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Sample records for 1d nanophotonic waveguides

  1. Mode conversion using stimulated Brillouin scattering in nanophotonic silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Aryanfar, Iman; Wolff, Christian; Steel, M J; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Poulton, Christopher G

    2014-11-17

    We theoretically and numerically investigate Stimulated Brillouin Scattering generated mode conversion in high-contrast suspended silicon nanophotonic waveguides. We predict significantly enhanced mode conversion when the linked effects of radiation pressure and motion of the waveguide boundaries are taken into account. The mode conversion is more than 10 times larger than would be predicted if the effect of radiation pressure is not taken into account: we find a waveguide length of 740 μm is required for 20dB of mode conversion, assuming a total pump power of 1W. This is sufficient to bring the effect into the realm of chip-scale photonic waveguides. We explore the interaction between the different types of acoustic modes that can exist within these waveguides, and show how the presence of these modes leads to enhanced conversion between the different possible optical modes. PMID:25402165

  2. Metallic nanowires for subwavelength waveguiding and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Deng; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hong-Xing

    2013-09-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly developing field concerning light manipulation at the nanoscale with many potential applications, of which plasmonic circuits are promising for future information technology. Plasmonic waveguides are fundamental elements for constructing plasmonic integrated circuits. Among the proposed different plasmonic waveguides, metallic nanowires have drawn much attention due to the highly confined electromagnetic waves and relatively low propagation loss. Here we review the recent research progress in the waveguiding characteristics of metallic nanowires and nanowire-based nanophotonic devices. Plasmon modes of both cylindrical and pentagonal metallic nanowires with and without substrate are discussed. Typical methods for exciting and detecting the plasmons in metallic nanowires are briefly summarized. Because of the multimode characteristic, the plasmon propagation and emission in the nanowire have many unique properties, benefiting the design of plasmonic devices. A few nanowire-based devices are highlighted, including quarter-wave plate, Fabry—Pérot resonator, router and logic gates.

  3. High efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between nanophotonic waveguide and fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Xu, Xue-Jun; Li, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Liang; Han, Wei-Hua; Fan, Zhong-Chao; Yu, Yu-De; Yu, Jin-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    A high efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonic waveguide and fibre is designed and fabricated. Coupling efficiencies of 46% and 25% at a wavelength of 1.55 μm are achieved by simulation and experiment, respectively. An optical 3 dB bandwidth of 45 nm from 1530 nm to 1575 nm is also obtained in experiment. Numerical calculation shows that a tolerance to fabrication error of 10 nm in etch depth is achievable. The measurement results indicate that the alignment error of ±2 μm results in less than 1 dB additional coupling loss.

  4. Efficient photon triplet generation in integrated nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Michael G; Herrera, Felipe; Griesse-Nascimento, Sarah; Reshef, Orad; Evans, Christopher C; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Mazur, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Generation of entangled photons in nonlinear media constitutes a basic building block of modern photonic quantum technology. Current optical materials are severely limited in their ability to produce three or more entangled photons in a single event due to weak nonlinearities and challenges achieving phase-matching. We use integrated nanophotonics to enhance nonlinear interactions and develop protocols to design multimode waveguides that enable sustained phase-matching for third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion (TOSPDC). We predict a generation efficiency of 0.13 triplets/s/mW of pump power in TiO2-based integrated waveguides, an order of magnitude higher than previous theoretical and experimental demonstrations. We experimentally verify our device design methods in TiO2 waveguides using third-harmonic generation (THG), the reverse process of TOSPDC that is subject to the same phase-matching constraints. We finally discuss the effect of finite detector bandwidth and photon losses on the energy-time coherence properties of the expected TOSPDC source. PMID:27137604

  5. Optical investigation of nanophotonic lithium niobate-based optical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Makram A.; Al-Douri, Y.; Hashim, U.; Salim, Evan T.; Prakash, Deo; Verma, K. D.

    2015-10-01

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) nanophotonics are prepared on quartz substrate by sol-gel method. They have been deposited with different molarity concentrations and annealed at 500 °C. These samples are characterized and analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible. The measured results show an importance of increasing molarity that indicates the structure starts to crystallize to become more regular. The estimated lattice constants, energy gaps and refractive index give good accordance with experimental results. Also, the calculated refractive index and optical dielectric constant are in agreement with experimental data.

  6. Design of T-shaped nanophotonic wire waveguide for optical interconnection in H-tree network.

    PubMed

    Kurt, H; Giden, I H; Citrin, D S

    2011-12-19

    Nanophotonic wire waveguides play an important role for the realization of highly dense integrated photonic circuits. The miniaturization of optoelectronic devices and realization of ultra-small integrated circuits strongly demand compact waveguide branches. T-shaped versions of nanophotonic wires are the first stage of both power splitting and optical-interconnection systems based on guided-wave optics; however, the acute transitions at the waveguide junctions typically induce huge bending losses in terms of radiated modes. Both 2D and 3D finite-difference time-domain methods are employed to monitor the efficient light propagation. By introducing appropriate combinations of dielectric posts around the dielectric-waveguide junctions within the 4.096μm×4.096μm region, we are able to reduce the bending losses dramatically and increase the transmission efficiency from low values of 18% in the absence of the dielectric posts to approximately 49% and 43% in 2D and 3D cases, respectively. These findings may lead to the implementation of such T-junctions in near-future high-density integrated photonics to deliver optical-clock signals via H-tree network. PMID:22274265

  7. Sensitivity Enhancement in Si Nanophotonic Waveguides Used for Refractive Index Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yaocheng; Ma, Ke; Dai, Daoxin

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is given for the sensitivity of several typical Si nanophotonic waveguides, including SOI (silicon-on-insulator) nanowires, nanoslot waveguides, suspended Si nanowires, and nanofibers. The cases for gas sensing (ncl ~ 1.0) and liquid sensing (ncl ~ 1.33) are considered. When using SOI nanowires (with a SiO₂ buffer layer), the sensitivity for liquid sensing (S ~ 0.55) is higher than that for gas sensing (S ~ 0.35) due to lower asymmetry in the vertical direction. By using SOI nanoslot waveguides, suspended Si nanowires, and Si nanofibers, one could achieve a higher sensitivity compared to sensing with a free-space beam (S = 1.0). The sensitivity for gas sensing is higher than that for liquid sensing due to the higher index-contrast. The waveguide sensitivity of an optimized suspended Si nanowire for gas sensing is as high as 1.5, which is much higher than that of a SOI nanoslot waveguide. Furthermore, the optimal design has very large tolerance to the core width variation due to the fabrication error (∆w ~ ±50 nm). In contrast, a Si nanofiber could also give a very high sensitivity (e.g., ~1.43) while the fabrication tolerance is very small (i.e., ∆w < ±5 nm). The comparative study shows that suspended Si nanowire is a good choice to achieve ultra-high waveguide sensitivity. PMID:26950132

  8. Sensitivity Enhancement in Si Nanophotonic Waveguides Used for Refractive Index Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yaocheng; Ma, Ke; Dai, Daoxin

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is given for the sensitivity of several typical Si nanophotonic waveguides, including SOI (silicon-on-insulator) nanowires, nanoslot waveguides, suspended Si nanowires, and nanofibers. The cases for gas sensing (ncl ~ 1.0) and liquid sensing (ncl ~ 1.33) are considered. When using SOI nanowires (with a SiO2 buffer layer), the sensitivity for liquid sensing (S ~ 0.55) is higher than that for gas sensing (S ~ 0.35) due to lower asymmetry in the vertical direction. By using SOI nanoslot waveguides, suspended Si nanowires, and Si nanofibers, one could achieve a higher sensitivity compared to sensing with a free-space beam (S = 1.0). The sensitivity for gas sensing is higher than that for liquid sensing due to the higher index-contrast. The waveguide sensitivity of an optimized suspended Si nanowire for gas sensing is as high as 1.5, which is much higher than that of a SOI nanoslot waveguide. Furthermore, the optimal design has very large tolerance to the core width variation due to the fabrication error (∆w ~ ±50 nm). In contrast, a Si nanofiber could also give a very high sensitivity (e.g., ~1.43) while the fabrication tolerance is very small (i.e., ∆w < ±5 nm). The comparative study shows that suspended Si nanowire is a good choice to achieve ultra-high waveguide sensitivity. PMID:26950132

  9. Broadband polarization independent nanophotonic coupler for silicon waveguides with ultra-high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cheben, Pavel; Schmid, Jens H; Wang, Shurui; Xu, Dan-Xia; Vachon, Martin; Janz, Siegfried; Lapointe, Jean; Painchaud, Yves; Picard, Marie-Josée

    2015-08-24

    Coupling of light to and from integrated optical circuits has been recognized as a major practical challenge since the early years of photonics. The coupling is particularly difficult for high index contrast waveguides such as silicon-on-insulator, since the cross-sectional area of silicon wire waveguides is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than that of a standard single-mode fiber. Here, we experimentally demonstrate unprecedented control over the light coupling between the optical fiber and silicon chip by constructing the nanophotonic coupler with ultra-high coupling efficiency simultaneously for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. We specifically demonstrate a subwavelength refractive index engineered nanostructure to mitigate loss and wavelength resonances by suppressing diffraction effects, enabling a coupling efficiency over 92% (0.32 dB) and polarization independent operation for a broad spectral range exceeding 100 nm. PMID:26368222

  10. Vertical optical ring resonators fully integrated with nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Abbas; Kleinert, Moritz; Stolarek, David; Zimmermann, Lars; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate full integration of vertical optical ring resonators with silicon nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates to accomplish a significant step towards 3D photonic integration. The on-chip integration is realized by rolling up 2D differentially strained TiO2 nanomembranes into 3D microtube cavities on a nanophotonic microchip. The integration configuration allows for out of plane optical coupling between the in-plane nanowaveguides and the vertical microtube cavities as a compact and mechanically stable optical unit, which could enable refined vertical light transfer in 3D stacks of multiple photonic layers. In this vertical transmission scheme, resonant filtering of optical signals at telecommunication wavelengths is demonstrated based on subwavelength thick walled microcavities. Moreover, an array of microtube cavities is prepared and each microtube cavity is integrated with multiple waveguides which opens up interesting perspectives towards parallel and multi-routing through a single cavity device as well as high-throughput optofluidic sensing schemes.

  11. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Dixon, J. E.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Kok, P.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95+/-5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations.

  12. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer.

    PubMed

    Coles, R J; Price, D M; Dixon, J E; Royall, B; Clarke, E; Kok, P; Skolnick, M S; Fox, A M; Makhonin, M N

    2016-01-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95±5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations. PMID:27029961

  13. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer

    PubMed Central

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Dixon, J. E.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Kok, P.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95±5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations. PMID:27029961

  14. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-02-01

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500-3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip.

  15. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500–3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip. PMID:25697764

  16. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; de Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.

  17. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Kuipers, L

    2016-01-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides. PMID:27079683

  18. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-04-15

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing themore » free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrodinger equation model. Finally, these results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides.« less

  19. Free-carrier-induced soliton fission unveiled by in situ measurements in nanophotonic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad; Wulf, Matthias; Lefrancois, Simon; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Kuipers, L.

    2016-01-01

    Solitons are localized waves formed by a balance of focusing and defocusing effects. These nonlinear waves exist in diverse forms of matter yet exhibit similar properties including stability, periodic recurrence and particle-like trajectories. One important property is soliton fission, a process by which an energetic higher-order soliton breaks apart due to dispersive or nonlinear perturbations. Here we demonstrate through both experiment and theory that nonlinear photocarrier generation can induce soliton fission. Using near-field measurements, we directly observe the nonlinear spatial and temporal evolution of optical pulses in situ in a nanophotonic semiconductor waveguide. We develop an analytic formalism describing the free-carrier dispersion (FCD) perturbation and show the experiment exceeds the minimum threshold by an order of magnitude. We confirm these observations with a numerical nonlinear Schrödinger equation model. These results provide a fundamental explanation and physical scaling of optical pulse evolution in free-carrier media and could enable improved supercontinuum sources in gas based and integrated semiconductor waveguides. PMID:27079683

  20. Photon transport in a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide QED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Nha, Hyunchul; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-06-01

    The waveguide quantum electrodynamics (QED) system may have important applications in quantum device and quantum information technology. In this article we review the methods being proposed to calculate photon transport in a one-dimensional (1D) waveguide coupled to quantum emitters. We first introduce the Bethe ansatz approach and the input–output formalism to calculate the stationary results of a single photon transport. Then we present a dynamical time-dependent theory to calculate the real-time evolution of the waveguide QED system. In the longtime limit, both the stationary theory and the dynamical calculation give the same results. Finally, we also briefly discuss the calculations of the multiphoton transport problems.

  1. Single-photon transport through an atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a single-photon pulse traveling through a linear atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional (1D) single mode photonic waveguide. We derive a time-dependent dynamical theory for this collective many-body system which allows us to study the real time evolution of the photon transport and the atomic excitations. Our analytical result is consistent with previous numerical calculations when there is only one atom. For an atomic chain, the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode can significantly change the dynamics of the system. The reflectivity of a photon can be tuned by changing the ratio of coupling strength and the photon linewidth or by changing the number of atoms in the chain. The reflectivity of a single-photon pulse with finite bandwidth can even approach 100 % . The spectrum of the reflected and transmitted photon can also be significantly different from the single-atom case. Many interesting physical phenomena can occur in this system such as the photonic band-gap effects, quantum entanglement generation, Fano-like interference, and superradiant effects. For engineering, this system may serve as a single-photon frequency filter, single-photon modulation, and may find important applications in quantum information.

  2. Broadband nanophotonic waveguides and resonators based on epitaxial GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bruch, Alexander W.; Xiong, Chi; Leung, Benjamin; Poot, Menno; Han, Jung; Tang, Hong X.

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate broadband, low loss optical waveguiding in single crystalline GaN grown epitaxially on c-plane sapphire wafers through a buffered metal-organic chemical vapor phase deposition process. High Q optical microring resonators are realized in near infrared, infrared, and near visible regimes with intrinsic quality factors exceeding 50 000 at all the wavelengths we studied. TEM analysis of etched waveguide reveals growth and etch-induced defects. Reduction of these defects through improved material and device processing could lead to even lower optical losses and enable a wideband photonic platform based on GaN-on-sapphire material system.

  3. Large-Area Binary Blazed Grating Coupler between Nanophotonic Waveguide and LED

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenqian; Zhang, Meiling; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Enbang; Miao, Changyun; Tang, Chunxiao

    2014-01-01

    A large-area binary blazed grating coupler for the arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) demodulation integrated microsystem on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) was designed for the first time. Through the coupler, light can be coupled into the SOI waveguide from the InP-based C-band LED for the AWG demodulation integrated microsystem to function. Both the length and width of the grating coupler are 360 μm, as large as the InP-based C-band LED light emitting area in the system. The coupler was designed and optimized based on the finite difference time domain method. When the incident angle of the light source is 0°, the coupling efficiency of the binary blazed grating is 40.92%, and the 3 dB bandwidth is 72 nm at a wavelength of 1550 nm. PMID:25126602

  4. Scattering of a cross-polarized linear wave by a soliton at an optical event horizon in a birefringent nanophotonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ciret, Charles; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2016-06-15

    The scattering of a linear wave on an optical event horizon, induced by a cross-polarized soliton, is experimentally and numerically investigated in integrated structures. The experiments are performed in a dispersion-engineered birefringent silicon nanophotonic waveguide. In stark contrast with copolarized waves, the large difference between the group velocity of the two cross-polarized waves enables a frequency conversion almost independent of the soliton wavelength. It is shown that the generated idler is only shifted by 10 nm around 1550 nm over a pump tuning range of 350 nm. Simulations using two coupled full vectorial nonlinear Schrödinger equations fully support the experimental results. PMID:27304314

  5. Scattering of a cross-polarized linear wave by a soliton at an optical event horizon in a birefringent nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciret, Charles; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of a linear wave on an optical event horizon, induced by a cross polarized soliton, is experimentally and numerically investigated in integrated structures. The experiments are performed in a dispersion-engineered birefringent silicon nanophotonic waveguide. In stark contrast with co-polarized waves, the large difference between the group velocity of the two cross-polarized waves enables a frequency conversion almost independent on the soliton wavelength. It is shown that the generated idler is only shifted by 10 nm around 1550 nm over a pump tuning range of 350 nm. Simulations using two coupled full vectorial nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equations fully support the experimental results.

  6. Connection between wave transport through disordered 1D waveguides and energy density inside the sample: A maximum-entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Pier A.; Shi, Zhou; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2015-11-01

    We study the average energy - or particle - density of waves inside disordered 1D multiply-scattering media. We extend the transfer-matrix technique that was used in the past for the calculation of the intensity beyond the sample to study the intensity in the interior of the sample by considering the transfer matrices of the two segments that form the entire waveguide. The statistical properties of the two disordered segments are found using a maximum-entropy ansatz subject to appropriate constraints. The theoretical expressions are shown to be in excellent agreement with 1D transfer-matrix simulations.

  7. Density controlled nanophotonic waveguide gratings for efficient on-chip out-coupling in the near field (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercruysse, Dries; Mukund, Vignesh; Jansen, Roelof; Stahl, Richard; Van Dorpe, Pol; Lagae, Liesbet; Rottenberg, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Waveguide optics takes up a prominent role in the progressing miniaturization of optical devices. Chip integrated photonic waveguides especially allow for complex routing schemes of light across a chip. In/out-coupling diffraction gratings form an essential tool in waveguide systems, as they facilitate the interaction between the waveguide system and the near or far-field.[1,2] Ideally, these gratings would couple out all light in the waveguide into a beam with a predefined polarization and, phase and intensity profile. As such they should be able to produce any functional beam that is typically prepared by free space optics. Yet, in practice there is typically a design trade-off between beam quality and out-coupling efficiency.[2] Light in the waveguide has to travel laterally through the grating to be coupled out. The light therefore decays exponentially over the grating, causing much more light to be coupled out at the start of the grating than at the end. This asymmetry results in a warped out-coupling intensity that heavily influences the light beam's intensity profile. Especially when the grating is addressing points in the near field, as is the case for focusing waveguide grating couplers, this effect can be highly disruptive. In this work we present a grating constructed from a field of sub-wavelength scatterers, rather than full grating lines. By tuning the position and the density of the scatterers, the phase and the intensity of the out-coupled light can be set precisely over large grating areas. An iterative design algorithm is developed that carefully tunes the density so as to control the light intensity in the waveguide and the amount of out-coupled light. Using FDTD simulations we show that these gratings can efficiently couple out light into a nearly diffraction limited spot with an even angular intensity. We verify this experimentally by fabricating these gratings in the SiN/SiO2 system using e-beam lithography. In addition, we also show that

  8. Analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in 1D waveguides with a breathing crack using the spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-11-01

    A breathing crack, due to its bilinear stiffness characteristics, modifies the frequency spectrum of a propagating dual-frequency elastic wave, and gives rise to sidebands around the probing frequency. This paper presents an analytical-numerical method to investigate such nonlinear frequency mixing resulting from the modulation effects induced by a breathing crack in 1D waveguides, such as axial rods and the Euler-Bernoulli beams. A transverse edge-crack is assumed to be present in both the waveguides, and the local flexibility caused by the crack is modeled using an equivalent spring approach. A simultaneous treatment of both the waveguides, in the framework of the Fourier transform based spectral finite element method, is presented for analyzing their response to a dual frequency excitation applied in the form of a tone-burst signal. The intermittent contact between the crack surfaces is accounted for by introducing bilinear contact forces acting at the nodes of the damage spectral element. Subsequently, an iterative approach is outlined for solving the resulting system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. Applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by considering several test cases. The existence of sidebands and the higher order harmonics is confirmed in the frequency domain response of both the waveguides under investigation. A qualitative comparison with the previous experimental observations accentuates the utility of the proposed solution method. Additionally, the influence of the two constituent frequencies in the dual frequency excitation is assessed by varying the relative strengths of their amplitudes. A brief parametric study is performed for bringing out the effects of the relative crack depth and crack location on the degree of modulation, which is quantified in terms of the modulation parameter. Results of the present investigation can find their potential use in providing an analytical-numerical support to the studies geared towards the

  9. Nonlinear analysis of flexural wave propagation through 1D waveguides with a breathing crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-05-01

    An analytical-numerical approach is presented to investigate the flexural wave propagation through a slender semi-infinite beam with a breathing edge-crack. A Fourier transform based spectral finite element method is employed in an iterative manner to analyze the nonlinear response of the cracked beam subjected to a transverse tone burst excitation. Results obtained using the spectral finite element method are corroborated using 1D finite element analysis that involves the formulation and solution of a linear complementarity problem at every time step. In both the methods, an equivalent rotational spring is used to model the local flexibility caused by an open crack and the respective damaged beam element is formulated. The effect of crack-breathing is accounted for by an intermittent contact force acting at the nodes of the damaged beam element. A parallel study involving the open crack model is performed in the same setting to facilitate a comparison between the open and the breathing crack model. An illustrative case study reveals clearly the existence of higher order harmonics originating from the crack-breathing phenomenon which are absent if the crack is assumed to remain open throughout. A thorough investigation of the wrap-around effect associated with spectral finite element method reveals that the relative strengths of the higher order harmonics are not influenced by the wrap-around effect. A brief parametric study involving the variation of crack depth is presented at the end which suggests that the magnitudes of the higher harmonic peaks increase with increasing levels of crack severity. The present study can be potentially useful in the efforts geared toward the development of damage detection/localization strategies based on the nonlinear wave-damage interaction.

  10. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  11. Reprint of : Connection between wave transport through disordered 1D waveguides and energy density inside the sample: A maximum-entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Pier A.; Shi, Zhou; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2016-08-01

    We study the average energy - or particle - density of waves inside disordered 1D multiply-scattering media. We extend the transfer-matrix technique that was used in the past for the calculation of the intensity beyond the sample to study the intensity in the interior of the sample by considering the transfer matrices of the two segments that form the entire waveguide. The statistical properties of the two disordered segments are found using a maximum-entropy ansatz subject to appropriate constraints. The theoretical expressions are shown to be in excellent agreement with 1D transfer-matrix simulations.

  12. Planar waveguides with less than 0.1 dB/m propagation loss fabricated with wafer bonding.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Jared F; Heck, Martijn J R; John, Demis D; Barton, Jonathon S; Bruinink, Christiaan M; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René G; Blumenthal, Daniel J; Bowers, John E

    2011-11-21

    We demonstrate a wafer-bonded silica-on-silicon planar waveguide platform with record low total propagation loss of (0.045 ± 0.04) dB/m near the free space wavelength of 1580 nm. Using coherent optical frequency domain reflectometry, we characterize the group index, fiber-to-chip coupling loss, critical bend radius, and propagation loss of these waveguides. PMID:22109434

  13. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  14. Time domain topology optimization of 3D nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elesin, Y.; Lazarov, B. S.; Jensen, J. S.; Sigmund, O.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel topology optimization framework for design of large scale 3D nanophotonic devices. The code shows excellent scalability and is demonstrated for optimization of broadband frequency splitter, waveguide intersection, photonic crystal-based waveguide and nanowire-based waveguide. The obtained results are compared to simplified 2D studies and we demonstrate that 3D topology optimization may lead to significant performance improvements.

  15. Nanophotonics for Optoelectronic Devices: Extrinsic Silicon Photonic Receivers and Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, Richard R.

    The demand for high data rate communications and renewable energy sources has led to new materials and platforms for optoelectronic devices, which require nanometer scale feature sizes. Devices that operate in the visible and near-infrared commonly have active areas with dimensions on the order of the diffraction limit ( l2n , where lambda is the free space wavelength and n is the index of refraction), for which the ray optics modeling techniques and bulk focusing optics traditionally used in optoelectronic device design are no longer applicable. In this subwavelength regime, nanophotonic light-trapping strategies are required to localize electromagnetic fields in the active area. This dissertation details the application of nanophotonics to two optoelectronic systems: extrinsic photodetectors for silicon photonics and light-trapping in organic photovoltaics. Error-free reception of 10 Gb/s data at lambda = 1.55 mum is demonstrated with a Si+ ion-implanted silicon waveguide photodiode. To mitigate the relatively small absorption coefficient of ion-implanted silicon, resonant cavity enhancement using in-line Fabry-Perot and 1D photonic crystal cavities, as well as slow light enhancement using a coupled resonator optical waveguide are discussed. The extension of these photodiodes to the mid-infrared is demonstrated using Zn+ implantation to detect over a range of lambda = 2.2-2.4 mum, and a new method for modulation and switching in integrated optics by using interference in a resonant cavity, termed coherent perfect loss (CPL), is presented. Finally, the upper limit of nanophotonic light trapping is derived for organic photovoltaics with material anisotropy included.

  16. Special issue on graphene nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu; Maier, S. A.; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2013-11-01

    , although it cannot be considered as the proceedings of that workshop, was conceived there. Several topics at the cutting edge of research into graphene nanophotonics are covered in this publication. The papers by Polyushkin et al [3] and Thackray et al [4] consider structures where graphene is placed in close proximity to metallic plasmonic resonators. There graphene is used either as a substrate for metallic nanoparticles [3] or as a top layer covering metallic stripes [4]. Both studies find that the plasmonic response of metallic nanoparticles is notably modified by the presence of a graphene. The papers of Nefedov et al [5] and Bludov et al [6] analyze how a metamaterial based on a stack of graphene layers can provide unusually high absorption and reflection. These findings suggest that dynamical tuning of the reflectance and absorbance is possible at specific frequencies. The theory of the transverse current response for graphene within the random phase approximation is presented, from a general standpoint, in the paper by Gutiérrez-Rubio et al [7], which considers non-local effects, as well as the dependence of both temperature and surrounding dielectric media. Forati et al [8] present a study on conductivity and current distributions in a graphene sheet located over a ridge-perturbed ground plane, showing how the resulting plasmonic waveguide is more sensitive to the bias voltage than to the geometric ridge parameters. Effective analytical methods to address the electromagnetic resonances related to the excitation of graphene plasmons in different structures are presented in the papers by Balaban et al [9] (devoted to individual graphene discs and stripes) and Slipchenko et al [10] (which considers periodic graphene gratings). Popov et al [11] predict lasing of terahertz radiation in graphene due to the stimulated generation of plasmons. Their paper demonstrates that the dynamic and frequency ranges, as well as the energy conversion efficiency, of the terahertz

  17. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  18. Broadband directional coupling in aluminum nitride nanophotonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, Matthias; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2013-03-25

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)-on-insulator has emerged as a promising platform for the realization of linear and non-linear integrated photonic circuits. In order to efficiently route optical signals on-chip, precise control over the interaction and polarization of evanescently coupled waveguide modes is required. Here we employ nanophotonic AlN waveguides to realize directional couplers with a broad coupling bandwidth and low insertion loss. We achieve uniform splitting of incoming modes, confirmed by high extinction-ratio exceeding 33dB in integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. Optimized three-waveguide couplers furthermore allow for extending the coupling bandwidth over traditional side-coupled devices by almost an order of magnitude, with variable splitting ratio. Our work illustrates the potential of AlN circuits for coupled waveguide optics, DWDM applications and integrated polarization diversity schemes. PMID:23546114

  19. Nanophotonics and supramolecular chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has become a key area in emerging bottom-up nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, supramolecular systems that can produce a photonic output are increasingly important research targets and present various possibilities for practical applications. Accordingly, photonic properties of various supramolecular systems at the nanoscale are important in current nanotechnology. In this short review, nanophotonics in supramolecular chemistry will be briefly summarized by introducing recent examples of control of photonic responses of supramolecular systems. Topics are categorized according to the fundamental actions of their supramolecular systems: (i) self-assembly; (ii) recognition; (iii) manipulation.

  20. Dielectric resonator antenna for applications in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Malheiros-Silveira, Gilliard N; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2013-01-14

    Optical nanoantennas, especially of the dipole type, have been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by many research groups. Likewise, the plasmonic waveguides and optical circuits have experienced significant advances. In radio frequencies and microwaves a category of antenna known as dielectric resonator antenna (DRA), whose radiant element is a dielectric resonator (DR), has been designed for several applications, including satellite and radar systems. In this letter, we explore the possibilities and advantages to design nano DRAs (NDRAs), i. e., DRAs for nanophotonics applications. Numerical demonstrations showing the fundamental antenna parameters for a circular cylindrical NDRA type have been carried out for the short (S), conventional (C), and long (L) bands of the optical communication spectrum. PMID:23389016

  1. Nanoscale observation of waveguide modes enhancing the efficiency of solar cells.

    PubMed

    Paetzold, Ulrich W; Lehnen, Stephan; Bittkau, Karsten; Rau, Uwe; Carius, Reinhard

    2014-11-12

    Nanophotonic light management concepts are on the way to advance photovoltaic technologies and accelerate their economical breakthrough. Most of these concepts make use of the coupling of incident sunlight to waveguide modes via nanophotonic structures such as photonic crystals, nanowires, or plasmonic gratings. Experimentally, light coupling to these modes was so far exclusively investigated with indirect and macroscopic methods, and thus, the nanoscale physics of light coupling and propagation of waveguide modes remain vague. In this contribution, we present a nanoscopic observation of light coupling to waveguide modes in a nanophotonic thin-film silicon solar cell. Making use of the subwavelength resolution of the scanning near-field optical microscopy, we resolve the electric field intensities of a propagating waveguide mode at the surface of a state-of-the-art nanophotonic thin-film solar cell. We identify the resonance condition for light coupling to this individual waveguide mode and associate it to a pronounced resonance in the external quantum efficiency that is found to increase significantly the power conversion efficiency of the device. We show that a maximum of the incident light couples to the investigated waveguide mode if the period of the electric field intensity of the waveguide mode matches the periodicity of the nanophotonic two-dimensional grating. Our novel experimental approach establishes experimental access to the local analysis of light coupling to waveguide modes in a number of optoelectronic devices concerned with nanophotonic light-trapping as well as nanophotonic light emission. PMID:25350265

  2. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  3. Nanophotonic Filters and Integrated Networks in Flexible 2D Polymer Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xuetao; Clevenson, Hannah; Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Li, Luozhou; Englund, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Polymers have appealing optical, biochemical, and mechanical qualities, including broadband transparency, ease of functionalization, and biocompatibility. However, their low refractive indices have precluded wavelength-scale optical confinement and nanophotonic applications in polymers. Here, we introduce a suspended polymer photonic crystal (SPPC) architecture that enables the implementation of nanophotonic structures typically limited to high-index materials. Using the SPPC platform, we demonstrate nanophotonic band-edge filters, waveguides, and nanocavities featuring quality (Q) factors exceeding 2, 300 and mode volumes (Vmode) below 1.7(λ/n)3. The unprecedentedly high Q/Vmode ratio results in a spectrally selective enhancement of radiative transitions of embedded emitters via the cavity Purcell effect with an enhancement factor exceeding 100. Moreover, the SPPC architecture allows straightforward integration of nanophotonic networks, shown here by a waveguide-coupled cavity drop filter with sub-nanometer spectral resolution. The nanoscale optical confinement in polymer promises new applications ranging from optical communications to organic opto-electronics, and nanophotonic polymer sensors. PMID:23828320

  4. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-06-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere.

  5. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere. PMID:26043287

  6. Nanophotonic Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolee, Jessica A.; Walker, Bennett N.; Chen, Yong; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Interactions between laser radiation and photonic structures at elevated laser intensities give rise to the production of positive and negative ions from adsorbates. These new types of ion sources exhibit properties that are significantly different from conventional laser desorption ionization sources. In this contribution comparisons are made between matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) of biomolecules with ion production from laser-induced silicon microcolumn arrays (LISMA) and nanopost arrays (NAPA). The sharp increase of ion yields from the nanophotonic ion sources follow a power law behavior with an exponent of up to n≈7, whereas in the case of MALDI n≈5. The strong field enhancement in the vicinity of the columns and posts scales with their aspect ratio. Slender high aspect ratio posts show reduced laser fluence threshold for ionization. Posts with diameters at or below the thermal diffusion length demonstrate high surface temperatures due to the radial confinement of the deposited energy. As a consequence enhanced fragmentation, i.e., lower survival yield of the molecular ions is observed. The origin of protons in the ionization of adsorbates was identified as the entrapped residues of the solvent.

  7. Successful commercialization of nanophotonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Supriya L.; Clarke, Roger B. M.; Hyde, Sam C. W.

    2006-08-01

    The exploitation of nanotechnology from proof of principle to realizable commercial applications encounters considerable challenges in regards to high volume, large scale, low cost manufacturability and social ethics. This has led to concerns over converting powerful intellectual property into realizable, industry attractive technologies. At The Technology Partnership we specifically address the issue of successful integration of nanophotonics into industry in markets such as biomedical, ophthalmic, energy, telecommunications, and packaging. In this paper we draw on a few examples where we have either developed industrial scale nanophotonic technology or engineering platforms which may be used to fortify nano/microphotonic technologies and enhance their commercial viability.

  8. Nanophotonics for Tailoring Light-Matter Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wenjun

    In this thesis, we will theoretically explore three nanophotonics phenomena which enable strong light-matter interaction. The first phenomenon is plasmonic resonance, where the surface plasmon mode at metal and dielectric boundaries significantly enhances the optical response of nanoparticles. We propose an optimization-based theoretical approach to tailor the optical response of silver/silica multilayer nanospheres over the visible spectrum. We show that the structure that provides the largest cross-section per volume/mass, averaged over a wide frequency range, is the silver coated silica sphere. We also show how properly chosen mixture of several species of different nanospheres can have an even larger minimal cross-section per volume/mass over the entire visible spectrum. The second phenomenon is photonic chiral edge state, where the breaking of time-reversal symmetry forces light to travel in only one direction. Based on the directional coupling between one-way waveguide and conventional two-waveguide, we propose a new type of optical circulators, which has the potential for simultaneous broadband operation and small device footprint. The third phenomenon is Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS), where photon and phonon are coupled through optical forces such as electrostriction force and radiation pressure. We develop a general method of calculating SBS gain via the overlap integral between optical and elastic modes. Applying this method to a rectangular waveguide, we demonstrate that the distribution of optical force and elastic modal profile jointly determine the magnitude and scaling of SBS gains. Applying this method to a periodic waveguide, we demonstrate that SBS gain can be further enhanced in the slow light regime. Based on this framework, we theoretically characterize a novel class of hybrid photon-phonon waveguides. Our analysis reveals that photon-phonon coupling via SBS can be directed and tailored over an exceptionally wide frequency range

  9. Disorder improves nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paetzold, U. W. Smeets, M.; Meier, M.; Bittkau, K.; Merdzhanova, T.; Smirnov, V.; Carius, R.; Rau, U.; Michaelis, D.; Waechter, C.

    2014-03-31

    We present a systematic experimental study on the impact of disorder in advanced nanophotonic light-trapping concepts of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared on imprint-textured glass superstrates. For periodically textured superstrates of periods below 500 nm, the nanophotonic light-trapping effect is already superior to state-of-the-art randomly textured front contacts. The nanophotonic light-trapping effect can be associated to light coupling to leaky waveguide modes causing resonances in the external quantum efficiency of only a few nanometer widths for wavelengths longer than 500 nm. With increasing disorder of the nanotextured front contact, these resonances broaden and their relative altitude decreases. Moreover, overall the external quantum efficiency, i.e., the light-trapping effect, increases incrementally with increasing disorder. Thereby, our study is a systematic experimental proof that disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light-trapping concepts employing grating couplers in thin-film solar cells. The result is relevant for the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasi periodic textures.

  10. Nanoimprint lithography: an enabling technology for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, He; Wang, Yifei; Li, Yuanrui; Song, Boxiang; Bratkovsk, Alexandre; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an indispensable tool to realize a fast and accurate nanoscale patterning in nanophotonics due to high resolution and high yield. The number of publication on NIL has increased from less than a hundred per year to over three thousand per year. In this paper, the most recent developments on NIL patterning transfer processes and its applications on nanophotonics are discussed and reviewed. NIL has been opening up new opportunities for nanophotonics, especially in fabricating optical meta-materials. With more researches on this low-cost high-throughput fabrication technology, we should anticipate a brighter future for nanophotonics and NIL.

  11. Near-infrared III-nitride-on-silicon nanophotonic platform with microdisk resonators.

    PubMed

    Roland, I; Zeng, Y; Checoury, X; El Kurdi, M; Sauvage, S; Brimont, C; Guillet, T; Gayral, B; Gromovyi, M; Duboz, J Y; Semond, F; de Micheli, M P; Boucaud, P

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a nanophotonic platform with microdisks using epitaxial III-nitride materials on silicon. The two-dimensional platform consists of suspended waveguides and mushroom-type microdisks as resonators side-coupled with a bus waveguide. Loaded quality factors up to 80000 have been obtained in the near-infrared spectral range for microdisk diameters between 8 and 15 μm. We analyze the dependence of the quality factors as a function of coupling efficiency. We have performed continuous-wave second harmonic generation experiments in resonance with the whispering gallery modes supported by the microdisks. PMID:27137573

  12. Near-unity coupling efficiency of a quantum emitter to a photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Arcari, M; Söllner, I; Javadi, A; Lindskov Hansen, S; Mahmoodian, S; Liu, J; Thyrrestrup, H; Lee, E H; Song, J D; Stobbe, S; Lodahl, P

    2014-08-29

    A quantum emitter efficiently coupled to a nanophotonic waveguide constitutes a promising system for the realization of single-photon transistors, quantum-logic gates based on giant single-photon nonlinearities, and high bit-rate deterministic single-photon sources. The key figure of merit for such devices is the β factor, which is the probability for an emitted single photon to be channeled into a desired waveguide mode. We report on the experimental achievement of β=98.43%±0.04% for a quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide, corresponding to a single-emitter cooperativity of η=62.7±1.5. This constitutes a nearly ideal photon-matter interface where the quantum dot acts effectively as a 1D "artificial" atom, since it interacts almost exclusively with just a single propagating optical mode. The β factor is found to be remarkably robust to variations in position and emission wavelength of the quantum dots. Our work demonstrates the extraordinary potential of photonic crystal waveguides for highly efficient single-photon generation and on-chip photon-photon interaction. PMID:25215983

  13. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  14. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Pantelić, Dejan; Sarajlić, Milija; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Matović, Jovan; Jelenković, Branislav; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Ćurčić, Srećko; Vuković, Slobodan; Pavlović, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; Lačković, Vesna; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Ćurčić, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  15. Nanophotonic Design for Broadband Light Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, Emily; Callahan, Dennis; Horowitz, Kelsey; Pala, Ragip; Atwater, Harry

    2014-10-13

    We describe nanophotonic design approaches for broadband light management including i) crossed-trapezoidal Si structures ii) Si photonic crystal superlattices, and iii) tapered and inhomogeneous diameter III-V/Si nanowire arrays.

  16. Nanophotonic graphene-based racetrack-resonator add/drop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth L., A.; da Silva, M. G.; Neves, D. M. C.; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We are presenting and analyzing a graphene-based nanophotonic device to operate as a resonator-add/drop filter, whose control is obtained by varying the graphene chemical potential. That device consists of graphene-based waveguides, two directional couplers and a racetrack resonator with 90° bends. Since the graphene chemical potential provides the achievement of the necessary parameters, the resonance and filtering of the signals are obtained by applying the correct value of the graphene chemical potential in the graphene nanoribbons. The results of this study should help in the development of new graphene-based nanophotonic devices operating in the terahertz and infrared range (including in the C-band of the International Telecommunication Union - ITU), for use in future communications networks.

  17. Heterogeneous Integration of Materials on Si for Nanophotonics Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, Solomon

    2009-03-01

    Optical interconnects are attractive candidates for achieving communication bandwidth well beyond terabit-per-second for high-performance multi-core microprocessors. Silicon has become a desirable material due to its transparency in the infrared wavelength range and the ease for integrating optical devices at the vicinity of CMOS circuitry utilizing standard processes. While state-of-the-art patterning techniques provide precise dimension control as well as pattern placement, standard doping and metallization steps enable utilization of phenomena such as carrier injection and depletion to render the devices tunable. As a result, large progress has been made on Si-based nanophotonic devices such as modulators, switches, and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems [1, 2]. To make photodetectors, however, a heterogeneous integration of other materials that absorb light in the infrared is necessary. Available in standard front-end CMOS processes for gate strain engineering, Germanium is suitable due to its high absorption coefficient at 1.3μm and 1.5μm wavelengths. Thus, Ge can be directly integrated into the process to fabricate compact photodetectors simultaneously with amplifier circuits in order to make a receiver for an optical network. Nevertheless, the integration of Ge photodetector into the CMOS process flow is very challenging due to process complexity and severe temperature constraints; as a result, photodetectors fabricated only after completing the front-end processes have been previously demonstrated. This talk will discuss Ge waveguide photodetectors that have been integrated into the front-end before the activation of CMOS well implants. By utilizing a lateral seeded crystallization method wherein the Ge waveguides are melted during high-temperature dopant activation, 20μm-long single-crystal Ge-on-insulator waveguides were formed. This approach eliminates the need for selective epitaxial growth of Ge, and avoids high-density misfit

  18. Superluminal and stopped light due to mode coupling in confined hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neira, Andres D.; Wurtz, Gregory A.; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropic metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion can be used to design waveguides with unusual properties. We show that, in contrast to planar waveguides, geometric confinement leads to coupling of ordinary (forward) and extraordinary (backward) modes and formation of hybrid waveguided modes, which near the crossing point may exhibit slow, stopped or superluminal behavior accompanied by very strong group velocity dispersion. These modes can be used for designing stopped-light nanolasers for nanophotonic applications and dispersion-facilitated signal reshaping in telecom applications.

  19. Nanophotonic filters for digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Kirsty

    There has been an increasing demand for low cost, portable CMOS image sensors because of increased integration, and new applications in the automotive, mobile communication and medical industries, amongst others. Colour reproduction remains imperfect in conventional digital image sensors, due to the limitations of the dye-based filters. Further improvement is required if the full potential of digital imaging is to be realised. In alternative systems, where accurate colour reproduction is a priority, existing equipment is too bulky for anything but specialist use. In this work both these issues are addressed by exploiting nanophotonic techniques to create enhanced trichromatic filters, and multispectral filters, all of which can be fabricated on-chip, i.e. integrated into a conventional digital image sensor, to create compact, low cost, mass produceable imaging systems with accurate colour reproduction. The trichromatic filters are based on plasmonic structures. They exploit the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in arrays of subwavelength holes in metal films to filter light. The currently-known analytical expressions are inadequate for optimising all relevant parameters of a plasmonic structure. In order to obtain arbitrary filter characteristics, an automated design procedure was developed that integrated a genetic algorithm and 3D finite-difference time-domain tool. The optimisation procedure's efficacy is demonstrated by designing a set of plasmonic filters that replicate the CIE (1931) colour matching functions, which themselves mimic the human eye's daytime colour response.

  20. Alternative materials lead to practical nanophotonic components (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Nathaniel; Ferrera, Marcello; DeVault, Clayton; Kim, Jongbum; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been a flurry of research in the field of alternative plasmonic materials, but for telecommunication applications, CMOS compatible materials titanium nitride and doped zinc oxides are among the most promising materials currently available. TiN is a gold-like ceramic with a permittivity cross-over near 500nm. In addition, TiN can attain ultra-thin, ultra-smooth epitaxial films on substrates such as c-sapphire, MgO, and silicon. Partnering TiN with CMOS compatible silicon nitride enables a fully solid state waveguide which is able to achieve a propagation length greater than 1cm for a ~8μm mode size at 1.55μm. Utilizing doped zinc oxide films as a dynamic material, high performance modulators can also be realized due to the low-loss achieved by the TiN/Si3N4 waveguide. Simply by placing a thin layer of aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) on top of the waveguide structure, a modulator with very low insertion loss is achieved. Our recent work has investigated optical tuning of AZO films by the pump-probe method, demonstrating a change in the refractive index of -0.17+0.25i at 1.3μm with an ultrafast response of 1ps. Assuming this change in the refractive index for the AZO film, a modulation of ~0.7dB/μm is possible in the structure with ~0.5dB insertion loss and an operational speed of 1THz. Further optimization of the design is expected to lead to an increased modulation depth without sacrificing insertion loss or speed. Consequently, nanophotonic technologies are reaching a critical point where many applications including telecom, medicine, and quantum science can see practical systems which provide new functionalities.

  1. Deposited amorphous silicon-on-insulator technology for nano-photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Selvaraja, Shankar; Schaekers, Marc; Bogaerts, Wim; Van Thourhout, Dries

    2014-02-01

    Low-loss deposited amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) layers for nano-photonic integrated circuit have been prepared using complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible technology. Waveguide loss as low as 3.45 dB/cm is reported for films deposited at a low temperature (300 °C) using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process. The influence of the deposition parameters such as gas dilution, plasma power and pressure on the quality of the deposited material is thoroughly characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. We show that the optical quality of the deposited film can be directly assessed from distinct frequency bands (2090, 2000 and 840 cm-1) using FTIR, without the need for further waveguide loss measurements.

  2. Optically Resonant Nanophotonic Devices for Label-Free Biomolecular Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Julie; Mandal, Sudeep; Erickson, David

    Optical devices, such as surface plasmon resonance chips and waveguide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers, have long been successfully used as label-free biomolecular sensors. Recently, however, there has been increased interest in developing new approaches to biomolecular detection that can improve on the limit of detection, specificity, and multiplexibility of these early devices and address emerging challenges in pathogen detection, disease diagnosis, and drug discovery. As we describe in this chapter, planar optically resonant nanophotonic devices (such as ring resonators, whispering gallery modes, and photonic crystal cavities) are one method that shows promise in significantly advancing the technology. Here we first provide a short review of these devices focusing on a handful of approaches illustrative of the state of the art. We then frame the major challenge to improving the technology as being the ability to provide simultaneously spatial localization of the electromagnetic energy and biomolecular binding events. We then introduce our “Nanoscale Optofluidic Sensor Arrays” which represents our approach to addressing this challenge. It is demonstrated how these devices serve to enable multiplexed detection while localizing the electromagnetic energy to a volume as small as a cubic wavelength. Challenges involved in the targeted immobilization of biomolecules over such a small area are discussed and our solutions presented. In general, we have tried to write this chapter with the novice in mind, providing details on the fabrication and immobilization methods that we have used and how one might adapt our approach to their designs.

  3. Nanophotonic front electrodes for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, Ulrich Wilhelm; Qiu, Weiming; Finger, Friedhelm; Poortmans, Jef; Cheyns, David

    2015-04-01

    In less than 3 years' time, a vast progress in power conversion efficiencies of organometal halide perovskite solar cells has been achieved by optimization of the device architecture, charge transport layers, and interfaces. A further increase in these efficiencies is expected from an improvement in the optical properties via anti-reflection coatings and nanophotonic light management concepts. In this contribution, we report on the development and implementation of a nanophotonic front electrode for perovskite solar cells. The nanostructures were replicated via the versatile and large-area compatible UV-nanoimprint lithography. The shallow design of the used transparent and conductive nanostructures enabled easy integration into our solution-based baseline process. Prototype methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells show an improvement of 5% in short-circuit current density and an improvement from 9.6% to 9.9% in power conversion efficiency compared to the flat reference device.

  4. Engineering metallic nanostructures for plasmonics and nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Nathan C; Nagpal, Prashant; McPeak, Kevin M; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures now play an important role in many applications. In particular, for the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics, the ability to engineer metals on nanometric scales allows the development of new devices and the study of exciting physics. This review focuses on top-down nanofabrication techniques for engineering metallic nanostructures, along with computational and experimental characterization techniques. A variety of current and emerging applications are also covered. PMID:22790420

  5. Precision tuning of silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlton J.

    In recent years, silicon photonics has begun to transition from research to commercialization. Decades of relentless advances in the field of computing have led to fundamental bottlenecks in the design of computers, especially in interconnect bandwidth density. For IBM, silicon photonics has become a potential technological solution for enabling the future of server systems and cutting-edge supercomputers. For Intel, silicon photonics has become a cost-effective solution for supplying the necessary bandwidth needed by future generations of consumer computing products. While the field of silicon photonics is now advancing at a rapid pace there is still a great deal of research to be done. This thesis investigates ways of improving the performance of fundamental silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes. These devices include numerous optical resonator designs as well as slow-light waveguides. Optical resonators are used to confine photons both spatially and temporally. In recent years, there has been much research, both theoretical and experimental, into improving the design of optical resonators. Improving these devices through fabrication processes has generally been less studied. Optical waveguides are used to guide the flow of photons over chip-level distances. Slow-light waveguides have also been studied by many research groups in recent years and can be applied to an increasingly wide-range of applications. The work can be divided into several parts: Chapter 1 is an introduction to the field of silicon photonics as well as an overview of the fabrication, experimental and computational techniques used throughout this work. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 describe our investigations into the precision tuning of nanophotonic devices using laser-assisted thermal oxidation and atomic layer deposition. Chapters 5 and 6 describe our investigations into improving the sidewall roughness of silicon photonic devices using hydrogen annealing and excimer laser

  6. Transfer Printing of Semiconductor Nanowires with Lasing Emission for Controllable Nanophotonic Device Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Guilhabert, Benoit; Hurtado, Antonio; Jevtics, Dimitars; Gao, Qian; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Dawson, Martin D

    2016-04-26

    Accurate positioning and organization of indium phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) with lasing emission at room temperature is achieved using a nanoscale transfer printing (TP) technique. The NWs retained their lasing emission after their transfer to targeted locations on different receiving substrates (e.g., polymers, silica, and metal surfaces). The NWs were also organized into complex spatial patterns, including 1D and 2D arrays, with a controlled number of elements and dimensions. The developed TP technique enables the fabrication of bespoke nanophotonic systems using NW lasers and other NW devices as building blocks. PMID:26974392

  7. Photonic bandgap structures in planar waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ctyroký, J

    2001-02-01

    If a one-dimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) photonic bandgap (PBG) structure is incorporated into a planar optical waveguide, the refractive-index nonuniformity in the direction perpendicular to the waveguide plane responsible for waveguiding may affect its behavior detrimentally. Such influence is demonstrated in the paper by numerical modeling of a deeply etched first-order waveguide Bragg grating. On the basis of physical considerations, a simple condition for the design of 1D and 2D waveguide PBG structures free of this degradation is formulated; it is, in fact the separability condition for the wave equation. Its positive effect is verified by numerical modeling of a modified waveguide Bragg grating that fulfills the separability condition. PMID:11205991

  8. Hybrid Silicon Nanophotonic Devices: Enhancing Light Emission, Modulation, and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Ryan Morrow

    Silicon has become an increasingly important photonic material for communications, information processing, and sensing applications. Silicon is inexpensive compared to compound semiconductors, and it is well suited for confining and guiding light at standard telecommunication wavelengths due to its large refractive index and minimal intrinsic absorption. Furthermore, silicon-based optical devices can be fabricated alongside microelectronics while taking advantage of advanced silicon processing technologies. In order to realize complete chip-based photonic systems, certain critical components must continue to be developed and refined on the silicon platform, including compact light sources, modulators, routers, and sensing elements. However, bulk silicon is not necessarily an ideal material for many active devices because of its meager light emission characteristics, limited refractive index tunability, and fundamental limitations in confining light beyond the diffraction limit. In this thesis, we present three examples of hybrid devices that use different materials to bring additional optical functionality to silicon photonics. First, we analyze high-index-contrast silicon slot waveguides and their integration with light-emitting erbium-doped glass materials. Theoretical and experimental results show significant enhancement of spontaneous emission rates in slot structures. We then demonstrate the integration of vanadium dioxide, a thermochromic phase-change material, with silicon waveguides to form micron-scale absorption modulators. It is shown experimentally that a 2-mum long waveguide-integrated device exhibits broadband modulation of more than 6.5 dB at wavelengths near 1550 nm. Finally, we demonstrate polymer-on-gold dielectric-loaded surface-plasmon waveguides and ring resonators coupled to silicon waveguides with 1.0+/-0.1 dB insertion loss. The plasmonic waveguides are shown to support a single surface mode at telecommunication wavelengths, with strong

  9. Local and nonlocal optically induced transparency effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longhai; Zheng, Jiajiu; Xu, Yang; Dai, Daoxin; He, Sailing

    2014-11-25

    Graphene is well-known as a two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms arrayed in a honeycomb structure. It has some unique and fascinating properties, which are useful for realizing many optoelectronic devices and applications, including transistors, photodetectors, solar cells, and modulators. To enhance light-graphene interactions and take advantage of its properties, a promising approach is to combine a graphene sheet with optical waveguides, such as silicon nanophotonic wires considered in this paper. Here we report local and nonlocal optically induced transparency (OIT) effects in graphene-silicon hybrid nanophotonic integrated circuits. A low-power, continuous-wave laser is used as the pump light, and the power required for producing the OIT effect is as low as ∼0.1 mW. The corresponding power density is several orders lower than that needed for the previously reported saturated absorption effect in graphene, which implies a mechanism involving light absorption by the silicon and photocarrier transport through the silicon-graphene junction. The present OIT effect enables low power, all-optical, broadband control and sensing, modulation and switching locally and nonlocally. PMID:25372937

  10. Scalable Fabrication of Integrated Nanophotonic Circuits on Arrays of Thin Single Crystal Diamond Membrane Windows.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Afaq H; Rath, Patrik; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kühn, Stefan; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Prawer, Steven

    2016-05-11

    Diamond has emerged as a promising platform for nanophotonic, optical, and quantum technologies. High-quality, single crystalline substrates of acceptable size are a prerequisite to meet the demanding requirements on low-level impurities and low absorption loss when targeting large photonic circuits. Here, we describe a scalable fabrication method for single crystal diamond membrane windows that achieves three major goals with one fabrication method: providing high quality diamond, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy; achieving homogeneously thin membranes, enabled by ion implantation; and providing compatibility with established planar fabrication via lithography and vertical etching. On such suspended diamond membranes we demonstrate a suite of photonic components as building blocks for nanophotonic circuits. Monolithic grating couplers are used to efficiently couple light between photonic circuits and optical fibers. In waveguide coupled optical ring resonators, we find loaded quality factors up to 66 000 at a wavelength of 1560 nm, corresponding to propagation loss below 7.2 dB/cm. Our approach holds promise for the scalable implementation of future diamond quantum photonic technologies and all-diamond photonic metrology tools. PMID:27111636

  11. Ideal, constant-loss nanophotonic mode converter using a Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Horth, Alexandre; Cheben, Pavel; Schmid, Jens H; Kashyap, Raman; Quitoriano, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-21

    Coupling light between an optical fiber and a silicon nanophotonic waveguide is a challenge facing the field of silicon photonics to which various mode converters have been proposed. Inverted tapers stand out as a practical solution enabling efficient and broadband mode conversion. Current design approaches often use linearly-shaped tapers and two dimensional approximations; however, these approaches have not been rigorously verified and there is not an overarching design framework to guide the design process. Here, using a Lagrangian formulation, we propose an original, constant-loss framework for designing shape-controlled photonic devices and apply this formalism to derive an ideal constant-loss taper (CLT). We specifically report on the experimental demonstration of a fabrication-tolerant, 15-µm-long CLT coupler, that produces 0.56 dB fiber-chip coupling efficiency, the highest efficiency-per-length ratio ever reported. PMID:27136856

  12. Low-loss, infrared and terahertz nanophotonics using surface phonon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.; Lindsay, Lucas; Giannini, Vincenzo; Vurgaftman, Igor; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Maier, Stefan A.; Glembocki, Orest J.

    2015-04-01

    The excitation of surface-phonon-polariton (SPhP) modes in polar dielectric crystals and the associated new developments in the field of SPhPs are reviewed. The emphasis of this work is on providing an understanding of the general phenomenon, including the origin of the Reststrahlen band, the role that optical phonons in polar dielectric lattices play in supporting sub-diffraction-limited modes and how the relatively long optical phonon lifetimes can lead to the low optical losses observed within these materials. Based on this overview, the achievements attained to date and the potential technological advantages of these materials are discussed for localized modes in nanostructures, propagating modes on surfaces and in waveguides and novel metamaterial designs, with the goal of realizing low-loss nanophotonics and metamaterials in the mid-infrared to terahertz spectral ranges.

  13. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films.

    PubMed

    Rath, Patrik; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram Hp

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices. PMID:23766953

  14. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Patrik; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Summary Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices. PMID:23766953

  15. Bulk plasmon-polaritons in hyperbolic nanorod metamaterial waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Vasilantonakis, Nikolaos; Nasir, Mazhar E; Dickson, Wayne; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials comprised of an array of plasmonic nanorods provide a unique platform for designing optical sensors and integrating nonlinear and active nanophotonic functionalities. In this work, the waveguiding properties and mode structure of planar anisotropic metamaterial waveguides are characterized experimentally and theoretically. While ordinary modes are the typical guided modes of the highly anisotropic waveguides, extraordinary modes, below the effective plasma frequency, exist in a hyperbolic metamaterial slab in the form of bulk plasmon-polaritons, in analogy to planar-cavity exciton-polaritons in semiconductors. They may have very low or negative group velocity with high effective refractive indices (up to 10) and have an unusual cut-off from the high-frequency side, providing deep-subwavelength (λ0/6–λ0/8 waveguide thickness) single-mode guiding. These properties, dictated by the hyperbolic anisotropy of the metamaterial, may be tuned by altering the geometrical parameters of the nanorod composite. PMID:26693254

  16. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  17. Superluminal and stopped light due to mode coupling in confined hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides.

    PubMed

    Neira, Andres D; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2015-01-01

    Anisotropic metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion can be used to design waveguides with unusual properties. We show that, in contrast to planar waveguides, geometric confinement leads to coupling of ordinary (forward) and extraordinary (backward) modes and formation of hybrid waveguided modes, which near the crossing point may exhibit slow, stopped or superluminal behavior accompanied by very strong group velocity dispersion. These modes can be used for designing stopped-light nanolasers for nanophotonic applications and dispersion-facilitated signal reshaping in telecom applications. PMID:26643503

  18. Nano-photonics: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    Nanotech is at the scale of 10-9 meters, located at the mesocopic transition phase, which can take both classical mechanics (CM) and quantum mechanics (QM) descriptions bridging ten orders of magnitude phenomena, between the microscopic world of a single atom at 10-10 meters with the macroscopic world at meters. However, QM principles aid the understanding of any unusual property at the nanotech level. The other major difference between nano-photonics and other forms of optics is that the nano-scale is not very 'hands on'. For the most part, we will not be able to see the components with our naked eyes, but will be required to use some nanotech imaging tools, as follows:

  19. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  20. Micro- and nanophotonic structures in the visible and near infrared spectral region for optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Cam Hoang, Thi Hong; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we present some research results on the micro and nano-photonic structures in the visible and near infrared spectral region for optical devices that have been done within the framework of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Program of Institute of Materials Science. In the first part, we report the design and fabrication of 1D photonic structure based on porous silicon layers fabricated by electrochemical etching method and some of their potential applications such as optical filters, microcavity and optical sensors for distinguishing the content of bio-gasoline. In addition, we demonstrate some results on preparation of the 2D and 3D nanophotonic structures based on silica opal layers prepared by sol-gel and self-assembled methods. In the second part, we demonstrate the results of lasing emissions of erbium ions in the visible and near infrared zone from microcavity. The observation of emission of single-mode green light at the wavelength of 537 nm from erbium ions in the microcavity is interesting for the study of atom-photon interaction phenomenon. In the last part, we will show some new results of design and fabrication of nanocomposite based on nanoscale TiO2 and/or ZnO and nanoparticles of semiconductors and metals, which are oriented to the fabrication of energy conversion and photo-reactor devices. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2012, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  1. Rigorous calculation of nonlinear parameters in graphene-comprising waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidimitriou, Dimitrios; Pitilakis, Alexandros; Kriezis, Emmanouil E.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a rigorous formalism for the calculation of the nonlinear parameter of arbitrary three-dimensional nanophotonic graphene-comprising waveguides. Graphene is naturally implemented as a zero-thickness conductive sheet, modeled solely by complex linear and nonlinear surface conductivity tensors, whose values are extracted from theoretical models. This representation is compared to the more commonly employed equivalent bulk-medium representation and is found superior. We numerically calculate the nonlinear parameters of several optical waveguide archetypes overlaid with infinite graphene monolayers, including silicon-wire and plasmonic metal-slot and metal-stripe configurations. The metal-slot configuration offers the most promising performance for Kerr-type nonlinear applications. Finally, we apply the same formalism to probe the potential of graphene nanoribbon waveguide nonlinearity in the terahertz band.

  2. A nanophotonic atom trap toward collective atom-light interactions and the design of a novel protection layer for superconducting circuits toward a hybrid quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Meng, Y.; Park, D. H.; Dagenais, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    A centimeter long silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguide with inverse-tapered ends has been developed to address and trap many cold neutral atoms (87Rb) for studying collective atom-light interactions and a hybrid quantum system. Two-color evanescent trapping fields (750 nm and 1064 nm) of guided modes (TE0) can confine cold neutral atoms above the waveguide, and its inverse-tapered waveguide-end has been used for higher input coupling. For a hybrid quantum system which couples trapped cold neutral atoms to superconducting (SC) circuits through magnetic dipole coupling, we consider a novel SC protection layer because SC circuits are vulnerable to the scattered light from trapping fields. Therefore, we design several types of dielectric and lossy multi-wavelength Bragg layers to protect SC circuits from NIR scattered optical photons and from a broadband MIR blackbody radiation of the nanophotonic device, considering the maximal back-transmission of the SC circuits' electro-magnetic fields through the layer and the heat transfer to SC circuits through the protection layer from absorbed scattered photons. This work is supported by ARO MURI award W911NF0910406.

  3. Photonic crystal slab waveguides in moderate index contrast media: Generalized transverse Bragg waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, David Bruce

    wavelength to period ratio. These optical results indicated a need for a deeper understanding of the confinement/guiding mechanisms in such waveguide structures. A simplification of the full 2-D problem to a more tractable "tilted 1-D" geometry led to the proposal of a new waveguide geometry, Generalized Transverse Bragg Waveguides (GTBW), as well as a new propagation mode characterized by spatial variation in both the transverse direction as well as the direction of propagation. GTBW demonstrate many of the same dispersion tunability traits exhibited in complete bandgap photonic crystal waveguides, under more modest fabrication demands, and moreover provide much insight into photonic crystal waveguide modes of all types. Generalized Transverse Bragg Waveguides are presented in terms of the standard physical properties associated with waveguides, including the dispersion relation, expressions for the spatial field profile, and the concepts of phase and group velocity. In addition, the proposal of at least one obvious application, semiconductor optical amplifiers, is offered.

  4. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  5. High-density information transmission and waveguide integration with low crosstalk and propagation loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianjun; Su, Weiheng; Liang, Yao; Zhang, Fengchun; Huang, Xuguang

    2016-03-01

    Photonic waveguides are fundamental components for photonic integrated circuits (PICs). Although a wide spectrum of nanophotonic structures, i.e., silicon waveguides and plasmonic waveguides, have been exploited for optical interconnects, these structures either can only support one polarization or they are not able to be integrated within a 1-μm scale due to strong crosstalk. The hurdle for high-density information transmission and waveguide integration is mainly the lack of a compact waveguide structure that can support different polarization states with low crosstalk. We propose and numerically demonstrate an ultralong-range waveguide that supports both transverse electric- and transverse magnetic-like polarizations. The propagation length of this waveguide is several decimeters with working bandwidths as great as 160 nm for both polarizations. In addition, this design is very compact with a small center-to-center distance of 1 μm between two adjacent waveguides while the isolation is as high as more than 69.3 dB. This waveguide is also able to guide light efficiently through a 90 deg bend with a 1-μm bending radius for both polarizations. Our work opens new perspectives for high-density waveguide integration in PICs, which would benefit various applications with limited physical space, such as on-chip information processing and sensing.

  6. Nonlinear waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SjöBerg, Daniel

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a cylindrical waveguide with an arbitrary cross section filled with a nonlinear material. The electromagnetic field is expanded in the usual eigenmodes of the waveguide, and the coupling between the modes is quantified. We derive the wave equations governing each mode with special emphasis on the situation with a dominant TE mode. The result is a strictly hyperbolic system of nonlinear partial differential equations for the dominating mode, whereas the minor modes satisfy hyperbolic systems of linear, nonstationary, and partial differential equations. A growth estimate is given for the minor modes.

  7. Nanophotonic materials and devices: driving the big data engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    Photonics has been critical to the growth of the Internet that now carries a vast array of information over optical fiber. The future growth of information technology, including the transmission and processing of vast amounts of data, will require a new class of photonic devices that readily integrate directly with semiconductor circuits and processors. Nanophotonics will play a key role in this development, providing both designer optical materials and radically smaller and lower power consumption devices. We present our developments in engineered nanophotonic polymer materials and electro-optic polymer/silicon nanowire devices in the context of this burgeoning field.

  8. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, S. N.; Moiseev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks.

  9. Diamond electro-optomechanical resonators integrated in nanophotonic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P.; Ummethala, S.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Diewald, S.; Lewes-Malandrakis, G.; Brink, D.; Heidrich, N.; Nebel, C.

    2014-12-22

    Diamond integrated photonic devices are promising candidates for emerging applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. Here, we demonstrate active modulation of diamond nanophotonic circuits by exploiting mechanical degrees of freedom in free-standing diamond electro-optomechanical resonators. We obtain high quality factors up to 9600, allowing us to read out the driven nanomechanical response with integrated optical interferometers with high sensitivity. We are able to excite higher order mechanical modes up to 115 MHz and observe the nanomechanical response also under ambient conditions.

  10. Tailorable stimulated Brillouin scattering in nanoscale silicon waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Heedeuk; Qiu, Wenjun; Jarecki, Robert; Cox, Jonathan A.; Olsson, Roy H.; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale modal confinement is known to radically enhance the effect of intrinsic Kerr and Raman nonlinearities within nanophotonic silicon waveguides. By contrast, stimulated Brillouin-scattering nonlinearities, which involve coherent coupling between guided photon and phonon modes, are stifled in conventional nanophotonics, preventing the realization of a host of Brillouin-based signal-processing technologies in silicon. Here we demonstrate stimulated Brillouin scattering in silicon waveguides, for the first time, through a new class of hybrid photonic–phononic waveguides. Tailorable travelling-wave forward-stimulated Brillouin scattering is realized—with over 1,000 times larger nonlinearity than reported in previous systems—yielding strong Brillouin coupling to phonons from 1 to 18 GHz. Experiments show that radiation pressures, produced by subwavelength modal confinement, yield enhancement of Brillouin nonlinearity beyond those of material nonlinearity alone. In addition, such enhanced and wideband coherent phonon emission paves the way towards the hybridization of silicon photonics, microelectromechanical systems and CMOS signal-processing technologies on chip. PMID:23739586

  11. Waveguide model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A model is presented which quantifies the electromagnetic modes (field configurations) in the immediate vicinity of the rectenna element. Specifically, the waveguide model characterizes the electromagnetic modes generated by planar waves normal to the array. The model applies only to incidence normal to the array.

  12. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, P A; Makarov, S V; Milichko, V A; Mukhin, I S; Gudovskikh, A S; Sitnikova, A A; Samusev, A K; Krasnok, A E; Belov, P A

    2016-03-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonance, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanoparticles are studied using dark-field optical spectroscopy and full-wave electromagnetic simulations. PMID:26864805

  13. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, P. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Milichko, V. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Samusev, A. K.; Krasnok, A. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonance, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanoparticles are studied using dark-field optical spectroscopy and full-wave electromagnetic simulations.

  14. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  15. Characteristics of surface plasmon polaritons in a dielectrically chiral-metal-chiral waveguiding structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Junqing

    2016-07-15

    We demonstrate theoretically the characteristics of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with an asymmetric chiral-metal-chiral (CMC) waveguide structure, under realistic frequency dependencies of the permittivity and chirality parameters. Generalized dispersion relations are derived which can be applied to the nonchiral SPPs. We find that the existence of cutoffs in different modes for the CMC structures may facilitate the design of mode-selective surface plasmon waveguides. CMC-SPPs also exhibit an interesting dependence of the polarization on the chiral strength. These novel characteristics of CMC-SPPs provide new possibilities for the design of more compact nanophotonic devices. PMID:27420505

  16. Observation of an optical event horizon in a silicon-on-insulator photonic wire waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ciret, Charles; Leo, François; Kuyken, Bart; Roelkens, Gunther; Gorza, Simon-Pierre

    2016-01-11

    We report on the first experimental observation of an optical analogue of an event horizon in integrated nanophotonic waveguides, through the reflection of a continuous wave on an intense pulse. The experiment is performed in a dispersion-engineered silicon-on-insulator waveguide. In this medium, solitons do not suffer from Raman induced self-frequency shift as in silica fibers, a feature that is interesting for potential applications of optical event horizons. As shown by simulations, this also allows the observation of multiple reflections at the same time on fundamental solitons ejected by soliton fission. PMID:26832243

  17. Integrating nanophotonic concepts and topics into optics curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, Gregory J.

    2007-06-01

    Nanophotonics has emerged as a new and important field of study, not only in research, but also in undergraduate optics and photonics education and training. Beyond the study of classical and quantum optics, it is important for students to learn about how the flow of light can be manipulated on a nanoscale level, and used in applications such as telecommunications, imaging, and medicine. This paper reports on our work to integrate basic nanophotonic concepts and topics into existing optics and optical electronics courses, as well as independent study projects, at the undergraduate level. Through classroom lectures, topical readings, computer modeling exercises, and laboratory experiments, students are introduced to nanophotonic concepts subsequent to a study of physical and geometrical optics. A compare and contrast methodology is employed to help students identify similarities and differences that exist in the optical behavior of bulk and nanostructured media. Training is further developed through engineering design and simulation exercises that use advanced, vector-diffraction-based, modeling software for simulating the performance of various materials and structures. To date, the addition of a nanophotonics component to the optics curriculum has proven successful, been enthusiastically received by students, and should serve as a basis for further course development efforts that emphasize the combined capabilities of nanotechnology and photonics.

  18. Waveguide Transition for Submillimeter-Wave MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Kevin M.; Deal, William R.; Radisic, Vesna; Mei, Xiaobing; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    An integrated waveguide-to-MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) chip operating in the 300-GHz range is designed to operate well on high-permittivity semiconductor substrates typical for an MMIC amplifier, and allows a wider MMIC substrate to be used, enabling integration with larger MMICs (power amplifiers). The waveguide-to- CBCPW (conductor-backed coplanar waveguide) transition topology is based on an integrated dipole placed in the E-plane of the waveguide module. It demonstrates low loss and good impedance matching. Measurement and simulation demonstrate that the loss of the transition and waveguide loss is less than 1-dB over a 340-to-380-GHz bandwidth. A transition is inserted along the propagation direction of the waveguide. This transition uses a planar dipole aligned with the maximum E-field of the TE10 waveguide mode as an inter face between the waveguide and the MMIC. Mode conversion between the coplanar striplines (CPS) that feed the dipole and the CBCPW transmission line is accomplished using a simple air-bridge structure. The bottom side ground plane is truncated at the same reference as the top-side ground plane, leaving the end of the MMIC suspended in air.

  19. Nanophotonic technologies for innovative all- optical signal processor using photonic crystals and quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Y.; Ikeda, N.; Ozaki, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Asakawa, K.; Ohkouchi, S.; Nakamura, S.

    2009-06-29

    GaAs-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2DPC) slab waveguides (WGs) and InAs quantum dots (QDs) were developed for key photonic device structures in the future. An ultrasmall and ultrafast symmetrical Mach-Zehnder (SMZ)-type all-optical switch (PC-SMZ) and an optical flip-flop device (PC-FF) have been developed based on these nanophotonic structures for an ultrafast digital photonic network. To realize these devices, two important techniques were developed. One is a new simulation method, i.e., topology optimization method of 2DPC WGs with wide/flat bandwidth, high transmittance and low reflectivity. Another is a new selective-area-growth method, i.e., metal-mask molecular beam epitaxy method of InAs QDs. This technique contributes to achieving high-density and highly uniform InAs QDs in a desired area such as an optical nonlinearity-induced phase shift arm in the PC-FF. Furthermore, as a unique site-controlled QD technique, a nano-jet probe method is also developed for positioning QDs at the centre of the optical nonlinearity-induced phase shift arm.

  20. Silicone polymer waveguide bridge for Si to glass optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Kevin L.; Riegel, Nicholas J.; Middlebrook, Christopher T.

    2015-03-01

    Multimode step index polymer waveguides achieve high-speed, (<10 Gb/s) low bit-error-rates for onboard and embedded circuit applications. Using several multimode waveguides in parallel enables overall capacity to reach beyond 100 Gb/s, but the intrinsic bandwidth limitations due to intermodal dispersion limit the data transmission rates within multimode waveguides. Single mode waveguides, where intermodal dispersion is not present, have the potential to further improve data transmission rates. Single mode waveguide size is significantly less than their multimode counterparts allowing for greater density of channels leading to higher bandwidth capacity per layer. Challenges in implementation of embedded single mode waveguides within printed circuit boards involves mass production fabrication techniques to create precision dimensional waveguides, precision alignment tolerances necessary to launch a mode, and effective coupling between adjoining waveguides and devices. An emerging need in which single mode waveguides can be utilized is providing low loss fan out techniques and coupling between on-chip transceiver devices containing Si waveguide structures to traditional single mode optical fiber. A polymer waveguide bridge for Si to glass optical fibers can be implemented using silicone polymers at 1310 nm. Fabricated and measured prototype devices with modeling and simulation analysis are reported for a 12 member 1-D tapered PWG. Recommendations and designs are generated with performance factors such as numerical aperture and alignment tolerances.

  1. Resonant Nanophotonic Spectrum Splitting for Ultrathin Multijunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to spectrum splitting for photovoltaics that utilizes the resonant optical properties of nanostructures for simultaneous voltage enhancement and spatial separation of different colors of light. Using metal–insulator–metal resonators commonly used in broadband metamaterial absorbers we show theoretically that output voltages can be enhanced significantly compared to single-junction devices. However, the approach is general and works for any type of resonator with a large absorption cross section. Due to its resonant nature, the spectrum splitting occurs within only a fraction of the wavelength, as opposed to traditional spectrum splitting methods, where many wavelengths are required. Combining nanophotonic spectrum splitting with other nanophotonic approaches to voltage enhancements, such as angle restriction and concentration, may lead to highly efficient but deeply subwavelength photovoltaic devices. PMID:26322319

  2. Controlling Quantum Transport with a Programmable Nanophotonic Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas; Steinbrecher, Gregory; Mower, Jacob; Lihini, Yoav; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Lloyd, Seth; Englund, Dirk

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has revealed emergent, counter-intuitive quantum transport effects in a range of physical medial including solid-state and biological systems. Photonic integrated circuits are promising platforms for studying such effects. A central goal in for photonic quantum transport simulators has been the ability to rapidly control all parameters of the transport problem. Here, we present a large-scale programmable nanophotonic processor composed of 56 Mach-Zehnder interferometers that enables control over modal couplings and differential phases between modes--enabling observations of Anderson localization, environment-assisted quantum transport, ballistic transport, and a number of intermediate quantum transport regimes. Rapid programmability enables tens of thousands of realizations of disordered and noisy systems. In addition, low loss makes this nanophotonic processor a promising platform for many-boson quantum simulation experiments.

  3. Fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2010-01-01

    Establishing the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light-trapping schemes is of paramount importance and is becoming increasingly urgent for current solar cell research. The standard theory of light trapping demonstrated that absorption enhancement in a medium cannot exceed a factor of 4n2/ sin2θ, where n is the refractive index of the active layer, and θ is the angle of the emission cone in the medium surrounding the cell. This theory, however, is not applicable in the nanophotonic regime. Here we develop a statistical temporal coupled-mode theory of light trapping based on a rigorous electromagnetic approach. Our theory reveals that the conventional limit can be substantially surpassed when optical modes exhibit deep-subwavelength-scale field confinement, opening new avenues for highly efficient next-generation solar cells. PMID:20876131

  4. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Sasaki, Minoru; Yeh, J. Andrew

    2008-04-01

    This special issue on optical MEMS and nanophotonics features papers presented at the International Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics Conference held in Hualien, Taiwan, 12-16 August 2007, chaired by J Andrew Yeh. Minoru Sasaki and Chennupati Jagadish served as Program Co-Chairs of optical MEMS and nanophotonics, respectively. The conference featured a broad range of technologies in both topical areas with participation from academia, government laboratories and industry. The conference covered the latest technical developments in the fields of optical micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and integrated micro-optics. Integration and miniaturization of photonic and optical MEMS components and systems towards micro- and nanoscale for various applications were discussed. The conference also featured nanophotonics which is expected to provide high-speed, high-bandwidth and compact photonic devices. The interaction of light with nanoscale structures including generation, manipulation and detection was discussed at the conference and covered photonic crystals, quantum dots, nanowires and plasmonics. Integrated systems combining nanostructures and optical MEMS were discussed. We would like to thank Hans Zappe for suggesting the special issue and providing timely advice on various related matters and also to Julia Dickinson and Claire Bedrock for their professionalism and help. Carol Chan of the National Tsing Hua University is gratefully acknowledged for her help with the conference. Administration by staff from the Instrument Technology Research Center is highly appreciated. The assistance of the students of the National Dong Hua University and the National Tsing Hua University made the conference most enjoyable. The next conference will be held in Freiburg, Germany, 11-14 August 2008 and will be chaired by Hans Zappe.

  5. Silicon Nanophotonics for Many-Core On-Chip Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Moustafa

    Number of cores in many-core architectures are scaling to unprecedented levels requiring ever increasing communication capacity. Traditionally, architects follow the path of higher throughput at the expense of latency. This trend has evolved into being problematic for performance in many-core architectures. Moreover, the trends of power consumption is increasing with system scaling mandating nontraditional solutions. Nanophotonics can address these problems, offering benefits in the three frontiers of many-core processor design: Latency, bandwidth, and power. Nanophotonics leverage circuit-switching flow control allowing low latency; in addition, the power consumption of optical links is significantly lower compared to their electrical counterparts at intermediate and long links. Finally, through wave division multiplexing, we can keep the high bandwidth trends without sacrificing the throughput. This thesis focuses on realizing nanophotonics for communication in many-core architectures at different design levels considering reliability challenges that our fabrication and measurements reveal. First, we study how to design on-chip networks for low latency, low power, and high bandwidth by exploiting the full potential of nanophotonics. The design process considers device level limitations and capabilities on one hand, and system level demands in terms of power and performance on the other hand. The design involves the choice of devices, designing the optical link, the topology, the arbitration technique, and the routing mechanism. Next, we address the problem of reliability in on-chip networks. Reliability not only degrades performance but can block communication. Hence, we propose a reliability-aware design flow and present a reliability management technique based on this flow to address reliability in the system. In the proposed flow reliability is modeled and analyzed for at the device, architecture, and system level. Our reliability management technique is

  6. Nanophotonics technology watch at the European Patent Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbandt, Y.; Kallinger, C.; Scheu, M.; Förster, W.

    2008-04-01

    Since its inception, the nanotechnology working group at the European Patent Office has been constantly updating the content of its different nanotechnology classification tags which it applies to patent publications worldwide. The main technologies in the nanophotonics area are photonic crystals, surface plasmon devices, semiconductor superlattices and scanning near-field microscopy. Some patent statistics are shown and a brief summary of legal issues is given.

  7. Silicon integrated nanophotonics for on-chip interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Yurii

    2008-03-01

    Current trend in microelectronics industry is to increase the parallelism in computation by multi-threading, by building large scale multi-chip systems and, more recently, by increasing the number of cores on a single chip. With such increase of parallelization the interconnect bandwidth between the racks, chips or different cores is becoming a limiting factor for the design of high performance computer systems. The on-chip ultrahigh-bandwidth silicon-based photonic network might provide an attractive solution to this bandwidth bottleneck. We will review recent results on silicon nanophotonic circuits based on photonic wires and photonic crystals. Strong light confinement at the diffraction limit enables dramatic scaling of the device area and allows unprecedented control over optical signals. Silicon nanophotonic devices have immense capacity for low-loss, high-bandwidth data processing that might enable the design of ultra-compact on-chip optical networks. In particular we will show recent results on design and characterization of various ultra-compact (<0.03mm2) silicon nanophotonic circuits as optical delay lines, electro-optic modulators, broadband optical switches, wavelength filters, etc.

  8. Novel Trapping and Scattering of Light in Resonant Nanophotonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei

    Nanophotonic structures provide unique ways to control light and alter its behaviors in ways not possible in macroscopic structures. In this thesis, we explore novel behaviors of light created by nanophotonic structures, with a common theme on resonance effects. The first half of the thesis focuses on a peculiar type of electromagnetic resonance, where the resonance lifetime diverges to infinity. These states, called bound states in the continuum, remain localized in space even though their frequency lie within a continuum of extended modes. We find such states in photonic crystal slabs and the surface of bulk photonic crystals. We show the conditions necessary for them to exist, and provide the first experimental observation of these unusual states. We also show that these states have a topological nature, with conserved and quantized topological charges that govern their generation, evolution, and annihilation. The second half of the thesis concerns light scattering from resonant nanophotonic structures, where resonances can enhance or suppress scattering at particular wavelengths and angles. We show that multiple resonances in one nanostructure and in the same multipole channel generally lead to a scattering dark state where the structure becomes transparent. Based on the coherent interference from multiple scatterers, we show there are geometries that can achieve a sharp structural color where the hue, saturation, and brightness are all viewing-angle independent. We also invent a new type of transparent display based on wavelength-selective light scattering from nanostructures.

  9. VTT's micron-scale silicon rib+strip waveguide platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Cherchi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    Silicon rib waveguides enable single-mode (SM) operation even with the combination of multi-micron core dimensions and high refractive index contrast. In such large waveguides the optical mode field is almost completely confined inside the Si core, which leads to small propagation losses and small polarization dependency. The unique SM condition of the rib waveguide also enables the use of an ultra-wide wavelength range, for example from 1.2 to <1.7 μm, without sacrificing either SM operation or low propagation loss. This makes micron-scale Si waveguides particularly well-suited for spectroscopy and extensive wavelength division multiplexing. However, rib waveguides require large bending radii, which lead to large circuit sizes. There are two solutions for this. So-called Euler bends in Si strip waveguides enable low-loss bends down to 1 μm bending radius with less than 0.1 dB/90° loss for both polarizations. Another alternative is a total-internal reflection mirror that can have loss as low as 0.1 dB for both polarizations in either strip or rib waveguides. The excitation of higher order modes in large strip waveguides is avoided by using adiabatic rib-strip converters and low-loss components. With rib and strip waveguides it is possible to reach a unique combination of low loss, extremely small footprint, small polarization dependency, ultra-wide bandwidth and tolerance to high optical powers.

  10. Nano-photonic Light Trapping In Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Dennis M., Jr.

    Over the last several decades there have been significant advances in the study and understanding of light behavior in nanoscale geometries. Entire fields such as those based on photonic crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials have been developed, accelerating the growth of knowledge related to nanoscale light manipulation. Coupled with recent interest in cheap, reliable renewable energy, a new field has blossomed, that of nanophotonic solar cells. In this thesis, we examine important properties of thin-film solar cells from a nanophotonics perspective. We identify key differences between nanophotonic devices and traditional, thick solar cells. We propose a new way of understanding and describing limits to light trapping and show that certain nanophotonic solar cell designs can have light trapping limits above the so called ray-optic or ergodic limit. We propose that a necessary requisite to exceed the traditional light trapping limit is that the active region of the solar cell must possess a local density of optical states (LDOS) higher than that of the corresponding, bulk material. Additionally, we show that in addition to having an increased density of states, the absorber must have an appropriate incoupling mechanism to transfer light from free space into the optical modes of the device. We outline a portfolio of new solar cell designs that have potential to exceed the traditional light trapping limit and numerically validate our predictions for select cases. We emphasize the importance of thinking about light trapping in terms of maximizing the optical modes of the device and efficiently coupling light into them from free space. To further explore these two concepts, we optimize patterns of superlattices of air holes in thin slabs of Si and show that by adding a roughened incoupling layer the total absorbed current can be increased synergistically. We suggest that the addition of a random scattering surface to a periodic patterning can increase incoupling by

  11. Characterization of bending loss in hollow flexible terahertz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Doradla, Pallavi; Joseph, Cecil S; Kumar, Jayant; Giles, Robert H

    2012-08-13

    Attenuation characteristics of hollow, flexible, metal and metal/dielectric coated polycarbonate waveguides were investigated using an optically pumped far infrared (FIR) laser at 215 µm. The bending loss of silver coated polycarbonate waveguides were measured as a function of various bending angles, bending radii, and bore diameters. Minimal propagation losses of 1.77, 0.96 dB/m were achieved by coupling the lowest loss TE11 mode into the silver or gold coated waveguide, and HE11 mode into the silver/polystyrene coated waveguides respectively. The maximal bending loss was found to be less than 1 dB/m for waveguides of 2 to 4.1 mm bore diameters, with a 6.4 cm bend radius, and up to 150° bending angle. The investigation shows the preservation of single laser mode in smaller bore waveguides even at greater bending angles. PMID:23038558

  12. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  13. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  14. Adiabatic elimination-based coupling control in densely packed subwavelength waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Mrejen, Michael; Suchowski, Haim; Hatakeyama, Taiki; Wu, Chihhui; Feng, Liang; O'Brien, Kevin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control light propagation in photonic integrated circuits is at the foundation of modern light-based communication. However, the inherent crosstalk in densely packed waveguides and the lack of robust control of the coupling are a major roadblock toward ultra-high density photonic integrated circuits. As a result, the diffraction limit is often considered as the lower bound for ultra-dense silicon photonics circuits. Here we experimentally demonstrate an active control of the coupling between two closely packed waveguides via the interaction with a decoupled waveguide. This control scheme is analogous to the adiabatic elimination, a well-known procedure in atomic physics. This approach offers an attractive solution for ultra-dense integrated nanophotonics for light-based communications and integrated quantum computing. PMID:26113179

  15. Towards nanoscale multiplexing with parity-time-symmetric plasmonic coaxial waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Baum, Brian; Jankovic, Vladan; Lawrence, Mark; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate a nanoscale mode-division multiplexing scheme based on parity-time- (PT ) symmetric coaxial plasmonic waveguides. Coaxial waveguides support paired degenerate modes corresponding to distinct orbital angular momentum states. PT -symmetric inclusions of gain and loss break the degeneracy of the paired modes and create new hybrid modes without definite orbital angular momentum. This process can be made thresholdless by matching the mode order with the number of gain and loss sections within the coaxial ring. Using both a Hamiltonian formulation and degenerate perturbation theory, we show how the wave vectors and fields evolve with increased loss/gain and derive sufficient conditions for thresholdless transitions. As a multiplexing filter, this PT -symmetric coaxial waveguide could help double density rates in on-chip nanophotonic networks.

  16. Enabling high-temperature nanophotonics for energy applications

    PubMed Central

    Yeng, Yi Xiang; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Bermel, Peter; Chan, Walker R.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The nascent field of high-temperature nanophotonics could potentially enable many important solid-state energy conversion applications, such as thermophotovoltaic energy generation, selective solar absorption, and selective emission of light. However, special challenges arise when trying to design nanophotonic materials with precisely tailored optical properties that can operate at high-temperatures (> 1,100 K). These include proper material selection and purity to prevent melting, evaporation, or chemical reactions; severe minimization of any material interfaces to prevent thermomechanical problems such as delamination; robust performance in the presence of surface diffusion; and long-range geometric precision over large areas with severe minimization of very small feature sizes to maintain structural stability. Here we report an approach for high-temperature nanophotonics that surmounts all of these difficulties. It consists of an analytical and computationally guided design involving high-purity tungsten in a precisely fabricated photonic crystal slab geometry (specifically chosen to eliminate interfaces arising from layer-by-layer fabrication) optimized for high performance and robustness in the presence of roughness, fabrication errors, and surface diffusion. It offers near-ultimate short-wavelength emittance and low, ultra-broadband long-wavelength emittance, along with a sharp cutoff offering 4∶1 emittance contrast over 10% wavelength separation. This is achieved via Q-matching, whereby the absorptive and radiative rates of the photonic crystal’s cavity resonances are matched. Strong angular emission selectivity is also observed, with short-wavelength emission suppressed by 50% at 75° compared to normal incidence. Finally, a precise high-temperature measurement technique is developed to confirm that emission at 1,225 K can be primarily confined to wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength. PMID:22308448

  17. Green nanophotonics for future datacom and Ethernet networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimberg, Dieter; Arsenijević, Dejan; Larisch, Gunter; Li, Hui; Lott, James A.; Moser, Philip; Schmeckebier, Holger; Wolf, Philip

    2014-05-01

    The use of Internet has increased and continues to increase exponentially, mostly driven by consumers. Thus bit rates in networks from access to WDM and finally the computer clusters and supercomputers increase as well rapidly. Their cost of energy reaches today 5-6 % of raw electricity production. For 2023 a cross over is predicted, if no new "green" technologies or "green" devices" will reduce energy consumption by about 15% per year. We present two distinct approaches for access and computer networks based on nanophotonic devices to reduce power consumption in the next decade.

  18. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  19. Hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices for coupling to rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazono, Evan; Hartz, Alex; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    With an assortment of narrow line-width transitions spanning the visible and IR spectrum and long spin coherence times, rare-earth doped crystals are the leading material system for solid-state quantum memories. Integrating these materials in an on-chip optical platform would create opportunities for highly integrated light-matter interfaces for quantum communication and quantum computing. Nano-photonic resonators with high quality factors and small mode volumes are required for efficient on-chip coupling to the small dipole moment of rare-earth ion transitions. However, direct fabrication of optical cavities in these crystals with current nanofabrication techniques is difficult and unparallelized, as either exotic etch chemistries or physical milling processes are required. We fabricated hybrid devices by mechanically transferring a nanoscale membrane of gallium arsenide (GaAs) onto a neodymium-doped yttrium silicon oxide (Y2SiO5) crystal and then using electron beam lithography and standard III-V dry etching to pattern nanobeam photonic crystal cavities and ring resonator cavities, a technique that is easily adapted to other frequency ranges for arbitrary dopants in any rare earth host system. Single crystalline GaAs was chosen for its low loss and high refractive index at the transition wavelength. We demonstrated the potential to evanescently couple between the cavity field and the 883 nm 4I9/2- 4F3/2 transition of nearby neodymium impurities in the host crystal by examining transmission spectra through a waveguide coupled to the resonator with a custom-built confocal microscope. The prospects and requirements for using this system for scalable quantum networks are discussed.

  20. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  1. Micromachined Silicon Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, William R.; Tai, Yu-Chong; Yap, Markus; Walker, Christopher K.

    1994-01-01

    Components that handle millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths fabricated conveniently. Micromachining rectangular waveguide involves standard steps of masking, etching, and deposition of metal on silicon. Parts made assembled into half-waveguide and finally into full waveguide. Silicon-micromachining approach enables simultaneous fabrication of several versions of waveguide, with variations in critical parameter, on single wafer of silicon. Performances of versions compared and optimized more quickly and at lower cost than is possible if different versions are fabricated sequentially, by conventional machining techniques.

  2. Quantum Optics in the Solid State with Diamond Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie; Evans, Ruffin; de Greve, Kristiaan; Goldman, Michael; High, Alex; Markham, Matthew; Stacey, Alastair; Twitchen, Daniel; Loncar, Marko; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2015-05-01

    Large-scale quantum networks will require efficient interfaces between photons and stationary quantum bits. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising candidate for quantum information processing because they are optically addressable, have spin degrees of freedom with long coherence times, and as solid-state entities, can be integrated into nanophotonic devices. An enabling feature of the NV center is its zero-phonon line (ZPL), which acts as an atom-like cycling transition that can be used for coherent optical manipulation and read-out of the spin. However, the ZPL only accounts for 3-5% of the total emission, and previously demonstrated methods of producing high densities of NV centers yield unstable ZPLs. We have developed techniques to fabricate high quality factor, small mode volume photonic crystal cavities directly out of diamond, and to deterministically position these photonic crystal cavities so that a stable NV center sits at the maximum electric field. We observe an enhancement of the spontaneous emission at the cavity resonance by a factor of up to 100. Crucially, we are able to control the NV center precisely using both microwave and resonant optical manipulation. These nanophotonic elements in diamond will provide key building blocks for quantum information processing such as single photon transistors, enabling distribution of entanglement over quantum networks.

  3. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  4. Micromachined Silicon Waveguide Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    Rectangular waveguides are commonly used as circuit elements in remote-sensing heterodyne receivers at millimeter wavelengths. The advantages of waveguides are low loss and mechanical tunability. However, conventional machining techniques for waveguide components operating above a few hundred GHz are complicated and costly. Waveguides micromachined from silicon however would have several important advantages including low-cost; small size for very high frequency (submillimeter wave) operation; high dimensional accuracy (important for high-Q circuits); atomically smooth walls, thereby reducing rf losses; and the ability to integrate active and passive devices directly in the waveguide on thin membranes, thereby solving the traditional problem of mounting thin substrates.

  5. Nanophotonic resonators for InP solar cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel A; Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy N

    2016-05-16

    We describe high efficiency thin-film InP solar cells that utilize a periodic array of TiO2 nanocylinders. These nanophotonic resonators are found to reduce the solar-weighted average reflectivity of an InP solar cell to ~1.3%, outperforming the best double-layer antireflection coatings. The coupling between Mie scattering resonances and thin-film interference effects accurately describes the optical enhancement provided by the nanocylinders. The spectrally resolved reflectivity and J-V characteristics of the device under AM1.5G illumination are determined via coupled optical and electrical simulations, resulting in a predicted power conversion efficiency > 23%. We conclude that the nanostructured coating reduces reflection without negatively affecting the electronic properties of the InP solar cell by separating the nanostructured optical components from the active layer of the device. PMID:27409965

  6. Nanophotonic integrated circuits from nanoresonators grown on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Roger; Ng, Kar Wei; Ko, Wai Son; Parekh, Devang; Lu, Fanglu; Tran, Thai-Truong D.; Li, Kun; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-07-01

    Harnessing light with photonic circuits promises to catalyse powerful new technologies much like electronic circuits have in the past. Analogous to Moore’s law, complexity and functionality of photonic integrated circuits depend on device size and performance scale. Semiconductor nanostructures offer an attractive approach to miniaturize photonics. However, shrinking photonics has come at great cost to performance, and assembling such devices into functional photonic circuits has remained an unfulfilled feat. Here we demonstrate an on-chip optical link constructed from InGaAs nanoresonators grown directly on a silicon substrate. Using nanoresonators, we show a complete toolkit of circuit elements including light emitters, photodetectors and a photovoltaic power supply. Devices operate with gigahertz bandwidths while consuming subpicojoule energy per bit, vastly eclipsing performance of prior nanostructure-based optoelectronics. Additionally, electrically driven stimulated emission from an as-grown nanostructure is presented for the first time. These results reveal a roadmap towards future ultradense nanophotonic integrated circuits.

  7. Photonic Crystals from Order to Disorder: Perturbative Methods in Nanophotonics

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Steven G. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric structures in which light can behave much differently than in a homogeneous medium. This talk gives an overview of some of the interesting properties and applications of these media, from switching in subwavelength microcavities to slow-light devices, to guiding light in air. However, some of the most interesting and challenging problems occur when the periodicity is disturbed, either by design or by inevitable fabrication imperfections. The talk focuses especially on small perturbations that have important effects, from slow-light tapers to surface roughness disorder, and will show that many classic perturbative approaches must be rethought for high-contrast nanophotonics. The combination of strong periodicity with large field discontinuities at interfaces causes standard methods to fail, but succumbs to new generalizations, while some problems remain open.

  8. Ultimate Limit of Light Extinction by Nanophotonic Structures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Verre, Ruggero; García de Abajo, F Javier; Apell, S Peter; Käll, Mikael

    2015-11-11

    Nanophotonic structures make it possible to precisely engineer the optical response at deep subwavelength scales. However, a fundamental understanding of the general performance limits remains a challenge. Here we use extensive electrodynamics simulations to demonstrate that the so-called f-sum rule sets a strict upper bound to the light extinction by nanostructures regardless their internal interactions and retardation effects. In particular, we show that the f-sum rule applies to arbitrarily complex plasmonic metal structures that exhibit an extraordinary spectral sensitivity to size, shape, near-field coupling effects, and incident polarization. The results may be used for benchmarking light scattering and absorption efficiencies, thus imposing fundamental limits on solar light harvesting, biomedical photonics, and optical communications. PMID:26478949

  9. Full loss compensation in hybrid plasmonic waveguides under electrical pumping.

    PubMed

    Svintsov, Dmitry A; Arsenin, Aleksey V; Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu

    2015-07-27

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) give an opportunity to break the diffraction limit and design nanoscale optical components, however their practical implementation is hindered by high ohmic losses in a metal. Here, we propose a novel approach for efficient SPP amplification under electrical pumping in a deep-subwavelength metal-insulator-semiconductor waveguiding geometry and numerically demonstrate full compensation for the SPP propagation losses in the infrared at an exceptionally low pump current density of 0.8 kA/cm2. This value is an order of magnitude lower than in the previous studies owing to the thin insulator layer between a metal and a semiconductor, which allows injection of minority carriers and blocks majority carriers reducing the leakage current to nearly zero. The presented results provide insight into lossless SPP guiding and development of future high dense nanophotonic and optoelectronic circuits. PMID:26367596

  10. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  11. Planar waveguide optical immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquette, Steven J.; Locascio-Brown, Laurie E.; Durst, Richard A.

    1991-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were covalently bonded to the surfaces of planar waveguides to confer immunoreacth''ity. Silver-ion diffused waveguides were used to measure theophylline concentrations in a fluorescence immunoassay and silicon nitride waveguides were used to detect theophylline in an absorbance-based immunoassay. Liposomes were employed in both assays as the optically detectable label in a competitive reaction to monitor antigen-antibody complexation. Regeneration of the active antibody site will be discussed.

  12. Lasing in silicon-organic hybrid waveguides.

    PubMed

    Korn, Dietmar; Lauermann, Matthias; Koeber, Sebastian; Appel, Patrick; Alloatti, Luca; Palmer, Robert; Dumon, Pieter; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics enables large-scale photonic-electronic integration by leveraging highly developed fabrication processes from the microelectronics industry. However, while a rich portfolio of devices has already been demonstrated on the silicon platform, on-chip light sources still remain a key challenge since the indirect bandgap of the material inhibits efficient photon emission and thus impedes lasing. Here we demonstrate a class of infrared lasers that can be fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integration platform. The lasers are based on the silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) integration concept and combine nanophotonic SOI waveguides with dye-doped organic cladding materials that provide optical gain. We demonstrate pulsed room-temperature lasing with on-chip peak output powers of up to 1.1 W at a wavelength of 1,310 nm. The SOH approach enables efficient mass-production of silicon photonic light sources emitting in the near infrared and offers the possibility of tuning the emission wavelength over a wide range by proper choice of dye materials and resonator geometry. PMID:26949229

  13. Lasing in silicon-organic hybrid waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Dietmar; Lauermann, Matthias; Koeber, Sebastian; Appel, Patrick; Alloatti, Luca; Palmer, Robert; Dumon, Pieter; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Silicon photonics enables large-scale photonic-electronic integration by leveraging highly developed fabrication processes from the microelectronics industry. However, while a rich portfolio of devices has already been demonstrated on the silicon platform, on-chip light sources still remain a key challenge since the indirect bandgap of the material inhibits efficient photon emission and thus impedes lasing. Here we demonstrate a class of infrared lasers that can be fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integration platform. The lasers are based on the silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) integration concept and combine nanophotonic SOI waveguides with dye-doped organic cladding materials that provide optical gain. We demonstrate pulsed room-temperature lasing with on-chip peak output powers of up to 1.1 W at a wavelength of 1,310 nm. The SOH approach enables efficient mass-production of silicon photonic light sources emitting in the near infrared and offers the possibility of tuning the emission wavelength over a wide range by proper choice of dye materials and resonator geometry.

  14. Lasing in silicon–organic hybrid waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Dietmar; Lauermann, Matthias; Koeber, Sebastian; Appel, Patrick; Alloatti, Luca; Palmer, Robert; Dumon, Pieter; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics enables large-scale photonic–electronic integration by leveraging highly developed fabrication processes from the microelectronics industry. However, while a rich portfolio of devices has already been demonstrated on the silicon platform, on-chip light sources still remain a key challenge since the indirect bandgap of the material inhibits efficient photon emission and thus impedes lasing. Here we demonstrate a class of infrared lasers that can be fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integration platform. The lasers are based on the silicon–organic hybrid (SOH) integration concept and combine nanophotonic SOI waveguides with dye-doped organic cladding materials that provide optical gain. We demonstrate pulsed room-temperature lasing with on-chip peak output powers of up to 1.1 W at a wavelength of 1,310 nm. The SOH approach enables efficient mass-production of silicon photonic light sources emitting in the near infrared and offers the possibility of tuning the emission wavelength over a wide range by proper choice of dye materials and resonator geometry. PMID:26949229

  15. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  16. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.

    1989-02-15

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE{sub 11} mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminium of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R{sub 0} from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R{sub 1} less than R{sub 0} at centers +b and {minus}b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric waveguides. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  17. High efficiency light conversion between micro- and nano-photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically demonstrate a tapered waveguide that is compatible with a silicon waveguide and hybrid plasmonic waveguide simultaneously. As much as 90% of the energy can be transferred from the photonic mode to plasmonic mode and vice versa.

  18. Interaction between Atoms and Slow Light: A Study in Waveguide Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaorun; Yang, Jianji; Faggiani, Rémi; Gill, Christopher; Petrov, Plamen G.; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Vynck, Kevin; Bernon, Simon; Bouyer, Philippe; Boyer, Vincent; Lalanne, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The emerging field of on-chip integration of nanophotonic devices and cold atoms offers extremely strong and pure light-matter interaction schemes, which may have a profound impact on quantum information science. In this context, a long-standing obstacle is to achieve a strong interaction between single atoms and single photons and at the same time trap atoms in a vacuum at large separation distances from dielectric surfaces. In this work, we study waveguide geometries that challenge these conflicting objectives. The designed photonic-crystal waveguide is expected to offer a good compromise, which additionally allows for easy manipulation of atomic clouds around the structure, while being tolerant to fabrication imperfections.

  19. Waveguide switch protector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Device for detecting excessive operation of electric motors used to drive waveguide switches is described. Purpose of device is to prevent burnout of electric motor in event of waveguide stoppage at some point other than extreme limits of travel. Operation of equipment, components used to sense motor performance, and schematic diagram are included.

  20. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE.sub.11 mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R.sub.0 from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R.sub.1 less than R.sub.0 at centers +b and -b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  1. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.

    1990-03-06

    This patent describes a corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations which provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE{sub 11} mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R{sub 0} from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R{sub 1} less than R{sub 0} at centers + b and {minus} B from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  2. Composite dielectric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, E.; Atsuki, K.; Kuzuya, R.

    1980-09-01

    The modal analysis of a composite circular dielectric waveguide (CCDW) is presented. Computed values of the propagation constant of a CCDW are compared with those of the homogeneous circular dielectric waveguides (HCDW). Microwave experiments concerning the propagation constant of a CCDW of Teflon and Rexolite are described.

  3. CALL FOR PAPERS: Topical issue on the fundamental aspects of nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Mark; Zayats, Anatoly; Zheludev, Nikolay

    2005-05-01

    The broad goals of the new discipline of nanophotonics are to develop concepts of optical functionality on the smallest possible spatial scale, at the lowest possible energy level, and on the shortest possible timescale by employing light interactions with nanostructures. A topical issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be devoted to papers reporting new and challenging results in this burgeoning field. Focused topical reviews within the special issue remit will also be considered, but potential contributors of such reviews should first contact the Guest Editors. Papers in other areas will also be considered for the issue as long as they offer ideas relevant for the field of nanophotonics. The special issue topics will include, but are not limited to: • Plasmonic nanophotonics • Nano-transmission lines and nano-antennas • Light in confined geometries and nano-cavities • Single molecule and single nanoparticle photonics • Quantum and coherent effects in nanophotonics • Nonlinear and ultrafast nanophotonics • Interaction of electron beams with nanophotonic structures • Nano-bio-photonics • Nanoscale imaging and photolithography • Optical atom trapping and manipulation in nanostructures All papers will be peer reviewed, and the normal refereeing standards of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be maintained. There are no page charges. Advice on preparing your work for publication in the journal, including advice on figures, tables and references, is available from our website at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopa. Manuscripts should be submitted to the Publisher by 1 September 2005, although authors are strongly encouraged to submit their work as soon as possible. Please include a covering letter stating that the submission is intended for the nanophotonics topical issue, to avoid treatment as a regular submission. Submission address: Dr Claire Bedrock (Publisher) Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics

  4. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  5. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  6. True stopping of light: a new regime for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakmakidis, Kosmas L.; Zhang, Xiang; Hess, Ortwin

    2014-09-01

    The extremely large speed of light is a tremendous asset but also makes it challenging to control, store or shrink beyond its wavelength. Particularly, reducing the speed of light down to zero is of fundamental scientific interest that could usher in a host of important photonic applications, some of which are hitherto fundamentally inaccessible. These include cavity-free, low-threshold nanolasers, novel solar-cell designs for efficient harvesting of light, nanoscale quantum information processing (owing to the enhanced density of states), as well as enhanced biomolecular sensing. We shall here present nanoplasmonic-based schemes where timedependent sources excite "complex-frequency" modes in uniform (plasmonic) heterostructures, enabling complete and dispersion-free stopping of light pulses, resilient to realistic levels of dissipative, radiative and surface-roughness losses. Our theoretical and computational results demonstrate extraordinary large lightdeceleration factors (of the order of 15,000,000) in integrated nanophotonic media, comparable only to those attainable with ultracold atomic vapours or with quantum coherence effects, such as coherent population oscillations, in ruby crystals.

  7. Nanophotonics-enabled smart windows, buildings and wearables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoff; Gentle, Angus; Arnold, Matthew; Cortie, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Design and production of spectrally smart windows, walls, roofs and fabrics has a long history, which includes early examples of applied nanophotonics. Evolving nanoscience has a special role to play as it provides the means to improve the functionality of these everyday materials. Improvement in the quality of human experience in any location at any time of year is the goal. Energy savings, thermal and visual comfort indoors and outdoors, visual experience, air quality and better health are all made possible by materials, whose "smartness" is aimed at designed responses to environmental energy flows. The spectral and angle of incidence responses of these nanomaterials must thus take account of the spectral and directional aspects of solar energy and of atmospheric thermal radiation plus the visible and color sensitivity of the human eye. The structures required may use resonant absorption, multilayer stacks, optical anisotropy and scattering to achieve their functionality. These structures are, in turn, constructed out of particles, columns, ultrathin layers, voids, wires, pure and doped oxides, metals, polymers or transparent conductors (TCs). The need to cater for wavelengths stretching from 0.3 to 35 μm including ultraviolet-visible, near-infrared (IR) and thermal or Planck radiation, with a spectrally and directionally complex atmosphere, and both being dynamic, means that hierarchical and graded nanostructures often feature. Nature has evolved to deal with the same energy flows, so biomimicry is sometimes a useful guide.

  8. Nanophotonic quantum phase switch with a single atom.

    PubMed

    Tiecke, T G; Thompson, J D; de Leon, N P; Liu, L R; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2014-04-10

    By analogy to transistors in classical electronic circuits, quantum optical switches are important elements of quantum circuits and quantum networks. Operated at the fundamental limit where a single quantum of light or matter controls another field or material system, such a switch may enable applications such as long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum information processing and metrology, and the exploration of novel quantum states of matter. Here, by strongly coupling a photon to a single atom trapped in the near field of a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity, we realize a system in which a single atom switches the phase of a photon and a single photon modifies the atom's phase. We experimentally demonstrate an atom-induced optical phase shift that is nonlinear at the two-photon level, a photon number router that separates individual photons and photon pairs into different output modes, and a single-photon switch in which a single 'gate' photon controls the propagation of a subsequent probe field. These techniques pave the way to integrated quantum nanophotonic networks involving multiple atomic nodes connected by guided light. PMID:24717513

  9. Plasmonic antennas as design elements for coherent ultrafast nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Brinks, Daan; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Hildner, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Broadband excitation of plasmons allows control of light-matter interaction with nanometric precision at femtosecond timescales. Research in the field has spiked in the past decade in an effort to turn ultrafast plasmonics into a diagnostic, microscopy, computational, and engineering tool for this novel nanometric–femtosecond regime. Despite great developments, this goal has yet to materialize. Previous work failed to provide the ability to engineer and control the ultrafast response of a plasmonic system at will, needed to fully realize the potential of ultrafast nanophotonics in physical, biological, and chemical applications. Here, we perform systematic measurements of the coherent response of plasmonic nanoantennas at femtosecond timescales and use them as building blocks in ultrafast plasmonic structures. We determine the coherent response of individual nanoantennas to femtosecond excitation. By mixing localized resonances of characterized antennas, we design coupled plasmonic structures to achieve well-defined ultrafast and phase-stable field dynamics in a predetermined nanoscale hotspot. We present two examples of the application of such structures: control of the spectral amplitude and phase of a pulse in the near field, and ultrafast switching of mutually coherent hotspots. This simple, reproducible and scalable approach transforms ultrafast plasmonics into a straightforward tool for use in fields as diverse as room temperature quantum optics, nanoscale solid-state physics, and quantum biology. PMID:24163355

  10. Imaging Nanophotonic Modes of Microresonators using a Focused Ion Beam

    PubMed Central

    Twedt, Kevin A.; Zou, Jie; Davanco, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik; McClelland, Jabez J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Optical microresonators have proven powerful in a wide range of applications, including cavity quantum electrodynamics1–3, biosensing4, microfludics5, and cavity optomechanics6–8. Their performance depends critically on the exact distribution of optical energy, confined and shaped by the nanoscale device geometry. Near-field optical probes9 can image this distribution, but the physical probe necessarily perturbs the near field, which is particularly problematic for sensitive high quality factor resonances10,11. We present a new approach to mapping nanophotonic modes that uses a controllably small and local optomechanical perturbation introduced by a focused lithium ion beam12. An ion beam (radius ≈50 nm) induces a picometer-scale dynamic deformation of the resonator surface, which we detect through a shift in the optical resonance wavelength. We map five modes of a silicon microdisk resonator (Q≥20,000) with both high spatial and spectral resolution. Our technique also enables in-situ observation of ion implantation damage and relaxation dynamics in a silicon lattice13,14. PMID:27087832

  11. Nanophotonic light trapping with patterned transparent conductive oxides.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Alok P; Schuller, Jon A; Brongersma, Mark L

    2012-05-01

    Transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) play a crucial role in solar cells by efficiently transmitting sunlight and extracting photo-generated charge. Here, we show how nanophotonics concepts can be used to transform TCO films into effective photon management layers for solar cells. This is accomplished by patterning the TCO layer present on virtually every thin-film solar cell into an array of subwavelength beams that support optical (Mie) resonances. These resonances can be exploited to concentrate randomly polarized sunlight or to effectively couple it to guided and diffracted modes. We first demonstrate these concepts with a model system consisting of a patterned TCO layer on a thin silicon (Si) film and outline a design methodology for high-performance, TCO-based light trapping coatings. We then show that the short circuit current density from a 300 nm thick amorphous silicon (a-Si) cell with an optimized TCO anti-reflection coating can be enhanced from 19.9 mA/cm2 to 21.1 mA/cm2, out of a possible 26.0 mA/cm2, by using an optimized nanobeam array. The key differences and advantages over plasmonic light trapping layers will be discussed. PMID:22712089

  12. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  13. Noncontacting waveguide backshort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A noncontacting waveguide backshort is provided for use with frequencies of interest between 1 and 1000 GHz including a relatively rugged metallic bar movably mounted within the waveguide in a MYLAR insulator. A series of regularly shaped and spaced circular or rectangular openings are made in the metallic bar to form sections of high impedance alternating with sections of the bar having low impedance. This creates a periodic impedance variation which serves to provided an adjustable short circuit in a waveguide for the frequencies of interest.

  14. Organic nanophotonic materials: the relationship between excited-state processes and photonic performances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2016-07-12

    Nanophotonics have recently captured broad attention because of their great potential in information processing and communication, which may allow rates and bandwidth beyond what is feasible in the realm of electronics. Organic materials could be well suitable for such applications due to their ability to generate, transmit, modulate and detect light in their lightweight and flexible nanoarchitectures. Their distinct nanophotonic properties strongly depend on their extrinsic morphologies and intrinsic molecular excited-state processes. In this feature article, we mainly focus on a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between molecular excited-state processes and the advanced photonic functionalities of organic micro/nano-crystals in recent organic nanophotonic research, and then expect to provide enlightenment for the design and development of tiny photonic devices with broadband tunable properties by tailoring the excited-state processes of organic microcrystals. PMID:26883812

  15. Mode-selected heat flow through a one-dimensional waveguide network

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, Christian Miechowski, Philipp; Buchholz, Sven S.; Chiatti, Olivio; Fischer, Saskia F.; Wieck, Andreas D.; Reuter, Dirk

    2015-02-23

    Cross-correlated measurements of thermal noise are performed to determine the electron temperature in nanopatterned channels of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure at 4.2 K. Two-dimensional (2D) electron reservoirs are connected via an extended one-dimensional (1D) electron waveguide network. Hot electrons are produced using a current I{sub h} in a source 2D reservoir, are transmitted through the ballistic 1D waveguide, and relax in a drain 2D reservoir. We find that the electron temperature increase, ΔT{sub e}, in the drain is proportional to the square of the heating current I{sub h}, as expected from Joule's law. No temperature increase is observed in the drain when the 1D waveguide does not transmit electrons. Therefore, we conclude that electron-phonon interaction is negligible for heat transport between 2D reservoirs at temperatures below 4.2 K. Furthermore, mode control of the 1D electron waveguide by application of a top-gate voltage reveals that ΔT{sub e} is not proportional to the number of populated subbands N, as previously observed in single 1D conductors. This can be explained with the splitting of the heat flow in the 1D waveguide network.

  16. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  17. Axially Modulated Plasma Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Layer, B. D.; York, A. G.; Varma, S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2009-01-22

    We demonstrate two techniques for making periodically modulated plasma waveguides-one with sharp, stable voids as short as 50 {mu}m with a period as small as 200 {mu}m, and another which modulates the waveguide diameter with a corrugation period as short as 35 {mu}m[1]. These features persist as the plasma expands for the full lifetime of the waveguide (>6 ns). The waveguides were made using the hydrodynamic shock method in a cluster jet using hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon. We demonstrate guided propagation at intensities up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, limited by our laser energy currently available. This technique is useful for quasi-phase matching to allow efficient coupling of laser energy to acceleration of relativistic electrons or generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation at selected frequencies.

  18. Omnidirectional optical waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-08-02

    In one embodiment, a system includes a scintillator material; a detector coupled to the scintillator material; and an omnidirectional waveguide coupled to the scintillator material, the omnidirectional waveguide comprising: a plurality of first layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a first range; and a plurality of second layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a second range, the second range being lower than the first range, a plurality of interfaces being defined between alternating ones of the first and second layers. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing alternating layers of a material having a relatively high refractive index and a material having a relatively low refractive index on a substrate to form an omnidirectional waveguide; and coupling the omnidirectional waveguide to at least one surface of a scintillator material.

  19. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Ruzic, David N.; Moore, Richard L.; Cohen, Samuel A.; Manos, Dennis M.

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  20. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  1. Feasibility study of nanoscaled optical waveguide based on near-resonant surface plasmon polariton.

    PubMed

    Yan, Min; Thylén, Lars; Qiu, Min; Parekh, Devang

    2008-05-12

    Currently subwavelength surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waveguides under intensive theoretical and experimental studies are mostly based on the geometrical singularity property of such waveguides. Typical examples include the metal-insulator-metal based waveguide and the metallic fiber. Both types of waveguides support a mode with divergent propagation constant as the waveguides' geometry (metal gap distance or fiber radius) shrinks to zero. Here we study an alternative way of achieving subwavelength confinement through deploying two materials with close but opposite epsilon values. The interface between such two materials supports a near-resonant SPP. By examining the relationship between mode propagation loss and the mode field size for both planar and fiber waveguides, we show that waveguides based on near-resonant SPP can be as attractive as those solely based on geometrical tailoring. We then explicitly study a silver and silicon based waveguide with a 25nm core size at 600nm wavelength, in its properties like single-mode condition, mode loss and group velocity. It is shown that loss values of both materials have to be decreased by approximately 1000 times in order to have 1dB/microm propagation loss. Hence we point out the necessity of novel engineering of low-loss metamaterials, or introducing gain, for practical applications of such waveguides. Due to the relatively simple geometry, the proposed near-resonant SPP waveguides can be a potential candidate for building optical circuits with a density close to the electronic counterpart. PMID:18545455

  2. Modeling of general 1-D periodic leaky-wave antennas in layered media using EIGER.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, Donald R.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Celepcikay, Ferhat T.; Johnson, William Arthur; Baccarelli, Paolo; Valerio, Guido; Paulotto, Simone; Langston, William L.; Jackson, David R.

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a mixed-potential integral-equation formulation for analyzing 1-D periodic leaky-wave antennas in layered media. The structures are periodic in one dimension and finite in the other two dimensions. The unit cell consists of an arbitrary-shaped metallic/dielectric structure. The formulation has been implemented in the EIGER{trademark} code in order to obtain the real and complex propagation wavenumbers of the bound and leaky modes of such structures. Validation results presented here include a 1-D periodic planar leaky-wave antenna and a fully 3-D waveguide test case.

  3. Modeling of general 1-D periodic leaky-wave antennas in layered media with EIGER.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, Donald R.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Celepcikay, F. T.; Johnson, William Arthur; Baccarelli, Paolo; Valerio, G.; Paulotto, Simone; Langston, William L.; Jackson, David R.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a mixed-potential integral-equation formulation for analyzing 1-D periodic leaky-wave antennas in layered media. The structures are periodic in one dimension and finite in the other two dimensions. The unit cell consists of an arbitrary-shaped metallic/dielectric structure. The formulation has been implemented in the EIGER{trademark} code in order to obtain the real and complex propagation wavenumbers of the bound and leaky modes of such structures. Validation results presented here include a 1-D periodic planar leaky-wave antenna and a fully 3-D waveguide test case.

  4. Metallic-nanowire-loaded silicon-on-insulator structures: a route to low-loss plasmon waveguiding on the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yusheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-02-01

    The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced down to the nanometer scale. Here we introduce a class of low-loss guiding schemes by integrating silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides with plasmon nanowire structures. The closely spaced silicon and metal configurations allow efficient light squeezing within the nanometer, low-index silica gaps between them, enabling deep-subwavelength light transmission with low modal attenuation. Optimizations of key structural parameters unravel the wide-range existence of the high-performance hybrid nanowire plasmon mode, which demonstrates improved guiding properties compared to the conventional hybrid and nanowire plasmon polaritons. The excitation strategy of the guided mode and the feasibility of the waveguide for compact photonic integration as well as active components are also discussed to lay the foundation for its practical implementation. The remarkable properties of these metallic-nanowire-loaded SOI waveguides potentially lend themselves to the implementation of high performance nanophotonic components, and open up promising opportunities for a variety of intriguing applications on the nanoscale.The simultaneous realization of nanoscale field localization and low transmission loss remains one of the major challenges in nanophotonics. Metal nanowire waveguides can fulfill this goal to a certain extent by confining light within subwavelength space, yet their optical performances are still restricted by the tradeoff between confinement and loss, which results in quite limited propagation distances when their mode sizes are reduced

  5. Correlations in light propagation in one-dimensional waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanainen, Juha; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-05-01

    We study light propagation between atoms in a one-dimensional waveguide both analytically and using numerical simulations. We employ classical electrodynamics, but in the limit of low light intensity the results are essentially exact also for quantum mechanics. We characterize the cooperative interactions between the atoms mediated by the electromagnetic field. The focus is on resonance shifts for various statistics of the positions of the atoms, such as statistically independent positions or atoms in a regular lattice. These shifts, potentially important if 1D waveguides are to be used in metrology, are different from the usual resonance shifts found in three spatial dimensions.

  6. Bound and scattering properties in waveguides around free-space Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaoren; Giannakeas, Panogiotis; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The two-body bound and scattering properties in an one-dimensional (1D) harmonic waveguide in the vicinity of free-space magnetic Feshbach resonances are investigated based on the local frame transformation approach. The multichannel characteristics of the interatomic interaction is taken into account. We examine the crossing between the bound state in the waveguide and the ground level of the transverse confinement, i.e. when the bound state crosses the scattering threshold in the waveguide and turns into a continuum state. For s-wave collision, the crossing occurs at the magnetic field where the effective 1D interaction strength g1 D vanishes, and the effective 1D scattering length a1 D diverges. This observation indicates that the molecular formation or atom loss signal in a harmonic waveguide is expected at the magnetic field where a1 D is infinite. Molecule formation is absent at position of the confinement induced resonance which is characterized by the divergence of g1 D . Financial support from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation is acknowledged.

  7. Low-loss segmented joint structure between a slab waveguide and arrayed waveguides designed by simple optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, K.; Idris, N. A.; Asakura, H.; Tsuda, H.

    2015-02-01

    Arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWG) are key devices in optical communication systems using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), and it is essential that these AWGs are low-loss. In this paper, we propose low-loss segmented joint structures between the slab waveguide and the waveguide array in an AWG. The effectiveness of these structures is confirmed by the measurement results. In addition, improvements in the loss uniformity can be obtained by utilizing mode converting segmented structures between the waveguide array and the slab waveguide on the output side. Moreover, the passband can be flattened by employing such a structure between the input and slab waveguides. These structures were designed using the same simple calculation and optimization method. Using these optimized structures, the transmittance was improved by 17%, the largest difference in insertion loss was reduced by 1.93 dB, and the 1-dB bandwidth was extended by 20%. These structures can be fabricated with ordinary planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technologies without the need for special fabrication processes.

  8. A Simple Optical Waveguide Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, J.; Sambles, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a thin film rectangular dielectric waveguide and its laboratory use. Discusses the theory of uniaxial thin film waveguides with mathematical expressions and the laboratory procedures for a classroom experiment with diagrams. (Author/YP)

  9. Large-Scale Nanophotonic Solar Selective Absorbers for High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Liu, Baoan; Ni, Yizhou; Liew, Kaiyang Kevin; Sze, Jeff; Chen, Shuo; Shen, Sheng

    2015-08-19

    An omnidirectional nanophotonic solar selective absorber is fabricated on a large scale using a template-stripping method. The nanopyramid nickel structure achieves an average absorptance of 95% at a wavelength range below 1.3 μm and a low emittance less than 10% at wavelength >2.5 μm. PMID:26134928

  10. Silicon integrated nanophotonics: from fundamental science to manufacturable technology (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Yurii A.

    2015-02-01

    The IBM Silicon Nanophotonics technology enables cost-efficient optical links that connect racks, modules, and chips together with ultralow power single-die optical transceivers. I will give an overview of its historical development, technology differentiators, current status and a roadmap.

  11. DESIGN OF INTEGRATING WAVEGUIDE BIOSENSOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Integrating Waveguide Biosensor allows for rapid and sensitive detection of pathogenic agents, cells and proteins via immunoassay or PCR products. The analytes are captured on the surface of the waveguide and then tagged with fluorescent labels. The waveguides are illuminated by excitation light...

  12. "Waveguidability" of idealized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Vries, Hylke; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-09-01

    It is known that strong zonal jets can act as waveguides for Rossby waves. In this study we use the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data to analyze the connection between jets and zonal waves at timescales beyond 10 days. Moreover, a barotropic model is used to systematically study the ability of idealized jets to trap Rossby wave energy ("waveguidability") as a function of jet strength, jet width, and jet location. In general, strongest waveguidability is found for narrow, fast jets. In addition, when the stationary wave number is integer, a resonant response is found through constructive interference. In Austral summer, the Southern Hemispheric jet is closest to the idealized jets considered and it is for this season that similar jet-zonal wave relationships are identified in the ECMWF reanalysis data.

  13. Compact waveguide splitter networks.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yusheng; Song, Jiguo; Kim, Seunghyun; Hu, Weisheng; Nordin, Gregory P

    2008-03-31

    We demonstrate compact waveguide splitter networks in siliconon- insulator (SOI) rib waveguides using trench-based splitters (TBSs) and bends (TBBs). Rather than a 90 degrees geometry, we use 105 degrees TBSs to facilitate reliable fabrication of high aspect ratio trenches suitable for 50/50 splitting when filled with SU8. Three dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation is used for splitter and bend design. Measured TBB and TBS optical efficiencies are 84% and 68%, respectively. Compact 105 degrees 1 x 4, 1 x 8, and 1 x 32 trench-based splitter networks (TBSNs) are demonstrated. The measured total optical loss of the 1 x 32 TBSN is 9.15 dB. Its size is only 700 microm x 1600 microm for an output waveguide spacing of 50 microm. PMID:18542598

  14. Bound and scattering states in harmonic waveguides in the vicinity of free space Feshbach resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaoren; Giannakeas, Panagiotis; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The two-body bound and scattering properties in an one-dimensional harmonic waveguide close to free space magnetic Feshbach resonances are investigated based on the local frame transformation approach within a single partial wave approximation. An energy and magnetic field dependent free space phase shift is adopted in the current theoretical framework. For both s- and p-wave interaction, the least bound state in the waveguide dissociates into the continuum at the resonant magnetic field where the effective one-dimensional scattering length {a}{{1D}} diverges. Consequently, the association of atoms into molecules in the waveguide occurs when the magnetic field is swept adiabatically across the pole of {a}{{1D}}. In the vicinity of broad s-wave resonances, the resonant magnetic field is nearly independent on the transverse confining frequency {ω }\\perp of the waveguide. Close to p-wave and narrow s-wave resonances, the resonant magnetic field changes as {ω }\\perp varies.

  15. Square dielectric THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Aflakian, N; Yang, N; LaFave, T; Henderson, R M; O, K K; MacFarlane, D L

    2016-06-27

    A holey cladding dielectric waveguide with square cross section is designed, simulated, fabricated and characterized. The TOPAS waveguide is designed to be single mode across the broad frequency range of 180 GHz to 360 GHz as shown by finite-difference time domain simulation and to robustly support simultaneous TE and TM mode propagation. The square fiber geometry is realized by pulling through a heat distribution made square by appropriate furnace design. The transmitted mode profile is imaged using a vector network analyzer with a pinhole at the receiver module. Good agreement between the measured mode distribution and the calculated mode distribution is demonstrated. PMID:27410645

  16. Waveguide apparatuses and methods

    DOEpatents

    Spencer, James E.

    2016-05-10

    Optical fiber waveguides and related approaches are implemented to facilitate communication. As may be implemented in accordance with one or more embodiments, a waveguide has a substrate including a lattice structure having a plurality of lattice regions with a dielectric constant that is different than that of the substrate, a defect in the lattice, and one or more deviations from the lattice. The defect acts with trapped transverse modes (e.g., magnetic and/or electric modes) and facilitates wave propagation along a longitudinal direction while confining the wave transversely. The deviation(s) from the lattice produces additional modes and/or coupling effects.

  17. Optical analogue of relativistic Dirac solitons in binary waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Truong X.; Longhi, Stefano; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-01-15

    We study analytically and numerically an optical analogue of Dirac solitons in binary waveguide arrays in the presence of Kerr nonlinearity. Pseudo-relativistic soliton solutions of the coupled-mode equations describing dynamics in the array are analytically derived. We demonstrate that with the found soliton solutions, the coupled mode equations can be converted into the nonlinear relativistic 1D Dirac equation. This paves the way for using binary waveguide arrays as a classical simulator of quantum nonlinear effects arising from the Dirac equation, something that is thought to be impossible to achieve in conventional (i.e. linear) quantum field theory. -- Highlights: •An optical analogue of Dirac solitons in nonlinear binary waveguide arrays is suggested. •Analytical solutions to pseudo-relativistic solitons are presented. •A correspondence of optical coupled-mode equations with the nonlinear relativistic Dirac equation is established.

  18. Metal-clad optical waveguides: analytical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kaminow, I P; Mammel, W L; Weber, H P

    1974-02-01

    Planar optical waveguides consisting of thin dielectric films with metal cladding have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. A computer program was devised to provide the phase and attenuation constants and wavefunctions for TE and TM modes in symmetric and asymmetric guides. Approximate expressions suitable for slide-rule calculation were also derived. Numerical results and illustrations are given for films of photoresist with Al, Ag, and Au cladding. Direct measurements of the attenuation and phase constants at 0.633 microm of numerous experimental waveguides are in reasonable agreement with theory. Attenuations <1 dB/cm, which is sufficiently small for application in devices, were measured. Calculated wavefunctions illustrate the mismatch of modes at transitions between unclad and metal-clad waveguides. Experimentally, we find substantial losses at such abrupt junctions. They can be overcome by simple tapered transitions. PMID:20125992

  19. Vought F4U-1D Corsair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    Vought F4U-1D Corsair: In February and March of 1945 this Corsair was examined in the NACA's 30 x 60 Full Scale Tunnel at Langley Field. The F4U-1D has rockets mounted on its wings for this test. After installation and during testing, the wings would be lowered to their flight position.

  20. Single MoO3 nanoribbon waveguides: good building blocks as elements and interconnects for nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Guoqing; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Exploring new nanowaveguide materials and structures is of great scientific interest and technological significance for optical and photonic applications. In this work, high-quality single-crystal MoO3 nanoribbons (NRs) are synthesized and used for optical guiding. External light sources are efficiently launched into the single MoO3 NRs using silica fiber tapers. It is found that single MoO3 NRs are as good nanowaveguides with loss optical losses (typically less than 0.1 dB/μm) and broadband optical guiding in the visible/near-infrared region. Single MoO3 NRs have good Raman gains that are comparable to those of semiconductor nanowaveguides, but the second harmonic generation efficiencies are about 4 orders less than those of semiconductor nanowaveguides. And also no any third-order nonlinear optical effects are observed at high pump power. A hybrid Fabry-Pérot cavity containing an active CdSe nanowire and a passive MoO3 NR is also demonstrated, and the ability of coupling light from other active nanostructures and fluorescent liquid solutions has been further demonstrated. These optical properties make single MoO3 NRs attractive building blocks as elements and interconnects in miniaturized photonic circuitries and devices.

  1. Single MoO3 nanoribbon waveguides: good building blocks as elements and interconnects for nanophotonic applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Guoqing; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Exploring new nanowaveguide materials and structures is of great scientific interest and technological significance for optical and photonic applications. In this work, high-quality single-crystal MoO3 nanoribbons (NRs) are synthesized and used for optical guiding. External light sources are efficiently launched into the single MoO3 NRs using silica fiber tapers. It is found that single MoO3 NRs are as good nanowaveguides with loss optical losses (typically less than 0.1 dB/μm) and broadband optical guiding in the visible/near-infrared region. Single MoO3 NRs have good Raman gains that are comparable to those of semiconductor nanowaveguides, but the second harmonic generation efficiencies are about 4 orders less than those of semiconductor nanowaveguides. And also no any third-order nonlinear optical effects are observed at high pump power. A hybrid Fabry-Pérot cavity containing an active CdSe nanowire and a passive MoO3 NR is also demonstrated, and the ability of coupling light from other active nanostructures and fluorescent liquid solutions has been further demonstrated. These optical properties make single MoO3 NRs attractive building blocks as elements and interconnects in miniaturized photonic circuitries and devices. PMID:26611855

  2. Plasmonic and nanophotonics sensors from visible to terahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Alireza

    The global research objective of this thesis is to demonstrate design of novel compact and ultra-sensitive plasmonic sensors operating anywhere from the visible to the THz spectral ranges. The enabling technologies for such sensors are photonic bandgap and microstructured waveguides and fibers containing metallic inclusions. We achieve the stated global objective by systematically addressing several smaller problems. Firstly, this thesis demonstrates plasmonic excitation in metalized microstructured fibers in the context of bio-chemical sensing with enhanced microfluidics for visible and IR ranges. Furthemore, this basic design concept is generalized for the use with photonic bandgap fibers and waveguides; major advantages of using photonic bandgap waveguides in place of Total Internal Reflection (TIR) fibers for plasmonic sensing are discovered. In the first chapter, we discuss the theory of surface plasmons, surface plasmon excitation and sensing methodologies. In the second chapter we show that using microstructured fibers one can solve much easier the problem of phase matching between the surface plasmon wave and fiber core mode, which is common when standard TIR fibers are used. Moreover, the use of microstructured fibers enables integration of the microfluidics and optics during drawing step thus simplifying considerably the sensor fabrication and operation. Furthermore, the different shapes of the metalized surface to enhance the plasmonic excitation were explored with an aim to enhance sensitivity. In the third chapter, the design of photonic crystal waveguide-based surface plasmon resonance sensor is proposed. By judicious design of a photonic crystal waveguide, the effective refractive index of a core mode can be made considerably smaller than that of the core material, thus enabling efficient phase matching with a plasmon, high sensitivity, and high coupling efficiency from an external Gaussian source, at any wavelength of choice from the visible to near

  3. Single-polarization hollow-core square photonic bandgap waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Masashi; Tsuji, Yasuhide

    2016-07-01

    Materials with a periodic structure have photonic bandgaps (PBGs), in which light can not be guided within certain wavelength ranges; thus light can be confined within a low-index region by the bandgap effect. In this paper, rectangular-shaped hollow waveguides having waveguide-walls (claddings) using the PBG have been discussed. The design principle for HE modes of hollow-core rectangular PBG waveguides with a Bragg cladding consisting of alternating high- and low-index layers, based on a 1D periodic multilayer approximation for the Bragg cladding, is established and then a novel single-polarization hollow-core square PBG waveguide using the bandgap difference between two polarized waves is proposed. Our results demonstrated that a single-polarization guiding can be achieved by using the square Bragg cladding structure with different layer thickness ratios in the mutually orthogonal directions and the transmission loss of the guided mode in a designed hollow-core square PBG waveguide is numerically estimated to be 0.04 dB/cm.

  4. Transmission of photonic quantum polarization entanglement in a nanoscale hybrid plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zou, Chang-Ling; Ren, Xi-Feng; Xiong, Xiao; Cai, Yong-Jing; Guo, Guo-Ping; Tong, Li-Min; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-04-01

    Photonic quantum technologies have been extensively studied in quantum information science, owing to the high-speed transmission and outstanding low-noise properties of photons. However, applications based on photonic entanglement are restricted due to the diffraction limit. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the maintaining of quantum polarization entanglement in a nanoscale hybrid plasmonic waveguide composed of a fiber taper and a silver nanowire. The transmitted state throughout the waveguide has a fidelity of 0.932 with the maximally polarization entangled state Φ(+). Furthermore, the Clauser, Horne, Shimony, and Holt (CHSH) inequality test performed, resulting in value of 2.495 ± 0.147 > 2, demonstrates the violation of the hidden variable model. Because the plasmonic waveguide confines the effective mode area to subwavelength scale, it can bridge nanophotonics and quantum optics and may be used as near-field quantum probe in a quantum near-field micro/nanoscope, which can realize high spatial resolution, ultrasensitive, fiber-integrated, and plasmon-enhanced detection. PMID:25775140

  5. Experimental investigation of plasmofluidic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bonwoo; Kwon, Min-Suk; Shin, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-16

    Plasmofluidic waveguides are based on guiding light which is strongly confined in fluid with the assistance of a surface plasmon polariton. To realize plasmofluidic waveguides, metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal (MISIM) waveguides, which are hybrid plasmonic waveguides fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, are employed. The insulator of the MISIM waveguide is removed to form 30-nm-wide channels, and they are filled with fluid. The plasmofluidic waveguide has a subwavelength-scale mode area since its mode is strongly confined in the fluid. The waveguides are experimentally characterized for different fluids. When the refractive index of the fluid is 1.440, the plasmofluidic waveguide with 190-nm-wide silicon has propagation loss of 0.46 dB/μm; the coupling loss between it and an ordinary silicon photonic waveguide is 1.79 dB. The propagation and coupling losses may be reduced if a few fabrication-induced imperfections are removed. The plasmofluidic waveguide may pave the way to a dynamically phase-tunable ultracompact device.

  6. Statistics of scattered photons from a driven three-level emitter in 1D open space

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Dibyendu; Bondyopadhaya, Nilanjan

    2014-01-07

    We derive the statistics of scattered photons from a Λ- or ladder-type three-level emitter (3LE) embedded in a 1D open waveguide. The weak probe photons in the waveguide are coupled to one of the two allowed transitions of the 3LE, and the other transition is driven by a control beam. This system shows electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) which is accompanied with the Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) at a strong driving by the control beam, and some of these effects have been observed recently. We show that the nature of second-order coherence of the transmitted probe photons near two-photon resonance changes from bunching to antibunching to constant as strength of the control beam is ramped up from zero to a higher value where the ATS appears.

  7. Gap plasmon excitation in plasmonic waveguide using Si waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Koji; Kamada, Shun; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Haraguchi, Masanobu

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic waveguides have attracted considerable attention for application in highly integrated optical circuits since they can confine light to areas smaller than the diffraction limit. In this context, in order to realize a highly integrated optical circuit, we fabricate and evaluate the optical characteristics of a poly(methyl methacrylate) junction positioned between Si and plasmonic waveguides. For the plasmonic waveguide, we employ a gap plasmonic waveguide in which the energy of the plasmonic wave can be confined in order to reduce the scattering loss at the junction. By experimental measurement, we determine the coupling efficiency between the Si and gap plasmonic waveguides and the propagation length at the gap plasmonic waveguide to be 52.4% and 11.1 µm, respectively. These values agree with those obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. We believe that our findings can significantly contribute to the development of highly integrated optical circuits.

  8. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10−19 W/Hz−1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  9. Molecular Imaging of Biological Samples on Nanophotonic Laser Desorption Ionization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Stopka, Sylwia A; Rong, Charles; Korte, Andrew R; Yadavilli, Sridevi; Nazarian, Javad; Razunguzwa, Trust T; Morris, Nicholas J; Vertes, Akos

    2016-03-24

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a comprehensive tool for the analysis of a wide range of biomolecules. The mainstream method for molecular MSI is matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, however, the presence of a matrix results in spectral interferences and the suppression of some analyte ions. Herein we demonstrate a new matrix-free MSI technique using nanophotonic ionization based on laser desorption ionization (LDI) from a highly uniform silicon nanopost array (NAPA). In mouse brain and kidney tissue sections, the distributions of over 80 putatively annotated molecular species are determined with 40 μm spatial resolution. Furthermore, NAPA-LDI-MS is used to selectively analyze metabolites and lipids from sparsely distributed algal cells and the lamellipodia of human hepatocytes. Our results open the door for matrix-free MSI of tissue sections and small cell populations by nanophotonic ionization. PMID:26929010

  10. Symmetric Waveguide Orthomode Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Grammer, W.

    2003-01-01

    Imaging applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths demand precise characterization of the amplitude, spectrum, and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation. The use of a waveguide orthomode transducer (OMT) can help achieve these goals by increasing spectral coverage and sensitivity while reducing exit aperture size, optical spill, instrumental polarization offsets, and lending itself to integration in focal plane arrays. For these reasons, four-old symmetric OMTs are favored over a traditional quasi-optical wire grid for focal plane imaging arrays from a systems perspective. The design, fabrication, and test of OMTs realized with conventional split-block techniques for millimeter wave-bands are described. The design provides a return loss is -20 dB over a full waveguide band (40% bandwidth), and the cross-polarization and isolation are greater than -40 dB for tolerances readily achievable in practice. Prototype examples realized in WR10.0 and WR3.7 wavebands will be considered in detail.

  11. Symmetric Waveguide Orthomode Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Grammer, W.

    2003-01-01

    Imaging applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths demand precise characterization of the amplitude, spectrum, and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation. The use of a waveguide orthomode transducer (OMT) can help achieve these goals by increasing spectral coverage and sensitivity while reducing exit aperture size, optical spill, instrumental polarization offsets, and lending itself to integration in focal plane arrays. For these reasons, four-fold symmetric OMTs are favored over a traditional quasi-optical wire grid for focal plane imaging arrays from a systems perspective. The design, fabrication, and test of OMTs realized with conventional split-block techniques for millimeter wave-bands are described. The design provides a return loss is -20 dB over a full waveguide band (40% bandwidth), and the cross-polarization and isolation are greater than -40 dB for tolerances readily achievable in practice. Prototype examples realized in WR10.0 and WR3.7 wavebands will be considered in detail.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of III-nitride nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Rajendra Prasad

    III-nitride photonic devices such as photodetectors (PDs), light emitting diode (LEDs), solar cells and optical waveguide amplifiers were designed, fabricated and characterized. High quality AlN epilayers were grown on sapphire and n-SiC substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and utilized as active deep UV (DUV) photonic materials for the demonstration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detectors, Schottky barrier detectors, and avalanche photodetectors (APDs). AlN DUV PDs exhibited peak responsivity at 200 nm with a very sharp cutoff wavelength at 207 nm and extremely low dark current (<10 fA), very high breakdown voltages, high responsivity, and more than four orders of DUV to UV/visible rejection ratio. AlN Schottky PDs grown on n-SiC substrates exhibited high zero bias responsivity and a thermal energy limited detectivity of about 1.0 x 1015 cm Hz 1/2 W-1. The linear mode operation of AlN APDs with the shortest cutoff wavelength (210 nm) and a photocurrent multiplication of 1200 was demonstrated. A linear relationship between device size and breakdown field was observed for AlN APDs. Photovoltaic operation of InGaN solar cells in wavelengths longer than that of previous attainments was demonstrated by utilizing In xGa1-xN/GaN MQWs as the active layer. InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cells with x =0.3 exhibited open circuit voltage of about 2 V, a fill factor of about 60% and external quantum efficiency of 40% at 420 nm and 10% at 450 nm. The performance of InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cell was found to be highly correlated with the crystalline quality of the InxGa 1-xN active layer. The possible causes of poorer PV characteristics for higher In content in InGaN active layer were explained. Photoluminescence excitation studies of GaN:Er and In0.06Ga 0.94N:Er epilayers showed that Er emission intensity at 1.54 mum increases significantly as the excitation energy is tuned from below to above the energy bandgap of these epilayers. Current-injected 1.54 mum LEDs

  13. Computing Scattering Characteristics Of Waveguide Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Manshadi, Farzin

    1994-01-01

    Rectangular WaveGuide Junction SCATtering RWGSCAT computer program solves scattering properties of waveguide device. Modeled as assembly of rectangular waveguides of different cross sections. RWGSCAT written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Optical waveguide dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Levine, H.; Mclaughlin, W.L.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1983-03-22

    An optical waveguide dosimeter for personnel dosimetry is provided including a liquid solution of leuko dye hermetically sealed in plastic tubing. Optical transport is improved by dipping the ends of the plastic tubing into clear epoxy, thus forming beads that serve as optical lenses. A layer of clear ultraviolet absorbing varnish coated on these beads and an opaque outer layer over the plastic tubing provides protection against ambient uv.

  15. Investigation of Truncated Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, David T.; Henry, Ross M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of truncated circular and square waveguide cross-sections are presented. An emphasis is placed upon numerical and experimental validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of these structures. A test component, a 90-degree phase shifter, was fabricated and tested at 30 GHz. The concepts explored can be directly applied in the design, synthesis and optimization of components in the microwave to sub-millimeter wavebands.

  16. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-12-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  17. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  18. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  19. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  20. Loss mechanisms in polyimide waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Kosc, T.; Singer, K.D. ); Cahill, P.A.; Seager, C.H.; Meinhardt, M.B. ); Beuhler, A.J.; Wargowski, D.A. )

    1994-08-15

    Waveguide losses in thin film polyimides using waveguide loss spectroscopy and photothermal deflection spectroscopy as a function of cure cycle and structure were studied. Fluorinated sidegroups on the polyimide backbone lead to decreases in birefringence and absorption. The primary waveguide loss mechanism is absorption, not scattering. Waveguide losses as low as 0.4 dB/cm at 800 nm have been measured. Losses as low as 0.3 dB/cm at 1300 nm can be inferred from the photothermal deflection spectroscopy.

  1. Composite waveguide on a photorefractive crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Usievich, B A; Nurligareev, D Kh; Sychugov, V A; Ivleva, Lyudmila I

    2011-10-31

    A new waveguiding structure (composite waveguide) has been proposed, which has the form of a linear dielectric layer on the surface of a photorefractive crystal and supports spatially confined modes propagating along its surface. We demonstrate that the modal properties of the composite waveguide are determined by those of a Bragg waveguide and the properties of nonlinear surface waves and the leaky modes of the thin-film waveguide. Various schemes of mode excitation in the composite waveguide are examined.

  2. Photonic Waveguide Choke Joint with Absorptive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Chuss, David T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A photonic waveguide choke includes a first waveguide flange member having periodic metal tiling pillars, a dissipative dielectric material positioned within an area between the periodic metal tiling pillars and a second waveguide flange member disposed to be coupled with the first waveguide flange member and in spaced-apart relationship separated by a gap. The first waveguide flange member has a substantially smooth surface, and the second waveguide flange member has an array of two-dimensional pillar structures formed therein.

  3. Interacting single atoms with nanophotonics for chip-integrated quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, Daniel James

    Underlying matter and light are their building blocks of tiny atoms and photons. The ability to control and utilize matter-light interactions down to the elementary single atom and photon level at the nano-scale opens up exciting studies at the frontiers of science with applications in medicine, energy, and information technology. Of these, an intriguing front is the development of quantum networks where N ≫ 1 single-atom nodes are coherently linked by single photons, forming a collective quantum entity potentially capable of performing quantum computations and simulations. Here, a promising approach is to use optical cavities within the setting of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). However, since its first realization in 1992 by Kimble et al., current proof-of-principle experiments have involved just one or two conventional cavities. To move beyond to N ≫ 1 nodes, in this thesis we investigate a platform born from the marriage of cavity QED and nanophotonics, where single atoms at ˜100 nm near the surfaces of lithographically fabricated dielectric photonic devices can strongly interact with single photons, on a chip. Particularly, we experimentally investigate three main types of devices: microtoroidal optical cavities, optical nanofibers, and nanophotonic crystal based structures. With a microtoroidal cavity, we realized a robust and efficient photon router where single photons are extracted from an incident coherent state of light and redirected to a separate output with high efficiency. We achieved strong single atom-photon coupling with atoms located ~100 nm near the surface of a microtoroid, which revealed important aspects in the atom dynamics and QED of these systems including atom-surface interaction effects. We present a method to achieve state-insensitive atom trapping near optical nanofibers, critical in nanophotonic systems where electromagnetic fields are tightly confined. We developed a system that fabricates high quality nanofibers with high

  4. New coplanar waveguide to rectangular waveguide end launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, R. N.; Taub, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A new coplanar waveguide to rectangular waveguide end launcher is experimentally demonstrated. The end launcher operates over the Ka-band frequencies that are designated for the NASA Advanced Communication Technology Satellite uplink. The measured insertion loss and return loss are better than 0.5 and -10 dB, respectively.

  5. Slab waveguide theory for general multi-slot waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, ZiChun; Yin, LiXiang; Zou, Yu; Wu, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Optical devices based on slot waveguide are of considerable interest in numerous applications due to the distinct feature of strong electric field confinement in a low-refractive index region. A theoretical model based on multi-slab waveguide theory is used to reveal the physical mechanism of the slot waveguide. The calculation results derived from the basic Helmholtz equation for the conventional single-slot waveguide with a ~2% validation of the effective refractive index are compared to the former experiment results by the Cornell University group. Moreover, we extend the theoretical model to a general multi-slot waveguide. Its electric field distribution and key properties such as optical power confinement factor and enhancement factor in slot are deduced theoretically and fully discussed.

  6. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  7. 1D ferrimagnetism in homometallic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, E.; Gómez-García, C. J.; Borrás-Almenar, J. J.

    1990-05-01

    The magnetic properties of the cobalt zigzag chain Co(bpy)(NCS)2 (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) are discussed on the basis of an Ising-chain model that takes into account alternating Landé factors. It is emphasized, for the first time, that a homometallic chain containing only one type of site can give rise to a 1D ferrimagneticlike behavior.

  8. DESIGN PACKAGE 1D SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    L.R. Eisler

    1995-02-02

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package 1D, Surface Facilities, (for a list of design items included in the package 1D system safety analysis see section 3). This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the structure/system/component (S/S/C) design, (2) add safety devices and capabilities to the designs that reduce risk, (3) provide devices that detect and warn personnel of hazardous conditions, and (4) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components (S/S/Cs) during normal operations excluding hazards occurring during maintenance and ''off normal'' operations.

  9. Observation of Photon Echoes From Evanescently Coupled Rare-Earth Ions in a Planar Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Sara; Bartholomew, John G; Madden, Stephen; Vu, Khu; Sellars, Matthew J

    2015-07-01

    We report the measurement of the inhomogeneous linewidth, homogeneous linewidth, and spin-state lifetime of Pr3+ ions in a novel waveguide architecture. The TeO2 slab waveguide deposited on a bulk Pr3+∶Y2SiO5 crystal allows the 3H4↔1D2 transition of Pr3+ ions to be probed by the optical evanescent field that extends into the substrate. The 2-GHz inhomogeneous linewidth, the optical coherence time of 70±5  μs, and the spin-state lifetime of 9.8±0.3  s indicate that the properties of ions interacting with the waveguide mode are consistent with those of bulk ions. This result establishes the foundation for large, integrated, and high performance rare-earth-ion quantum systems based on a waveguide platform. PMID:26182097

  10. Observation of Photon Echoes From Evanescently Coupled Rare-Earth Ions in a Planar Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzban, Sara; Bartholomew, John G.; Madden, Stephen; Vu, Khu; Sellars, Matthew J.

    2015-07-01

    We report the measurement of the inhomogeneous linewidth, homogeneous linewidth, and spin-state lifetime of Pr3 + ions in a novel waveguide architecture. The TeO2 slab waveguide deposited on a bulk Pr3 +∶Y2SiO5 crystal allows the 3H4↔1D2 transition of Pr3 + ions to be probed by the optical evanescent field that extends into the substrate. The 2-GHz inhomogeneous linewidth, the optical coherence time of 70 ±5 μ s , and the spin-state lifetime of 9.8 ±0.3 s indicate that the properties of ions interacting with the waveguide mode are consistent with those of bulk ions. This result establishes the foundation for large, integrated, and high performance rare-earth-ion quantum systems based on a waveguide platform.

  11. Low-loss chalcogenide waveguides for chemical sensing in the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pan; Choi, Duk-Yong; Yu, Yi; Gai, Xin; Yang, Zhiyong; Debbarma, Sukanta; Madden, Steve; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2013-12-01

    We report the characteristics of low-loss chalcogenide waveguides for sensing in the mid-infrared (MIR). The waveguides consisted of a Ge₁₁.₅As₂₄Se₆₄.₅ rib waveguide core with a 10nm fluoropolymer coating on a Ge₁₁.₅As₂₄S₆₄.₅ bottom cladding and were fabricated by thermal evaporation, photolithography and ICP plasma etching. Over most of the functional group band from 1500 to 4000 cm⁻¹ the losses were < 1 dB/cm with a minimum of 0.3 dB/cm at 2000 cm⁻¹. The basic capabilities of these waveguides for spectroscopy were demonstrated by measuring the absorption spectrum of soluble Prussian blue in Dimethyl Sulphoxide. PMID:24514544

  12. Integrated optic waveguide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramer, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    Integrated optic waveguide circuits with a phase bias and modulator on the same chip were designed, fabricated, and tested for use in a fiber-optic rotation sensor (gyro) under development. Single mode fiber-optic pigtails were permanently coupled to the four ports of the chip. The switch format was based on coherent coupling between waveguides formed in Z-cut LiNbO3. The control of the coupling was achieved by electro-optically varying the phase propagation constants of each guide. Fiber-to-chip interfacing required the development of appropriate fixturing and manipulation techniques to achieve the close tolerance needed for high coupling efficiency between a fiber with an approximately 5 micron m core and a channel guide with a roughly 2 micron m by 5 micron m cross section. Switch and chip performance at 0.85 micron m is discussed as well as potential improvements related to insertion loss reduction, switching voltages, and suppression of Li2O out-diffusion.

  13. Nanophotonic reservoir computing with photonic crystal cavities to generate periodic patterns.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Martin Andre Agnes; Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Wyffels, Francis; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) is a technique in machine learning inspired by neural systems. RC has been used successfully to solve complex problems such as signal classification and signal generation. These systems are mainly implemented in software, and thereby they are limited in speed and power efficiency. Several optical and optoelectronic implementations have been demonstrated, in which the system has signals with an amplitude and phase. It is proven that these enrich the dynamics of the system, which is beneficial for the performance. In this paper, we introduce a novel optical architecture based on nanophotonic crystal cavities. This allows us to integrate many neurons on one chip, which, compared with other photonic solutions, closest resembles a classical neural network. Furthermore, the components are passive, which simplifies the design and reduces the power consumption. To assess the performance of this network, we train a photonic network to generate periodic patterns, using an alternative online learning rule called first-order reduced and corrected error. For this, we first train a classical hyperbolic tangent reservoir, but then we vary some of the properties to incorporate typical aspects of a photonics reservoir, such as the use of continuous-time versus discrete-time signals and the use of complex-valued versus real-valued signals. Then, the nanophotonic reservoir is simulated and we explore the role of relevant parameters such as the topology, the phases between the resonators, the number of nodes that are biased and the delay between the resonators. It is important that these parameters are chosen such that no strong self-oscillations occur. Finally, our results show that for a signal generation task a complex-valued, continuous-time nanophotonic reservoir outperforms a classical (i.e., discrete-time, real-valued) leaky hyperbolic tangent reservoir (normalized root-mean-square errors=0.030 versus NRMSE=0.127). PMID:24807033

  14. Förster resonance energy transfer rate in any dielectric nanophotonic medium with weak dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wubs, Martijn; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the ongoing debate about nanophotonic control of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), notably by the local density of optical states (LDOS), we study FRET and spontaneous emission in arbitrary nanophotonic media with weak dispersion and weak absorption in the frequency overlap range of donor and acceptor. This system allows us to obtain the following two new insights. Firstly, we derive that the FRET rate only depends on the static part of the Green function. Hence, the FRET rate is independent of frequency, in contrast to spontaneous-emission rates and LDOS that are strongly frequency dependent in nanophotonic media. Therefore, the position-dependent FRET rate and the LDOS at the donor transition frequency are completely uncorrelated for any nondispersive medium. Secondly, we derive an exact expression for the FRET rate as a frequency integral of the imaginary part of the Green function. This leads to very accurate approximation for the FRET rate that features the LDOS that is integrated over a huge bandwidth ranging from zero frequency to far into the UV. We illustrate these general results for the analytic model system of a pair of ideal dipole emitters—donor and acceptor—in the vicinity of an ideal mirror. We find that the FRET rate is independent of the LDOS at the donor emission frequency. Moreover, we observe that the FRET rate hardly depends on the frequency-integrated LDOS. Nevertheless, the FRET is controlled between inhibition and 4×enhancement at distances close to the mirror, typically a few nm. Finally, we discuss the consequences of our results to applications of Förster resonance energy transfer, for instance in quantum information processing.

  15. Preparation of 1D nanostructures using biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruneanu, Stela; Olenic, Liliana; Barbu Tudoran, Lucian; Kacso, Irina; Farha Al-Said, Said A.; Hassanien, Reda; Houlton, Andrew; Horrocks, Benjamin R.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we have shown that one-dimensional (1D) particle arrays can be obtained using biomolecules, like DNA or amino-acids. Nano-arrays of silver and gold were prepared in a single-step synthesis, by exploiting the binding abilities of λ-DNA and L-Arginine. The morphology and optical properties of these nanostructures were investigated using AFM, TEM and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy.

  16. Coalescence phenomena in 1D silver nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Wing, C.; Pérez-Alvarez, M.; Mondragón-Galicia, G.; Arenas-Alatorre, J.; Gutiérrez-Wing, M. T.; Henk, M. C.; Negulescu, I. I.; Rusch, K. A.

    2009-07-01

    Different coalescence processes on 1D silver nanostructures synthesized by a PVP assisted reaction in ethylene glycol at 160 °C were studied experimentally and theoretically. Analysis by TEM and HRTEM shows different defects found on the body of these materials, suggesting that they were induced by previous coalescence processes in the synthesis stage. TEM observations showed that irradiation with the electron beam eliminates the boundaries formed near the edges of the structures, suggesting that this process can be carried out by the application of other means of energy (i.e. thermal). These results were also confirmed by theoretical calculations by Monte Carlo simulations using a Sutton-Chen potential. A theoretical study by molecular dynamics simulation of the different coalescence processes on 1D silver nanostructures is presented, showing a surface energy driven sequence followed to form the final coalesced structure. Calculations were made at 1000-1300 K, which is near the melting temperature of silver (1234 K). Based on these results, it is proposed that 1D nanostructures can grow through a secondary mechanism based on coalescence, without losing their dimensionality.

  17. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  18. Broadband nanophotonic wireless links and networks using on-chip integrated plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanqing; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their high capacity and flexibility, broadband wireless communications have been widely employed in radio and microwave regimes, playing indispensable roles in our daily life. Their optical analogs, however, have not been demonstrated at the nanoscale. In this paper, by exploiting plasmonic nanoantennas, we demonstrate the complete design of broadband wireless links and networks in the realm of nanophotonics. With a 100-fold enhancement in power transfer superior to previous designs as well as an ultrawide bandwidth that covers the entire telecommunication wavelength range, such broadband nanolinks and networks are expected to pave the way for future optical integrated nanocircuits. PMID:26783033

  19. Broadband nanophotonic wireless links and networks using on-chip integrated plasmonic antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanqing; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their high capacity and flexibility, broadband wireless communications have been widely employed in radio and microwave regimes, playing indispensable roles in our daily life. Their optical analogs, however, have not been demonstrated at the nanoscale. In this paper, by exploiting plasmonic nanoantennas, we demonstrate the complete design of broadband wireless links and networks in the realm of nanophotonics. With a 100-fold enhancement in power transfer superior to previous designs as well as an ultrawide bandwidth that covers the entire telecommunication wavelength range, such broadband nanolinks and networks are expected to pave the way for future optical integrated nanocircuits.

  20. Broadband nanophotonic wireless links and networks using on-chip integrated plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanqing; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their high capacity and flexibility, broadband wireless communications have been widely employed in radio and microwave regimes, playing indispensable roles in our daily life. Their optical analogs, however, have not been demonstrated at the nanoscale. In this paper, by exploiting plasmonic nanoantennas, we demonstrate the complete design of broadband wireless links and networks in the realm of nanophotonics. With a 100-fold enhancement in power transfer superior to previous designs as well as an ultrawide bandwidth that covers the entire telecommunication wavelength range, such broadband nanolinks and networks are expected to pave the way for future optical integrated nanocircuits. PMID:26783033

  1. Origin of high strength and nanophotonic properties of crab shell (Paralithodes camtschaticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Aurognzeb, Deeder

    2009-03-01

    Understanding biomaterial is very important for superior material development. Here, we report structural and nanophotonic properties of crab shell. The fibrous shell is composed of nanocrystalline calcite, which gives the structure very high strength. Scanning electron microscope cross section and energy dispersive x-ray shows top surface (reddish) is fibrous with metal nanoparticle segregation, while the bottom layer is composed of layered nanohole array similar to air-dielectric photonic lattice structure. The air-dielectric nanohole arrays are disordered but correlated with fractal dimension >1 and able to block infrared. Nanocrystalline calcite and metal nanoparticles can also block extreme level of UV.

  2. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  3. Hollow waveguide for urology treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, H.; Němec, M.; Koranda, P.; Pokorný, J.; Kőhler, O.; Drlík, P.; Miyagi, M.; Iwai, K.; Matsuura, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our work was the application of the special sealed hollow waveguide system for the urology treatment - In our experimental study we have compared the effects of Ho:YAG (wavelength 2100 nm) and Er:YAG (wavelength 2940 nm) laser radiation both on human urinary stones (or compressed plaster samples which serve as a model) fragmentation and soft ureter tissue incision in vitro. Cyclic Olefin Polymer - coated silver (COP/Ag) hollow glass waveguides with inner and outer diameters 700 and 850 μm, respectively, were used for the experiment. To prevent any liquid to diminish and stop the transmission, the waveguide termination was utilized.

  4. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  5. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  6. Losses in polycrystalline silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresi, J. S.; Black, M. R.; Agarwal, A. M.; Kimerling, L. C.

    1996-04-01

    The losses of polycrystalline silicon (polySi) waveguides clad by SiO2 are measured by the cutback technique. We report losses of 34 dB/cm at a wavelength of 1.55 μm in waveguides fabricated from chemical mechanical polished polySi deposited at 625 °C. These losses are two orders of magnitude lower than reported absorption measurements for polySi. Waveguides fabricated from unpolished polySi deposited at 625 °C exhibit losses of 77 dB/cm. We find good agreement between calculated and measured losses due to surface scattering.

  7. Variable temperature spectroscopy of as-grown and passivated CdS nanowire optical waveguide cavities.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Lambert K; Piccione, Brian; Cho, Chang-Hee; Aspetti, Carlos; Wirshba, Aaron D; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2011-04-28

    Semiconductor nanowire waveguide cavities hold promise for nanophotonic applications such as lasers, waveguides, switches, and sensors due to the tight optical confinement in these structures. However, to realize their full potential, high quality nanowires, whose emission at low temperatures is dominated by free exciton emission, need to be synthesized. In addition, a proper understanding of their complex optical properties, including light-matter coupling in these subwavelength structures, is required. We have synthesized very high-quality wurztite CdS nanowires capped with a 5 nm SiO(2) conformal coating with diameters spanning 100-300 nm using physical vapor and atomic layer deposition techniques and characterized their spatially resolved photoluminescence over the 77-298 K temperature range. In addition to the Fabry-Pérot resonator modulated emission from the ends of the wires, the low temperature emission from the center of the wire shows clear free excitonic peaks and LO phonon replicas, persisting up to room-temperature in the passivated wires. From laser scanning measurements we determined the absorption in the vicinity of the excitonic resonances. In addition to demonstrating the high optical quality of the nanowire crystals, these results provide the fundamental parameters for strong light-matter coupling studies, potentially leading to low threshold polariton lasers, sensitive sensors and optical switches at the nanoscale. PMID:21214218

  8. Complete power concentration into a single waveguide in large-scale waveguide array lenses

    PubMed Central

    Catrysse, Peter B.; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    Waveguide array lenses are waveguide arrays that focus light incident on all waveguides at the input side into a small number of waveguides at the output side. Ideal waveguide array lenses provide complete (100%) power concentration of incident light into a single waveguide. While of great interest for several applications, ideal waveguide array lenses have not been demonstrated for practical arrays with large numbers of waveguides. The only waveguide arrays that have sufficient degrees of freedom to allow for the design of an ideal waveguide array lens are those where both the propagation constants of the individual waveguides and the coupling constants between the waveguides vary as a function of space. Here, we use state-of-the-art numerical methods to demonstrate complete power transfer into a single waveguide for waveguide array lenses with large numbers of waveguides. We verify this capability for more than a thousand waveguides using a spatial coupled mode theory. We hereby extend the state-of-art by more than two orders of magnitude. We also demonstrate for the first time a physical design for an ideal waveguide array lens. The design is based on an aperiodic metallic waveguide array and focuses ~100% of the incident light into a deep-subwavelength focal spot. PMID:25319203

  9. Coplanar Waveguide Radial Line Stub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, R. N.; Taub, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide radial line stub resonator is experimentally characterized with respect to stub radius, sectoral angle, substrate thickness, and relative dielectric constant. A simple closed-form design equation which predicts the resonance radius of the stub is presented.

  10. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  11. Waveguides for performing enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Levene; Michael J. , Korlach; Jonas , Turner; Stephen W. , Craighead; Harold G. , Webb; Watt W.

    2007-11-06

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode wave guide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  12. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    SciTech Connect

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  13. Single mode acoustic fiber waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. S.; May, R. G.; Claus, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    The single mode operation of a clad rod acoustic waveguide is described. Unlike conventional clad optical and acoustic waveguiding structures which use modes confined to a central core surrounded by a cladding, this guide supports neither core nor cladding modes but a single interface wave field on the core-cladding boundary. The propagation of this bound field and the potential improved freedom from spurious responses is discussed.

  14. Atomic-scale photonic hybrids for mid-infrared and terahertz nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.; Reinecke, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of nanophotonics focuses on the ability to confine light to nanoscale dimensions, typically much smaller than the wavelength of light. The goal is to develop light-based technologies that are impossible with traditional optics. Subdiffractional confinement can be achieved using either surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) or surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). SPPs can provide a gate-tunable, broad-bandwidth response, but suffer from high optical losses; whereas SPhPs offer a relatively low-loss, crystal-dependent optical response, but only over a narrow spectral range, with limited opportunities for active tunability. Here, motivated by the recent results from monolayer graphene and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures, we discuss the potential of electromagnetic hybrids -- materials incorporating mixtures of SPPs and SPhPs -- for overcoming the limitations of the individual polaritons. Furthermore, we also propose a new type of atomic-scale hybrid the crystalline hybrid -- where mixtures of two or more atomic-scale (~3 nm or less) polar dielectric materials lead to the creation of a new material resulting from hybridized optic phonon behaviour of the constituents, potentially allowing direct control over the dielectric function. These atomic-scale hybrids expand the toolkit of materials for mid-infrared to terahertz nanophotonics and could enable the creation of novel actively tunable, yet low-loss optics at the nanoscale.

  15. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  16. A waveguide based microfluidic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Nooshin S.; Chan, Peggy; Friend, James R.; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    Microfluidics is based on the performance of fluids in a microenvironment. As the microfluidics research advances in the cellular behaviour, the need for improved micro devices grows. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a micro ridge waveguide to be employed in fluids manipulations. Then it investigates the characteristics of the device in order to control the movement of the fluids on top of the ridge of the waveguide. The elastic vibration is excited along the ridge of the guide with the use of thickness poled lead zirconate titanate (PZT) elements attached to both sides of the waveguide. To excite anti-symmetric or flexural mode in the ridge of the guide, the propagation velocity has been kept significantly below the Rayleigh wave velocity. The velocity reduction of 15% is achieved with the high aspect ratio ridge (H/W =3) design. A three dimensional model of the micro waveguide has also been developed to determine the vibration characteristics; the natural frequency and the considered mode of the micro waveguide through finite element analysis using ANSYS. The travelling wave along the ridge of the guide is able to transmit strong vibration to the fluid atop of the substrate. The results represents a promising approach, through recasting the waveguide structure to be suitable in fluids and particle in fluids manipulations in one dimensional environment with the strong confined energy, at smaller scale with higher vibration displacement.

  17. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  18. Biocompatible silk step-index optical waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Perotto, Giovanni; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatible optical waveguides were constructed entirely of silk fibroin. A silk film (n=1.54) was encapsulated within a silk hydrogel (n=1.34) to form a robust and biocompatible waveguide. Such waveguides were made using only biologically and environmentally friendly materials without the use of harsh solvents. Light was coupled into the silk waveguides by direct incorporation of a glass optical fiber. These waveguides are extremely flexible, and strong enough to survive handling and manipulation. Cutback measurements showed propagation losses of approximately 2 dB/cm. The silk waveguides were found to be capable of guiding light through biological tissue. PMID:26600988

  19. Long range correlations by local dissipation in lattice waveguide QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Baptiste; Grimsmo, Arne L.; Blais, Alexandre

    In waveguide QED, superconducting qubits acting as artificial atoms are coupled to 1D superconducting transmission lines playing the role of common bath for the qubits. By controlling their effective separation and coupling to the transmission line, it is possible to engineer various types of dissipation-induced interactions between the qubits. In this talk, we consider the situation where multiple superconducting qubits are coupled to a lattice of superconducting transmission lines. We show that this can lead to the creation of highly entangled dark states using local dissipation only. Using tensor networks techniques, we study such large-scale highly-correlated systems.

  20. Femtosecond laser-written lithium niobate waveguide laser operating at 1085 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yang; de Aldana, Javier R. Vázquez; Chen, Feng

    2014-10-01

    We report on the channel waveguide lasers at 1085 nm in femtosecond laser written Type II waveguides in an Nd:MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The waveguide was constructed in a typical dual-line approach. In the geometry, we found that four vicinal regions of the track pair could guide light propagation. In addition, these guiding cores support polarization-dependent-guided modes. The propagation losses of the waveguides were measured to be as low as 1 dB/cm. Under an optical pump at 808 nm, the continuous-wave waveguide lasing at 1085 nm was generated, reaching a slope efficiency of 27% and maximum output power of 8 mW. The lasing threshold was 71 mW. Our results show that with the femtosecond laser written Nd:MgO:LiNbO3 waveguide as the miniature light source, it was possible to construct all-LiNbO3-based integrated devices for diverse photonic applications.

  1. Exceptional points and asymmetric mode conversion in quasi-guided dual-mode optical waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S. N.; Chong, Y. D.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hermitian systems host unconventional physical effects that be used to design new optical devices. We study a non-Hermitian system consisting of 1D planar optical waveguides with suitable amount of simultaneous gain and loss. The parameter space contains an exceptional point, which can be accessed by varying the transverse gain and loss profile. When light propagates through the waveguide structure, the output mode is independent of the choice of input mode. This “asymmetric mode conversion” phenomenon can be explained by the swapping of mode identities in the vicinity of the exceptional point, together with the failure of adiabatic evolution in non-Hermitian systems. PMID:27101933

  2. Exceptional points and asymmetric mode conversion in quasi-guided dual-mode optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. N.; Chong, Y. D.

    2016-04-01

    Non-Hermitian systems host unconventional physical effects that be used to design new optical devices. We study a non-Hermitian system consisting of 1D planar optical waveguides with suitable amount of simultaneous gain and loss. The parameter space contains an exceptional point, which can be accessed by varying the transverse gain and loss profile. When light propagates through the waveguide structure, the output mode is independent of the choice of input mode. This “asymmetric mode conversion” phenomenon can be explained by the swapping of mode identities in the vicinity of the exceptional point, together with the failure of adiabatic evolution in non-Hermitian systems.

  3. Nonlinear diffusion model for annealed proton-exchanged waveguides in zirconium-doped lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Langrock, Carsten; Roussev, Rostislav V; Nava, Giovanni; Minzioni, Paolo; Argiolas, Nicola; Sada, Cinzia; Fejer, Martin M

    2016-08-20

    Photorefractive-damage- (PRD) resistant zirconium-oxide-doped lithium niobate is investigated as a substrate for the realization of annealed proton-exchanged (APE) waveguides. Its advantages are a favorable distribution coefficient, PRD resistance comparable to magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate, and a proton-diffusion behavior resembling congruent lithium niobate. A 1D model for APE waveguides was developed based on a previous model for congruently melting lithium niobate. Evidence for a nonlinear index dependence on concentration was found. PMID:27556972

  4. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, D.; Moeller, C.P.

    1993-05-04

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150 C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  5. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, Dimartino; Moeller, Charles P.

    1993-01-01

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150.degree. C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  6. Optical waveguide tamper sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, R.F.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1997-03-01

    Dielectric optical waveguides exhibit properties that are well suited to sensor applications. They have low refractive index and are transparent to a wide range of wavelengths. They can react with the surrounding environment in a variety of controllable ways. In certain sensor applications, it is advantageous to integrate the dielectric waveguide on a semiconductor substrate with active devices. In this work, we demonstrate a tamper sensor based on dielectric waveguides that connect epitaxial GaAs-GaAlAs sources and detectors. The tamper sensing function is realized by attaching particles of absorbing material with high refractive index to the surface of the waveguides. These absorbers are then attached to a lid or cover, as in an integrated circuit package or multi-chip module. The absorbers attenuate the light in the waveguides as a function of absorber interaction. In the tamper indicating mode, the absorbers are placed randomly on the waveguides, to form a unique attenuation pattern that is registered by the relative signal levels on the photodetectors. When the lid is moved, the pattern of absorbers changes, altering the photodetector signals. This dielectric waveguide arrangement is applicable to a variety of sensor functions, and specifically can be fabricated as a chemical sensor by the application of cladding layers that change their refractive index and/or optical absorption properties upon exposure to selected chemical species. An example is found in palladium claddings that are sensitive to hydrogen. A description of designs and a basic demonstration of the tamper sensing and chemical sensing functions is described herein.

  7. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  8. Graphene-enhanced waveguide-resonance gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mahesh; Tervo, Jani; Kaplas, Tommi; Svirko, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that the integration of graphene strongly influences optical properties of the subwavelength gratings, opening a way toward nanophotonic devices. By using the Fourier-expansion modal method, we demonstrate that graphene-titanium dioxide nanostructures can be used for designing polarization-insensitive absorbers and biochemical sensors.

  9. Coaxial waveguide MRI.

    PubMed

    Alt, Stefan; Müller, Marco; Umathum, Reiner; Bolz, Armin; Bachert, Peter; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-04-01

    As ultrahigh-field MR imaging systems suffer from the standing wave problems of conventional coil designs, the use of antenna systems that generate travelling waves was suggested. As a modification to the original approach, we propose the use of a coaxial waveguide configuration with interrupted inner conductor. This concept can focus the radiofrequency energy to the desired imaging region in the human body and can operate at different Larmor frequencies without hardware modifications, as it is not limited by a lower cut-off frequency. We assessed the potential of the method with a hardware prototype setup that was loaded with a tissue equivalent phantom and operated with imaging areas of different size. Signal and flip angle distributions within the phantom were analyzed, and imaging at different Larmor frequencies was performed. Results were compared to a finite difference time domain simulation of the setup that additionally provides information on the spatial distribution of the specific absorption rate load. Furthermore, simulation results with a human model (virtual family) are presented. It was found that the proposed method can be used for MRI at multiple frequencies, achieving transmission efficiencies similar to other travelling wave approaches but still suffers from several limitations due to the used mode of wave propagation. PMID:22021117

  10. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.