorological station level from the Brazilian National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) and social and economic statistics data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) and from the Brazilian Institute of Applied Economic Research (IPEA). Through analysis of socioeconomic and satellite earth observation data we were able to produce and present spatially-explicit information with the current state and transition in forest cover and its impacts to forest

  2. Where Occupation and Environment Overlap: US Forest Service Worker Exposure to Libby Amphibole Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Martin; Butler, Corey; Berry, David; Wroble, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an evaluation of exposures to asbestiform amphibole, known as Libby Amphibole (LA), to personnel from the US Department of Agriculture-Forest Service (USFS) working in the Kootenai National Forest near a former vermiculite mine close to Libby, Montana. LA is associated with vermiculite that was obtained from this mine; mining and processing over many years have resulted in the spread of LA into the surrounding Kootenai Forest where it has been found in tree bark, soil, and forest floor litter. As a result of this and other contamination, Libby and surrounding areas have been designated a “Superfund” site by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This article describes the application of EPA methods for assessing cancer risks to NIOSH sampling results. Phase-contrast microscopy for airborne asbestos fiber evaluation was found to be less useful than transmission electron microscopy in the presence of interfering organic (plant) fibers. NIOSH Method 7402 was extended by examination of larger areas of the filter, but fiber counts remained low. There are differences between counting rules in NIOSH 7402 and the ISO method used by EPA but these are minor in the context of the uncertainty in concentration estimates from the low counts. Estimates for cancer risk are generally compatible with those previously estimated by the EPA. However, there are limitations to extrapolating these findings of low risk throughout the entire area and to tasks that were not evaluated. PMID:25715191

  3. Where occupation and environment overlap: US Forest Service worker exposure to Libby Amphibole fibers.

    PubMed

    Harper, Martin; Butler, Corey; Berry, David; Wroble, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an evaluation of exposures to asbestiform amphibole, known as Libby Amphibole (LA), to personnel from the US Department of Agriculture-Forest Service (USFS) working in the Kootenai National Forest near a former vermiculite mine close to Libby, Montana. LA is associated with vermiculite that was obtained from this mine; mining and processing over many years have resulted in the spread of LA into the surrounding Kootenai Forest where it has been found in tree bark, soil, and forest floor litter. As a result of this and other contamination, Libby and surrounding areas have been designated a "Superfund" site by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This article describes the application of EPA methods for assessing cancer risks to NIOSH sampling results. Phase-contrast microscopy for airborne asbestos fiber evaluation was found to be less useful than transmission electron microscopy in the presence of interfering organic (plant) fibers. NIOSH Method 7402 was extended by examination of larger areas of the filter, but fiber counts remained low. There are differences between counting rules in NIOSH 7402 and the ISO method used by EPA but these are minor in the context of the uncertainty in concentration estimates from the low counts. Estimates for cancer risk are generally compatible with those previously estimated by the EPA. However, there are limitations to extrapolating these findings of low risk throughout the entire area and to tasks that were not evaluated. PMID:25715191

  4. Land use impact on water quality: valuing forest services in terms of the water supply sector.

    PubMed

    Fiquepron, Julien; Garcia, Serge; Stenger, Anne

    2013-09-15

    The aim of this paper is to quantify the impact of the forest on raw water quality within the framework of other land uses. On the basis of measurements of quality parameters that were identified as being the most problematic (i.e., pesticides and nitrates), we modeled how water quality is influenced by land uses. In order to assess the benefits provided by the forest in terms of improved water quality, we used variations of drinking water prices that were determined by the operating costs of water supply services (WSS). Given the variability of links between forests and water quality, we chose to cover all of France using data observed in each administrative department (France is divided into 95 départements), including a description of WSS and information on land uses. We designed a model that describes the impact of land uses on water quality, as well as the operation of WSS and prices. This bioeconomic model was estimated by the generalized method of moments (GMM) to account for endogeneity and heteroscedasticity issues. We showed that the forest has a positive effect on raw water quality compared to other land uses, with an indirect impact on water prices, making them lower for consumers. PMID:23681358

  5. [Evaluation of ecosystem service values of the forests of Shennongjia Nature Reserve].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Jie; Wang, Shi-Chang; Peng, Hao; Li, Zhen-Qing

    2014-05-01

    As an ecological protected area for rare animals and plants in a subtropical forest zone, Shennongjia National Reserve plays an important role in the study of biodiversity in China. By using the market value, shade-price and opportunity-cost methods, the forest ecosystem service values of Shennongjia National Nature Reserve were evaluated, including forest production, recreation and culture, water conservation, soil conservation, gas regulation, environment purification, nutrient circulation and biodiversity conservation. The total value of the Shennongjia Nature Reserve was approximately 204.33 x 10(8) yuan RMB x a(-1). The values of the different functions were in order of biodiversity conservation (68.5%) > soil conservation (12.7%) > recreation and culture (4.9%) > gas regulation (4.8%) > forest production (4.2%) > water conservation (3.9%) > environment purification (0.7%) > nutrient circulation (0.3%). The values with respect to utility were in sequence of unused value (68.5%) > indirect value in use (22.4% ) > direct value in use (9.1%). PMID:25129946

  6. Ecosystem Services and Opportunity Costs Shift Spatial Priorities for Conserving Forest Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Schröter, Matthias; Rusch, Graciela M.; Barton, David N.; Blumentrath, Stefan; Nordén, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion of spatially explicit information on ecosystem services in conservation planning is a fairly new practice. This study analyses how the incorporation of ecosystem services as conservation features can affect conservation of forest biodiversity and how different opportunity cost constraints can change spatial priorities for conservation. We created spatially explicit cost-effective conservation scenarios for 59 forest biodiversity features and five ecosystem services in the county of Telemark (Norway) with the help of the heuristic optimisation planning software, Marxan with Zones. We combined a mix of conservation instruments where forestry is either completely (non-use zone) or partially restricted (partial use zone). Opportunity costs were measured in terms of foregone timber harvest, an important provisioning service in Telemark. Including a number of ecosystem services shifted priority conservation sites compared to a case where only biodiversity was considered, and increased the area of both the partial (+36.2%) and the non-use zone (+3.2%). Furthermore, opportunity costs increased (+6.6%), which suggests that ecosystem services may not be a side-benefit of biodiversity conservation in this area. Opportunity cost levels were systematically changed to analyse their effect on spatial conservation priorities. Conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services trades off against timber harvest. Currently designated nature reserves and landscape protection areas achieve a very low proportion (9.1%) of the conservation targets we set in our scenario, which illustrates the high importance given to timber production at present. A trade-off curve indicated that large marginal increases in conservation target achievement are possible when the budget for conservation is increased. Forty percent of the maximum hypothetical opportunity costs would yield an average conservation target achievement of 79%. PMID:25393951

  7. Hybrid MCDA Methods to Integrate Multiple Ecosystem Services in Forest Management Planning: A Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhde, Britta; Andreas Hahn, W.; Griess, Verena C.; Knoke, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a decision aid frequently used in the field of forest management planning. It includes the evaluation of multiple criteria such as the production of timber and non-timber forest products and tangible as well as intangible values of ecosystem services (ES). Hence, it is beneficial compared to those methods that take a purely financial perspective. Accordingly, MCDA methods are increasingly popular in the wide field of sustainability assessment. Hybrid approaches allow aggregating MCDA and, potentially, other decision-making techniques to make use of their individual benefits and leading to a more holistic view of the actual consequences that come with certain decisions. This review is providing a comprehensive overview of hybrid approaches that are used in forest management planning. Today, the scientific world is facing increasing challenges regarding the evaluation of ES and the trade-offs between them, for example between provisioning and regulating services. As the preferences of multiple stakeholders are essential to improve the decision process in multi-purpose forestry, participatory and hybrid approaches turn out to be of particular importance. Accordingly, hybrid methods show great potential for becoming most relevant in future decision making. Based on the review presented here, the development of models for the use in planning processes should focus on participatory modeling and the consideration of uncertainty regarding available information.

  8. Hybrid MCDA Methods to Integrate Multiple Ecosystem Services in Forest Management Planning: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Uhde, Britta; Hahn, W Andreas; Griess, Verena C; Knoke, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a decision aid frequently used in the field of forest management planning. It includes the evaluation of multiple criteria such as the production of timber and non-timber forest products and tangible as well as intangible values of ecosystem services (ES). Hence, it is beneficial compared to those methods that take a purely financial perspective. Accordingly, MCDA methods are increasingly popular in the wide field of sustainability assessment. Hybrid approaches allow aggregating MCDA and, potentially, other decision-making techniques to make use of their individual benefits and leading to a more holistic view of the actual consequences that come with certain decisions. This review is providing a comprehensive overview of hybrid approaches that are used in forest management planning. Today, the scientific world is facing increasing challenges regarding the evaluation of ES and the trade-offs between them, for example between provisioning and regulating services. As the preferences of multiple stakeholders are essential to improve the decision process in multi-purpose forestry, participatory and hybrid approaches turn out to be of particular importance. Accordingly, hybrid methods show great potential for becoming most relevant in future decision making. Based on the review presented here, the development of models for the use in planning processes should focus on participatory modeling and the consideration of uncertainty regarding available information. PMID:25896820

  9. Forest Ecosystem Processes at the Watershed Scale: Ecosystem services, feedback and evolution in developing mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Larry

    2010-05-01

    Mountain watersheds provide significant ecosystem services both locally and for surrounding regions, including the provision of freshwater, hydropower, carbon sequestration, habitat, forest products and recreational/aesthetic opportunities. The hydrologic connectivity along hillslopes in sloping terrain provides an upslope subsidy of water and nutrients to downslope ecosystem patches, producing characteristic ecosystem patterns of vegetation density and type, and soil biogeochemical cycling. Recent work suggests that optimal patterns of forest cover evolve along these flowpaths which maximize net primary productivity and carbon sequestration at the hillslope to catchment scale. These watersheds are under significant pressure from potential climate change, changes in forest management, increasing population and development, and increasing demand for water export. As water balance and flowpaths are altered by shifting weather patterns and new development, the spatial distribution and coupling of water, carbon and nutrient cycling will spur the evolution of different ecosystem patterns. These issues have both theoretical and practical implications for the coupling of water, carbon and nutrient cycling at the landscape level, and the potential to manage watersheds for bundled ecosystem services. If the spatial structure of the ecosystem spontaneously adjusts to maximize landscape level use of limiting resources, there may be trade-offs in the level of services provided. The well known carbon-for-water tradeoff reflects the growth of forests to maximize carbon uptake, but also transpiration which limits freshwater availability in many biomes. We provide examples of the response of bundled ecosystem services to climate and land use change in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States. These mountains have very high net primary productivity, biodiversity and water yields, and provide significant freshwater resources to surrounding regions. There has been a

  10. Ottawa's urban forest: A geospatial approach to data collection for the UFORE/i-Tree Eco ecosystem services valuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael D.

    The i-Tree Eco model, developed by the U.S. Forest Service, is commonly used to estimate the value of the urban forest and the ecosystem services trees provide. The model relies on field-based measurements to estimate ecosystem service values. However, the methods for collecting the field data required for the model can be extensive and costly for large areas, and data collection can thus be a barrier to implementing the model for many cities. This study investigated the use of geospatial technologies as a means to collect urban forest structure measurements within the City of Ottawa, Ontario. Results show that geospatial data collection methods can serve as a proxy for urban forest structure parameters required by i-Tree Eco. Valuations using the geospatial approach are shown to be less accurate than those developed from field-based data, but significantly less expensive. Planners must weigh the limitations of either approach when planning assessment projects.

  11. Natural disturbance impacts on ecosystem services and biodiversity in temperate and boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Thom, Dominik; Seidl, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    In many parts of the world forest disturbance regimes have intensified recently, and future climatic changes are expected to amplify this development further in the coming decades. These changes are increasingly challenging the main objectives of forest ecosystem management, which are to provide ecosystem services sustainably to society and maintain the biological diversity of forests. Yet a comprehensive understanding of how disturbances affect these primary goals of ecosystem management is still lacking. We conducted a global literature review on the impact of three of the most important disturbance agents (fire, wind, and bark beetles) on 13 different ecosystem services and three indicators of biodiversity in forests of the boreal, cool- and warm-temperate biomes. Our objectives were to (i) synthesize the effect of natural disturbances on a wide range of possible objectives of forest management, and (ii) investigate standardized effect sizes of disturbance for selected indicators via a quantitative meta-analysis. We screened a total of 1958 disturbance studies published between 1981 and 2013, and reviewed 478 in detail. We first investigated the overall effect of disturbances on individual ecosystem services and indicators of biodiversity by means of independence tests, and subsequently examined the effect size of disturbances on indicators of carbon storage and biodiversity by means of regression analysis. Additionally, we investigated the effect of commonly used approaches of disturbance management, i.e. salvage logging and prescribed burning. We found that disturbance impacts on ecosystem services are generally negative, an effect that was supported for all categories of ecosystem services, i.e. supporting, provisioning, regulating, and cultural services (P < 0.001). Indicators of biodiversity, i.e. species richness, habitat quality and diversity indices, on the other hand were found to be influenced positively by disturbance (P < 0.001). Our analyses thus

  12. Divergence of ecosystem services in U.S. National Forests and Grasslands under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ge; Duan, Kai; Sun, Shanlei; Caldwell, Peter; Cohen, Erika; McNulty, Steven; Zhang, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The 170 National Forests and Grasslands (NFs) in the conterminous United States are public lands that provide important ecosystem services such as clean water and timber supply to the American people. This modeling study investigates the potential impacts of climate change on two key ecosystem functions (i.e., water yield and ecosystem productivity) using the most recent climate projections derived from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We find that future climate change may result in a significant reduction in water yield but an increase in forest productivity in NFs. On average, gross ecosystem productivity is projected to increase by 76 ~ 229 g C m-2 yr-1 (8% ~ 24%) while water yield is projected to decrease by 18 ~ 31 mm yr-1 (4% ~ 7%) by 2100 as a result of the combination of increased air temperature (+1.8 ~ +5.2 ℃) and precipitation (+17 ~ +51 mm yr-1). The notable divergence in ecosystem services of water supply and carbon sequestration is expected to intensify under higher greenhouse gas emission and associated climate change in the future, posing greater challenges to managing NFs for both ecosystem services.

  13. Tradeoffs between Three Forest Ecosystem Services across the State of New Hampshire, USA: Timber, Carbon, and Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D. A.; Burakowski, E. A.; Murphy, M. B.; Borsuk, M. E.; Niemiec, R. M.; Howarth, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Albedo is an important physical property of the land surface which influences the total amount of incoming solar radiation that is reflected back into space. It is a critical ecosystem service that helps regulate the Earth's energy balance and, in the context of climate mitigation, has been shown to have a strong influence on the overall effectiveness of land management schemes designed to counteract climate change. Previously, we demonstrated that incorporating the physical effects of albedo into an ecological economic forest model of locations in the White Mountain National Forest, in New Hampshire, USA, leads to a substantially shorter optimal rotation period for forest harvest than under a carbon- and timber-only approach. In this study, we investigate similar tradeoffs at 565 sites across the entire state of New Hampshire in a variety of different forest types, latitudes, and elevations. Additionally, we use a regression tree approach to calculate the influence of biogeochemical and physical factors on the optimal rotation period. Our results suggest that in many instances, incorporating albedo may lead to optimal rotation times approaching zero, or, perpetual clear-cut. Overall, the difference between growing season and winter-time albedo for forested and harvested states was the most significant variable influencing the rotation period, followed by timber stumpage price, and biomass growth rate. These results provide an initial understanding of tradeoffs amongst these three ecosystem services and provide guidance for forest managers as to the relative important properties of their forests when these three services are incentivized economically.

  14. 76 FR 43718 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Federal Register for these sites (63 FR 39293-39294, July 22, 1998; 70 FR 44686-44687, August 3, 2005; 70 FR 56483-56484, September 27, 2005; and 71 FR 38413, July 6, 2006). The human remains and associated... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  15. Historical and current roles of insects and pathogens in eastern Oregon and Washington forested landscapes. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hessburg, P.F.; Mitchell, R.G.; Filip, G.M.

    1994-04-01

    The paper examines, by climax conifer series, historical and current roles of many important pathogens and insects of interior Northwest coniferious forests and their unique responses to changing successional conditions resulting from management. Future research on forest pathogens and insects should address three primary subject areas: insect and pathogen population dynamics in managed and unmanaged forests; ecological roles and effects of native and introduced pathogens and insects; and effects of natural disturbances and management practices on native insects, pathogens, and their natural enemies.

  16. Tracking changes in the susceptibility of forest land infested with gypsy moth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Gansner, D.A.; Quimby, J.W.; King, S.L.; Arner, S.L.; Drake, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The report questions the forest land subject to intensive outbreaks of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) which become less susceptible to defoliation. A model for estimating the lifelihood of gypsy moth defoliation has been developed and validated. It was applied to forest-inventory plot data to quantity trends in the susceptibility of forest land in south-central Pennsylvania during a period of intensive infestation. Results show that even though susceptibility of the region's forest apparently has declined, the potential for future infestations remains relatively high.

  17. Lessons from community-based payment for ecosystem service schemes: from forests to rangelands.

    PubMed

    Dougill, Andrew J; Stringer, Lindsay C; Leventon, Julia; Riddell, Mike; Rueff, Henri; Spracklen, Dominick V; Butt, Edward

    2012-11-19

    Climate finance investments and international policy are driving new community-based projects incorporating payments for ecosystem services (PES) to simultaneously store carbon and generate livelihood benefits. Most community-based PES (CB-PES) research focuses on forest areas. Rangelands, which store globally significant quantities of carbon and support many of the world's poor, have seen little CB-PES research attention, despite benefitting from several decades of community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) projects. Lessons from CBNRM suggest institutional considerations are vital in underpinning the design and implementation of successful community projects. This study uses documentary analysis to explore the institutional characteristics of three African community-based forest projects that seek to deliver carbon-storage and poverty-reduction benefits. Strong existing local institutions, clear land tenure, community control over land management decision-making and up-front, flexible payment schemes are found to be vital. Additionally, we undertake a global review of rangeland CBNRM literature and identify that alongside the lessons learned from forest projects, rangeland CB-PES project design requires specific consideration of project boundaries, benefit distribution, capacity building for community monitoring of carbon storage together with awareness-raising using decision-support tools to display the benefits of carbon-friendly land management. We highlight that institutional analyses must be undertaken alongside improved scientific studies of the carbon cycle to enable links to payment schemes, and for them to contribute to poverty alleviation in rangelands. PMID:23045714

  18. Lessons from community-based payment for ecosystem service schemes: from forests to rangelands

    PubMed Central

    Dougill, Andrew J.; Stringer, Lindsay C.; Leventon, Julia; Riddell, Mike; Rueff, Henri; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Butt, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Climate finance investments and international policy are driving new community-based projects incorporating payments for ecosystem services (PES) to simultaneously store carbon and generate livelihood benefits. Most community-based PES (CB-PES) research focuses on forest areas. Rangelands, which store globally significant quantities of carbon and support many of the world's poor, have seen little CB-PES research attention, despite benefitting from several decades of community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) projects. Lessons from CBNRM suggest institutional considerations are vital in underpinning the design and implementation of successful community projects. This study uses documentary analysis to explore the institutional characteristics of three African community-based forest projects that seek to deliver carbon-storage and poverty-reduction benefits. Strong existing local institutions, clear land tenure, community control over land management decision-making and up-front, flexible payment schemes are found to be vital. Additionally, we undertake a global review of rangeland CBNRM literature and identify that alongside the lessons learned from forest projects, rangeland CB-PES project design requires specific consideration of project boundaries, benefit distribution, capacity building for community monitoring of carbon storage together with awareness-raising using decision-support tools to display the benefits of carbon-friendly land management. We highlight that institutional analyses must be undertaken alongside improved scientific studies of the carbon cycle to enable links to payment schemes, and for them to contribute to poverty alleviation in rangelands. PMID:23045714

  19. Old-growth definition for evergreen bay forests and related seral communities. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McKevlin, M.R.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes old-growth conditions in an evergreen bay forest stand. Bay forests occur throughout the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains. However, they are considered rare and are present across the landscape in a patchwork mosaic with other forest types in various stages of succession. Bay forests can be found associated with pocosins. Carolina bays and sandhill seeps, stream heads, and stream margins. The dominant species include loblolly-bay, sweetbay, and redbay, hence the name evergreen bay forest. However, several other swamp species associates are common, as well as many highly flammable shrub species. This forest type is subject to infrequent, high intensity, widespread disturbances such as fire. Fire is necessary to the nutrient cycling of this forest type and in conjunction with hydrology, controls succession. These stands are frequently inundated by surface water, resulting in the development of histic soils low in fertility. Alteration of the hydrology by man and catastrophic wildfire are considered to be the greatest threats to the existence of bay forests.

  20. Old-growth definition for Red River bottom forests in the eastern United States. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Shear, T.; Young, M.; Kellison, R.

    1997-05-01

    Our goal was to develop a description of old-growth red river bottom forests of the Southeastern United States. We compared the characteristics of forests described in the scientific literature and forests we examined to various published criteria for old-growth condition. Because red rivers are a relatively new landscape feature (most < 250 years old, resulting from human-induced soil erosion) and because dramatic changes to their floodplains continue to occur, we do not believe that any old-growth red river forests exist. All the stands along these rivers present at European settlement have been cut and/or otherwise severely altered. In the dynamic landscape after settlement, there have been no opportunities for new old-growth forests to develop. Stands older than 50 to 60 years are rare. Therefore, we propose a stand condition called older growth and list the characteristics. With time and stable site conditions, we believe that old-growth and red river forests can develop from older-growth forests.

  1. Biology of amphibians and reptiles in old-growth forests in the Pacific northwest. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, A.R.; Beatty, J.J.; Olson, D.H.; Storm, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    The amphibian and reptile fauna of older forest ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest includes several endemic species, species with unique behavioral and ecological characteristics, and species whose populations have been in decline in recent years. The authors review the biology of these species and include information on their distinguishing characteristics, behavior, and ecology. Herpetofaunal associations with forest characteristic and the impact of habitat loss are addressed.

  2. U.S. Forest Service Leads Climate Change Adaptation in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halofsky, J.; Peterson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Effective climate change engagement on public lands is characterized by (1) an enduring science-management partnership, (2) involvement of key stakeholders, (3) consideration of broad landscapes with multiple landowners, (4) science-based, peer-reviewed assessments of sensitivity of natural resources to climate change, (5) adaptation strategies and tactics developed by resource managers, (6) leadership and a workforce motivated to implement climate-smart practices in resource planning and project management. Using this approach, the U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with other organizations, has developed climate change vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans for diverse ecosystems and multiple resources in national forests and other lands in the western United States, although implementation (step 6) has been slow in some cases. Hundreds of meetings, strategies, plans, and panels have focused on climate change adaptation over the past decade, but only direct engagement between scientists and resource managers (less research, less planning, more action) has resulted in substantive outcomes and increased organizational capacity for climate-smart management.

  3. Divergence of ecosystem services in U.S. National Forests and Grasslands under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Sun, Ge; Sun, Shanlei; Caldwell, Peter V; Cohen, Erika C; McNulty, Steven G; Aldridge, Heather D; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The 170 National Forests and Grasslands (NFs) in the conterminous United States are public lands that provide important ecosystem services such as clean water and timber supply to the American people. This study investigates the potential impacts of climate change on two key ecosystem functions (i.e., water yield and ecosystem productivity) using the most recent climate projections derived from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We find that future climate change may result in a significant reduction in water yield but an increase in ecosystem productivity in NFs. On average, gross ecosystem productivity is projected to increase by 76 ~ 229 g C m(-2) yr(-1) (8% ~ 24%) while water yield is projected to decrease by 18 ~ 31 mm yr(-1) (4% ~ 7%) by 2100 as a result of the combination of increased air temperature (+1.8 ~ +5.2 °C) and precipitation (+17 ~ +51 mm yr(-1)). The notable divergence in ecosystem services of water supply and carbon sequestration is expected to intensify under higher greenhouse gas emission and associated climate change in the future, posing greater challenges to managing NFs for both ecosystem services. PMID:27100360

  4. Divergence of ecosystem services in U.S. National Forests and Grasslands under a changing climate

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Kai; Sun, Ge; Sun, Shanlei; Caldwell, Peter V.; Cohen, Erika C.; McNulty, Steven G.; Aldridge, Heather D.; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The 170 National Forests and Grasslands (NFs) in the conterminous United States are public lands that provide important ecosystem services such as clean water and timber supply to the American people. This study investigates the potential impacts of climate change on two key ecosystem functions (i.e., water yield and ecosystem productivity) using the most recent climate projections derived from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We find that future climate change may result in a significant reduction in water yield but an increase in ecosystem productivity in NFs. On average, gross ecosystem productivity is projected to increase by 76 ~ 229 g C m−2 yr−1 (8% ~ 24%) while water yield is projected to decrease by 18 ~ 31 mm yr−1 (4% ~ 7%) by 2100 as a result of the combination of increased air temperature (+1.8 ~ +5.2 °C) and precipitation (+17 ~ +51 mm yr−1). The notable divergence in ecosystem services of water supply and carbon sequestration is expected to intensify under higher greenhouse gas emission and associated climate change in the future, posing greater challenges to managing NFs for both ecosystem services. PMID:27100360

  5. Divergence of ecosystem services in U.S. National Forests and Grasslands under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Kai; Sun, Ge; Sun, Shanlei; Caldwell, Peter V.; Cohen, Erika C.; McNulty, Steven G.; Aldridge, Heather D.; Zhang, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The 170 National Forests and Grasslands (NFs) in the conterminous United States are public lands that provide important ecosystem services such as clean water and timber supply to the American people. This study investigates the potential impacts of climate change on two key ecosystem functions (i.e., water yield and ecosystem productivity) using the most recent climate projections derived from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We find that future climate change may result in a significant reduction in water yield but an increase in ecosystem productivity in NFs. On average, gross ecosystem productivity is projected to increase by 76 ~ 229 g C m‑2 yr‑1 (8% ~ 24%) while water yield is projected to decrease by 18 ~ 31 mm yr‑1 (4% ~ 7%) by 2100 as a result of the combination of increased air temperature (+1.8 ~ +5.2 °C) and precipitation (+17 ~ +51 mm yr‑1). The notable divergence in ecosystem services of water supply and carbon sequestration is expected to intensify under higher greenhouse gas emission and associated climate change in the future, posing greater challenges to managing NFs for both ecosystem services.

  6. Wisconsin timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Whipple, J.W.

    1997-09-21

    In this bulletin we discuss recent Wisconsin forest industry trends and report the results of a detailed study of forest indsutry, industrial roundwood production, and associated primary mill wood and bark residue in Wisconsin in 1994. Such detailed information is necessary for intelligent planning and decisionmaking in wood procurement, forest resource management, and forest industry development. Likewise, researchers need current forest industry and idustrial roundwood information for planning project.

  7. Minnesota timber industry. An assessment of timber product output and use, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Dahlman, R.A.

    1997-09-19

    In this bulletin, the authors discuss recent Minnesota forest industry trends and report the results of a detailed study of forest industrial roundwood production, and associated primary mill wood and bark residue in Minnesota in 1992. Such detailed information is necessary for intelligent planning and decisionmaking in wood procurement, forest resource management, and forest industry development. Likewise, researchers need current forest industry and industrial roundwood information for planning projects.

  8. Minnesota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1990. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Dahlman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The bulletin includes recent Minnesota forest industry trends and report the results of a detailed study of forest industry, industrial roundwood production, and associated primary mill wood and bark residue in Minnesota in 1990. Such detailed information is necessary for intelligent planning and decisionmaking in wood procurement, forest resource management, and forest industry development. Likewise, researchers need current forest industry and industrial roundwood information for planning projects.

  9. Risk perceptions and behavioral context: U.S. Forest Service fire management professionals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan G.; Carpenter, Edwin H.; Cortner, Hanna J.; Cleaves, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Fire managers from the U.S. Forest Service were surveyed to determine which decision factors most strongly influenced their fire‐risk decisions. Safety, the resources at risk, public opinion, and the reliability of information were important influences on these decisions. This research allowed direct comparison between fire managers’ perceptions of factor importance and how their fire‐risk decisions changed in response to those factors. These risk decisions were highly responsive to changes in context (an escaped wildfire decision versus a prescribed burning decision) as well as to changing factors. The results demonstrate the utility of using scenarios in risk research and the vital importance of context in studying risk‐taking behavior. Research which attempts to remove risk decisions from their real‐world context may well distort the nature of risk‐taking behavior.

  10. Risk Tradeoffs in Adaptive Ecosystem Management: The Case of the U.S. Forest Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Marc J.; Martin, Caysie A.; Predmore, S. Andrew; Morse, Wayde C.

    2014-06-01

    Natural resource planning processes on public lands in the United States are driven in large part by the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which dictates general processes for analyzing and disclosing the likely impacts of proposed actions. The outcomes of these processes are the result of multiple factors, many related to the manifold smaller incremental decisions made by agency personnel directing the processes. Through interviews with decision makers, team leaders, and team members on five NEPA processes within the U.S. Forest Service, this study examines those incremental decisions. Risk, in particular external relationship risk, emerged as a dominant lens through which agency personnel weigh and make process-related decisions. We discuss the tradeoffs associated with agency actors' emphasis on this form of risk and their potential implications for adaptive ecosystem management and organizational performance.

  11. Risk tradeoffs in adaptive ecosystem management: the case of the U.S. Forest Service.

    PubMed

    Stern, Marc J; Martin, Caysie A; Predmore, S Andrew; Morse, Wayde C

    2014-06-01

    Natural resource planning processes on public lands in the United States are driven in large part by the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which dictates general processes for analyzing and disclosing the likely impacts of proposed actions. The outcomes of these processes are the result of multiple factors, many related to the manifold smaller incremental decisions made by agency personnel directing the processes. Through interviews with decision makers, team leaders, and team members on five NEPA processes within the U.S. Forest Service, this study examines those incremental decisions. Risk, in particular external relationship risk, emerged as a dominant lens through which agency personnel weigh and make process-related decisions. We discuss the tradeoffs associated with agency actors' emphasis on this form of risk and their potential implications for adaptive ecosystem management and organizational performance. PMID:24687320

  12. Trade-offs between three forest ecosystem services across the state of New Hampshire, USA: timber, carbon, and albedo.

    PubMed

    Lutz, David A; Burakowski, Elizabeth A; Murphy, Mackenzie B; Borsuk, Mark E; Niemiec, Rebecca M; Howarth, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Forests are more frequently being managed to store and sequester carbon for the purposes of climate change mitigation. Generally, this practice involves long-term conservation of intact mature forests and/or reductions in the frequency and intensity of timber harvests. However, incorporating the influence of forest surface albedo often suggests that long rotation lengths may not always be optimal in mitigating climate change in forests characterized by frequent snowfall. To address this, we investigated trade-offs between three ecosystem services: carbon storage, albedo-related radiative forcing, and timber provisioning. We calculated optimal rotation length at 498 diverse Forest Inventory and Analysis forest sites in the state of New Hampshire, USA. We found that the mean optimal rotation lengths across all sites was 94 yr (standard deviation of sample means = 44 yr), with a large cluster of short optimal rotation lengths that were calculated at high elevations in the White Mountain National Forest. Using a regression tree approach, we found that timber growth, annual storage of carbon, and the difference between annual albedo in mature forest vs. a post-harvest landscape were the most important variables that influenced optimal rotation. Additionally, we found that the choice of a baseline albedo value for each site significantly altered the optimal rotation lengths across all sites, lowering the mean rotation to 59 yr with a high albedo baseline, and increasing the mean rotation to 112 yr given a low albedo baseline. Given these results, we suggest that utilizing temperate forests in New Hampshire for climate mitigation purposes through carbon storage and the cessation of harvest is appropriate at a site-dependent level that varies significantly across the state. PMID:27039516

  13. 7 CFR 1.673 - How will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... alternative not adopted on: (1) Energy supply, distribution, cost, and use; (2) Flood control; (3) Navigation... alternative and formulate its modified condition? 1.673 Section 1.673 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of... will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition? (a)...

  14. 7 CFR 1.673 - How will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... alternative not adopted on: (1) Energy supply, distribution, cost, and use; (2) Flood control; (3) Navigation... alternative and formulate its modified condition? 1.673 Section 1.673 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of... will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition? (a)...

  15. 7 CFR 1.673 - How will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... alternative not adopted on: (1) Energy supply, distribution, cost, and use; (2) Flood control; (3) Navigation... alternative and formulate its modified condition? 1.673 Section 1.673 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of... will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition? (a)...

  16. 7 CFR 1.673 - How will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... alternative not adopted on: (1) Energy supply, distribution, cost, and use; (2) Flood control; (3) Navigation... alternative and formulate its modified condition? 1.673 Section 1.673 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of... will the Forest Service analyze a proposed alternative and formulate its modified condition? (a)...

  17. 78 FR 34125 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, San Juan National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ..., CO. In 1937, I. F. ``Zeke'' Flora conducted excavations without a permit in the burial crevice of the... Cultural Items published in the Federal Register. A portion of the Flora collection at the Falls Creek Rock... custody of the Mesa Verde National Park at the request of the Forest Service. Flora transferred...

  18. 77 FR 12792 - Notice of Forest Service Land Management Plans To Be Amended To Incorporate Greater Sage-Grouse...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Incorporate Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation Measures AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice, Request... statements to incorporate greater sage-grouse conservation measures into land use plans and land management... related to the greater sage-grouse planning effort by any of the following methods: Rocky Mountain...

  19. Insights from an Evaluability Assessment of the U.S. Forest Service "More Kids in the Woods" Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zint, Michaela T.; Covitt, Beth A.; Dowd, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted an evaluability assessment of the U.S. Forest Service's "More Kids in the Woods" internal grant initiative based on a review of 26 funded proposals, the creation of logic models, and a survey of project leaders. Evaluations of the initiative are warranted because it has clear outcome objectives, is implemented as intended, and results…

  20. Ecological health of river basins in forested regions of eastern Washington and Oregon. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wissmar, R.C.; Smith, J.E.; McIntosh, B.A.; Li, H.W.; Reeves, G.H.

    1994-02-01

    A retrospective examination of the history of the cumulative influences of past land water uses on the ecological health of select river basins in forest regions of eastern Washington and Oregon indicates the loss of fish and riparian habitat diversity and quality since the 19th century. The study focuses on impacts of timber harvest, fire management, live stock grazing, mining and irrigation management practices on stream and riparian ecosystems. An examination of past environmental management approaches for assessing stream, riparian, and watershed conditions in forest regions shows numerous advantages and shortcomings. Rcommendations for ecosystem management with emphasis on monitoring and restoration activities are provided.

  1. Genetic variation and seed zones of douglas-fir in the Siskiyou National Forest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.K.; Sugano, A.I.

    1993-07-01

    The provisional seed zones and breeding zones were developed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Siskiyou National Forest in southwestern Oregon. Zones were based on maps of genetic variation patterns obtained by evaluating genotypes of trees from 260 locations in the region. Genotypes controlling growth vigor and growth rhythm were assessed in the common garden. Within the Forest, three breeding blocks were recommended, with different numbers of elevational bands in each block: from 0 to 610 meters, from 611 to 838 meters, and then a series of bands 152 meters wide at higher elevations.

  2. 78 FR 73819 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of...-18, 2013 meeting of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee due to the Government partial shutdown... INFORMATION CONTACT: Maya Solomon, Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Program Coordinator; by phone...

  3. Institutional, Individual, and Socio-Cultural Domains of Partnerships: A Typology of USDA Forest Service Recreation Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekamp, Erin; Cerveny, Lee K.; McCreary, Allie

    2011-09-01

    Federal land management agencies, such as the USDA Forest Service, have expanded the role of recreation partners reflecting constrained growth in appropriations and broader societal trends towards civic environmental governance. Partnerships with individual volunteers, service groups, commercial outfitters, and other government agencies provide the USDA Forest Service with the resources necessary to complete projects and meet goals under fiscal constraints. Existing partnership typologies typically focus on collaborative or strategic alliances and highlight organizational dimensions (e.g., structure and process) defined by researchers. This paper presents a partner typology constructed from USDA Forest Service partnership practitioners' conceptualizations of 35 common partner types. Multidimensional scaling of data from unconstrained pile sorts identified 3 distinct cultural dimensions of recreation partners—specifically, partnership character, partner impact, and partner motivations—that represent institutional, individual, and socio-cultural cognitive domains. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis provides further insight into the various domains of agency personnel's conceptualizations. While three dimensions with high reliability (RSQ = 0.83) and corresponding hierarchical clusters illustrate commonality between agency personnel's partnership suppositions, this study also reveals variance in personnel's familiarity and affinity for specific partnership types. This real-world perspective on partner types highlights that agency practitioners not only make strategic choices when selecting and cultivating partnerships to accomplish critical task, but also elect to work with partners for the primary purpose of providing public service and fostering land stewardship.

  4. Uneven-aged silviculture for loblolly and shortleaf pine forest cover types. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.B.; Cain, M.D.; Guldin, J.M.; Murphy, P.A.; Shelton, M.G.

    1996-06-01

    A half-century of experience and research with uneven-aged silviculture in loblolly-shortleaf pine stands in the South are summarized in this publication, and silvicultural guidelines for developing and managing uneven-aged stands are provided. This publication should be useful to silviculturists, foresters, and other resource professionals in developing and managing uneven-aged pine stands. It can also serve as a teaching aid in forestry workshops, short courses, and university curricula.

  5. Digital Bedrock Compilation: A Geodatabase Covering Forest Service Lands in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, D.; de La Fuente, J. A.; Reichert, M.

    2010-12-01

    This digital database contains bedrock geologic mapping for Forest Service lands within California. This compilation began in 2004 and the first version was completed in 2005. Second publication of this geodatabase was completed in 2010 and filled major gaps in the southern Sierra Nevada and Modoc/Medicine Lake/Warner Mountains areas. This digital map database was compiled from previously published and unpublished geologic mapping, with source mapping and review from California Geological Survey, the U.S. Geological Survey and others. Much of the source data was itself compilation mapping. This geodatabase is huge, containing ~107,000 polygons and ~ 280,000 arcs. Mapping was compiled from more than one thousand individual sources and covers over 41,000,000 acres (~166,000 km2). It was compiled from source maps at various scales - from ~ 1:4,000 to 1:250,000 and represents the best available geologic mapping at largest scale possible. An estimated 70-80% of the source information was digitized from geologic mapping at 1:62,500 scale or better. Forest Service ACT2 Enterprise Team compiled the bedrock mapping and developed a geodatabase to store this information. This geodatabase supports feature classes for polygons (e.g, map units), lines (e.g., contacts, boundaries, faults and structural lines) and points (e.g., orientation data, structural symbology). Lookup tables provide detailed information for feature class items. Lookup/type tables contain legal values and hierarchical groupings for geologic ages and lithologies. Type tables link coded values with descriptions for line and point attributes, such as line type, line location and point type. This digital mapping is at the core of many quantitative analyses and derivative map products. Queries of the database are used to produce maps and to quantify rock types of interest. These include the following: (1) ultramafic rocks - where hazards from naturally occurring asbestos are high, (2) granitic rocks - increased

  6. 77 FR 40565 - Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Forest Service Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... of Decision for Amendments to the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management Planning Documents... provide advice and recommendations to promote better integration of forest management activities...

  7. Gypsy moth in the United States: An atlas. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Liebhold, A.M.; Gottschalk, K.W.; Luzader, E.R.; Mason, D.A.; Bush, R.

    1997-02-01

    This atlas includes 52 maps that doucment the historical spread of gypsy moth from 1900 to the present, historical forest defoliation in the Northeast from 1984 to the present, and the distribution of susceptible forests in the conterminous United States. These maps should be useful for planning activities to limit the spread of gypsy moth and mitigate the effects of this forest insect pest in areas that have not yet been invaded.

  8. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the United States Forest Service: Caribou-Targhee National Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort; Ian Nienhueser

    2014-06-01

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect and evaluate data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect and evaluate data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest (CTNF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. ITSNA acknowledges the support of Idaho National Laboratory and CTNF for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by enthusiasm and support from the Forest Service and CTNF personnel.

  9. Implementing ecosystem management in public agencies: lessons from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Tomas M; Bodine, Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    Ecosystem management was formally adopted over a decade ago by many U.S. natural resource agencies, including the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. This approach calls for management based on stakeholder collaboration; interagency cooperation; integration of scientific, social, and economic information; preservation of ecological processes; and adaptive management. Results of previous studies indicate differences in the extent to which particular components of ecosystem management would be implemented within the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management and suggest a number of barriers thought to impede implementation. Drawing on survey and interview data from agency personnel and stakeholders, we compared levels of ecosystem-management implementation in the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management and identified the most important barriers to implementation. Agency personnel perceived similarly high levels of implementation on many ecosystem-management components, whereas stakeholders perceived lower levels. Agencies were most challenged by implementation of preservation of ecological processes, adaptive management, and integration of social and economic information, whereas the most significant barriers to implementation were political, cultural, and legal. PMID:18254853

  10. Evaluating the relative impact of climate and economic changes on forest and agricultural ecosystem services in mountain regions.

    PubMed

    Briner, Simon; Elkin, Ché; Huber, Robert

    2013-11-15

    Provisioning of ecosystem services (ES) in mountainous regions is predicted to be influenced by i) the direct biophysical impacts of climate change, ii) climate mediated land use change, and iii) socioeconomic driven changes in land use. The relative importance and the spatial distribution of these factors on forest and agricultural derived ES, however, is unclear, making the implementation of ES management schemes difficult. Using an integrated economic-ecological modeling framework, we evaluated the impact of these driving forces on the provision of forest and agricultural ES in a mountain region of southern Switzerland. Results imply that forest ES will be strongly influenced by the direct impact of climate change, but that changes in land use will have a comparatively small impact. The simulation of direct impacts of climate change affects forest ES at all elevations, while land use changes can only be found at high elevations. In contrast, changes to agricultural ES were found to be primarily due to shifts in economic conditions that alter land use and land management. The direct influence of climate change on agriculture is only predicted to be substantial at high elevations, while socioeconomic driven shifts in land use are projected to affect agricultural ES at all elevations. Our simulation results suggest that policy schemes designed to mitigate the negative impact of climate change on forests should focus on suitable adaptive management plans, accelerating adaptation processes for currently forested areas. To maintain provision of agricultural ES policy needs to focus on economic conditions rather than on supporting adaptation to new climate. PMID:23995509

  11. Decision making, procedural compliance, and outcomes definition in U.S. forest service planning processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Marc J.; Predmore, S. Andrew

    2011-04-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) dictates a process of analyzing and disclosing the likely impacts of proposed agency actions on the human environment. This study addresses two key questions related to NEPA implementation in the U.S. Forest Service: 1) how do Interdisciplinary (ID) team leaders and decision makers conceptualize the outcomes of NEPA processes? And 2), how does NEPA relate to agency decision making? We address these questions through two separate online surveys that posed questions about recently completed NEPA processes - the first with the ID team leaders tasked with carrying out the processes, and the second with the line officers responsible for making the processes' final decisions. Outcomes of NEPA processes include impacts on public relations, on employee morale and team functioning, on the achievement of agency goals, and on the achievement of NEPA's procedural requirements (disclosure) and substantive intent (minimizing negative environmental impacts). Although both tended to view public relations outcomes as important, decision makers' perceptions of favorable outcomes were more closely linked to the achievement of agency goals and process efficiency than was the case for ID team leaders. While ID team leaders' responses suggest that they see decision making closely integrated with the NEPA process, decision makers more commonly decoupled decision making from the NEPA process. These findings suggest a philosophical difference between ID team leaders and decision makers that may pose challenges for both the implementation and the evaluation of agency NEPA. We discuss the pros and cons of integrating NEPA with decision making or separating the two. We conclude that detaching NEPA from decision making poses greater risks than integrating them.

  12. Enabling intelligent copernicus services for carbon and water balance modeling of boreal forest ecosystems - North State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häme, Tuomas; Mutanen, Teemu; Rauste, Yrjö; Antropov, Oleg; Molinier, Matthieu; Quegan, Shaun; Kantzas, Euripides; Mäkelä, Annikki; Minunno, Francesco; Atli Benediktsson, Jon; Falco, Nicola; Arnason, Kolbeinn; Storvold, Rune; Haarpaintner, Jörg; Elsakov, Vladimir; Rasinmäki, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    The objective of project North State, funded by Framework Program 7 of the European Union, is to develop innovative data fusion methods that exploit the new generation of multi-source data from Sentinels and other satellites in an intelligent, self-learning framework. The remote sensing outputs are interfaced with state-of-the-art carbon and water flux models for monitoring the fluxes over boreal Europe to reduce current large uncertainties. This will provide a paradigm for the development of products for future Copernicus services. The models to be interfaced are a dynamic vegetation model and a light use efficiency model. We have identified four groups of variables that will be estimated with remote sensed data: land cover variables, forest characteristics, vegetation activity, and hydrological variables. The estimates will be used as model inputs and to validate the model outputs. The earth observation variables are computed as automatically as possible, with an objective to completely automatic estimation. North State has two sites for intensive studies in southern and northern Finland, respectively, one in Iceland and one in state Komi of Russia. Additionally, the model input variables will be estimated and models applied over European boreal and sub-arctic region from Ural Mountains to Iceland. The accuracy assessment of the earth observation variables will follow statistical sampling design. Model output predictions are compared to earth observation variables. Also flux tower measurements are applied in the model assessment. In the paper, results of hyperspectral, Sentinel-1, and Landsat data and their use in the models is presented. Also an example of a completely automatic land cover class prediction is reported.

  13. Historical review of termite activity at forest service termiticide test sites from 1971 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Mulrooney, J E; Wagner, T L; Shelton, T G; Peterson, C J; Gerard, P D

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Forest Service has a long history of providing termiticide efficacy data used for product registration and labeling. Four primary test sites (Arizona and Florida, Mississippi, and South Carolina [hereafter southeast]) have been used for this purpose. Various parameters of termite attack at water-only control plots were examined in this study to assess the relative pressures of termites at each site. Termiticide studies installed between 1971 and 2001 by using ground board (GB) and concrete slab (CS) test methods were included. GB control plots were attacked 85% of the time in the southeast, about twice the rate observed in Arizona (43%). CS plots were attacked 59-70% of the time in the southeast, significantly higher than in Arizona (43%). Termites were slower to initiate attack at control plots in Arizona compared with the southeast, and they were up to twice as slow at GB controls. Once initial attack began, GB plots were reattacked at higher percentages in the southeast (89-90%) than in Arizona (67%). Reattack at CS plots ranged from 65% in Arizona and South Carolina to 76% in Mississippi. Termites caused less damage to wooden blocks in control plots in Arizona than the southeast. Attack rates at controls generally declined during the 1990s, but these rates have rebounded since 2000, except at CS plots in Arizona and South Carolina. Statistical analysis of attacks at plots treated with chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and permethrin also was undertaken. Time to initial termite attack (failure) of the organophosphate chlorpyrifos was generally shorter in Arizona than in the southeast, whereas time to initial attack in plots treated with one of three pyrethroids (cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and permethrin) was generally longer in Arizona. PMID:17461075

  14. Habitat management for red tree voles in douglas-fir forests. Biology and management of old-growth forests. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, M.H.; Holthausen, R.S.; Aubry, K.B.

    1992-09-01

    The relations between arboreal rodents and trees causes the animals to be particularly sensitive to the effects of timber harvesting. Among arboreal rodents, the authors consider the red tree vole to be the most vulnerable to local extinctions resulting from the loss or fragmentation of old-growth Douglas-fir forests. Red tree voles are nocturnal, canopy dwelling, and difficult to study. The following habitat characteristics are potentially important for the species: tree species, stand development, tree size, moisture conditions, topographic positions, elevation, and stand size. Based on these characteristics, the authors developed interim management strategies to help sustain or expand existing populations of red tree voles.

  15. Insects of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.A.

    1994-07-01

    In this review of the literature on forest entomology in Puerto Rico, emphasis is given to research conducted in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF). This review should serve as an introduction to the insects inhabiting the LEF for researchers and as a guide for the identification of possible insect pests. There are three sections to this review. The first deals with basic insect ecology; the second, forest insect pests; and the third, insect attacks on dry wood and during wood seasoning. The reference section and appendices contain information on the systematics and taxonomy of different insect orders found in Puerto Rico.

  16. Tropical Forest Remote Sensing Services for the Democratic Republic of Congo inside the EU FP7 ReCover Project (Final Results 2000-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarpaintner, J.; de la Fuente Blanco, D.; Enssle, F.; Datta, P.; Mazinga, A.; Singa, C.; Mane, L.

    2015-04-01

    'ReCover' was a 3-year EU-FP7 project (Nov. 2010 - Dec. 2013), aiming to develop and improve science based remote sensing services to support tropical forest management and activities to reduce emission from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) in the tropical region (Hame et al., 2012). This is an overview of the final ReCover service delivery of 2000-2012 single-year optical (Landsat, ALOS AVNIR-2, RapidEye) and C-and L-band SAR (Envisat ASAR and ALOS Palsar, respectively) image mosaics, their derived forest/non-forest maps, a multi-sensor forest change map (2000-2010) and a biomass map (based on 2003-2009 ICESat GLAS) o he user of he De ocr ic Repub ic of Congo DRC), he Observatoir Satellitale des Fore s d'Afrique Cen r e OSFAC). The results are an improvement from a first iteration service delivery in 2012 after a critical review and validation process by both, the user and service providers, further method development and research, like a prior statistical data analysis considering temporal/seasonal variability, improved data pre-processing, and through the use of ground reference data collected in March 2013 for classification training. Validation with Kompsat-2 VHR data for the 2010 forest/non-forest maps revealed accuracies of 87% and 88% for optical and radar sensors, respectively.

  17. Potential of VIIRS Time Series Data for Aiding the USDA Forest Service Early Warning System for Forest Health Threats: A Gypsy Moth Defoliation Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ryan, Robert E.; Smoot, James; Kuper, Phillip; Prados, Donald; Russell, Jeffrey; Ross, Kenton; Gasser, Gerald; Sader, Steven; McKellip, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    This report details one of three experiments performed during FY 2007 for the NASA RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) at Stennis Space Center. This RPC experiment assesses the potential of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data for detecting and monitoring forest defoliation from the non-native Eurasian gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). The intent of the RPC experiment was to assess the degree to which VIIRS data can provide forest disturbance monitoring information as an input to a forest threat EWS (Early Warning System) as compared to the level of information that can be obtained from MODIS data. The USDA Forest Service (USFS) plans to use MODIS products for generating broad-scaled, regional monitoring products as input to an EWS for forest health threat assessment. NASA SSC is helping the USFS to evaluate and integrate currently available satellite remote sensing technologies and data products for the EWS, including the use of MODIS products for regional monitoring of forest disturbance. Gypsy moth defoliation of the mid-Appalachian highland region was selected as a case study. Gypsy moth is one of eight major forest insect threats listed in the Healthy Forest Restoration Act (HFRA) of 2003; the gypsy moth threatens eastern U.S. hardwood forests, which are also a concern highlighted in the HFRA of 2003. This region was selected for the project because extensive gypsy moth defoliation occurred there over multiple years during the MODIS operational period. This RPC experiment is relevant to several nationally important mapping applications, including agricultural efficiency, coastal management, ecological forecasting, disaster management, and carbon management. In this experiment, MODIS data and VIIRS data simulated from MODIS were assessed for their ability to contribute broad, regional geospatial information on gypsy moth defoliation. Landsat and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission

  18. Timber resource statistics for the north interior resource area of California. Forest Service research bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the North Interior Resource Area of California, which includes Lassen, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Trinity Counties. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of the Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Six Rivers, Plumas, Shasta-Trinity, Rogue River, and Toiyabe National Forests. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality , and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of timberland area and timber volume are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  19. Status of precommercial-sized softwoods in Louisiana, 1991. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precommercial-sized softwoods in seedling- and sapling-sized stands are presented and discussed. Inadequate levels of softwood stocking in NIPF (Nonindustrial private forest) lands could diminish long-term supplies of softwood in the State.

  20. Woody biomass resource of east Texas, 1992. Forest Service Resource Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1993-09-01

    Data from the most recent east Texas forest survey were used to derive estimates of wood and bark biomass by counties. The information is important to resource managers, legislators, policymakers, and procurement specialists in regard to the extent, location, and potential availability of the woody biomass resource in the State. Wood and bark biomass estimates for all trees on timberland are summarized in the report. The resource is described by dimension (size), forest type, ownership, species, stand attributes, and tree merchantability class.

  1. 76 FR 28949 - Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Forest Service Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in... held at the Kisatchie National Forest Supervisor's Office, 2500 Shreveport Hwy, Pineville, LA....

  2. 76 FR 19952 - Davy Crockett National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Davy Crockett National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting, Davy Crockett National Forest Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: In accordance.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Davy Crockett National Forest Resource Advisory Committee...

  3. 76 FR 14647 - Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting, Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: In.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Sabine National Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)...

  4. Effects of harvesting forest biomass on water and climate regulation services: A synthesis of long-term ecosystem experiments in eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, Jesse; Beier, Colin D; Groffman, Peter M; Burns, Douglas A.; Beall, Frederick D; Hazlett, Paul W.; Yorks, Thad E

    2016-01-01

    Demand for woody biomass fuels is increasing amidst concerns about global energy security and climate change, but there may be negative implications of increased harvesting for forest ecosystem functions and their benefits to society (ecosystem services). Using new methods for assessing ecosystem services based on long-term experimental research, post-harvest changes in ten potential benefits were assessed for ten first-order northern hardwood forest watersheds at three long-term experimental research sites in northeastern North America. As expected, we observed near-term tradeoffs between biomass provision and greenhouse gas regulation, as well as tradeoffs between intensive harvest and the capacity of the forest to remediate nutrient pollution. In both cases, service provision began to recover along with the regeneration of forest vegetation; in the case of pollution remediation, the service recovered to pre-harvest levels within 10 years. By contrast to these two services, biomass harvesting had relatively nominal and transient impacts on other ecosystem services. Our results are sensitive to empirical definitions of societal demand, including methods for scaling societal demand to ecosystem units, which are often poorly resolved. Reducing uncertainty around these parameters can improve confidence in our results and increase their relevance for decision-making. Our synthesis of long-term experimental studies provides insights on the social-ecological resilience of managed forest ecosystems to multiple drivers of change.

  5. Chicago's urban forest ecosystem: Results of the Chicago Urban Forest Climate Project. (Includes executive summary). Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, E.G.; Nowak, D.J.; Rowntree, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    Results of the 3-year Chicago Urban Forest Climate Project indicate that there are an estimated 50.8 million trees in the Chicago area of Cook and DuPage Counties; 66 percent of these trees rated in good or excellent condition. During 1991, trees in the Chicago area removed an estimated 6,145 tons of air pollutants, providing air cleansing valued at $9.2 million dollars. These trees also sequester approximately 155,000 tons of carbon per year, and provide residential heating and cooling energy savings that, in turn, reduce carbon emissions from power plants by about 12,600 tons annually. Shade, lower summer air temperatures, and a reduction in windspeed associated with increasing tree cover by 10 percent can lower total heating and cooling energy use by 5 to 10 percent annually ($50 to $90 per dwelling unit). The projected net present value of investment in planting and care of 95,000 trees in Chicago is $38 million ($402 per planted tree), indicating that the long-term benefits of trees are more than twice their costs.

  6. Integrated services to support detection, prevention and planning of the agricultural-forest-rural land against fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipioni, A.; Tagliaferri, F.

    2009-04-01

    Objective of the document is to define lines of development and distribution of the services to support detection, prevention and planning of the agricultural-forest-rural land against fire. The services will be a valid support on hand of the Regional and National Administrations involved in the agricultural-forest-rural activities (Ministry of Agricultural and Forestry Policies, National Forest Police, ecc..), through the employment of the SIAN "National Agricultural Informative System", that is the integrated national information system for the entire agriculture, forestry and fisheries Administration. The services proposals would be distributed through the GIS (Geographic Information Systems) of the SIAN: the GIS database is a single nation-wide digital graphic database consisting of: - Ortophotos: Aerial images of approz. 45 km2 each with ground resolution of 50 cm; - Cadastral maps: Land maps; - Thematic layers: Land use and crops identification The GIS services can take full advantage of the benefits of SIAN architectural model designed for best integration and interoperability with other Central and Local P.A. bodies whose main items are: - Integration of information from different sources; - Maintainance of the internal coeherence of any integrated information; - Flexibility with respect to technical or organizational changes The "innovative "services described below could be useful to support the development of institutional tasks of public Agencies and Administrations (es. Regions or Civil Protection agencies) according to than previewed from the D.Lgs. 173/98. Services of support to the management of the phenomenon of wildland fires The activities outlined in below figure, don't have a linear and defined temporal sequence, but a dynamic and time integration. It guarantees not only the integrated use of the various information, but also the value of every product, for level of accuracy, coherence and timeliness of the information. Description of four main

  7. Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from the United States forest service northern region, 1906-2010

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Global forests capture and store significant amounts of CO2 through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach and the California Forest Project Protocol (CFPP) to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1906 to 2010 for the USFS Northern Region, which includes forests in northern Idaho, Montana, South Dakota, and eastern Washington. Results Based on the IPCC approach, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing at one million megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year in the mid 1960s, with peak cumulative storage of 28 million MgC occurring in 1995. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels in the mid twentieth century. Harvest levels declined after 1970, resulting in less carbon entering the HWP pool. Since 1995, emissions from HWP at solid waste disposal sites have exceeded additions from harvesting, resulting in a decline in the total amount of carbon stored in the HWP pool. The CFPP approach shows a similar trend, with 100-year average carbon storage for each annual Northern Region harvest peaking in 1969 at 937,900 MgC, and fluctuating between 84,000 and 150,000 MgC over the last decade. Conclusions The Northern Region HWP pool is now in a period of negative net annual stock change because the decay of products harvested between 1906 and 2010 exceeds additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest. However, total forest carbon includes both HWP and ecosystem carbon, which may have increased over the study period. Though our

  8. Analyses of Great Smoky Mountain red spruce tree-ring data. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Deusen, P.C.

    1988-05-01

    Contents include: Southern Appalachian Red Spruce--Fraser Fir Forests; A tree ring analysis of Red Spruce in the Southern Appalachian Mountains; Utilizing time series models and spatial analysis of forecast residuals for tree-ring analysis of Red Spruce; A fractal approach to analysis of tree-ring increments; Red Spruce Tree Ring Analysis using a Kalman Filter.

  9. Evaluating management tradeoffs between economic fiber production and other ecosystem services in a Chinese-fir dominated forest plantation in Fujian Province.

    PubMed

    Kang, Haijun; Seely, Brad; Wang, Guangyu; Innes, John; Zheng, Dexiang; Chen, Pingliu; Wang, Tongli; Li, Qinglin

    2016-07-01

    Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) is not only a valuable timber species, but also plays an important role in the provision of ecosystem services. Forest management decisions to increase the production of fiber for economic gain may have negative impacts on the long-term flow of ecosystem services from forest resources. Such tradeoffs should be taken into account to fulfill the requirements of sustainable forest management. Here we employed an established, ecosystem-based, stand-level model (FORECAST) in combination with a simplified harvest-scheduling model to evaluate the potential tradeoffs among indicators of provisional, regulating and supporting ecosystem services in a Chinese-fir-dominated landscape located in Fujian Province as a case study. Indicators included: merchantable volume harvested, biomass harvested, ecosystem carbon storage, CO2 fixation, O2 released, biomass nitrogen content, pollutant absorption, and soil fertility. A series of alternative management scenarios, representing different combinations of rotation length and harvest intensity, were simulated to facilitate the analysis. Results from the analysis were summarized in the form of a decision matrix designed to provide a method for forest managers to evaluate management alternatives and tradeoffs in the context of key indicators of ecosystem services. The scenario analysis suggests that there are considerable tradeoffs in terms of ecosystem services associated with stand and landscape-level management decisions. Longer rotations and increased retention tended to favor regulating and supporting services while the opposite was true for provisional services. PMID:26994796

  10. Rocky Mountain Regional Guide (covering forest service programs that affect the states of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming (east of the continental divide))

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Regional Guide proposes the future multiple-use management of the National Forests and National Grasslands in the Rocky Mountain Region. It also provides integrated direction for the National Forest System, and coordination with Research, and State and Private Forestry so these organizational units can accomplish their missions. The management of the National Forest System includes the administration of National Forests and National Grasslands and management within the principles of multiple-use and sustained-yield. Research includes planning and coordinating research programs to learn how we can best use and protect the plant, animal, soil, water, and aesthetic resources of nonagricultural rural lands. State and Private Forestry includes coordinating and providing leadership for intergovernmental resource programs; and coordinating and providing technical and financial assistance to improve and protect tribal, State, privately-owned forest resources, and urban and community forestry. In doing this the Forest Service bears a host of legal and ethical responsibilities. This Regional Guide reflects the responsibilities entrusted to the Forest Service.

  11. Woody biomass resource of major tree taxa for the Midsouth states. Forest Service Resource Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1992-02-01

    Data from the most recent State forest surveys were used to derive estimates of wood and bark biomass for the Midsouth region. For clarification of these data, appendix 1 defines relevant terms. Species that occurred in the Midsouth sample are listed in appendix 2. Appendix 3 tables 1 through 3 describe the Midsouth timberland area by State. Tables 4 through 48 describe the biomass resource by species group (4-6), ownership class (7-12), forest type (13-18), tree class (19-30), diameter class (31-36), basal area class (37-42), and height class (43-48). See the list of tables for a more detailed description of table content. Appendix 4 figures 1 through 7 describe the extent of biomass resource by yield class.

  12. 77 FR 39506 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Tongass National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... Forest at the address below by August 2, 2012. ADDRESSES: Forrest Cole, Supervisor, Tongass National... contact Forrest Cole, Supervisor, Tongass National Forest, 648 Mission Street Federal Building,...

  13. Plant biomass in the Tanana River Basin, Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Vegetation biomass tables are presented for the Tanana River Basin. Average biomass for each species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in the 13 forest and 30 nonforest vegetation types is shown. These data combined with area estimates for each vegetation type provide a tool for estimating habitat carrying capacity for many wildlife species. Tree biomass is reported for the entire aboveground tree, thereby allowing estimates of total fiber content.

  14. Web service tools in the era of forest fire management and elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursanidis, Dimitris; Kochilakis, Giorgos; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Varella, Vasiliki; Kotroni, Vassiliki; Eftychidis, Giorgos; Lagouvardos, Kostas

    2014-10-01

    Wildfires in forests and forested areas in South Europe, North America, Central Asia and Australia are a diachronic threat with crucial ecological, economic and social impacts. Last decade the frequency, the magnitude and the intensity of fires have increased even more because of the climate change. An efficient response to such disasters requires an effective planning, with an early detection system of the ignition area and an accurate prediction of fire propagation to support the rapid response mechanisms. For this reason, information systems able to predict and visualize the behavior of fires, are valuable tools for fire fighting. Such systems, able also to perform simulations that evaluate the fire development scenarios, based on weather conditions, become valuable Decision Support Tools for fire mitigation planning. A Web-based Information System (WIS) developed in the framework of the FLIRE (Floods and fire risk assessment and management) project, a LIFE+ co-funded by the European Commission research, is presented in this study. The FLIRE WIS use forest fuel maps which have been developed by using generalized fuel maps, satellite data and in-situ observations. Furthermore, it leverages data from meteorological stations and weather forecast from numerical models to feed the fire propagation model with the necessary for the simulations inputs and to visualize the model's results for user defined time periods and steps. The user has real-time access to FLIRE WIS via any web browser from any platform (PC, Laptop, Tablet, Smartphone).

  15. Spatial Assessment of Forest Ecosystem Functions and Services using Human Relating Factors for SDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Lee, W. K.; Jeon, S. W.; Kim, T.; Lim, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Application of ecosystem service concept in environmental related decision making could be numerical and objective standard for policy maker between preserving and developing perspective of environment. However, pursuing maximum benefit from natural capital through ecosystem services caused failure by losing ecosystem functions through its trade-offs. Therefore, difference between ecosystem functions and services were demonstrated and would apply human relating perspectives. Assessment results of ecosystem functions and services can be divided 3 parts. Tree growth per year set as the ecosystem function factor and indicated through so called pure function map. After that, relating functions can be driven such as water conservation, air pollutant purification, climate change regulation, and timber production. Overall process and amount are numerically quantified. These functional results can be transferred to ecosystem services by multiplying economic unit value, so function reflecting service maps can be generated. On the other hand, above services, to implement more reliable human demand, human reflecting service maps are also be developed. As the validation, quantified ecosystem functions are compared with former results through pixel based analysis. Three maps are compared, and through comparing difference between ecosystem function and services and inversed trends in function based and human based service are analysed. In this study, we could find differences in PF, FRS, and HRS in relation to based ecosystem conditions. This study suggests that the differences in PF, FRS, and HRS should be understood in the decision making process for sustainable management of ecosystem services. Although the analysis is based on in sort existing process separation, it is important to consider the possibility of different usage of ecosystem function assessment results and ecosystem service assessment results in SDG policy making. Furthermore, process based functional approach

  16. Impact of payments for environmental services and protected areas on local livelihoods and forest conservation in northern Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Clements, Tom; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-02-01

    The potential impacts of payments for environmental services (PES) and protected areas (PAs) on environmental outcomes and local livelihoods in developing countries are contentious and have been widely debated. The available evidence is sparse, with few rigorous evaluations of the environmental and social impacts of PAs and particularly of PES. We measured the impacts on forests and human well-being of three different PES programs instituted within two PAs in northern Cambodia, using a panel of intervention villages and matched controls. Both PES and PAs delivered additional environmental outcomes relative to the counterfactual: reducing deforestation rates significantly relative to controls. PAs increased security of access to land and forest resources for local households, benefiting forest resource users but restricting households' ability to expand and diversify their agriculture. The impacts of PES on household well-being were related to the magnitude of the payments provided. The two higher paying market-linked PES programs had significant positive impacts, whereas a lower paying program that targeted biodiversity protection had no detectable effect on livelihoods, despite its positive environmental outcomes. Households that signed up for the higher paying PES programs, however, typically needed more capital assets; hence, they were less poor and more food secure than other villagers. Therefore, whereas the impacts of PAs on household well-being were limited overall and varied between livelihood strategies, the PES programs had significant positive impacts on livelihoods for those that could afford to participate. Our results are consistent with theories that PES, when designed appropriately, can be a powerful new tool for delivering conservation goals whilst benefiting local people. PMID:25492724

  17. Serological Survey for Antibodies to Mosquito-Borne Bunyaviruses Among US National Park Service and US Forest Service Employees.

    PubMed

    Kosoy, Olga; Rabe, Ingrid; Geissler, Aimee; Adjemian, Jennifer; Panella, Amanda; Laven, Janeen; Basile, Alison J; Velez, Jason; Griffith, Kevin; Wong, David; Fischer, Marc; Lanciotti, Robert S

    2016-03-01

    Serum samples from 295 employees of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM), Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO), and Grand Teton National Park with adjacent Bridger-Teton National Forest (GRTE-BTNF) were subjected to serological analysis for mosquito-borne bunyaviruses. The sera were analyzed for neutralizing antibodies against six orthobunyaviruses: La Crosse virus (LACV), Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), snowshoe hare virus (SSHV), California encephalitis virus, and Trivittatus virus (TVTV) belonging to the California serogroup and Cache Valley virus (CVV) belonging to the Bunyamwera serogroup. Sera were also tested for immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against LACV and JCV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proportion of employees with neutralizing antibodies to any California serogroup bunyavirus was similar in all three sites, with the prevalence ranging from 28% to 36%. The study demonstrated a seroprevalence of 3% to CVV across the three parks. However, proportions of persons with antibodies to specific viruses differed between parks. Participants residing in the eastern regions had a higher seroprevalence to LACV, with 24% (18/75) GRSM employees being seropositive. In contrast, SSHV seroprevalence was limited to employees from the western sites, with 1.7% (1/60) ROMO and 3.8% (6/160) GRTE-BTNF employees being positive. Seroprevalence to JCV was noted in employees from all sites at rates of 6.7% in GRSM, 21.7% in ROMO, and 15.6% in GRTE-BTNF. One employee each from ROMO (1.7%) and GRTE-BTNF (1.9%) were positive for TVTV. This study also has illustrated the greater sensitivity and specificity of plaque reduction neutralization test compared to IgG ELISA in conducting serosurveys for LACV and JCV. PMID:26855300

  18. Leguminous ground covers could reduce herbicide use in forestry. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ponder, F.

    1994-01-01

    Establishing tree seedlings in mixed stands after harvesting is difficult without adequate vegetation control. Artificial regeneration can be used to ensure desirable future stands, but competing vegetation decreases survival and growth. Vegetation control can be costly and laborious. Large amounts of herbicides are used annually in forest management to reduce vegetation that competes with trees for growing space, nutrients, water, light, and other essential components. Using herbicides to control weeds is economical, but may not always be environmentally acceptable. One alternative is to establish nitrogen-fixing (legume) ground covers, which may suppress the more competitive weeds and enrich the soil.

  19. User's guide to the douglas-fir beetle impact model. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, M.A.; Eav, B.B.; Thompson, M.K.

    1994-09-01

    Douglas-fir beetle occurs throughout the range of its principal host, Douglas-fir. At epidemic levels, the beetle causes considerable mortality in large-diameter Douglas-fir trees. Wind storms, drought, fire, and other factors have been reported as precendent conditions for epidemics of Douglas-fir beetle. An impact model has been developed to simulate tree mortality during such epidemics. The model has been linked to the Stand Prognosis Model (Forest Vegetation Simulator). This is a guide for using the model.

  20. Predicting regeneration establishment with the prognosis model. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, D.E.; Carlson, C.E.

    1993-08-01

    The conifer establishment following regeneration timber harvests is predicted by version 2 of the Regeneration Establishment Model, a submodel of the Prognosis Model. The regeneration model covers 10 species for forests in Montana, central Idaho, and northern Idaho. Most harvest and site preparation methods can be simulated so that alternative treatments can be evaluated. Also included in the model is the influence of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on regeneration success. The model predicts the probability of stocking, seedling density, species composition, and seedling heights 2 to 20 years after harvest. The paper describes the study design, equation development, model formulation, and model behavior for the Regeneration Establishment Model.

  1. Wisconsin timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1990. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Whipple, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    In terms of volume of wood used, pulp mills dominate Wisconsin's forest industry, but sawmills far outnumber any other category. There were 323 mills of all types operating in Wisconsin in 1990. Wisconsin is divided into five Survey Units. Industrial roundwood production rose from 328.7 million cubic feet in 1988 to 342.6 million cubic feet in 1990. Pulpwood accounted for 66 percent of the industrial roundwood production in 1990. In 1990, 83 percent of the total growing-stock removals due to harvest came from aspen, red oak, hard maple, red pine, white birch, jack pine, and soft maple.

  2. Population dynamics of the major north American needle-eating budworms. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    The report includes data from six western States provided 1,251 life tables representing western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis. These data provided projection capabilities for defoliation and successive budworm densities, as well as a basis for comparing survival rates among the three principal North American needle-eating budworms (western and eastern spruce budworms, and the jack pine budworm). Several modifications are suggested in current methods for managing budworm susceptible forests, and suggestions are provided for further studies on the budworm life systems.

  3. Susceptibility of volcanic ash-influenced soil in Northern Idaho to mechanical compaction. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Page-Dumroese, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Timber harvesting and mechanical site preparation can reduce site productivity if they excessively disturb or compact the soil. Volcanic ash-influenced soils with low undisturbed bulk densities and rock content are particularly susceptible. The study evaluates the effects of harvesting and site preparation on changes in the bulk density of ash-influenced forest soils in northern Idaho. Three different levels of surface organic matter were studied. Soil samples were taken before and after harvesting to determine the extent and depth of compaction. Soil bulk densities increased significantly after extensive compaction from site preparation, especially when little logging slash and surface organic matter were left on the soil surface. As site preparation intensity increased, bulk density increased significantly at greater depths in the soil profile. Although ash-influenced soils have naturally low bulk densities, they can easily be compacted to levels that limit growth. The experimental site has been designated as part of the Forest Service's national long-term site productivity study into the impacts of organic matter depletion and soil compaction on stand development.

  4. Exploring interactions between payment for hydrologic service policies, landowner decisions, and ecohydrology in a Mexican cloud forest watershed: Is there a disconnect between the policy and the resource?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbjornsen, H.; Geissert, D.; Gomez-Tagle, A.; Holwerda, F.; Manson, R.; Perez-Maqueo, O.; Munoz-Villers, L.; Scullion, J.

    2013-05-01

    Payment for hydrologic service (PHS) programs are increasingly being used as a means to incentivize watershed protection by compensating upstream 'water producers' with payments made by downstream 'water consumers'. However, the effectiveness of PHS programs in achieving their target goals is often poorly understood. Here, we draw from insights obtained from socioeconomic and ecohydrological research in Veracruz, Mexico to explore interactions between PHS policies, landowner decisions, and hydrologic services. GIS analysis of land-cover changes during 2003-2009 combined with interviews of PHS participants indicated that despite lower deforestation rates on properties receiving PES payments, other factors were likely to have a greater influence on land use decisions than PHS payments per se, including opportunity costs and personal conservation ethic. The interviews also highlighted a general lack of trust and cooperation between the citizen participants and government administrators, which was reflected in the relatively low level of knowledge of the PHS programs' regulations and goals, the role of forests in protecting water resources, and a low level of co-financing by the private sector. An important premise of PHS programs is that protecting existing forest cover (and planting trees) will enhance water supply, especially in upland cloud forests that are due to their perceived role as water producers. Measurements of climate, steamflow, canopy fog interception, plant transpiration, soil water dynamics, and hydrologic flow paths were collected over a 3-year period to assess stand water balance and streamflow response under four different land covers: mature cloud forest, pasture, regenerating cloud forest, pine reforestation. Results suggested relatively minor additional inputs of fog to increasing streamflow in cloud forest watersheds, while conversion of forest to pasture did not markedly decrease dry season flows, but did increase annual flows due to lower

  5. Screening procedure to evaluate air pollution effects in region 1 wilderness areas, 1991. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, J.; Acheson, A.; Brakke, D.; Eversman, S.; Savig, K.

    1997-07-01

    Based on mandates contained in the 1977 and 1990 Clean Air Act amendments (Public Law 95-95) and the 1964 Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-557), 25 scientists and 15 managers discussed approaches for evaluating air pollution effects on aquatic, terrestrial, and visibility resources in wilderness areas administered by Region 1 of the Forest Service. Participants identified screening parameters that may predictably vary with changes in air quality, Criteria for those parameters were identified for assessing permit applications involving new emissions that may impact wilderness values. Region 1 participation in the multi-agency process for evaluating proposed emissions would require a monitoring program, effective analysis methodology, and proactive review and consultation.

  6. Urban forest ecosystem services: A case study in Corvallis,Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Questions/Methods One EPA research focus is quantifying ecosystem services, benefits that ecosystems provide to humans, in order to promote informed natural resource management decisions and to assess the effectiveness of existing environmental policies. A case study...

  7. Forest health in the Blue Mountains: Science perspectives. A management strategy for fire-adapted ecosystems. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mutch, R.W.; Arno, S.F.; Brown, J.K.; Carlson, C.E.; Ottmar, R.D.

    1993-02-01

    The fire-adapted forests of the Blue Mountains are suffering from a forest health problem of catastrophic proportions. The composition of the forest at lower elevations has shifted from historically open-growth stands of primarily ponderosa pine and western larch to stands with dense understories of Douglas-fir and grand fir. Epidemic levels of insect infestations and large wildfires adversely affect visual quality, wildlife habitat, stream sedimentation, and timber values. A management strategy to restore forest health at lower elevations will require that the seral ponderosa pine and western larch stands be managed for much lower tree densities and a more open coniferous understory. A combination of silvicultural partial cutting and prescribed fire on a large scale will be needed to produce the desired future condition of healthy, open, and park-like forests.

  8. An application of Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES) to three national forests in Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrouse, Benson C.; Semmens, Darius J.; Clement, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread recognition that social-value information is needed to inform stakeholders and decision makers regarding trade-offs in environmental management, it too often remains absent from ecosystem service assessments. Although quantitative indicators of social values need to be explicitly accounted for in the decision-making process, they need not be monetary. Ongoing efforts to map such values demonstrate how they can also be made spatially explicit and relatable to underlying ecological information. We originally developed Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES) as a tool to assess, map, and quantify nonmarket values perceived by various groups of ecosystem stakeholders. With SolVES 2.0 we have extended the functionality by integrating SolVES with Maxent maximum entropy modeling software to generate more complete social-value maps from available value and preference survey data and to produce more robust models describing the relationship between social values and ecosystems. The current study has two objectives: (1) evaluate how effectively the value index, a quantitative, nonmonetary social-value indicator calculated by SolVES, reproduces results from more common statistical methods of social-survey data analysis and (2) examine how the spatial results produced by SolVES provide additional information that could be used by managers and stakeholders to better understand more complex relationships among stakeholder values, attitudes, and preferences. To achieve these objectives, we applied SolVES to value and preference survey data collected for three national forests, the Pike and San Isabel in Colorado and the Bridger–Teton and the Shoshone in Wyoming. Value index results were generally consistent with results found through more common statistical analyses of the survey data such as frequency, discriminant function, and correlation analyses. In addition, spatial analysis of the social-value maps produced by SolVES provided information that was

  9. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service 1996 annual report wetlands research related to the Pen Branch restoration effort on the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Kolka, R.K.; Trettin, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service and their collaborators (SRTC, SREL, and several universities) in wetlands monitoring and research on the Savannah River Site. This report describes the rationales, methods, and results (when available) of these studies and summarizes and integrates the available information through 1996.

  10. Timberland and woodland resources of central and west Oklahoma. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    The first forest survey of 44 central and west Oklahoma counties shows 1,338,100 acres of timberland and 908,700 acres of woodland. Total live-tree volume was 1,476.8 million cubic feet (cubic feet), 65 percent of which was in timberland. Post oak is the predominant species, making up 20 percent of live-tree volume on timberland and 75 percent of live-tree volume on woodland. There were 2,865 million board feet (fbm) of sawtimber, 76 percent of which was in timberland. Net growth for growing stock was 18.7 and 7.6 million cubic feed/year for timberland and woodland, respectively.

  11. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the piedmont. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 16 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Piedmont. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,753 trees sampled in the Piedmont and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  12. Pioneer exotic tree search for the douglas-fir region. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Silen, R.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    After three-quarters of a century of introduction of 152 conifer and broadleaf species, no promising candidate exotic was found for the Douglas-fir region. Growth curves spanning 50 years or longer are figured for many species. Firs, pines, larches, spruces, hemlocks, and cedars orginating in northwestern North America had superior growth rates to those from other forest regions. The probable basis for these differences is discussed. The record highlights a general failure of introduced hardwoods, the slow decline of most introduced conifers, the long time needed to express failures, dramatic effects of climatic extremes or introduced pests, failure of native species of continental origin at Wind River, striking similarities of growth rate for the species originating in each country, and many important contrasts between results from early reports and long-term conclusions.

  13. 75 FR 38456 - Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Forest Service Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program... CFLRP projects and make recommendations for project selection to the Secretary of Agriculture....

  14. 76 FR 3605 - Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Forest Service Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program... and make recommendations for project selection to the Secretary of Agriculture. DATES: The...

  15. 76 FR 9740 - Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Forest Service Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in... Parkway, Natchitoches, LA. Written comments should be sent to Holly Morgan, Kisatchie National...

  16. 75 FR 42375 - Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Forest Service Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in... Parkway, Natchitoches, LA. Written comments should be sent to Holly Morgan, Kisatchie National...

  17. Climatic influences on the spatial distribution of ecosystem services and costs in the Los Angeles urban forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, H. R.; Pataki, D. E.; Weller, L. T.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial distribution of urban ecosystem services (e.g. shading, flowering or provision of food) and costs (such as irrigation) is dependent in part on the biogeography of the species and plant communities of interest. In natural ecosystems, the distribution of plant species and functional types is in large part limited by climatic conditions and the ability of plants to disperse. However, in urban ecosystems many species are planted, and their distribution may depend largely on social factors such as income and neighborhood age. The importance of climatic gradients in these settings is unknown. In order to understand the factors that affect the distribution of urban trees with different functional traits and ecosystem services, urban forest inventories were conducted on >350 plots within the city of Los Angeles. Los Angeles is a city with extreme socioeconomic diversity and a complex history of urban development patterns, as well as a sharp climatic gradient largely influenced by proximity to the coast. Thus, the plots covered a range of neighborhood ages, household incomes, and climates. We found that more moderate climate zones (generally closer to the coast) had a higher proportion of evergreen species and flowering species than warmer, more inland areas. In general, we have found that many of these flowering species have relatively low water use efficiency. In contrast, the distribution of fruiting trees seemed largely related to land use history in this area: the proportion of fruiting trees was highest in areas formerly used for citrus production. There was also a slight trend towards a higher proportion of high water using species in inland areas. This pattern could result in significant water costs, as the combination of intrinsically high water use and high atmospheric demand will compound urban forest water loss in inland areas. Although environmental drivers can be difficult to disentangle from social drivers, our results thus far suggest that

  18. Biology, ecology, and social aspects of wild edible mushrooms in the forests of the Pacific northwest: A preface to managing commercial harvest. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, R.; O'Dell, T.; Luoma, D.; Amaranthus, M.; Costellano, M.

    1993-02-01

    The commercial harvest of edible, forest fungi has a multimillion dollar industry with several thousand tons harvested annually. The primary objectives of the overview paper are to provide information on the biology of forest fungi, describe the major edible fungi harvested in the Pacific Northwest, integrate a perspective on the social aspects of the mushroom harvest issue, summarize the development of the commercial mushroom industry, and suggest research and monitoring protocols for developing management guidelines.

  19. Visions of success and achievement in recreation-related USDA Forest Service NEPA processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Marc J.; Blahna, Dale J.; Cerveny, Lee K.; Mortimer, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is incorporated into the planning and decision-making culture of all natural resource agencies in the U.S. Yet, we know little about how the attitudes and internal interactions of interdisciplinary (ID) teams engaged in NEPA processes influence process outcomes. We conducted a web-based survey of 106 ID team leaders involved with environmental analyses (EA) or environmental impact statements (EIS) for projects dealing with recreation and travel management on national forests. We explore how they define success in these processes and identify factors most powerfully associated with perceptions of positive outcomes. The survey revealed a tremendous diversity in definitions of success. Strong correlations between the perceived importance of particular indicators of success and their achievement suggest that pre-conceived notions may often help to shape process outcomes. Regression analyses revealed the following factors as the best predictors of ID team leaders' perception of an 'excellent outcome': achievement of the agency mission, whether compromise had taken place between the interested parties, team satisfaction and harmony, timely process completion, and project implementation. Yet, respondents consistently ranked compromise with interested parties and team member satisfaction among the least important measures of successful NEPA processes. Results suggest that clarifying appropriate measures of success in NEPA processes across the agency could make ID team performance more consistent. The research also suggests that greater attention to ID team interactions, both internally and between teams and interested publics, could result in better outcomes.

  20. A wood and bark fuel economics computer program (FEP). Forest service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harpole, G.B.; Ince, P.J.; Tschernitz, J.L.; Bilek, E.

    1982-09-01

    Forest products harvesting and manufacturing processes are expected to provide large and continuing supplies of wood and bark residues. At the same time, the demand for wood residue-type materials for production of wood-fiber based products as well as wood and bark fuels is expected to create competing utilization alternatives. Primary objectives of the fuel economics computer program (FEP) presented here are: (1) to provide a means for assessing the relative energy values of fossil fuels and wood/bark fuels, and (2) to provide pre-engineering assessments of the potential investment that may be justified by benefits gained through modification of systems to burn wood/bark fuels. The FEP computer program utilizes readily available fuel and economics information, standard combustion equations, and discounted cash flow analytic techniques. Because the FEP program is designed for preliminary assessments of wood/bark fuel use opportunities it is suggested that more advanced engineering and financial analytic methods be used for further evaluation whenever favorable venture likelihoods are indicated by the FEP program.

  1. Annotated list of the flora of the Bisley Area, luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico 1987 to 1992. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chinea, J.D.; Beymer, R.J.; Sastre de Jesus, I.; Scatena, F.N.

    1993-08-01

    The plant species of the Bisley area were surveyed for several years, mostly as a result of studies conducted under the Long-Term Ecological Research Program of the National Science Foundation. A list was prepared that contains a total of 336 plant species in 255 genera and 102 families of bryophytes and vascular plants. Within these species there are 107 tree species, 20 shrub species, 28 dicotyledonous vines, 86 herbs, 52 bryophytes, and 43 ferns. There are 22 introduced and 314 native species (of the later, 30 are endemic to Puerto Rico). Nine families account for 39 percent of all species found in the Bisley area. Forests of the Bisley area have been classified as subtropical wet forests, lower montane rain forests, and single-dominant forests. The Bisley watersheds are covered by a secondary forest of the tabonuco type (Dacryodes excelsa). This forest type is part of the Dacryodes-Sloanea association of Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and higher elevation islands of the Lesser Antilles.

  2. Shade Trading: An Emerging Riparian Forest-Based Payment for Ecosystem Services Market in Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillozet, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the regulatory and compliance context for Oregon's emerging ecosystem services (ES) market in riparian shade to meet water quality obligations. In Oregon's market as with many other ES programs, contracts and other regulatory documents not only delimit the obligations and liabilities of different parties, but also constitute a primary mechanism through which ES service delivery is measured. Through a review of compliance criteria I find that under Oregon's shade trades, permittees are held to a number of input-based criteria, which essentially affirm that parties comply with predetermined practices and procedures, and one `pseudo output based' criterion, in which ES delivery is estimated through a model. The case presented in the paper critically engages with the challenges of measuring ES and in assessing the outcomes of ES projects. It places these challenges as interrelated and proposes that market designers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should consider explicit efficacy, efficiency, and equity targets.

  3. Shade Trading: An Emerging Riparian Forest-Based Payment for Ecosystem Services Market in Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Guillozet, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the regulatory and compliance context for Oregon's emerging ecosystem services (ES) market in riparian shade to meet water quality obligations. In Oregon's market as with many other ES programs, contracts and other regulatory documents not only delimit the obligations and liabilities of different parties, but also constitute a primary mechanism through which ES service delivery is measured. Through a review of compliance criteria I find that under Oregon's shade trades, permittees are held to a number of input-based criteria, which essentially affirm that parties comply with predetermined practices and procedures, and one 'pseudo output based' criterion, in which ES delivery is estimated through a model. The case presented in the paper critically engages with the challenges of measuring ES and in assessing the outcomes of ES projects. It places these challenges as interrelated and proposes that market designers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should consider explicit efficacy, efficiency, and equity targets. PMID:26099569

  4. Guidelines for evaluating air-pollution impacts on Class I wilderness areas in the Pacific Northwest. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.; Schmoldt, D.; Peterson, D.; Eilers, J.; Fisher, R.

    1992-05-01

    Forest Service air resource managers in the Pacific Northwest are responsible for protecting class 1 wilderness areas from air pollution. To do this, they need scientifically defensible information to determine critical concentrations of air pollution having the potential to impact class 1 wilderness values. This report documents the results of a workshop where current information on air pollution effects on aquatic and terrestrial resources and visibility was gathered from participating scientists and managers. Critical air pollution concentrations were determined for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone. Critical values for sulfur and nitrogen deposition to forest ecosystems are listed.

  5. 76 FR 54196 - Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Forest Service Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee..., Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory...

  6. 78 FR 65962 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of meeting of the Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board. SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Black Hills National Forest cancelled the October 16, 2013 meeting of the...

  7. 77 FR 22755 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board AGENCY: USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of meetings of the Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board. SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Black Hills National Forest was required...

  8. Modelling the Spatial-temporal Variation of Urban/peri-urban Forests and Their Ecosystem Services: a Case Study of North-West Sydney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeh, I. A.; Zou, X. L.

    2015-12-01

    In terms of total terrestrial sequestered carbon, the global soils and forests are recognized as the predominant C sinks. Even though urban forests stored a relatively small proportion of the total terrestrial C, they also provide other important ecosystem services such as improving air quality, cooling effect in buildings and aesthetics. Thus in view of these environmental services the quantification of urban tree is increasingly viewed as essential to the understanding of how these ecosystem services can be optimized. The aims of this paper are to: i) quantify the spatial-temporal distribution of urban forests in Northwest Sydney using remote sensing techniques; ii) determine the total urban C-storage over many decades; iii) apply UFORE model to estimate air pollutant removal ability of urban forest. The results revealed the estimated total trees in Northwest Sydney in 2011was approximately 2.3 million. These urban forests potentially store an estimated 1.3 million tons of carbon in various forms such as biomass, soil carbon, etc. The relative carbon sequestration rate of these trees was estimated to be about 20,500 tC/yr (equivalent to AUD 467,000/year). Furthermore, the results show that trees near buildings can potentially avoid AUD 12.9 million of energy cost every year and 70000 tons of carbon emission, the latter which is equivalent to additional savings of nearly AUD 1.6 million per year. We also estimated that urban forests in the study area could potentially remove about 44,600 tons of pollutants (mainly greenhouse gases) annually equivalent to a saving of about AUD 409 million per year. Thus the results reveal the spatial-temporal variation of urban vegetation in the last twenty year between 1991 and 2011. The study has showcased the importance and potential role of urban forests in preserving carbon and thus reducing GHG emissions into atmosphere. Furthermore, these results highlight the significant value of urban forests in term of pollutant removal

  9. 78 FR 6806 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forest Resource Committee Meeting will meet in Arlington, Va. The committee is... copying. The public may inspect comments received on the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Web...

  10. 76 FR 79151 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forest Resource Committee Meeting will meet in Washington, DC on January 20, 2012... closed to the public. The Forest Resource Committee is authorized under the Food, Conservation,...

  11. Contingent valuation study of the value of reducing fire hazards to old-growth forests in the Pacific northwest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, J.B.; Gonzalez-Caban, A.; Gregory, R.

    1996-07-01

    A contingent valuation methodology was applied to old-growth forests and critical habitat units for the Northern Spotted Owl in Oregon to esimate the economic value to the public in knowing that rare and unique ecosystems will be protected from fire for current and future generations. Generalizing to the whole state, the total annual willingness-to-pay of Oregon residents ranges from $49.6 to $99 million. In terms of old-growth forests protected from fire, the value is $28 per acre.

  12. Impact of Forest Management on Future Forest Carbon Storage in Alaska Coastal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Kushch, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The forest in Coastal Alaska are unique in many ways. Two groups of forest types occur in the Alaska region: boreal and temperate rain forests. About eighty-eight percent of these forests are in public ownership. High proportations of reserved forests and old-growth forests make the forests in coastal Alaska differ from that in other coastal regions. This study is focused on how forest management actions may impact the future carbon stocks and flux in coastal Alaska forests. The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data collected by US Forest Service are the primary data used for estimation of current carbon storage and projections of future forest carbon storage for all forest carbon pools in Alaska coastal forests under different management scenarios and climate change effect.

  13. Turning the tide: how blue carbon and payments for ecosystem services (PES) might help save mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Tommaso; Binet, Thomas; Kairo, James Gitundu; King, Lesley; Madden, Sarah; Patenaude, Genevieve; Upton, Caroline; Huxham, Mark

    2014-12-01

    In this review paper, we aim to describe the potential for, and the key challenges to, applying PES projects to mangroves. By adopting a "carbocentric approach," we show that mangrove forests are strong candidates for PES projects. They are particularly well suited to the generation of carbon credits because of their unrivaled potential as carbon sinks, their resistance and resilience to natural hazards, and their extensive provision of Ecosystem Services other than carbon sequestration, primarily nursery areas for fish, water purification and coastal protection, to the benefit of local communities as well as to the global population. The voluntary carbon market provides opportunities for the development of appropriate protocols and good practice case studies for mangroves at a small scale, and these may influence larger compliance schemes in the future. Mangrove habitats are mostly located in developing countries on communally or state-owned land. This means that issues of national and local governance, land ownership and management, and environmental justice are the main challenges that require careful planning at the early stages of mangrove PES projects to ensure successful outcomes and equitable benefit sharing within local communities. PMID:24817088

  14. Replacing monocultures with mixed-species stands: Ecosystem service implications of two production forest alternatives in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Felton, Adam; Nilsson, Urban; Sonesson, Johan; Felton, Annika M; Roberge, Jean-Michel; Ranius, Thomas; Ahlström, Martin; Bergh, Johan; Björkman, Christer; Boberg, Johanna; Drössler, Lars; Fahlvik, Nils; Gong, Peichen; Holmström, Emma; Keskitalo, E Carina H; Klapwijk, Maartje J; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lundmark, Tomas; Niklasson, Mats; Nordin, Annika; Pettersson, Maria; Stenlid, Jan; Sténs, Anna; Wallertz, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    Whereas there is evidence that mixed-species approaches to production forestry in general can provide positive outcomes relative to monocultures, it is less clear to what extent multiple benefits can be derived from specific mixed-species alternatives. To provide such insights requires evaluations of an encompassing suite of ecosystem services, biodiversity, and forest management considerations provided by specific mixtures and monocultures within a region. Here, we conduct such an assessment in Sweden by contrasting even-aged Norway spruce (Picea abies)-dominated stands, with mixed-species stands of spruce and birch (Betula pendula or B. pubescens), or spruce and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). By synthesizing the available evidence, we identify positive outcomes from mixtures including increased biodiversity, water quality, esthetic and recreational values, as well as reduced stand vulnerability to pest and pathogen damage. However, some uncertainties and risks were projected to increase, highlighting the importance of conducting comprehensive interdisciplinary evaluations when assessing the pros and cons of mixtures. PMID:26744048

  15. 75 FR 66718 - Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Forest Service Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan EIS AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... the existing motorized public access routes and prohibitions within the Blackfoot travel planning area. Consistent with the Forest Service travel planning regulations, the resulting available public...

  16. Impacts of human activity and climate on the hydrology and ecosystem services of forests in the Guianas on the northern rim of Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, G.; Wagner, T.; Bovolo, I.; Pereira, R.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical deforestation is one of the main areas of international concern in relation to increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide and feedbacks between land cover and climate. The Guiana Shield region, including the Guianas (Guyana, Surinam, and French Guiana), contains one of the largest remaining continuous areas of tropical forest on the Earth, and is therefore of international importance for climate stability. Its importance to the regional climate of South America is also potentially significant, as a possible conduit for vapour transport between the Caribbean and the continental interior. However, recent studies have confirmed the paucity of reliable hydrometeorological data in the forested interior in the Guianas that could help to improve understanding of these macro-scale links as well as the more local impacts of forest activities. A new hydrological monitoring programme has been established at the Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development in the interior of Guyana to provide evidence related to the impacts of forest activities and climate on ecosystem services provided by the forest. These services include water, carbon and nutrient cycling that are essential for maintaining biodiversity and other indicators necessary for long-term sustainability of the forest environment. The Iwokrama Centre aims to test the concept of a truly sustainable forest where conservation, environmental balance and economic use are mutually reinforcing. Iwokrama is uniquely placed for this research, in that it has integral involvement of the indigenous forest communities, and is geographically situated at a transition between mature intact forest and a savannah region that is likely to be sensitive to climate change, and on a larger scale at a transition between distinctive climate types in the coastal region of the Guianas influenced by the Equatorial Trough and the Amazonian interior which experiences a more continental type climate. The

  17. Forest structure and landscape patterns in the subalpine lodgepole pine type: A procedure for quantifying past and present conditions. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Arno, S.F.; Reinhardt, E.D.; Scott, J.H.

    1993-02-01

    The report presents a method of quantitatively representing the mosaic of stand types on a small landscape in the subalpine lodgepole pine forest type. The method utilizes macroplots placed systematically on a transect grid. Structure and composition of both current and past stands are inventoried. Procedures for data analysis and interpretation are illustrated for a lodgepole pine landscape in Montana.

  18. Locatable Mineral Reports for Colorado, South Dakota, and Wyoming provided to the USDA Forest Service in Fiscal Years 2006-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Anna B.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is required by Congress (under Public Law 86-509) to provide Locatable Mineral Reports to the USDA Forest Service whenever National Forest System lands are sold or exchanged. This volume is a compilation of the reports already provided to the Forest Service by the author in fiscal years 2006-2009 (October 2006-September 2009). Altogether, the reports describe the geology and locatable mineral resource potential of 57 properties offered in 10 land-exchange proposals. Approximately 41,084 acres were evaluated: 19,068 acres in Federal parcels and 22,016 acres in non-Federal parcels. The parcels are located in eight National Forests and one National Grassland in three States. Locatable Mineral Reports provide a summary of the geology and a subjective appraisal of the mineral resource potential of land parcels considered for exchange. Information in each report is based on a review of published maps and reports, unpublished data in U.S. Geological Survey files, the professional expertise of the writer, and interviews with other knowledgeable geoscientists. No visits were conducted to support the reports included in this volume. The mineral resource information provided is used in making relative comparisons of the potential future mineral value of lands being offered in an exchange and in appraising the value of the land. Future mineral potential value is subjectively expressed in qualitative terms using a three-tier nomenclature of 'high,' 'moderate,' and 'low.' In general, 'high' is applied where mineral deposits are present on the property or adjacent to it or there are other indications that the area has been mineralized. 'Moderate' is applied where mineralization is only suspected or where an area possesses some of the same geologic characteristics that are common to areas around known mineral deposits. A 'low' value is routinely applied to all remaining areas, with the understanding that the information required to prove the absence of

  19. Establishment and maintenance of regulating ecosystem services in a dryland area of Central Asia: the Kökyar Protection Forest, Aksu, NW China, as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missall, S.; Welp, M.; Thevs, N.; Abliz, A.; Halik, Ü.

    2014-12-01

    The city of Aksu, situated at the northern fringe of the Taklimakan Desert in the northwest of China, is exposed to periodic severe dust and sand storms. In 1986, local authorities decided to establish a peri-urban shelterbelt plantation, the so-called Kökyar Protection Forest. It was realised as a patchwork of poplar shelterbelts and orchards. The total area of the plantation reached 3800 ha in 2005. This endeavour was made possible by the annual mass mobilisation of Aksu citizens, based on the Chinese regulation of the "National Compulsory Afforestation Campaigns". Establishment costs amounted to ca. CNY 60 000 ha-1 (ca. USD 10 000 ha-1). The regulating ecosystem services provided by Kökyar Protection Forest clearly reduce dust and sand storm impacts on Aksu City. Permanent maintenance of the plantation is facilitated by leasing orchard plots to private fruit farmers. This system ensures forest tending, reduces government expenses, and provides incomes to farmers. From the perspective of the local economy, annual farming net benefits generated by Kökyar fruit farmers more than compensate annual government grants for maintenance, resulting in an overall monetary net benefit of at least CNY 10 500 ha-1 (ca. USD 1600 ha-1) on the long-term average. The intended regulating ecosystem services can thus be provided to the citizens of Aksu without payments for ecosystem services or other financial burdens. For a more complete understanding of Kökyar Protection Forest, future research should be directed towards quantifying the effect of its regulating ecosystem services, and on investigating the negative downstream consequences of its water consumption.

  20. Measuring the willingness to pay user fees for interpretive services at a national forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhor-Wilcock, Barbara Ashley

    An understanding of willingness to pay (WTP) for nonmarket environmental goods is useful for planning and policy, but difficult to determine. WTP for interpretive services was investigated using interviews with 361 participants in guided nature tours. Immediately after the tour, participants were asked to state their WIT for the tour. Responses were predominantly 5 (42%), 2 (14%) and 10 (13%). A predetermined amount was added to the open-ended (OE) WTP offer and respondents were asked if they were willing to pay a larger amount. Acceptance of the larger amount depended strongly on the relative increase over the initial WTP. If the increase was smaller than the initial offer, most respondents agreed, whereas if the increment was larger, most did not agree, suggesting that the initial offer was approximately half of the true WTP. The two WTP questions were used to define lower and upper bounds for each respondent's true WTP. A censored interval regression was used to estimate a WTP distribution with mean 11.30 and median $10.00. The median is twice that of the OE WTP, further suggesting that the OE response understated value by 50 percent. The estimated true WTP distribution and the OE WTP distribution have a weak, but statistically significant, dependence on some demographic, travel, and benefit variables, although these relations have negligible practical significance over the observed range of the variables. To evaluate whether the WTP amounts were based on a true economic tradeoff, respondents were asked to explain their WTP responses. For the initial OE question, 38% gave explanations that could be interpreted as an economic tradeoff, whereas 33% gave reasons that were clearly irrelevant. For the second, dichotomous choice (DC), question, 59% gave reasons suggesting a relevant economic judgement. A DC question may provoke apparently relevant answers, regardless of the underlying reasoning (a majority simply said "it was (not) worth it"). The DC reasoning may

  1. Integrating forest ecosystem services into the farming landscape: A stochastic economic assessment.

    PubMed

    Monge, Juan J; Parker, Warren J; Richardson, James W

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess how payments for ecosystem services could assist plantation forestry's integration into pastoral dairy farming in order to improve environmental outcomes and increase business resilience to both price uncertainty and production limits imposed by environmental policies. Stochastic Dominance (SD) criteria and portfolio analysis, accounting for farmers' risk aversion levels, were used to rank different land-use alternatives and landscapes with different levels of plantation forestry integration. The study was focused on a modal 200-ha dairy farm in the Lake Rotorua Catchment of the Central North Island region of New Zealand, where national environmental policies are being implemented to improve water quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Nitrogen and carbon payments would help farmers improve early cash flows for forestry, provide financial leverage to undertake afforestation projects and contribute to improved environmental outcomes for the catchment. The SD criteria demonstrated that although dairy farming generates the highest returns, plantation forestry with nitrogen and carbon payments would be a preferred alternative for landowners with relatively low risk aversion levels who consider return volatility and environmental limits within their land-use change criteria. Using the confidence premium concept, environmental payments to encourage plantation forestry into the landscape were shown to be lower when the majority of landowners are risk averse. The certainty equivalence approach helped to identify the optimal dairy-forestry portfolio arrangements for landowners of different levels of risk aversion, intensities of dairy farming (status quo and intensified) and nitrogen prices. At low nitrogen prices, risk neutral farmers would choose to afforest less than half of the farm and operate at the maximum nitrogen allowance, because dairy farming at both intensities provides the highest return among the different land

  2. Impact of payments for environmental services and protected areas on local livelihoods and forest conservation in northern Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Tom; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-01-01

    The potential impacts of payments for environmental services (PES) and protected areas (PAs) on environmental outcomes and local livelihoods in developing countries are contentious and have been widely debated. The available evidence is sparse, with few rigorous evaluations of the environmental and social impacts of PAs and particularly of PES. We measured the impacts on forests and human well-being of three different PES programs instituted within two PAs in northern Cambodia, using a panel of intervention villages and matched controls. Both PES and PAs delivered additional environmental outcomes relative to the counterfactual: reducing deforestation rates significantly relative to controls. PAs increased security of access to land and forest resources for local households, benefiting forest resource users but restricting households’ ability to expand and diversify their agriculture. The impacts of PES on household well-being were related to the magnitude of the payments provided. The two higher paying market-linked PES programs had significant positive impacts, whereas a lower paying program that targeted biodiversity protection had no detectable effect on livelihoods, despite its positive environmental outcomes. Households that signed up for the higher paying PES programs, however, typically needed more capital assets; hence, they were less poor and more food secure than other villagers. Therefore, whereas the impacts of PAs on household well-being were limited overall and varied between livelihood strategies, the PES programs had significant positive impacts on livelihoods for those that could afford to participate. Our results are consistent with theories that PES, when designed appropriately, can be a powerful new tool for delivering conservation goals whilst benefiting local people. El Impacto de los Pagos por Servicios Ambientales y Áreas Protegidas sobre la Subsistencia Local y la Conservación del Bosque en el Norte de Camboya Resumen Los impactos

  3. Integrating land use and climate change scenarios and models into assessment of forested watershed services in Southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Trisurat, Yongyut; Eawpanich, Piyathip; Kalliola, Risto

    2016-05-01

    The Thadee watershed, covering 112km(2), is the main source of water for agriculture and household consumption in the Nakhon Srithammarat Province in Southern Thailand. As the natural forests upstream have been largely degraded and transformed to fruit tree and rubber plantations, problems with landslides and flooding have resulted. This research attempts to predict how further land-use/land-cover changes during 2009-2020 and conceivable changes in rainfall may influence the future levels of water yield and sediment load in the Thadee River. Three different land use scenarios (trend, development and conservation) were defined in collaboration with the local stakeholders, and three different rainfall scenarios (average rainfall, climate change and extreme wet) were determined on the basis of literature sources. Spatially explicit empirical modelling was employed to allocate future land demands and to assess the contributions of land use and rainfall changes, considering both their separate and combined effects. The results suggest that substantial land use changes may occur from a large expansion of rubber plantations in the upper sub-watersheds, especially under the development land use scenario. The reduction of the current annual rainfall by approximately 30% would decrease the predicted water yields by 38% from 2009. According to the extreme rainfall scenario (an increase of 36% with respect to current rainfall), an amplification of 50% of the current runoff could result. Sensitivity analyses showed that the predicted soil loss is more responsive to changes in rainfall than to the compared land use scenarios alone. However, very high sediment load and runoff levels were predicted on the basis of combined intensified land use and extreme rainfall scenarios. Three conservation activities-protection, reforestation and a mixed-cropping system-are proposed to maintain the functional watershed services of the Thadee watershed region. PMID:26915561

  4. The groundwater recharge response and hydrologic services of tropical humid forest ecosystems to use and reforestation: Support for the “infiltration-evapotranspiration trade-off hypothesis”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Jagdish; Bonell, Michael; Venkatesh, Basappa; Purandara, Bekal K.; Rakesh, K. N.; Lele, Sharachchandra; Kiran, M. C.; Reddy, Veerabasawant; Badiger, Shrinivas

    2013-08-01

    The hydrologic effects of forest use and reforestation of degraded lands in the humid tropics has implications for local and regional hydrologic services but such issues have been relatively less studied when compared to the impacts of forest conversion. In particular, the “infiltration-evapotranspiration trade-off” hypothesis which predicts a net gain or loss to baseflow and dry-season flow under both, forest degradation or reforestation depending on conditions has not been tested adequately. In the Western Ghats of India, we examined the hydrologic responses and groundwater recharge and hydrologic services linked with three ecosystems, (1) remnant tropical evergreen forest (NF), (2) heavily-used former evergreen forest which now has been converted to tree savanna, known as degraded forest(DF), and (3) exotic Acacia plantations (AC, Acacia auriculiformis) on degraded former forest land. Instrumented catchments ranging from 7 to 23 ha representing these three land-covers (3 NF, 4 AC and 4 DF, in total 11 basins), were established and maintained between 2003 and 2005 at three sites in two geomorphological zones, Coastal and Up-Ghat (Malnaad). Four larger (1-2 km2) catchments downstream of the head-water catchments in the Malnaad with varying proportions of different land-cover and providing irrigation water for areca-nut and paddy rice were also measured for post-monsoon baseflow. Daily hydrological and climate data was available at all the sites. In addition, 36 min data was available at the Coastal site for 41 days as part of the opening phase of the summer monsoon, June-July 2005. Low potential and actual evapotranspiration rates during the monsoon that are similar across all land-cover ensures that the main control on the extent of groundwater recharge during the south-west monsoon is the proportion of rainfall that is converted into quick flow rather than differences in evapotranspiration between the different land cover types. The Flow duration curves

  5. 36 CFR 223.110 - Delegation to regional forester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 223.110 Delegation to regional forester. The Chief, Forest Service, after approval of conditions of... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delegation to regional forester. 223.110 Section 223.110 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  6. Timber resource statistics for the San Joaquin and southern resource areas of California. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1997-05-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the San Joaquin and Southern Resource Areas of California. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of some areas. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of timberland area and timber volume are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  7. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values

  8. 78 FR 41782 - Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests; Idaho; Notice To Proceed With Forest Plan Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... Forest Service Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests; Idaho; Notice To Proceed With Forest Plan Revision AGENCY: Forest Service, Northern Region, Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests, USDA. ACTION: Notice of initiating the development of a proposed forest plan revision for the Nez Perce-Clearwater National...

  9. Biomass and nutrient distributions in central Oregon second-growth ponderosa pine ecosystems. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.N.; Shainsky, L.J.

    1995-03-01

    We investigated the distributioin of biomass and nurtrients in second-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) ecosystems in central Oregon. Destructive sampling of aboveground and belowground tree biomass was carried out at six sites in the Deschutes National Forest; three of these sites also were intensively sampled for biomass and nutrient concentrations of the soil, forest floor, residue, and shrub components. Tree biomass equations were developed that related component biomass to diameter at breast height and total tree height.

  10. 36 CFR 223.216 - Special Forest Products definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special Forest Products definitions. 223.216 Section 223.216 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  11. 36 CFR 223.216 - Special Forest Products definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special Forest Products definitions. 223.216 Section 223.216 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  12. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  13. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  14. 36 CFR 223.216 - Special Forest Products definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special Forest Products definitions. 223.216 Section 223.216 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  15. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  16. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  17. 36 CFR 223.216 - Special Forest Products definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special Forest Products definitions. 223.216 Section 223.216 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  18. 36 CFR 223.110 - Delegation to regional forester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delegation to regional forester. 223.110 Section 223.110 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  19. 36 CFR 223.110 - Delegation to regional forester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delegation to regional forester. 223.110 Section 223.110 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  20. 36 CFR 223.110 - Delegation to regional forester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delegation to regional forester. 223.110 Section 223.110 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  1. 36 CFR 223.110 - Delegation to regional forester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delegation to regional forester. 223.110 Section 223.110 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST...

  2. 76 FR 28210 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Forest Service Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Walker... the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with the title II of the Act....

  3. 77 FR 47358 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with Title II of the Act....

  4. 77 FR 46375 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... Forest Service Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Walker... recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with the title II of the Act....

  5. 77 FR 51753 - Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Forest Service Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC... and recommendations to the Forest Service concerning projects and funding consistent with title II...

  6. Special forest products: An east-side perspective. Interior Columbia Basin ecosystem management project: Scientific assessment. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, W.E.; Blatner, K.

    1997-02-01

    The special forest products industry has gained increasing attention, as timber harvest levels in the Pacific Northwest have declined, and has been heralded, at least by some, as a partial solution to the employment problems common throughout the rural areas of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. To date, relatively little work has been published on those portions of the industry located east of the Cascade Range. Yet the east side produced about 48 percent of the total wild edible mushroom harvest (about 1.9 million pounds worth $11.8 million) during 1992. The region also accounts for all of the baby`s breath harvested in the Pacific Northwest and has the potential to produce large quantities of other foral products. It also seems to have the potential to become an important producer of other edibles and medicinal products; however, relatively little is known about this segment of the industry. The following report provides overview of the special forest products industry east of the Cascade Range and evaluates its potential for expansion.

  7. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  8. 75 FR 54085 - Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, Rio Grande National Forest, USDA. ACTION: Corrected Notice...

  9. 76 FR 17818 - Umatilla National Forest, Columbia County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Forest Service Umatilla National Forest, Columbia County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Umatilla National Forest, Columbia County Resource...) Discussion and selection proposed projects for 2012 and if there are participants, (3) Public...

  10. 77 FR 43046 - Lolo National Forest; Montana; Center Horse Landscape Restoration EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Forest Service Lolo National Forest; Montana; Center Horse Landscape Restoration EIS AGENCY: Forest.... ADDRESSES: Send written comments to: Center Horse Landscape Restoration Project Leader, USDA Forest Service..., Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose and Need for Action The Center Horse...

  11. 76 FR 81911 - National Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... Forest Service National Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule AGENCY: USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of intent to establish an advisory... Advisory Committee for Implementation of the National Forest System Land Management Planning...

  12. 75 FR 38767 - Intermountain Region, Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests; ID; Amendment to the 2003...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Forest Service Intermountain Region, Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests; ID; Amendment to the 2003 Land and Resource Management Plans: Wildlife Conservation Strategy (Forested Biological Community) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Third correction of notice of intent (NOI) to prepare...

  13. Screening procedure to evaluate effects of air pollution on Eastern Region wildernesses cited as Class I air-quality areas. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.B.; Nichols, D.S.; Federer, C.A.; Jensen, K.F.; Parrott, H.

    1991-09-01

    The USDA Forest Service's Eastern Region manages eight wilderness areas that have been designated as Class I air quality areas by the Federal Clean Air Act. As part of the legislation, Federal land managers are required to consult with air pollution regulators on the potential impacts of proposed air pollution emissions on the air quality-related values (AQRV) of these wilderness areas. An interim procedure for screening applications for Prevention of Significant Deterioration permits required for Class I areas is discussed, and the AQRVs for the eight Eastern Region wilderness areas are described.

  14. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. James A. Burger

    2002-02-04

    This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

  15. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  16. The U.S. Forest Service's analysis of cumulative effects to wildlife: A study of legal standards, current practice, and ongoing challenges on a National Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Courtney A.

    2012-01-15

    Cumulative effects analysis (CEA) allows natural resource managers to understand the status of resources in historical context, learn from past management actions, and adapt future activities accordingly. U.S. federal agencies are required to complete CEA as part of environmental impact assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Past research on CEA as part of NEPA has identified significant deficiencies in CEA practice, suggested methodologies for handling difficult aspects of CEA, and analyzed the rise in litigation over CEA in U.S. courts. This article provides a review of the literature and legal standards related to CEA as it is done under NEPA and then examines current practice on a U.S. National Forest, utilizing qualitative methods in order to provide a detailed understanding of current approaches to CEA. Research objectives were to understand current practice, investigate ongoing challenges, and identify impediments to improvement. Methods included a systematic review of a set of NEPA documents and semi-structured interviews with practitioners, scientists, and members of the public. Findings indicate that the primary challenges associated with CEA include: issues of both geographic and temporal scale of analysis, confusion over the purpose of the requirement, the lack of monitoring data, and problems coordinating and disseminating data. Improved monitoring strategies and programmatic analyses could support improved CEA practice.

  17. Hurricane Impacts on Ecological Services and Economic Values of Coastal Urban Forest: A Case Study of Pensacola, Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    As urbanized areas continue to grow and green spaces dwindle, the importance of urban forests increases for both ecologically derived health benefits and for their potential to mitigate climate change. This study examined pre- and post- hurricane conditions of Pensacola's urban f...

  18. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-08-04

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Baseline soil carbon was determined for each of the eighty-one plots. Fertility analysis of soil samples was completed and these data were used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions and the pre-designated plots were fertilized. We also evaluated economic-based policy instruments that are designed to mitigate the reforestation burden borne by the owner of reclaimed mined land. Results suggest that although profitability of reforestation of these previously reclaimed mine lands may be achievable on better sites under lower interest rates, substantial payments would be required to reach

  19. An integrated eco-hydrologic modeling framework for assessing the effects of interacting stressors on forest ecosystem services - ESRP mtg

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently established the Ecosystem Services Research Program to help formulate methods and models for conducting comprehensive risk assessments that quantify how multiple ecosystem services interact and respond in concert to environmental ...

  20. An integrated eco-hydrologic modeling framework for assessing the effects of interacting stressors on forest ecosystem services

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently established the Ecosystem Services Research Program to help formulate methods and models for conducting comprehensive risk assessments that quantify how multiple ecosystem services interact and respond in concert to environmental ...

  1. Forest health and global change.

    PubMed

    Trumbore, S; Brando, P; Hartmann, H

    2015-08-21

    Humans rely on healthy forests to supply energy, building materials, and food and to provide services such as storing carbon, hosting biodiversity, and regulating climate. Defining forest health integrates utilitarian and ecosystem measures of forest condition and function, implemented across a range of spatial scales. Although native forests are adapted to some level of disturbance, all forests now face novel stresses in the form of climate change, air pollution, and invasive pests. Detecting how intensification of these stresses will affect the trajectory of forests is a major scientific challenge that requires developing systems to assess the health of global forests. It is particularly critical to identify thresholds for rapid forest decline, because it can take many decades for forests to restore the services that they provide. PMID:26293952

  2. Establishment and maintenance of regulating ecosystem services in a dryland area of central Asia, illustrated using the Kökyar Protection Forest, Aksu, NW China, as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missall, S.; Welp, M.; Thevs, N.; Abliz, A.; Halik, Ü.

    2015-06-01

    The city of Aksu, situated at the northern fringe of the Taklimakan Desert in northwest China, is exposed to severe periodic dust and sand storms. In 1986, local authorities decided to establish a peri-urban shelterbelt plantation, the so-called Kökyar Protection Forest, with the aim of reducing dust and sand storm impacts on Aksu City by the regulating ecosystem services provided by the plantation. It was realised as a patchwork of poplar shelterbelts and orchards. The total area of the plantation reached 3800 ha in 2005. The Kökyar Protection Forest is used as a case study to answer the following question: under which institutional frameworks and to which financial conditions can peri-urban shelterbelts be established and maintained? The endeavour of planting the shelterbelt was made possible by the annual mass mobilisation of Aksu citizens, based on the Chinese regulation of the "National Compulsory Afforestation Campaigns". Establishment costs amounted to ca. CNY 60 000 ha-1 (ca. USD 10 000 ha-1). Permanent maintenance of the plantation is facilitated by leasing orchard plots to private fruit farmers. From the perspective of the local economy, annual farming net benefits generated by Kökyar fruit farmers more than compensate for annual government grants for maintenance, resulting in an average overall monetary net benefit of at least CNY 10 500 ha-1 (ca. USD 1600 ha-1) in the long term. For a more complete understanding of Kökyar Protection Forest, future research should be directed towards quantifying the effect of its regulating ecosystem services and on investigating the negative downstream consequences of its water consumption.

  3. Residential fuel-wood production and sources from round-wood in Missouri, 1987. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Witter, D.J.; Smith, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    A study of Missouri fuelwood production from roundwood in 1987 was required to provide estimates of fuelwood production for the fourth Missouri forest inventory and to determine the impact of fuelwood production on the forest resource. To answer these and related questions in Missouri, a cooperative study was completed in 1987. Total fuel production from roundwood in 1987 was 924 thousand cords. More than 99 percent of the fuelwood was cut by households. Oak comprised 60 percent of the fuelwood cut. Private land supplied 98 percent of the fuelwood cut. Rural woodlands furnished 53 percent of the fuelwood. The remaining 47 percent of fuelwood harvested came from other land classes. Growing stock on timberland was a minor source of fuelwood. Dead trees on timberland provided 35 percent of the fuelwood. Commercial producers cut five times as much from growing stock on timberland as did households.

  4. 75 FR 16719 - Information Collection; Forest Landscape Value and Special Place Mapping for National Forest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Forest Landscape Value and Special Place... Value and Special Place Mapping for National Forest Planning. DATES: Comments must be received in...: Forest Landscape Value and Special Place Mapping for National Forest Planning. OMB Number: 0596-NEW....

  5. Instar development of the douglas-fir tussock moth in relation to field temperatures. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, R.C.; Grimble, D.G.; Weatherby, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    Instar development is recorded for the Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudot-sugata) for two different elevations in the Boise National Forest, Idaho, in 1991. The percentage of the population by instars is associated with accumulated degree-days after eclosion, which can be used to predict the proper timing for spray application. For all practical purposes, areas can be released for spraying when third instars are initially found.

  6. 78 FR 76100 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board (Board) will... Committee Act of 1972 (5 U.S.C. App. II), the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of...

  7. 75 FR 64692 - Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Forest Service Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will... basement floor. Written comments should be sent to Kimberly Morgan, Daniel Boone National Forest,...

  8. 78 FR 73187 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board (Board) will meet in Rapid City, South.... II), the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 1600 et.seq.),...

  9. 75 FR 30771 - Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Forest Service Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. ] SUMMARY: The Kisatchie National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in..., Kisatchie National Forest, 2500 Shreveport Highway, Pineville, LA 71360. Comments may also be sent via...

  10. 76 FR 12692 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, CO...

  11. 76 FR 14898 - Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Forest Service Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will... Kimberly Morgan, Daniel Boone National Forest, 1700 Bypass Road, Winchester, KY 40391. Comments may also...

  12. 75 FR 69619 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Forest Service Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee ] will meet in Grand.... The purpose of the meeting is to provide background information on national forest projects...

  13. 75 FR 57438 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Forest Service Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Grand... purpose of the meeting is to orient the new Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee...

  14. 76 FR 16377 - Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Forest Service Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Chippewa National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Walker... comments should be sent to Chippewa National Forest RAC, 200 Ash Avenue, NW., Cass Lake, MN 56633....

  15. 75 FR 48306 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15 Burnett Court, Durango, CO...

  16. 76 FR 68717 - Ashley National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Ashley National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting cancellation. SUMMARY: The Ashley National Forest Resource Advisory Committee was scheduled to meet on November 10, 2011 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Forest...

  17. 77 FR 75120 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board will meet in Rapid City, South Dakota...) (FACA); and the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 1600...

  18. 76 FR 6761 - Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Forest Service Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Daniel Boone National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will... comments should be sent to Kimberly Morgan, Daniel Boone National Forest, 1700 Bypass Road, Winchester,...

  19. 76 FR 40876 - San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Forest Service San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The San Juan National Forest Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet in... Sonoran Meeting Rooms. Written comments should be sent to Attn: San Juan National Forest RAC, 15...

  20. Trials of mixed-conifer plantings for increasing diversity in the lodgepole pine type. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.M.

    1993-03-01

    Greater forest diversity is needed in the lodgepole pine forest cover type--particularly, along and east of the Continental Divide in Montana--if large-scale losses from cyclical bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent wildfires are to be reduced. Three species were compared to lodgepole pine in a test of mixed-species planting in three ecological habitat types of the lodgepole pine type. Differences in seedling survival, condition, and growth were observed among species and among habitat types by the fifth year after planting. The results indicate Englemann spruce and Douglas-fir can be used to attain mixed-species stands by interplanting naturally regenerated lodgepole pine seedling stands. Western larch probably can succeed only when planted in moist Douglas-fir, spruce, or the warmer subalpine fir habitat types east of the Continental Divide. Because of greater frost tolerance, western larch x alpine larch hybrids are promising for increasing forest diversity in some of the colder subalpine fir habitat types.

  1. Spatial Bayesian belief networks as a planning decision tool for mapping ecosystem services trade-offs on forested landscapes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Redin, Julen; Luque, Sandra; Poggio, Laura; Smith, Ron; Gimona, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    An integrated methodology, based on linking Bayesian belief networks (BBN) with GIS, is proposed for combining available evidence to help forest managers evaluate implications and trade-offs between forest production and conservation measures to preserve biodiversity in forested habitats. A Bayesian belief network is a probabilistic graphical model that represents variables and their dependencies through specifying probabilistic relationships. In spatially explicit decision problems where it is difficult to choose appropriate combinations of interventions, the proposed integration of a BBN with GIS helped to facilitate shared understanding of the human-landscape relationships, while fostering collective management that can be incorporated into landscape planning processes. Trades-offs become more and more relevant in these landscape contexts where the participation of many and varied stakeholder groups is indispensable. With these challenges in mind, our integrated approach incorporates GIS-based data with expert knowledge to consider two different land use interests - biodiversity value for conservation and timber production potential - with the focus on a complex mountain landscape in the French Alps. The spatial models produced provided different alternatives of suitable sites that can be used by policy makers in order to support conservation priorities while addressing management options. The approach provided provide a common reasoning language among different experts from different backgrounds while helped to identify spatially explicit conflictive areas. PMID:26597639

  2. 76 FR 14372 - New Mexico Collaborative Forest Restoration Program Technical Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... to Walter Dunn, Cooperative and International Forestry, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway SE... the Cooperative and International Forestry Staff, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway SE., Albuquerque..., Cooperative and International Forestry, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway SE., Albuquerque, NM...

  3. 78 FR 16244 - New Mexico Collaborative Forest Restoration Program Technical Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Walter Dunn, Cooperative and International Forestry, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway SE., Albuquerque... Cooperative and International Forestry Staff, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway SE., Albuquerque. FOR FURTHER... International Forestry, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway SE., Albuquerque, NM 87102. Individuals who...

  4. Diversified Native Species Restoration for Recovery of Multiple Ecosystem Services in a Highly Disturbed Tropical Dry Forest Landscape of Southwestern Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Guillen, K.; Otterstrom, S.; Perla, C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical dry forests have been reduced to a fraction of their original extent in the Neotropics due to conversion to agriculture and cattle pasture. While TDF can recover via natural regeneration, resulting forests are dominated by wind-dispersed pioneer species of limited value for frugivorous wildlife. Additionally, passive restoration can be perceived as "abandonment" resulting in neighbors casually invading property to rear livestock and extract timber. In 2007, the NGO Paso Pacífico initiated restoration in a highly degraded tropical dry forest landscape of southwestern Nicaragua; funded by an ex-ante carbon purchase, the project was designed to integrate multiple native tree species known to provide resources used by local wildlife. We restored roughly 400 hectares spanning a rainfall gradient from dry to transitional moist forest, using reforestation (planting 70 species of tree seedlings in degraded pastures on a 4x4 m grid, leaving occurring saplings) and assisted regeneration (clearing vines and competing vegetation from saplings in natural regeneration and strategically managing canopy cover). In just over seven years, mean carbon increased nearly threefold, from to 21.5±5.0 to 57.9±9.6 SE tonnes/ha. Current carbon stocks match those of 20-year-old forests in the area, accumulated in less than a decade. Stem density per 15-m radius plot decreased from 16.3±2.3 to 12.5±0.9 SE, while species richness increased from 3.9±0.4 to 18.4±1.4 SE. Alpha richness of woody stems across plots increased from 36 to 94 species, and over 20 tree species established as a result of natural dispersal and recruitment. We have observed sensitive species such as spider monkeys and parrots foraging in restoration areas. Managed reforestation is a highly effective method for rapidly restoring the functionality of multiple ecosystem services in degraded TDF, particularly when social and political realities force restoration to coexist with human productive activities

  5. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Forest botanical products definition. 223.277 Section 223.277 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Forest Botanical Products § 223.277...

  6. 36 CFR 223.216 - Special Forest Products definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special Forest Products definitions. 223.216 Section 223.216 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Special Forest Products § 223.216...

  7. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-11-29

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine

  8. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and

  9. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures

  10. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these

  11. Human uses of forested watersheds and riparian corridors: hazard mitigation as an ecosystem service, with examples from Panama, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Humans have long favored settlement along rivers for access to water supply for drinking and agriculture, for transport corridors, and for food sources. Additionally, settlement in or near montane forests include benefits such as food sources, wood supply, esthetic values, and high quality water resources derived from watersheds where upstream human disturbance and environmental degradation is generally reduced. However, the advantages afforded by these riparian and montane settings pose episodic risks for communities located there as floods, landslides, and wildfires cause loss of life, destroy infrastructure, and damage or destroy crops. A basic understanding of flood probability and magnitude as well as hillslope stability by residents in these environments can mitigate these risks. Early humans presumably developed some degree of knowledge about these risks by means of their long periods of occupation in these environments and their observations of seasonal and storm rainfall patterns and river discharge, which became more refined as agriculture developed over the past 10,000 years. Modern global urbanization, particularly in regions of rapid economic growth, has resulted in much of this "organic" knowledge being lost, as rural populations move into megacities, many of which encroach on floodplains and mountain fronts. Moreover, the most likely occupants of these hazardous locations are often economically constrained, increasing their vulnerabity. Effective stewardship of river floodplains and upstream montane forests yields a key ecosystem service, which in addition to the well-known services, ie. water, hydroelectric energy, etc., provides a risk mitigation service, by reducing hazard and vulnerability. Puerto Rico, Panama, and Venezuela illustrate a range of practices and results, providing useful examples for planners and land use managers.

  12. The Urban Forest and Ecosystem Services: Impacts on Urban Water, Heat, and Pollution Cycles at the Tree, Street, and City Scale.

    PubMed

    Livesley, S J; McPherson, G M; Calfapietra, C

    2016-01-01

    Many environmental challenges are exacerbated within the urban landscape, such as stormwater runoff and flood risk, chemical and particulate pollution of urban air, soil and water, the urban heat island, and summer heat waves. Urban trees, and the urban forest as a whole, can be managed to have an impact on the urban water, heat, carbon and pollution cycles. However, there is an increasing need for empirical evidence as to the magnitude of the impacts, both beneficial and adverse, that urban trees can provide and the role that climatic region and built landscape circumstance play in modifying those impacts. This special section presents new research that advances our knowledge of the ecological and environmental services provided by the urban forest. The 14 studies included provide a global perspective on the role of trees in towns and cities from five continents. Some studies provide evidence for the cooling benefit of the local microclimate in urban green space with and without trees. Other studies focus solely on the cooling benefit of urban tree transpiration at a mesoscale or on cooling from canopy shade at a street and pedestrian scale. Other studies are concerned with tree species differences in canopy interception of rainfall, water uptake from biofilter systems, and water quality improvements through nutrient uptake from stormwater runoff. Research reported here also considers both the positive and the negative impacts of trees on air quality, through the role of trees in removing air pollutants such as ozone as well as in releasing potentially harmful volatile organic compounds and allergenic particulates. A transdisciplinary framework to support future urban forest research is proposed to better understand and communicate the role of urban trees in urban biogeochemical cycles that are highly disturbed, highly managed, and of paramount importance to human health and well-being. PMID:26828167

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  14. 78 FR 13316 - National Forest System Land Management Planning Directives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...The Forest Service has issued proposed directives to Forest Service Handbook (FSH 1909.12) and Manual (FSM 1920) establishing procedures and responsibilities for implementing the National Forest System (NFS) land management planning regulation. Issuance of these proposed directives will provide consistent overall guidance to Forest Service Line Officers and Agency employees in developing,......

  15. 78 FR 37781 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... of June 6, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-13453, on page 34035, in the first column, correct the ``Call-in... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting; Correction. SUMMARY: The Forest Service published a document in the Federal...

  16. Accuracy of early stand exam age estimates in the Swan Valley of Western Montana. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.; Lesica, P.

    1994-04-01

    The stand exams conducted in western Montana over 50 years ago provide a valuable source of information on prefire suppression and preharvest condition of the region's forests. Of the early exam estimates of stand origin, 52 percent were within 20 years of estimates taken from stand exams conducted in the 1980's, and 73 percent were within 60 years. There was no significant bias toward either higher or lower age estimates. The early stand exam data can give an accurate estimate of stand age distributions over large areas.

  17. Highly stocked coniferous stands on the Olympic Peninsula: chemical composition and implications for harvest strategy. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.N.; Waddell, D.R.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents an assessment of macronutrients and their distribution within highly stocked, stagnant stands of mixed conifers on the Quilcene Ranger District, Olympic National Forest, northwest Washington. These stands consisted of predominantly three species: western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menzeisii), and western redcedar (Thuja plicata). Preliminary investigation suggests that the living crown contains a small portion of the nutrient capital on the site. Extracting this material from the site during harvest or site preparation should not pose a threat to future production of biomass. Bioassays suggested that no macronutrients were deficient for growth of Douglas-fir seedlings.

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-312-2185, U. S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Gallatin National Forest, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.E.

    1992-03-01

    In response to a request from the U.S. Department of Interior, National Park Service (NPS) an evaluation was undertaken of worker exposure to forest fire smoke at Gallatin National Forest, Montana. Personal breathing zone air samples were collected for carbon-monoxide (630080) (CO), sulfur-dioxide (7446095) (SO2), aldehydes, respirable particulate matter (RPM), and respirable crystalline silica (14808607). The CO exposure ranged up to 17 parts per million (ppm) which was below the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit of 35ppm. SO2 concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 3.0ppm; three samples were above the recommended limit of 2ppm. Aldehyde concentrations were an order of magnitude or more below the evaluation criteria. Of the 14 samples analyzed for silica, one sample was above the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit for quartz of 0.1mg/cu m. The authors conclude that an exposure hazard does exist for SO2. Suggestions were made for the collecting of data during the current fire fighting season.

  19. From the office to the field: areas of tension and consensus in the implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act within the US Forest Service.

    PubMed

    Stern, Marc J; Predmore, S Andrew; Mortimer, Michael J; Seesholtz, David N

    2010-06-01

    We conducted an online survey (n = 3321) followed by five focus groups with Forest Service employees involved in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to explore agency views of how NEPA should be implemented within the agency. We filter these perceptions through the lenses of different functional groups within the agency, each with its own role in agency compliance with NEPA and its own suite of perceived accountabilities. In doing so, we uncover areas of consensus regarding valued practices as well as tensions between employees with different roles in NEPA compliance. General consensus exists regarding the importance of the effective functioning of interdisciplinary teams, but opinions about what constitutes an effective team vary. Findings suggest that NEPA serves as a playing field for competing accountabilities felt by line officers, disciplinary specialists, and advisory personnel within the agency, as each attempts to exert influence over NEPA processes and their outcomes. PMID:20223584

  20. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 μm (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model

  1. Forest type mapping with satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, A. G., Jr.; Bryant, E. S.

    1976-01-01

    Computer classification of data from Landsat, an earth-orbiting satellite, has resulted in measurements and maps of forest types for two New Hampshire counties. The acreages of hardwood and softwood types and total forested areas compare favorably with Forest Service figures for the same areas. These techniques have advantages for field application, particularly in states having forest taxation laws based on general productivity.

  2. Distribution of biomass and nutrients in lodgepole pine/bitterbrush ecosystems in central Oregon. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.N.; Shainsky, L.J.

    1992-09-01

    The authors investigated the distribution of biomass and nutrients in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. murryana Dougl.) ecosystems on pumice soils in south-central Oregon. Sixty-three trees were sampled to develop equations for estimating dry weights of tree crowns, boles, bark, and coarse roots from diameter at breast height and height. The concentrations of total carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur were determined for each of these components. Biomass, nutrient concentrations, and nutrient contents of the associated vegetation, forest floor, woody debris, fine roots, and soil horizons also were determined. An example stand illustrates the use of these data for determining the effects of bole versus whole-tree harvesting on nutrient capital in a lodgepole pine ecosystem.

  3. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Arkansas area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 9 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Arkansas Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 1,417 trees sampled in the Arkansas Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination woth total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  4. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the upper coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 11 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Upper Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 521 trees sampled in the Upper Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  5. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Appalachian area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 20 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Appalachian Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,670 trees sampled in the Appalachian Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  6. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 14 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,728 trees sampled in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  7. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Delta area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 13 species and 6 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Delta Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 990 trees sampled in the Delta Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on diameter outside of the bark (d.o.b.) in combination with height with to a 9-inch d.o.b. top.

  8. Development of a mixed shrub-tanoak-douglas-fir community in a treated and untreated condition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1996-08-01

    On a medium site in northern California, a tanoak-mixed shrub community was given several treatments (manual release two and three times, a combination chainsaw and cut surface herbicide treatment, two foliar herbicides, and a tank mix of the two herbicides) to study its development in both a natural (control) and treated condition. The herbicides were 2,4-D, Garlon 3A, and Garlon 4, each applied two times. Survival of planted Douglas-fir seedlings was recorded for 11 years and growth was quantified for 9 years after the last treatment application. In addition to Douglas-fir, data are presented individually for the two most abundant species (tanoak and snowbrush), for greenleaf manzanita, and for the hardwood tree and shrubs combined. The treatment response data, cost information, and plant community relationships provides the forest land manager with knowledge on how to attain some specific plant communities in the future, and their developmental potentials.

  9. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystems Services

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2006-04-30

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this quarter we worked on methodologies for analyzing carbon in mine soils. A unique property of mine soils is the presence of coal and carboniferous rock particles that are present in mine soils in various sizes, quantities, and qualities. There is no existing method in the literature that may be of use for quantitative estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in mine soils that can successfully differentiate between pedogenic and geogenic carbon forms. In this report we present a detailed description of a 16-step method for measuring SOC in mine soils designed for and tested on a total of 30 different mine soil mixtures representing a wide spectrum of mine soils in the hard-rock region of the Appalachian coalfield. The proposed method is a combination of chemical procedure for carbonates removal, a thermal procedure for pedogenic C removal, and elemental C analysis procedure at 900 C. Our methodology provides a means to correct for the carbon loss from the more volatile constituents of coal fragments in the mine soil samples and another correction factor for the protected organic matter that can also remain unoxidized following thermal pretreatment. The correction factors for coal and soil material-specific SOM were based on carbon content loss from coal and SOM determined by a parallel thermal oxidation analysis of pure ground coal fragments retrieved from the same mined site as the soil samples and of coal-free soil rock fragments of sandstone and siltstone origin.

  10. Forest Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weicherding, Patrick J.; And Others

    This bulletin deals with forest management and provides an overview of forestry for the non-professional. The bulletin is divided into six sections: (1) What Is Forestry Management?; (2) How Is the Forest Measured?; (3) What Is Forest Protection?; (4) How Is the Forest Harvested?; (5) What Is Forest Regeneration?; and (6) What Is Forest…

  11. Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, Charles S.

    The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid…

  12. Assessment of ecosystem services provided by urban forests: Public lands within the Urban growth Boundary of Corvallis, oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    One recent research focus of EPA is quantifying a range of ecosystem services, the benefits that ecosystems provide to humans, in order to promote informed natural resource management decisions and to assess the effectiveness of existing environmental policies. A case study is u...

  13. Assessment of ecosystem services provided by urban forests: public lands withinthe Urban Growth Boundary of Corvallis, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    One recent research focus of EPA is quantifying a range of ecosystem services, the benefits that ecosystems provide to humans, in order to promote informed natural resource management decisions and to assess the effectiveness of existing environmental policies. A case study is u...

  14. 36 CFR 223.219 - Sustainable harvest of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sustainable harvest of special forest products. 223.219 Section 223.219 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS Special...

  15. 36 CFR 223.219 - Sustainable harvest of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sustainable harvest of special forest products. 223.219 Section 223.219 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS Special...

  16. 36 CFR 223.219 - Sustainable harvest of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sustainable harvest of special forest products. 223.219 Section 223.219 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS Special...

  17. 78 FR 65962 - Revision of the Land Management Plan for the Flathead National Forest

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Flathead National Forest. SUMMARY: The Flathead National Forest, located in Montana, is initiating the forest planning process pursuant to the 2012 Forest Planning Rule. This process results in a Forest Land... Forest Service Revision of the Land Management Plan for the Flathead National Forest AGENCY:...

  18. 36 CFR 223.219 - Sustainable harvest of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sustainable harvest of special forest products. 223.219 Section 223.219 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS Special...

  19. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2006-05-05

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report we present data that show the spatial distribution of carbon in mine soils. Soil carbon data from deep soil pits from grassland minelands located in Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia were analyzed to determine the vertical distribution and variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) down to a 2-m depth. Regression analyses were used to describe and model the distribution by soil depth of C(wt%), BD{sub fines}(g cm{sup -3}), and fines (vol%) in mine soils. The volume of excavated mine soil samples was transformed in terms of costs of digging and sampling, including sample collection and preparation, and C(wt%) analysis, in order to determine the maximum cost-effective depth (MCD) for carbon inventorying on the mined sites analyzed. Based on the horizontal variation of SOC(g m{sup -2}), we determined the sampling intensity required to achieve a desired accuracy of the amount of sequestered SOC(g m{sup -2}) at certain probability levels. The MCD and sampling intensity measurements were used to determine the minimum detectable difference (MDD) of SOC(g m{sup -2}) between two consecutive carbon inventories. We also proposed a method to determine the minimum number of years before a future C inventory event is carried out so that the measured SOC(g m{sup -2}) differences were greater than MDD. We used geostatistical analyses procedures to determine spatial dependence predictability of surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) data on the minelands analyzed. Kriging techniques were used to create surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) maps for the sites in Ohio and West Virginia. The average C sequestration rate in the surface soil layer for the Ohio (age 9) sites was estimated at 124 g C m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, and it was

  20. 76 FR 8333 - Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource... Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  1. Winter sowings produce 1-0 sugar pine planting stock in the Sierra Nevada. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkinson, J.L.; McCain, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    Seed source and sowing date effects on first-year seedling growth and Fusarium root and collar rot of sugar pine were analyzed in two consecutive nursery tests at the Pacific Southwest Research Station's Institute of Forest Genetics, near Placerville in the western Sierra Nevada. The experimental design in both tests consisted of four replications of a randomized complete block of split-split plots, with sowing date split for disease treatment and seed source. Seed sources were natural stands at low, middle, and high elevations on the western slope of the northern Sierra Nevada. Seeds were soaked 36 hours in aerated water at 25 deg (77 deg F), chilled 90 days at 1 deg C (34 deg F), and sown in fumigated soil in February, March, April, and May. Treatment plots were drenched with fungicides just before sowing in the first test, and were inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum at time of sowing in the second test. Seedling emergence averaged 96 to 99 percent, regardless of sowing date.

  2. Mechanical and chemical release in a 12-year-old ponderosa pine plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Fiddler, G.O.; McDonald, P.M.

    1997-04-01

    A 12-year-old ponderosa pine plantation on the Tahoe National Forest in northern California was mechanically treated with a Hydro-Ax in an attempt to increase the survival and growth of the planted seedlings. Other release methods were not feasible because the shrubs in the mixed-shrub community (greenleaf manzanita, mountain whitethorn, bittercherry, coffeberry) were too large (3 to 5 feet tall) and well developed. Additional treatments were a chemical treatment, in which 2,4-D was applied to a portion of the study site that had been treated with the Hydro-Ax 1 year previously, and control. Eleven growing seasons after treatment (1993), average pine crown cover was statistically higher in the mechanical treatment (Hydro-Ax alone) than in the control. This was the only significant enhancement of pine growth by the Hydro-Ax alone. Mean pine diameter and height did not differ statistically from the control after 11 years. In contrast, the Hydro-Ax plus herbicide (chemical) treatment statistically increased pine crown cover, height, and diameter over the Hydro-Ax alone and the control. Mean crown cover was 104 percent greater in the treated trees than for pines in the control, height was 45 percent greater, and diameter was 47 percent greater. Relative costs were $225 per acre for the Hydro-Ax alone (mechanical) and $273 per acre for the Hydro-Ax + herbicide (chemical). Altogether, the most cost-effective treatment was Hydro-Ax + herbicide (chemical).

  3. Stability and change in minerotrophic peatlands, Sierra Nevada of California and Nevada. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolome, J.W.; Erman, D.C.; Schwarz, C.F.

    1990-02-01

    Minerotrophic peatlands or fens in California's Sierra Nevada are small wet meadows surrounded by mixed conifer forest. The dynamics of vegetation change at the meadow edge and the ages and development of fens were investigated, in the Sagehen Creek Basin near Truckee, California, through the use of radiocarbon dating of peat, pollen studies, examination of processes of peat development and accumulation, stand age analysis of trees around peatlands, and evaluation of tree-ring variation. These approaches were used to evaluate both short- and long-term changes. Fens varied in age from more than 8000 years to less than 1000 years old. Results suggest that overall fen development proceeds rapidly, with peat buildup dependent upon adequate moisture supply. During fen development trees repeatedly invade and retreat from the fen edges. The timing of invasions appear unrelated to events such as human disturbance and climatic change. Instead, changes are most likely to result from alterations in groundwater supply in interaction with tree establishment, longevity, and water uptake. Little evidence was found that accepted successional models which emphasize predictable and gradual vegetational development apply to fens in the Sagehen Basin.

  4. 76 FR 41196 - National Forests in Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service National Forests in Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Tombigbee and Holly...

  5. 76 FR 41195 - National Forests In Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service National Forests In Mississippi, Tombigbee and Holly Springs Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Tombigbee and Holly...

  6. 36 CFR 212.2 - Forest transportation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Forest transportation program. 212.2 Section 212.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... public at the headquarters of that administrative unit. (b) Forest transportation atlas. A...

  7. 36 CFR 293.17 - National Forest Primitive Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Forest Primitive Areas. 293.17 Section 293.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.17 National Forest Primitive Areas. (a) Within those areas...

  8. 36 CFR 261.57 - National Forest wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Forest wilderness. 261.57 Section 261.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.57 National Forest wilderness. When provided by...

  9. 36 CFR 228.15 - Operations within National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operations within National Forest Wilderness. 228.15 Section 228.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Locatable Minerals § 228.15 Operations within National Forest Wilderness....

  10. 36 CFR 261.18 - National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Forest Wilderness. 261.18 Section 261.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.18 National Forest Wilderness. The following are prohibited in...

  11. 36 CFR 261.55 - National Forest System trails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Forest System trails. 261.55 Section 261.55 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.55 National Forest System trails. When provided...

  12. 36 CFR 293.17 - National Forest Primitive Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Forest Primitive Areas. 293.17 Section 293.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.17 National Forest Primitive Areas. (a) Within those areas...

  13. 36 CFR 261.18 - National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Forest Wilderness. 261.18 Section 261.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.18 National Forest Wilderness. The following are prohibited in...

  14. 36 CFR 261.18 - National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Forest Wilderness. 261.18 Section 261.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.18 National Forest Wilderness. The following are prohibited in...

  15. 36 CFR 228.15 - Operations within National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operations within National Forest Wilderness. 228.15 Section 228.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Locatable Minerals § 228.15 Operations within National Forest Wilderness....

  16. 36 CFR 261.55 - National Forest System trails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Forest System trails. 261.55 Section 261.55 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.55 National Forest System trails. When provided...

  17. 36 CFR 261.21 - National Forest primitive areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Forest primitive areas. 261.21 Section 261.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.21 National Forest primitive areas. The following...

  18. 36 CFR 261.21 - National Forest primitive areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Forest primitive areas. 261.21 Section 261.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.21 National Forest primitive areas. The following...

  19. 36 CFR 261.21 - National Forest primitive areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Forest primitive areas. 261.21 Section 261.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.21 National Forest primitive areas. The following...

  20. 36 CFR 261.21 - National Forest primitive areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Forest primitive areas. 261.21 Section 261.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.21 National Forest primitive areas. The following...

  1. 36 CFR 261.21 - National Forest primitive areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Forest primitive areas. 261.21 Section 261.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.21 National Forest primitive areas. The following...

  2. 36 CFR 261.55 - National Forest System trails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Forest System trails. 261.55 Section 261.55 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.55 National Forest System trails. When provided...

  3. 36 CFR 228.15 - Operations within National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operations within National Forest Wilderness. 228.15 Section 228.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Locatable Minerals § 228.15 Operations within National Forest Wilderness....

  4. 36 CFR 261.57 - National Forest wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Forest wilderness. 261.57 Section 261.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.57 National Forest wilderness. When provided by...

  5. 36 CFR 261.55 - National Forest System trails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Forest System trails. 261.55 Section 261.55 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.55 National Forest System trails. When provided...

  6. 36 CFR 293.17 - National Forest Primitive Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Forest Primitive Areas. 293.17 Section 293.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.17 National Forest Primitive Areas. (a) Within those areas...

  7. 36 CFR 261.57 - National Forest wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Forest wilderness. 261.57 Section 261.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.57 National Forest wilderness. When provided by...

  8. 36 CFR 261.18 - National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Forest Wilderness. 261.18 Section 261.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.18 National Forest Wilderness. The following are prohibited in...

  9. 36 CFR 228.15 - Operations within National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operations within National Forest Wilderness. 228.15 Section 228.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Locatable Minerals § 228.15 Operations within National Forest Wilderness....

  10. 36 CFR 293.17 - National Forest Primitive Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Forest Primitive Areas. 293.17 Section 293.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.17 National Forest Primitive Areas. (a) Within those areas...

  11. 36 CFR 261.18 - National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Forest Wilderness. 261.18 Section 261.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.18 National Forest Wilderness. The following are prohibited in...

  12. 36 CFR 293.17 - National Forest Primitive Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National Forest Primitive Areas. 293.17 Section 293.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.17 National Forest Primitive Areas. (a) Within those areas...

  13. 36 CFR 261.57 - National Forest wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Forest wilderness. 261.57 Section 261.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.57 National Forest wilderness. When provided by...

  14. 36 CFR 261.55 - National Forest System trails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National Forest System trails. 261.55 Section 261.55 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.55 National Forest System trails. When provided...

  15. 36 CFR 228.15 - Operations within National Forest Wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations within National Forest Wilderness. 228.15 Section 228.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Locatable Minerals § 228.15 Operations within National Forest Wilderness....

  16. 36 CFR 261.57 - National Forest wilderness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Forest wilderness. 261.57 Section 261.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS Prohibitions in Areas Designated by Order § 261.57 National Forest wilderness. When provided by...

  17. 36 CFR 230.6 - Landowner forest stewardship plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Landowner forest stewardship plan. 230.6 Section 230.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY ASSISTANCE Stewardship Incentive Program § 230.6 Landowner forest...

  18. 36 CFR 230.6 - Landowner forest stewardship plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Landowner forest stewardship plan. 230.6 Section 230.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY ASSISTANCE Stewardship Incentive Program § 230.6 Landowner forest...

  19. 76 FR 61666 - Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Forest Service Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program... project selection to the Secretary of Agriculture. DATES: The meeting will be held October 18-20,...

  20. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  1. Forests of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, M.A.; Dirzo, R.; Zadroga, F.

    1995-07-01

    Forest of Mexico as elsewhere provide essential goods and services for both local citizens and the international community. Benefits include climate regulation, biodiversity, and wood and nonwood products for local consumption and economic activity. Deforestation is a matter of great environmental and economic concern. This article assesses rates of deforestation, the present status of forest in Mexico, and the major factors responsible for deforestation in the tropical southeastern region.

  2. 29 CFR 570.54 - Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., timber tract occupations, forestry service occupations, logging occupations, and occupations in the... § 570.54 Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry... forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention, in timber tracts, in forestry services, logging, and...

  3. 29 CFR 570.54 - Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., timber tract occupations, forestry service occupations, logging occupations, and occupations in the... § 570.54 Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry... forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention, in timber tracts, in forestry services, logging, and...

  4. 29 CFR 570.54 - Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., timber tract occupations, forestry service occupations, logging occupations, and occupations in the... § 570.54 Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry... forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention, in timber tracts, in forestry services, logging, and...

  5. 29 CFR 570.54 - Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., timber tract occupations, forestry service occupations, logging occupations, and occupations in the... § 570.54 Forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention occupations, timber tract occupations, forestry... forest fire fighting and forest fire prevention, in timber tracts, in forestry services, logging, and...

  6. Texas Disasters II: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Assist the Texas Forest Service in Mapping and Analyzing Fuel Loads and Phenology in Texas Grasslands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, Michael; Williams, Meredith; Fenn, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The risk of severe wildfires in Texas has been related to weather phenomena such as climate change and recent urban expansion into wild land areas. During recent years, Texas wild land areas have experienced sequences of wet and dry years that have contributed to increased wildfire risk and frequency. To prevent and contain wildfires, the Texas Forest Service (TFS) is tasked with evaluating and reducing potential fire risk to better manage and distribute resources. This task is made more difficult due to the vast and varied landscape of Texas. The TFS assesses fire risk by understanding vegetative fuel types and fuel loads. To better assist the TFS, NASA Earth observations, including Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Specrtoradiometer (MODIS) data, were analyzed to produce maps of vegetation type and specific vegetation phenology as it related to potential wildfire fuel loads. Fuel maps from 2010-2011 and 2014-2015 fire seasons, created by the Texas Disasters I project, were used and provided alternating, complementary map indicators of wildfire risk in Texas. The TFS will utilize the end products and capabilities to evaluate and better understand wildfire risk across Texas.

  7. Colville study: Wood utilization for ecosystem management. Preliminary results of study of product potential from small-diameter stands. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Willits, S.; Barbour, R.J.; Tesch, S.; Ryland, D.; McNeel, J.

    1996-12-01

    The Colville Study was developed in 1994 to identify and evaluate a series of management options for achieving ecosystem objectives in dense stands of small diameter trees while also producing wood products. The Colville National Forest selected the Rocky II Timber Sale as an example of this type of stand that needed management to achieve the following goals: (1) create late successional forest structure, (2) decrease forest health risk from fire, insects, and disease, (3) improve wildlife habitat by providing large green trees and snags, and (4) improve stand aesthetics by decreasing stand density. The Colville Study was divided into four technical focus areas: Silviculture and Ecology, Forest Operations, Timber Conversion, and Economics.

  8. 75 FR 53630 - Notice of Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory... of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet for the first time as indicated below. DATES: The Cherokee National Forest...

  9. 75 FR 61417 - Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... National Forest, 308 Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101. Comments may also be sent via e-mail to... inspect comments received at Bridger-Teton National Forest, Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101....

  10. 76 FR 45505 - Ozark-Ouachita National Forests Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Forest Service Ozark-Ouachita National Forests Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice and recommendations to the Forest..., Ouachita National Forest, P.O. Box 1270, Hot Springs, AR 71902. (501-321-5318). Individuals who...

  11. 76 FR 13975 - Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA...-Teton National Forest, 308 Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101. Comments may also be sent via e- mail to... ] inspect comments received at Bridger-Teton National Forest, Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101....

  12. 75 FR 69046 - Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... National Forest, 308 Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101. Comments may also be sent via e-mail to... inspect comments received at Bridger-Teton National Forest, Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101....

  13. 76 FR 5330 - Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA..., Bridger-Teton National Forest, 308 Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101. Comments may also be sent via e... public may inspect comments received at Bridger-Teton National Forest, Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY...

  14. 76 FR 2331 - Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... National Forest, 308 Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101. Comments may also be sent via e- mail to... inspect comments received at Bridger-Teton National Forest, Hwy 189 North, Kemmerer, WY 83101....

  15. 77 FR 18999 - New Mexico Collaborative Forest Restoration Program Technical Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Forest Service New Mexico Collaborative Forest Restoration Program Technical Advisory Panel AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The New Mexico Collaborative Forest Restoration... under the Community Forest Restoration Act (Title VI, Pub. L. 106-393) and in compliance with...

  16. 36 CFR 223.217 - Authority to dispose of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to dispose of special forest products. 223.217 Section 223.217 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Special Forest Products §...

  17. 36 CFR 223.217 - Authority to dispose of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Authority to dispose of special forest products. 223.217 Section 223.217 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  18. 36 CFR 223.217 - Authority to dispose of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Authority to dispose of special forest products. 223.217 Section 223.217 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  19. 36 CFR 223.217 - Authority to dispose of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Authority to dispose of special forest products. 223.217 Section 223.217 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  20. 36 CFR 223.217 - Authority to dispose of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authority to dispose of special forest products. 223.217 Section 223.217 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS,...

  1. 36 CFR 212.10 - Maximum economy National Forest System roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Forest System roads. 212.10 Section 212.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... economy National Forest System roads. The Chief may acquire, construct, reconstruct, improve, and maintain National Forest System roads within and near the National Forests and other lands administered by...

  2. 36 CFR 212.10 - Maximum economy National Forest System roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Forest System roads. 212.10 Section 212.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... economy National Forest System roads. The Chief may acquire, construct, reconstruct, improve, and maintain National Forest System roads within and near the National Forests and other lands administered by...

  3. 36 CFR 212.10 - Maximum economy National Forest System roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Forest System roads. 212.10 Section 212.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... economy National Forest System roads. The Chief may acquire, construct, reconstruct, improve, and maintain National Forest System roads within and near the National Forests and other lands administered by...

  4. 36 CFR 212.10 - Maximum economy National Forest System roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Forest System roads. 212.10 Section 212.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... economy National Forest System roads. The Chief may acquire, construct, reconstruct, improve, and maintain National Forest System roads within and near the National Forests and other lands administered by...

  5. 36 CFR 212.10 - Maximum economy National Forest System roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Forest System roads. 212.10 Section 212.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... economy National Forest System roads. The Chief may acquire, construct, reconstruct, improve, and maintain National Forest System roads within and near the National Forests and other lands administered by...

  6. 36 CFR 223.219 - Sustainable harvest of special forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sustainable harvest of special forest products. 223.219 Section 223.219 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Special Forest Products § 223.219 Sustainable harvest of special...

  7. Forest Interpreter's Primer on Fire Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelker, Thomas M.

    Specifically prepared for the use of Forest Service field-based interpreters of the management, protection, and use of forest and range resources and the associated human, cultural, and natural history found on these lands, this book is the second in a series of six primers on the multiple use of forest and range resources. Following an…

  8. 76 FR 55643 - Helena National Forest; Montana; Divide Travel Plan EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... Forest Service Helena National Forest; Montana; Divide Travel Plan EIS AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... the existing motorized public access routes and prohibitions within the Divide travel planning area for wheeled and over-snow motorized vehicles. Consistent with Forest Service travel...

  9. 75 FR 16731 - Young Dodge SEIS; Kootenai National Forest, Lincoln County, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... FR 14315) on February 22, 2008, and the notice of the Final EIS (70 FR 38131) on May 1, 2008. The... Forest Service Young Dodge SEIS; Kootenai National Forest, Lincoln County, MT AGENCY: Forest Service... Forest Service will prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the Young...

  10. 78 FR 18307 - Forest Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    .... Correction In the Federal Register of January 31, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-02091, on page 6806, in the third... by March 29, 2013. Dated: March 21, 2013. Paul Ries, Associate Deputy Chief, State & Private...

  11. Meeting of the southeast management working group (4th) abstracts. Held in Memphis, Tennessee on November 12-14, 1992. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.P.

    1993-08-01

    Contents: hurricane effects on neotropical migrants at a South Carolina bottomland hardwood site; point count results from 9 bottomland hardwood sites in South Carolina; bird banding at hilton pond: monitoring and managing for neotropical migrants in South Carolina's piedmont region; effects of forest management on population parameters and habitat use of wood thrushes; and influence of red-cockaded woodpecker habitat management on the abundance of neotropical migrant breeding birds in two loblolly pine forests of Mississippi: study design and preliminary results.

  12. Changing governance of the world's forests.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Arun; Chhatre, Ashwini; Hardin, Rebecca

    2008-06-13

    Major features of contemporary forest governance include decentralization of forest management, logging concessions in publicly owned commercially valuable forests, and timber certification, primarily in temperate forests. Although a majority of forests continue to be owned formally by governments, the effectiveness of forest governance is increasingly independent of formal ownership. Growing and competing demands for food, biofuels, timber, and environmental services will pose severe challenges to effective forest governance in the future, especially in conjunction with the direct and indirect impacts of climate change. A greater role for community and market actors in forest governance and deeper attention to the factors that lead to effective governance, beyond ownership patterns, is necessary to address future forest governance challenges. PMID:18556552

  13. 77 FR 50979 - Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; Solicitation of nominees to the Northwest Forest Plan Provincial... on the Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees (the Eastern Washington Cascades and...

  14. 36 CFR 261.6 - Timber and other forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), or its implementing regulations at 36 CFR 223.185-223.203... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timber and other forest products. 261.6 Section 261.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  15. 36 CFR 261.6 - Timber and other forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), or its implementing regulations at 36 CFR 223.185-223.203... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timber and other forest products. 261.6 Section 261.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  16. 36 CFR 261.6 - Timber and other forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), or its implementing regulations at 36 CFR 223.185-223.203... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timber and other forest products. 261.6 Section 261.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  17. 36 CFR 261.6 - Timber and other forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), or its implementing regulations at 36 CFR 223.185-223.203... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timber and other forest products. 261.6 Section 261.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  18. 36 CFR 261.6 - Timber and other forest products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), or its implementing regulations at 36 CFR 223.185-223.203... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timber and other forest products. 261.6 Section 261.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  19. Geochemical investigations and interim recommendations for priority abandoned mine sites on U.S.D.A. Forest Service lands, Mineral Creek watershed, San Juan County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    Field observations, sampling of mine dumps and mine drainage waters, and laboratory studies of dump materials have been made at mining areas deemed to be on public lands administered by the USDA Forest Service in the Mineral Creek watershed. Results of chemical analyses of dump materials, leachates of those materials, and of surface waters draining mines or dumps provide indications of where acid is generated or consumed, and what metals are mobilized below mines or dumps. Information on 25 sites is reviewed and reclamation priorities are ranked into four classes (high, medium, low priority, or no work required). The western side of the upper Animas watershed (the Mineral Creek watershed) has a history of mining and prospecting for about 130 years. The intensity of miningrelated disturbance is higher than in most parts of the San Juan Mountains region, but actually is much less than the eastern half of the watershed (US BLM lands) and none of the mines moved millions of tons of rock and ore as in some of the eastern mines. The majority of the roughly one thousand mining sites on the USFS lands are very small (less than 100 tons or 70 cubic yards of dump material), are more than 2 miles from a major stream, or are so inaccessible as to prohibit reclamation. Twenty five sites have been considered by others to have significant size and potential for significant environmental degradation. These most significant mining areas were evaluated by multiple criteria, including tendency to generate acid or liberate toxic metals, observed acidic pH or dead vegetation (?kill zones?) below dumps or adits, potential mobility of metals, and likelihood of transport into streams of the watershed. In the author?s opinion, no single measurable parameter, such as metal concentration, is reliable for ranking significance or feasibility of reclamation. Rather, subjective estimates are required to evaluate combinations of, or interactions among, several parameters. The most subjective

  20. 78 FR 17632 - Caribou-Targhee National Forest; Idaho and Wyoming; Amendment to the Targhee Revised Forest Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Forest Plan--Canada Lynx Habitat AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... Revised Forest Plan (1997) to include a map identifying specific areas where the Northern Rockies Lynx... Notice to: Targhee Lynx Analysis, Caribou-Targhee National Forest, 1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls,...